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Sample records for clinical disease phenotypes

  1. Sickle cell disease clinical phenotypes in children from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-20

    Jul 20, 2014 ... Background:The clinical phenotypes of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are poorly described in many sub-Saharan countries ..... World Health Organization. ... apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA59/A59_9‑en.pdf.

  2. Phenotype and Clinical Course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Co-Existent Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chung Sang; Deepak, Parakkal; De La Fuente, Jaime; Bledsoe, Adam C; Larson, Joseph J; Murray, Joseph A; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2018-05-07

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, principally Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease are among the most common immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We aim to elucidate the clinical course and outcomes of patients with concomitant inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease, a unique population that remains scarcely studied to date. A retrospective matched case-control study of adults with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease was performed at a tertiary referral institution in North America. Logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier curves compared disease characteristics and clinical outcomes of the two groups. A total of 342 inflammatory bowel disease patients were included in this study, of which 114 had coexistent celiac disease and 228 did not. Patients with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease had higher rates of primary sclerosing cholangitis (19.3% vs 5.7%; odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-9.4; pceliac disease (10.5% vs 3.5%; odds ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.3-8.2; p=0.01), compared to patients without concomitant celiac disease. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease with concomitant celiac disease have unique phenotypic features compared to non-celiac inflammatory bowel disease, with higher risks for colitis-related hospitalizations, extensive colitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Increased recognition of coexistent IBD and celiac disease can prompt clinicians to investigate for concomitant disease sooner, particularly in patients with seemingly refractory disease.

  3. Parkinsonian syndroms: Clinical phenotype, differential diagnosis and disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, A.

    2002-01-01

    Parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), other neurodegenerative diseases with parkinsonism, the so-called atypical parkinsonian syndromes, and symptomatic parkinsonian syndromes, such as Wilson's disease. IPD is the most frequent disease with parkinsonism as the main clinical feature and is responsible for approx. 80% of all parkinsonian syndromes. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes are the most important differential diagnoses of IPD. The two most frequent types are multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). For clinical diagnosis it is essential to take a careful medical history and to examine the patients physically in regular intervals. However, various clinico-pathological studies have shown that approx. 25% of patients with clinical diagnosis of IPD may have other causes of parkinsonism. Selected technical investigations, in particular functional imaging of the central dopaminergic system using PET or SPECT, may help to make clinical diagnosis more secure. This paper reviews the clinical features and diagnostic findings in diseases with parkinsonism and summarises the difficulties in establishing early and differential diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  4. Association of Immunological Cell Profiles with Specific Clinical Phenotypes of Scleroderma Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, David; Mayayo, Teodoro; González-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Rabasco, Antonio María; Lahoz, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to search the correlation among immunological profiles and clinical phenotypes of scleroderma in well-characterized groups of scleroderma patients, comparing forty-nine scleroderma patients stratified according to specific clinical phenotypes with forty-nine healthy controls. Five immunological cell subpopulations (B, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, NK, and monocytes) and their respective stages of apoptosis and activation were analyzed by flow cytometry, in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Analyses of results were stratified according to disease stage, time since the diagnosis, and visceral damage (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac affliction) and by time of treatment with corticosteroids. An increase in the percentages of monocytes and a decrease in the B cells were mainly related to the disease progression. A general apoptosis decrease was found in all phenotypes studied, except in localized scleroderma. An increase of B and NK cells activation was found in patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago. Specific cell populations like monocytes, NK, and B cells were associated with the type of affected organ. This study shows how, in a heterogeneous disease, proper patient's stratification according to clinical phenotypes allows finding specific cellular profiles. Our data may lead to improvements in the knowledge of prognosis factors and to aid in the analysis of future specific therapies. PMID:24818126

  5. Phenotype/genotype correlations in Gaucher disease type 1: Clinical and therapeutic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibille, A.; Eng, C.M.; Kim, S.J.; Pastores, G. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G.A. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disease and the most prevalent genetic disease among Ashkenazi Jews. Gaucher disease type 1 is characterized by marked variability of the phenotype and by the absence of neuronopathic involvement. To test the hypothesis that this phenotypic variability was due to genetic compounds of several different mutant alleles, 161 symptomatic patients with Gaucher disease type 1 (> 90% Ashkenazi Jewish) were analyzed for clinical involvement, and their genotypes were determined. Qualitative and quantitative measures of disease involvement included age at onset of the disease manifestations, hepatic and splenic volumes, age at splenectomy, and severity of bony disease. High statistically significant differences (P < .005) were found in each clinical parameter in patients with the N370S/N370S genotype compared with those patients with the N370S/84GG, N370S/L444P, and N370/ genotypes. The symptomatic N370S homozygotes had onset of their disease two to three decades later than patients with the other genotypes. In addition, patients with the latter genotypes have much more severely involved livers, spleens, and bones and had a higher incidence of splenectomy at an earlier age. These predictive genotype analyses provide the basis for genetic care delivery and therapeutic recommendations in patients affected with Gaucher disease type 1. 38 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Phenotyping of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Based on the Integration of Metabolomes and Clinical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Kilk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Apart from the refined management-oriented clinical stratification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the molecular pathologies behind this highly prevalent disease have remained obscure. The aim of this study was the characterization of patients with COPD, based on the metabolomic profiling of peripheral blood and exhaled breath condensate (EBC within the context of defined clinical and demographic variables. Mass-spectrometry-based targeted analysis of serum metabolites (mainly amino acids and lipid species, untargeted profiles of serum and EBC of patients with COPD of different clinical characteristics (n = 25 and control individuals (n = 21 were performed. From the combined clinical/demographic and metabolomics data, associations between clinical/demographic and metabolic parameters were searched and a de novo phenotyping for COPD was attempted. Adjoining the clinical parameters, sphingomyelins were the best to differentiate COPD patients from controls. Unsaturated fatty acid-containing lipids, ornithine metabolism and plasma protein composition-associated signals from the untargeted analysis differentiated the Global Initiative for COPD (GOLD categories. Hierarchical clustering did not reveal a clinical-metabolomic stratification superior to the strata set by the GOLD consensus. We conclude that while metabolomics approaches are good for finding biomarkers and clarifying the mechanism of the disease, there are no distinct co-variate independent clinical-metabolic phenotypes.

  7. Alzheimer disease-like clinical phenotype in a family with FTDP-17 caused by a MAPT R406W mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S.G.; Holm, I.E.; Schwartz, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre-symptomatic an......We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre...

  8. Pre-clinical cognitive phenotypes for Alzheimer disease: a latent profile approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Kathleen M; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Romero, Heather R; Plassman, Brenda L; Burke, James R; Browndyke, Jeffrey N; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2014-11-01

    Cognitive profiles for pre-clinical Alzheimer disease (AD) can be used to identify groups of individuals at risk for disease and better characterize pre-clinical disease. Profiles or patterns of performance as pre-clinical phenotypes may be more useful than individual test scores or measures of global decline. To evaluate patterns of cognitive performance in cognitively normal individuals to derive latent profiles associated with later onset of disease using a combination of factor analysis and latent profile analysis. The National Alzheimer Coordinating Centers collect data, including a battery of neuropsychological tests, from participants at 29 National Institute on Aging-funded Alzheimer Disease Centers across the United States. Prior factor analyses of this battery demonstrated a four-factor structure comprising memory, attention, language, and executive function. Factor scores from these analyses were used in a latent profile approach to characterize cognition among a group of cognitively normal participants (N = 3,911). Associations between latent profiles and disease outcomes an average of 3 years later were evaluated with multinomial regression models. Similar analyses were used to determine predictors of profile membership. Four groups were identified; each with distinct characteristics and significantly associated with later disease outcomes. Two groups were significantly associated with development of cognitive impairment. In post hoc analyses, both the Trail Making Test Part B, and a contrast score (Delayed Recall - Trails B), significantly predicted group membership and later cognitive impairment. Latent profile analysis is a useful method to evaluate patterns of cognition in large samples for the identification of preclinical AD phenotypes; comparable results, however, can be achieved with very sensitive tests and contrast scores. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical and Phenotypic Differences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Among Arab and Jewish Children in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinawi, Firas; Assa, Amit; Bashir, Husam; Peleg, Sarit; Shamir, Raanan

    2017-08-01

    Data on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) phenotypes among the Arab population in Israel or in the neighboring Arab countries is scarce. We aimed to assess differences in disease phenotype among Arab and Jewish children living in Israel. We performed a retrospective chart review of pediatric IBD cases, which were diagnosed at the Schneider Children's Medical Center and Ha'Emek Medical Center in Israel between 2000 and 2014. Demographic, clinical, and phenotypic variables were compared between Arabs and Jews from Eastern (Sephardic) and Western (Ashkenazi) origin. Seventy-one Arab children with IBD were compared with 165 Ashkenazi and 158 Sephardic Jewish children. Age and gender did not differ between groups. Sephardic and Ashkenazi Jewish Crohn's disease (CD) patients had significantly more stenotic behavior (24 and 26 vs. 5%, p = 0.03) and less fistulzing perianal disease (15 and 11 vs. 31%, p = 0.014) compared with Arab patients. Arab children with ulcerative colitis (UC) had more severe disease at diagnosis compared to Sephardic and Ashkenazi Jews reflected by higher Pediatric UC Activity Index (45 vs. 35 and 35, respectively, p = 0.03). Arab patients had significantly lower proportion of anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies positivity (in CD) and perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies positivity (in UC) than both Sephardic and Ashkenazi Jewish children (23 vs. 53 and 65%, p = 0.002 and 35 vs. 60 and 75%, respectively, p = 0.002). Arab and Jewish children with IBD differ in disease characteristics and severity. Whether genetic or environmental factors are the cause for these differences is yet to be determined.

  10. From genotype to phenotype; clinical variability in Lesch-Nyhan disease. The role of epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigueros Genao, M; Torres, R J

    2014-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a rare genetic disease characterized by a deficiency in the function of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Patients affected by this disease experience hyperuricemia, motor disorders, mental retardation and, in the most severe cases, self-mutilation. Its clinical manifestations depend on the enzymatic activity of HGPRT, which is classically linked to the type of alteration in the HGPRT gene. More than 400 mutations of this gene have been found. At present, one of the controversial aspects of the disease is the relationship between the genotype and phenotype; cases have been described lacking a mutation, such as the patient presented in this article, as well as families who despite sharing the same genetic defect show disorders with differing severity. Epigenetic processes, which modify the genetic expression without changing the sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), could explain the clinical variability observed in this disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical phenotypes of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder and, over the years, many different clinical subtypes of asthma have been described. A precise definition of asthma phenotypes is now becoming more and more important, not only for a better understanding of pathophysiologic

  12. Biomarker-driven phenotyping in Parkinson disease: a translational missing link in disease-modifying clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espay, Alberto J.; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Tanner, Caroline M.; Fernandez, Hubert H; Simon, David K.; Leverenz, James B.; Merola, Aristide; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Brundin, Patrik; Kauffman, Marcelo A.; Erro, Roberto; Kieburtz, Karl; Woo, Daniel; Macklin, Eric A.; Standaert, David G.; Lang, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Past clinical trials of putative neuroprotective therapies have targeted Parkinson disease (PD) as a single pathogenic disease entity. From an Oslerian clinico-pathologic perspective, the wide complexity of PD converges into Lewy bodies and justifies a reductionist approach to PD: a single-mechanism therapy can affect most of those sharing the classic pathologic hallmark. From a systems-biology perspective, PD is a group of disorders that, while related by sharing the feature of nigral dopamine-neuron degeneration, exhibit unique genetic, biological and molecular abnormalities, which probably respond differentially to a given therapeutic approach, particularly for strategies aimed at neuroprotection. Under this model, only biomarker-defined, homogenous subtypes of PD are likely to respond optimally to therapies proven to affect the biological processes within each subtype. Therefore, we suggest that precision medicine applied to PD requires a reevaluation of the biomarker-discovery effort. This effort is currently centered on correlating biological measures to clinical features of PD and on identifying factors that predict whether various prodromal states will convert into the classical movement disorder. We suggest, instead, that subtyping of PD requires the reverse view, where abnormal biological signals (i.e., biomarkers) rather than clinical definitions are used to define disease phenotypes. Successful development of disease-modifying strategies will depend on how relevant the specific biological processes addressed by an intervention are to the pathogenetic mechanisms in the subgroup of targeted patients. This precision-medicine approach will likely yield smaller but well-defined subsets of PD amenable to successful neuroprotection. PMID:28233927

  13. Genotype-phenotype correlations in a mountain population community with high prevalence of Wilson's disease: genetic and clinical homogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relu Cocoş

    Full Text Available Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by more than 500 mutations in ATP7B gene presenting considerably clinical manifestations heterogeneity even in patients with a particular mutation. Previous findings suggested a potential role of additional genetic modifiers and environment factors on phenotypic expression among the affected patients. We conducted clinical and genetic investigations to perform genotype-phenotype correlation in two large families living in a socio-culturally isolated community with the highest prevalence of Wilson's disease ever reported of 1 ∶ 1130. Sequencing of ATP7B gene in seven affected individuals and 43 family members identified a common compound heterozygous genotype, H1069Q/M769H-fs, in five symptomatic and two asymptomatic patients and detected the presence of two out of seven identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in all affected patients. Symptomatic patients had similar clinical phenotype and age at onset (18 ± 1 years showing dysarthria and dysphagia as common clinical features at the time of diagnosis. Moreover, all symptomatic patients presented Kayser-Fleischer rings and lack of dystonia accompanied by unfavourable clinical outcomes. Our findings add value for understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations in Wilson's disease based on a multifamily study in an isolated population with high extent of genetic and environmental homogeneity as opposed to majority of reports. We observed an equal influence of presumed other genetic modifiers and environmental factors on clinical presentation and age at onset of Wilson's disease in patients with a particular genotype. These data provide valuable inferences that could be applied for predicting clinical management in asymptomatic patients in such communities.

  14. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in Singapore: clinical phenotypes, disease activity, damage, and autoantibody profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J H T; Hoh, S F; Win, M T M; Chan, Y H; Das, L; Arkachaisri, T

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by immune dysregulation affecting patients less than 18 years old. One-fifth of SLE cases are diagnosed during childhood. cSLE presents differently from adults and has a more severe and aggressive course. We describe the clinical and antibody profiles in our cSLE Singapore cohort. All cSLE patients who satisfied the 1997 American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria were captured in our lupus registry from January 2009 to January 2014. Data including demographic, cumulative clinical, serologic data, and damage indices were collected. Adjusted mean SLEDAI-2K (AMS) was used to summarize disease activity over multiple visits. Cluster analysis using non-hierarchical K-means procedure was performed on eight selected antibodies. The 64 patients (female:male ratio 5:1; Chinese 45.3%, Malay 28.1%, Indian 9.4%, and other races 17.2%) had a mean onset age of 11.5 years (range 2.1-16.7) and mean age at diagnosis was 11.9 years (range 2.6-18.0). Our study demonstrated differences in clinical manifestations for which hematologic involvement was the most common manifestation with less renal disease and uncommon neurologic manifestation as compared to other cSLE cohorts reported in our region. Antibody clusters were identified in our cohort but their clinical association/discrimination and outcome prediction required further validation study. Outcomes of our cohort in regard to disease activity after therapy and organ damages were comparable if not better to other cSLE cohorts elsewhere. Steroid-related damage, including symptomatic multifocal avascular necrosis and cataract, were not uncommon locally. Infection remains the major cause of death for the continent. Nevertheless, the five year survival rate of our cohort (98.4%) was high. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Extended phenotype and clinical subgroups in unilateral Meniere disease: A cross-sectional study with cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejo, L; Martin-Sanz, E; Teggi, R; Trinidad, G; Soto-Varela, A; Santos-Perez, S; Manrique, R; Perez, N; Aran, I; Almeida-Branco, M S; Batuecas-Caletrio, A; Fraile, J; Espinosa-Sanchez, J M; Perez-Guillen, V; Perez-Garrigues, H; Oliva-Dominguez, M; Aleman, O; Benitez, J; Perez, P; Lopez-Escamez, J A

    2017-12-01

    To define clinical subgroups by cluster analysis in patients with unilateral Meniere disease (MD) and to compare them with the clinical subgroups found in bilateral MD. A cross-sectional study with a two-step cluster analysis. A tertiary referral multicenter study. Nine hundred and eighty-eight adult patients with unilateral MD. best predictors to define clinical subgroups with potential different aetiologies. We established five clusters in unilateral MD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 53% of patients, and it is defined as the sporadic, classic MD without migraine and without autoimmune disorder (AD). Group 2 is found in 8% of patients, and it is defined by hearing loss, which antedates the vertigo episodes by months or years (delayed MD), without migraine or AD in most of cases. Group 3 involves 13% of patients, and it is considered familial MD, while group 4, which includes 15% of patients, is linked to the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by a comorbid AD. We found significant differences in the distribution of AD in clusters 3, 4 and 5 between patients with uni- and bilateral MD. Cluster analysis defines clinical subgroups in MD, and it extends the phenotype beyond audiovestibular symptoms. This classification will help to improve the phenotyping in MD and facilitate the selection of patients for randomised clinical trials. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A proteomic network approach across the ALS-FTD disease spectrum resolves clinical phenotypes and genetic vulnerability in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoh, Mfon E; Dammer, Eric B; Dai, Jingting; Duong, Duc M; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Gearing, Marla; Glass, Jonathan D; Seyfried, Nicholas T

    2018-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are neurodegenerative diseases with overlap in clinical presentation, neuropathology, and genetic underpinnings. The molecular basis for the overlap of these disorders is not well established. We performed a comparative unbiased mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of frontal cortical tissues from postmortem cases clinically defined as ALS, FTD, ALS and FTD (ALS/FTD), and controls. We also included a subset of patients with the C9orf72 expansion mutation, the most common genetic cause of both ALS and FTD Our systems-level analysis of the brain proteome integrated both differential expression and co-expression approaches to assess the relationship of these differences to clinical and pathological phenotypes. Weighted co-expression network analysis revealed 15 modules of co-expressed proteins, eight of which were significantly different across the ALS-FTD disease spectrum. These included modules associated with RNA binding proteins, synaptic transmission, and inflammation with cell-type specificity that showed correlation with TDP-43 pathology and cognitive dysfunction. Modules were also examined for their overlap with TDP-43 protein-protein interactions, revealing one module enriched with RNA-binding proteins and other causal ALS genes that increased in FTD/ALS and FTD cases. A module enriched with astrocyte and microglia proteins was significantly increased in ALS cases carrying the C9orf72 mutation compared to sporadic ALS cases, suggesting that the genetic expansion is associated with inflammation in the brain even without clinical evidence of dementia. Together, these findings highlight the utility of integrative systems-level proteomic approaches to resolve clinical phenotypes and genetic mechanisms underlying the ALS-FTD disease spectrum in human brain. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  17. Distribution of clinical phenotypes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease caused by biomass and tobacco smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpe, Rafael; Sanjuán López, Pilar; Cano Jiménez, Esteban; Castro Añón, Olalla; Pérez de Llano, Luis A

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to biomass smoke is a risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is unknown whether COPD caused by biomass smoke has different characteristics to COPD caused by tobacco smoke. To determine clinical differences between these two types of the disease. Retrospective observational study of 499 patients with a diagnosis of COPD due to biomass or tobacco smoke. The clinical variables of both groups were compared. There were 122 subjects (24.4%) in the biomass smoke group and 377 (75.5%) in the tobacco smoke group. In the tobacco group, the percentage of males was higher (91.2% vs 41.8%, P<.0001) and the age was lower (70.6 vs 76.2 years, P<.0001). Body mass index and FEV1% values were higher in the biomass group (29.4±5.7 vs 28.0±5.1, P=.01, and 55.6±15.6 vs 47.1±17.1, P<.0001, respectively). The mixed COPD-asthma phenotype was more common in the biomass group (21.3% vs 5%, P<.0001), although this difference disappeared when corrected for gender. The emphysema phenotype was more common in the tobacco group (45.9% vs 31.9%, P=.009). The prevalence of the chronic bronchitis and exacerbator phenotypes, the comorbidity burden and the rate of hospital admissions were the same in both groups. Differences were observed between COPD caused by biomass and COPD caused by tobacco smoke, although these may be attributed in part to uneven gender distribution between the groups. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. A rule-based electronic phenotyping algorithm for detecting clinically relevant cardiovascular disease cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Santiago; Rodríguez Tablado, Manuel; Ricci, Ricardo Ignacio; Terrasa, Sergio; Kopitowski, Karin

    2017-07-14

    The implementation of electronic medical records (EMR) is becoming increasingly common. Error and data loss reduction, patient-care efficiency increase, decision-making assistance and facilitation of event surveillance, are some of the many processes that EMRs help improve. In addition, they show a lot of promise in terms of data collection to facilitate observational epidemiological studies and their use for this purpose has increased significantly over the recent years. Even though the quantity and availability of the data are clearly improved thanks to EMRs, still, the problem of the quality of the data remains. This is especially important when attempting to determine if an event has actually occurred or not. We sought to assess the sensitivity, specificity, and agreement level of a codes-based algorithm for the detection of clinically relevant cardiovascular (CaVD) and cerebrovascular (CeVD) disease cases, using data from EMRs. Three family physicians from the research group selected clinically relevant CaVD and CeVD terms from the international classification of primary care, Second Edition (ICPC-2), the ICD 10 version 2015 and SNOMED-CT 2015 Edition. These terms included both signs, symptoms, diagnoses and procedures associated with CaVD and CeVD. Terms not related to symptoms, signs, diagnoses or procedures of CaVD or CeVD and also those describing incidental findings without clinical relevance were excluded. The algorithm yielded a positive result if the patient had at least one of the selected terms in their medical records, as long as it was not recorded as an error. Else, if no terms were found, the patient was classified as negative. This algorithm was applied to a randomly selected sample of the active patients within the hospital's HMO by 1/1/2005 that were 40-79 years old, had at least one year of seniority in the HMO and at least one clinical encounter. Thus, patients were classified into four groups: (1) Negative patients (2) Patients with Ca

  19. CD28/CTLA-4/ICOS haplotypes confers susceptibility to Graves' disease and modulates clinical phenotype of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Adamska, Edyta; Frydecka, Irena; Bolanowski, Marek; Tomkiewicz, Anna; Jonkisz, Anna; Karabon, Lidia; Partyka, Anna; Nowak, Oskar; Szalinski, Marek; Daroszewski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Graves' disease, an autoimmune disease with heterogeneous symptoms including Graves' orbitopathy, has a combined genetic/environmental background, where variations within CD28/CTLA-4/ICOS genes are considered as disease markers.Association of CD28c.17+3T>C(rs3116496), CTLA-4g.319C>T(rs5742909), CTLA-4c.49A>G(rs231775), CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33), CT60(rs3087243), Jo31(rs11571302), ICOSc.1554+4GT(8_15) polymorphisms with susceptibility to Graves' disease and clinical outcome was investigated. The study group comprised of 561 Polish Caucasians, including 172 unrelated Graves' disease patients. CTLA-4c.49A>G, CTLA-4g.319C>T, and CT60 were genotyped by PCR-RFLP; Jo31 and CD28c.17+3C>T by minisequencing; CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33) and ICOSc.1554+4GT(8_15)-PCR and fluorescence-based technique. CD28c.17+3T>C(rs3116496)T/CTLA-4g.319C>T(rs5742909)C/CTLA-4c.49A>G(rs231775)G/CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33)(AT 16-21 )/CT60(rs3087243)G/Jo31(rs11571302)G/ICOSc.1554+4GT(8_15)(m) and TCA(AT Graves' disease, especially in males, as well as overall Graves' orbitopathy development with severe outcome. TCG(AT 16-21 )GG(l) haplotype increased risk of Graves' disease and reduced the chance of successful medical treatment. Although this haplotype was mainly observed in patients without signs of Graves' orbitopathy, if Graves' orbitopathy developed it favored a Graves' orbitopathy outcome. Haplotype TCA(AT >21 )GT(m) increased Graves' disease risk in women and, in all patients, was linked to Graves' disease without Graves' orbitopathy. TCG(AT Graves' disease risk factor, whereas CT60 was an independent factor for disease progression. Sporadic Graves' disease was related to presence of CTLA-4c.49A>G[A] and the rare CTLA-4g.319C>T[T] allele variant. Familial background of the disease was exclusively associated with CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33)[AT >21 ]/[AT >21 ] genotype. CD28/CTLA-4/ICOS loci may confer inherited susceptibility to Graves' disease or may be involved in susceptibility to Graves' disease and play a

  20. Frequently relapsing anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease with changing clinical phenotype and antibody characteristics over time

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Bobby; Magil, Alex B.; Barbour, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease is a typically monophasic autoimmune disease with severe pulmonary and renal involvement. We report an atypical case of frequently relapsing anti-GBM antibody disease with both anti-GBM antibody?positive flares with pulmonary and renal involvement, and anti-GBM antibody?negative flares that were pulmonary limited with no histologic renal disease. This is the first report of alternating disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody status over...

  1. Clinical events in a large prospective cohort of children with sickle cell disease in Nagpur, India: evidence against a milder clinical phenotype in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dipty; Arjunan, Aishwarya; Sarathi, Vijaya; Jain, Harshwardhan; Bhandarwar, Amol; Vuga, Marike; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2016-10-01

    The clinical phenotype of sickle cell disease (SCD) has been reported to be milder in India than in the United States. The objective of this large single-center study was to examine the rate of complications to define the phenotype of SCD in India. The rate of complications per 100 person-years in 833 pediatric SCD patients for 1954 person-years in Nagpur, India including those diagnosed on newborn screen (NBS) and those presenting later in childhood (non-NBS) was compared to those reported in the cooperative study of sickle cell disease (CSSCD). Event rates were also compared between patients belonging to scheduled castes (SCs), scheduled tribes (STs), and other backward classes (OBC). Comparison of CSSCD versus Nagpur NBS versus Nagpur non-NBS for rates of pain (32.4 vs. 85.2 vs. 62.4), severe anemia (7.1 vs. 27 vs. 6.6), stroke (0.7 vs. 0.8 vs. 1.4), splenic sequestration (3.4 vs. 6.7 vs. 1.6), acute chest syndrome (24.5 vs. 23.6 vs. 1.0), and meningitis (0.8 vs. 0 vs. 0.1) revealed more frequent complications in Nagpur compared to CSSCD. Comparison of ST, SC, and OBC for rates of pain (84.6 vs. 71.9 vs. 63.5), acute chest syndrome (3.6 vs. 2.8 vs. 2.2), severe anemia (5.4 vs. 9.5 vs. 11.4), stroke (1.2 vs. 0.4 vs. 0.3), splenic sequestration (0.6 vs. 2.4 vs. 1.9), and meningitis (0.8 vs. 0 vs. 0.1) revealed significantly more frequent complications among ST. SCD-related complications are more frequent in Indian children than that observed in CSSCD. Further study is indicated to define SCD phenotype in India. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. ACE phenotyping in Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Sergei M; Tikhomirova, Victoria E; Metzger, Roman; Naperova, Irina A; Bukina, Tatiana M; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Tayebi, Nahid; Gayfullin, Nurshat M; Schwartz, David E; Samokhodskaya, Larisa M; Kost, Olga A; Sidransky, Ellen

    2018-04-01

    Gaucher disease is characterized by the activation of splenic and hepatic macrophages, accompanied by dramatically increased levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). To evaluate the source of the elevated blood ACE, we performed complete ACE phenotyping using blood, spleen and liver samples from patients with Gaucher disease and controls. ACE phenotyping included 1) immunohistochemical staining for ACE; 2) measuring ACE activity with two substrates (HHL and ZPHL); 3) calculating the ratio of the rates of substrate hydrolysis (ZPHL/HHL ratio); 4) assessing the conformational fingerprint of ACE by evaluating the pattern of binding of monoclonal antibodies to 16 different ACE epitopes. We show that in patients with Gaucher disease, the dramatically increased levels of ACE originate from activated splenic and/or hepatic macrophages (Gaucher cells), and that both its conformational fingerprint and kinetic characteristics (ZPHL/HHL ratio) differ from controls and from patients with sarcoid granulomas. Furthermore, normal spleen was found to produce high levels of endogenous ACE inhibitors and a novel, tightly-bound 10-30 kDa ACE effector which is deficient in Gaucher spleen. The conformation of ACE is tissue-specific. In Gaucher disease, ACE produced by activated splenic macrophages differs from that in hepatic macrophages, as well as from macrophages and dendritic cells in sarcoid granulomas. The observed differences are likely due to altered ACE glycosylation or sialylation in these diseased organs. The conformational differences in ACE may serve as a specific biomarker for Gaucher disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A simple phenotypic classification for celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Sood

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims : Celiac disease is a global health problem. The presentation of celiac disease has unfolded over years and it is now known that it can manifest at different ages, has varied presentations, and is prone to develop complications, if not managed properly. Although the Oslo definitions provide consensus on the various terminologies used in literature, there is no phenotypic classification providing a composite diagnosis for the disease. Methods : Various variables identified for phenotypic classification included age at diagnosis, age at onset of symptoms, clinical presentation, family history and complications. These were applied to the existing registry of 1,664 patients at Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, India. In addition, age was evaluated as below 15 and below 18 years. Cross tabulations were used for the verification of the classification using the existing data. Expert opinion was sought from both international and national experts of varying fields. Results : After empirical verification, age at diagnosis was considered appropriate in between A1 (<18 and A2 (≧18. The disease presentation has been classified into 3 types–P1 (classical, P2 (non-classical and P3 (asymptomatic. Complications were considered as absent (C0 or present (C1. A single phenotypic classification based on these 3 characteristics, namely age at the diagnosis, clinical presentation, and intestinal complications (APC classification was derived. Conclusions : APC classification (age at diagnosis, presentation, complications is a simple disease explanatory classification for patients with celiac disease aimed at providing a composite diagnosis.

  4. Multidimensional clinical phenotyping of an adult cystic fibrosis patient population.

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    Douglas J Conrad

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease.The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier.Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1 a low lung health scores phenotype, 2 a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3 various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency.This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study.

  5. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals novel USH2A mutations associated with diverse disease phenotypes: implications for clinical and molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Sheng, Xunlun; Liu, Xiaoxing; Li, Huiping; Liu, Yani; Rong, Weining; Ha, Shaoping; Liu, Wenzhou; Kang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    USH2A mutations have been implicated in the disease etiology of several inherited diseases, including Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2), nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and nonsyndromic deafness. The complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects make it difficult to manage patients with such mutations. In the present study, we aim to determine the genetic etiology and to characterize the correlated clinical phenotypes for three Chinese pedigrees with nonsyndromic RP, one with RP sine pigmento (RPSP), and one with USH2. Family histories and clinical details for all included patients were reviewed. Ophthalmic examinations included best corrected visual acuities, visual field measurements, funduscopy, and electroretinography. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied using two sequence capture arrays to reveal the disease causative mutations for each family. Genotype-phenotype correlations were also annotated. Seven USH2A mutations, including four missense substitutions (p.P2762A, p.G3320C, p.R3719H, and p.G4763R), two splice site variants (c.8223+1G>A and c.8559-2T>C), and a nonsense mutation (p.Y3745*), were identified as disease causative in the five investigated families, of which three reported to have consanguineous marriage. Among all seven mutations, six were novel, and one was recurrent. Two homozygous missense mutations (p.P2762A and p.G3320C) were found in one individual family suggesting a potential double hit effect. Significant phenotypic divergences were revealed among the five families. Three families of the five families were affected with early, moderated, or late onset RP, one with RPSP, and the other one with USH2. Our study expands the genotypic and phenotypic variability relevant to USH2A mutations, which would help with a clear insight into the complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects, and is complementary for a better management of patients with such mutations. We have also

  6. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals novel USH2A mutations associated with diverse disease phenotypes: implications for clinical and molecular diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Chen

    Full Text Available USH2A mutations have been implicated in the disease etiology of several inherited diseases, including Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2, nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP, and nonsyndromic deafness. The complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects make it difficult to manage patients with such mutations. In the present study, we aim to determine the genetic etiology and to characterize the correlated clinical phenotypes for three Chinese pedigrees with nonsyndromic RP, one with RP sine pigmento (RPSP, and one with USH2. Family histories and clinical details for all included patients were reviewed. Ophthalmic examinations included best corrected visual acuities, visual field measurements, funduscopy, and electroretinography. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS was applied using two sequence capture arrays to reveal the disease causative mutations for each family. Genotype-phenotype correlations were also annotated. Seven USH2A mutations, including four missense substitutions (p.P2762A, p.G3320C, p.R3719H, and p.G4763R, two splice site variants (c.8223+1G>A and c.8559-2T>C, and a nonsense mutation (p.Y3745*, were identified as disease causative in the five investigated families, of which three reported to have consanguineous marriage. Among all seven mutations, six were novel, and one was recurrent. Two homozygous missense mutations (p.P2762A and p.G3320C were found in one individual family suggesting a potential double hit effect. Significant phenotypic divergences were revealed among the five families. Three families of the five families were affected with early, moderated, or late onset RP, one with RPSP, and the other one with USH2. Our study expands the genotypic and phenotypic variability relevant to USH2A mutations, which would help with a clear insight into the complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects, and is complementary for a better management of patients with such mutations. We have

  7. Comprehensive clinical evaluation of a large Spanish family with Anderson-Fabry disease, novel GLA mutation and severe cardiac phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román-Monserrat, Irene; Moreno-Flores, Victoria; López-Cuenca, David; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Elena; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Rodríguez-González-Herrero, Beatriz; Alegría-Fernández, Marisol; Poza-Cisneros, Gabriela; Piñero-Fernández, Juan A; Sornichero-Martínez, Javier; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R

    2014-06-06

    Fabry disease is an X-linked multisystemic lysosomal-storage condition. We describe a large family with a novel GLA mutation: p.M187R/g7219 T>G. Anamnesis/physical-exam, blood/urine analysis, α-Gal-A activity and/or genetic study of at-risk individuals and multidisciplinary evaluation in confirmed cases. 4 males and 13 heterozygous-females displayed the mutation. Cardiac/renal/neurological disease was diagnosed at a mean age of 41/29/39 years in males and 51/56/46 years in females. Onset mean age was 20 years versus 42 years. 9/15 had cardiomyopathy. Delta wave suggestive of accessory pathway was identified in 1 male and 2 females. 1 female had cardiac arrest (ventricular fibrillation, 61 years). 2 females and 1 male died suddenly (63, 64 and 57 years). Cardiac-subscore of Mainz Severity-Score-Index was severe for males and females over 40 years. 4/15(26%) developed early renal disease. 2 males needed dialysis. 1 male died at 69 years in spite of kidney-heart transplant. We describe the largest genetically confirmed Spanish family using multidisciplinary evaluation and MSSI calculation. The novel mutation p.M187R/g7219 T>G is associated with a particularly malignant cardiac phenotype in males and females over 40 years. Severity was higher than that of the largest Spanish FOS-cohort. Short-PR with delta is being reported for the first time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Fabry Disease in Families With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Clinical Manifestations in the Classic and Later-Onset Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalsteinsdottir, Berglind; Palsson, Runolfur; Desnick, Robert J; Gardarsdottir, Marianna; Teekakirikul, Polakit; Maron, Martin; Appelbaum, Evan; Neisius, Ulf; Maron, Barry J; Burke, Michael A; Chen, Brenden; Pagant, Silvere; Madsen, Christoffer V; Danielsen, Ragnar; Arngrimsson, Reynir; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E; Gunnarsson, Gunnar Th

    2017-08-01

    The screening of Icelandic patients clinically diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulted in identification of 8 individuals from 2 families with X-linked Fabry disease (FD) caused by GLA (α-galactosidase A gene) mutations encoding p.D322E (family A) or p.I232T (family B). Familial screening of at-risk relatives identified mutations in 16 family A members (8 men and 8 heterozygotes) and 25 family B members (10 men and 15 heterozygotes). Clinical assessments, α-galactosidase A (α-GalA) activities, glycosphingolipid substrate levels, and in vitro mutation expression were used to categorize p.D322E as a classic FD mutation and p.I232T as a later-onset FD mutation. In vitro expression revealed that p.D322E and p.I232T had α-GalA activities of 1.4% and 14.9% of the mean wild-type activity, respectively. Family A men had markedly decreased α-GalA activity and childhood-onset classic manifestations, except for angiokeratoma and cornea verticillata. Family B men had residual α-GalA activity and developed FD manifestations in adulthood. Despite these differences, all family A and family B men >30 years of age had left ventricular hypertrophy, which was mainly asymmetrical, and had similar late gadolinium enhancement patterns. Ischemic stroke and severe white matter lesions were more frequent among family A men, but neither family A nor family B men had overt renal disease. Family A and family B heterozygotes had less severe or no clinical manifestations. Men with classic or later-onset FD caused by GLA missense mutations developed prominent and similar cardiovascular disease at similar ages, despite markedly different α-GalA activities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes: the future of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, MeiLan K; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    Significant heterogeneity of clinical presentation and disease progression exists within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although FEV(1) inadequately describes this heterogeneity, a clear alternative has not emerged. The goal of phenotyping is to identify patient groups with unique...... prognostic or therapeutic characteristics, but significant variation and confusion surrounds use of the term "phenotype" in COPD. Phenotype classically refers to any observable characteristic of an organism, and up until now, multiple disease characteristics have been termed COPD phenotypes. We, however......, propose the following variation on this definition: "a single or combination of disease attributes that describe differences between individuals with COPD as they relate to clinically meaningful outcomes (symptoms, exacerbations, response to therapy, rate of disease progression, or death)." This more...

  10. Isolated visual symptoms at onset in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: the clinical phenotype of the “Heidenhain variant”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S A; Murray, K L; Heath, C A; Will, R G; Knight, R S G

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Heidenhain variant of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is commonly understood to represent cases with early, prominent visual complaints. The term is clarified to represent those who present with isolated visual symptoms. This group may pose diagnostic difficulties and often present to ophthalmologists where they may undergo needless invasive procedures. Method: A retrospective review of 594 pathologically proved sCJD cases referred to the UK National CJD Surveillance Unit over a 15 year period to identify Heidenhain cases. Results: 22 cases had isolated visual symptoms at onset with a mean illness duration of 4 months. The mean age at disease onset was 67 years. Most displayed myoclonus, pyramidal signs, and a delay in the onset of dementia for some weeks. 17 (77%) were referred initially to ophthalmology. Two underwent cataract extraction before diagnosis. All tested cases were homozygous for methionine at codon 129 of the prion protein gene. Conclusions: This rare, but clinically distinct, group of patients with sCJD may cause diagnostic difficulties. Because ocular intervention carries with it the risk of onward transmission awareness of this condition among ophthalmologists is important. PMID:16170128

  11. Phenotypic Detection of Genitourinary Candidiasis among Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic Attendees in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluranti J. Obisesan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of genitourinary candidiasis (GC is fraught with challenges, especially, in an era of increasing antifungal resistance. This descriptive cross-sectional study conducted between May 2013 and January 2014 determined the prevalence and characteristics of GC and the species of Candida among 369 attendees of a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD clinic of Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. Appropriate urogenital specimen collected from each attendee was examined by microscopy and culture for Candida, with preliminary species identification by CHROMAgar Candida and confirmation by Analytical Profile Index (API 20C AUX. The age range of attendees was 1-80 years, mean age was 36.32±11.34 years, and male to female ratio was 1 to 3. The prevalence of genitourinary candidiasis was 47.4%, with 4.9% in males and 42.5% in females (p<0.0001. The age groups 31–45 and 16–30 have the highest prevalence of 23.3% and 16.8%, respectively. The species of Candida recovered include Candida glabrata 46.9%, Candida albicans 33.7%, Candida dubliniensis 9.7%, Candida tropicalis 5.7%, Candida krusei 1.7%, Candida lusitaniae 1.7%, and Candida utilis 0.6%. This study reported non-C. albicans Candida, especially C. glabrata, as the most frequently isolated species in GC, contrary to previous studies in this environment and elsewhere.

  12. Phenotypic Detection of Genitourinary Candidiasis among Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic Attendees in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obisesan, Oluranti J.; Olowe, Olugbenga A.; Taiwo, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    The management of genitourinary candidiasis (GC) is fraught with challenges, especially, in an era of increasing antifungal resistance. This descriptive cross-sectional study conducted between May 2013 and January 2014 determined the prevalence and characteristics of GC and the species of Candida among 369 attendees of a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) clinic of Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. Appropriate urogenital specimen collected from each attendee was examined by microscopy and culture for Candida, with preliminary species identification by CHROMAgar Candida and confirmation by Analytical Profile Index (API) 20C AUX. The age range of attendees was 1-80 years, mean age was 36.32 ± 11.34 years, and male to female ratio was 1 to 3. The prevalence of genitourinary candidiasis was 47.4%, with 4.9% in males and 42.5% in females (p < 0.0001). The age groups 31–45 and 16–30 have the highest prevalence of 23.3% and 16.8%, respectively. The species of Candida recovered include Candida glabrata 46.9%, Candida albicans 33.7%, Candida dubliniensis 9.7%, Candida tropicalis 5.7%, Candida krusei 1.7%, Candida lusitaniae 1.7%, and Candida utilis 0.6%. This study reported non-C. albicans Candida, especially C. glabrata, as the most frequently isolated species in GC, contrary to previous studies in this environment and elsewhere. PMID:26064140

  13. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...... of atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  14. Distinct Niemann-Pick Disease Type C Clinical, Cytological, and Biochemical Phenotype in an Adult Patient With 1 Mutated, Overexpressed Allele

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    Julia Jecel MD

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C is a rare autosomal-recessive neurovisceral lysosomal storage disease. We report on a juvenile onset, now 25-year-old female patient with typical neurologic symptoms, including vertical gaze palsy, of NP-C. The diagnosis was supported by a positive filipin test (“variant biochemical phenotype” of cholesterol accumulation in cultured fibroblasts, high numbers of “Niemann-Pick cells” in the bone marrow, and 1 positive out of 3 NP-C biomarkers tested, but NP-C was not definitely confirmed genetically. She showed only 1 known NPC1 variant (3 bp deletion in exon 18; p.N916del; this allele, however, being distinctly overexpressed at the messenger RNA level as compared to the wild-type allele, as a not as yet clarified (copathogenic? phenomenon. The patient’s mother, also carrying the p.N916del allele but without overexpression, has a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system classified as multiple sclerosis. However, her severe clinical phenotype includes some signs also consistent with NP-C. The laboratory diagnosis of NP-C can be challenging in detecting novel disease constellations.

  15. Cortical thickness in de novo patients with Parkinson disease and mild cognitive impairment with consideration of clinical phenotype and motor laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danti, S; Toschi, N; Diciotti, S; Tessa, C; Poletti, M; Del Dotto, P; Lucetti, C

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with motor and non-motor symptoms, including cognitive deficits. Several magnetic resonance imaging approaches have been applied to investigate brain atrophy in PD. The aim of this study was to detect early structural cortical and subcortical changes in de novo PD whilst distinguishing cognitive status, clinical phenotype and motor laterality. Eighteen de novo PD with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), 18 de novo PD without MCI (PD-NC) and 18 healthy control subjects were evaluated. In the PD-MCI group, nine were tremor dominant and nine were postural instability gait disorder (PIGD) phenotype; 11 had right-sided symptom dominance and seven had left-sided symptom dominance. FreeSurfer was used to measure cortical thickness/folding, subcortical structures and to study group differences as well as the association with clinical and neuropsychological data. Parkinson's disease with MCI showed regional thinning in the right frontal, right middle temporal areas and left insula compared to PD-NC. A reduction of the volume of the left and right thalamus and left hippocampus was found in PD-MCI compared to PD-NC. PD-MCI PIGD showed regional thinning in the right inferior parietal area compared to healthy controls. A decreased volume of the left thalamus was reported in PD-MCI with right-sided symptom dominance compared to PD-NC and PD-MCI with left-sided symptom dominance. When MCI was present, PD patients showed a fronto-temporo-parietal pattern of cortical thinning. This cortical pattern does not appear to be influenced by motor laterality, although one-sided symptom dominance may contribute to volumetric reduction of specific subcortical structures. © 2015 EAN.

  16. Age at onset and Parkinson disease phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Gennaro; Ferrara, Nicola; Brooks, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore clinical phenotype and characteristics of Parkinson disease (PD) at different ages at onset in recently diagnosed patients with untreated PD. Methods: We have analyzed baseline data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative database. Four hundred twenty-two patients with a diagnosis of PD confirmed by DaTSCAN imaging were divided into 4 groups according to age at onset (onset younger than 50 years, 50–59 years, 60–69 years, and 70 years or older) and investigated for differences in side, type and localization of symptoms, occurrence/severity of motor and nonmotor features, nigrostriatal function, and CSF biomarkers. Results: Older age at onset was associated with a more severe motor and nonmotor phenotype, a greater dopaminergic dysfunction on DaTSCAN, and reduction of CSF α-synuclein and total tau. The most common presentation was the combination of 2 or 3 motor symptoms (bradykinesia, resting tremor, and rigidity) with rigidity being more common in the young-onset group. In about 80% of the patients with localized onset, the arm was the most affected part of the body, with no difference across subgroups. Conclusions: Although the presentation of PD symptoms is similar across age subgroups, the severity of motor and nonmotor features, the impairment of striatal binding, and the levels of CSF biomarkers increase with age at onset. The variability of imaging and nonimaging biomarkers in patients with PD at different ages could hamper the results of future clinical trials. PMID:26865518

  17. The phenotypic spectrum of organic acidurias and urea cycle disorders Part 2: the evolving clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kölker, Stefan; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Burlina, Alberto B.; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Wijburg, Frits A.; Teles, Elisa Leão; Zeman, Jiri; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Barić, Ivo; Karall, Daniela; Arnoux, Jean-Baptiste; Avram, Paula; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Blasco-Alonso, Javier; Boy, S. P. Nikolas; Rasmussen, Marlene Bøgehus; Burgard, Peter; Chabrol, Brigitte; Chakrapani, Anupam; Chapman, Kimberly; Cortès I Saladelafont, Elisenda; Couce, Maria L.; de Meirleir, Linda; Dobbelaere, Dries; Furlan, Francesca; Gleich, Florian; González, Maria Julieta; Gradowska, Wanda; Grünewald, Stephanie; Honzik, Tomas; Hörster, Friederike; Ioannou, Hariklea; Jalan, Anil; Häberle, Johannes; Haege, Gisela; Langereis, Eveline; de Lonlay, Pascale; Martinelli, Diego; Matsumoto, Shirou; Mühlhausen, Chris; Murphy, Elaine; de Baulny, Hélène Ogier; Ortez, Carlos; Pedrón, Consuelo C.; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Pena-Quintana, Luis; Ramadža, Danijela Petković; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Sokal, Etienne; Summar, Marshall L.; Thompson, Nicholas; Vara, Roshni; Pinera, Inmaculada Vives; Walter, John H.; Williams, Monique; Lund, Allan M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angeles; Garcia Cazorla, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Background The disease course and long-term outcome of patients with organic acidurias (OAD) and urea cycle disorders (UCD) are incompletely understood. Aims To evaluate the complex clinical phenotype of OAD and UCD patients at different ages. Results Acquired microcephaly and movement disorders

  18. Semantic Disease Gene Embeddings (SmuDGE): phenotype-based disease gene prioritization without phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Alshahrani, Mona

    2018-04-30

    In the past years, several methods have been developed to incorporate information about phenotypes into computational disease gene prioritization methods. These methods commonly compute the similarity between a disease\\'s (or patient\\'s) phenotypes and a database of gene-to-phenotype associations to find the phenotypically most similar match. A key limitation of these methods is their reliance on knowledge about phenotypes associated with particular genes which is highly incomplete in humans as well as in many model organisms such as the mouse. Results: We developed SmuDGE, a method that uses feature learning to generate vector-based representations of phenotypes associated with an entity. SmuDGE can be used as a trainable semantic similarity measure to compare two sets of phenotypes (such as between a disease and gene, or a disease and patient). More importantly, SmuDGE can generate phenotype representations for entities that are only indirectly associated with phenotypes through an interaction network; for this purpose, SmuDGE exploits background knowledge in interaction networks comprising of multiple types of interactions. We demonstrate that SmuDGE can match or outperform semantic similarity in phenotype-based disease gene prioritization, and furthermore significantly extends the coverage of phenotype-based methods to all genes in a connected interaction network.

  19. Semantic Disease Gene Embeddings (SmuDGE): phenotype-based disease gene prioritization without phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    AlShahrani, Mona; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2018-01-01

    In the past years, several methods have been developed to incorporate information about phenotypes into computational disease gene prioritization methods. These methods commonly compute the similarity between a disease's (or patient's) phenotypes and a database of gene-to-phenotype associations to find the phenotypically most similar match. A key limitation of these methods is their reliance on knowledge about phenotypes associated with particular genes which is highly incomplete in humans as well as in many model organisms such as the mouse. Results: We developed SmuDGE, a method that uses feature learning to generate vector-based representations of phenotypes associated with an entity. SmuDGE can be used as a trainable semantic similarity measure to compare two sets of phenotypes (such as between a disease and gene, or a disease and patient). More importantly, SmuDGE can generate phenotype representations for entities that are only indirectly associated with phenotypes through an interaction network; for this purpose, SmuDGE exploits background knowledge in interaction networks comprising of multiple types of interactions. We demonstrate that SmuDGE can match or outperform semantic similarity in phenotype-based disease gene prioritization, and furthermore significantly extends the coverage of phenotype-based methods to all genes in a connected interaction network.

  20. CKD Self-management: Phenotypes and Associations With Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauben, Sarah J; Hsu, Jesse Y; Rosas, Sylvia E; Jaar, Bernard G; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deo, Rajat; Saab, Georges; Chen, Jing; Lederer, Swati; Kanthety, Radhika; Hamm, L Lee; Ricardo, Ana C; Lash, James P; Feldman, Harold I; Anderson, Amanda H

    2018-03-24

    To slow chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and its complications, patients need to engage in self-management behaviors. The objective of this study was to classify CKD self-management behaviors into phenotypes and assess the association of these phenotypes with clinical outcomes. Prospective cohort study. Adults with mild to moderate CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. 3,939 participants in the CRIC Study recruited between 2003 and 2008 served as the derivation cohort and 1,560 participants recruited between 2013 and 2015 served as the validation cohort. CKD self-management behavior phenotypes. CKD progression, atherosclerotic events, heart failure events, death from any cause. Latent class analysis stratified by diabetes was used to identify CKD self-management phenotypes based on measures of body mass index, diet, physical activity, blood pressure, smoking status, and hemoglobin A 1c concentration (if diabetic); Cox proportional hazards models. 3 identified phenotypes varied according to the extent of implementation of recommended CKD self-management behaviors: phenotype I characterized study participants with the most recommended behaviors; phenotype II, participants with a mixture of recommended and not recommended behaviors; and phenotype III, participants with minimal recommended behaviors. In multivariable-adjusted models for those with and without diabetes, phenotype III was strongly associated with CKD progression (HRs of 1.82 and 1.49), death (HRs of 1.95 and 4.14), and atherosclerotic events (HRs of 2.54 and 1.90; each P diabetes. No consensus definition of CKD self-management; limited to baseline behavior data. There are potentially 3 CKD self-management behavior phenotypes that distinguish risk for clinical outcomes. These phenotypes may inform the development of studies and guidelines regarding optimal self-management. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. A simple algorithm for the identification of clinical COPD phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Paillasseur, Jean-Louis; Janssens, Wim; Piquet, Jacques; ter Riet, Gerben; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Cosio, Borja; Bakke, Per; Puhan, Milo A.; Langhammer, Arnulf; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Almagro, Pere; Ancochea, Julio; Celli, Bartolome R.; Casanova, Ciro; de-Torres, Juan P.; Decramer, Marc; Echazarreta, Andrés; Esteban, Cristobal; Gomez Punter, Rosa Mar; Han, MeiLan K.; Johannessen, Ane; Kaiser, Bernhard; Lamprecht, Bernd; Lange, Peter; Leivseth, Linda; Marin, Jose M.; Martin, Francis; Martinez-Camblor, Pablo; Miravitlles, Marc; Oga, Toru; Sofia Ramírez, Ana; Sin, Don D.; Sobradillo, Patricia; Soler-Cataluña, Juan J.; Turner, Alice M.; Verdu Rivera, Francisco Javier; Soriano, Joan B.; Roche, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify simple rules for allocating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to clinical phenotypes identified by cluster analyses. Data from 2409 COPD patients of French/Belgian COPD cohorts were analysed using cluster analysis resulting in the identification of

  2. Clinical and inflammatory markers in asthma and COPD phenotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the studies described in this thesis, we conclude that adult-onset respiratory diseases (asthma and COPD) are heterogeneous conditions characterized by different clinical features and inflammatory characteristics. The first part of the thesis focused on phenotypes of adult-onset asthma. We

  3. OligoPVP: Phenotype-driven analysis of individual genomic information to prioritize oligogenic disease variants

    KAUST Repository

    Boudellioua, Imene; Kulmanov, Maxat; Schofield, Paul N; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2018-01-01

    patient phenotypes to databases of gene-phenotype associations observed in clinical research can provide useful information and improve variant prioritization for Mendelian diseases. Additionally, background knowledge about interactions between genes can

  4. Clinical phenotype-based gene prioritization: an initial study using semantic similarity and the human phenotype ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masino, Aaron J; Dechene, Elizabeth T; Dulik, Matthew C; Wilkens, Alisha; Spinner, Nancy B; Krantz, Ian D; Pennington, Jeffrey W; Robinson, Peter N; White, Peter S

    2014-07-21

    Exome sequencing is a promising method for diagnosing patients with a complex phenotype. However, variant interpretation relative to patient phenotype can be challenging in some scenarios, particularly clinical assessment of rare complex phenotypes. Each patient's sequence reveals many possibly damaging variants that must be individually assessed to establish clear association with patient phenotype. To assist interpretation, we implemented an algorithm that ranks a given set of genes relative to patient phenotype. The algorithm orders genes by the semantic similarity computed between phenotypic descriptors associated with each gene and those describing the patient. Phenotypic descriptor terms are taken from the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) and semantic similarity is derived from each term's information content. Model validation was performed via simulation and with clinical data. We simulated 33 Mendelian diseases with 100 patients per disease. We modeled clinical conditions by adding noise and imprecision, i.e. phenotypic terms unrelated to the disease and terms less specific than the actual disease terms. We ranked the causative gene against all 2488 HPO annotated genes. The median causative gene rank was 1 for the optimal and noise cases, 12 for the imprecision case, and 60 for the imprecision with noise case. Additionally, we examined a clinical cohort of subjects with hearing impairment. The disease gene median rank was 22. However, when also considering the patient's exome data and filtering non-exomic and common variants, the median rank improved to 3. Semantic similarity can rank a causative gene highly within a gene list relative to patient phenotype characteristics, provided that imprecision is mitigated. The clinical case results suggest that phenotype rank combined with variant analysis provides significant improvement over the individual approaches. We expect that this combined prioritization approach may increase accuracy and decrease effort for

  5. Resolution of Disease Phenotypes Resulting from Multilocus Genomic Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Jennifer E; Harel, Tamar; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A; James, Regis A; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep H; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Bi, Weimin; Xiao, Rui; Ding, Yan; Xia, Fan; Beaudet, Arthur L; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eng, Christine M; Sutton, V Reid; Shaw, Chad A; Plon, Sharon E; Yang, Yaping; Lupski, James R

    2017-01-05

    Whole-exome sequencing can provide insight into the relationship between observed clinical phenotypes and underlying genotypes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data from a series of 7374 consecutive unrelated patients who had been referred to a clinical diagnostic laboratory for whole-exome sequencing; our goal was to determine the frequency and clinical characteristics of patients for whom more than one molecular diagnosis was reported. The phenotypic similarity between molecularly diagnosed pairs of diseases was calculated with the use of terms from the Human Phenotype Ontology. A molecular diagnosis was rendered for 2076 of 7374 patients (28.2%); among these patients, 101 (4.9%) had diagnoses that involved two or more disease loci. We also analyzed parental samples, when available, and found that de novo variants accounted for 67.8% (61 of 90) of pathogenic variants in autosomal dominant disease genes and 51.7% (15 of 29) of pathogenic variants in X-linked disease genes; both variants were de novo in 44.7% (17 of 38) of patients with two monoallelic variants. Causal copy-number variants were found in 12 patients (11.9%) with multiple diagnoses. Phenotypic similarity scores were significantly lower among patients in whom the phenotype resulted from two distinct mendelian disorders that affected different organ systems (50 patients) than among patients with disorders that had overlapping phenotypic features (30 patients) (median score, 0.21 vs. 0.36; P=1.77×10 -7 ). In our study, we found multiple molecular diagnoses in 4.9% of cases in which whole-exome sequencing was informative. Our results show that structured clinical ontologies can be used to determine the degree of overlap between two mendelian diseases in the same patient; the diseases can be distinct or overlapping. Distinct disease phenotypes affect different organ systems, whereas overlapping disease phenotypes are more likely to be caused by two genes encoding proteins that interact within

  6. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-07-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed.

  7. HIV coreceptor phenotyping in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Andrew J; Swenson, Luke C; Harrigan, P Richard

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of CCR5 antagonists increases the options available for constructing antiretroviral regimens. However, this option is coupled with the caveat that patients should be tested for HIV coreceptor tropism prior to initiating CCR5 antagonist-based therapy. Failure to screen for CXCR4 usage increases the risk of using an ineffective drug, thus reducing the likelihood of viral suppression and increasing their risk for developing antiretroviral resistance. This review discusses current and future methods of determining HIV tropism, with a focus on their utility in the clinical setting for screening purposes. Some of these methods include recombinant phenotypic tests, such as the Monogram Trofile assay, as well as genotype-based predictors, heteroduplex tracking assays, and flow cytometry based methods. Currently, the best evidence supports the use of phenotypic methods, although other methods of screening for HIV coreceptor usage prior to the administration of CCR5 antagonists may reduce costs and increase turnaround time over phenotypic methods. The presence of low levels of X4 virus is a challenge to all assay methods, resulting in reduced sensitivity in clinical, patient-derived samples when compared to clonally derived samples. Gaining a better understanding of the output of these assays and correlating them with clinical progression and therapy response will provide some indication on how both genotype-based, and phenotypic assays for determining HIV coreceptor usage can be improved. In addition, leveraging new technologies capable of detecting low-level minority species may provide the most significant advances in ensuring that individuals with low levels of dual/mixed tropic virus are not inadvertently prescribed CCR5 antagonists.

  8. Disease phenotype at diagnosis in pediatric Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bie, Charlotte I; Paerregaard, Anders; Kolacek, Sanja

    2013-01-01

    It has been speculated that pediatric Crohn's disease (CD) is a distinct disease entity, with probably different disease subtypes. We therefore aimed to accurately phenotype newly diagnosed pediatric CD by using the pediatric modification of the Montreal classification, the Paris classification....

  9. Concepts of pathogenesis in psoriatic arthritis: genotype determines clinical phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-05-07

    This review focuses on the genetic features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and their relationship to phenotypic heterogeneity in the disease, and addresses three questions: what do the recent studies on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tell us about the genetic relationship between cutaneous psoriasis (PsO) and PsA - that is, is PsO a unitary phenotype; is PsA a genetically heterogeneous or homogeneous entity; and do the genetic factors implicated in determining susceptibility to PsA predict clinical phenotype? We first discuss the results from comparing the HLA typing of two PsO cohorts: one cohort providing the dermatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsO without evidence of arthritic disease; and the second cohort providing the rheumatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsA. We show that these two cohorts differ considerably in their predominant HLA alleles, indicating the heterogeneity of the overall PsO phenotype. Moreover, the genotype of patients in the PsA cohort was shown to be heterogeneous with significant elevations in the frequency of haplotypes containing HLA-B*08, HLA-C*06:02, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*38 and HLA-B*39. Because different genetic susceptibility genes imply different disease mechanisms, and possibly different clinical courses and therapeutic responses, we then review the evidence for a phenotypic difference among patients with PsA who have inherited different HLA alleles. We provide evidence that different alleles and, more importantly, different haplotypes implicated in determining PsA susceptibility are associated with different phenotypic characteristics that appear to be subphenotypes. The implication of these findings for the overall pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in PsA is discussed with specific reference to their bearing on the discussion of whether PsA is conceptualised as an autoimmune process or one that is based on entheseal responses.

  10. Gaucher Disease: The Metabolic Defect, Pathophysiology, Phenotypes And Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N.; Cohen, Ian J.; Mistry, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), a prototype lysosomal storage disorder, results from inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to biallelic mutations in GBA. The result is widespread accumulation of macrophages engorged with predominantly lysosomal glucocerebroside. A complex multisystem phenotype arises involving the liver, spleen, bone marrow and occasionally the lungs in type 1 Gaucher disease; in neuronopathic fulminant type 2 and chronic type 3 disease there is in addition progressive neurodegenerative disease. Manifestations of Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) include hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, a complex pattern of bone involvement with avascular osteonecrosis (AVN), osteoporosis, fractures and lytic lesions. Enzyme replacement therapy became the standard of care in 1991, and this has transformed the natural history of GD1. This article reviews the clinical phenotypes of GD, diagnosis, pathophysiology and its natural history. A subsequent chapter discusses the treatment options. PMID:25345088

  11. Factor VII Deficiency: Clinical Phenotype, Genotype and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Siragusa, Sergio; Mariani, Guglielmo

    2017-03-28

    Factor VII deficiency is the most common among rare inherited autosomal recessive bleeding disorders, and is a chameleon disease due to the lack of a direct correlation between plasma levels of coagulation Factor VII and bleeding manifestations. Clinical phenotypes range from asymptomatic condition-even in homozygous subjects-to severe life-threatening bleedings (central nervous system, gastrointestinal bleeding). Prediction of bleeding risk is thus based on multiple parameters that challenge disease management. Spontaneous or surgical bleedings require accurate treatment schedules, and patients at high risk of severe hemorrhages may need prophylaxis from childhood onwards. The aim of the current review is to depict an updated summary of clinical phenotype, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment of inherited Factor VII deficiency.

  12. Two Clinical Phenotypes in Polycythemia Vera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Jerry L.; Considine, Michael; Williams, Donna M.; Talbot, Conover C.; Rogers, Ophelia; Moliterno, Alison R.; Jie, Chunfa; Ochs, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Polycythemia vera is the ultimate phenotypic consequence of the V617F mutation in Janus kinase 2 (encoded by JAK2), but the extent to which this mutation influences the behavior of the involved CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells is unknown. METHODS We analyzed gene expression in CD34+ peripheral-blood cells from 19 patients with polycythemia vera, using oligonucleotide microarray technology after correcting for potential confounding by sex, since the phenotypic features of the disease differ between men and women. RESULTS Men with polycythemia vera had twice as many up-regulated or down-regulated genes as women with polycythemia vera, in a comparison of gene expression in the patients and in healthy persons of the same sex, but there were 102 genes with differential regulation that was concordant in men and women. When these genes were used for class discovery by means of unsupervised hierarchical clustering, the 19 patients could be divided into two groups that did not differ significantly with respect to age, neutrophil JAK2 V617F allele burden, white-cell count, platelet count, or clonal dominance. However, they did differ significantly with respect to disease duration; hemoglobin level; frequency of thromboembolic events, palpable splenomegaly, and splenectomy; chemotherapy exposure; leukemic transformation; and survival. The unsupervised clustering was confirmed by a supervised approach with the use of a top-scoring-pair classifier that segregated the 19 patients into the same two phenotypic groups with 100% accuracy. CONCLUSIONS Removing sex as a potential confounder, we identified an accurate molecular method for classifying patients with polycythemia vera according to disease behavior, independently of their JAK2 V617F allele burden, and identified previously unrecognized molecular pathways in polycythemia vera outside the canonical JAK2 pathway that may be amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:25162887

  13. Dystrophic Cardiomyopathy: Complex Pathobiological Processes to Generate Clinical Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Tsuda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, and X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XL-DCM consist of a unique clinical entity, the dystrophinopathies, which are due to variable mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a common complication of dystrophinopathies, but the onset, progression, and severity of heart disease differ among these subgroups. Extensive molecular genetic studies have been conducted to assess genotype-phenotype correlation in DMD, BMD, and XL-DCM to understand the underlying mechanisms of these diseases, but the results are not always conclusive, suggesting the involvement of complex multi-layers of pathological processes that generate the final clinical phenotype. Dystrophin protein is a part of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC that is localized in skeletal muscles, myocardium, smooth muscles, and neuronal tissues. Diversity of cardiac phenotype in dystrophinopathies suggests multiple layers of pathogenetic mechanisms in forming dystrophic cardiomyopathy. In this review article, we review the complex molecular interactions involving the pathogenesis of dystrophic cardiomyopathy, including primary gene mutations and loss of structural integrity, secondary cellular responses, and certain epigenetic and other factors that modulate gene expressions. Involvement of epigenetic gene regulation appears to lead to specific cardiac phenotypes in dystrophic hearts.

  14. FTLD-TDP with motor neuron disease, visuospatial impairment and a progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome: broadening the clinical phenotype of TDP-43 proteinopathies. A report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmerová Iva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin and TDP-43 positive neuronal inclusions represents a novel entity (FTLD-TDP that may be associated with motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND; involvement of extrapyramidal and other systems has also been reported. Case presentation We present three cases with similar clinical symptoms, including Parkinsonism, supranuclear gaze palsy, visuospatial impairment and a behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, associated with either clinically possible or definite MND. Neuropathological examination revealed hallmarks of FTLD-TDP with major involvement of subcortical and, in particular, mesencephalic structures. These cases differed in onset and progression of clinical manifestations as well as distribution of histopathological changes in the brain and spinal cord. Two cases were sporadic, whereas the third case had a pathological variation in the progranulin gene 102 delC. Conclusions Association of a "progressive supranuclear palsy-like" syndrome with marked visuospatial impairment, motor neuron disease and early behavioral disturbances may represent a clinically distinct phenotype of FTLD-TDP. Our observations further support the concept that TDP-43 proteinopathies represent a spectrum of disorders, where preferential localization of pathogenetic inclusions and neuronal cell loss defines clinical phenotypes ranging from frontotemporal dementia with or without motor neuron disease, to corticobasal syndrome and to a progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome.

  15. Mechanistic phenotypes: an aggregative phenotyping strategy to identify disease mechanisms using GWAS data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Mosley

    Full Text Available A single mutation can alter cellular and global homeostatic mechanisms and give rise to multiple clinical diseases. We hypothesized that these disease mechanisms could be identified using low minor allele frequency (MAF<0.1 non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs associated with "mechanistic phenotypes", comprised of collections of related diagnoses. We studied two mechanistic phenotypes: (1 thrombosis, evaluated in a population of 1,655 African Americans; and (2 four groupings of cancer diagnoses, evaluated in 3,009 white European Americans. We tested associations between nsSNPs represented on GWAS platforms and mechanistic phenotypes ascertained from electronic medical records (EMRs, and sought enrichment in functional ontologies across the top-ranked associations. We used a two-step analytic approach whereby nsSNPs were first sorted by the strength of their association with a phenotype. We tested associations using two reverse genetic models and standard additive and recessive models. In the second step, we employed a hypothesis-free ontological enrichment analysis using the sorted nsSNPs to identify functional mechanisms underlying the diagnoses comprising the mechanistic phenotypes. The thrombosis phenotype was solely associated with ontologies related to blood coagulation (Fisher's p = 0.0001, FDR p = 0.03, driven by the F5, P2RY12 and F2RL2 genes. For the cancer phenotypes, the reverse genetics models were enriched in DNA repair functions (p = 2×10-5, FDR p = 0.03 (POLG/FANCI, SLX4/FANCP, XRCC1, BRCA1, FANCA, CHD1L while the additive model showed enrichment related to chromatid segregation (p = 4×10-6, FDR p = 0.005 (KIF25, PINX1. We were able to replicate nsSNP associations for POLG/FANCI, BRCA1, FANCA and CHD1L in independent data sets. Mechanism-oriented phenotyping using collections of EMR-derived diagnoses can elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms.

  16. A simple algorithm for the identification of clinical COPD phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Paillasseur, Jean-Louis; Janssens, Wim

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify simple rules for allocating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to clinical phenotypes identified by cluster analyses. Data from 2409 COPD patients of French/Belgian COPD cohorts were analysed using cluster analysis resulting in the identification...... of subgroups, for which clinical relevance was determined by comparing 3-year all-cause mortality. Classification and regression trees (CARTs) were used to develop an algorithm for allocating patients to these subgroups. This algorithm was tested in 3651 patients from the COPD Cohorts Collaborative...... International Assessment (3CIA) initiative. Cluster analysis identified five subgroups of COPD patients with different clinical characteristics (especially regarding severity of respiratory disease and the presence of cardiovascular comorbidities and diabetes). The CART-based algorithm indicated...

  17. Cardiac Phenotype of Prehypertrophic Fabry Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Sabrina; Kozor, Rebecca; Baig, Shanat; Abdel-Gadir, Amna; Medina-Menacho, Katia; Rosmini, Stefania; Captur, Gabriella; Tchan, Michel; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn; Murphy, Elaine; Lachmann, Robin; Ramaswami, Uma; Edwards, Nicola C; Hughes, Derralynn; Steeds, Richard P; Moon, James C

    2018-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare and treatable X-linked lysosomal storage disorder. Cardiac involvement determines outcomes; therefore, detecting early changes is important. Native T1 by cardiovascular magnetic resonance is low, reflecting sphingolipid storage. Early phenotype development is familiar in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy but unexplored in FD. We explored the prehypertrophic cardiac phenotype of FD and the role of storage. A prospective, international multicenter observational study of 100 left ventricular hypertrophy-negative FD patients (mean age: 39±15 years; 19% male) and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (mean age: 40±14 years; 25% male) who underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance, including native T1 and late gadolinium enhancement, and 12-lead ECG. In FD, 41% had a low native T1 using a single septal region of interest, but this increased to 59% using a second slice because early native T1 lowering was patchy. ECG abnormalities were present in 41% and twice as common with low native T1 (53% versus 24%; P =0.005). When native T1 was low, left ventricular maximum wall thickness, indexed mass, and ejection fraction were higher (maximum wall thickness 9±1.5 versus 8±1.4 mm, P gadolinium enhancement was more likely when native T1 was low (27% versus 6%; P =0.01). FD had higher maximal apical fractal dimensions compared with healthy volunteers (1.27±0.06 versus 1.24±0.04; P <0.005) and longer anterior mitral valve leaflets (23±2 mm versus 21±3 mm; P <0.005). There is a detectable prehypertrophic phenotype in FD consisting of storage (low native T1), structural, functional, and ECG changes. © 2018 The Authors.

  18. Stargardt disease: towards developing a model to predict phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathfield, Laura; Lacerda, Miguel; Nossek, Christel; Roberts, Lisa; Ramesar, Rajkumar S

    2013-10-01

    Stargardt disease is an ABCA4-associated retinopathy, which generally follows an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern and is a frequent cause of macular degeneration in childhood. ABCA4 displays significant allelic heterogeneity whereby different mutations can cause retinal diseases with varying severity and age of onset. A genotype-phenotype model has been proposed linking ABCA4 mutations, purported ABCA4 functional protein activity and severity of disease, as measured by degree of visual loss and the age of onset. It has, however, been difficult to verify this model statistically in observational studies, as the number of individuals sharing any particular mutation combination is typically low. Seven founder mutations have been identified in a large number of Caucasian Afrikaner patients in South Africa, making it possible to test the genotype-phenotype model. A generalised linear model was developed to predict and assess the relative pathogenic contribution of the seven mutations to the age of onset of Stargardt disease. It is shown that the pathogenicity of an individual mutation can differ significantly depending on the genetic context in which it occurs. The results reported here may be used to identify suitable candidates for inclusion in clinical trials, as well as guide the genetic counselling of affected individuals and families.

  19. PhenoLines: Phenotype Comparison Visualizations for Disease Subtyping via Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Michael; Naeini, Mahdi Pakdaman; Doshi-Velez, Finale; Chevalier, Fanny; Khan, Azam; Wigdor, Daniel; Brudno, Michael

    2018-01-01

    PhenoLines is a visual analysis tool for the interpretation of disease subtypes, derived from the application of topic models to clinical data. Topic models enable one to mine cross-sectional patient comorbidity data (e.g., electronic health records) and construct disease subtypes-each with its own temporally evolving prevalence and co-occurrence of phenotypes-without requiring aligned longitudinal phenotype data for all patients. However, the dimensionality of topic models makes interpretation challenging, and de facto analyses provide little intuition regarding phenotype relevance or phenotype interrelationships. PhenoLines enables one to compare phenotype prevalence within and across disease subtype topics, thus supporting subtype characterization, a task that involves identifying a proposed subtype's dominant phenotypes, ages of effect, and clinical validity. We contribute a data transformation workflow that employs the Human Phenotype Ontology to hierarchically organize phenotypes and aggregate the evolving probabilities produced by topic models. We introduce a novel measure of phenotype relevance that can be used to simplify the resulting topology. The design of PhenoLines was motivated by formative interviews with machine learning and clinical experts. We describe the collaborative design process, distill high-level tasks, and report on initial evaluations with machine learning experts and a medical domain expert. These results suggest that PhenoLines demonstrates promising approaches to support the characterization and optimization of topic models.

  20. The phenotypic spectrum of organic acidurias and urea cycle disorders. Part 2: the evolving clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölker, Stefan; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Burlina, Alberto B; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Wijburg, Frits A; Teles, Elisa Leão; Zeman, Jiri; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Barić, Ivo; Karall, Daniela; Arnoux, Jean-Baptiste; Avram, Paula; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Blasco-Alonso, Javier; Boy, S P Nikolas; Rasmussen, Marlene Bøgehus; Burgard, Peter; Chabrol, Brigitte; Chakrapani, Anupam; Chapman, Kimberly; Cortès I Saladelafont, Elisenda; Couce, Maria L; de Meirleir, Linda; Dobbelaere, Dries; Furlan, Francesca; Gleich, Florian; González, Maria Julieta; Gradowska, Wanda; Grünewald, Stephanie; Honzik, Tomas; Hörster, Friederike; Ioannou, Hariklea; Jalan, Anil; Häberle, Johannes; Haege, Gisela; Langereis, Eveline; de Lonlay, Pascale; Martinelli, Diego; Matsumoto, Shirou; Mühlhausen, Chris; Murphy, Elaine; de Baulny, Hélène Ogier; Ortez, Carlos; Pedrón, Consuelo C; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Pena-Quintana, Luis; Ramadža, Danijela Petković; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Sokal, Etienne; Summar, Marshall L; Thompson, Nicholas; Vara, Roshni; Pinera, Inmaculada Vives; Walter, John H; Williams, Monique; Lund, Allan M; Garcia-Cazorla, Angeles; Garcia Cazorla, Angeles

    2015-11-01

    The disease course and long-term outcome of patients with organic acidurias (OAD) and urea cycle disorders (UCD) are incompletely understood. To evaluate the complex clinical phenotype of OAD and UCD patients at different ages. Acquired microcephaly and movement disorders were common in OAD and UCD highlighting that the brain is the major organ involved in these diseases. Cardiomyopathy [methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic aciduria (PA)], prolonged QTc interval (PA), optic nerve atrophy [MMA, isovaleric aciduria (IVA)], pancytopenia (PA), and macrocephaly [glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1)] were exclusively found in OAD patients, whereas hepatic involvement was more frequent in UCD patients, in particular in argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) deficiency. Chronic renal failure was often found in MMA, with highest frequency in mut(0) patients. Unexpectedly, chronic renal failure was also observed in adolescent and adult patients with GA1 and ASL deficiency. It had a similar frequency in patients with or without a movement disorder suggesting different pathophysiology. Thirteen patients (classic OAD: 3, UCD: 10) died during the study interval, ten of them during the initial metabolic crisis in the newborn period. Male patients with late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency were presumably overrepresented in the study population. Neurologic impairment is common in OAD and UCD, whereas the involvement of other organs (heart, liver, kidneys, eyes) follows a disease-specific pattern. The identification of unexpected chronic renal failure in GA1 and ASL deficiency emphasizes the importance of a systematic follow-up in patients with rare diseases.

  1. Phenotypic Progression of Stargardt Disease in a Large Consanguineous Tunisian Family Harboring New ABCA4 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousra Falfoul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the progression of Stargardt (STGD disease over nine years in two branches of a large consanguineous Tunisian family. Initially, different phenotypes were observed with clinical intra- and interfamilial variations. At presentation, four different retinal phenotypes were observed. In phenotype 1, bull’s eye maculopathy and slight alteration of photopic responses in full-field electroretinography were observed in the youngest child. In phenotype 2, macular atrophy and yellow white were observed in two brothers. In phenotype 3, diffuse macular, peripapillary, and peripheral RPE atrophy and hyperfluorescent dots were observed in two sisters. In phenotype 4, Stargardt disease-fundus flavimaculatus phenotype was observed in two cousins with later age of onset. After a progression of 9 years, all seven patients displayed the same phenotype 3 with advanced stage STGD and diffuse atrophy. WES and MLPA identified two ABCA4 mutations M1: c.[(?_4635_(5714+?dup; (?_6148_(6479_+? del] and M2: c.[2041C>T], p.[R681∗]. In one branch, the three affected patients had M1/M1 causal mutations and in the other branch the two affected patients had M1/M2 causal mutations. After 9-year follow-up, all patients showed the same phenotypic evolution, confirming the progressive nature of the disease. Genetic variations in the two branches made no difference to similar end-stage disease.

  2. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A; Brunner, Han G; Burke, Christopher J; Carr, Ian M; Carvalho, Daniel R; Chandler, Kate E; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C; Cowan, Frances M; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De Laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G M; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C J; Hayward, Bruce E; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D; Kingston, Helen M; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Kornberg, Andrew J; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles M; Lyall, E G Hermione; Lynch, Sally A; Lyons, Michael J; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B; Mewasingh, Leena D; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K; Ostergaard, John R; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A; Corcoles, C Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B P; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N A; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S H; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L; Willemsen, Michel A A; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2007-10-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation-positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified.

  3. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  4. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weismueller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Faerkkilae, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew L.; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; de Valle, Maria Benito; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. METHODS: We

  5. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weismuller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J.; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Farkkila, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; Benito de Valle, Maria; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    2017-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. We performed a retrospective

  6. Clinical phenotype analysis of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wo-tu TIAN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD is a disorder characterized by recurrent and brief dystonic or choreoathetoid attacks that are induced by sudden voluntary movement with highly clinical and genetic heterogeneity. We aimed to investigate the clinical features of PKD in a large Chinese population. Methods One hundred and ninety five patients diagnosed as primary PKD were recruited. For all of the participants, neurological examinations were conducted and clinical manifestations were recorded and summarized in self - made uniform registration form for PKD patients. Clinical characteristics were statistically analyzed and compared between familial and sporadic PKD patients.  Results Among all of the 195 PKD patients in the present study, the gender ratio was 4.42∶1 (male∶ female. The average age of onset was (12.32 ± 3.49 years. There were 162 patients (83.08% manifestated with pure form and 33 (16.92% with complicated form of PKD. Among them 16 patients (8.21% had essential tremor (ET, and 144 patients (73.85% had premonitory symptom. The percentage of patients manifested as dystonia, chorea and mixed form during episodic attacks were 68.72% (134/195, 4.10% (8/195 and 27.18% (53/195 repectively. There were 134 cases (68.72% had facial involvement. It was recorded that 115 (58.97%, 54 (27.69% and 26 (13.33% patients had frequency of attack < 10 times/d, 10-20 times/d and > 20-30 times/d respectively. The percentages of patients whose duration of attack <10 s, 10-30 s and > 30-60 s were 60% (117/195, 29.74% (58/195 and 10.26% (20/195 respectively. There were 64 patietns (32.82% with family history of PKD and 131 (67.18% were sporadic PKD patients. Up to 40% (78/195 of patients did not require/take medications, as they had minor clinical manifestations or concerns about the side effects of anticonvulsants. Among 117 patients (60% prescribed with anticonvulsants, 114 patients showed a good response, including complete control (N

  7. X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism: Clinical Phenotype, Genetics and Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L. Rosales

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical phenotype of X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism (XDP is typically one that involves a Filipino adult male whose ancestry is mostly traced in the Philippine island of Panay. Dystonia usually starts focally in the lower limbs or oromandibular regions, then spreads to become generalized eventually. Parkinsonism sets in later into the disease and usually in combination with dystonia. /DYT3/ and /TAF1/ are the two genes associated with XDP. An SVA retrotransposon insertion in an intron of /TAF1/ may reduce neuron-specific expression of the /TAF1/ isoform in the caudate nucleus, and subsequently interfere with the transcription of many neuronal genes. Polypharmacy with oral benzodiazepines, anticholinergic agents and muscle relaxants leaves much to be desired in terms of efficacy. The medications to date that may appear beneficial, especially in disabling dystonias, are zolpidem, muscle afferent block with lidocaine-ethanol and botulinum toxin type A. Despite the few cases undergoing deep brain stimulation, this functional surgery has shown the greatest promise in XDP. An illustrative case of XDP in a family depicts the variable course of illness, including a bout of “status dystonicus,” challenges in therapy, reckoning with the social impact of the disease, and eventual patient demise. Indeed, there remains some gaps in understanding some phenomenological, genetic and treatment aspects of XDP, the areas upon which future research directions may be worthwhile.

  8. Milder clinical and biochemical phenotypes associated with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant in cobalamin C disease: Implications for management and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almannai, Mohammed; Marom, Ronit; Divin, Kristian; Scaglia, Fernando; Sutton, V Reid; Craigen, William J; Lee, Brendan; Burrage, Lindsay C; Graham, Brett H

    2017-09-01

    Cobalamin C disease is a multisystemic disease with variable manifestations and age of onset. Genotype-phenotype correlations are well-recognized in this disorder. Here, we present a large cohort of individuals with cobalamin C disease, several of whom are heterozygous for the c.482G>A pathogenic variant (p.Arg161Gln). We compared clinical characteristics of individuals with this pathogenic variant to those who do not have this variant. To our knowledge, this study represents the largest single cohort of individuals with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant. A retrospective chart review of 27 individuals from 21 families with cobalamin C disease who are followed at our facility was conducted. 13 individuals (48%) are compound heterozygous with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) on one allele and a second pathogenic variant on the other allele. Individuals with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant had later onset of symptoms and easier metabolic control. Moreover, they had milder biochemical abnormalities at presentation which likely contributed to the observation that 4 individuals (31%) in this group were missed by newborn screening. The c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant is associated with milder disease. These individuals may not receive a timely diagnosis as they may not be identified on newborn screening or because of unrecognized, late onset symptoms. Despite the milder presentation, significant complications can occur, especially if treatment is delayed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Systems Approach to Refine Disease Taxonomy by Integrating Phenotypic and Molecular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The International Classification of Diseases (ICD relies on clinical features and lags behind the current understanding of the molecular specificity of disease pathobiology, necessitating approaches that incorporate growing biomedical data for classifying diseases to meet the needs of precision medicine. Our analysis revealed that the heterogeneous molecular diversity of disease chapters and the blurred boundary between disease categories in ICD should be further investigated. Here, we propose a new classification of diseases (NCD by developing an algorithm that predicts the additional categories of a disease by integrating multiple networks consisting of disease phenotypes and their molecular profiles. With statistical validations from phenotype-genotype associations and interactome networks, we demonstrate that NCD improves disease specificity owing to its overlapping categories and polyhierarchical structure. Furthermore, NCD captures the molecular diversity of diseases and defines clearer boundaries in terms of both phenotypic similarity and molecular associations, establishing a rational strategy to reform disease taxonomy. Keywords: Disease taxonomy, Network medicine, Disease phenotypes, Molecular profiles, Precision medicine

  10. Genotype-phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J; Larovere, Laura E; Yamada, Yasukazu; Nguyen, Khue V; Hegde, Madhuri; Visser, Jasper E; Schretlen, David J; Nyhan, William L; Puig, Juan G; O'Neill, Patrick J; Jinnah, H A

    2014-05-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype-phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is caused by a wide variety of mutations in the HPRT1 gene. The gene encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism. The fine structure of enzyme has been established by crystallography studies, and its function can be measured with very precise biochemical assays. This rich knowledge of genetic alterations in the gene and their functional effect on its protein product provides a powerful model for exploring factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. The present study summarizes 615 known genetic mutations, their influence on the gene product, and their relationship to the clinical phenotype. In general, the results are compatible with the concept that the overall severity of the disease depends on how mutations ultimately influence enzyme activity. However, careful evaluation of exceptions to this concept point to several additional genetic and non-genetic factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. These factors are not unique to Lesch-Nyhan disease, and are relevant to most other genetic diseases. The disease therefore serves as a valuable model for understanding the challenges associated with establishing genotype-phenotype correlations for other disorders.

  11. Urea Cycle Defects: Early-Onset Disease Associated with A208T Mutation in OTC Gene-Expanding the Clinical Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ana Isabel; Rincón, Alejandra; García, Mary; Suárez-Obando, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OMIM: 311250) is the most common disorder of urea cycle disorders, accounting for nearly 50% of all cases. We report a case of a two-month- old male patient, who attends our medical genetics consultation because of low citrulline levels and elevated glutamine to citrulline ratio detected by expanded newborn screening with tandem mass spectrometry. He is an asymptomatic male with a normal physical examination and appropriate neurodevelopmental milestones. The patient has a family history of one older brother who died at 18 months old from severe and sudden hyperammonemia and a maternal aunt who suddenly died at two years old. He had high plasma ammonium concentration and a confirmed OTC mutation (p.A208T). Usually, this mutation causes OTC deficiency of late onset in adult males. However, this report raises awareness about mutations previously described as a late-onset causing disease, which can cause severe hyperammonemia and high risk of dying at an early age.

  12. Epilepsy phenotypes in siblings with Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihisa; Arai, Eisuke; Kitamura, Yuri; Abe, Shinpei; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Fujimaki, Takuro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Norrie disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is characterized by congenital blindness. Although epileptic seizures are observed in some patients with Norrie disease, little is known about this phenomenon. Here, we report the manifestation of epilepsy in siblings with Norrie disease to increase our knowledge of epilepsy in this condition. Three brothers with congenital blindness were diagnosed with Norrie disease after genetic analyses indicated the deletion of exon 2 of the NDP gene. The eldest brother had suffered from epileptic seizures since the age of 11years, and his seizures were resistant to antiepileptic drugs. Although the second brother had no epileptic seizures, the youngest sibling had experiences epileptic seizures since the age of 8years. His seizures were controlled using lamotrigine and levetiracetam. An electroencephalography (EEG) revealed epileptiform discharges in the occipital areas in all three brothers. A study of these patients will increase our knowledge of epilepsy in patients with Norrie disease. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Differences in phenotype and disease course in adult and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Bartek, Jiri; Wewer, Anne Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have compared phenotype and disease course in children and adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim To compare phenotype, treatment and disease course in children (<15 years) and adults (=18 years) with IBD. Methods Two population-based cohorts comprising paediatri...

  14. Urea Cycle Defects: Early-Onset Disease Associated with A208T Mutation in OTC Gene—Expanding the Clinical Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OMIM: 311250 is the most common disorder of urea cycle disorders, accounting for nearly 50% of all cases. We report a case of a two-month- old male patient, who attends our medical genetics consultation because of low citrulline levels and elevated glutamine to citrulline ratio detected by expanded newborn screening with tandem mass spectrometry. He is an asymptomatic male with a normal physical examination and appropriate neurodevelopmental milestones. The patient has a family history of one older brother who died at 18 months old from severe and sudden hyperammonemia and a maternal aunt who suddenly died at two years old. He had high plasma ammonium concentration and a confirmed OTC mutation (p.A208T. Usually, this mutation causes OTC deficiency of late onset in adult males. However, this report raises awareness about mutations previously described as a late-onset causing disease, which can cause severe hyperammonemia and high risk of dying at an early age.

  15. Prevalence of comorbidities according to predominant phenotype and severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camiciottoli G

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gianna Camiciottoli,1,2 Francesca Bigazzi,1 Chiara Magni,1 Viola Bonti,1 Stefano Diciotti,3 Maurizio Bartolucci,4 Mario Mascalchi,5 Massimo Pistolesi1 1Section of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, 3Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi,” University of Bologna, Cesena, 4Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Careggi University Hospital, 5Radiodiagnostic Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Background: In addition to lung involvement, several other diseases and syndromes coexist in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence of idiopathic arterial hypertension (IAH, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease (PVD, diabetes, osteoporosis, and anxious depressive syndrome in a clinical setting of COPD outpatients whose phenotypes (predominant airway disease and predominant emphysema and severity (mild and severe diseases were determined by clinical and functional parameters. Methods: A total of 412 outpatients with COPD were assigned either a predominant airway disease or a predominant emphysema phenotype of mild or severe degree according to predictive models based on pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/vital capacity; total lung capacity %; functional residual capacity %; and diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide % and sputum characteristics. Comorbidities were assessed by objective medical records. Results: Eighty-four percent of patients suffered from at least one comorbidity and 75% from at least one cardiovascular comorbidity, with IAH and PVD being the most prevalent ones (62% and 28%, respectively. IAH prevailed significantly in predominant airway disease, osteoporosis prevailed

  16. Gaucher disease: molecular heterogeneity and phenotype-genotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theophilus, B; Latham, T; Grabowski, G A; Smith, F I

    1989-08-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is the most prevalent lysosomal storage disease. This autosomal recessive trait results from the defective activity of acid beta-glucosidase (beta-Glc). Four different exonic point mutations have been identified as causal alleles for GD. To facilitate screening for these alleles, assays were developed using allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization to amplified genomic DNA sequences. Specifically, intron bases flanking exons 5, 9, and 10 were determined, and conditions for PCR amplification of these exons were obtained. Two different procedures were developed to distinguish signals obtained from the structural beta-Glc gene exons and those from the pseudogene. These procedures were used to determine the distribution of all known GD alleles in a population of 44 affected patients of varying phenotypes and ethnicity. The high frequency of one of the exon 9 mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish GD type 1 patients was confirmed, and, in addition, this mutation was present in ethnically diverse non-Jewish type 1 GD patients. Homozygotes (N = 5) for this allele were midly affected older individuals, and this mutant allele was not found in any patient with neuronopathic disease. The exon 10 mutation was confirmed as the predominant allele in types 2 and 3 GD. However, several type 1 GD patients, including one of Ashkenazi-Jewish heritage, also were heterozygous for this allele. The presence of this allele in type 1 patients did not correlate with the severity of clinical symptoms. The second exon 9 mutation and the exon 5 mutation were rare, since they occurred only heterozygously either in one type 2 GD patient or in two related Ashkenazi-Jewish GD patients, respectively. Although most GD patients (38 of 44) had at least one of the known mutant alleles, 57% were heterozygotes for only one of these mutations. Fourteen percent of patients were negative for all mutations. A total of 73% of GD patients had at least one unknown allele. The varying clinical

  17. Stargardt disease: towards developing a model to predict phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Heathfield, Laura; Lacerda, Miguel; Nossek, Christel; Roberts, Lisa; Ramesar, Rajkumar S

    2013-01-01

    Stargardt disease is an ABCA4-associated retinopathy, which generally follows an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern and is a frequent cause of macular degeneration in childhood. ABCA4 displays significant allelic heterogeneity whereby different mutations can cause retinal diseases with varying severity and age of onset. A genotype–phenotype model has been proposed linking ABCA4 mutations, purported ABCA4 functional protein activity and severity of disease, as measured by degree of visual...

  18. Expanded clinical phenotype of women with the FMR1 premutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Sarah M; Cook, Kylee; Tartaglia, Nicole; Tassone, Flora; Nguyen, Danh V; Pan, Ruiqin; Bronsky, Hannah E; Yuhas, Jennifer; Borodyanskaya, Mariya; Grigsby, Jim; Doerflinger, Melanie; Hagerman, Paul J; Hagerman, Randi J

    2008-04-15

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is generally considered to be uncommon in older female carriers of premutation alleles (55-200 CGG repeats) of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene; however, neither prevalence, nor the nature of the clinical phenotype, has been well characterized in female carriers. In this study, we evaluated 146 female carriers (mean, 42.3 years; range, 20-75 years) with and without core features of FXTAS (tremor; gait ataxia), and 69 age-matched controls (mean, 45.8 years; range, 21-78 years). Compared with controls, carriers with definite or probable FXTAS had greater medical co-morbidity, with increased prevalence of thyroid disease (P = 0.0096), hypertension (P = 0.0020), seizures (P = 0.0077), peripheral neuropathy (P = 0.0040), and fibromyalgia (P = 0.0097), in addition to the typical symptoms of FXTAS-tremor (P < 0.0001) and ataxia (P < 0.0001). The non-FXTAS premutation group had more complaints of chronic muscle pain (P = 0.0097), persistent paraesthesias in extremities (P < 0.0001), and history of tremor (P < 0.0123) than controls. The spectrum of clinical involvement in female carriers with FXTAS is quite broad, encompassing a number of medical co-morbidities as well as the core movement disorder. The remarkable degree of thyroid dysfunction (17% in the non-FXTAS group and 50% in the FXTAS group) warrants consideration of thyroid function studies in all female premutation carriers, particularly those with core features of FXTAS. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Prediction of disease and phenotype associations from genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Lewis

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS have proven useful as a method for identifying genetic variations associated with diseases. In this study, we analyzed GWAS data for 61 diseases and phenotypes to elucidate common associations based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. The study was an expansion on a previous study on identifying disease associations via data from a single GWAS on seven diseases.Adjustments to the originally reported study included expansion of the SNP dataset using Linkage Disequilibrium (LD and refinement of the four levels of analysis to encompass SNP, SNP block, gene, and pathway level comparisons. A pair-wise comparison between diseases and phenotypes was performed at each level and the Jaccard similarity index was used to measure the degree of association between two diseases/phenotypes. Disease relatedness networks (DRNs were used to visualize our results. We saw predominant relatedness between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis for the first three levels of analysis. Expected relatedness was also seen between lipid- and blood-related traits.The predominant associations between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis can be validated by clinical studies. The diseases have been proposed to share a systemic inflammation phenotype that can result in progression of additional diseases in patients with one of these three diseases. We also noticed unexpected relationships between metabolic and neurological diseases at the pathway comparison level. The less significant relationships found between diseases require a more detailed literature review to determine validity of the predictions. The results from this study serve as a first step towards a better understanding of seemingly unrelated diseases and phenotypes with similar symptoms or modes of treatment.

  20. Early-onset stargardt disease: phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertus, S.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Bax, N.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the phenotype and genotype of patients with early-onset Stargardt disease. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-one Stargardt patients with age at onset

  1. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease in type 2 ... Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary artery ... CAD, Group II: 48 type 2DM patients with developed CAD, Group III: 40 age and ...

  2. OligoPVP: Phenotype-driven analysis of individual genomic information to prioritize oligogenic disease variants

    KAUST Repository

    Boudellioua, Imene

    2018-05-02

    Purpose: An increasing number of Mendelian disorders have been identified for which two or more variants in one or more genes are required to cause the disease, or significantly modify its severity or phenotype. It is difficult to discover such interactions using existing approaches. The purpose of our work is to develop and evaluate a system that can identify combinations of variants underlying oligogenic diseases in individual whole exome or whole genome sequences. Methods: Information that links patient phenotypes to databases of gene-phenotype associations observed in clinical research can provide useful information and improve variant prioritization for Mendelian diseases. Additionally, background knowledge about interactions between genes can be utilized to guide and restrict the selection of candidate disease modules. Results: We developed OligoPVP, an algorithm that can be used to identify variants in oligogenic diseases and their interactions, using whole exome or whole genome sequences together with patient phenotypes as input. We demonstrate that OligoPVP has significantly improved performance when compared to state of the art pathogenicity detection methods. Conclusions: Our results show that OligoPVP can efficiently detect oligogenic interactions using a phenotype-driven approach and identify etiologically important variants in whole genomes.

  3. A characteristic phenotypic retinal appearance in Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenser, Kimberly A; Fecko, Alice; Dailey, Wendy; Trese, Michael T

    2007-02-01

    To describe a striking retinal finding that the authors have only seen in Norrie disease eyes and to determine if a particular genotype corresponds to this dramatic presentation. This is a retrospective, interventional case report of four patients seen in the clinic over a 1-year period. All patients had analysis of the Norrie gene by direct sequencing. All patients presented with a similar retinal appearance of dense stalk tissue, globular dystrophic retina, and peripheral avascular retina with pigmentary changes. Each patient was found to have a mutation in the Norrie gene affecting a cystine residue in the cystine knot domain. The mutations are predicted to disrupt the structure of the protein product, norrin, which is required for activation of the Wnt receptor:beta-catenin pathway. No other vitreoretinopathy that the authors have seen demonstrates this characteristic retinal presentation of severe retinal dysplasia. All four patients were found to have mutations in the Norrie gene which alter the cystine knot motif. Mutations affecting this domain appear to have devastating effects on retinal development and indicate phenotype correlates with mutations affecting the cystine knot domain.

  4. Viral phenotype, antiretroviral resistance and clinical evolution in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, M J; Cilleruelo, M J; Ortiz, M; Villota, J; García, M; Perez-Jurado, M L; Barreiro, G; Martín-Fontelos, P; Bernal, A

    1997-11-01

    The syncytium-inducing (SI) viral phenotype and the emergence of viral strains resistant to zidovudine have been described in persons infected with HIV, and in some cases they have been associated with poor prognosis. HIV isolates obtained from 37 HIV-infected children were analyzed to determine whether the SI viral phenotype and the mutation on the 215 position of the reverse transcriptase (M215) could be used as markers of disease progression. We performed peripheral blood coculture mononuclear cells, and we analyzed the induction of syncytia using the MT-2 cell line. The emergence of mutations on the 215 position was determined by PCR. We found a statistically significant association (P < 0.05) between SI viral phenotype and (1) recurrent serious bacterial infections, (2) absolute CD4+ cell counts <2 SD, (3) progression to AIDS and (4) death. Sixty percent of the children treated with zidovudine developed 215 mutant viral strains without statistically significant association with clinical or immunologic findings. The SI viral phenotype was statistically associated with the presence of the 215 mutation (P < 0.05). SI viral phenotype is a marker associated with a poor clinical and immunologic progression of the disease and it may facilitate the emergence of mutant strains in children treated with zidovudine.

  5. COACH CV: The Seven Clinical Phenotypes of Concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Craton

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diverse physiological manifestations of concussion is changing rapidly. This has an influence on the clinical assessment of patients who have sustained a concussion. The 2017 Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport states that numerous post-injury clinical findings, such as cognitive deficits, post-traumatic headaches, dizziness, difficulties with oculomotor function, and depression have all been associated with a poorer prognosis in concussed patients. This demonstrates that there are several potential clinical manifestations after head injury warranting clinical evaluation. We have developed an acronym to guide the office-based assessment of concussed patients to consider each of the potential clinical phenotypes. “COACH CV” prompts the clinician to evaluate for cognitive problems, oculomotor dysfunction, affective disturbances, cervical spine disorders, headaches, and cardiovascular and vestibular anomalies.

  6. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Shamim Saleha; Muhammad Ajmal; Muhammad Jamil

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. METHODS: A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH). To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype...

  7. Clinical features of Friedreich's ataxia: classical and atypical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Michael H; Boesch, Sylvia; Nachbauer, Wolfgang; Mariotti, Caterina; Giunti, Paola

    2013-08-01

    One hundred and fifty years since Nikolaus Friedreich's first description of the degenerative ataxic syndrome which bears his name, his description remains at the core of the classical clinical phenotype of gait and limb ataxia, poor balance and coordination, leg weakness, sensory loss, areflexia, impaired walking, dysarthria, dysphagia, eye movement abnormalities, scoliosis, foot deformities, cardiomyopathy and diabetes. Onset is typically around puberty with slow progression and shortened life-span often related to cardiac complications. Inheritance is autosomal recessive with the vast majority of cases showing an unstable intronic GAA expansion in both alleles of the frataxin gene on chromosome 9q13. A small number of cases are caused by a compound heterozygous expansion with a point mutation or deletion. Understanding of the underlying molecular biology has enabled identification of atypical phenotypes with late onset, or atypical features such as retained reflexes. Late-onset cases tend to have slower progression and are associated with smaller GAA expansions. Early-onset cases tend to have more rapid progression and a higher frequency of non-neurological features such as diabetes, cardiomyopathy, scoliosis and pes cavus. Compound heterozygotes, including those with large deletions, often have atypical features. In this paper, we review the classical and atypical clinical phenotypes of Friedreich's ataxia. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Identification of extreme motor phenotypes in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braisch, Ulrike; Hay, Birgit; Muche, Rainer; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Long, Jeffrey D; Orth, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The manifestation of motor signs in Huntington's disease (HD) has a well-known inverse relationship with HTT CAG repeat length, but the prediction is far from perfect. The probability of finding disease modifiers is enhanced in individuals with extreme HD phenotypes. We aimed to identify extreme HD motor phenotypes conditional on CAG and age, such as patients with very early or very late onset of motor manifestation. Retrospective data were available from 1,218 healthy controls and 9,743 HD participants with CAG repeats ≥40, and a total of about 30,000 visits. Boundaries (2.5% and 97.5% quantiles) for extreme motor phenotypes (UHDRS total motor score (TMS) and motor age-at-onset) were estimated using quantile regression for longitudinal data. More than 15% of HD participants had an extreme TMS phenotype for at least one visit. In contrast, only about 4% of participants were consistent TMS extremes at two or more visits. Data from healthy controls revealed an upper cut-off of 13 for the TMS representing the extreme of motor ratings for a normal aging population. In HD, boundaries of motor age-at-onset based on diagnostic confidence or derived from the TMS data cut-off in controls were similar. In summary, a UHDRS TMS of more than 13 in an individual carrying the HD mutation indicates a high likelihood of motor manifestations of HD irrespective of CAG repeat length or age. The identification of motor phenotype extremes can be useful in the search for disease modifiers, for example, genetic or environmental such as medication. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells...... chimeras are hyperexcitable. Conversely, normal glia can ameliorate disease phenotype in transgenic HD mice, as striatal transplantation of normal glia rescues aspects of electrophysiological and behavioural phenotype, restores interstitial potassium homeostasis, slows disease progression and extends...

  10. Effect of phenotype on health care costs in Crohn's disease: A European study using the Montreal classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odes, Selwyn; Vardi, Hillel; Friger, Michael; Wolters, Frank; Hoie, Ole; Moum, Bjørn; Bernklev, Tomm; Yona, Hagit; Russel, Maurice; Munkholm, Pia; Langholz, Ebbe; Riis, Lene; Politi, Patrizia; Bondini, Paolo; Tsianos, Epameinondas; Katsanos, Kostas; Clofent, Juan; Vermeire, Severine; Freitas, João; Mouzas, Iannis; Limonard, Charles; O'Morain, Colm; Monteiro, Estela; Fornaciari, Giovanni; Vatn, Morten; Stockbrugger, Reinhold

    2007-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract associated with life-long high health care costs. We aimed to determine the effect of disease phenotype on cost. Clinical and economic data of a community-based CD cohort with 10-year follow-up were analyzed retrospectively in relation to Montreal classification phenotypes. In 418 patients, mean total costs of health care for the behavior phenotypes were: nonstricturing-nonpenetrating 1690, stricturing 2081, penetrating 3133 and penetrating-with-perianal-fistula 3356 €/patient-phenotype-year (P<0.001), and mean costs of surgical hospitalization 215, 751, 1293 and 1275 €/patient-phenotype-year respectively (P<0.001). Penetrating-with-perianal-fistula patients incurred significantly greater expenses than penetrating patients for total care, diagnosis and drugs, but not surgical hospitalization. Total costs were similar in the location phenotypes: ileum 1893, colon 1748, ileo-colonic 2010 and upper gastrointestinal tract 1758 €/patient-phenotype-year, but surgical hospitalization costs differed significantly, 558, 209, 492 and 542 €/patient-phenotype-year respectively (P<0.001). By multivariate analysis, the behavior phenotype significantly impacted total, medical and surgical hospitalization costs, whereas the location phenotype affected only surgical costs. Younger age at diagnosis predicted greater surgical expenses. Behavior is the dominant phenotype driving health care cost. Use of the Montreal classification permits detection of cost differences caused by perianal fistula.

  11. Clinical phenotype of 5 females with a CDKL5 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, Xenia L; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Yntema, Helger G; Verrips, Aad

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin dependent kinase like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been reported in approximately 80 patients since the first description in 2003. The clinical presentation partly corresponds with Rett syndrome, considering clinical features as intellectual disability, hypotonia, and poor visual, language, and motor development. However, these patients do not meet the consensus criteria for Rett syndrome since they lack the clear period of regression. Furthermore, in contrast to Rett syndrome, patients with CDKL5 mutations, have seizures or infantile spasms starting in the first weeks of life. We present clinical phenotype of 5 girls having a mutation in the CDKL5 gene. All mutations are novel and are pathogenic since they either lead to a frameshift in the reading frame or affect a consensus splice site. Four of the mutations are detected de novo in the affected girl.

  12. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camiciottoli G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gianna Camiciottoli,1 Stefano Diciotti,2 Francesca Bigazzi,1 Simone Lombardo,3 Maurizio Bartolucci,4 Matteo Paoletti,1 Mario Mascalchi,3 Massimo Pistolesi1 1Section of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi,” University of Bologna, Cesena, Italy; 3Radiodiagnostic Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 4Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Abstract: A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory–expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28 and in females (n=27. Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10 showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory–expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second, and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Shared Mechanistic and Phenotypic Traits Suggest Overlapping Disease Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, Francisco; Doyle, Tracy J; Fletcher, Elaine A; Ascherman, Dana P; Rosas, Ivan O

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of clinically evident interstitial lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is approximately 10%. An additional 33% of undiagnosed patients have interstitial lung abnormalities that can be detected with high-resolution computed tomography. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease patients have three times the risk of death compared to those with rheumatoid arthritis occurring in the absence of interstitial lung disease, and the mortality related to interstitial lung disease is rising. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease is most commonly classified as the usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, overlapping mechanistically and phenotypically with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but can occur in a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, mainly nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Based on this, we propose two possible pathways to explain the coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease: (i) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may come about when an immune response against citrullinated peptides taking place in another site (e.g. the joints) subsequently affects the lungs; (ii) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may represent a disease process in which idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis-like pathology triggers an immune response against citrullinated proteins that promotes articular disease indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. More studies focused on elucidating the basic mechanisms leading to different sub-phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease and the overlap with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are necessary to improve our understanding of the disease process and to define new therapeutic targets.

  14. Variation in clinical phenotype of human infection among genetic groups of Blastomyces dermatitidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meece, Jennifer K.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Gruszka, Sarah; Sloss, Brian L.; Sullivan, Bradley; Reed, Kurt D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Blastomyces dermatitidis, the etiologic agent of blastomycosis, has 2 genetic groups and shows varied clinical presentation, ranging from silent infections to fulminant respiratory disease and dissemination. The objective of this study was to determine whether clinical phenotype and outcomes vary based on the infecting organism's genetic group.Methods. We used microsatellites to genotype 227 clinical isolates of B. dermatitidis from Wisconsin patients. For each isolate, corresponding clinical disease characteristics and patient demographic information were abstracted from electronic health records and Wisconsin Division of Health reportable disease forms and questionnaires.Results. In univariate analysis, group 1 isolates were more likely to be associated with pulmonary-only infections (P 1 month (P smoking status (P = .0001) remained predictors for group 2 infections.Conclusions. This study identified previously unknown associations between clinical phenotype of human infection and genetic groups of B. dermatitidis and provides a framework for further investigations of the genetic basis for virulence in B. dermatitidis.

  15. Acute Kidney Injury: Definition, Pathophysiology and Clinical Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos; Spanou, Loukia

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome that complicates the course and worsens the outcome in a significant number of hospitalised patients. Recent advances in clinical and basic research will help with a more accurate definition of this syndrome and in the elucidation of its pathogenesis. With this knowledge we will be able to conduct more accurate epidemiologic studies in an effort to gain a better understanding of the impact of this syndrome. AKI is a syndrome that rarely has a sole and distinct pathophysiology. Recent evidence, in both basic science and clinical research, is beginning to change our view for AKI from a single organ failure syndrome to a syndrome where the kidney plays an active role in the progress of multi-organ dysfunction. Accurate and prompt recognition of AKI and better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the various clinical phenotypes are of great importance to research for effective therapeutic interventions. In this review we provide the most recent updates in the definition, epidemiology and pathophysiology of AKI.

  16. Phenotypic heterogeneity associated with a novel mutation (Gly112Glu) in the Norrie disease protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R C; Russell, S R; Streb, L M; Alsheikheh, A; Stone, E M

    2006-02-01

    To determine the molecular pathology and clinical severity of two pedigrees with a history of early retinal detachment and peripheral retinal vascular abnormalities. Longitudinal cohort study. A longitudinal clinical study and DNA analysis was performed on 49 family members of two pedigrees. Nine individuals were found to be hemizygous for a mutation at codon 112 (Gly112Glu) of the Norrie disease protein (NDP) in one pedigree. Significant phenotypic heterogeneity was found. The proband presented with a unilateral subtotal retinal detachment at the age of 3 years, and subsequently developed a slowly progressive tractional retinal detachment involving the macula in the contralateral eye at the age of 4 years. One individual had only mild peripheral retinal pigmentary changes with normal vision at the age of 79 years. The remaining seven individuals had varying degrees of peripheral retinal vascular abnormalities and anterior segment findings. Seven affected members of a second pedigree affected by a previously reported mutation, Arg74Cys, also demonstrated wide ocular phenotypic variation. A novel mutation (Gly112Glu), which represents the most carboxy located, NDP mutation reported, results in significant phenotypic heterogeneity. These data support the contention that the spectrum of ocular disease severity associated with these NDP mutations is broad. Use of terms that characterize this entity by phenotypic appearance, such as familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, do not adequately communicate the potential spectrum of severity of this disorder to affected or carrier family members.

  17. Genotype-phenotype variations in five Spanish families with Norrie disease or X-linked FEVR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria José; Gimenez-Pardo, Ascension; Garcia-Hoyos, Maria; Cantalapiedra, Diego; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Rodriguez de Alba, Marta; Ramos, Carmen; Ayuso, Carmen

    2005-09-02

    Norrie disease (OMIM 310600) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital blindness in males. Approximately 40 to 50% of the cases develop deafness and mental retardation. X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (XL-FEVR) is a hereditary ocular disorder characterized by a failure of peripheral retinal vascularization. Both X-linked disorders are due to mutations in the NDP gene, which encodes a 133 amino acid protein called Norrin, but autosomal recessive (AR) and autosomal dominant (AD) forms of FEVR have also been described. In this study, we report the molecular findings and the related phenotype in five Spanish families affected with Norrie disease or XL-FEVR due to mutations of the NDP gene. The study was conducted in 45 subjects from five Spanish families. These families were clinically diagnosed with Norrie disease or similar conditions. The three exons of the NDP gene were analyzed by automatic DNA sequencing. Haplotype analyses were also performed. Two new nonsense mutations, apart from other mutations previously described in the NDP gene, were found in those patients affected with ND or X-linked FEVR. An important genotype-phenotype variation was found in relation to the different mutations of the NDP gene. In fact, the same mutation may be responsible for different phenotypes. We speculate that there might be other molecular factors that interact in the retina with Norrin, which contribute to the resultant phenotypes.

  18. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha

    2007-01-01

    complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we...

  19. Clinical phenotype and genetic mutation of one case with head tremor and cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-ming XIE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To make the diagnosis for a patient presented with head tremor and cerebellar atrophy by integrating clinical features and accessory examination with genetic testing and to explore the interpretation of genetic testing results.  Methods A 30-year-old male patient's medical information, clinical pheontype, family history and accessory examinations were collected. The next?generation sequencing (NGS of exons in 3994 causative genes of Mendelian inheritance diseases and the family tree verification were carried out. China Human Phenotype Ontology (CHPO, Phenomizer, Ensembl and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database were used to interpret the genetic test results.  Results The patient carried heterozygous mutation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 19 (SCA19 related KCND3 gene c.1057A > G (p. Ser353Gly, but his parents did not carry this mutation. The patient also carried heterozygous mutation of parkinsonism type 20 (PARK20 related SYNJ1 gene c.4436C > T (p.Thr1479Ile which was also seen in his mother. Phenotypic similarity analysis showed the patient's phenotype was correspond with the phenotype of SCA19, and the variation locus of KCND3 gene c.1057A > G was highly conservative with homologous gene in different species.  Conclusions By means of the integration of clinical phenotype with the result of genetic test, KCND3 gene c.1057A > G (p.Ser353Gly carried in the patient is the pathogenic mutation. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.07.007

  20. Genotypic Diversity Is Associated with Clinical Outcome and Phenotype in Cryptococcal Meningitis across Southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew A Beale

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is a major cause of mortality throughout the developing world, yet little is known about the genetic markers underlying Cryptococcal virulence and patient outcome. We studied a cohort of 230 Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn isolates from HIV-positive South African clinical trial patients with detailed clinical follow-up using multi-locus sequence typing and in vitro phenotypic virulence assays, correlating these data with clinical and fungal markers of disease in the patient. South African Cn displayed high levels of genetic diversity and locus variability compared to globally distributed types, and we identified 50 sequence types grouped within the main molecular types VNI, VNII and VNB, with 72% of isolates typed into one of seven 'high frequency' sequence types. Spatial analysis of patients' cryptococcal genotype was not shown to be clustered geographically, which might argue against recent local acquisition and in favour of reactivation of latent infection. Through comparison of MLST genotyping data with clinical parameters, we found a relationship between genetic lineage and clinical outcome, with patients infected with the VNB lineage having significantly worse survival (n=8, HR 3.35, CI 1.51-7.20, p=0.003, and this was maintained even after adjustment for known prognostic indicators and treatment regimen. Comparison of fungal genotype with in vitro phenotype (phagocytosis, laccase activity and CSF survival performed on a subset of 89 isolates revealed evidence of lineage-associated virulence phenotype, with the VNII lineage displaying increased laccase activity (p=0.001 and ex vivo CSF survival (p=0.0001. These findings show that Cryptococcus neoformans is a phenotypically heterogeneous pathogen, and that lineage plays an important role in cryptococcal virulence during human infection. Furthermore, a detailed understanding of the genetic diversity in Southern Africa will support further investigation into how genetic

  1. CARD15 in inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn's disease phenotypes : An association study and pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenbrug, L. E.; Nolte, I. M.; Oosterom, E.; van der Steege, G.; Meerman, G. J. te; van Dullemen, H. M.; Drenth, J. P. H.; de Jong, D. J.; van der Linde, K.; Jansen, P. L. M.; Kleibeuker, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Three major polymorphisms of the Caspase-Activation Recruitment Domain containing protein 15 gene have been described to be associated with Crohn's disease. Genotype-phenotype studies reported in literature provide conflicting data on disease localisation and behaviour. We investigated

  2. HNF1B-associated clinical phenotypes: the kidney and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockenhauer, Detlef; Jaureguiberry, Graciana

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in HNF1B, the gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β are the most commonly identified genetic cause of renal malformations. HNF1B was first identified as a disease gene for diabetes (MODY5) in 1997, and its involvement in renal disease was subsequently noted through clinical observations in pedigrees affected by MODY5. Since then, a whole spectrum of associated phenotypes have been reported, including genital malformations, autism, epilepsy, gout, hypomagnesaemia, primary hyperparathyroidism, liver and intestinal abnormalities and a rare form of kidney cancer. The most commonly identified mutation, in approximately 50 % of patients, is an entire gene deletion occurring in the context of a 17q12 chromosomal microdeletion that also includes several other genes. Some of the associated phenotypes, especially the neurologic ones, appear to occur only in the context of this microdeletion and thus may not be directly linked to HNF1B. Here we review the spectrum of associated phenotypes and discuss potential implications for clinical management.

  3. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H.V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G.C.M.; Brown, D.L.; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.; Helbig, I.; Hurst, J.A.; Jahn, J.; Jackson, L.G.; Kelly, A.M.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Mansour, S.; Martin, C.L.; Moss, C.; Mumford, A.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Park, S.M.; Riggs, E.R.; Scott, R.H.; Sisodiya, S.; Vooren, S. van der; Wapner, R.J.; Wilkie, A.O.; Wright, C.F.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Leeuw, N. de; Vries, B. de; Washingthon, N.L.; Smith, C.L.; Westerfield, M.; Schofield, P.; Ruef, B.J.; Gkoutos, G.V.; Haendel, M.; Smedley, D.; Lewis, S.E.; Robinson, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have

  4. Disease modeling and phenotypic drug screening for diabetic cardiomyopathy using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawnel, Faye M; Boccardo, Stefano; Prummer, Michael; Delobel, Frédéric; Graff, Alexandra; Weber, Michael; Gérard, Régine; Badi, Laura; Kam-Thong, Tony; Bu, Lei; Jiang, Xin; Hoflack, Jean-Christophe; Kiialainen, Anna; Jeworutzki, Elena; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Burcin, Mark; Gromo, Gianni; Boehringer, Markus; Stahlberg, Henning; Hall, Benjamin J; Magnone, Maria Chiara; Kolaja, Kyle; Chien, Kenneth R; Bailly, Jacques; Iacone, Roberto

    2014-11-06

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a complication of type 2 diabetes, with known contributions of lifestyle and genetics. We develop environmentally and genetically driven in vitro models of the condition using human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes. First, we mimic diabetic clinical chemistry to induce a phenotypic surrogate of diabetic cardiomyopathy, observing structural and functional disarray. Next, we consider genetic effects by deriving cardiomyocytes from two diabetic patients with variable disease progression. The cardiomyopathic phenotype is recapitulated in the patient-specific cells basally, with a severity dependent on their original clinical status. These models are incorporated into successive levels of a screening platform, identifying drugs that preserve cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro during diabetic stress. In this work, we present a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of a complex metabolic condition, showing the power of this technique for discovery and testing of therapeutic strategies for a disease with ever-increasing clinical significance. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Disease Modeling and Phenotypic Drug Screening for Diabetic Cardiomyopathy using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye M. Drawnel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a complication of type 2 diabetes, with known contributions of lifestyle and genetics. We develop environmentally and genetically driven in vitro models of the condition using human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes. First, we mimic diabetic clinical chemistry to induce a phenotypic surrogate of diabetic cardiomyopathy, observing structural and functional disarray. Next, we consider genetic effects by deriving cardiomyocytes from two diabetic patients with variable disease progression. The cardiomyopathic phenotype is recapitulated in the patient-specific cells basally, with a severity dependent on their original clinical status. These models are incorporated into successive levels of a screening platform, identifying drugs that preserve cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro during diabetic stress. In this work, we present a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC model of a complex metabolic condition, showing the power of this technique for discovery and testing of therapeutic strategies for a disease with ever-increasing clinical significance.

  6. Similarity-based search of model organism, disease and drug effect phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Gruenberger, Michael; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Schofield, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Semantic similarity measures over phenotype ontologies have been demonstrated to provide a powerful approach for the analysis of model organism phenotypes, the discovery of animal models of human disease, novel pathways, gene functions

  7. NF1 truncating mutations associated to aggressive clinical phenotype with elephantiasis neuromatosa and solid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Giovanni; Martorana, Davide; Pellacani, Giovanni; Ruini, Cristel; Loschi, Pietro; Baccarani, Alessio; De Santis, Giorgio; Pollio, Annamaria; Neri, Tauro Maria; Mandel, Victor Desmond; Maiorana, Antonio; Maccio, Livia; Maccaferri, Monia; Tomasi, Aldo

    2014-06-01

    Von Recklinghausen disease is a syndrome characterized by a wide phenotypic variability giving rise to both, cutaneous and visceral benign and malignant neoplasms. The first include cutaneous neurofibromas, subcutaneous and plexiform neurofibromas. The latter can undergo malignant transformation and/or determine elephantiasis neuromatosa. Visceral tumors may include malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, cerebral gliomas and abdominal neurofibromas. In the present study, the authors discuss the clinical and biomolecular characterization of a cohort of 20 families with a diagnosis of type 1 neurofibromatosis. Clinically, the cohort includes three probands with elephantiasis neuromatosa and a peculiarly high incidence of breast and gastrointestinal cancer. Among the 14 NF1 mutations documented, 10 encoding for a truncated protein have been associated to particularly aggressive clinical phenotypes including elephantiasis neuromatosa, malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumors, breast cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumors. This effect on protein synthesis, rather than the type of NF1 mutation, is the key to the explanation of the genotype-phenotype correlations in the context of neurofibromatosis type 1. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. A probabilistic model to predict clinical phenotypic traits from genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Ching; Douville, Christopher; Wang, Cheng; Niknafs, Noushin; Yeo, Grace; Beleva-Guthrie, Violeta; Carter, Hannah; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Li, Biao; Mooney, Sean; Karchin, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Genetic screening is becoming possible on an unprecedented scale. However, its utility remains controversial. Although most variant genotypes cannot be easily interpreted, many individuals nevertheless attempt to interpret their genetic information. Initiatives such as the Personal Genome Project (PGP) and Illumina's Understand Your Genome are sequencing thousands of adults, collecting phenotypic information and developing computational pipelines to identify the most important variant genotypes harbored by each individual. These pipelines consider database and allele frequency annotations and bioinformatics classifications. We propose that the next step will be to integrate these different sources of information to estimate the probability that a given individual has specific phenotypes of clinical interest. To this end, we have designed a Bayesian probabilistic model to predict the probability of dichotomous phenotypes. When applied to a cohort from PGP, predictions of Gilbert syndrome, Graves' disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and various blood groups were accurate, as individuals manifesting the phenotype in question exhibited the highest, or among the highest, predicted probabilities. Thirty-eight PGP phenotypes (26%) were predicted with area-under-the-ROC curve (AUC)>0.7, and 23 (15.8%) of these were statistically significant, based on permutation tests. Moreover, in a Critical Assessment of Genome Interpretation (CAGI) blinded prediction experiment, the models were used to match 77 PGP genomes to phenotypic profiles, generating the most accurate prediction of 16 submissions, according to an independent assessor. Although the models are currently insufficiently accurate for diagnostic utility, we expect their performance to improve with growth of publicly available genomics data and model refinement by domain experts.

  9. Parkinsonian phenotype in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3: a two-case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos João

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder of late onset, which is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of the ATXN3 gene. This disease presents clinical heterogeneity, which cannot be completely explained by the size of the repeat tract. MJD presents extrapyramidal motor signs, namely Parkinsonism, more frequently than the other subtypes of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias. Although Parkinsonism seems to segregate within MJD families, only a few MJD patients develop parkinsonian features and, therefore, the clinical and genetic aspects of these rare presentations remain poorly investigated. The main goal of this work was to describe two MJD patients displaying the parkinsonian triad (tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity, namely on what concerns genetic variation in Parkinson's disease (PD associated loci (PARK2, LRRK2, PINK1, DJ-1, SNCA, MAPT, APOE, and mtDNA tRNAGln T4336C. Case presentation Patient 1 is a 40 year-old female (onset at 30 years of age, initially with a pure parkinsonian phenotype (similar to the phenotype previously reported for her mother. Patient 2 is a 38 year-old male (onset at 33 years of age, presenting an ataxic phenotype with parkinsonian features (not seen either in other affected siblings or in his father. Both patients presented an expanded ATXN3 allele with 72 CAG repeats. No PD mutations were found in the analyzed loci. However, allelic variants previously associated with PD were observed in DJ-1 and APOE genes, for both patients. Conclusions The present report adds clinical and genetic information on this particular and rare MJD presentation, and raises the hypothesis that DJ-1 and APOE polymorphisms may confer susceptibility to the parkinsonian phenotype in MJD.

  10. Severe Enterovirus Infections in Hospitalized Children in the South of England: Clinical Phenotypes and Causative Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Hans; Pelosi, Emanuela; Cooper, Andrea; Pappachan, John; Sykes, Kim; MacIntosh, Iain; Gbesemete, Diane; Clark, Tristan W; Patel, Sanjay V; Faust, Saul N; Tebruegge, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Most enterovirus surveillance studies lack detailed clinical data, which limits their clinical usefulness. This study aimed to describe the clinical spectrum and outcome of severe enterovirus infections in children, and to determine whether there are associations between causative enterovirus genotypes and clinical phenotypes. Retrospective analysis of microbiological and clinical data from a tertiary children's hospital in the South of England over a 17-month period (2012-2013). In total, 30 patients were identified, comprising sepsis (n = 9), myocarditis (n = 8), meningitis (n = 8) and encephalitis (n = 5). Cases with sepsis or myocarditis were significantly younger than those with central nervous system disease (median age 21 and 15 days vs. 79 days; P = 0.0244 and P = 0.0310, respectively). There was considerable diversity in the causative genotypes in each of the clinical phenotypes, with some predominance of echoviruses in the meningitis group, and coxsackie B viruses in the myocarditis group. Thirteen cases required mechanical ventilation, 11 cases inotropic support, 3 cases dialysis and 3 cases extracorporal membrane oxygenation. The overall mortality was 10% (sepsis group, n = 1; myocarditis group, n = 2). Of the survivors, 5 (19%) had long-term sequelae (myocardial dysfunction, n = 2; neurological sequelae, n = 3). Patients with encephalitis had the longest hospital stay (median: 16 days), compared with 9, 6 and 3 days in patients with myocarditis, sepsis and meningitis, respectively (P = 0.005). Enterovirus infections, particularly enteroviral myocarditis and encephalitis, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. The results show that there are currently no strong associations between clinical phenotypes and particular causative enterovirus genotypes in the South of England.

  11. The clinical profile of idiopathic Parkinson's disease in a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clinical profile of idiopathic Parkinson's disease in a South African hospital complex - the influence of ethnicity and gender. Marcelle Smith, Girish Modi. Abstract. Background Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (IPD) has not been well studied in Black African populations. Data on the demographics, phenotype differences ...

  12. Clinical patterns in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooden, Stephanie Maria van

    2012-01-01

    The clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients may reflect the existence of subtypes of the disease. PD subtypes have often been defined by a classification according to researcher-specified criteria, such as age-at-onset or predominant clinical motor features. The general objective

  13. Clinical Phenotype of Depression Affects Interleukin-6 Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadka, Łukasz; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Kulus, Michał; Olajossy, Marcin

    2017-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is not a single disease, but a number of various ailments that form one entity. Psychomotor retardation, anhedonia, sleep disorders, an increased suicide risk, and anxiety are the main symptoms that often define the clinical diagnosis of depression. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), as one of the proinflammatory cytokines, seems to be overexpressed during certain mental disorders, including MDD. Overexpression of IL-6 in depression is thought to be a factor associated with bad prognosis and worse disease course. IL-6 may directly affect brain functioning and production of neurotransmitters; moreover, its concentration is correlated with certain clinical symptoms within the wide range of depressive symptomatology. Furthermore, there is a strong correlation between IL-6 synthesis and psychosomatic functioning of the patient. This article discusses potential sources and significance of IL-6 in the pathogenesis of depression.

  14. rs657075 (CSF2 Is Associated with the Disease Phenotype (BAS-G of Ankylosing Spondylitis

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    Wei-Chiao Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a systemic autoimmune disease mainly affecting the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joints, and exhibits peripheral inflammatory arthropathy. More than 25 loci have been identified as associated with AS. Because both AS and rheumatoid arthritis (RA are autoimmune diseases that may share some common genetic factors, we therefore examined if the newly identified RA genetic polymorphisms were associated with AS in a Taiwanese population. In this study, we enrolled 475 AS patients and 11,301 healthy subjects from a Taiwanese biobank as controls. Although none of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were associated with the susceptibility to AS, the AS disease index Bath AS Global (BAS-G clinical phenotype was observed as significantly correlated to the AA genotype of rs657075 (CSF2. The significance remains after gender/age/disease duration adjustment and after group categorization by human leukocyte antigen-B 27 (HLA-B27 genotype. We further investigated the possible functions of rs657075 through bioinformatics approaches. Results revealed that polymorphism of rs657075 is able to influence the expression of acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 6 (ACSL6. In conclusion, our study indicated that rs657075 (CSF2 is strongly associated with the AS disease index Bath AS Global (BAS-G clinical phenotype.

  15. Targeting mitochondrial phenotypes for non-communicable diseases

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    Zhengtang Qi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept that “Exercise is Medicine” has been challenged by the rising prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs. This is partly due to the fact that the underlying mechanisms of how exercise influences energy homeostasis and counteracts high-fat diets and physical inactivity is complex and remains relatively poorly understood on a molecular level. In addition to genetic polymorphisms in humans that lead to gross variations in responsiveness to exercise, adaptation in mitochondrial networks is central to physical activity, inactivity, and diet. To harness the benefits of exercise for NCDs, much work still needs to be done to improve health effectively on a societal level such as developing personalized exercise interventions aided by advances in high-throughput genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. We propose that understanding the mitochondrial phenotype according to the molecular information of genotypes, lifestyles, and exercise responsiveness in individuals will optimize exercise effects for prevention of NCDs.

  16. LEBER'S DISEASE. CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Maslova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Violation of visual functions and oculomotor frustration develop at 90% of patients with MS. More than a half of patients are transferred by the numerous recurrence of an optical neuritis which is coming to an end with a partial atrophy of optic nerve. For well-timed purpose of pathogenetic treatment differential diagnostics with other diseases, being accompanied an atrophy of an optic nerve, in particular with Leber's disease

  17. Serum anti-glycan antibodies in paediatric-onset Crohn's disease: association with disease phenotype and diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sładek, Małgorzata; Wasilewska, Agata; Swiat, Agnieszka; Cmiel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies reacting with various microbial epitopes have been described in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and are associated with a specific diagnosis and clinical presentation. To evaluate the profile of new anti-glycan antibodies, their potential association with disease phenotype and diagnostic accuracy in paediatric Crohn's disease (CD). Blood samples from 134 paediatric IBD patients (109 CD, 25 ulcerative colitis (UC)) and 67 controls were blindly analysed for anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA), anti-chitobioside carbohydrate (ACCA), anti-laminaribioside carbohydrate (ALCA), and anti-mannobioside carbohydrate (AMCA) antibodies using commercially available assays. The serological response to glycans was correlated with clinical disease characteristics. At least one of the tested anti-glycan antibodies was present in 75% of CD patients. Despite the high frequency of reactivity to glycan epitopes, a limited overlap of serological markers was observed. In total, 49% of ASCA-negative patients presented with one of the following: ACCA, ALCA, or AMCA. The occurrence of one antibody from the anti-glycan panel was independently associated with complicated disease phenotype and ileocolonic disease location. A higher level of immune response as assessed by the quartile sum scores for ACCA, ALCA, and AMCA was linked with older age at diagnosis (10-17 years) and ileocolonic disease location. The ASCA had the greatest accuracy for diagnosis and differentiation of CD. Qualitative and quantitative serologicalal response to glycan epitopes was associated with distinct clinical presentation in paediatric CD patients. This raises the possibility for the use of these markers to differentiate subgroups of CD patients with more sever clinical presentation. The ASCA was the most accurate serological marker for CD; however, testing for the new anti-glycan antibodies may constitute an adjunctive tool in a specific group of patients to aid in the differentiation of CD with absent

  18. Histological Stratification of Thick and Thin Plaque Psoriasis Explores Molecular Phenotypes with Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Brodmerkel, Carrie; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Krueger, James G.; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis, which presents as red, scaly patches on the body, is a common, autoimmune skin disease that affects 2 to 3 percent of the world population. To leverage recent molecular findings into the personalized treatment of psoriasis, we need a strategy that integrates clinical stratification with molecular phenotyping. In this study, we sought to stratify psoriasis patients by histological measurements of epidermal thickness, and to compare their molecular characterizations by gene expression, serum cytokines, and response to biologics. We obtained histological measures of epidermal thickness in a cohort of 609 psoriasis patients, and identified a mixture of two subpopulations—thick and thin plaque psoriasis—from which they were derived. This stratification was verified in a subcohort of 65 patients from a previously published study with significant differences in inflammatory cell infiltrates in the psoriatic skin. Thick and thin plaque psoriasis shared 84.8% of the meta-analysis-derived psoriasis transcriptome, but a stronger dysregulation of the meta-analysis-derived psoriasis transcriptome was seen in thick plaque psoriasis on microarray. RT-PCR revealed that gene expression in thick and thin plaque psoriasis was different not only within psoriatic lesional skin but also in peripheral non-lesional skin. Additionally, differences in circulating cytokines and their changes in response to biologic treatments were found between the two subgroups. All together, we were able to integrate histological stratification with molecular phenotyping as a way of exploring clinical phenotypes with different expression levels of the psoriasis transcriptome and circulating cytokines. PMID:26176783

  19. Clinical neurogenetics: huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Yvette M

    2013-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the triad of abnormal movements (typically chorea), cognitive impairment, and psychiatric problems. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the gene encoding the protein huntingtin on chromosome 4 and causes progressive atrophy of the striatum as well as cortical and other extrastriatal structures. Genetic testing has been available since 1993 to confirm diagnosis in affected adults and for presymptomatic testing in at-risk individuals. This review covers HD signs, symptoms, and pathophysiology; current genetic testing issues; and current and future treatment strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Serum immunoglobulin G4 levels and Graves' disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carmen Sorina; Sirbu, Anca Elena; Betivoiu, Minodora Andreea; Florea, Suzana; Barbu, Carmen Gabriela; Fica, Simona Vasilica

    2017-02-01

    We investigated, at diagnosis, the relationship between serum immunoglobulin G4 levels and the main characteristics of Graves' disease: hyperthyroidism severity, goiter size, presence of active Graves' ophthalmopathy, antithyroid antibodies status, and titer. This prospective study included 80 newly diagnosed Graves' disease patients. The main parameters measured at diagnosis: thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine, total triiodothyronine, thyroglobulin, antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies, immunoglobulin G4. In Graves' disease patients, serum immunoglobulin G4 levels were higher than in general population (p = 0.028) and higher in men compared to women (p = 0.002). Only one female patient with intense hypoechoic goiter, high anti-thyroglobulin antibody, and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titers had an elevated serum immunoglobulin G4 level at diagnosis. Patients with immunoglobulin G4 levels above the 75th percentile (>237.52 mg/dl, N = 20) were younger at Graves' ophthalmopathy onset (p 286.28 mg/dl, N = 8) had lower total triiodothyronine values (p = 0.001) than patients with IgG below the 90th percentile. No significant correlations were found between smoking status (p = 0.58), goiter size (p = 0.50), the presence of ophthalmopathy (p = 0.42) or thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody titers (p = 0.45) and the mean value of immunoglobulin G4 levels at diagnosis. Our data suggest that Graves' disease patients with elevated immunoglobulin G4 levels at diagnosis have a phenotype characterized by higher anti-thyroglobulin antibody and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titers, less severe T3 hyperthyroidism, younger age at ophthalmopathy onset and require a shorter duration of the first methimazole treatment cycle.

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes and balance impairment

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    Voica AS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alina Sorina Voica,1 Cristian Oancea,1 Emanuela Tudorache,1 Alexandru F Crisan,2 Ovidiu Fira-Mladinescu,1 Voicu Tudorache,1 Bogdan Timar3 1Department of Pulmonology, Victor Babeş University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 2Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center, Hospital of Pneumoftiziology and Infectious Diseases “Dr Victor Babeş”, 3Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Victor Babeş University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timişoara, Romania Background/objective: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a respiratory disease that results in airflow limitation and respiratory distress, also having many nonrespiratory manifestations that affect both function and mobility. Preliminary evidence suggests that balance deficits constitute an important secondary impairment in individuals with COPD. Our objective was to investigate balance performance in two groups of COPD patients with different body compositions and to observe which of these groups are more likely to experience falls in the future.Methods: We included 27 stable COPD patients and 17 healthy individuals who performed a series of balance tests. The COPD patients were divided in two groups: emphysematous and bronchitic. Patients completed the activities balance confidence scale and the COPD assessment test questionnaire and afterward performed the Berg Balance Scale, timed up and go, single leg stance and 6-minute walking distance test. We analyzed the differences in the balance tests between the studied groups.Results: Bronchitic COPD was associated with a decreased value when compared to emphysematous COPD for the following variables: single leg stance (8.7 vs 15.6; P<0.001 and activities balance confidence (53.2 vs 74.2; P=0.001. Bronchitic COPD patients had a significantly higher value of timed up and go test compared to patients with emphysematous COPD (14.7 vs 12.8; P=0.001.Conclusion: Patients with COPD have a higher balance impairment than their healthy peers

  2. Supporting the annotation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) phenotypes with text mining workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Rak, Rafal; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a life-threatening lung disorder whose recent prevalence has led to an increasing burden on public healthcare. Phenotypic information in electronic clinical records is essential in providing suitable personalised treatment to patients with COPD. However, as phenotypes are often "hidden" within free text in clinical records, clinicians could benefit from text mining systems that facilitate their prompt recognition. This paper reports on a semi-automatic methodology for producing a corpus that can ultimately support the development of text mining tools that, in turn, will expedite the process of identifying groups of COPD patients. A corpus of 30 full-text papers was formed based on selection criteria informed by the expertise of COPD specialists. We developed an annotation scheme that is aimed at producing fine-grained, expressive and computable COPD annotations without burdening our curators with a highly complicated task. This was implemented in the Argo platform by means of a semi-automatic annotation workflow that integrates several text mining tools, including a graphical user interface for marking up documents. When evaluated using gold standard (i.e., manually validated) annotations, the semi-automatic workflow was shown to obtain a micro-averaged F-score of 45.70% (with relaxed matching). Utilising the gold standard data to train new concept recognisers, we demonstrated that our corpus, although still a work in progress, can foster the development of significantly better performing COPD phenotype extractors. We describe in this work the means by which we aim to eventually support the process of COPD phenotype curation, i.e., by the application of various text mining tools integrated into an annotation workflow. Although the corpus being described is still under development, our results thus far are encouraging and show great potential in stimulating the development of further automatic COPD phenotype extractors.

  3. Senescent phenotypes of skin fibroblasts from patients with Tangier disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Fumihiko; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Chiaki; Sandoval, Jose C.; Oku, Hiroyuki; Yuasa-Kawase, Miyako; Tsubakio-Yamamoto, Kazumi; Koseki, Masahiro; Masuda, Daisaku; Tsujii, Ken-ichi; Ishigami, Masato; Nishida, Makoto; Shimomura, Iichiro; Hori, Masatsugu; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2007-01-01

    Tangier disease (TD) is characterized by a deficiency of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma and patients with TD have an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Recently, we reported that fibroblasts from TD exhibited large and flattened morphology, which is often observed in senescent cells. On the other hand, data have accumulated to show the relationship between cellular senescence and development of atherosclerotic CAD. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TD fibroblasts exhibited cellular senescence. The proliferation of TD fibroblasts was gradually decreased at population doubling level (PDL) ∼10 compared with control cells. TD cells practically ceased proliferation at PDL ∼30. DNA synthesis was markedly decreased in TD fibroblasts. TD cells exhibited a higher positive rate for senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), which is one of the biomarkers of cellular senescence in vitro. These data showed that TD cells reached cellular senescence at an earlier PDL compared with controls. Although, there was no difference in the telomere length of fibroblasts between TD and controls at the earlier passage (PDL 6), the telomere length of TD cells was shorter than that of controls at the late passage (PDL 25). Taken together, the current study demonstrates that the late-passaged TD fibroblasts showed senescent phenotype in vitro, which might be related to the increased cardiovascular manifestations in TD patients

  4. Extending Injury- and Disease-Resistant CNS Phenotypes by Repetitive Epigenetic Conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Gidday

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant reductions in the extent of acute injury in the CNS can be achieved by exposure to different preconditioning stimuli, but the duration of the induced protective phenotype is typically short-lasting, and thus is deemed as limiting its clinical applicability. Extending the period over which such adaptive epigenetic changes persist – in effect, expanding conditioning’s therapeutic window – would significantly broaden the potential applications of such a treatment approach in patients. The frequency of the conditioning stimulus may hold the key. While transient (1-3 days protection against CNS ischemic injury is well established preclinically following a single preconditioning stimulus, repetitively presenting preconditioning stimuli extends the duration of ischemic tolerance by many weeks. Moreover, repetitive intermittent postconditioning enhances postischemic recovery metrics and improves long-term survival. Intermittent conditioning is also efficacious for preventing or delaying injury in preclinical models of chronic neurodegenerative disease, and for promoting long-lasting functional improvements in a number of other pathologies as well. Although the detailed mechanisms underlying these protracted kinds of neuroplasticity remain largely unstudied, accumulating empirical evidence supports the contention that all of these adaptive phenotypes are epigenetically mediated. Going forward, additional preclinical demonstrations of the ability to induce sustained beneficial phenotypes that reduce the burden of acute and chronic neurodegeneration, and experimental interrogations of the regulatory constructs responsible for these epigenetic responses, will accelerate the identification of not only efficacious, but practical, adaptive epigenetics-based treatments for individuals with neurological disease.

  5. Tetralogy of Fallot and Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome – Complex Clinical Phenotypes Meet Complex Genetic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahm, Harald; Schön, Patric; Doppler, Stefanie; Dreßen, Martina; Cleuziou, Julie; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Ewert, Peter; Lange, Rüdiger; Krane, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In many cases congenital heart disease (CHD) is represented by a complex phenotype and an array of several functional and morphological cardiac disorders. These malformations will be briefly summarized in the first part focusing on two severe CHD phenotypes, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). In most cases of CHD the genetic origin remains largely unknown, though the complexity of the clinical picture strongly argues against a dysregulation which can be attributed to a single candidate gene but rather suggests a multifaceted polygenetic origin with elaborate interactions. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide approaches using whole exome sequencing, comparative sequence analysis of multiplex families to identify de novo mutations and global technologies to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms, copy number variants, dysregulation of the transcriptome and epigenetic variations have been conducted to obtain information about genetic alterations and potential predispositions possibly linked to the occurrence of a CHD phenotype. In the second part of this review we will summarize and discuss the available literature on identified genetic alterations linked to TOF and HLHS. PMID:26069455

  6. Persistent systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD: a novel phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvar Agustí

    Full Text Available Because chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a heterogeneous condition, the identification of specific clinical phenotypes is key to developing more effective therapies. To explore if the persistence of systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD we assessed patients recruited to the well-characterized ECLIPSE cohort (NCT00292552.Six inflammatory biomarkers in peripheral blood (white blood cells (WBC count and CRP, IL-6, IL-8, fibrinogen and TNF-α levels were quantified in 1,755 COPD patients, 297 smokers with normal spirometry and 202 non-smoker controls that were followed-up for three years. We found that, at baseline, 30% of COPD patients did not show evidence of systemic inflammation whereas 16% had persistent systemic inflammation. Even though pulmonary abnormalities were similar in these two groups, persistently inflamed patients during follow-up had significantly increased all-cause mortality (13% vs. 2%, p<0.001 and exacerbation frequency (1.5 (1.5 vs. 0.9 (1.1 per year, p<0.001 compared to non-inflamed ones. As a descriptive study our results show associations but do not prove causality. Besides this, the inflammatory response is complex and we studied only a limited panel of biomarkers, albeit they are those investigated by the majority of previous studies and are often and easily measured in clinical practice.Overall, these results identify a novel systemic inflammatory COPD phenotype that may be the target of specific research and treatment.

  7. Glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP): biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Tathiane M; de Souza, Camila F; Sabedot, Thais S; Silva, Tiago C; Mosella, Maritza S; Kalkanis, Steven N; Snyder, James; Castro, Ana Valeria B; Noushmehr, Houtan

    2018-04-09

    Gliomas are a heterogeneous group of brain tumors with distinct biological and clinical properties. Despite advances in surgical techniques and clinical regimens, treatment of high-grade glioma remains challenging and carries dismal rates of therapeutic success and overall survival. Challenges include the molecular complexity of gliomas, as well as inconsistencies in histopathological grading, resulting in an inaccurate prediction of disease progression and failure in the use of standard therapy. The updated 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system reflects a refinement of tumor diagnostics by integrating the genotypic and phenotypic features, thereby narrowing the defined subgroups. The new classification recommends molecular diagnosis of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutational status in gliomas. IDH-mutant gliomas manifest the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP). Notably, the recent identification of clinically relevant subsets of G-CIMP tumors (G-CIMP-high and G-CIMP-low) provides a further refinement in glioma classification that is independent of grade and histology. This scheme may be useful for predicting patient outcome and may be translated into effective therapeutic strategies tailored to each patient. In this review, we highlight the evolution of our understanding of the G-CIMP subsets and how recent advances in characterizing the genome and epigenome of gliomas may influence future basic and translational research.

  8. Phenotypic Diversity of Sickle Cell Disease in Patients with a Double Heterozygosity for Hb S and Hb D-Punjab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lidiane S; Okumura, Jéssika V; Belini-Júnior, Édis; Oliveira, Renan G; Nascimento, Patrícia P; Silva, Danilo G H; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Oliani, Sonia M; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity for sickle cell disease is associated to several genetic factors such as genotype for sickle cell disease, β-globin gene cluster haplotypes and Hb F levels. The coinheritance of Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) and Hb D-Punjab (HBB: c.364G > C) results in a double heterozygosity, which constitutes one of the genotypic causes of sickle cell disease. This study aimed to assess the phenotypic diversity of sickle cell disease presented by carriers of the Hb S/Hb D-Punjab genotype and the Bantu [- + - - - -] haplotype. We evaluated medical records from 12 patients with sickle cell disease whose Hb S/Hb D-Punjab genotype and Bantu haplotype were confirmed by molecular analysis. Hb S and Hb D-Punjab levels were quantified by chromatographic analysis. Mean concentrations of Hb S and Hb D-Punjab were 44.8 ± 2.3% and 43.3 ± 1.8%, respectively. Painful crises were present in eight (66.7%) patients evaluated, representing the most common clinical event. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) was the second most prevalent manifestation, occurring in two individuals (16.7%). Three patients were asymptomatic, while another two exhibited greater diversity of severe clinical manifestations. Medical records here analyzed reported a significant clinical diversity in sickle cell disease ranging from the absence of symptoms to wide phenotypic variety. The sickle cell disease genotype, Bantu haplotype and hemoglobin (Hb) levels did not influence the clinical diversity. Thus, we concluded that the phenotypic variation in sickle cell disease was present within a specific genotype for disease regardless of the β-globin gene cluster haplotypes.

  9. Toward a Reasoned Classification of Diseases Using Physico-Chemical Based Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Schwartz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diseases and health conditions have been classified according to anatomical site, etiological, and clinical criteria. Physico-chemical mechanisms underlying the biology of diseases, such as the flow of energy through cells and tissues, have been often overlooked in classification systems.Objective: We propose a conceptual framework toward the development of an energy-oriented classification of diseases, based on the principles of physical chemistry.Methods: A review of literature on the physical chemistry of biological interactions in a number of diseases is traced from the point of view of the fluid and solid mechanics, electricity, and chemistry.Results: We found consistent evidence in literature of decreased and/or increased physical and chemical forces intertwined with biological processes of numerous diseases, which allowed the identification of mechanical, electric and chemical phenotypes of diseases.Discussion: Biological mechanisms of diseases need to be evaluated and integrated into more comprehensive theories that should account with principles of physics and chemistry. A hypothetical model is proposed relating the natural history of diseases to mechanical stress, electric field, and chemical equilibria (ATP changes. The present perspective toward an innovative disease classification may improve drug-repurposing strategies in the future.

  10. Toward a Reasoned Classification of Diseases Using Physico-Chemical Based Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Laurent; Lafitte, Olivier; da Veiga Moreira, Jorgelindo

    2018-01-01

    Background: Diseases and health conditions have been classified according to anatomical site, etiological, and clinical criteria. Physico-chemical mechanisms underlying the biology of diseases, such as the flow of energy through cells and tissues, have been often overlooked in classification systems. Objective: We propose a conceptual framework toward the development of an energy-oriented classification of diseases, based on the principles of physical chemistry. Methods: A review of literature on the physical chemistry of biological interactions in a number of diseases is traced from the point of view of the fluid and solid mechanics, electricity, and chemistry. Results: We found consistent evidence in literature of decreased and/or increased physical and chemical forces intertwined with biological processes of numerous diseases, which allowed the identification of mechanical, electric and chemical phenotypes of diseases. Discussion: Biological mechanisms of diseases need to be evaluated and integrated into more comprehensive theories that should account with principles of physics and chemistry. A hypothetical model is proposed relating the natural history of diseases to mechanical stress, electric field, and chemical equilibria (ATP) changes. The present perspective toward an innovative disease classification may improve drug-repurposing strategies in the future. PMID:29541031

  11. 'Leukodystrophy-like' phenotype in children with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody-associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Rossor, Thomas; Mankad, Kshitij; Chong, Wk 'Kling'; Lux, Andrew; Wassmer, Evangeline; Lim, Ming; Barkhof, Frederik; Ciccarelli, Olga; Hemingway, Cheryl

    2018-04-01

    To review the demographics and clinical and paraclinical parameters of children with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody-associated relapsing disease. In this UK-based, multicentre study, 31 children with MOG antibody-associated relapsing disease were studied retrospectively. Of the 31 children studied, 14 presented with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM); they were younger (mean 4.1y) than the remainder (mean 8.5y) who presented with optic neuritis and/or transverse myelitis (p<0.001). Similarly, children who had an abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at onset (n=20) were younger than patients with normal MRI at onset (p=0.001) or at follow-up (p<0.001). 'Leukodystrophy-like' MRI patterns of confluent largely symmetrical lesions was seen during the course of the disease in 7 out of 14 children with a diagnosis of ADEM, and was only seen in children younger than 7 years of age. Their disability after a 3-year follow-up was mild to moderate, and most patients continued to relapse, despite disease-modifying treatments. MOG antibody should be tested in children presenting with relapsing neurological disorders associated with confluent, bilateral white matter changes, and distinct enhancement pattern. Children with MOG antibody-associated disease present with age-related differences in phenotypes, with a severe leukoencephalopathy phenotype in the very young and normal intracranial MRI in the older children. This finding suggests a susceptibility of the very young and myelinating brain to MOG antibody-mediated mechanisms of damage. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody-associated demyelination manifest with an age-related phenotype. Children with MOG antibody and 'leukodystrophy-like' imaging patterns tend to have poor response to second-line immunotherapy. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  12. Exhaled volatile organic compounds for phenotyping chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanta Maria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive phenotyping of chronic respiratory diseases would be highly beneficial in the personalised medicine of the future. Volatile organic compounds can be measured in the exhaled breath and may be produced or altered by disease processes. We investigated whether distinct patterns of these compounds were present in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and clinically relevant disease phenotypes. Methods Breath samples from 39 COPD subjects and 32 healthy controls were collected and analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Subjects with COPD also underwent sputum induction. Discriminatory compounds were identified by univariate logistic regression followed by multivariate analysis: 1. principal component analysis; 2. multivariate logistic regression; 3. receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results Comparing COPD versus healthy controls, principal component analysis clustered the 20 best-discriminating compounds into four components explaining 71% of the variance. Multivariate logistic regression constructed an optimised model using two components with an accuracy of 69%. The model had 85% sensitivity, 50% specificity and ROC area under the curve of 0.74. Analysis of COPD subgroups showed the method could classify COPD subjects with far greater accuracy. Models were constructed which classified subjects with ≥2% sputum eosinophilia with ROC area under the curve of 0.94 and those having frequent exacerbations 0.95. Potential biomarkers correlated to clinical variables were identified in each subgroup. Conclusion The exhaled breath volatile organic compound profile discriminated between COPD and healthy controls and identified clinically relevant COPD subgroups. If these findings are validated in prospective cohorts, they may have diagnostic and management value in this disease.

  13. Clinical heterogeneity in Fabry disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Salogub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked, lysosomal storage disease (OMIM: 301500, caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of its substrates, glycosphingolipids, primarily – globotriaosylceramide, in the lysosomes of multiple cell types with multi-system clinical manifestations, even within the same family, including abnormalities of the central and peripheral nervous system, kidneys, heart, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, organ of vision. Clinical heterogeneity is often the reason of the delayed diagnosis. Nowadays enzyme replacement therapy has proved its efficiency in the treatment of Fabry disease. Including Fabry disease in the differential diagnosis of a large range of disorders is important because of its wide clinical heterogeneity and the possibility of an earlier intervention with a beneficial treatment.

  14. Linking human diseases to animal models using ontology-based phenotype annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Washington

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientists and clinicians who study genetic alterations and disease have traditionally described phenotypes in natural language. The considerable variation in these free-text descriptions has posed a hindrance to the important task of identifying candidate genes and models for human diseases and indicates the need for a computationally tractable method to mine data resources for mutant phenotypes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ontological annotation of disease phenotypes will facilitate the discovery of new genotype-phenotype relationships within and across species. To describe phenotypes using ontologies, we used an Entity-Quality (EQ methodology, wherein the affected entity (E and how it is affected (Q are recorded using terms from a variety of ontologies. Using this EQ method, we annotated the phenotypes of 11 gene-linked human diseases described in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM. These human annotations were loaded into our Ontology-Based Database (OBD along with other ontology-based phenotype descriptions of mutants from various model organism databases. Phenotypes recorded with this EQ method can be computationally compared based on the hierarchy of terms in the ontologies and the frequency of annotation. We utilized four similarity metrics to compare phenotypes and developed an ontology of homologous and analogous anatomical structures to compare phenotypes between species. Using these tools, we demonstrate that we can identify, through the similarity of the recorded phenotypes, other alleles of the same gene, other members of a signaling pathway, and orthologous genes and pathway members across species. We conclude that EQ-based annotation of phenotypes, in conjunction with a cross-species ontology, and a variety of similarity metrics can identify biologically meaningful similarities between genes by comparing phenotypes alone. This annotation and search method provides a novel and efficient means to identify

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes: the future of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, MeiLan K; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    (s) to guide the development of therapy where possible. It follows that any proposed phenotype, whether defined by symptoms, radiography, physiology, or cellular or molecular fingerprint will require an iterative validation process in which "candidate" phenotypes are identified before their relevance...

  16. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke; Schumm, L Philip; Zeissig, Sebastian; Ahmad, Tariq; Andersen, Vibeke; Andrews, Jane M; Annese, Vito; Brand, Stephan; Brant, Steven R; Cho, Judy H; Daly, Mark J; Dubinsky, Marla; Duerr, Richard H; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Franke, Andre; Gearry, Richard B; Goyette, Philippe; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hov, Johannes R; Huang, Hailang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Kupcinskas, Limas; Lawrance, Ian C; Lee, James C; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stephan; Théâtre, Emilie; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Weersma, Rinse K; Wilson, David C; Parkes, Miles; Vermeire, Severine; Rioux, John D; Mansfield, John; Silverberg, Mark S; Radford-Smith, Graham; McGovern, Dermot P B; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lees, Charlie W

    2016-01-09

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We undertook the largest genotype association study, to date, in widely used clinical subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of further understanding the biological relations between diseases. This study included patients from 49 centres in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australasia. We applied the Montreal classification system of inflammatory bowel disease subphenotypes to 34,819 patients (19,713 with Crohn's disease, 14,683 with ulcerative colitis) genotyped on the Immunochip array. We tested for genotype-phenotype associations across 156,154 genetic variants. We generated genetic risk scores by combining information from all known inflammatory bowel disease associations to summarise the total load of genetic risk for a particular phenotype. We used these risk scores to test the hypothesis that colonic Crohn's disease, ileal Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis are all genetically distinct from each other, and to attempt to identify patients with a mismatch between clinical diagnosis and genetic risk profile. After quality control, the primary analysis included 29,838 patients (16,902 with Crohn's disease, 12,597 with ulcerative colitis). Three loci (NOD2, MHC, and MST1 3p21) were associated with subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease, mainly disease location (essentially fixed over time; median follow-up of 10·5 years). Little or no genetic association with disease behaviour (which changed dramatically over time) remained after conditioning on disease location and age at onset. The genetic risk score representing all known risk alleles for inflammatory bowel disease showed strong association with

  17. Distinct pathological phenotypes of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in recipients of prion-contaminated growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cali, Ignazio; Miller, Cathleen J; Parisi, Joseph E; Geschwind, Michael D; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Schonberger, Lawrence B

    2015-06-25

    The present study compares the clinical, pathological and molecular features of a United States (US) case of growth hormone (GH)-associated Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (GH-CJD) (index case) to those of two earlier referred US cases of GH-CJD and one case of dura mater (d)-associated CJD (dCJD). All iatrogenic CJD (iCJD) subjects were methionine (M) homozygous at codon 129 (129MM) of the prion protein (PrP) gene and had scrapie prion protein (PrP(Sc)) type 1 (iCJDMM1). The index subject presented with ataxia, weight loss and changes in the sleep pattern about 38 years after the midpoint of GH treatment. Autopsy examination revealed a neuropathological phenotype reminiscent of both sCJDMV2-K (a sporadic CJD subtype in subjects methionine/valine heterozygous at codon 129 with PrP(Sc) type 2 and the presence of kuru plaques) and variant CJD (vCJD). The two earlier cases of GH-CJDMM1 and the one of dCJDMM1 were associated with neuropathological phenotypes that differed from that of the index case mainly because they lacked PrP plaques. The phenotype of the earlier GH-CJDMM1 cases shared several, but not all, characteristics with sCJDMM1, whereas dCJDMM1 was phenotypically indistinguishable from sCJDMM1. Two distinct groups of dCJDMM1 have also been described in Japan based on clinical features, the presence or absence of PrP plaques and distinct PK-resistant PrP(Sc) (resPrP(Sc)) electrophoretic mobilities. The resPrP(Sc) electrophoretic mobility was, however, identical in our GH-CJDMM1 and dCJDMM1 cases, and matched that of sCJDMM1. Our study shows that receipt of prion-contaminated GH can lead to a prion disease with molecular features (129MM and PrP(Sc) type 2) and phenotypic characteristics that differ from those of sporadic prion disease (sCJDMM1), a difference that may reflect adaptation of "heterologous" prion strains to the 129MM background.

  18. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-06-08

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  19. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  20. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  1. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  2. Novel mutations in the PRX and the MTMR2 genes are responsible for unusual Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouioua, Sonia; Hamadouche, Tarik; Funalot, Benoit; Bernard, Rafaëlle; Bellatache, Nora; Bouderba, Radia; Grid, Djamel; Assami, Salima; Benhassine, Traki; Levy, Nicolas; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Tazir, Meriem

    2011-08-01

    Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, relatively common in Algeria due to high prevalence of consanguineous marriages, are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. We report on two consanguineous families with demyelinating autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4) associated with novel homozygous mutations in the MTMR2 gene, c.331dupA (p.Arg111LysfsX24) and PRX gene, c.1090C>T (p.Arg364X) respectively, and peculiar clinical phenotypes. The three patients with MTMR2 mutations (CMT4B1 family) had a typical phenotype of severe early onset motor and sensory neuropathy with typical focally folded myelin on nerve biopsy. Associated clinical features included vocal cord paresis, prominent chest deformities and claw hands. Contrasting with the classical presentation of CMT4F (early-onset Dejerine-Sottas phenotype), the four patients with PRX mutations (CMT4F family) had essentially a late age of onset and a protracted and relatively benign evolution, although they presented marked spine deformities. These observations broaden the spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with these two CMT4 forms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Trichinella infection and clinical disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Meyer, C N; Krantz, T

    1996-01-01

    Trichinellosis is caused by ingestion of insufficiently cooked meat contaminated with infective larvae of Trichinella species. The clinical course is highly variable, ranging from no apparent infection to severe and even fatal disease. We report two illustrative cases of trichinellosis. Returning....... Life-threatening cardiopulmonary, renal and central nervous system complications developed. The patient recovered after several months. Her husband, who also ate the pork, did not have clinical symptoms, but an increased eosinophil count and a single larva in a muscle biopsy confirmed infection....... The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of trichinellosis are reviewed....

  4. Evolution of disease phenotype in adult and pediatric onset Crohn’s disease in a population-based cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovasz, Barbara Dorottya; Lakatos, Laszlo; Horvath, Agnes; Szita, Istvan; Pandur, Tunde; Mandel, Michael; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Golovics, Petra Anna; Mester, Gabor; Balogh, Mihaly; Molnar, Csaba; Komaromi, Erzsebet; Kiss, Lajos Sandor; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the evolution of disease phenotype in adult and pediatric onset Crohn’s disease (CD) populations, diagnosed between 1977 and 2008. METHODS: Data of 506 incident CD patients were analyzed (age at diagnosis: 28.5 years, interquartile range: 22-38 years). Both in- and outpatient records were collected prospectively with a complete clinical follow-up and comprehensively reviewed in the population-based Veszprem province database, which included incident patients diagnosed between January 1, 1977 and December 31, 2008 in adult and pediatric onset CD populations. Disease phenotype according to the Montreal classification and long-term disease course was analysed according to the age at onset in time-dependent univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Among this population-based cohort, seventy-four (12.8%) pediatric-onset CD patients were identified (diagnosed ≤ 17 years of age). There was no significant difference in the distribution of disease behavior between pediatric (B1: 62%, B2: 15%, B3: 23%) and adult-onset CD patients (B1: 56%, B2: 21%, B3: 23%) at diagnosis, or during follow-up. Overall, the probability of developing complicated disease behaviour was 49.7% and 61.3% in the pediatric and 55.1% and 62.4% in the adult onset patients after 5- and 10-years of follow-up. Similarly, time to change in disease behaviour from non stricturing, non penetrating (B1) to complicated, stricturing or penetrating (B2/B3) disease was not significantly different between pediatric and adult onset CD in a Kaplan-Meier analysis. Calendar year of diagnosis (P = 0.04), ileal location (P < 0.001), perianal disease (P < 0.001), smoking (P = 0.038) and need for steroids (P < 0.001) were associated with presence of, or progression to, complicated disease behavior at diagnosis and during follow-up. A change in disease location was observed in 8.9% of patients and it was associated with smoking status (P = 0.01), but not with age at diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Long

  5. Characteristic cardiac phenotypes are detected by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with different clinical phenotypes and genotypes of mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Anca; Ludwig, Anna; Stubbe-Dräger, Bianca; Boentert, Matthias; Young, Peter; Waltenberger, Johannes; Rösch, Sabine; Sechtem, Udo; Yilmaz, Ali

    2015-05-22

    Mitochondrial myopathies (MM) are a heterogeneous group of inherited conditions resulting from a primary defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain with consecutively impaired cellular energy metabolism. Small sized studies using mainly electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiography have revealed cardiac abnormalities ranging from conduction abnormalities and arrhythmias to hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy in these patients. Recently, characteristic patterns of cardiac involvement were documented by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO)/Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) and with mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). The present study aimed to characterize the prevalence and pattern of cardiac abnormalities and to test the additional diagnostic value of CMR in this patient population. The hypothesis that different neuromuscular MM syndromes present with different cardiac disease phenotypes was evaluated. Sixty-four MM patients (50 ± 15 years, 44% male) and 25 matched controls (52 ± 14 years, 36% male) prospectively underwent cardiac evaluations including CMR (comprising cine- and late-gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) imaging). Based on the neuromuscular phenotype and genotype, the patients were grouped: (a) CPEO/KSS (N = 33); (b) MELAS/-like (N = 11); c) myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) (N = 3) and d) other non-specific MM forms (N = 17). Among the 64 MM patients, 34 (53%) had at least one abnormal CMR finding: 18 (28%) demonstrated an impaired left ventricular ejection-fraction (LV-EF patients showed significantly higher maximal wall thickness (10 ± 3 vs. 8 ± 2 mm, p = 0.005) and concentricity (LV mass to end-diastolic volume: 0.84 ± 0.27 vs. 0.67 ± 0.11, p patients showed the highest frequency of cardiac disease (in 10/11 (91%)), a mostly concentric LV hypertrophy (6/9; 67%) with or

  6. Predictive genomics: A cancer hallmark network framework for predicting tumor clinical phenotypes using genome sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Edwin; Zaman, Naif; Mcgee, Shauna; Milanese, Jean-Sébastien; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; O'Connor, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a cancer hallmark network framework for modelling genome-sequencing data to predict cancer clonal evolution and associated clinical phenotypes. Strategies of using this framework in conjunction with genome sequencing data in an attempt to predict personalized drug targets, drug resistance, and metastasis for a cancer patient, as well as cancer risks for a healthy individual are discussed. Accurate prediction of cancer clonal evolution and clinical phenotypes will have substantial i...

  7. Similarity-based search of model organism, disease and drug effect phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-02-19

    Background: Semantic similarity measures over phenotype ontologies have been demonstrated to provide a powerful approach for the analysis of model organism phenotypes, the discovery of animal models of human disease, novel pathways, gene functions, druggable therapeutic targets, and determination of pathogenicity. Results: We have developed PhenomeNET 2, a system that enables similarity-based searches over a large repository of phenotypes in real-time. It can be used to identify strains of model organisms that are phenotypically similar to human patients, diseases that are phenotypically similar to model organism phenotypes, or drug effect profiles that are similar to the phenotypes observed in a patient or model organism. PhenomeNET 2 is available at http://aber-owl.net/phenomenet. Conclusions: Phenotype-similarity searches can provide a powerful tool for the discovery and investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying an observed phenotypic manifestation. PhenomeNET 2 facilitates user-defined similarity searches and allows researchers to analyze their data within a large repository of human, mouse and rat phenotypes.

  8. Nonketotic hyperglycinemia: Functional assessment of missense variants in GLDC to understand phenotypes of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Alonso, Irene; Navarrete, Rosa; Arribas-Carreira, Laura; Perona, Almudena; Abia, David; Couce, María Luz; García-Cazorla, Angels; Morais, Ana; Domingo, Rosario; Ramos, María Antonia; Swanson, Michael A; Van Hove, Johan L K; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar

    2017-06-01

    The rapid analysis of genomic data is providing effective mutational confirmation in patients with clinical and biochemical hallmarks of a specific disease. This is the case for nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH), a Mendelian disorder causing seizures in neonates and early-infants, primarily due to mutations in the GLDC gene. However, understanding the impact of missense variants identified in this gene is a major challenge for the application of genomics into clinical practice. Herein, a comprehensive functional and structural analysis of 19 GLDC missense variants identified in a cohort of 26 NKH patients was performed. Mutant cDNA constructs were expressed in COS7 cells followed by enzymatic assays and Western blot analysis of the GCS P-protein to assess the residual activity and mutant protein stability. Structural analysis, based on molecular modeling of the 3D structure of GCS P-protein, was also performed. We identify hypomorphic variants that produce attenuated phenotypes with improved prognosis of the disease. Structural analysis allows us to interpret the effects of mutations on protein stability and catalytic activity, providing molecular evidence for clinical outcome and disease severity. Moreover, we identify an important number of mutants whose loss-of-functionality is associated with instability and, thus, are potential targets for rescue using folding therapeutic approaches. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivka Colen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute (NCI Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research.

  10. Macrophage phenotype is associated with disease severity in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Lynne R; Maxwell, Nicola C; Gill, Sharonjit K; Dockrell, David H; Sabroe, Ian; McGreal, Eamon P; Kotecha, Sailesh; Whyte, Moira K

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of persistent lung inflammation in preterm infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD) is poorly characterized, hampering efforts to stratify prognosis and treatment. Airway macrophages are important innate immune cells with roles in both the induction and resolution of tissue inflammation. To investigate airway innate immune cellular phenotypes in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or CLD. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was obtained from term and preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation. BAL cells were phenotyped by flow cytometry. Preterm birth was associated with an increase in the proportion of non-classical CD14(+)/CD16(+) monocytes on the day of delivery (58.9 ± 5.8% of total mononuclear cells in preterm vs 33.0 ± 6.1% in term infants, p = 0.02). Infants with RDS were born with significantly more CD36(+) macrophages compared with the CLD group (70.3 ± 5.3% in RDS vs 37.6 ± 8.9% in control, p = 0.02). At day 3, infants born at a low gestational age are more likely to have greater numbers of CD14(+) mononuclear phagocytes in the airway (p = 0.03), but fewer of these cells are functionally polarized as assessed by HLA-DR (p = 0.05) or CD36 (p = 0.05) positivity, suggesting increased recruitment of monocytes or a failure to mature these cells in the lung. These findings suggest that macrophage polarization may be affected by gestational maturity, that more immature macrophage phenotypes may be associated with the progression of RDS to CLD and that phenotyping mononuclear cells in BAL could predict disease outcome.

  11. Macrophage phenotype is associated with disease severity in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne R Prince

    Full Text Available The etiology of persistent lung inflammation in preterm infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD is poorly characterized, hampering efforts to stratify prognosis and treatment. Airway macrophages are important innate immune cells with roles in both the induction and resolution of tissue inflammation.To investigate airway innate immune cellular phenotypes in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS or CLD.Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was obtained from term and preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation. BAL cells were phenotyped by flow cytometry.Preterm birth was associated with an increase in the proportion of non-classical CD14(+/CD16(+ monocytes on the day of delivery (58.9 ± 5.8% of total mononuclear cells in preterm vs 33.0 ± 6.1% in term infants, p = 0.02. Infants with RDS were born with significantly more CD36(+ macrophages compared with the CLD group (70.3 ± 5.3% in RDS vs 37.6 ± 8.9% in control, p = 0.02. At day 3, infants born at a low gestational age are more likely to have greater numbers of CD14(+ mononuclear phagocytes in the airway (p = 0.03, but fewer of these cells are functionally polarized as assessed by HLA-DR (p = 0.05 or CD36 (p = 0.05 positivity, suggesting increased recruitment of monocytes or a failure to mature these cells in the lung.These findings suggest that macrophage polarization may be affected by gestational maturity, that more immature macrophage phenotypes may be associated with the progression of RDS to CLD and that phenotyping mononuclear cells in BAL could predict disease outcome.

  12. Deconstruction of Vulnerability to Complex Diseases: Enhanced Effect Sizes and Power of Intermediate Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The deconstruction of vulnerability to complex disease with the help of intermediate phenotypes, including the heritable and disease-associated endophenotypes, is a legacy of Henri Begleiter. Systematic searches for genes influencing complex disorders, including bipolar disorder, have recently been completed using whole genome association (WGA, identifying a series of validated loci. Using this information, it is possible to compare effect sizes of disease loci discovered in very large samples to the effect sizes of replicated functional loci determining intermediate phenotypes that are of essential interest in psychiatric disorders. It is shown that the genes influencing intermediate phenotypes tend to have a larger effect size. Furthermore, the WGA results reveal that the number of loci of large effect size for complex diseases is limited, and yet multiple functional loci have already been identified for intermediate phenotypes relevant to psychiatric diseases, and without the benefit of WGA.

  13. Genome Sequencing Reveals Loci under Artificial Selection that Underlie Disease Phenotypes in the Laboratory Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atanur, Santosh S.; Diaz, Ana Garcia; Maratou, Klio; Sarkis, Allison; Rotival, Maxime; Game, Laurence; Tschannen, Michael R.; Kaisaki, Pamela J.; Otto, Georg W.; Ma, Man Chun John; Keane, Thomas M.; Hummel, Oliver; Saar, Kathrin; Chen, Wei; Guryev, Victor; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Garrett, Michael R.; Joe, Bina; Citterio, Lorena; Bianchi, Giuseppe; McBride, Martin; Dominiczak, Anna; Adams, David J.; Serikawa, Tadao; Flicek, Paul; Cuppen, Edwin; Hubner, Norbert; Petretto, Enrico; Gauguier, Dominique; Kwitek, Anne; Jacob, Howard; Aitman, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Large numbers of inbred laboratory rat strains have been developed for a range of complex disease phenotypes. To gain insights into the evolutionary pressures underlying selection for these phenotypes, we sequenced the genomes of 27 rat strains, including 11 models of hypertension, diabetes, and

  14. Norrie disease: extraocular clinical manifestations in 56 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharon E; Mullen, Thomas E; Graham, Dionne; Sims, Katherine B; Rehm, Heidi L

    2012-08-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by congenital blindness, progressive sensorineural hearing loss and cognitive impairment. The ocular phenotype has been well described, while the extraocular manifestations of the disorder are not well understood. We present the data from the Norrie Disease Registry, which consists of 56 patients with detailed clinical histories and genotype data. This study represents the largest, detailed investigation into the phenotypic spectrum of ND to date and more importantly expands knowledge of the extraocular clinical manifestations. We identify several novel aspects of the syndrome that will improve the management of these patients. In particular, we expand our understanding of the neurologic manifestations in ND and identify a chronic seizure disorder in approximately 10% of all patients. In addition, details of the hearing phenotype are described including the median age of onset (12 years of age) and how genotype affects onset. Moreover, we find vascular disease to be a significant component of ND; and vascular health should be, in the future, a component of patient clinical care. In summary, the results expand our understanding of the phenotypic variability and genotypic heterogeneity in ND patients. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Clinical and molecular characterization of a novel INS mutation identified in patients with MODY phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, Barbara; Artuso, Rosangela; Lenzi, Lorenzo; Guasti, Monica; Braccesi, Giulia; Barni, Federica; Casalini, Emilio; Giglio, Sabrina; Toni, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    Correct diagnosis of Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) is based on genetic tests requiring an appropriate subject selection by clinicians. Mutations in the insulin (INS) gene rarely occur in patients with MODY. This study is aimed at determining the genetic background and clinical phenotype in patients with suspected MODY. 34 patients with suspected MODY, negative for mutations in the GCK, HNF1α, HNF4α, HNF1β and PDX1 genes, were screened by next generation sequencing (NGS). A heterozygous INS mutation was identified in 4 members of the same family. First genetic tests performed identified two heterozygous silent nucleotide substitutions in MODY3/HNF1α gene. An ineffective attempt to suspend insulin therapy, administering repaglinide and sulphonylureas, was made. DNA was re-sequenced by NGS investigating a set of 102 genes. Genes implicated in the pathway of pancreatic β-cells, candidate genes for type 2 diabetes mellitus and genes causative of diabetes in mice were selected. A novel heterozygous variant in human preproinsulin INS gene (c.125T > C) was found in the affected family members. The new INS mutation broadens the spectrum of possible INS phenotypes. Screening for INS mutations is warranted not only in neonatal diabetes but also in MODYx patients and in selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus negative for autoantibodies. Subjects with complex diseases without a specific phenotype should be studied by NGS because Sanger sequencing is ineffective and time consuming in detecting rare variants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes: Neuropsychology and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-11

    Alzheimer Disease, Early Onset; Alzheimer Disease; Alzheimer Disease, Late Onset; Dementia, Alzheimer Type; Logopenic Progressive Aphasia; Primary Progressive Aphasia; Visuospatial/Perceptual Abilities; Posterior Cortical Atrophy; Executive Dysfunction; Corticobasal Degeneration; Ideomotor Apraxia

  17. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared bet...... of a patient's disease, in part genetically determined, and the major driver to changes in disease behaviour over time. FUNDING: International Inflammatory Bowel Disease Genetics Consortium members funding sources (see Acknowledgments for full list)....

  18. An Expanded Multi-Organ Disease Phenotype Associated with Mutations in YARS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tracewska-Siemiątkowska, Anna; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Bosch, Danielle G M

    2017-01-01

    Whole exome sequence analysis was performed in a Swedish mother-father-affected proband trio with a phenotype characterized by progressive retinal degeneration with congenital nystagmus, profound congenital hearing impairment, primary amenorrhea, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and liver disease...

  19. Gaucher disease types 1 and 3: Phenotypic characterization of large populations from the ICGG Gaucher Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Gregory A; Zimran, Ari; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Study of the natural history of Gaucher disease has revealed marked phenotypic variation. Correlations to genotypes could provide insight into individual susceptibility to varying disease severity, which may impact whole-life medical care, reproductive decisions, and therapeutic choices for affected families. Importantly, pre-symptomatic or prospective interventions or the use of therapies with significant risk require accurate risk-benefit analyses based on the prognosis for individual patients. The body of international data held within the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry provides an unprecedented opportunity to characterize the phenotypes of Gaucher disease types 1 and 3 and to appreciate demographic and ethnic factors that may influence phenotypes. The diversity of GBA gene mutations from patients with Gaucher disease represented in the ICGG Gaucher Registry database and in the literature provides the basis for initial genotype/phenotype correlations, the outcomes of which are summarized here. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bronchodilator responsiveness as a phenotypic characteristic of established chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Paul; Agusti, Alvar; Edwards, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Bronchodilator responsiveness is a potential phenotypic characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We studied whether change in lung function after a bronchodilator is abnormal in COPD, whether stable responder subgroups can be identified, and whether these subgroups experience...

  1. Clinical phenotype of 5 females with a CDKL5 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, X.L.; Spruijt, L.; Yntema, H.G.; Verrips, A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin dependent kinase like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been reported in approximately 80 patients since the first description in 2003. The clinical presentation partly corresponds with Rett syndrome, considering clinical features as intellectual disability, hypotonia, and poor

  2. Neuro degenerative diseases: clinical concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, V.

    2005-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the main neuro-degenerative diseases (NDDs) seen clinically. They share some common clinical symptoms and neuro-pathological findings. The increase of life expectancy in the developed countries will inevitably contribute to enhance the prevalence of these diseases. Behavioral disorders, common in NDDs, will produce major care management challenges. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease corresponds to a histopathological diagnosis, based on the observation of a de-pigmentation and a neuronal loss in the substantia nigra, as well as on the presence of intra-neuronal inclusion bodies. AD is insidious with slowly progressive dementia in which the decline in memory constitutes the main complaint. The diagnosis of definite AD requires the presence of clinical criteria as well as the histopathological confirmation of brain lesions. The two main lesions are the presence of senile plaques and neuro-fibrillary tangles. Positron emission tomography (PET) explores cerebral metabolism and neurotransmitter kinetics in NDDs using principally [ 18 F]-deoxyglucose and [ 18 F]-dopa. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic function is altered in PD, as evidenced by the low uptake of [ 18 F]-dopa in the posterior putamen as compared to anterior putamen and caudate nucleus. In contrast, [ 18 F]-dopa uptake is equally depressed in all striatal structures in progressive supra-nuclear palsy. Regional glucose metabolism at rest is preserved in elderly once cerebral atrophy is taken into account. On the contrary, glucose metabolism is globally reduced in AD, with marked decrease in the parietal and temporal regions. PET has proved to be useful to study in vivo neurochemical processes in patients suffering from NDDs. The potential of this approach is still largely unexploited, and depends on new ligand production to establish early diagnosis and treatment follow-up. (author)

  3. Cassava brown streak disease in Rwanda, the associated viruses and disease phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munganyinka, E; Ateka, E M; Kihurani, A W; Kanyange, M C; Tairo, F; Sseruwagi, P; Ndunguru, J

    2018-02-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) was first observed on cassava ( Manihot esculenta ) in Rwanda in 2009. In 2014 eight major cassava-growing districts in the country were surveyed to determine the distribution and variability of symptom phenotypes associated with CBSD, and the genetic diversity of cassava brown streak viruses. Distribution of the CBSD symptom phenotypes and their combinations varied greatly between districts, cultivars and their associated viruses. The symptoms on leaf alone recorded the highest (32.2%) incidence, followed by roots (25.7%), leaf + stem (20.3%), leaf + root (10.4%), leaf + stem + root (5.2%), stem + root (3.7%), and stem (2.5%) symptoms. Analysis by RT-PCR showed that single infections of Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) were most common (74.2% of total infections) and associated with all the seven phenotypes studied. Single infections of Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) were predominant (15.3% of total infections) in CBSD-affected plants showing symptoms on stems alone. Mixed infections (CBSV + UCBSV) comprised 10.5% of total infections and predominated in the combinations of leaf + stem + root phenotypes. Phylogenetic analysis and the estimates of evolutionary divergence, using partial sequences (210 nt) of the coat protein gene, revealed that in Rwanda there is one type of CBSV and an indication of diverse UCBSV. This study is the first to report the occurrence and distribution of both CBSV and UCBSV based on molecular techniques in Rwanda.

  4. A rare case of haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamee Shastry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a rare case of severe hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN with Bombay phenotype mother. A retrospective study of a case with severe haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother was done. Blood grouping, antibody screening, and lectin study was done on the blood sample of the baby and mother to confirm the diagnosis. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained from the hospital laboratory information system for the analysis. Blood group of the baby was A positive, direct antiglobulin test was negative. Blood group of the mother was confirmed to be Bombay phenotype, Hematological parameters showed all the signs of ongoing hemolysis and the bilirubin level was in the zone of exchange transfusion. Due to the unavailability of this rare phenotype blood unit, baby was managed conservatively. Anticipating the fetal anemia and HDN with mothers having Bombay phenotype and prior notification to the transfusion services will be of great help in optimizing the neonatal care and outcome.

  5. Clinical Polymorphism of Stargardt Disease in a Large Consanguineous Tunisian Family; Implications for Nosology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila El Matri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the polymorphic expression of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family with clinical intra- and interfamilial variation of the condition. Methods: Twelve subjects from two related families with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease were enrolled. A detailed clinical examination including visual acuity and visual field measurement, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, electroretinography (ERG and color vision testing was performed for all subjects. Results: The youngest child from family A manifested typical Stargardt disease while her two brothers presented with Stargardt disease-fundus flavimaculatus (STGD-FFM and her two sisters demonstrated a peculiar phenotype overlapping Stargardt disease and cone-rod dystrophy; their phenotypic manifestation corresponded well with ERG groups I, II and III, respectively. This uncommon occurrence of an age-related decline in ERG amplitude and worsening of fundus changes is suggestive of a grading pattern in Stargardt disease. Their two cousins in family B, displayed the STGD-FFM phenotype. Despite clinically similar STGD-FFM patterns in both families, age of onset and progression of the phenotype in family B differed from family A. Conclusion: This is the first report on phenotypic variation of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family. Regarding phenotype and severity of visual symptoms, family A demonstrated Stargardt disease at various stages of progression. In addition, STGDFFM appeared to be an independent clinical entity in family B. These findings imply that further parameters are required to classify Stargardt′s disease.

  6. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-01-01

    of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs

  7. Clinical potentials of methylator phenotype in stage 4 high-risk neuroblastoma: an open challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Banelli

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of stage 4 high-risk neuroblastoma patients are alive and disease-free 5 years after disease onset while the remaining experience rapid and fatal progression. Numerous findings underline the prognostic role of methylation of defined target genes in neuroblastoma without taking into account the clinical and biological heterogeneity of this disease. In this report we have investigated the methylation of the PCDHB cluster, the most informative member of the "Methylator Phenotype" in neuroblastoma, hypothesizing that if this epigenetic mark can predict overall and progression free survival in high-risk stage 4 neuroblastoma, it could be utilized to improve the risk stratification of the patients, alone or in conjunction with the previously identified methylation of the SFN gene (14.3.3sigma that can accurately predict outcome in these patients. We have utilized univariate and multivariate models to compare the prognostic power of PCDHB methylation in terms of overall and progression free survival, quantitatively determined by pyrosequencing, with that of other markers utilized for the patients' stratification utilizing methylation thresholds calculated on neuroblastoma at stage 1-4 and only on stage 4, high-risk patients. Our results indicate that PCDHB accurately distinguishes between high- and intermediate/low risk stage 4 neuroblastoma in agreement with the established risk stratification criteria. However PCDHB cannot predict outcome in the subgroup of stage 4 patients at high-risk whereas methylation levels of SFN are suggestive of a "methylation gradient" associated with tumor aggressiveness as suggested by the finding of a higher threshold that defines a subset of patients with an extremely severe disease (OS <24 months. Because of the heterogeneity of neuroblastoma we believe that clinically relevant methylation markers should be selected and tested on homogeneous groups of patients rather than on patients at all stages.

  8. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  9. PhenoTips: patient phenotyping software for clinical and research use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdea, Marta; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Fiume, Marc; Bowdin, Sarah; Boycott, Kym M; Chénier, Sébastien; Chitayat, David; Faghfoury, Hanna; Meyn, M Stephen; Ray, Peter N; So, Joyce; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Brudno, Michael

    2013-08-01

    We have developed PhenoTips: open source software for collecting and analyzing phenotypic information for patients with genetic disorders. Our software combines an easy-to-use interface, compatible with any device that runs a Web browser, with a standardized database back end. The PhenoTips' user interface closely mirrors clinician workflows so as to facilitate the recording of observations made during the patient encounter. Collected data include demographics, medical history, family history, physical and laboratory measurements, physical findings, and additional notes. Phenotypic information is represented using the Human Phenotype Ontology; however, the complexity of the ontology is hidden behind a user interface, which combines simple selection of common phenotypes with error-tolerant, predictive search of the entire ontology. PhenoTips supports accurate diagnosis by analyzing the entered data, then suggesting additional clinical investigations and providing Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) links to likely disorders. By collecting, classifying, and analyzing phenotypic information during the patient encounter, PhenoTips allows for streamlining of clinic workflow, efficient data entry, improved diagnosis, standardization of collected patient phenotypes, and sharing of anonymized patient phenotype data for the study of rare disorders. Our source code and a demo version of PhenoTips are available at http://phenotips.org. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  10. Broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric phenotypes associated with white matter disease in PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Tugce B; Davila, Jorge; Lewis, Denice; Boafo, Addo; Sell, Erick; Richer, Julie; Nikkel, Sarah M; Armour, Christine M; Tomiak, Eva; Lines, Matthew A; Sawyer, Sarah L

    2018-01-01

    White matter lesions have been described in patients with PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS). How these lesions correlate with the neurocognitive features associated with PTEN mutations, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or developmental delay, has not been well established. We report nine patients with PTEN mutations and white matter changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), eight of whom were referred for reasons other than developmental delay or ASD. Their clinical presentations ranged from asymptomatic macrocephaly with normal development/intellect, to obsessive compulsive disorder, and debilitating neurological disease. To our knowledge, this report constitutes the first detailed description of PTEN-related white matter changes in adult patients and in children with normal development and intelligence. We present a detailed assessment of the neuropsychological phenotype of our patients and discuss the relationship between the wide array of neuropsychiatric features and observed white matter findings in the context of these individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Neutral lipid-storage disease with myopathy and extended phenotype with novel PNPLA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Roberto; Pozzessere, Simone; Rastelli, Emanuele; Serra, Laura; Terracciano, Chiara; Gibellini, Manuela; Bozzali, Marco; Arca, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Neutral lipid-storage disease with myopathy is caused by mutations in PNPLA2, which produce skeletal and cardiac myopathy. We report a man with multiorgan neutral lipid storage and unusual multisystem clinical involvement, including cognitive impairment. Quantitative brain MRI with voxel-based morphometry and extended neuropsychological assessment were performed. In parallel, the coding sequences and intron/exon boundaries of the PNPLA2 gene were screened by direct sequencing. Neuropsychological assessment revealed global cognitive impairment, and brain MRI showed reduced gray matter volume in the temporal lobes. Molecular characterization revealed a novel homozygous mutation in exon 5 of PNPLA2 (c.714C>A), resulting in a premature stop codon (p.Cys238*). Some PNPLA2 mutations, such as the one described here, may present with an extended phenotype, including brain involvement. In these cases, complete neuropsychological testing, combined with quantitative brain MRI, may help to characterize and quantify cognitive impairment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Huntington's disease: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Raymund AC

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Huntington disease (HD is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by unwanted choreatic movements, behavioral and psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Prevalence in the Caucasian population is estimated at 1/10,000-1/20,000. Mean age at onset of symptoms is 30-50 years. In some cases symptoms start before the age of 20 years with behavior disturbances and learning difficulties at school (Juvenile Huntington's disease; JHD. The classic sign is chorea that gradually spreads to all muscles. All psychomotor processes become severely retarded. Patients experience psychiatric symptoms and cognitive decline. HD is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by an elongated CAG repeat (36 repeats or more on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 in the Huntingtine gene. The longer the CAG repeat, the earlier the onset of disease. In cases of JHD the repeat often exceeds 55. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and signs in an individual with a parent with proven HD, and is confirmed by DNA determination. Pre-manifest diagnosis should only be performed by multidisciplinary teams in healthy at-risk adult individuals who want to know whether they carry the mutation or not. Differential diagnoses include other causes of chorea including general internal disorders or iatrogenic disorders. Phenocopies (clinically diagnosed cases of HD without the genetic mutation are observed. Prenatal diagnosis is possible by chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis. Preimplantation diagnosis with in vitro fertilization is offered in several countries. There is no cure. Management should be multidisciplinary and is based on treating symptoms with a view to improving quality of life. Chorea is treated with dopamine receptor blocking or depleting agents. Medication and non-medical care for depression and aggressive behavior may be required. The progression of the disease leads to a complete dependency in daily life, which

  13. Association Between Lipoprotein(A) and Small Apo(A) Phenotypes and Coronary Heart Disease in Sudanese Diabetic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.M.; Elabid, B.E.H.; Addalla, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background:Recent studies indicate an independent association of apolipoprotein(a) small phenotypes with the diabetes and the onset of coronary heart disease.Apolipoprotein(a)small phenotypes when used together with Lipoprotein(a) levels make powerful markers in assessing the actual risk of developing coronary heart disease in diabetic patients. Objectives: Evaluation of clinical and diagnostic significant of Lipoprotein(a) levels and apolipoprotein(a) small phenotypes and its relation to coronary heart disease in Sudanese diabetic patients. Setting and duration of study: Diabetic patients attending hospitals and medical centers from May 2011-December 2012, in Khartoum, Sudan. Patients and Methods: This was a case control, hospital based study done on 138 Sudanese diabetic patients attending hospitals and medical centers in Khartoum. Patients were divided into 2 groups. One group had diabetic cases with coronary heart disease and the other were diabetic patients without coronary heart disease. Controls were age and gender matched. Blood samples were collected from both groups(patients and controls) and were run for apolipoproteins, lipoproteins and apolipoprotein(a) small phenotype,low-density lipoprotein,high-density lipoprotein and trigeminal ganglia. Results: The levels of Lipoprotein(a) of patients were significantly higher than controls (p<0.05). Apolipoprotein(a)small phenotype distribution showed a significant difference when compared between patients of both groups (diabetics with and without coronary heart disease) and controls (p<0.05). Both low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol showed significant difference in both patient groups and controls (p<0.05). Total cholesterol and triglyceride levels showed no significant difference between patients and controls. Apolipoprotein(a) small phenotypes showed significant distribution in diabetic patients when compared with coronary heart disease patients (more than one low molecular weight

  14. Different renal phenotypes in related adult males with Fabry disease with the same classic genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Renzo; Moschella, Mariarita; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Donati, Ilaria; Flachi, Marta; Grimaldi, Daniela; Cerretani, Davide; Giovanni, Paola De; Montevecchi, Marcello; Rigotti, Angelo; Ravasio, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Fabry disease related patients with classical mutation usually exhibit similar severe phenotype especially concerning renal manifestation. A dry blood spot screening (DBS) and the DNA analysis has been performed in a 48-year-old man (Patient 1) because of paresthesia. The DBS revealed absent leukocyte α -Gal A enzyme activity while DNA analysis identified the I354K mutation. Serum creatinine and e-GFR were in normal range and also albuminuria and proteinuria were absent. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions and a diffuse focus of gliosis in the white matter, while the echocardiogram showed a left ventricular hypertrophy. The renal biopsy performed in the case index showed a massive deposition of zebra bodies. By a familiar investigation, it was recognized that his brother (Patient 2) died 2 years before from sudden death syndrome at the age of 49. He had suffered sporadic and undiagnosed pain at the extremities, a prior cataract, bilateral neurosensorial hearing loss and left ventricular hypertrophy on Echocardiogram. His previous laboratory examinations revealed a normal serum creatinine and the absence of proteinuria. Pedigree analysis of the brothers revealed a high disease burden among family members, with an affected cousin (Patient 3) who progressed early to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that required renal transplantation. Here we describe the clinical history of three adult male members of the same family with the same genotype who manifested different presentation and progression of the disease, particularly concerning the renal involvement.

  15. Clinical phenotype and outcome of hepatitis E virus-associated neuralgic amyotrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, J.J.J. van; Dalton, H.R.; Ripellino, P.; Madden, R.G.; Jones, C.; Fritz, M.; Gobbi, C.; Melli, G.; Pasi, E.; Herrod, J.; Lissmann, R.F.; Ashraf, H.H.; Abdelrahim, M.; Masri, O.; Fraga, M.; Benninger, D.; Kuntzer, T.; Aubert, V.; Sahli, R.; Moradpour, D.; Blasco-Perrin, H.; Attarian, S.; Gerolami, R.; Colson, P.; Giordani, M.T.; Hartl, J.; Pischke, S.; Lin, N.X.; McLean, B.N.; Bendall, R.P.; Panning, M.; Peron, J.M.; Kamar, N.; Izopet, J.; Jacobs, B.C.; Alfen, N. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical phenotype and outcome in hepatitis E virus-associated neuralgic amyotrophy (HEV-NA). METHODS: Cases of NA were identified in 11 centers from 7 European countries, with retrospective analysis of demographics, clinical/laboratory findings, and treatment and

  16. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease: phenotypic characterization and genotypic correlations in 21 affected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudorfer, Orit; Pastores, Gregory M; Zeng, Bai J; Gianutsos, John; Zaroff, Charles M; Kolodny, Edwin H

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the phenotype (and corresponding genotype) of adult patients with late-onset Tay-Sachs disease, a clinical variant of the GM2-gangliosidoses. A comprehensive physical examination, including neurological assessments, was performed to establish the current disease pattern and severity. In addition, the patients' past medical histories were reviewed. The patients' alpha-subunit mutations (beta-Hexosaminidase A genotype) were determined and correlated with their corresponding clinical findings and disease course. Twenty-one patients (current mean age: 27.0 years; range: 14-47 years) were identified. The pedigree revealed a relative with the "classic" infantile or late-onset form of Tay-Sachs disease in four (out of 18) unrelated families. The patients were predominantly male (15/21 individuals) and of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry (15/18 families). Mean age at onset was 18.1 years; balance problems and difficulty climbing stairs were the most frequent presenting complaints. In several cases, the diagnosis was delayed (mean age at diagnosis: 27.0 years). Analysis of the beta-hex A gene revealed the G269S mutation as the most common disease allele; found in homozygosity (N = 1) or heterozygosity (N = 18; including 2 sib pairs). Disease onset (age 36 years) was delayed and progression relatively slower in the homozygous G269S patient. Two siblings (ages 28 and 31 years), of non-Jewish ancestry, were compound heterozygotes (TATC1278/W474C); their clinical course is dominated by psychiatric problems. Brain imaging studies revealed marked cerebellar atrophy in all patients (N = 18) tested, regardless of disease stage. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease is an infrequent disorder and the diagnosis is often missed or delayed (by approximately 8 years). Early on, the majority of patients develop signs of either cerebellar or anterior motor neuron involvement. Affected individuals may also develop psychotic episodes. In most cases, the later

  17. Particularities of COPD exacerbations in different phenotypes of the disease in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendah, Ines; Ayed, Khadija; Kwas, Hamida; Khattab, Amel; Ghédira, Habib

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is defined by a limitation of airflow. This disease is characterized by exacerbations that threaten the patient's life and worsens his prognosis. Moreover, COPD patients are different according to many parameters that define different phenotypes. Characteristics of exacerbations may depend on these phenotypes according to few recent studies. To determine the characteristics and the prognosis of the exacerbations in each phenotype of COPD patients phenotype in Tunisia. Retrospective study including 153 male patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbation from January 2009 to June 2012. Patients were classified into 4 phenotypes according to Burgel's classification. Patients were divided into four phenotypes: phenotype (PH)1: (n=68), PH2: (n=33), PH3: (n=25) and PH4: (n=27). Mean age for PH1, 2, 3 and 4 was: 61, 74, 56 and 72 years. The number of exacerbations per year was higher in PH1. Dyspnea was more important in PH1 and 4. Hypercapnia on admission was higher in PH4. Non invasive ventilation and transfer to resuscitation unit were more frequently mandatory in PH3 and 4.   Death occurred 2% of PH1 and 5% of PH4. Hospitalization duration was more important in PH4. COPD patients are heterogenous and belong to different phenotypes. The characteristics of the exacerbations and their prognosis widely differ according to these different groups. In Tunisia, it seems that patients who had moderate respiratory functional tests impairment are the lowest responders to treatment with a higher frequency of resuscitation unit transfer.

  18. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S.; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M.; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T.; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A.; Brunner, Han G.; Burke, Christopher J.; Carr, Ian M.; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Chandler, Kate E.; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C.; Cowan, Frances M.; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; de Laet, Corinne; de Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D.; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J.; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hayward, Bruce E.; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P.; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G.; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D.; Kingston, Helen M.; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kornberg, Andrew J.; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J.; Livingston, John H.; Lourenco, Charles M.; Lyall, E. G. Hermione; Lynch, Sally A.; Lyons, Michael J.; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P.; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B.; Mewasingh, Leena D.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K.; Ostergaard, John R.; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R. Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M.; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A.; Corcoles, C. Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B. P.; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L.; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; van Coster, Rudy N. A.; van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L.; Willemsen, Michel A. A.; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease

  19. Differences in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes between non-smokers and smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wonjun; Lim, Myoung Nam; Bak, So Hyeon; Hong, Seok-Ho; Han, Seon-Sook; Lee, Seung-Joon; Kim, Woo Jin; Hong, Yoonki

    2018-02-01

    Although tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), more than one-fourth of COPD patients are non-smokers. In this cross-sectional study, the differences in COPD phenotypes between non-smokers and smokers in male subjects were investigated and were focused on structural lung changes using a quantitative assessment of computed tomography (CT) images. They divided male participants with COPD, from a Korean cohort near a cement plant, into non-smokers and smokers by a cutoff of a 5 pack-year smoking history. Clinical characteristics, including age, body mass index (BMI), spirometry results, history of biomass smoke exposure, and CT measurements, were compared between the two groups. Emphysema index (EI) and mean wall area percentage (MWA %) were used to evaluate the structural lung changes on volumetric CT scans. The non-smoker group (n = 49) had younger patients and had a greater BMI than the smoker group (n = 113) (P smokers had emphysema than non-smokers (EI 10.0 vs. 6.5, P smokers than in non-smokers (MWA 69.1 vs. 65.3, P = .03), while EI was not statistically different (EI 7.1 vs. 10.4, P = .52). Non-smoker males with COPD were younger and had a greater BMI than the smokers. Tobacco smoke exposure seemed to be associated with an emphysema-predominant phenotype, while biomass smoke exposure exhibited a significant interaction with tobacco smoking in an airway-predominant phenotype. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Clinical investigation in Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Naoki; Maehara, Mitsuo; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    1983-01-01

    Wilson's disease of cerebral type with a chief complaint of tremor occurred in 3 brothers and sisters of a certain family line. Treatment with D-penicillamine produced remarkable clinical improvement as shown by the disappearance of tremor and Kayser-Fleischer ring. Cranial CT scans made before the treatment revealed abnormal findings such as low density areas in the (bilateral) thalamus and the lenticular nucleus, atrophy of the cerebral cortex, and enlargement of the ventricles. After the treatment, cranial CT revealed that the low density areas in the thalamus and the lenticular nucleus disappeared corresponding to the clinical improvement. However, the atrophy of the cerebral cortex and the enlargement of the ventricles were not ameliorated. (Ueda, J.)

  1. Phenotype-genotype correlation in Wilson disease in a large Lebanese family: association of c.2299insC with hepatic and of p. Ala1003Thr with neurologic phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julnar Usta

    Full Text Available Genotype phenotype correlations in Wilson disease (WD are best established in homozygous patients or in compound heterozygous patients carrying the same set of mutations. We determined the clinical phenotype of patients with WD carrying the c.2298_2299insC in Exon 8 (c.2299insC or the p. Ala1003Thr missense substitution in Exon 13 mutations in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. We investigated 76 members of a single large Lebanese family. Their genotypes were determined, and clinical assessments were carried out for affected subjects. We also performed a literature search retrieving the phenotypes of patients carrying the same mutations of our patients in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. There were 7 consanguineous marriages in this family and the prevalence of WD was 8.9% and of carriers of ATP7B mutation 44.7%. WD was confirmed in 9 out of 76 subjects. All 9 had the c.2299insC mutation, 5 homozygous and 4-compound heterozygous with p. Ala1003Thr. Six of our patients had hepatic, 2 had neurologic and 1 had asymptomatic phenotype. Based on our data and a literature review, clear phenotypes were reported for 38 patients worldwide carrying the c.2299insC mutation. About 53% of those have hepatic and 29% have neurologic phenotype. Furthermore, there were 10 compound heterozygous patients carrying the p. Ala1003Thr mutation. Among those, 80% having c.2299insC as the second mutation had hepatic phenotype, and all others had neurologic phenotype. We hereby report an association between the c.2299insC mutation and hepatic phenotype and between the p. Ala1003Thr mutation and neurologic phenotype.

  2. Fenótipos clínicos de asma grave Clinical phenotypes of severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseliane de Souza Araújo Alves

    2008-09-01

    specialized outpatient clinic. A systematic protocol for patient evaluation and follow-up was applied. Treatment compliance and control of the disease at the end of follow-up were defined by clinical and functional data. Patients who did not meet asthma control criteria after six months despite compliance with treatment and correct use of medication were characterized as treatment-resistant. Phenotypes were determined by factorial analysis and compared using various tests. RESULTS: At the end of follow-up, 88 patients were considered treatment compliant and 23 were considered noncompliant. Factorial analysis of the compliant patients identified four phenotypes: phenotype 1 (28 patients comprised patients who were treatment-resistant, more often presenting nocturnal symptoms and exacerbations, as well as more often using rescue bronchodilators; phenotype 2 (48 patients comprised patients with persistent airflow limitation, lower ratios of forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity at baseline, more advanced age and longer duration of symptoms; phenotype 3 (42 patients comprised patients with allergic rhinosinusitis who were nonsmokers and presented predominantly reversible airflow obstruction; and phenotype 4 (15 patients comprised cases with a history of aspirin intolerance to acetylsalicylic acid associated with near-fatal asthma. Conclusions: A significant number of patients with severe asthma are noncompliant with treatment. Although many patients with severe asthma have persistent airflow obstruction, the most relevant clinical phenotype comprises patients who are resistant to the typical treatment.

  3. PURA syndrome: clinical delineation and genotype-phenotype study in 32 individuals with review of published literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Margot R F; Janowski, Robert; Alvi, Mohsan; Self, Jay E; van Essen, Ton J; Vreeburg, Maaike; Rouhl, Rob P W; Stevens, Servi J C; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Schieving, Jolanda; Pfundt, Rolph; van Dijk, Katinke; Smeets, Eric; Stumpel, Connie T R M; Bok, Levinus A; Cobben, Jan Maarten; Engelen, Marc; Mansour, Sahar; Whiteford, Margo; Chandler, Kate E; Douzgou, Sofia; Cooper, Nicola S; Tan, Ene-Choo; Foo, Roger; Lai, Angeline H M; Rankin, Julia; Green, Andrew; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Isohanni, Pirjo; Williams, Shelley; Ruhoy, Ilene; Carvalho, Karen S; Dowling, James J; Lev, Dorit L; Sterbova, Katalin; Lassuthova, Petra; Neupauerová, Jana; Waugh, Jeff L; Keros, Sotirios; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Smithson, Sarah F; Brunner, Han G; van Hoeckel, Ceciel; Anderson, Mel; Clowes, Virginia E; Siu, Victoria Mok; DDD study, The; Selber, Paulo; Leventer, Richard J; Nellaker, Christoffer; Niessing, Dierk; Hunt, David; Baralle, Diana

    2018-01-01

    Background De novo mutations in PURA have recently been described to cause PURA syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy, feeding difficulties and neonatal hypotonia. Objectives To delineate the clinical spectrum of PURA syndrome and study genotype-phenotype correlations. Methods Diagnostic or research-based exome or Sanger sequencing was performed in individuals with ID. We systematically collected clinical and mutation data on newly ascertained PURA syndrome individuals, evaluated data of previously reported individuals and performed a computational analysis of photographs. We classified mutations based on predicted effect using 3D in silico models of crystal structures of Drosophila-derived Pur-alpha homologues. Finally, we explored genotype-phenotype correlations by analysis of both recurrent mutations as well as mutation classes. Results We report mutations in PURA (purine-rich element binding protein A) in 32 individuals, the largest cohort described so far. Evaluation of clinical data, including 22 previously published cases, revealed that all have moderate to severe ID and neonatal-onset symptoms, including hypotonia (96%), respiratory problems (57%), feeding difficulties (77%), exaggerated startle response (44%), hypersomnolence (66%) and hypothermia (35%). Epilepsy (54%) and gastrointestinal (69%), ophthalmological (51%) and endocrine problems (42%) were observed frequently. Computational analysis of facial photographs showed subtle facial dysmorphism. No strong genotype-phenotype correlation was identified by subgrouping mutations into functional classes. Conclusion We delineate the clinical spectrum of PURA syndrome with the identification of 32 additional individuals. The identification of one individual through targeted Sanger sequencing points towards the clinical recognisability of the syndrome. Genotype-phenotype analysis showed no significant correlation between mutation classes and

  4. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N.; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J.; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available. PMID:26119816

  5. Differential effects of the loss of intrachain- versus interchain-disulfide bonds in the cystine-knot domain of von Willebrand factor on the clinical phenotype of von Willebrand disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjernberg, Pernilla; Vos, Hans L.; Spaargaren-van Riel, Caroline C.; Luken, Brenda M.; Voorberg, Jan; Bertina, Rogier M.; Eikenboom, Jeroen C. J.

    2006-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) contains a large number of cysteine residues, which all form disulfide bonds. Mutations of cysteines located in the cystine-knot (CK) domain of VWF have been identified in both qualitative type 2A (IID) and quantitative type 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD). Our objective

  6. Matching disease and phenotype ontologies in the ontology alignment evaluation initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrow, Ian; Jiménez-Ruiz, Ernesto; Splendiani, Andrea; Romacker, Martin; Woollard, Peter; Markel, Scott; Alam-Faruque, Yasmin; Koch, Martin; Malone, James; Waaler, Arild

    2017-12-02

    The disease and phenotype track was designed to evaluate the relative performance of ontology matching systems that generate mappings between source ontologies. Disease and phenotype ontologies are important for applications such as data mining, data integration and knowledge management to support translational science in drug discovery and understanding the genetics of disease. Eleven systems (out of 21 OAEI participating systems) were able to cope with at least one of the tasks in the Disease and Phenotype track. AML, FCA-Map, LogMap(Bio) and PhenoMF systems produced the top results for ontology matching in comparison to consensus alignments. The results against manually curated mappings proved to be more difficult most likely because these mapping sets comprised mostly subsumption relationships rather than equivalence. Manual assessment of unique equivalence mappings showed that AML, LogMap(Bio) and PhenoMF systems have the highest precision results. Four systems gave the highest performance for matching disease and phenotype ontologies. These systems coped well with the detection of equivalence matches, but struggled to detect semantic similarity. This deserves more attention in the future development of ontology matching systems. The findings of this evaluation show that such systems could help to automate equivalence matching in the workflow of curators, who maintain ontology mapping services in numerous domains such as disease and phenotype.

  7. Lafora disease: from genotype to phenotype* Rashmi Parihar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S.Ganesh

    The progressive myoclonic epilepsy of Lafora, or Lafora disease, is a neurodegenerative .... interact with a number of proteins, a possible disease modifying role for these interacting proteins are .... substrates are low (Mittal et al. 2015). Laforin ..... Roemer MI. 1990 Public and private sectors in health system development.

  8. Association of FLG single nucleotide variations with clinical phenotypes of atopic dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungshin Kim

    Full Text Available FLG encodes a large protein called profilaggrin, which plays a key role in maintaining an effective skin barrier against the environment. In this study, we identified FLG single nucleotide variations (FLG-SNVs and evaluated the association of FLG-SNVs with clinical phenotypes including atopic dermatitis (AD-associated minor clinical features, presence of specific allergic sensitization, and serum parameters.Eighty-one Korean patients with AD were enrolled. AD-associated minor clinical features as well as allergic rhinitis and asthma were diagnosed by specialists. FLG-SNVs were identified by Sanger sequencing of entire exons through long-range PCR. Allergic sensitization to a specific allergen was evaluated by multiple allergen simultaneous test. Serologic parameters such as serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP and eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN were measured.A total of seventy-three SNVs and 4 LOF mutations were successfully genotyped. rs71626704 and rs76413899 were significantly associated with a history of asthma and cheilitis (P = 0.002 and P = 0.033, respectively, however, the associations were not found statistically significant after adjustment by multiple comparisons. In addition, we detected haplotype blocks which were correlated with non-specific hand or foot dermatitis and scalp scale. We identified FLG-SNVs which were associated with sensitization to environmental allergens; rs62623409 and rs71625199 (P = 0.038 and P = 0.008, respectively. Patients with FLG P478S TT and history of allergic rhinitis showed a higher EDN level, and among those patients, the ones with asthma showed a higher ECP level.This study revealed the association of FLG-SNVs with AD-associated minor clinical features. We firstly identified rs71625199 which was associated with higher environmental allergic sensitization. We also suggest that FLG P478S is a kind of disease modifier which affects serologic parameters such as EDN and ECP.

  9. Variation in phenotypic appearance of Graves' disease: effect of genetic anticipation and duration of complaints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Xander; Smit, Natalie; Endert, Erik; Tijssen, Jan; Wiersinga, Wilmar

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to susceptibility of Graves' disease. In this study. we evaluated whether the duration of symptoms or a positive family history of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) are related to specific phenotypes in patients with a first episode of

  10. Phenotypic concordance in familial inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results of a nationwide IBD Spanish database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabré, Eduard; Mañosa, Míriam; García-Sánchez, Valle; Gutiérrez, Ana; Ricart, Elena; Esteve, Maria; Guardiola, Jordi; Aguas, Mariam; Merino, Olga; Ponferrada, Angel; Gisbert, Javier P; Garcia-Planella, Esther; Ceña, Gloria; Cabriada, José L; Montoro, Miguel; Domènech, Eugeni

    2014-07-01

    Disease outcome has been found to be poorer in familial inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than in sporadic forms, but assessment of phenotypic concordance in familial IBD provided controversial results. We assessed the concordance for disease type and phenotypic features in IBD families. Patients with familial IBD were identified from the IBD Spanish database ENEIDA. Families in whom at least two members were in the database were selected for concordance analysis (κ index). Concordance for type of IBD [Crohn's disease (CD) vs. ulcerative colitis (UC)], as well as for disease extent, localization and behaviour, perianal disease, extraintestinal manifestations, and indicators of severe disease (i.e., need for immunosuppressors, biological agents, and surgery) for those pairs concordant for IBD type, were analyzed. 798 out of 11,905 IBD patients (7%) in ENEIDA had familial history of IBD. Complete data of 107 families (231 patients and 144 consanguineous pairs) were available for concordance analyses. The youngest members of the pairs were diagnosed with IBD at a significantly younger age (p<0.001) than the oldest ones. Seventy-six percent of pairs matched up for the IBD type (κ=0.58; 95%CI: 0.42-0.73, moderate concordance). There was no relevant concordance for any of the phenotypic items assessed in both diseases. Familial IBD is associated with diagnostic anticipation in younger individuals. Familial history does not allow predicting any phenotypic feature other than IBD type. Copyright © 2013 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gehan Hamdy

    2014-04-22

    Apr 22, 2014 ... Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary ..... Early detection of the disease and timely interventions can reduce the morbidity ..... additional risk factor of retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. The behavioural/dysexecutive variant of Alzheimer's disease: clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkoppele, R.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.; Perry, D.C.; Cohn-Sheehy, B.I.; Scheltens, N.M.E.; Vogel, J.W.; Kramer, J.H.; van der Vlies, A.E.; La Joie, R.; Rosen, H.J.; van der Flier, W.M.; Grinberg, L.T.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Huang, E.J.; van Berckel, B.N.M.; Miller, B.L.; Barkhof, F.; Jagust, W.J.; Scheltens, P.; Seeley, W.W.; Rabinovici, G.D.

    2015-01-01

    A 'frontal variant of Alzheimer's disease' has been described in patients with predominant behavioural or dysexecutive deficits caused by Alzheimer's disease pathology. The description of this rare Alzheimer's disease phenotype has been limited to case reports and small series, and many clinical,

  13. Can we Predict Disease Course with Clinical Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Golovics, Petra A; Lakatos, Peter L

    2018-01-01

    The disease phenotype at diagnosis and the disease course of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) show remarkable heterogeneity across patients. This review aims to summarize the currently available evidence on clinical and some environmental predictive factors, which clinicians should evaluate in the everyday practice together with other laboratory and imaging data to prevent disease progression, enable a more personalized therapy, and avoid negative disease outcomes. In recent population-based epidemiological and referral cohort studies, the evolution of disease phenotype of CD and UC varied significantly. Most CD and severe UC patients still require hospitalization or surgery/colectomy during follow-up. A change in the natural history of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) with improved outcomes in parallel with tailored positioning of aggressive immunomodulator and biological therapy has been suspected. According to the currently available literature, it is of major importance to refer IBD cases at risk for adverse disease outcomes as early during the disease course as possible. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Elevated Serum IgG4 Defines Specific Clinical Phenotype of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le-Feng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To explore the correlation of serum IgG4 (sIgG4 with clinical manifestations or therapeutic response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods. Consecutive 136 RA patients were recruited and followed up at regular interval. SIgG4 was detected by immunonephelometry. Serial synovial tissue sections from 46 RA patients were stained immunohistochemically for IgG4. Results. Forty-six percent of 136 RA patients had elevated sIgG4. Patients with elevated sIgG4 had higher sIgG4/sIgG ratio, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor, and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies than those with normal sIgG4 (all P<0.05. Among 45 patients who received methotrexate and leflunomide therapy, 50% (9/18 of patients with elevated sIgG4 and 85% (23/27 of patients with normal sIgG4 reached therapeutic target (disease activity score of 28 joints < 3.2 at 6-month visit (χ2=6.508, P=0.011. IgG4-positive plasma cell count correlated positively with sIgG4, total synovitis score, and CD3-, CD20-, and CD38-positive cell counts (all P<0.05. Conclusions. Our results showed that elevated sIgG4 in RA is common and disproportional to total IgG and RA with elevated sIgG4 may be a specific clinical phenotype with higher disease activity, higher level of autoantibodies, and poor response to methotrexate and leflunomide therapy.

  15. JUNCTOPHILIN 3 (JPH3) EXPANSION MUTATIONS CAUSING HUNTINGTON DISEASE LIKE 2 (HDL2) ARE COMMON IN SOUTH AFRICAN PATIENTS WITH AFRICAN ANCESTRY AND A HUNTINGTON DISEASE PHENOTYPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, A; Mitchell, CL; Essop, F; Tager, S; Temlett, J; Stevanin, G; Ross, CA; Rudnicki, DD; Margolis, RL

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by abnormal movements, cognitive decline and psychiatric symptoms, caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene on chromosome 4p. A CAG/CTG repeat expansion in the junctophilin-3 (JPH3) gene on chromosome 16q24.2 causes a Huntington disease-like phenotype (HDL2). All patients to date with HDL2 have some African ancestry. The present study aimed to characterize the genetic basis of the Huntington disease phenotype in South Africans and to investigate the possible origin of the JPH3 mutation. In a sample of unrelated South African individuals referred for diagnostic HD testing, 62% (106/171) of white patients compared to only 36% (47/130) of black patients had an expansion in HTT. However, 15% (20/130) of black South African patients and no white patients (0/171) had an expansion in JPH3, confirming the diagnosis of Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2). Individuals with HDL2 share many clinical features with individuals with HD and are clinically indistinguishable in many cases, although the average age of onset and diagnosis in HDL2 is 5 years later than HD and individual clinical features may be more prominent. HDL2 mutations contribute significantly to the HD phenotype in South Africans with African ancestry. JPH3 haplotype studies in 31 families, mainly from South Africa and North America, provide evidence for a founder mutation and support a common African origin for all HDL2 patients. Molecular testing in individuals with an HD phenotype and African ancestry should include testing routinely for JPH3 mutations. PMID:26079385

  16. Lyme Disease Diagnosed by Alternative Methods: A Phenotype Similar to That of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, David M; Miller, Ruth R; Gardy, Jennifer L; Parker, Shoshana M; Morshed, Muhammad G; Steiner, Theodore S; Singer, Joel; Shojania, Kam; Tang, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    A subset of patients reporting a diagnosis of Lyme disease can be described as having alternatively diagnosed chronic Lyme syndrome (ADCLS), in which diagnosis is based on laboratory results from a nonreference Lyme specialty laboratory using in-house criteria. Patients with ADCLS report symptoms similar to those reported by patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). We performed a case-control study comparing patients with ADCLS and CFS to each other and to both healthy controls and controls with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Subjects completed a history, physical exam, screening laboratory tests, 7 functional scales, reference serology for Lyme disease using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria, reference serology for other tick-associated pathogens, and cytokine expression studies. The study enrolled 13 patients with ADCLS (12 of whom were diagnosed by 1 alternative US laboratory), 25 patients with CFS, 25 matched healthy controls, and 11 SLE controls. Baseline clinical data and functional scales indicate significant disability among ADCLS and CFS patients and many important differences between these groups and controls, but no significant differences between each other. No ADCLS patient was confirmed as having positive Lyme serology by reference laboratory testing, and there was no difference in distribution of positive serology for other tick-transmitted pathogens or cytokine expression across the groups. In British Columbia, a setting with low Lyme disease incidence, ADCLS patients have a similar phenotype to that of CFS patients. Disagreement between alternative and reference laboratory Lyme testing results in this setting is most likely explained by false-positive results from the alternative laboratory. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Clinical phenotype in relation to the distance-to-index-patient in familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besseling, Joost; Huijgen, Roeland; Martin, Seth S.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Hovingh, G. Kees

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated whether the severity of the familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) phenotype, i.e. increased levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, decreases in more distantly related patients within one family. We included heterozygous FH patients

  18. Sequence homology at the breakpoint and clinical phenotype of mitochondrial DNA deletion syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Wang, Jing; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Landsverk, Megan; Douglas, Ganka; Brundage, Ellen K; Craigen, William J; Schmitt, Eric S; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2010-12-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM), progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41). Only 15% (3/20) of the young patients (deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17) exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier onset and more severe disease with multisystem involvement.

  19. The clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome due to germline PMS2 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Leigha; Clendenning, Mark; Sotamaa, Kaisa; Hampel, Heather; Green, Jane; Potter, John D.; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Young, Joanne; Winship, Ingrid; Dowty, James G.; White, Darren M.; Hopper, John L.; Baglietto, Laura; Jenkins, Mark A.; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome (also known as Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer) has been well described, little is known about disease in PMS2 mutation carriers. Now that mutation detection methods can discern mutations in PMS2 from mutations in its pseudogenes, more mutation carriers have been identified. Information about the clinical significance of PMS2 mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling. Here, we report the clinical characteristics of a large series of PMS2 mutation carriers. Methods We performed PMS2 mutation analysis using long range PCR and MLPA for 99 probands diagnosed with Lynch syndrome-associated tumors showing isolated loss of PMS2 by immunohistochemistry. Penetrance was calculated using a modified segregation analysis adjusting for ascertainment. Results Germline PMS2 mutations were detected in 62% of probands (n = 55 monoallelic; 6 biallelic). Among families with monoallelic PMS2 mutations, 65.5% met revised Bethesda guidelines. Compared with the general population, in mutation carriers, the incidence of colorectal cancer was 5.2 fold higher and the incidence of endometrial cancer was 7.5 fold higher. In North America, this translates to a cumulative cancer risk to age 70 of 15–20% for colorectal cancer, 15% for endometrial cancer, and 25–32% for any Lynch syndrome-associated cancer. No elevated risk for non-Lynch syndrome-associated cancers was observed. Conclusions PMS2 mutations contribute significantly to Lynch syndrome but the penetrance for monoallelic mutation carriers appears to be lower than that for the other mismatch repair genes. Modified counseling and cancer surveillance guidelines for PMS2 mutation carriers are proposed. PMID:18602922

  20. The clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome due to germ-line PMS2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Leigha; Clendenning, Mark; Sotamaa, Kaisa; Hampel, Heather; Green, Jane; Potter, John D; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Young, Joanne; Winship, Ingrid; Dowty, James G; White, Darren M; Hopper, John L; Baglietto, Laura; Jenkins, Mark A; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2008-08-01

    Although the clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome (also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) has been well described, little is known about disease in PMS2 mutation carriers. Now that mutation detection methods can discern mutations in PMS2 from mutations in its pseudogenes, more mutation carriers have been identified. Information about the clinical significance of PMS2 mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling. Here, we report the clinical characteristics of a large series of PMS2 mutation carriers. We performed PMS2 mutation analysis using long-range polymerase chain reaction and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for 99 probands diagnosed with Lynch syndrome-associated tumors showing isolated loss of PMS2 by immunohistochemistry. Penetrance was calculated using a modified segregation analysis adjusting for ascertainment. Germ-line PMS2 mutations were detected in 62% of probands (n = 55 monoallelic; 6 biallelic). Among families with monoallelic PMS2 mutations, 65.5% met revised Bethesda guidelines. Compared with the general population, in mutation carriers, the incidence of colorectal cancer was 5.2-fold higher, and the incidence of endometrial cancer was 7.5-fold higher. In North America, this translates to a cumulative cancer risk to age 70 years of 15%-20% for colorectal cancer, 15% for endometrial cancer, and 25%-32% for any Lynch syndrome-associated cancer. No elevated risk for non-Lynch syndrome-associated cancers was observed. PMS2 mutations contribute significantly to Lynch syndrome, but the penetrance for monoallelic mutation carriers appears to be lower than that for the other mismatch repair genes. Modified counseling and cancer surveillance guidelines for PMS2 mutation carriers are proposed.

  1. Disease Model Discovery from 3,328 Gene Knockouts by The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Terrence F.; Conte, Nathalie; West, David B.; Jacobsen, Julius O.; Mason, Jeremy; Warren, Jonathan; Chen, Chao-Kung; Tudose, Ilinca; Relac, Mike; Matthews, Peter; Karp, Natasha; Santos, Luis; Fiegel, Tanja; Ring, Natalie; Westerberg, Henrik; Greenaway, Simon; Sneddon, Duncan; Morgan, Hugh; Codner, Gemma F; Stewart, Michelle E; Brown, James; Horner, Neil; Haendel, Melissa; Washington, Nicole; Mungall, Christopher J.; Reynolds, Corey L; Gallegos, Juan; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Sorg, Tania; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Bower, Lynette R; Moore, Mark; Morse, Iva; Gao, Xiang; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Obata, Yuichi; Cho, Soo Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Seavitt, John; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Herault, Yann; Wurst, Wolfgang; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Lloyd, K.C. Kent; Flenniken, Ann M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Newbigging, Susan; McKerlie, Colin; Justice, Monica J.; Murray, Stephen A.; Svenson, Karen L.; Braun, Robert E.; White, Jacqueline K.; Bradley, Allan; Flicek, Paul; Wells, Sara; Skarnes, William C.; Adams, David J.; Parkinson, Helen; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D.M.; Smedley, Damian

    2017-01-01

    Although next generation sequencing has revolutionised the ability to associate variants with human diseases, diagnostic rates and development of new therapies are still limited by our lack of knowledge of function and pathobiological mechanism for most genes. To address this challenge, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) is creating a genome- and phenome-wide catalogue of gene function by characterizing new knockout mouse strains across diverse biological systems through a broad set of standardised phenotyping tests, with all mice made readily available to the biomedical community. Analysing the first 3328 genes reveals models for 360 diseases including the first for type C Bernard-Soulier, Bardet-Biedl-5 and Gordon Holmes syndromes. 90% of our phenotype annotations are novel, providing the first functional evidence for 1092 genes and candidates in unsolved diseases such as Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia 3. Finally, we describe our role in variant functional validation with the 100,000 Genomes and other projects. PMID:28650483

  2. Persistence of the extended psychosis phenotype in young people: Link between vulnerability and clinical need

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, J.T.W.

    2011-01-01

    Psychosis is one of the most severe psychiatric conditions, in terms of both individual and societal burden. The pathway from the earliest and mildest expressions of psychosis to clinical disorder is highly variable and heterogeneous. A better understanding of the psychosis phenotype and its

  3. [Phenotypic variability in 47, XXX patients: Clinical report of four new cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Ernesto; Márquez, Marisa; Solari, Andrea; Ziembar, María I; Laudicina, Alejandro

    2010-08-01

    The 47, XXX karyotype has a frequency of 1 in 1000 female newborns. However, this karyotype is not usually suspected at birth or childhood. These patients are usually diagnosed during adulthood when they develop premature ovarian failure or infertility, because the early phenotype doesn t have any specific features. The study describes four cases and the clinical variability of the 47, XXX karyotype.

  4. The Broader Autism Phenotype and Friendships in Non-Clinical Dyads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, Allison L.; Block, Nicole; Donnellan, M. Brent; Ingersoll, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    The broader autism phenotype (BAP) is a set of subclinical traits qualitatively similar to those observed in autism spectrum disorders. The current study sought to elucidate the association between self- and informant-reports of the BAP and friendships, in a non-clinical sample of college student dyads. Self-informant agreement of the BAP and…

  5. The clinical phenotype of hereditary versus sporadic prostate cancer: HPC definition revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Oort, I.M. van; Sedelaar, J.P.M.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The definition of hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) is based on family history and age at onset. Intuitively, HPC is a serious subtype of prostate cancer but there are only limited data on the clinical phenotype of HPC. Here, we aimed to compare the prognosis of HPC to the sporadic form

  6. Transcriptional Profiling of Egg Allergy and Relationship to Disease Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Kosoy

    Full Text Available Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies of childhood. There is a lack of information on the immunologic basis of egg allergy beyond the role of IgE.To use transcriptional profiling as a novel approach to uncover immunologic processes associated with different phenotypes of egg allergy.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were obtained from egg-allergic children who were defined as reactive (BER or tolerant (BET to baked egg, and from food allergic controls (AC who were egg non-allergic. PBMCs were stimulated with egg white protein. Gene transcription was measured by microarray after 24 h, and cytokine secretion by multiplex assay after 5 days.The transcriptional response of PBMCs to egg protein differed between BER and BET versus AC subjects. Compared to the AC group, the BER group displayed increased expression of genes associated with allergic inflammation as well as corresponding increased secretion of IL-5, IL-9 and TNF-α. A similar pattern was observed for the BET group. Further similarities in gene expression patterns between BER and BET groups, as well as some important differences, were revealed using a novel Immune Annotation resource developed for this project. This approach identified several novel processes not previously associated with egg allergy, including positive associations with TLR4-stimulated myeloid cells and activated NK cells, and negative associations with an induced Treg signature. Further pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes comparing BER to BET subjects showed significant enrichment of IFN-α and IFN-γ response genes, as well as genes associated with virally-infected DCs.Transcriptional profiling identified several novel pathways and processes that differed when comparing the response to egg allergen in BET, BER, and AC groups. We conclude that this approach is a useful hypothesis-generating mechanism to identify novel immune processes associated with allergy and tolerance to forms

  7. [Advanced Parkinson's disease: clinical characteristics and treatment (part 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulisevsky, J; Luquin, M R; Arbelo, J M; Burguera, J A; Carrillo, F; Castro, A; Chacón, J; García-Ruiz, P J; Lezcano, E; Mir, P; Martinez-Castrillo, J C; Martínez-Torres, I; Puente, V; Sesar, A; Valldeoriola-Serra, F; Yañez, R

    2013-10-01

    A large percentage of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop motor fluctuations, dyskinesias, and severe non-motor symptoms within 3 to 5 years of starting dopaminergic therapy, and these motor complications are refractory to treatment. Several authors refer to this stage of the disease as advanced Parkinson's disease. To define the clinical manifestations of advanced PD and the risk factors for reaching this stage of the disease. This consensus document has been prepared by using an exhaustive literature search and by discussion of the contents by an expert group on movement disorders of the Sociedad Española de Neurología (Spanish Neurology Society), coordinated by two of the authors (JK and MRL). Severe motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, axial motor symptoms resistant to levodopa, and cognitive decline are the main signs in the clinical phenotype of advanced PD. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictive genomics: a cancer hallmark network framework for predicting tumor clinical phenotypes using genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zaman, Naif; Mcgee, Shauna; Milanese, Jean-Sébastien; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen

    2015-02-01

    Tumor genome sequencing leads to documenting thousands of DNA mutations and other genomic alterations. At present, these data cannot be analyzed adequately to aid in the understanding of tumorigenesis and its evolution. Moreover, we have little insight into how to use these data to predict clinical phenotypes and tumor progression to better design patient treatment. To meet these challenges, we discuss a cancer hallmark network framework for modeling genome sequencing data to predict cancer clonal evolution and associated clinical phenotypes. The framework includes: (1) cancer hallmarks that can be represented by a few molecular/signaling networks. 'Network operational signatures' which represent gene regulatory logics/strengths enable to quantify state transitions and measures of hallmark traits. Thus, sets of genomic alterations which are associated with network operational signatures could be linked to the state/measure of hallmark traits. The network operational signature transforms genotypic data (i.e., genomic alterations) to regulatory phenotypic profiles (i.e., regulatory logics/strengths), to cellular phenotypic profiles (i.e., hallmark traits) which lead to clinical phenotypic profiles (i.e., a collection of hallmark traits). Furthermore, the framework considers regulatory logics of the hallmark networks under tumor evolutionary dynamics and therefore also includes: (2) a self-promoting positive feedback loop that is dominated by a genomic instability network and a cell survival/proliferation network is the main driver of tumor clonal evolution. Surrounding tumor stroma and its host immune systems shape the evolutionary paths; (3) cell motility initiating metastasis is a byproduct of the above self-promoting loop activity during tumorigenesis; (4) an emerging hallmark network which triggers genome duplication dominates a feed-forward loop which in turn could act as a rate-limiting step for tumor formation; (5) mutations and other genomic alterations have

  9. Palmoplantar psoriasis: a phenotypical and clinical review with introduction of a new quality-of-life assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Elizabeth; Masrour, Shamin; McKey, Joanna; Menter, Alan

    2009-06-01

    Palmoplantar psoriasis is associated with significant quality-of-life issues. Its epidemiology and phenotypical expression remain ill defined. We reviewed the literature and our clinical experience and developed a new quality-of-life assessment tool. We conducted a retrospective review of 150 patients with palmoplantar psoriasis. In all, 78 (52%) patients displayed predominantly hyperkeratotic palmoplantar lesions, 24 (16%) pustular, 18 (12%) combination, and 30 (20%) had an indeterminate phenotype. In 27 (18%) patients, lesions were confined to the palms and soles. A new quality-of-life index was constructed to characterize disease severity. In all, 27 (18%) had mild, 72 (48%) moderate, and 51 (34%) severe disease involvement. Palmoplantar disease severity appeared independent from the degree of body surface area involvement. This was a retrospective review. The quality-of-life index remains to be statistically verified in prospective clinical studies. Defining morphologic subtypes together with the use of a specific quality-of-life assessment tool in patients with palmoplantar psoriasis will improve our understanding and treatment of this recalcitrant form of psoriasis.

  10. Identification and distribution of COPD phenotypes in clinical practice according to Spanish COPD Guidelines: the FENEPOC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calle Rubio M

    2017-08-01

    Research Council dyspnea scale; respiratory symptoms; comorbidities; hospitalizations; and exacerbations in the last year. Physicians considered that >80% of the diagnostic tools needed to classify COPD phenotypes were available, with the exception of computed tomography (26.9% and carbon monoxide transfer test (13.5% in PC, and sputum eosinophilia count in PC and pulmonology centers (40.4% and 49.4%, respectively.Conclusion: In Spanish clinical practice, almost half of the patients with COPD presented with NE phenotype. The prevalence of ACO according to the Spanish consensus definition was very low. In general, physicians indicated that they had the necessary tools for diagnosing COPD phenotypes.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, phenotype, diagnosis, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, ACO

  11. Variability in clinical phenotypes of PRPF8-linked autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa correlates with differential PRPF8/SNRNP200 interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Pascal; Passarin, Olga; Munier, Francis L; Tran, Viet H; Vaclavik, Veronika

    2018-01-01

    To expand the genotype/phenotype correlations in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) harboring PRPF8 variants. Two patients, a father and his daughter, harboring a novel p.PRPF8-Glu2331* variant, underwent ophthalmic examination at 3-year-interval, including fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, and ISCEV standard full field ERGs. All reported disease-causing PRPF8 variants were collected and localized in the PRPF8 and PRPF8/SNRNP200 protein structures. The p.PRPF8-Glu2331* variant results in a truncated PRPF8 protein lacking the last five C-terminal amino acids and caused in the two patients a severe clinical phenotype, with the macula being affected from the second decade on. All but two adRP-linked variants are located in the last exon 43 encoding the C-terminal tail of the C-terminal PRPF8 Jab1 domain. The p.PRPF8-Ser2118Phe and -Asn2280Lys variants encoded by exons 39 and 42, respectively, are located at the basis of the C-terminal tail. Frame-shift mutations and nonconservative amino acid changes in PRPF8 typically cause severe clinical phenotypes. The conservative missense variant p.PRPF8-Arg2310Lys that is not altering the global charge of the C-terminal tail, and variants located at the basis of the C-terminal tail show milder clinical phenotypes, in accordance with functional data on PRPF8/SNRNP200 interactions in yeast.

  12. Exploring the Genome and Phenotype of Multi-Drug Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae of Clinical Origin

    OpenAIRE

    João Anes; Daniel Hurley; Marta Martins; Séamus Fanning; Séamus Fanning

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important nosocomial pathogen with an extraordinary resistant phenotype due to a combination of acquired resistant-elements and efflux mechanisms. In this study a detailed molecular characterization of 11 K. pneumoniae isolates of clinical origin was carried out. Eleven clinical isolates were tested for their susceptibilities, by disk diffusion and broth microdilution and interpreted according to CLSI guidelines. Efflux activity was determined by measuring the extr...

  13. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  14. Influence of cerebrovascular disease on brain networks in prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Joanna Su Xian; Liu, Siwei; Loke, Yng Miin; Hilal, Saima; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Xu, Xin; Tan, Boon Yeow; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian; Zhou, Juan

    2017-11-01

    Network-sensitive neuroimaging methods have been used to characterize large-scale brain network degeneration in Alzheimer's disease and its prodrome. However, few studies have investigated the combined effect of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease on brain network degeneration. Our study sought to examine the intrinsic functional connectivity and structural covariance network changes in 235 prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. We focused particularly on two higher-order cognitive networks-the default mode network and the executive control network. We found divergent functional connectivity and structural covariance patterns in Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. Alzheimer's disease patients without cerebrovascular disease, but not Alzheimer's disease patients with cerebrovascular disease, showed reductions in posterior default mode network functional connectivity. By comparison, while both groups exhibited parietal reductions in executive control network functional connectivity, only Alzheimer's disease patients with cerebrovascular disease showed increases in frontal executive control network connectivity. Importantly, these distinct executive control network changes were recapitulated in prodromal Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. Across Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease, higher default mode network functional connectivity z-scores correlated with greater hippocampal volumes while higher executive control network functional connectivity z-scores correlated with greater white matter changes. In parallel, only Alzheimer's disease patients without cerebrovascular disease showed increased default mode network structural covariance, while only Alzheimer's disease patients with cerebrovascular disease showed increased executive control network structural covariance compared to controls. Our

  15. Genotypic classification of patients with Wolfram syndrome: insights into the natural history of the disease and correlation with phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heredia, Miguel López; Clèries, Ramón; Nunes, Virginia

    2013-07-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a degenerative, recessive rare disease with an onset in childhood. It is caused by mutations in WFS1 or CISD2 genes. More than 200 different variations in WFS1 have been described in patients with Wolfram syndrome, which complicates the establishment of clear genotype-phenotype correlation. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of WFS1 mutations and update the natural history of the disease. This study analyzed clinical and genetic data of 412 patients with Wolfram syndrome published in the last 15 years. (i) 15% of published patients do not fulfill the current -inclusion criterion; (ii) genotypic prevalence differences may exist among countries; (iii) diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy might not be the first two clinical features in some patients; (iv) mutations are nonuniformly distributed in WFS1; (v) age at onset of diabetes mellitus, hearing defects, and diabetes insipidus may depend on the patient's genotypic class; and (vi) disease progression rate might depend on genotypic class. New genotype-phenotype correlations were established, disease progression rate for the general population and for the genotypic classes has been calculated, and new diagnostic criteria have been proposed. The conclusions raised could be important for patient management and counseling as well as for the development of treatments for Wolfram syndrome.

  16. Th1 and Th17 Cells and Associated Cytokines Discriminate among Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Gabriel; Acuña, Eric; Reyes, Lilian I; Ottum, Payton A; De Sarno, Patrizia; Villarroel, Luis; Ciampi, Ethel; Uribe-San Martín, Reinaldo; Cárcamo, Claudia; Naves, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory, and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It is a heterogeneous pathology that can follow different clinical courses, and the mechanisms that underlie the progression of the immune response across MS subtypes remain incompletely understood. Here, we aimed to determine differences in the immunological status among different MS clinical subtypes. Blood samples from untreated patients diagnosed with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) ( n  = 21), different clinical forms of MS ( n  = 62) [relapsing-remitting (RRMS), secondary progressive, and primary progressive], and healthy controls (HCs) ( n  = 17) were tested for plasma levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-10, TGF-β, IL-17A, and IL-17F by immunoanalysis. Th1 and Th17 lymphocyte frequencies were determined by flow cytometry. Our results showed that IFN-γ levels and the IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio were higher in CIS patients than in RRMS patients and HC. Th1 cell frequencies were higher in CIS and RRMS than in progressive MS, and RRMS had a higher Th17 frequency than CIS. The Th1/Th17 cell ratio was skewed toward Th1 in CIS compared to MS phenotypes and HC. Receiver operating characteristic statistical analysis determined that IFN-γ, the IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio, Th1 cell frequency, and the Th1/Th17 cell ratio discriminated among CIS and MS subtypes. A subanalysis among patients expressing high IL-17F levels showed that IL-17F and the IFN-γ/IL-17F ratio discriminated between disease subtypes. Overall, our data showed that CIS and MS phenotypes displayed distinct Th1- and Th17-related cytokines and cell profiles and that these immune parameters discriminated between clinical forms. Upon validation, these parameters might be useful as biomarkers to predict disease progression.

  17. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA): clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA) (OMIM 225400) is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4) due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP) and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial), independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity. PMID:21699693

  18. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA: clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariminejad Ariana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA (OMIM 225400 is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4 due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial, independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity.

  19. Towards precision medicine-based therapies for glioblastoma: interrogating human disease genomics and mouse phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Gao, Zhen; Wang, Bingcheng; Xu, Rong

    2016-08-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumors. It has poor prognosis even with optimal radio- and chemo-therapies. Since GBM is highly heterogeneous, drugs that target on specific molecular profiles of individual tumors may achieve maximized efficacy. Currently, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) projects have identified hundreds of GBM-associated genes. We develop a drug repositioning approach combining disease genomics and mouse phenotype data towards predicting targeted therapies for GBM. We first identified disease specific mouse phenotypes using the most recently discovered GBM genes. Then we systematically searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with GBM. We evaluated the ranks for approved and novel GBM drugs, and compared with an existing approach, which also use the mouse phenotype data but not the disease genomics data. We achieved significantly higher ranks for the approved and novel GBM drugs than the earlier approach. For all positive examples of GBM drugs, we achieved a median rank of 9.2 45.6 of the top predictions have been demonstrated effective in inhibiting the growth of human GBM cells. We developed a computational drug repositioning approach based on both genomic and phenotypic data. Our approach prioritized existing GBM drugs and outperformed a recent approach. Overall, our approach shows potential in discovering new targeted therapies for GBM.

  20. Identification of Clinical Phenotypes in Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia with Pulmonary Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Suguru; Tanino, Yoshinori; Misa, Kenichi; Fukuhara, Naoko; Nikaido, Takefumi; Uematsu, Manabu; Fukuhara, Atsuro; Wang, Xintao; Ishida, Takashi; Munakata, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Objective Since the term "combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema" (CPFE) was first proposed, the co-existence of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary emphysema (PE) has drawn considerable attention. However, conflicting results on the clinical characteristics of patients with both pulmonary fibrosis and PE have been published because of the lack of an exact definition of CPFE. The goal of this study was thus to clarify the clinical characteristics and phenotypes of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) with PE. Methods We retrospectively analyzed IIP patients who had been admitted to our hospital. Their chest high-resolution computed tomography images were classified into two groups according to the presence of PE. We then performed a cluster analysis to identify the phenotypes of IIP patients with PE. Results Forty-four (53.7%) out of 82 patients had at least mild emphysema in their bilateral lungs. The cluster analysis separated the IIP patients with PE into three clusters. The overall survival rate of one cluster that consisted of mainly idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients was significantly worse than those of the other clusters. Conclusion Three different phenotypes can be identified in IIP patients with PE, and IPF with PE is a distinct clinical phenotype with a poor prognosis.

  1. Motor phenotype and magnetic resonance measures of basal ganglia iron levels in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzeck, Nico; Singh-Curry, Victoria; Eckart, Cindy; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Perry, Richard J; Bain, Peter G; Düzel, Emrah; Husain, Masud

    2013-12-01

    In Parkinson's disease the degree of motor impairment can be classified with respect to tremor dominant and akinetic rigid features. While tremor dominance and akinetic rigidity might represent two ends of a continuum rather than discrete entities, it would be important to have non-invasive markers of any biological differences between them in vivo, to assess disease trajectories and response to treatment, as well as providing insights into the underlying mechanisms contributing to heterogeneity within the Parkinson's disease population. Here, we used magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether Parkinson's disease patients exhibit structural changes within the basal ganglia that might relate to motor phenotype. Specifically, we examined volumes of basal ganglia regions, as well as transverse relaxation rate (a putative marker of iron load) and magnetization transfer saturation (considered to index structural integrity) within these regions in 40 individuals. We found decreased volume and reduced magnetization transfer within the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease patients compared to healthy controls. Importantly, there was a positive correlation between tremulous motor phenotype and transverse relaxation rate (reflecting iron load) within the putamen, caudate and thalamus. Our findings suggest that akinetic rigid and tremor dominant symptoms of Parkinson's disease might be differentiated on the basis of the transverse relaxation rate within specific basal ganglia structures. Moreover, they suggest that iron load within the basal ganglia makes an important contribution to motor phenotype, a key prognostic indicator of disease progression in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamim Saleha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. METHODS: A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH. To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype in this family, genomic DNA from blood sample of each individual was genotyped using microsatellite Short Tandem Repeat (STR markers for the known Usher syndrome loci. Then direct sequencing was performed to find out disease associated mutations in the candidate gene. RESULTS: By genetic linkage analysis, the USH phenotype of this family was mapped to PCDH15 locus on chromosome 10q21.1. Three different point mutations in exon 11 of PCDH15 were identified and one of them, c.1304A>C was found to be segregating with the disease phenotype in Pakistani family with Usher phenotype. This, c.1304A>C transversion mutation predicts an amino-acid substitution of aspartic acid with an alanine at residue number 435 (p.D435A of its protein product. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed conservation of aspartic acid at position 435 and predicated this change as pathogenic. CONCLUSION: The identification of c.1304A>C pathogenic mutation in PCDH15 gene and its association with Usher syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family is the first example of a missense mutation of PCDH15 causing USH1 phenotype. In previous reports, it was hypothesized that severe mutations such as truncated protein of PCDH15 led to the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment.

  3. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleha, Shamim; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jamil, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad; Hameed, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH). To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype in this family, genomic DNA from blood sample of each individual was genotyped using microsatellite Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers for the known Usher syndrome loci. Then direct sequencing was performed to find out disease associated mutations in the candidate gene. By genetic linkage analysis, the USH phenotype of this family was mapped to PCDH15 locus on chromosome 10q21.1. Three different point mutations in exon 11 of PCDH15 were identified and one of them, c.1304A>C was found to be segregating with the disease phenotype in Pakistani family with Usher phenotype. This, c.1304A>C transversion mutation predicts an amino-acid substitution of aspartic acid with an alanine at residue number 435 (p.D435A) of its protein product. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed conservation of aspartic acid at position 435 and predicated this change as pathogenic. The identification of c.1304A>C pathogenic mutation in PCDH15 gene and its association with Usher syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family is the first example of a missense mutation of PCDH15 causing USH1 phenotype. In previous reports, it was hypothesized that severe mutations such as truncated protein of PCDH15 led to the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment.

  4. Clinical Significance of Immuno phenotypic Markers in Pediatric T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIDHOM, I.; SHAABAN, Kh.; SOLIMAN, S.; HAMDY, N.; YASSIN, D.; SALEM, Sh.; HASSANEIN, H.; MANSOUR, M.T.; EZZAT, S.; EL-ANWAR, W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cell-marker profiling has led to conflicting conclusions about its prognostic significance in T-ALL. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of the expression of CD34, CD10 and myeloid associated antigens (CD13/ CD33) in childhood T-ALL and to relate their presence to initial clinical and biologic features and early response to therapy. Patients and Methods: This study included 67 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed T-ALL recruited from the Children's Cancer Hospital in Egypt during the time period from July 2007 to June 2008. Immuno phenotypic markers and minimal residual disease (MRD) were studied by five-color flow cytometry. Results: The frequency of CD34 was 34.9%, CD10 33.3%, while CD13/CD33 was 18.8%. No significant association was encountered between CD34, CD10 or myeloid antigen positivity and the presenting clinical features as age, sex, TLC and CNS leukemia. Only CD10+ expression had significant association with initial CNS involvement (p=0.039). CD34 and CD13/CD33 expression was significantly associated with T-cell maturation stages (p<0.05). No relationship was observed for age, TLC, gender, NCI risk or CNS involvement with early response to therapy illustrated by BM as well as MRD day 15 and day 42. CD34+, CD13/CD33+ and early T-cell stage had high MRD levels on day 15 that was statistically highly significant (p<0.01), but CD10+ had statistically significant lower MRD level on day 15 (p=0.049). However, only CD34 retained its significance at an MRD cut-off level of 0.01%. Conclusion: CD34, CD10, CD13/CD33 expression, as well as T-cell maturation stages, may have prognostic significance in pediatric T-ALL as they have a significant impact on early clearance of leukemic cells detected by MRD day 15.

  5. Transgenic fatal familial insomnia mice indicate prion infectivity-independent mechanisms of pathogenesis and phenotypic expression of disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihssane Bouybayoune

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatal familial insomnia (FFI and a genetic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD178 are clinically different prion disorders linked to the D178N prion protein (PrP mutation. The disease phenotype is determined by the 129 M/V polymorphism on the mutant allele, which is thought to influence D178N PrP misfolding, leading to the formation of distinctive prion strains with specific neurotoxic properties. However, the mechanism by which misfolded variants of mutant PrP cause different diseases is not known. We generated transgenic (Tg mice expressing the mouse PrP homolog of the FFI mutation. These mice synthesize a misfolded form of mutant PrP in their brains and develop a neurological illness with severe sleep disruption, highly reminiscent of FFI and different from that of analogously generated Tg(CJD mice modeling CJD178. No prion infectivity was detectable in Tg(FFI and Tg(CJD brains by bioassay or protein misfolding cyclic amplification, indicating that mutant PrP has disease-encoding properties that do not depend on its ability to propagate its misfolded conformation. Tg(FFI and Tg(CJD neurons have different patterns of intracellular PrP accumulation associated with distinct morphological abnormalities of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, suggesting that mutation-specific alterations of secretory transport may contribute to the disease phenotype.

  6. Haptoglobin Phenotype Predicts a Low Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, My; Strandhave, Charlotte; Krarup, H.B.

    2009-01-01

    whether Hp phenotyping in patients with CKD could identify a group of high-risk patients according to HRV measurements. Methods: Patients (n = 61) were recruited from our outpatient clinic. They were eligible if they had CKD, defined as a plasma creatinine level between 1.70 and 4.52 mg/dL, for more than...... 3 months. The Hp phenotype was determined using a high-performance liquid chromatography. Furthermore, a 24-hour Holter recording was obtained in each patient for analysis of 24-h HRV indices in the time domain. Results: The CKD patients in the three groups [phenotypes Hp 1-1 (n=12), Hp 2-1 (n=32......), and Hp 2-2 (n=17)] were comparable regarding clinical relevant parameters such as age, plasma creatinine, body mass index, PTH level, and haemoglobin. Furthermore, sodium-, potassium-, and calcium levels were within normal range in all patients. The HRV parameter SDNN (SD of all normal RR...

  7. Phenotypic effects of subclinical paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Tracey C; Coffey, Mike P; Bond, Karen S; Hutchings, Mike R; Wall, Eileen

    2017-01-01

    The effect of subclinical paratuberculosis (or Johne's disease) risk status on performance, health, and fertility was studied in 58,096 UK Holstein-Friesian cows with 156,837 lactations across lactations 1 to 3. Low-, medium-, and high-risk group categories were allocated to cows determined by a minimum of 4 ELISA milk tests taken at any time during their lactating life. Lactation curves of daily milk, protein, and fat yields and protein and fat percentage, together with log e -transformed somatic cell count, were estimated using a random regression model to quantify differences between risk groups. The effect of subclinical paratuberculosis risk groups on fertility, lactation-average somatic cell count, and mastitis were analyzed using linear regression fitting risk group as a fixed effect. Milk yield losses associated with high-risk cows compared with low-risk cows in lactations 1, 2, and 3 for mean daily yield were 0.34, 1.05, and 1.61kg; likewise, accumulated 305-d yields were 103, 316, and 485kg, respectively. The total loss was 904kg over the first 3 lactations. Protein and fat yield losses associated with high-risk cows were significant, but primarily a feature of decreasing milk yield. Similar trends were observed for both test-day and lactation-average somatic cell count measures with higher somatic cell counts from medium- and high-risk cows compared with low-risk cows, and differences were in almost all cases significant. Likewise, mastitis incidence was significantly higher in high-risk cows compared with low-risk cows in lactations 2 and 3. Whereas the few significant differences between risk groups among fertility traits were inconsistent with no clear trend. These results are expected to be conservative, as some animals that were considered negative may become positive after the timeframe of this study, particularly if the animal was tested when relatively young. However, the magnitude of milk yield losses together with higher somatic cell counts and

  8. Incidence, disease phenotype at diagnosis, and early disease course in inflammatory bowel diseases in Western Hungary, 2002-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Laszlo; Kiss, Lajos S; David, Gyula; Pandur, Tunde; Erdelyi, Zsuzsanna; Mester, Gabor; Balogh, Mihaly; Szipocs, Istvan; Molnar, Csaba; Komaromi, Erzsebet; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2011-12-01

    Recent trends indicate a change in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), with previously low incidence areas now reporting a progressive rise in the incidence. Our aim was to analyze the incidence and disease phenotype at diagnosis in IBD in the population-based Veszprem Province database, which included incident patients diagnosed between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2006. Data of 393 incident patients were analyzed (ulcerative colitis [UC]: 220, age-at-diagnosis: 40.5 years; Crohn's disease [CD]: 163, age-at-diagnosis: 32.5 years; and indeterminate colitis [IC]: 10). Both hospital and outpatient records were collected and comprehensively reviewed. Adjusted mean incidence rates were 8.9/10(5) person-years for CD and 11.9/10(5) person-years in UC. Peak onset age in both CD and UC patients was 21-30 years old. Location at diagnosis in UC was proctitis in 26.8%, left-sided colitis in 50.9%, and pancolitis in 22.3%. The probability of proximal extension and colectomy after 5 years was 12.7% and 2.8%. The disease location in CD was ileal in 20.2%, colonic in 35.6%, ileocolonic in 44.2%, and upper gastrointestinal in four patients. Behavior at diagnosis was stenosing/penetrating in 35.6% and perianal in 11.1%. Patients with colonic disease were older at diagnosis compared to patients with ileal or ileocolonic disease. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, probability of surgical resection was 9.8%, 18.5%, and 21.3% after 1, 3, and 5 years of disease duration, respectively. The incidence of IBD in Veszprem Province in the last decade was high, equal to that in high-incidence areas in Western European countries. Early disease course is milder compared to data reported in the literature. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  9. Prominent scapulae mimicking an inherited myopathy expands the phenotype of CHD7-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Grady, Gina L.; Ma, Alan; Sival, Deborah; Wong, Monica T. Y.; Peduto, Tony; Menezes, Manoj P.; Young, Helen; Waddell, Leigh; Ghaoui, Roula; Needham, Merrilee; Lek, Monkol; North, Kathryn N.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Clarke, Nigel F.

    CHD7 variants are a well-established cause of CHARGE syndrome, a disabling multi-system malformation disorder that is often associated with deafness, visual impairment and intellectual disability. Less severe forms of CHD7-related disease are known to exist, but the full spectrum of phenotypes

  10. An expanded multi-organ disease phenotype associated with mutations in YARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tracewska-Siemiątkowska, Anna; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Bosch, Danielle G.M.; Nickerson, Deborah; Bamshad, Michael J.; Möller, J. C.; Kjellström, U.; Andréasson, S.; Van De Vorst, Maartje; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Möller, Claes; Kjellström, Ulrika; Andréasson, Sten; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    Whole exome sequence analysis was performed in a Swedish mother–father-affected proband trio with a phenotype characterized by progressive retinal degeneration with congenital nystagmus, profound congenital hearing impairment, primary amenorrhea, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and liver disease. A

  11. Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes and Genotypes Associated with Mutations in Presenilin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadev, Suman; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Stahl, Justin; Klunk, William; Yu, Cheng-En; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 2 are rare causes of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Eighteen presenilin 2 mutations have been reported, although not all have been confirmed pathogenic. Much remains to be learned about the range of phenotypes associated with these mutations. We have analysed our unique collection of 146 affected cases in 11…

  12. Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our mission is to conduct infectious disease clinical research of importance to the military through a unique, adaptive, and collaborative network, to inform health...

  13. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome - additional functional evidence and expanding the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenighofer, M; Hung, C Y; McCauley, J L; Dallman, J; Back, E J; Mihalek, I; Gripp, K W; Sol-Church, K; Rusconi, P; Zhang, Z; Shi, G-X; Andres, D A; Bodamer, O A

    2016-03-01

    RASopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of conditions caused by mutations in 1 of 16 proteins in the RAS-mitogen activated protein kinase (RAS-MAPK) pathway. Recently, mutations in RIT1 were identified as a novel cause for Noonan syndrome. Here we provide additional functional evidence for a causal role of RIT1 mutations and expand the associated phenotypic spectrum. We identified two de novo missense variants p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly. Both variants resulted in increased MEK-ERK signaling compared to wild-type, underscoring gain-of-function as the primary functional mechanism. Introduction of p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly into zebrafish embryos reproduced not only aspects of the human phenotype but also revealed abnormalities of eye development, emphasizing the importance of RIT1 for spatial and temporal organization of the growing organism. In addition, we observed severe lymphedema of the lower extremity and genitalia in one patient. We provide additional evidence for a causal relationship between pathogenic mutations in RIT1, increased RAS-MAPK/MEK-ERK signaling and the clinical phenotype. The mutant RIT1 protein may possess reduced GTPase activity or a diminished ability to interact with cellular GTPase activating proteins; however the precise mechanism remains unknown. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to expand and includes lymphedema of the lower extremities in addition to nuchal hygroma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Immuno phenotype of blood lymphocytes in radiation-associated Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butenko, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Immuno phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes has been studied in Hodgkin's disease including patients exposed to radionuclides of the characteristic Chernobyl pattern. The group of patients under study has been characterized by decreasing T- and NK-cell immunity, such a decrease being more pronounced in radiation-associated Hodgkin's lymphoma. The data obtained as well as the evidence of Epstein-Barr virus activation could explain the aggressiveness of the disease in such patients and the difficulties in their treatment

  15. New mutation of the MPZ gene in a family with the Dejerine-Sottas disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floroskufi, Paraskewi; Panas, Marios; Karadima, Georgia; Vassilopoulos, Demetris

    2007-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B is associated with mutations in the myelin protein zero gene. In the present study a new myelin protein zero gene mutation (c.89T>C,Ile30Thr) was detected in a family with the Dejerine-Sottas disease phenotype. The results support the hypothesis that severe, early-onset neuropathy may be related to either an alteration of a conserved amino acid or a disruption of the tertiary structure of myelin protein zero.

  16. Novel mutation in TSPAN12 leads to autosomal recessive inheritance of congenital vitreoretinal disease with intra-familial phenotypic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Moran; Levanon, Erez Y; Hujeirat, Yasir; Khayat, Morad; Pe'er, Jacob; Shalev, Stavit

    2014-12-01

    Developmental malformations of the vitreoretinal vasculature are a heterogeneous group of conditions with various modes of inheritance, and include familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), persistent fetal vasculature (PFV), and Norrie disease. We investigated a large consanguineous kindred with multiple affected individuals exhibiting variable phenotypes of abnormal vitreoretinal vasculature, consistent with the three above-mentioned conditions and compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Exome sequencing identified a novel c.542G > T (p.C181F) apparently mutation in the TSPAN12 gene that segregated with the ocular disease in the family. The TSPAN12 gene was previously reported to cause dominant and recessive FEVR, but has not yet been associated with other vitreoretinal manifestations. The intra-familial clinical variability caused by a single mutation in the TSPAN12 gene underscores the complicated phenotype-genotype correlation of mutations in this gene, and suggests that there are additional genetic and environmental factors involved in the complex process of ocular vascularization during embryonic development. Our study supports considering PFV, FEVR, and Norrie disease a spectrum of disorders, with clinical and genetic overlap, caused by mutations in distinct genes acting in the Norrin/β-catenin signaling pathway. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genotype and Phenotype Predictors of Relapse of Graves’ Disease after Antithyroid Drug Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Wen; Chen, I-Ya; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Hsi, Edward; Liu, Rue-Tsuan; Hsieh, Ching-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background For patients with Graves’ disease (GD), the primary goal of antithyroid drug therapy is to temporarily restore the patient to the euthyroid state and wait for a subsequent remission of the disease. This study sought to identify the predictive markers for the relapse of disease. Methods To do this, we studied 262 GD patients with long enough follow-up after drug withdrawal to determine treatment outcome. The patients were divided into three groups by time of relapse: early relapse group (n = 91) had an early relapse within 9 months, late relapse group (n = 65) had a relapse between 10 and 36 months, and long-term remission group (n = 106) were either still in remission after at least 3 years or relapsed after 3 years of drug withdrawal. We assessed the treatment outcome of 23 SNPs of costimulatory genes, phenotype and smoking habits. We used permutation to obtain p values for each SNP as an adjustment for multiple testing. Cox proportional hazards models was performed to assess the strength of association between the treatment outcome and clinical and laboratory variables. Results Four SNPs were significantly associated with disease relapse: rs231775 (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.18–3.26) at CTLA-4 and rs745307 (OR 7.97, 95% CI 1.01–62.7), rs11569309 (OR 8.09, 95% CI 1.03–63.7), and rs3765457 (OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.08–6.28) at CD40. Combining risk alleles at CTLA-4 and CD40 improved the predictability of relapse. Using 3 years as the cutoff point for multivariate analysis, we found several independent predictors of disease relapse: number of risk alleles (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.09–1.56), a large goiter size at the end of the treatment (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.05–1.61), persistent TSH-binding inhibitory Ig (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.15–2.35), and smoking habit (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.05–2.42). Conclusion Genetic polymorphism of costimulatory genes, smoking status, persistent goiter, and TSH-binding inhibitory Ig predict disease relapse. PMID:24783027

  18. Parkinson Disease: The Relationship Between Non-motor Symptoms and Motor Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Fang; Obaid, Mona; Wieler, Marguerite; Camicioli, Richard; Martin, W R Wayne

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) presents with motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS). The NMS often precede the onset of motor symptoms, but may progress throughout the disease course. Tremor dominant, postural instability gait difficulty (PIGD), and indeterminate phenotypes can be distinguished using Unified PD Rating scales (UPDRS-III). We hypothesized that the PIGD phenotype would be more likely to develop NMS, and that the non-dopamine-responsive axial signs would correlate with NMS severity. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional chart review to assess the relationship between NMS and PD motor phenotypes. PD patients were administered the NMS Questionnaire, the UPDRS-III, and the Mini-Mental State Examination score. The relationship between NMS burden and PD subtypes was examined using linear regression models. The prevalence of each NMS among difference PD motor subtypes was analyzed using chi-square test. PD patients with more advanced disease based on their UPDRS-III had higher NMS Questionnaire scores. The axial component of UPDRS-III correlated with higher NMS. There was no correlation between NMS and tremor scores. There was a significant correlation between PIGD score and higher NMS burden. PIGD group had higher prevalence in most NMS domains when compared with tremor dominant and indeterminate groups independent of disease duration and severity. NMS profile and severity vary according to motor phenotype. We conclude that in the PD population, patients with a PIGD phenotype who have more axial involvement, associated with advanced disease and poor motor response, have a higher risk for a higher NMS burden.

  19. Distinct prion-like strains of amyloid beta implicated in phenotypic diversity of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mark; Appleby, Brian; Safar, Jiri G

    2016-01-01

    Vast evidence on human prions demonstrates that variable disease phenotypes, rates of propagation, and targeting of distinct brain structures are determined by unique conformers (strains) of pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Recent progress in the development of advanced biophysical tools that inventory structural characteristics of amyloid beta (Aβ) in the brain cortex of phenotypically diverse Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, revealed unique spectrum of oligomeric particles in the cortex of rapidly progressive cases, implicating these structures in variable rates of propagation in the brain, and in distict disease manifestation. Since only ∼30% of phenotypic diversity of AD can be explained by polymorphisms in risk genes, these and transgenic bioassay data argue that structurally distinct Aβ particles play a major role in the diverse pathogenesis of AD, and may behave as distinct prion-like strains encoding diverse phenotypes. From these observations and our growing understanding of prions, there is a critical need for new strain-specific diagnostic strategies for misfolded proteins causing these elusive disorders. Since targeted drug therapy can induce mutation and evolution of prions into new strains, effective treatments of AD will require drugs that enhance clearance of pathogenic conformers, reduce the precursor protein, or inhibit the conversion of precursors into prion-like states.

  20. Schwartz–jampel syndrome: Clinical and diagnostic phenotype of a rare genetic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskara P Shelley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The distinctive phenotypic, clinical, skeletal characteristics with the typical electrophysiological features of an 11-year-old male child who presented to the neurology outpatient service are described, with the objective of emphasizing the diagnostic awareness of chondrodystrophic myotonia or Schwartz–Jampel syndrome, a very rare genetic disorder. This autosomal recessive disorder due to mutations in the gene Perlecan leads to abnormal cartilage development and anomalous neuromuscular activity.

  1. Chronobiology differs between men and women with cluster headache, clinical phenotype does not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Nunu; Barloese, Mads; Petersen, Anja

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe differences between the sexes in the phenotype of cluster headache (CH) in a large, well-characterized clinical CH population. METHODS: Patients from the Danish CH survey aged 18-65 years, diagnosed with CH according to International Classification of Headache Disorders, se...... more often failed. Furthermore, women had chronic CH more frequently than men. A long diagnostic delay and frequent misdiagnosis emphasize the need for increased awareness of CH in both sexes....

  2. Comprehensive Clinical Phenotyping & Genetic Mapping for the Discovery of Autism Susceptibility Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    teaching students with autism spectrum disorders 4.52 Learn strategies for incorporating IEP goals and district standard into daily teaching...W403 Columbus, OH 43205 Final Report Comprehensive Clinical Phenotyping & Genetic Mapping for the Discovery of Autism Susceptibility Genes...QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 1.0 Summary In 2006, the Central Ohio Registry for Autism (CORA) was initiated as a collaboration between Wright-Patterson Air

  3. Comprehensive Clinical Phenotyping and Genetic Mapping for the Discovery of Autism Susceptibility Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    behavioral teaching strategies and best practice for teaching students with autism spectrum disorders 4.52 Learn strategies for incorporating IEP goals...AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2013-0013 Comprehensive Clinical Phenotyping and Genetic Mapping for the Discovery of Autism Susceptibility Genes...Genetic Mapping for the Discovery of Autism Susceptibility Genes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6

  4. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongbo; Zhang, Guangde; Zhou, Meng; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Haixiu; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes) showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD.

  5. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Shi

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD.

  6. Phenotypic Characteristics Associated with Virulence of Clinical Isolates from the Sporothrix Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; de Oliveira, Luã Cardoso; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Nosanchuk, Joshua Daniel; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2015-01-01

    The Sporothrix complex members cause sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Several specific phenotypic characteristics are associated with virulence in many fungi, but studies in this field involving the Sporothrix complex species are scarce. Melanization, thermotolerance, and production of proteases, catalase, and urease were investigated in 61 S. brasiliensis, one S. globosa, and 10 S. schenckii strains. The S. brasiliensis strains showed a higher expression of melanin and urease compared with S. schenckii. These two species, however, presented similar thermotolerances. Our S. globosa strain had low expression of all studied virulence factors. The relationship between these phenotypes and clinical aspects of sporotrichosis was also evaluated. Strains isolated from patients with spontaneous regression of infection were heavily melanized and produced high urease levels. Melanin was also related to dissemination of internal organs and protease production was associated with HIV-coinfection. A murine sporotrichosis model showed that a S. brasiliensis strain with high expression of virulence factors was able to disseminate and yield a high fungal burden in comparison with a control S. schenckii strain. Our results show that virulence-related phenotypes are variably expressed within the Sporothrix complex species and might be involved in clinical aspects of sporotrichosis. PMID:25961005

  7. Sex differences in correlates of intermediate phenotypes and prevalent cardiovascular disease in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate B. Schnabel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background-There are marked sex differences in cardiovascular disease [CVD] manifestation. It is largely unknown how the distribution of CVD risk factors or intermediate phenotypes explain sex-specific differences.Methods and Results-In 5000 individuals of the population-based Gutenberg Health Study, mean age 55±11 years, 51% males, we examined sex-specific associations of classical CVD risk factors with intima-media thickness, ankle-brachial index, flow-mediated dilation, peripheral arterial tonometry, echocardiographic and electrocardiographic variables. Intermediate cardiovascular phenotypes were related to prevalent CVD (coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, lower extremity artery disease [LEAD] N=561.We observed differential distributions of CVD risk factors with a higher risk factor burden in men. Manifest coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction and LEAD were more frequent in men; the proportion of heart failure was higher in women. Intermediate phenotypes showed clear sex differences with more beneficial values in women. Fairly linear changes towards less beneficial values with age were observed in both sexes. In multivariable-adjusted regression analyses age, systolic blood pressure and body mass index were consistently associated with intermediate phenotypes in both sexes with different ranking according to random forests, maximum model R² 0.43. Risk factor-adjusted associations with prevalent CVD showed some differences by sex. No interactions by menopausal status were observed. Conclusions-In a population-based cohort we observed sex differences in risk factors and a broad range of intermediate phenotypes of noninvasive cardiovascular structure and function. Their relation to prevalent CVD differed markedly. Our results indicate the need of future investigations to understand sex differences in CVD manifestation.

  8. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of blood natural killer cells from melanoma patients at different clinical stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Fregni

    Full Text Available Melanomas are aggressive skin tumors characterized by high metastatic potential. Immunotherapy is a valuable alternative for metastatic melanoma patients resistant to chemotherapy. Natural Killer (NK cells are efficient anti-tumor cytotoxic effectors. We previously showed that blood NK cells from stage IV metastatic melanoma patients display decreased NK receptors and that chemotherapy modifies the functional status of blood NK cells. To investigate the role of NK cells along melanoma progression, we have here studied NK cells from patients at different stages of the disease. First, we showed that ex vivo NK cells from certain stage III-IV patients displayed low degranulation potential. Using a dynamic label-free assay, we found that immunoselected IL-2 activated blood NK cells from patients efficiently lysed melanoma cells through NKp46 and NKG2D receptors, independently to the clinical stage. Moreover, the ex vivo phenotype of circulating NK cells from 33 patients (stage I to IV was extensively analyzed. NK cells from patients displayed higher variability in the percentages of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR and Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D receptor expression compared to donor NK cells. The main defect was the decreased expression of NCR1 (NKp46 by NK cells from metastatic patients. Interestingly, we found a positive correlation between the NK cell percentages of NKp46 and the duration of stage IV in melanoma patients. Finally, we showed that NK cells infiltrated primary melanomas and displayed a predominant peritumoral distribution. These results are new arguments for the development of NK-based therapies in melanoma patients.

  9. Clinical Correlates of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Phenotypes at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyar Erdogmus

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hypertension and its complications are major public health issues worldwide due to their association with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite significant progress in health, the prevalence of hypertension is increasing. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM is becoming increasingly important for the management of hypertension. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical and laboratory correlates of ambulatory blood pressure (ABP phenotypes at a tertiary care hospital in Turkey. Methods: The characteristics of 1053 patients were retrospectively obtained from the hospital database. Hypertension was defined as patients with office blood pressure (BP ≥140/90 mmHg and/or previously diagnosed hypertension and/or the use of antihypertensive medication. According to the office BP and ABPM results patients were identified namely: (1 sustained normotensive (SNT patients (both office BP and ABPM were normal, (2 sustained hypertensive (SHT patients (both office BP and ABPM were high, (3 masked hypertensive (MHT patients (office BP were normal, but ABPM were high, (4 white coat hypertensive (WCHT patients (office BP were above limits, but ABPM were normal. Results: A total of 1053 patients were included to the study (female/male: 608/445 and mean age 55 ± 15 years. The mean age of patients with hypertension was significantly higher than without hypertension (p< 0.0001. Hypertension was more frequent in females (p=0.009. The rates of history of diabetes mellitus (DM, hyperlipidemia (HL, and chronic kidney disease (CKD were higher in patients with hypertension (p< 0.0001. Among patients with hypertension (n=853, 81%, ABPM results showed that 388 (45% of patients had SHT, 92 (11% had MHT, and 144 (17% had WCHT, whereas 229 (27% had SNT. Patients with MHT were significantly older than patients with SNT (p=0.025. The prevalence of SHT was higher in men than in women, whereas the prevalence of WCHT was higher in

  10. Neural/Bayes network predictor for inheritable cardiac disease pathogenicity and phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Ajtai, Katalin

    2018-04-11

    The cardiac muscle sarcomere contains multiple proteins contributing to contraction energy transduction and its regulation during a heartbeat. Inheritable heart disease mutants affect most of them but none more frequently than the ventricular myosin motor and cardiac myosin binding protein c (mybpc3). These co-localizing proteins have mybpc3 playing a regulatory role to the energy transducing motor. Residue substitution and functional domain assignment of each mutation in the protein sequence decides, under the direction of a sensible disease model, phenotype and pathogenicity. The unknown model mechanism is decided here using a method combing neural and Bayes networks. Missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are clues for the disease mechanism summarized in an extensive database collecting mutant sequence location and residue substitution as independent variables that imply the dependent disease phenotype and pathogenicity characteristics in 4 dimensional data points (4ddps). The SNP database contains entries with the majority having one or both dependent data entries unfulfilled. A neural network relating causes (mutant residue location and substitution) and effects (phenotype and pathogenicity) is trained, validated, and optimized using fulfilled 4ddps. It then predicts unfulfilled 4ddps providing the implicit disease model. A discrete Bayes network interprets fulfilled and predicted 4ddps with conditional probabilities for phenotype and pathogenicity given mutation location and residue substitution thus relating the neural network implicit model to explicit features of the motor and mybpc3 sequence and structural domains. Neural/Bayes network forecasting automates disease mechanism modeling by leveraging the world wide human missense SNP database that is in place and expanding. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic evaluation of 18 Nocardia isolates from human clinical samples in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Herrera, K; Sandoval, H; Couble, A; Mouniee, D; Ramírez-Durán, N; Uzcategui de Morillo, M; Serrano, J A; Bergeron, E; Boiron, P; Rodríguez-Nava, V

    2012-03-01

    Mexico has the largest number of clinical cases of actinomycetoma in North and South America. Species originally identified by less specific methods have been recently reclassified as other known species or as new species. To assess, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic methods, the species distribution of 18 human clinical isolates originally identified as N. brasiliensis, some of them isolated between 1947 and 1959 in Mexico City. Clinical isolates came from the Hospital General, "Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez", and Instituto Nacional de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológica (INDRE) in Mexico, D.F. The strains used in this study included 15 clinical strains isolated between 1947 and 1959 that were originally identified as N. brasiliensis and three more strains obtained in 2007 identified as Nocardia spp. The isolates were identified genotypically by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene, and their phenotypic profiles were obtained with the API Coryne(®) system. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns were tested according to the protocol of the Comité de l'antibiogramme de la Société française de microbiologie[4]. According to 16S rRNA gene, sequencing were identified among 18 human clinical isolates as Nocardia farcinica (n=11) and Nocardia brasiliensis (n=7). A high number of the strains were susceptible to the majority of the antibiotics tested. The phenotypic profiles of the strains were quite uniform for N. farcinica and some variability was observed for N. brasiliensis strains. N. farcinica was the most prevalent species identified. Modern methodologies should be applied in clinical laboratories to accurately identify etiological agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. LORD: a phenotype-genotype semantically integrated biomedical data tool to support rare disease diagnosis coding in health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Remy; Maaroufi, Meriem; Fonjallaz, Yannick; de Carrara, Albane; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves; Dhombres, Ferdinand; Landais, Paul

    Characterizing a rare disease diagnosis for a given patient is often made through expert's networks. It is a complex task that could evolve over time depending on the natural history of the disease and the evolution of the scientific knowledge. Most rare diseases have genetic causes and recent improvements of sequencing techniques contribute to the discovery of many new diseases every year. Diagnosis coding in the rare disease field requires data from multiple knowledge bases to be aggregated in order to offer the clinician a global information space from possible diagnosis to clinical signs (phenotypes) and known genetic mutations (genotype). Nowadays, the major barrier to the coding activity is the lack of consolidation of such information scattered in different thesaurus such as Orphanet, OMIM or HPO. The Linking Open data for Rare Diseases (LORD) web portal we developed stands as the first attempt to fill this gap by offering an integrated view of 8,400 rare diseases linked to more than 14,500 signs and 3,270 genes. The application provides a browsing feature to navigate through the relationships between diseases, signs and genes, and some Application Programming Interfaces to help its integration in health information systems in routine.

  13. The vascular phenotype in pseudoxanthoma elasticum and related disorders: Contribution of a genetic disease to the understanding of vascular calcification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eLeftheriotis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification is a complex and dynamic process occurring in various physiological conditions such as aging and exercise or in acquired metabolic disorders like diabetes or chronic renal insufficiency. Arterial calcifications are also observed in several genetic diseases revealing the important role of unbalanced or defective anti- or pro-calcifying factors. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE is an inherited disease (OMIM 264800 characterized by elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft conjunctive tissues including the skin, eyes and arterial media. The PXE disease results from mutations in the ABCC6 gene, encoding an ATP-binding cassette transporter primarily expressed in the liver, kidneys suggesting that it is a prototypic metabolic soft-tissue calcifying disease of genetic origin. The clinical expression of the PXE arterial disease is characterized by an increased risk for coronary (myocardial infarction, cerebral (aneurysm and stroke and lower limb peripheral artery disease. However, the structural and functional changes in the arterial wall induced by PXE are still unexplained. The use of a recombinant mouse model inactivated for the Abcc6 gene is an important tool for the understanding of the PXE pathophysiology although the vascular impact in this model remains limited to date. Overlapping of the PXE phenotype with other inherited calcifying diseases could bring important informations to our comprehension of the PXE disease.

  14. Motor outcome measures in Huntington disease clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilmann, Ralf; Schubert, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in motor function are a hallmark of Huntington disease (HD). The Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale Total Motor Score (UHDRS-TMS) is a categoric clinical rating scale assessing multiple domains of motor disability in HD. The UHDRS-TMS or subsets of its items have served as primary or secondary endpoints in numerous clinical trials. In spite of a well-established video-based annual online certification system, intra- and interrater variability, subjective error, and rater-induced placebo effects remain a concern. In addition, the UHDRS-TMS was designed to primarily assess motor symptoms in manifest HD. Recently, advancement of technology resulted in the introduction of the objective Q-Motor (i.e., Quantitative-Motor) assessments in biomarker studies and clinical trials in HD. Q-Motor measures detected motor signs in blinded cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of manifest, prodromal, and premanifest HD cohorts up to two decades before clinical diagnosis. In a multicenter clinical trial in HD, Q-Motor measures were more sensitive than the UHDRS-TMS and exhibited no placebo effects. Thus, Q-Motor measures are currently explored in several multicenter trials targeting both symptomatic and disease-modifying mechanisms. They may supplement the UHDRS-TMS, increase the sensitivity and reliability in proof-of-concept studies, and open the door for phenotype assessments in clinical trials in prodromal and premanifest HD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigating Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease Based on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome phenotypes in the 18-14 year Old High School Girls in Shiraz 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Dabbaghmaneh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In patients with polycystic ovary syndrome hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia may represent an increased risk for coronary cardiovascular disease .This study aimed to investigate risk factors for cardiovascular disease based on polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes in Shiraz. Methods: This Cross-sectional study was performed on 3200 students aged 18-14. Demographic survey, clinical signs of androgen excess (acne, hirsutism, alopecia, Ultrasound were applied in order to find the cyst. Tests included prolactin, dehydroepiandrodion sulfate, and oral glucose tolerance test, fasting blood glucose, blood sugar two hours later, triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein. Data were submitted to SPSS software, version 11.5 and then analyzed by chi-square tests. Results: The serum cholesterol mean in four phenotypes had a statistically significant relationship with non-PCOS patients(p<0.05. Mean of serum cholesterol in oligomenorrhea, Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary phenotype (195.09±30.28 was higher than the other phenotypes. Mean of serum cholesterol and low density lipoprotein(LDL-C were significantly higher in patients with Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovarian phenotype(130.046±26.27 and oligomenorrhea, Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype(138.58±28.34 compared with non-infected individuals. Serum glucose mean in all phenotype was higher than non-infected after two hours and it showed a significant relation in oligomenorrhea and also polycystic ovarian phenotype(98.03 ± 20.98 versus 87.5±12.97 with non-infected individuals. Conclusion: Biochemical factors that lead to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases is increased in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Therefore, it should be attended in prevention programs

  16. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  17. Big data in Parkinson's disease: using smartphones to remotely detect longitudinal disease phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, John; Arora, Siddharth; de Vos, Maarten

    2018-04-26

    To better understand the longitudinal characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD) through the analysis of finger tapping and memory tests collected remotely using smartphones. Using a large cohort (312 PD subjects and 236 controls) of participants in the mPower study, we extract clinically validated features from a finger tapping and memory test to monitor the longitudinal behaviour of study participants. We investigate any discrepancy in learning rates associated with motor and non-motor tasks between PD subjects and healthy controls. The ability of these features to predict self-assigned severity measures is assessed whilst simultaneously inspecting the severity scoring system for floor-ceiling effects. Finally, we study the relationship between motor and non-motor longitudinal behaviour to determine if separate aspects of the disease are dependent on one another. We find that the test performances of the most severe subjects show significant correlations with self-assigned severity measures. Interestingly, less severe subjects do not show significant correlations, which is shown to be a consequence of floor-ceiling effects within the mPower self-reporting severity system. We find that motor performance after practise is a better predictor of severity than baseline performance suggesting that starting performance at a new motor task is less representative of disease severity than the performance after the test has been learnt. We find PD subjects show significant impairments in motor ability as assessed through the alternating finger tapping (AFT) test in both the short- and long-term analyses. In the AFT and memory tests we demonstrate that PD subjects show a larger degree of longitudinal performance variability in addition to requiring more instances of a test to reach a steady state performance than healthy subjects. Our findings pave the way forward for objective assessment and quantification of longitudinal learning rates in PD. This can be particularly

  18. Clinical spectrum of Castleman disease-associated neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Elie; Dispenzieri, Angela; Mandrekar, Jay; Mauermann, Michelle L

    2016-12-06

    To define the peripheral neuropathy phenotypes associated with Castleman disease. We conducted a retrospective chart review for patients with biopsy-proven Castleman disease evaluated between January 2003 and December 2014. Patients with associated peripheral neuropathy were identified and divided into 2 groups: those with Castleman disease without POEMS syndrome (CD-PN) and those with Castleman disease with POEMS syndrome (CD-POEMS). We used a cohort of patients with POEMS as controls. Clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory characteristics were collected and compared among patient subgroups. There were 7 patients with CD-PN, 20 with CD-POEMS, and 122 with POEMS. Patients with CD-PN had the mildest neuropathy characterized by predominant sensory symptoms with no pain and mild distal sensory deficits (median Neuropathy Impairment Score of 7 points). Although both patients with CD-POEMS and patients with POEMS had a severe sensory and motor neuropathy, patients with CD-POEMS were less affected (median Neuropathy Impairment Score of 33 and 66 points, respectively). The degree of severity was also reflected on electrodiagnostic testing in which patients with CD-PN demonstrated a mild degree of axonal loss, followed by patients with CD-POEMS and then those with POEMS. Demyelinating features, defined by European Federation of Neurologic Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society criteria, were present in 43% of the CD-PN, 78% of the CD-POEMS, and 86% of the POEMS group. There is a spectrum of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies associated with Castleman disease. CD-PN is sensory predominant and is the mildest phenotype, whereas CD-POEMS is a more severe sensory and motor neuropathy. Compared to the POEMS cohort, those with CD-POEMS neuropathy have a similar but less severe phenotype. Whether these patients respond differently to treatment deserves further study. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Interactions between the FTO and GNB3 genes contribute to varied clinical phenotypes in hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    Full Text Available The genes FTO and GNB3 are implicated in essential hypertension but their interaction remains to be explored. This study investigates the role of interaction between the two genes in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension.In a case-control study comprising 750 controls and 550 patients, interaction between the polymorphisms of FTO and GNB3 was examined using multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR. The influence of interaction on clinical phenotypes like systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and body mass index was also investigated. The 3-locus MDR model comprising FTO rs8050136C/A and GNB3 rs1129649T/C and rs5443C/T emerged as the best disease conferring model. Moreover, the interacted-genotypes having either 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 risk alleles correlated with linearly increasing odds ratios of 1.91 (P = 0.027; 3.93 (P = 2.08E-06; 4.51 (P = 7.63E-07; 7.44 (P = 3.66E-08 and 11.57 (P = 1.18E-05, respectively, when compared with interacted-genotypes devoid of risk alleles. Furthermore, interactions among haplotypes of FTO (H1-9 and GNB3 (Ha-d differed by >1.5-fold for protective-haplotypes, CTGGC+TC [H2+Ha] and CTGAC+TC [H4+Ha] (OR = 0.39, P = 0.003; OR = 0.22, P = 6.86E-05, respectively and risk-haplotypes, AAAGC+CT [H3+Hc] and AAAGC+TT [H3+Hd] (OR = 2.91, P = 9.98E-06; OR = 2.50, P = 0.004, respectively compared to individual haplotypes. Moreover, the effectiveness of gene-gene interaction was further corroborated with a 1.29-, 1.25- and 1.38-fold higher SBP, MAP and BMI, respectively, in patients having risk interacted-haplotype H3+Hc and 2.48-fold higher SBP having risk interacted-haplotype H3+Hd compared to individual haplotypes.Interactions between genetic variants of FTO and GNB3 influence clinical parameters to augment hypertension.

  20. Clinical observation of radiation urinary bladder disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yuke; Liu Libo; Zhang Haiying; Liang Shuo; Chen Dawei; Wu Zhenfeng; Dong Lihua; Lu Xuejun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Clinical characteristic, diagnosis and treatment of radiation urinary bladder disease induced by radiation therapy for cancers in the pelvis were inquired into for providing diagnostic basis. Methods: Statistical analysis for the clinical cases was carried out. Results: The incidence of radiation bladder diseases induced by radiation therapy of cervix cancer are about 0.8%-2.96%, with an average of 2.14%. Radiation bladder disease is divided into acute radiation cystitis, chronic radiation cystitis and radiation vesical fistula. Chronic radiation cystitis is seen most often in the clinic and its main clinical symptom is painless macroscopic hematuria, which is again subdivided into slight and severe degrees. Diagnosis should include history of exposure to radiation, which dose exceed the dose threshold, and typical clinical characteristics. Conclusion: The characteristics, types and diagnostic basis of radiation urinary bladder disease analyzed in this study can provide the reference for drawing up diagnostic standard

  1. Cuticular Drusen: Clinical Phenotypes and Natural History Defined Using Multimodal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Cherepanoff, Svetlana; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Killingsworth, Murray; Chen, Fred K; Mendis, Randev; Mrejen, Sarah; Too, Lay Khoon; Gal-Or, Orly; Curcio, Christine A; Freund, K Bailey; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A

    2018-01-01

    To define the range and life cycles of cuticular drusen phenotypes using multimodal imaging and to review the histologic characteristics of cuticular drusen. Retrospective, observational cohort study and experimental laboratory study. Two hundred forty eyes of 120 clinic patients with a cuticular drusen phenotype and 4 human donor eyes with cuticular drusen (n = 2), soft drusen (n = 1), and hard drusen (n = 1). We performed a retrospective review of clinical and multimodal imaging data of patients with a cuticular drusen phenotype. Patients had undergone imaging with various combinations of color photography, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, near-infrared reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, high-resolution OCT, and ultrawide-field imaging. Human donor eyes underwent processing for high-resolution light and electron microscopy. Appearance of cuticular drusen in multimodal imaging and the topography of a cuticular drusen distribution; age-dependent variations in cuticular drusen phenotypes, including the occurrence of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) abnormalities, choroidal neovascularization, acquired vitelliform lesions (AVLs), and geographic atrophy (GA); and ultrastructural and staining characteristics of druse subtypes. The mean age of patients at the first visit was 57.9±13.4 years. Drusen and RPE changes were seen in the peripheral retina, anterior to the vortex veins, in 21.8% of eyes. Of eyes with more than 5 years of follow-up, cuticular drusen disappeared from view in 58.3% of eyes, drusen coalescence was seen in 70.8% of eyes, and new RPE pigmentary changes developed in 56.2% of eyes. Retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities, AVLs, neovascularization, and GA occurred at a frequency of 47.5%, 24.2%, 12.5%, and 25%, respectively, and were significantly more common in patients older than 60 years of age (all P < 0.015). Occurrence of GA and neovascularization were important determinants of final visual acuity in eyes with the

  2. The distribution of clinical phenotypes of preterm birth syndrome: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Fernando C; Papageorghiou, Aris T; Victora, Cesar G; Noble, Julia A; Pang, Ruyan; Iams, Jay; Cheikh Ismail, Leila; Goldenberg, Robert L; Lambert, Ann; Kramer, Michael S; Carvalho, Maria; Conde-Agudelo, Agustin; Jaffer, Yasmin A; Bertino, Enrico; Gravett, Michael G; Altman, Doug G; Ohuma, Eric O; Purwar, Manorama; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Kennedy, Stephen H; Villar, José

    2015-03-01

    Preterm birth has been difficult to study and prevent because of its complex syndromic nature. To identify phenotypes of preterm delivery syndrome in the Newborn Cross-Sectional Study of the INTERGROWTH-21st Project. A population-based, multiethnic, cross-sectional study conducted at 8 geographically demarcated sites in Brazil, China, India, Italy, Kenya, Oman, the United Kingdom, and the United States. A total of 60,058 births over a 12-month fixed period between April 27, 2009, and March 2, 2014. Of these, 53,871 had an ultrasonography estimate of gestational age, among which 5828 were preterm births (10.8%). Pregnancies were prospectively studied using a standardized data collection and online data management system. Newborns had anthropometric and clinical examinations using standardized methods and identical equipment and were followed up until hospital discharge. The main study outcomes were clusters of preterm phenotypes and for each cluster, we analyzed signs of presentation at hospital admission, admission rates for neonatal intensive care for 7 days or more, and neonatal mortality rates. Twelve preterm birth clusters were identified using our conceptual framework. Eleven consisted of combinations of conditions known to be associated with preterm birth, 10 of which were dominated by a single condition. However, the most common single cluster (30.0% of the total preterm cases; n = 1747) was not associated with any severe maternal, fetal, or placental condition that was clinically detectable based on the information available; within this cluster, many cases were caregiver initiated. Only 22% (n = 1284) of all the preterm births occurred spontaneously without any of these severe conditions. Maternal presentation on hospital admission, newborn anthropometry, and risk for death before hospital discharge or admission for 7 or more days to a neonatal intensive care unit, none of which were used to construct the clusters, also differed according to the identified

  3. Clinical presentation of juvenile Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruocco Heloísa H.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical presentation a group of patients with juvenile onset of Huntington disease. METHOD: All patients were interviewed following a structured clinical questioner. Patients were genotyped for the trinucleotide cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeat in the Huntington Disease gene. High resolution brain MRI was performed in all patients. RESULTS: We identified 4 patients with juvenile onset of disease among 50 patients with Huntington disease followed prospectively in our Neurogenetics clinic. Age at onset varied from 3 to 13 years, there were 2 boys, and 3 patients had a paternal inheritance of the disease. Expanded Huntington disease allele sizes varied from 41 to 69 trinucleotide repeats. The early onset patients presented with rigidity, bradykinesia, dystonia, dysarthria, seizures and ataxia. MRI showed severe volume loss of caudate and putamen nuclei (p=0.001 and reduced cerebral and cerebellum volumes (p=0.01. CONCLUSION: 8% of Huntington disease patients seen in our clinic had juvenile onset of the disease. They did not present with typical chorea as seen in adult onset Huntington disease. There was a predominance of rigidity and bradykinesia. Two other important clinical features were seizures and ataxia, which related with the imaging findings of early cortical atrophy and cerebellum volume loss.

  4. The Relation between Diverse Phenotypes of PCOS with Clinical Manifestations, Anthropometric Indices and Metabolic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrami, Seyedeh Hajar; Abbasi Ranjbar, Zahra; Milani, Forozan; Kezem-Nejad, Ehsan; Hassanzadeh Rad, Afagh; Dalil Heirat, Seyedeh Fatemeh

    2016-02-01

    Critical issue regarding to variation of findings based on different phenotypes led investigators to define whether they are distinct features or overlapping ones. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association between diverse phenotypes of PCOS (Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome) with clinical manifestations, anthropometric indices, and metabolic characteristics. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in 15-39 years old women with PCOS referred to infertility clinics in the north part of Iran, Rasht during 2010-2011. Data were gathered through an interview by a form consisted of demographic characteristics, laboratory findings, ovarian volume and anthropometric indices. A total of 214 patients consisted of 161 PCOS (cases) and 53 normal women (controls) participated in this study. The most prevalent phenotype in PCOS population was IM/PCO/HA (54%), followed by IM/HA (28%) and IM/PCO (13%). PCO/HA was present only in 6 PCOS patients (5%). PCOS patients were significantly younger than controls (P=0.07). Results showed that increased ovarian volume were higher in PCOS group in comparison with controls and IM/PCO/HA, and IM/PCO had respectively the largest ovarian volumes. Also, a significant relation was observed based on Cholesterol, 17OHP, LH, TG, 2hpp, and LH/FSH between patients with PCOS and control groups. There were significant differences in demographic, anthropometric, hormonal and ultrasound findings between PCOS and controls. Therefore, it seems that classification of the characteristics of each phenotype could offer an appropriate guide for screening risks of PCOS and may facilitate performing most favorable treatment for these complications.

  5. The Importance of Clinical Phenotype in Understanding and Preventing Spontaneous Preterm Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplin, M Sean

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) is a well-known cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity. The search for the underlying pathways, documentation of the genetic causes, and identification of markers of spontaneous PTB have been marginally successful due to the fact that it is highly complex, with numerous processes that lead to a final common pathway. There is a great need for a comprehensive, consistent, and uniform classification system, which will be useful in identifying mechanisms, assigning prognosis, aiding in clinical management, and can identify areas of interest for intervention and future study. Effective classification systems must overcome obstacles including the lack of widely accepted definitions and uncertainty about inclusion of classifying features (e.g., presentation at delivery and multiple gestations) and levels of detail of these features. The optimal classification system should be based on the clinical phenotype, including characteristics of the mother, fetus, placenta, and the presentation for delivery. We present a proposed phenotyping system for spontaneous PTB. Future classification systems must establish a universally accepted set of definitions and a standardized clinical workup for all PTBs including the minimum clinical data to be collected and the laboratory and pathologic evaluation that should be completed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Effect of liver disease on dextromethorphan oxidation capacity and phenotype: a study in 107 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Larrey, D; Babany, G; Tinel, M; Freneaux, E; Amouyal, G; Habersetzer, F; Letteron, P; Pessayre, D

    1989-01-01

    1. The O-demethylation of dextromethorphan to dextrorphan exhibits a genetically-controlled polymorphism, co-segregating with that of debrisoquine hydroxylation. Dextromethorphan has been proposed as a test compound to assess drug oxidation polymorphism. 2. We studied the effects of liver disease of varying severity on dextromethorphan oxidation capacity. Phenotyping was performed using the urinary dextromethorphan/dextrorphan metabolic ratio after oral administration of 40 mg dextromethorpha...

  7. The Effect of Parkinson Disease Tremor Phenotype on Cepstral Peak Prominence and Transglottal Airflow in Vowels and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Brittany R; Watts, Christopher R

    2018-02-19

    The physiological manifestations of Parkinson disease are heterogeneous, as evidenced by disease subtypes. Dysphonia has been well documented as an early and progressively significant impairment associated with the disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate how acoustic and aerodynamic measures of vocal function were affected by Parkinson tremor subtype (phenotype) in an effort to better understand the heterogeneity of voice impairment severity in Parkinson disease. This is a prospective case-control study. Thirty-two speakers with Parkinson disease assigned to tremor and nontremor phenotypes and 10 healthy controls were recruited. Sustained vowels and connected speech were recorded from each speaker. Acoustic measures of cepstral peak prominence (CPP) and aerodynamic measures of transglottal airflow (TAF) were calculated from the recorded acoustic and aerodynamic waveforms. Speakers with a nontremor dominant phenotype exhibited significantly (P Parkinson tremor phenotype in mild to moderate stages of the disease. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiac Amyloidosis and its New Clinical Phenotype: Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Jorge, Antonio José Lagoeiro; Souza, Celso Vale; Andrade, Thais Ribeiro de

    2017-07-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is now an emerging cardiovascular epidemic, being identified as the main phenotype observed in clinical practice. It is more associated with female gender, advanced age and comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease. Amyloidosis is a clinical disorder characterized by the deposition of aggregates of insoluble fibrils originating from proteins that exhibit anomalous folding. Recently, pictures of senile amyloidosis have been described in patients with HFpEF, demonstrating the need for clinical cardiologists to investigate this etiology in suspect cases. The clinical suspicion of amyloidosis should be increased in cases of HFPS where the cardio imaging methods are compatible with infiltrative cardiomyopathy. Advances in cardio imaging methods combined with the possibility of performing genetic tests and identification of the type of amyloid material allow the diagnosis to be made. The management of the diagnosed patients can be done in partnership with centers specialized in the study of amyloidosis, which, together with the new technologies, investigate the possibility of organ or bone marrow transplantation and also the involvement of patients in clinical studies that evaluate the action of the new emerging drugs. Resumo A insuficiência cardíaca com fração de ejeção preservada (ICFEP) é hoje uma epidemia cardiovascular emergente, sendo identificada como o principal fenótipo observado na prática clínica. Está mais associado ao sexo feminino, idade avançada e a comorbidades como hipertensão arterial, diabetes, obesidade e doença renal crônica. A amiloidose é uma desordem clínica caracterizada pelo depósito de agregados de fibrilas insolúveis originadas de proteínas que apresentam dobramento anômalo. Recentemente, têm sido descritos quadros de amiloidose senil em pacientes com ICFEP, demonstrando a necessidade de os cardiologistas clínicos investigarem

  9. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed; White, Jacqui; Morgan, Hugh; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Sorg, Tania; Wells, Sara; Fuchs, Helmut; Fray, Martin; Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl Mj; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie; Holmes, Chris; Steel, Karen P; Herault, Yann; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve Dm

    2015-09-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-oriented platforms. We developed new statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no previous functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice, finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. New phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with previously unknown function, providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems.

  10. Characteristics of COPD patients according to GOLD classification and clinical phenotypes in the Russian Federation: the SUPPORT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkhipov V

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vladimir Arkhipov,1 Daria Arkhipova,2 Marc Miravitlles,3 Andrey Lazarev,4 Ekaterina Stukalina5 1Clinical Pharmacology and Therapy Department, Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Moscow, Russian Federation; 2Clinical Pharmacology and Propaedeutic Internal Diseases Department, First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russian Federation; 3Pneumology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Ciber de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, Barcelona, Spain; 4AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Moscow, Russian Federation; 5AstraZeneca LP, Gaithersburg, MD, USA Background: The high prevalence of COPD in the Russian Federation has been demonstrated in several epidemiological studies. However, there are still no data on the clinical characteristics of these patients according to Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD groups and phenotypes, which could provide additional understanding of the burden of COPD, routine clinical practice, and ways to improve the treatment of patients with COPD in Russia.Patients and methods: SUPPORT was an observational multicenter study designed to obtain data about the distribution of patients with previously diagnosed COPD according to the severity of bronchial obstruction, symptom severity, risk of exacerbation, COPD phenotypes, and treatment of COPD. We included patients with a previous diagnosis of COPD who visited one of 33 primary-care centers for any reason in 23 cities in Russia.Results: Among the 1,505 patients with a previous diagnosis of COPD who attended the primary-care centers and were screened for the study, 1,111 had a spirometry-confirmed diagnosis and were included in the analysis. Up to 53% of the patients had severe or very severe COPD (GOLD stages III–IV, and 74.3% belonged to the GOLD D group. The majority of patients were frequent exacerbators (exacerbators with chronic bronchitis [37.3%], exacerbators without chronic bronchitis [14%], while 35.8% were

  11. Immune phenotype in children with therapy-naïve remitted and relapsed Crohn’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseh, Aron; Vasarhelyi, Barna; Molnar, Kriszta; Szalay, Balazs; Svec, Peter; Treszl, Andras; Dezsofi, Antal; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Arato, Andras; Tulassay, Tivadar; Veres, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the prevalence of subpopulations of CD4+ cells along with that of major inhibitor or stimulator cell types in therapy-naïve childhood Crohn’s disease (CD) and to test whether abnormalities of immune phenotype are normalized with the improvement of clinical signs and symptoms of disease. METHODS: We enrolled 26 pediatric patients with CD. 14 therapy-naïve CD children; of those, 10 children remitted on conventional therapy and formed the remission group. We also tested another group of 12 children who relapsed with conventional therapy and were given infliximab; and 15 healthy children who served as controls. The prevalence of Th1 and Th2, naïve and memory, activated and regulatory T cells, along with the members of innate immunity such as natural killer (NK), NK-T, myeloid and plasmocytoid dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR-4 expression were determined in peripheral blood samples. RESULTS: Children with therapy-naïve CD and those in relapse showed a decrease in Th1 cell prevalence. Simultaneously, an increased prevalence of memory and activated lymphocytes along with that of DCs and monocytes was observed. In addition, the ratio of myeloid /plasmocytoid DCs and the prevalence of TLR-2 or TLR-4 positive DCs and monocytes were also higher in therapy-naïve CD than in controls. The majority of alterations diminished in remitted CD irrespective of whether remission was obtained by conventional or biological therapy. CONCLUSION: The finding that immune phenotype is normalized in remission suggests a link between immune phenotype and disease activity in childhood CD. Our observations support the involvement of members of the adaptive and innate immune systems in childhood CD. PMID:21157977

  12. Comparison of the Phenotype and Approach to Pediatric Versus Adult Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, V; Alisi, A; Newton, Kimberly P.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the main chronic non-communicable diseases in westernized societies; its worldwide prevalence has doubled during the last 20 years. NAFLD has serious health implications not only for adults, but also for children. However, pediatric NAFLD is not only an important global problem in itself, but it is likely to be associated with increases in comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. There are several differences between NAFLD in children and adults and it is not clear whether the disease observed in children is the initial phase of a process that progresses with age. The increasing prevalence of pediatric NAFLD has serious implications for the future adult population requiring appropriate action. Studies of NAFLD progression, pathogenesis, and management should evaluate disease phenotypes in children and follow these over patient lifetimes. We review the similarities and differences of NAFLD between children and adults. PMID:27003600

  13. Annotating Diseases Using Human Phenotype Ontology Improves Prediction of Disease-Associated Long Non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Duc-Hau; Dao, Lan T M

    2018-05-23

    Recently, many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified and their biological function has been characterized; however, our understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms related to disease is still limited. To overcome the limitation in experimentally identifying disease-lncRNA associations, computational methods have been proposed as a powerful tool to predict such associations. These methods are usually based on the similarities between diseases or lncRNAs since it was reported that similar diseases are associated with functionally similar lncRNAs. Therefore, prediction performance is highly dependent on how well the similarities can be captured. Previous studies have calculated the similarity between two diseases by mapping exactly each disease to a single Disease Ontology (DO) term, and then use a semantic similarity measure to calculate the similarity between them. However, the problem of this approach is that a disease can be described by more than one DO terms. Until now, there is no annotation database of DO terms for diseases except for genes. In contrast, Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is designed to fully annotate human disease phenotypes. Therefore, in this study, we constructed disease similarity networks/matrices using HPO instead of DO. Then, we used these networks/matrices as inputs of two representative machine learning-based and network-based ranking algorithms, that is, regularized least square and heterogeneous graph-based inference, respectively. The results showed that the prediction performance of the two algorithms on HPO-based is better than that on DO-based networks/matrices. In addition, our method can predict 11 novel cancer-associated lncRNAs, which are supported by literature evidence. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stargardt disease: clinical features, molecular genetics, animal models and therapeutic options

    OpenAIRE

    Tanna, P.; Strauss, R. W.; Fujinami, K.; Michaelides, M.

    2017-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1; MIM 248200) is the most prevalent inherited macular dystrophy and is associated with disease-causing sequence variants in the gene ABCA4 Significant advances have been made over the last 10 years in our understanding of both the clinical and molecular features of STGD1, and also the underlying pathophysiology, which has culminated in ongoing and planned human clinical trials of novel therapies. The aims of this review are to describe the detailed phenotypic and genot...

  15. Stargardt disease: clinical features, molecular genetics, animal models and therapeutic options

    OpenAIRE

    Tanna, Preena; Strauss, Rupert W; Fujinami, Kaoru; Michaelides, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1; MIM 248200) is the most prevalent inherited macular dystrophy and is associated with disease-causing sequence variants in the gene ABCA4. Significant advances have been made over the last 10?years in our understanding of both the clinical and molecular features of STGD1, and also the underlying pathophysiology, which has culminated in ongoing and planned human clinical trials of novel therapies. The aims of this review are to describe the detailed phenotypic and geno...

  16. Maternal transmission of Alzheimer's disease: Prodromal metabolic phenotype and the search for genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosconi Lisa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After advanced age, having a parent affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most significant risk factor for developing AD among cognitively normal (NL individuals. Although rare genetic mutations have been identified among the early-onset forms of familial AD (EOFAD, the genetics of the more common forms of late-onset AD (LOAD remain elusive. While some LOAD cases appear to be sporadic in nature, genetically mediated risk is evident from the familial aggregation of many LOAD cases. The patterns of transmission and biological mechanisms through which a family history of LOAD confers risk to the offspring are not known. Brain imaging studies using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET have shown that NL individuals with a maternal history of LOAD, but not with a paternal family history, express a phenotype characterised by a pattern of progressive reductions of brain glucose metabolism, similar to that in AD patients. As maternally inherited AD may be associated with as many as 20 per cent of the total LOAD population, understanding the causes and mechanisms of expression of this form of AD is of great relevance. This paper reviews known genetic mutations implicated in EOFAD and their effects on brain chemistry, structure and function; epidemiology and clinical research findings in LOAD, including in vivo imaging findings showing selective patterns of hypometabolism in maternally inherited AD; possible genetic mechanisms involved in maternal transmission of AD, including chromosome X mutations, mitochondrial DNA and imprinting; and genetic mechanisms involved in other neurological disorders with known or suspected maternal inheritance. The review concludes with a discussion of the potential role of brain imaging for identifying endophenotypes in NL individuals at risk for AD, and for directing investigation of potential susceptibility genes for AD.

  17. Clinical and Histologic Mimickers of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-08-17

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel, classically associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. The diagnosis of celiac disease is made when there are compatible clinical features, supportive serologic markers, representative histology from the small bowel, and response to a gluten-free diet. Histologic findings associated with celiac disease include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy, and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lamina propria. It is important to recognize and diagnose celiac disease, as strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can lead to resolution of clinical and histologic manifestations of the disease. However, many other entities can present with clinical and/or histologic features of celiac disease. In this review article, we highlight key clinical and histologic mimickers of celiac disease. The evaluation of a patient with serologically negative enteropathy necessitates a carefully elicited history and detailed review by a pathologist. Medications can mimic celiac disease and should be considered in all patients with a serologically negative enteropathy. Many mimickers of celiac disease have clues to the underlying diagnosis, and many have a targeted therapy. It is necessary to provide patients with a correct diagnosis rather than subject them to a lifetime of an unnecessary gluten-free diet.

  18. Validation and discovery of genotype-phenotype associations in chronic diseases using linked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard; Freimuth, Robert; Chute, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates federated SPARQL queries over Linked Open Data (LOD) in the Semantic Web to validate existing, and potentially discover new genotype-phenotype associations from public datasets. In particular, we report our preliminary findings for identifying such associations for commonly occurring chronic diseases using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and Database for SNPs (dbSNP) within the LOD knowledgebase and compare them with Gene Wiki for coverage and completeness. Our results indicate that Semantic Web technologies can play an important role for in-silico identification of novel disease-gene-SNP associations, although additional verification is required before such information can be applied and used effectively.

  19. Early Detection of Apathetic Phenotypes in Huntington's Disease Knock-in Mice Using Open Source Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnig, Shawn; Bragg, Robert M; Tiwana, Hardeep S; Solem, Wes T; Hovander, William S; Vik, Eva-Mari S; Hamilton, Madeline; Legg, Samuel R W; Shuttleworth, Dominic D; Coffey, Sydney R; Cantle, Jeffrey P; Carroll, Jeffrey B

    2018-02-02

    Apathy is one of the most prevalent and progressive psychiatric symptoms in Huntington's disease (HD) patients. However, preclinical work in HD mouse models tends to focus on molecular and motor, rather than affective, phenotypes. Measuring behavior in mice often produces noisy data and requires large cohorts to detect phenotypic rescue with appropriate power. The operant equipment necessary for measuring affective phenotypes is typically expensive, proprietary to commercial entities, and bulky which can render adequately sized mouse cohorts as cost-prohibitive. Thus, we describe here a home-built, open-source alternative to commercial hardware that is reliable, scalable, and reproducible. Using off-the-shelf hardware, we adapted and built several of the rodent operant buckets (ROBucket) to test Htt Q111/+ mice for attention deficits in fixed ratio (FR) and progressive ratio (PR) tasks. We find that, despite normal performance in reward attainment in the FR task, Htt Q111/+ mice exhibit reduced PR performance at 9-11 months of age, suggesting motivational deficits. We replicated this in two independent cohorts, demonstrating the reliability and utility of both the apathetic phenotype, and these ROBuckets, for preclinical HD studies.

  20. Genotypic and Phenotypic Diversity of Cryptococcus gattii VGII Clinical Isolates and Its Impact on Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa A. Barcellos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cryptococcus gattii species complex harbors the main etiological agents of cryptococcosis in immunocompetent patients. C. gattii molecular type VGII predominates in the north and northeastern regions of Brazil, leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. C. gattii VGII isolates have a strong clinical relevance and phenotypic variations. These phenotypic variations among C. gattii species complex isolates suggest that some strains are more virulent than others, but little information is available related to the pathogenic properties of those strains. In this study, we analyzed some virulence determinants of C. gattii VGII strains (CG01, CG02, and CG03 isolated from patients in the state of Piauí, Brazil. The C. gattii R265 VGIIa strain, which was isolated from the Vancouver outbreak, differed from C. gattii CG01, CG02 and CG03 isolates (also classified as VGII when analyzed the capsular dimensions, melanin production, urease activity, as well as the glucuronoxylomannan (GXM secretion. Those differences directly reflected in their virulence potential. In addition, CG02 displayed higher virulence compared to R265 (VGIIa strain in a cryptococcal murine model of infection. Lastly, we examined the genotypic diversity of these strains through Multilocus Sequence Type (MLST and one new subtype was described for the CG02 isolate. This study confirms the presence and the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of highly virulent strains in the Northeast region of Brazil.

  1. Tissue-specific functional networks for prioritizing phenotype and disease genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfang Guan

    Full Text Available Integrated analyses of functional genomics data have enormous potential for identifying phenotype-associated genes. Tissue-specificity is an important aspect of many genetic diseases, reflecting the potentially different roles of proteins and pathways in diverse cell lineages. Accounting for tissue specificity in global integration of functional genomics data is challenging, as "functionality" and "functional relationships" are often not resolved for specific tissue types. We address this challenge by generating tissue-specific functional networks, which can effectively represent the diversity of protein function for more accurate identification of phenotype-associated genes in the laboratory mouse. Specifically, we created 107 tissue-specific functional relationship networks through integration of genomic data utilizing knowledge of tissue-specific gene expression patterns. Cross-network comparison revealed significantly changed genes enriched for functions related to specific tissue development. We then utilized these tissue-specific networks to predict genes associated with different phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that prediction performance is significantly improved through using the tissue-specific networks as compared to the global functional network. We used a testis-specific functional relationship network to predict genes associated with male fertility and spermatogenesis phenotypes, and experimentally confirmed one top prediction, Mbyl1. We then focused on a less-common genetic disease, ataxia, and identified candidates uniquely predicted by the cerebellum network, which are supported by both literature and experimental evidence. Our systems-level, tissue-specific scheme advances over traditional global integration and analyses and establishes a prototype to address the tissue-specific effects of genetic perturbations, diseases and drugs.

  2. Norrie-Warburg syndrome: two novel mutations in patients with classical clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, A; Veske, A; Jojart, G; Grammatico, B; Huber, B; Gu, S; del Porto, G; Senyi, K

    1996-01-01

    Norrie-Warburg syndrome (NWS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by blindness, which is invariable, deafness and mental disturbances, which are present occasionally. We describe here two novel mutations, a missense mutation (C126S) and a 1-base pair insertion (insT466/T467), together with a recurrent mutation (M1V), found in patients presenting with the classical clinical phenotype of NWS. All three mutations are likely to result in prominent structural changes of the norrin protein.

  3. A novel missense Norrie disease mutation associated with a severe ocular phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif O; Shamsi, Farrukh A; Al-Saif, Amr; Kambouris, Marios

    2004-01-01

    Clinical findings and pedigree analysis led to the diagnosis of severe Norrie disease in two brothers. DNA sequencing demonstrated a novel missense mutation (703G>T) that significantly alters predicted protein structure. Less severe retinal developmental disease may be associated with milder mutations in the Norrie disease gene.

  4. Cortical sensorimotor alterations classify clinical phenotype and putative genotype of spasmodic dysphonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, Giovanni; Fuertinger, Stefan; Fleysher, Lazar; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Simonyan, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Background Spasmodic dysphonia (SD), or laryngeal dystonia, is a task-specific isolated focal dystonia of unknown causes and pathophysiology. Although functional and structural abnormalities have been described in this disorder, the influence of its different clinical phenotypes and genotypes remains scant, making it difficult to explain SD pathophysiology and to identify potential biomarkers. Methods We used a combination of independent component analysis and linear discriminant analysis of resting-state functional MRI data to investigate brain organization in different SD phenotypes (abductor vs. adductor type) and putative genotypes (familial vs. sporadic cases) and to characterize neural markers for genotype/phenotype categorization. Results We found abnormal functional connectivity within sensorimotor and frontoparietal networks in SD patients compared to healthy individuals as well as phenotype- and genotype-distinct alterations of these networks, involving primary somatosensory, premotor and parietal cortices. The linear discriminant analysis achieved 71% accuracy classifying SD and healthy individuals using connectivity measures in the left inferior parietal and sensorimotor cortex. When categorizing between different forms of SD, the combination of measures from left inferior parietal, premotor and right sensorimotor cortices achieved 81% discriminatory power between familial and sporadic SD cases, whereas the combination of measures from the right superior parietal, primary somatosensory and premotor cortices led to 71% accuracy in the classification of adductor and abductor SD forms. Conclusions Our findings present the first effort to identify and categorize isolated focal dystonia based on its brain functional connectivity profile, which may have a potential impact on the future development of biomarkers for this rare disorder. PMID:27346568

  5. Cortical sensorimotor alterations classify clinical phenotype and putative genotype of spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, G; Fuertinger, S; Fleysher, L; Ozelius, L J; Simonyan, K

    2016-10-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD), or laryngeal dystonia, is a task-specific isolated focal dystonia of unknown causes and pathophysiology. Although functional and structural abnormalities have been described in this disorder, the influence of its different clinical phenotypes and genotypes remains scant, making it difficult to explain SD pathophysiology and to identify potential biomarkers. We used a combination of independent component analysis and linear discriminant analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data to investigate brain organization in different SD phenotypes (abductor versus adductor type) and putative genotypes (familial versus sporadic cases) and to characterize neural markers for genotype/phenotype categorization. We found abnormal functional connectivity within sensorimotor and frontoparietal networks in patients with SD compared with healthy individuals as well as phenotype- and genotype-distinct alterations of these networks, involving primary somatosensory, premotor and parietal cortices. The linear discriminant analysis achieved 71% accuracy classifying SD and healthy individuals using connectivity measures in the left inferior parietal and sensorimotor cortices. When categorizing between different forms of SD, the combination of measures from the left inferior parietal, premotor and right sensorimotor cortices achieved 81% discriminatory power between familial and sporadic SD cases, whereas the combination of measures from the right superior parietal, primary somatosensory and premotor cortices led to 71% accuracy in the classification of adductor and abductor SD forms. Our findings present the first effort to identify and categorize isolated focal dystonia based on its brain functional connectivity profile, which may have a potential impact on the future development of biomarkers for this rare disorder. © 2016 EAN.

  6. Latent Cognitive Phenotypes in De Novo Parkinson's Disease: A Person-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBelle, Denise R; Walsh, Ryan R; Banks, Sarah J

    2017-08-01

    Cognitive impairment is an important aspect of Parkinson's disease (PD), but there is considerable heterogeneity in its presentation. This investigation aims to identify and characterize latent cognitive phenotypes in early PD. Latent class analysis, a data-driven, person-centered, cluster analysis was performed on cognitive data from the Parkinson's Progressive Markers Initiative baseline visit. This analytic method facilitates identification of naturally occurring endophenotypes. Resulting classes were compared across biomarker, symptom, and demographic data. Six cognitive phenotypes were identified. Three demonstrated consistent performance across indicators, representing poor ("Weak-Overall"), average ("Typical-Overall"), and strong ("Strong-Overall") cognition. The remaining classes demonstrated unique patterns of cognition, characterized by "Strong-Memory," "Weak-Visuospatial," and "Amnestic" profiles. The Amnestic class evidenced greater tremor severity and anosmia, but was unassociated with biomarkers linked with Alzheimer's disease. The Weak-Overall class was older and reported more non-motor features associated with cognitive decline, including anxiety, depression, autonomic dysfunction, anosmia, and REM sleep behaviors. The Strong-Overall class was younger, more female, and reported less dysautonomia and anosmia. Classes were unrelated to disease duration, functional independence, or available biomarkers. Latent cognitive phenotypes with focal patterns of impairment were observed in recently diagnosed individuals with PD. Cognitive profiles were found to be independent of traditional biomarkers and motoric indices of disease progression. Only globally impaired class was associated with previously reported indicators of cognitive decline, suggesting this group may drive the effects reported in studies using variable-based analysis. Longitudinal and neuroanatomical characterization of classes will yield further insight into the evolution of cognitive

  7. Impairment of adolescent hippocampal plasticity in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease precedes disease phenotype.

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    Daniela Hartl

    Full Text Available The amyloid precursor protein (APP was assumed to be an important neuron-morphoregulatory protein and plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. In the study presented here, we analyzed the APP-transgenic mouse model APP23 using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis technology in combination with DIGE and mass spectrometry. We investigated cortex and hippocampus of transgenic and wildtype mice at 1, 2, 7 and 15 months of age. Furthermore, cortices of 16 days old embryos were analyzed. When comparing the protein patterns of APP23 with wildtype mice, we detected a relatively large number of altered protein spots at all age stages and brain regions examined which largely preceded the occurrence of amyloid plaques. Interestingly, in hippocampus of adolescent, two-month old mice, a considerable peak in the number of protein changes was observed. Moreover, when protein patterns were compared longitudinally between age stages, we found that a large number of proteins were altered in wildtype mice. Those alterations were largely absent in hippocampus of APP23 mice at two months of age although not in other stages compared. Apparently, the large difference in the hippocampal protein patterns between two-month old APP23 and wildtype mice was caused by the absence of distinct developmental changes in the hippocampal proteome of APP23 mice. In summary, the absence of developmental proteome alterations as well as a down-regulation of proteins related to plasticity suggest the disturption of a normally occurring peak of hippocampal plasticity during adolescence in APP23 mice. Our findings are in line with the observation that AD is preceded by a clinically silent period of several years to decades. We also demonstrate that it is of utmost importance to analyze different brain regions and different age stages to obtain information about disease-causing mechanisms.

  8. Development and clinical course of diseases accompanied by connective tissue dysplasia in children of puberty age

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    Elizarova S.Yu.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The risk of development and clinical course of somatic diseases have been analyzed in the research work. 111 adolescents suffering from connective tissue dysplasia have been under the study. It has been stated that the frequency of somatic diseases among adolescents with connective tissue dysplasia is higher than this frequency among adolescents without such disease. Phenotypic signs of connective tissue dysplasia have been revealed. They are responsible for the development of bronchial asthma and severe stomach ulcer

  9. Phenotypic variability within the inclusion body spectrum of basophilic inclusion body disease and neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease in frontotemporal lobar degenerations with FUS-positive inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Ellen; Lladó, Albert; Clarimón, Jordi; Rey, Maria Jesús; Rivera, Rosa Maria; Ezquerra, Mario; Antonell, Anna; Navarro-Otano, Judith; Ribalta, Teresa; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Pérez, Anna; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Ferrer, Isidre

    2012-09-01

    Basophilic inclusion body disease and neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID) are rare diseases included among frontotemporal lobar degenerations with FUS-positive inclusions (FTLD-FUS). We report clinical and pathologic features of 2 new patients and reevaluate neuropathologic characteristics of 2 previously described cases, including an early-onset case of basophilic inclusion body disease (aged 38 years) with a 5-year disease course and abundant FUS-positive inclusion bodies and 3 NIFID cases. One NIFID case (aged 37 years) presented with early-onset psychiatric disturbances and rapidly progressive cognitive decline. Two NIFID cases had later onset (aged 64 years and 70 years) and complex neurologic deficits. Postmortem neuropathologic studies in late-onset NIFID cases disclosed α-internexin-positive "hyaline conglomerate"-type inclusions that were positive with 1 commercial anti-FUS antibody directed to residues 200 and 250, but these were negative to amino acids 90 and 220 of human FUS. Early-onset NIFID had similar inclusions that were positive with both commercial anti-FUS antibodies. Genetic testing performed on all cases revealed no FUS gene mutations. These findings indicate that phenotypic variability in NIFID, including clinical manifestations and particular neuropathologic findings, may be related to the age at onset and individual differences in the evolution of lesions.

  10. Phenotypic identification, frequency distribution and antibiogram of carbapenemase producing enterobacteriaceae in clinical isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, M.; Saad, N.

    2018-01-01

    Objective:To differentiate between Ambler class A, B and D of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae by using simple phenotypic methods that can be carried out in the laboratory without requiring any specialised techniques. Study Design:Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study:Microbiology Department, Army Medical College, NUST, Islamabad, from November 2015 to November 2016. Methodology: Clinical specimens were subjected to identification of Enterobacteriaceae by colony morphology and API 20 E. Carbapenem resistance was detected by applying meropenem disc (10 mu g) by disc diffusion method according to CLSI (Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute) criteria. Carbapenemase production among Enterobacteriaceaewas detected by Modified Hodge test. Phenotypic methods, Phenylboronic acid (for Class A KPC producing Enterobacteriaceae) and EDTA inhibition tests (for Class B MBL producing Entrobacteriaceae) were applied. Presence of OXA 48 was detected by phenotypic method using imipenem 10 mu g, EDTA and PBA discs. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results:Forty-three out of 45 (95.45%) were carbapenemase producers. Thirty-eight out of 43 (88.3%) were KPC producers and 4 out of 43 (11.62%) were MBL producers. All KPC producers were Klebsiella pneumoniae. Among five MBL producers, one each (20%) was Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli and 3 (60%) were Klebsiella pneumoniae. All MBL producers were resistant to aztreonam and amoxicillin/clavulanate. Two of the KPC producing Klebsiella pneumoniaewere pan-drug resistant (resistant to colistin and tigecycline). Two were non-carbapenemase producers. Conclusion:Enterobacteriaceaestrains producing KPC-type carbapenemase were the most prevalent (88.3%) in the studied healthcare setup. (author)

  11. Unusual Phenotype of the Brownell-Oppenheimer Variant of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

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    Dronacharya Lamichhane

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare, transmissible, neurodegenerative disease caused by conformationally changed abnormal prion protein. Most patients present with cognitive impairment, myoclonus, ataxia, visual impairment alone or in combination. Patients who present with ataxia only at the onset are said to have Brownell-Oppenheimer variant of the disease. However, here we present a case where visual symptoms preceded the clinical presentation and hallucinations accompanied the ataxia at the onset of the disease.

  12. The immature dentate gyrus represents a shared phenotype of mouse models of epilepsy and psychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Rick; Kobayashi, Katsunori; Hagihara, Hideo; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Walton, Noah M; Gross, Adam K; Heusner, Carrie L; Chen, Qian; Tamura, Kouichi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2013-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence to suggest psychiatric disorders, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, share common etiologies, pathophysiologies, genetics, and drug responses with many of the epilepsies. Here, we explored overlaps in cellular/molecular, electrophysiological, and behavioral phenotypes between putative mouse models of bipolar disorder/schizophrenia and epilepsy. We tested the hypothesis that an immature dentate gyrus (iDG), whose association with psychosis in patients has recently been reported, represents a common phenotype of both diseases. Behaviors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (α-CaMKII) heterozygous knock-out (KO) mice, which are a representative bipolar disorder/schizophrenia model displaying iDG, and pilocarpine-treated mice, which are a representative epilepsy model, were tested followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)/immunohistochemistry for mRNA/protein expression associated with an iDG phenotype. In vitro electrophysiology of dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs) was examined in pilocarpine-treated epileptic mice. The two disease models demonstrated similar behavioral deficits, such as hyperactivity, poor working memory performance, and social withdrawal. Significant reductions in mRNA expression and immunoreactivity of the mature neuronal marker calbindin and concomitant increases in mRNA expression and immunoreactivity of the immature neuronal marker calretinin represent iDG signatures that are present in both mice models. Electrophysiologically, we have confirmed that DG GCs from pilocarpine-treated mice represent an immature state. A significant decrease in hippocampal α-CaMKII protein levels was also found in both models. Our data have shown iDG signatures from mouse models of both bipolar disorder/schizophrenia and epilepsy. The evidence suggests that the iDG may, in part, be responsible for the abnormal behavioral phenotype, and that the underlying pathophysiologies in epilepsy

  13. Risk reductions for cardiovascular disease with pravastatin treatment by dyslipidemia phenotype: a post hoc analysis of the MEGA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Masato; Ikewaki, Katsunori; Ayaori, Makoto; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Ishikawa, Toshitsugu; Nakamura, Haruo

    2013-03-01

    The beneficial effect of statins for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention has been well established. However, the effectiveness among different phenotypes of dyslipidemia has not been confirmed. We evaluated the effect of pravastatin on the incidence of CVD in relation to the phenotype of dyslipidemia. The MEGA Study evaluated the effect of low-dose pravastatin on primary prevention of CVD in 7832 Japanese patients, who were randomized to diet alone or diet plus pravastatin and followed for more than 5 years. These patients were classified into phenotype IIa (n=5589) and IIb (n=2041) based on the electrophoretic pattern for this post hoc analysis. In the diet group there was no significant difference in the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, CVD, and total mortality between the two phenotypes. Phenotype IIb patients, compared to phenotype IIa, had lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and a significantly higher incidence of CVD in relation to a low HDL-C level (dyslipidemia. Significant risk reductions were observed for CHD by 38% (p=0.04) and CVD by 31% (p=0.02) in type IIa dyslipidemia but not in phenotype IIb. Pravastatin therapy provided significant risk reductions for CHD and CVD in patients with phenotype IIa dyslipidemia, but not in those with phenotype IIb dyslipidemia. Copyright © 2012 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lyme disease: clinical diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchette, TF; Davis, I; Johnston, BL

    2014-01-01

    Background Lyme disease is an emerging zoonotic infection in Canada. As the Ixodes tick expands its range, more Canadians will be exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. Objective To review the clinical diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease for front-line clinicians. Methods A literature search using PubMed and restricted to articles published in English between 1977 and 2014. Results Individuals in Lyme-endemic areas are at greatest risk, but not all tick bites transmit Lyme disease. The diagnosis is predominantly clinical. Patients with Lyme disease may present with early disease that is characterized by a “bull’s eye rash”, fever and myalgias or with early disseminated disease that can manifest with arthralgias, cardiac conduction abnormalities or neurologic symptoms. Late Lyme disease in North America typically manifests with oligoarticular arthritis but can present with a subacute encephalopathy. Antibiotic treatment is effective against Lyme disease and works best when given early in the infection. Prophylaxis with doxycyline may be indicated in certain circumstances. While a minority of patients may have persistent symptoms, evidence does not demonstrate that prolonged courses of antibiotics improve outcome. Conclusion Clinicians need to be aware of the signs and symptoms of Lyme disease. Knowing the regions where Borrelia infection is endemic in North America is important for recognizing patients at risk and informing the need for treatment. PMID:29769842

  15. Clinical spectrum and genotype-phenotype associations of KCNA2-related encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnada, Silvia; Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Gardella, Elena; Schubert, Julian; Kaiwar, Charu; Klee, Eric W; Lanpher, Brendan C; Gavrilova, Ralitza H; Synofzik, Matthis; Bast, Thomas; Gorman, Kathleen; King, Mary D; Allen, Nicholas M; Conroy, Judith; Ben Zeev, Bruria; Tzadok, Michal; Korff, Christian; Dubois, Fanny; Ramsey, Keri; Narayanan, Vinodh; Serratosa, Jose M; Giraldez, Beatriz G; Helbig, Ingo; Marsh, Eric; O'Brien, Margaret; Bergqvist, Christina A; Binelli, Adrian; Porter, Brenda; Zaeyen, Eduardo; Horovitz, Dafne D; Wolff, Markus; Marjanovic, Dragan; Caglayan, Hande S; Arslan, Mutluay; Pena, Sergio D J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Balestrini, Simona; Syrbe, Steffen; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Lemke, Johannes R; Møller, Rikke S; Lerche, Holger; Rubboli, Guido

    2017-09-01

    Recently, de novo mutations in the gene KCNA2, causing either a dominant-negative loss-of-function or a gain-of-function of the voltage-gated K+ channel Kv1.2, were described to cause a new molecular entity within the epileptic encephalopathies. Here, we report a cohort of 23 patients (eight previously described) with epileptic encephalopathy carrying either novel or known KCNA2 mutations, with the aim to detail the clinical phenotype associated with each of them, to characterize the functional effects of the newly identified mutations, and to assess genotype-phenotype associations. We identified five novel and confirmed six known mutations, three of which recurred in three, five and seven patients, respectively. Ten mutations were missense and one was a truncation mutation; de novo occurrence could be shown in 20 patients. Functional studies using a Xenopus oocyte two-microelectrode voltage clamp system revealed mutations with only loss-of-function effects (mostly dominant-negative current amplitude reduction) in eight patients or only gain-of-function effects (hyperpolarizing shift of voltage-dependent activation, increased amplitude) in nine patients. In six patients, the gain-of-function was diminished by an additional loss-of-function (gain-and loss-of-function) due to a hyperpolarizing shift of voltage-dependent activation combined with either decreased amplitudes or an additional hyperpolarizing shift of the inactivation curve. These electrophysiological findings correlated with distinct phenotypic features. The main differences were (i) predominant focal (loss-of-function) versus generalized (gain-of-function) seizures and corresponding epileptic discharges with prominent sleep activation in most cases with loss-of-function mutations; (ii) more severe epilepsy, developmental problems and ataxia, and atrophy of the cerebellum or even the whole brain in about half of the patients with gain-of-function mutations; and (iii) most severe early-onset phenotypes

  16. Clinical presentation of adult coeliac disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajuddin, T

    2012-02-01

    The mode of presentation of coeliac disease has been changing to more atypical or silent disease. Few studies described the clinical presentation of adult coeliac disease in Ireland in recent years. We retrospectively collected the clinical data for all patients who had a diagnosis of coeliac disease made in our centre between January 07 and December 08. Forty seven adults, predominantly females (n = 30), had a confirmed diagnosis of coeliac disease made during the study period. In our patient cohort, the presenting symptom was diarrhoea in 19 (40%) patients, while 16 patients (34%) did not have any G.I. symptoms, 10 (21%) presented with anaemia. Females presented at a significantly younger age compared to males, with median ages at diagnosis of 44.5 and 57 years, respectively (p = 0.04). Females also presented more commonly with non G.I. symptoms (p = 0.07). The reasons behind this gender difference need further study.

  17. Exome analysis in clinical practice: expanding the phenotype of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, Karen W; Ennis, Sara; Napoli, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    Exome analysis has had a dramatic impact on genetic research. We present the application of such newly generated information to patient care. The patient was a female, born with normal growth parameters to nonconsanguineous parents after an uneventful pregnancy. She had bilateral cleft lip/palate and ankyloblepharon. Sparse hair, dysplastic nails and hypohidrosis were subsequently noted. With exception of speech related issues, her development was normal. A clinical diagnosis of ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate or Hay-Wells syndrome resulted in TP63 sequence analysis. TP63 sequence and deletion/duplication analysis of all coding exons had a normal result, as did chromosome and SNP array analysis. Diagnostic exome analysis revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation in KRT83 categorized as deleterious and associated with monilethrix. In addition, a homozygous missense variant of unknown clinical significance was reported in RIPK4. Using research based exome analysis, RIPK4 had just a few months prior been identified as pathogenic for Bartsocas-Papas syndrome. While the clinical diagnostic report implied the KRT83 mutation as a more likely cause for the patient's phenotype, clinical correlation, literature review and use of computerized mutation analysis programs allowed us to identify the homozygous RIPK4 (c.488G > A; p.Gly163Asp) mutation as the underlying pathogenic change. Consequently, we expand the phenotype of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome to an attenuated presentation resembling Hay-Wells syndrome, lacking lethality and pterygia. In contrast to the autosomal dominant Hay-Wells syndrome, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome is autosomal recessive, implying a 25% recurrence risk. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Animal models of polycystic ovary syndrome: a focused review of rodent models in relationship to clinical phenotypes and cardiometabolic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Danni; Vine, Donna F

    2012-07-01

    To review rodent animal models of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), with a focus on those associated with the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Review. Rodent models of PCOS. Description and comparison of animal models. Comparison of animal models to clinical phenotypes of PCOS. Animals used to study PCOS include rodents, mice, rhesus monkeys, and ewes. Major methods to induce PCOS in these models include subcutaneous injection or implantation of androgens, estrogens, antiprogesterone, letrozole, prenatal exposure to excess androgens, and exposure to constant light. In addition, transgenic mice models and spontaneous PCOS-like rodent models have also been developed. Rodents are the most economical and widely used animals to study PCOS and ovarian dysfunction. The model chosen to study the development of PCOS and other metabolic parameters remains dependent on the specific etiologic hypotheses being investigated. Rodent models have been shown to demonstrate changes in insulin metabolism, with or without induction of hyperandrogenemia, and limited studies have investigated cardiometabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Given the clinical heterogeneity of PCOS, the utilization of different animal models may be the best approach to further our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with the early etiology of PCOS and cardiometabolic risk. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. PhenoTips: Patient Phenotyping Software for Clinical and Research Use.

    OpenAIRE

    Girdea, Marta; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Fiume, Marc; Buske, Orion; Bowdin, Sarah; Boycott, Kym M.; Chénier, Sébastien; Chitayat, David; Faghfoury, Hanna; Meyn, Stephen; Ray, Peter N.; So, Joyce; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Brudno, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We have developed PhenoTips, a deep phenotyping tool and database, specifically designed for phenotyping patients with genetic disorders. Our tool closely mirrors clinician workflows so as to facilitate the recording of observations made during the patient encounter. Phenotypic information is represented using the Human Phenotype Ontology; however, the complexity of the ontology is hidden behind a user interface, which combines simple selection of common phenotypes with error-tolerant, predic...

  20. Phenotype variability of infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease IMNEPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Mignot, Cyril; Doummar, Diane; Hashem, Mais; Faqeih, Eissa; Josset, Patrice; Dubern, Béatrice; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Kraemer, Nadine; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-04-29

    Infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease (IMNEPD) has been recently linked to biallelic mutation of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 gene PTRH2. Two index patients with IMNEPD in the original report had multiple neurological symptoms such as postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability, developmental delay, sensorineural deafness, cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. In addition, distal muscle weakness and abnormalities of thyroid, pancreas, and liver were found. Here, we report five further IMNEPD patients with a different homozygous PTRH2 mutation, broaden the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and differentiate common symptoms and interindividual variability in IMNEPD associated with a unique mutation. We thereby hope to better define IMNEPD and promote recognition and diagnosis of this novel disease entity.

  1. Genetics of kidney disease and related cardiometabolic phenotypes in Zuni Indians: The Zuni Kidney Project

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    Sandra L Laston

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to identify genetic factors associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD and related cardiometabolic phenotypes among participants of the Genetics of Kidney Disease in Zuni Indians study. The study was conducted as a community-based participatory research project in the Zuni Indians, a small endogamous tribe in rural New Mexico. We recruited 998 members from 28 extended multigenerational families, ascertained through probands with CKD who had at least one sibling with CKD. We used the Illumina Infinium Human1M-Duo v3.0 BeadChips to type 1.1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Prevalence estimates for CKD, hyperuricemia, diabetes and hypertension were 24%, 30%, 17% and 34%, respectively. We found a significant (p<1.58 × 10-7 association for a SNP in a novel gene for serum creatinine (PTPLAD2. We replicated significant associations for genes with serum uric acid (SLC2A9, triglyceride levels (APOA1, BUD13, ZNF259, and total cholesterol (PVRL2. We found novel suggestive associations (p<1.58 × 10-6 for SNPs in genes with systolic (OLFML2B, and diastolic blood pressure (NFIA. We identified a series of genes associated with CKD and related cardiometabolic phenotypes among Zuni Indians, a population with a high prevalence of kidney disease. Illuminating genetic variations that modulate the risk for these disorders may ultimately provide a basis for novel preventive strategies and therapeutic interventions.

  2. Physical Activity across Frailty Phenotypes in Females with Parkinson’s Disease

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    Kaitlyn P. Roland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Females with Parkinson’s disease (PD are vulnerable to frailty. PD eventually leads to decreased physical activity, an indicator of frailty. We speculate PD results in frailty through reduced physical activity. Objective. Determine the contribution of physical activity on frailty in PD (n=15, 65 ± 9 years and non-PD (n=15, 73 ± 14 years females. Methods. Frailty phenotype (nonfrail/prefrail/frail was categorized and 8 hours of physical activity was measured using accelerometer, global positioning system, and self-report. Two-way ANCOVA (age as covariate was used to compare physical activity between disease and frailty phenotypes. Spearman correlation assessed relationships, and linear regression determined associations with frailty. Results. Nonfrail recorded more physical activity (intensity, counts, self-report compared with frail. Self-reported physical activity was greater in PD than non-PD. In non-PD, step counts, light physical activity time, sedentary time, and self-reported physical activity were related to frailty (R=0.91. In PD, only carbidopa-levodopa dose was related to frailty (r=0.61. Conclusion. Physical activity influences frailty in females without PD. In PD females, disease management may be a better indicator of frailty than physical activity. Further investigation into how PD associated factors contribute to frailty is warranted.

  3. Phenotypic charactheristics of fluorescent pseudomonss, biological control agent of lincat disease of temanggung tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NINING NURUL AZIZAH

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent pseudomonass isolated from local plants-rishosphere in temanggung controlled lincat disease of tobacco. This report describe phenotypic charactheristics of the bacteria in order to be used as a base for the development of the bacteria as a biological control agent of lincat disease. Phenotypic charactheristics of six isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonass which controlled lincat disease in the field were determined in the laboratory of Plant Bacteriology, Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University. Plant pathogenicity tests were conducted by hypersensitive reaction into tobacco leaf and inoculation to tobacco plants. Antagonism test between fluorescent Pseudomonass and other candidate of biological control agents were also conducted. The results indicated that the bacteria were rod shape, Gram negative, positive reaction in catalase and oxidase tests. Nitrate reduce to nitrite, arginine was hydrolysed, fluorescent pigment were produced on King’s B medium, levan formation positive and all bacteria denitrifiy. The bacteria used urea, tween 80 and amylum were not hydrolised, poly--hydroxybutyrate was not accumulated in the cells. Negative reactions were observed for lysine decarboxylation, indol production, VP/MR reaction, and gelatn liquefation. Some compounds could be used as solely carbon sources. All isolates grew on the medium containing 2% NaCl. The best pH for growth was 6-7 and all isolates grew at 20-41C. Negative result were obtained for hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity tests.

  4. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine M Hölter

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  5. Update on the clinical management of Wilson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedera P

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peter Hedera Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Wilson’s disease (WD, albeit relatively rare, is an important genetic metabolic disease because of highly effective therapies that can be lifesaving. It is a great imitator and requires a high index of suspicion for correct and timely diagnosis. Neurologic, psychiatric and hepatologic problems in WD are very nonspecific, and we discuss the most common clinical phenotypes. The diagnosis remains laboratory based, and here we review the most important challenges and pitfalls in laboratory evaluation of WD, including the emerging role of genetic testing in WD diagnosis. WD is a monogenic disorder but has very high allelic heterogeneity with >500 disease-causing mutations identified, and new insights into phenotype–genotype correlations are also reviewed. The gold standard of therapy is chelation of excessive copper, but many unmet needs exist because of possible clinical deterioration in treated patients and potential adverse effects associated with currently available chelating medications. We also review the most promising novel therapeutic approaches, including chelators targeting specific cell types, cell transplantation and gene therapy. Keywords: Wilson’s disease, copper, ATP7B, chelation, gene therapy

  6. [Clinical characteristics of human recombination activating gene 1 mutations in 8 immunodeficiency patients with diverse phenotypes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, G; Wang, W J; Liu, D R; Tao, Z F; Hui, X Y; Hou, J; Sun, J Q; Wang, X C

    2018-03-02

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics of 8 immunodeficiency cases caused by human recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations, and to explore the relationship among genotypes, clinical manifestations and immunophenotypes. Methods: Clinical data were collected and analyzed from patients with RAG1 mutations who visited the Department of Clinical Immunology, Children's Hospital of Fudan University between October 2013 and June 2017. The data included clinical manifestations, immunophenotypes and genotypes. Results: A total of 8 patients were diagnosed with RAG1 deficiency (6 boys and 2 girls). The minimum age of onset was 2 months, and the maximum age was 4 months. The minimum age of diagnosis was 2 months, and the maximum age was 13 years. Four patients had a family history of infant death due to severe infections. Two cases were born to the same consanguineous parents. All cases had recurrent infections, including involvement of respiratory tract (8 cases), digestive tract (6 cases), urinary tract (1 case), and central nervous system (1 case). The pathogens of infection included bacteria, viruses and fungi. Rotavirus was found in 3 cases, cytomegalovirus (CMV) in 5 cases, bacillus Calmette-Guérin adverse reaction in 2 cases (1 of whom had a positive acid-fast smear from lymph node puncture fluid), fungal infection in 3 cases. One case had multiple nodular space-occupying lesions in lungs and abdominal cavity complicated with multiple bone destruction. The peripheral blood lymphocyte counts of all patients ranged between 0.1 ×10(9)/L and 3.3×10(9)/L (median, 0.65×10(9)/L). Eosinophilia was found in 3 cases (range, (0.48-1.69) ×10(9)/L). The patients were classified according to immunophenotype as severe combined immunodeficiency phenotype (4 cases), leaky severe combined immunodeficiency (2 cases), Omenn syndrome (1 case) and combined immunodeficiency (1 case) . Decreased serum IgG levels were found in 3 cases, increased serum IgM levels in

  7. An Expanded Multi-Organ Disease Phenotype Associated with Mutations in YARS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tracewska-Siemiątkowska, Anna; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Bosch, Danielle G M

    2017-01-01

    Whole exome sequence analysis was performed in a Swedish mother-father-affected proband trio with a phenotype characterized by progressive retinal degeneration with congenital nystagmus, profound congenital hearing impairment, primary amenorrhea, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and liver disease....... A homozygous variant c.806T > C, p.(F269S) in the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase gene (YARS) was the only identified candidate variant consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. Mutations in YARS have previously been associated with both autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome and a recently reported...

  8. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  9. Adult onset Niemann-Pick type C disease: A clinical, neuroimaging and molecular genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Carla; Tarugi, Patrizla; Dotti, Maria Teresa; De Stefano, Nicola; Vattimo, Angelo; Chierichetti, Francesea; Calandra, Sebastiano; Federico, Antonio

    2003-11-01

    We report on a patient with adult-onset Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, carrying the mutations P1007 and I1061T in the NPC1 gene, presenting with marked psychiatric changes followed by dystonia and cognitive impairment. Filipin staining, single photon emission computed tomography perfusional, positron emission tomography metabolic, conventional magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings suggested a pathophysiological correlation with phenotype expression. This case expands the clinical and genetic spectrum of the rare adult-onset NPC disease phenotype.

  10. Parkinsonian phenotype in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3): a two-case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettencourt, C.; Santos, C.; Coutinho, P.; Rizzu, P.; Vasconcelos, J.; Kay, T.; Cymbron, T.; Raposo, M.; Heutink, P.; Lima, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder of late onset, which is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of the ATXN3 gene. This disease presents clinical heterogeneity, which cannot be

  11. Invited commentary: Personality phenotype and mortality--new avenues in genetic, social, and clinical epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Benjamin P

    2013-09-01

    In this issue of the Journal, Jokela et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;178(5):667-675) scrutinize the association between personality phenotype and all-cause mortality in remarkable detail by using an "individual-participant meta-analysis" design. Across 7 large cohorts varying in demographics and methods of personality measurement, they find varying prospective associations for 4 dimensions of the five-factor (or "Big Five") model of personality, but robust and consistent prospective associations for Big Five dimension of "conscientiousness." Jokela et al. place an important exclamation point on a long era of study of this topic and hint directly and indirectly at new avenues for this line of research. I consider the following 3 areas particularly rife for further inquiry: the role of genetics in personality and health studies; the role of personality in social inequalities in health; and the health policy and clinical implications of work like that of Jokela et al., including the potential role of personality phenotype in the evolution of personalized medicine.

  12. Clinical phenotype of South-East Asian temporomandibular disorder patients with upper airway resistance syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, D K L; Pang, K P

    2018-01-01

    Clinical and radiographic characteristics of a subset of South East Asian temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients with comorbid upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) were documented in a multi-center prospective series of 86 patients (26 men and 60 women / mean age 35.7 years). All had excessive daytime sleepiness, high arousal index and Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index (AHI) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia while 90·7% reported sleep bruxism (SB). Unlike patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), hypertension was uncommon (4·7%) while depression was prevalent at 68·6% with short REM latency of 25% documented in 79·6% and 57·6% of these depressed patients, respectively. 65·1% displayed a posteriorly displaced condyle at maximum intercuspation with or without TMJ clicking. Most exhibited a forward head posture (FHP) characterised by loss of normal cervical lordosis (80·2%), C0-C1 narrowing (38·4%) or an elevated hyoid position (50%), and 91·9% had nasal congestion. We postulate the TMD-UARS phenotype may have originally developed as an adaptive response to 'awake' disordered breathing during growth. Patients with persistent TMD and/or reporting SB should be screened for UARS and chronic nasal obstruction, especially when they also present with FHP. The lateral cephalogram is a useful tool in the differentiation of UARS from other OSA phenotypes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical Presentation and Disease Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Danish Abdul; Moin, Maryum; Majeed, Atif; Sadiq, Kamran; Biloo, Abdul Gaffar

    2017-01-01

    To determine different clinical presentationsand disease location demarcatedby upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopyand relevant histopathologyin children diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This is 5 years (2010 to 2015) retrospective studyconducted at the Aga Khan University Hospitalenrolling65admitted children between 6 months to 15years from either gender, diagnosed with IBD on clinical presentation, endoscopy and biopsy. Different clinical presentations at the time of diagnosis were noted in different categories of the disease. All patients underwent upper and lower (up to the terminal ileum) endoscopy with multiple punch biopsies and histologic assessment of mucosal specimens. All endoscopies were done by paediatric gastroenterologists at endoscopy suite of the hospital and all specimens were reported by the pathology department. ESPGHAN revised criteria for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease in children and an adolescent was used to standardize our diagnosis. Extent of disease on endoscopy and relevant histopathology of the biopsy samples were noted at the time of diagnosis. Data was summarized using mean, standard deviation, numbers and percentages for different variables. Total 56 children were enrolled according to inclusion criteria. There were 34children (61.53%) diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC), 10 patients (16.92%) had Crohn'sDisease (CD) and 11 (21.53%) patients were labeled as Indeterminate colitis (IC). Mean age at onset of symptoms was10.03±2.44 and mean age at diagnosis was11.10±2.36. Abdominal pain (80%) and chronic diarrhea (70%) were common symptoms in CD whereas bloody diarrhea (79.41%) and rectal bleeding(64.70%)were common presentation in UC. Patients diagnosed with indeterminate colitis(IC) had similar clinical features as in UC patients. Only 7% patients had some extra-intestinal features in the form of joint pain and/or uveitis. Aspartate aminotransferase level (95.18 ±12.89) was relatively high in

  14. The Human Phenotype Ontology in 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köhler, Sebastian; Vasilevsky, Nicole A.; Engelstad, Mark; Foster, Erin; McMurry, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Deep phenotyping has been defined as the precise and comprehensive analysis of phenotypic abnormalities in which the individual components of the phenotype are observed and described. The three components of the Human PhenotypeOntology (HPO; www.human-phenotype-ontology.org) project are the phenotype vocabulary, disease-phenotype annotations and the algorithms that operate on these. These components are being used for computational deep phenotyping and precision medicine as well as integration of clinical data into translational research. The HPO is being increasingly adopted as a standard for phenotypic abnormalities by diverse groups such as international rare disease organizations, registries, clinical labs, biomedical resources, and clinical software tools and will thereby contribute toward nascent efforts at global data exchange for identifying disease etiologies. This update article reviews the progress of the HPO project since the debut Nucleic Acids Research database article in 2014, including specific areas of expansion such as common (complex) disease, new algorithms for phenotype driven genomic discovery and diagnostics, integration of cross-species mapping efforts with the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, an improved quality control pipeline, and the addition of patient-friendly terminology.

  15. The role of inflammation in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension: from cellular mechanisms to clinical phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poth, Jens M.; Fini, Mehdi A.; Olschewski, Andrea; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases sharing the common feature of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. The disease is usually characterized by mild to moderate pulmonary vascular remodeling that is largely thought to be reversible compared with the progressive irreversible disease seen in World Health Organization (WHO) group I disease. However, in these patients, the presence of PH significantly worsens morbidity and mortality. In addition, a small subset of patients with hypoxic PH develop “out-of-proportion” severe pulmonary hypertension characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling that is irreversible and similar to that in WHO group I disease. In all cases of hypoxia-related vascular remodeling and PH, inflammation, particularly persistent inflammation, is thought to play a role. This review focuses on the effects of hypoxia on pulmonary vascular cells and the signaling pathways involved in the initiation and perpetuation of vascular inflammation, especially as they relate to vascular remodeling and transition to chronic irreversible PH. We hypothesize that the combination of hypoxia and local tissue factors/cytokines (“second hit”) antagonizes tissue homeostatic cellular interactions between mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts and/or smooth muscle cells) and macrophages and arrests these cells in an epigenetically locked and permanently activated proremodeling and proinflammatory phenotype. This aberrant cellular cross-talk between mesenchymal cells and macrophages promotes transition to chronic nonresolving inflammation and vascular remodeling, perpetuating PH. A better understanding of these signaling pathways may lead to the development of specific therapeutic targets, as none are currently available for WHO group III disease. PMID:25416383

  16. Bilingualism delays clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Woumans, Evy; Santens, Patrick; Sieben, Anne; Versijpt, Jan; Stevens, Michaël; Duyck, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of bilingualism on the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a European sample of patients. We assessed all incoming AD patients in two university hospitals within a specified timeframe. Sixty-nine monolinguals and 65 bilinguals diagnosed with probable AD were compared for time of clinical AD manifestation and diagnosis. The influence of other potentially interacting variables was also examined. Results indicated a significant delay f...

  17. Hirschsprung disease as a yet undescribed phenotype in a patient with ARID1B mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Yoshihashi, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Yuri; Uehara, Tomoko; Honda, Masataka; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Miyama, Sahoko

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the BAF complex (mammalian SWI/SNF complex) are responsible for Coffin-Siris syndrome, which is characterized by developmental delay, distinctive facial features, hirsutism, and hypoplasia/aplasia of the fifth finger/fingernails. Hirschsprung disease is characterized by defective stem cells in the enteric neural system, and the involvement of multiple signaling cascades has been implicated. So far, the roles of the BAF complex in the genesis of Hirschsprung disease have remained unknown. Here, we document a patient with coarse facial features, postnatal growth failure, developmental delay, epilepsy, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and cerebellum but without a hypoplastic fifth finger/fingernail. In addition, he had Hirschsprung disease. Exome sequencing with a gene set representing a total of 4,813 genes with known relationships to human diseases revealed a heterozygous frameshift mutation in ARID1B (c.5789delC p.Pro1930Leufs*44). The presence of a congenital cataract and Hirschsprung disease in the presently reported patient further expands the phenotypic spectrum of patients with ARID1B mutations and may suggest the potential role of the BAF complex in the pathogenesis of the enteric neural system. The present observation is in agreement with a recent study of Drosophila neuroblasts showing that the dysregulated BAF complex leads to an abnormal lineage progression of neural stem cell lineages and that Hirschsprung disease is caused by abnormal stem cell lineages in the peripheral neural tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A clinical approach to Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadelman, R B; Wormser, G P

    1990-05-01

    Lyme disease (also known as Lyme borreliosis) is an emerging, newly described infectious disease with diverse clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by the spirochetal agent Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to humans by the bite of certain species of Ixodes ticks harboring the organism. The most readily identifiable clinical feature is the distinctive skin lesion, erythema migrans. If recently infected patients go untreated, approximately 15% will develop neurologic conditions (most commonly facial nerve palsy), 8% will develop myocarditis (typically with heart block), and 60% will develop migratory mono- or pauci-articular arthritis. Diagnosis depends on clinical suspicion, recognition of the characteristic signs and symptoms, and appropriate testing for antibody to B. burgdorferi. Serology for Lyme disease, although in need of better standardization, is most useful in diagnosing patients with manifestations of Lyme disease other than erythema migrans. All manifestations of Lyme disease are potentially treatable with either a beta-lactam antibiotic (for instance penicillin, amoxicillin, or ceftriaxone) or a tetracycline preparation. However, the optimal antimicrobial regimen, including choice of drug, drug dose, route of administration, and length of therapy, is unknown. Other important areas for future research include Ixodes biology and control, improved laboratory tests for diagnosis and for assessing response to therapy, and vaccine development.

  19. Multivariate Associations Among Behavioral, Clinical, and Multimodal Imaging Phenotypes in Patients With Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Dominik A; Doucet, Gaelle E; Lee, Won Hee; Rasgon, Alexander; Krinsky, Hannah; Leibu, Evan; Ing, Alex; Schumann, Gunter; Rasgon, Natalie; Frangou, Sophia

    2018-04-01

    Alterations in multiple neuroimaging phenotypes have been reported in psychotic disorders. However, neuroimaging measures can be influenced by factors that are not directly related to psychosis and may confound the interpretation of case-control differences. Therefore, a detailed characterization of the contribution of these factors to neuroimaging phenotypes in psychosis is warranted. To quantify the association between neuroimaging measures and behavioral, health, and demographic variables in psychosis using an integrated multivariate approach. This imaging study was conducted at a university research hospital from June 26, 2014, to March 9, 2017. High-resolution multimodal magnetic resonance imaging data were obtained from 100 patients with schizophrenia, 40 patients with bipolar disorder, and 50 healthy volunteers; computed were cortical thickness, subcortical volumes, white matter fractional anisotropy, task-related brain activation (during working memory and emotional recognition), and resting-state functional connectivity. Ascertained in all participants were nonimaging measures pertaining to clinical features, cognition, substance use, psychological trauma, physical activity, and body mass index. The association between imaging and nonimaging measures was modeled using sparse canonical correlation analysis with robust reliability testing. Multivariate patterns of the association between nonimaging and neuroimaging measures in patients with psychosis and healthy volunteers. The analyses were performed in 92 patients with schizophrenia (23 female [25.0%]; mean [SD] age, 27.0 [7.6] years), 37 patients with bipolar disorder (12 female [32.4%]; mean [SD] age, 27.5 [8.1] years), and 48 healthy volunteers (20 female [41.7%]; mean [SD] age, 29.8 [8.5] years). The imaging and nonimaging data sets showed significant covariation (r = 0.63, P nonimaging variables examined, age (r = -0.53), IQ (r = 0.36), and body mass index (r = -0.25) were associated

  20. Hereditary rickets. How genetic alterations explain the biochemical and clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Gole, Evaggelia; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni

    2013-12-01

    The reemergence of vitamin D deficiency in the industrialized countries resurrects the "threat" of nutritional rickets, especially among pediatric populations, a fact that may lead to underdiagnosis of hereditary rickets. Today, hereditary rickets may be subdivided into two main groups according to their biochemical profile: the one associated with defects in vitamin D synthesis and action and the second associated with abnormal phosphorus metabolism. The classification of the patients in a particular group of hereditary rickets is determinative of the treatment to follow. This review, through the recent advances on vitamin D and P metabolism, discusses the molecular and biochemical defects associated to each group of inherited rickets, as well as the clinical phenotypes and the recommended therapeutic approaches.

  1. Clinical pattern of heart diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejaz, M.S.; Billoo, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    This study was done to determine various causes and clinical presentation of heart disease in children. It was a prospective hospital study conducted in Department of Pediatrics Civil Hospital, Karachi from August 1995 to February 1996. In this study, 70 patients of heart disease upto 12 years of age were inducted. There were 33 (47.14%) cases of congenital heart diseases and 37 (52.85%) cases of acquired heart diseases. The age distribution showed that heart disease was more frequent between 0-11 months of age (41.42%). Congenital heart diseases were also frequent between 0-11 months (28.57%). On the other hand acquired heart diseases were more common between 6-12 years (22.85%). In this study the males were predominantly involved, the male to female ratio was 1.05:1. In congenital heart disease it was 1.3:1 and in acquired heart diseases it was 0.85:1. Ventricular septal defect was the commonest congenital lesion reported (20%). Rheumatic fever and viral myocarditis were two frequently occurring acquired heart-diseases 17.14% each. The common presentation of heart diseases were respiratory distress (94.28%), fever (90%), feeding difficulty (57.14%) and failure to thrive (34.28%). In case of rheumatic fever, chorea was present in 8.57%, arthritis in 11.42% and S/C nodules (2.85%) cases respectively. The early management of the problem may help in decreasing morbidity and mortality due to these disease in children. Prenatal detection of congenital cardiac lesions by fetal echocardiography in high risk pregnancies, early intervention in neonatal period and counseling of the parents may help in prevention of congenital heart diseases in children. Primary prevention of rheumatic fever can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment of streptococcal throat infection. (author)

  2. Use of global assays to understand clinical phenotype in congenital factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, L A; Goldenberg, N A; Simpson, M L; Villalobos-Menuey, E; Bombardier, C; Acharya, S S; Santiago-Borrero, P J; Cambara, A; DiMichele, D M

    2013-09-01

    Congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency is characterized by genotypic variability and phenotypic heterogeneity. Traditional screening and factor assays are unable to reliably predict clinical bleeding phenotype and guide haemorrhage prevention strategy. Global assays of coagulation and fibrinolysis may better characterize overall haemostatic balance and aid in haemorrhagic risk assessment. We evaluated the ability of novel global assays to better understand clinical bleeding severity in congenital FVII deficiency. Subjects underwent central determination of factor VII activity (FVII:C) as well as clot formation and lysis (CloFAL) and simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation (STP) global assay analysis. A bleeding score was assigned to each subject through medical chart review. Global assay parameters were analysed with respect to bleeding score and FVII:C. Subgroup analyses were performed on paediatric subjects and subjects with FVII ≥ 1 IU dL(-1). CloFAL fibrinolytic index (FI2 ) inversely correlated with FVII:C while CloFAL maximum amplitude (MA) and STP maximum velocity of thrombin generation (VT max) varied directly with FVII:C. CloFAL FI2 directly correlated with bleeding score among subjects in both the total cohort and paediatric subcohort, but not among subjects with FVII ≥ 1 IU dL(-1) . Among subjects with FVII ≥ 1 IU dL(-1), STP time to maximum velocity of thrombin generation and time to maximum velocity of plasmin generation inversely correlated with bleeding score. These preliminary findings suggest a novel potential link between a hyperfibrinolytic state in bleeding severity and congenital FVII deficiency, an observation that should be further explored. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Genotypes and clinical phenotypes in children with cytochrome-c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darin, N; Moslemi, A-R; Lebon, S; Rustin, P; Holme, E; Oldfors, A; Tulinius, M

    2003-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency has been associated with a wide spectrum of clinical features and may be caused by mutations in different genes of both the mitochondrial and the nuclear DNA. In an attempt to correlate the clinical phenotype with the genotype in 16 childhood cases, mtDNA was analysed for deletion, depletion, and mutations in the three genes encoding COX subunits and the 22 tRNA genes. Furthermore, nuclear DNA was analysed for mutations in the SURF1, SCO2, COX10, and COX17 genes and cases with mtDNA depletion were analysed for mutations in the TK2 gene. SURF1-mutations were identified in three out of four cases with Leigh syndrome while a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA (trp) gene was identified in the fourth. One case with mtDNA depletion had mutations in the TK2 gene. In two cases with leukoencephalopathy, one case with encephalopathy, five cases with fatal infantile myopathy and cardiomyopathy, two cases with benign infantile myopathy, and one case with mtDNA depletion, no mutations were identified. We conclude that COX deficiency in childhood should be suspected in a wide range of clinical settings and although an increasing number of genetic defects have been identified, the underlying mutations remain unclear in the majority of the cases.

  4. Deconstructing oppositional defiant disorder: clinic-based evidence for an anger/irritability phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabick, Deborah A G; Gadow, Kenneth D

    2012-04-01

    To examine risk factors and co-occurring symptoms associated with mother-reported versus teacher-reported anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in a clinic-based sample of 1,160 youth aged 6 through 18 years. Participants completed a background history questionnaire (mothers), school functioning questionnaire (mothers, teachers), and DSM-IV-referenced symptom checklists (mothers, teachers). Youth meeting AIS criteria for ODD were compared to youth with ODD who met criteria for noncompliant symptoms (NS) but not AIS and to clinic controls. Compared with NS youth, youth with AIS were rated as exhibiting higher levels of anxiety and mood symptoms for both mother- and teacher-defined groups, and higher levels of conduct disorder symptoms for mother-defined younger and older youth. The remaining group differences for developmental, psychosocial, and psychiatric correlates varied as a function of informant and youth's age. Evidence suggests that AIS may constitute a more severe and qualitatively different ODD clinical phenotype, but informant and age of youth appear to be important considerations. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The importance of genotype-phenotype correlation in the clinical management of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Muñoz, Víctor Manuel; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Porras-Martín, Carlos; Such-Martínez, Miguel; Crespo-Leiro, María Generosa; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; de Teresa-Galván, Eduardo; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Cabrera-Bueno, Fernando

    2018-01-22

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance, in which aortic root dilation is the main cause of morbidity and mortality. Fibrillin-1 (FBN-1) gene mutations are found in more than 90% of MFS cases. The aim of our study was to summarise variants in FBN-1 and establish the genotype-phenotype correlation, with particular interest in the onset of aortic events, in a broad population of patients with an initial clinical suspicion of MFS. This single centre prospective cohort study included all patients presenting variants in the FBN-1 gene who visited a Hereditary Aortopathy clinic between September 2010 and October 2016. The study included 90 patients with FBN-1 variants corresponding to 58 non-interrelated families. Of the 57 FBN-1 variants found, 25 (43.9%) had previously been described, 23 of which had been identified as associated with MFS, while the the remainder are described for the first time. For 84 patients (93.3%), it was possible to give a definite diagnosis of Marfan syndrome in accordance with Ghent criteria. 44 of them had missense mutations, 6 of whom had suffered an aortic event (with either prophylactic surgery for aneurysm or dissection), whereas 20 of the 35 patients with truncating mutations had suffered an event (13.6% vs. 57.1%, p importance not only in the diagnosis, but also in risk stratification and clinical management of patients with suspected MFS.

  6. Clinical heterogeneity in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Bart; Speelman, Johannes D.; de Haan, Rob J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine clinical heterogeneity in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease using cluster analysis and to describe the subgroups in terms of impairment, disability, perceived quality of life, and use of dopaminergic therapy. METHODS: We conducted a k-means cluster analysis in a prospective

  7. Brief report: genotype, phenotype, and clinical course in five patients with PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidowich, Andrew P; Freeman, Alexandra F; Kuhns, Douglas B; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Gallin, John I; Turner, Maria L; Kastner, Daniel L; Holland, Steven M

    2012-06-01

    To describe the genotypes, phenotypes, immunophenotypes, and treatments of PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne), a rare autoinflammatory disease, in 5 patients. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and through interviews with 5 patients from 4 kindreds. PSTPIP1 (CD2BP1) exon 10 and exon 11 sequencing was performed in each patient. Neutrophil granule content and cytokine levels were determined in plasma and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients and controls. We identified 2 previously described PAPA syndrome-associated PSTPIP1 mutations, A230T and E250Q, and a novel change, E250K. Disease penetrance was incomplete, with variable expressivity. The cutaneous manifestations included pathergy, cystic acne, and pyoderma gangrenosum. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and circulating neutrophil granule enzyme levels were markedly elevated in patients compared to those in controls. PBMC stimulation studies demonstrated impaired production of IL-10 and enhanced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Good resolution of pyoderma gangrenosum was achieved in 3 patients with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) blockade treatment. This analysis of 5 patients demonstrates that mutations in PSTPIP1 are incompletely penetrant and variably expressed in the PAPA syndrome. Neutrophil granule proteins are markedly elevated ex vivo and in the plasma, and elevated levels might be compatible with a diagnosis of PAPA syndrome. TNFα blockade appears to be effective in treating the cutaneous manifestations of PAPA syndrome. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Transgenic Fatal Familial Insomnia Mice Indicate Prion Infectivity-Independent Mechanisms of Pathogenesis and Phenotypic Expression of Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bouybayoune, I.; Mantovani, S.; Del Gallo, F.; Bertani, I.; Restelli, E.; Comerio, L.; Tapella, L.; Baracchi, F.; Fernández-Borges, N.; Mangieri, M.; Bisighini, C.; Beznoussenko, G..V.; Paladini, A.; Balducci, C.; Micotti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary Genetic prion diseases are degenerative brain disorders caused by mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PrP). Different PrP mutations cause different diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). The reason for this variability is not known, but assembly of the mutant PrPs into distinct aggregates that spread in the brain by promoting PrP aggregation may contribute to the disease phenotype. We previously generated transgenic ...

  9. Gender differences in the T-cell profiles of the airways in COPD patients associated with clinical phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsslund H

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Helena Forsslund,1 Mingxing Yang,1 Mikael Mikko,1 Reza Karimi,1 Sven Nyrén,2 Benita Engvall,1 Johan Grunewald,1 Heta Merikallio,1,3 Riitta Kaarteenaho,3–5 Jan Wahlström,1 Åsa M Wheelock,1 C Magnus Sköld1 1Department of Medicine Solna and Centre for Molecular Medicine, Respiratory Medicine Unit, 2Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Respiratory Research Unit and Medical Research Center Oulu, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; 4Unit of Medicine and Clinical Research, Pulmonary Division, University of Eastern Finland, 5Center for Medicine and Clinical Research, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland Abstract: T lymphocytes are believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. How T cells are recruited to the lungs and contribute to the inflammatory process is largely unknown. COPD is a heterogeneous disease, and discriminating disease phenotypes based on distinct molecular and cellular pathways may provide new approaches for individualized diagnosis and therapies. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and blood samples were obtained from 40 never-smokers, 40 smokers with normal lung function, and 38 COPD patients. T-cell chemokine receptor expression was analyzed with flow cytometry, and soluble BAL cytokines and chemokines were measured using a cytokine multiplex assay. Correlations with gender and clinical characteristics including lung imaging were investigated using multivariate modeling. Th1/Tc1- and Th2/Tc2-associated soluble analytes and T-cell chemokine receptors were analyzed as cumulative Th1/Tc1 and Th2/Tc2 immune responses. A higher expression of chemokine receptor CCR5 on CD8+ T cells in BAL and higher percentage of CXCR3+CD8+ T cells in blood was found in female smokers with COPD compared to those without COPD. CCR5 expression

  10. Clinical Epidemiology of Buruli Ulcer from Benin (2005-2013: Effect of Time-Delay to Diagnosis on Clinical Forms and Severe Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Capela

    Full Text Available Buruli Ulcer (BU is a neglected infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is responsible for severe necrotizing cutaneous lesions that may be associated with bone involvement. Clinical presentations of BU lesions are classically classified as papules, nodules, plaques and edematous infiltration, ulcer or osteomyelitis. Within these different clinical forms, lesions can be further classified as severe forms based on focality (multiple lesions, lesions' size (>15 cm diameter or WHO Category (WHO Category 3 lesions. There are studies reporting an association between delay in seeking medical care and the development of ulcerative forms of BU or osteomyelitis, but the effect of time-delay on the emergence of lesions classified as severe has not been addressed. To address both issues, and in a cohort of laboratory-confirmed BU cases, 476 patients from a medical center in Allada, Benin, were studied. In this laboratory-confirmed cohort, we validated previous observations, demonstrating that time-delay is statistically related to the clinical form of BU. Indeed, for non-ulcerated forms (nodule, edema, and plaque the median time-delay was 32.5 days (IQR 30.0-67.5, while for ulcerated forms it was 60 days (IQR 20.0-120.0 (p = 0.009, and for bone lesions, 365 days (IQR 228.0-548.0. On the other hand, we show here that time-delay is not associated with the more severe phenotypes of BU, such as multi-focal lesions (median 90 days; IQR 56-217.5; p = 0.09, larger lesions (diameter >15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-120; p = 0.92 or category 3 WHO classification (median 60 days; IQR 30-150; p = 0.20, when compared with unifocal (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, small lesions (diameter ≤15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, or WHO category 1+2 lesions (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, respectively. Our results demonstrate that after an initial period of progression towards ulceration or bone involvement, BU lesions become stable regarding size and focal

  11. Phenotypic and Genotypic Resistance of Salmonella Isolates from Healthy and Diseased Pigs in China During 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu, Yueguang; Zhu, Shun; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Sun, Mengzhen; Zou, Geng; Meng, Xianrong; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Rui; Li, Shaowen

    2017-07-01

    The antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella strains is rapidly increasing worldwide, which poses significant threats to animal and public health. In this study, a total of 249 porcine Salmonella isolates collected in China during 2008-2015 were examined, including 155 clinical isolates from diseased pigs and 94 nonclinical isolates from healthy pigs. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration of seven antimicrobial agents, 96.4% of the isolates were resistant to at least one of the tested antibiotics and 81.0% of them showed multidrug resistance. The highest antimicrobial resistance was observed for tetracycline (85.9%), and the lowest was found for cefotaxime (13.3%). The isolates from diseased pigs exhibited significantly higher levels of antimicrobial resistance than those from healthy pigs. Twenty-two isolates from healthy pigs were resistant to ciprofloxacin, which may inhibit the curative effectiveness of fluoroquinolones on bacterial food-borne poisoning and infections in humans caused by contaminated food. Moreover, cefotaxime resistance of the strains isolated from diseased pigs during 2013-2015 was significantly higher compared with the strains isolated during 2008-2010. Further study showed that the correlation between phenotypic and genotypic resistance varied among the isolates from different sources, and in many cases, the presence of resistance genes was not consistent with the resistance to the corresponding antimicrobials. These results are very significant for veterinary practice and public health.

  12. Inflammatory bowel diseases phenotype, C. difficile and NOD2 genotype are associated with shifts in human ileum associated microbial composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Li

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that Crohn's disease (CD-related genetic polymorphisms involved in host innate immunity are associated with shifts in human ileum-associated microbial composition in a cross-sectional analysis of human ileal samples. Sanger sequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene and 454 sequencing of 16S rRNA gene hypervariable regions (V1-V3 and V3-V5, were conducted on macroscopically disease-unaffected ileal biopsies collected from 52 ileal CD, 58 ulcerative colitis and 60 control patients without inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD undergoing initial surgical resection. These subjects also were genotyped for the three major NOD2 risk alleles (Leu1007fs, R708W, G908R and the ATG16L1 risk allele (T300A. The samples were linked to clinical metadata, including body mass index, smoking status and Clostridia difficile infection. The sequences were classified into seven phyla/subphyla categories using the Naïve Bayesian Classifier of the Ribosome Database Project. Centered log ratio transformation of six predominant categories was included as the dependent variable in the permutation based MANCOVA for the overall composition with stepwise variable selection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays were conducted to measure the relative frequencies of the Clostridium coccoides - Eubacterium rectales group and the Faecalibacterium prausnitzii spp. Empiric logit transformations of the relative frequencies of these two microbial groups were included in permutation-based ANCOVA. Regardless of sequencing method, IBD phenotype, Clostridia difficile and NOD2 genotype were selected as associated (FDR ≤ 0.05 with shifts in overall microbial composition. IBD phenotype and NOD2 genotype were also selected as associated with shifts in the relative frequency of the C. coccoides--E. rectales group. IBD phenotype, smoking and IBD medications were selected as associated with shifts in the relative frequency of F. prausnitzii spp. These

  13. Inflammatory bowel diseases phenotype, C. difficile and NOD2 genotype are associated with shifts in human ileum associated microbial composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ellen; Hamm, Christina M; Gulati, Ajay S; Sartor, R Balfour; Chen, Hongyan; Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Tianyi; Rohlf, F James; Zhu, Wei; Gu, Chi; Robertson, Charles E; Pace, Norman R; Boedeker, Edgar C; Harpaz, Noam; Yuan, Jeffrey; Weinstock, George M; Sodergren, Erica; Frank, Daniel N

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Crohn's disease (CD)-related genetic polymorphisms involved in host innate immunity are associated with shifts in human ileum-associated microbial composition in a cross-sectional analysis of human ileal samples. Sanger sequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and 454 sequencing of 16S rRNA gene hypervariable regions (V1-V3 and V3-V5), were conducted on macroscopically disease-unaffected ileal biopsies collected from 52 ileal CD, 58 ulcerative colitis and 60 control patients without inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) undergoing initial surgical resection. These subjects also were genotyped for the three major NOD2 risk alleles (Leu1007fs, R708W, G908R) and the ATG16L1 risk allele (T300A). The samples were linked to clinical metadata, including body mass index, smoking status and Clostridia difficile infection. The sequences were classified into seven phyla/subphyla categories using the Naïve Bayesian Classifier of the Ribosome Database Project. Centered log ratio transformation of six predominant categories was included as the dependent variable in the permutation based MANCOVA for the overall composition with stepwise variable selection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were conducted to measure the relative frequencies of the Clostridium coccoides - Eubacterium rectales group and the Faecalibacterium prausnitzii spp. Empiric logit transformations of the relative frequencies of these two microbial groups were included in permutation-based ANCOVA. Regardless of sequencing method, IBD phenotype, Clostridia difficile and NOD2 genotype were selected as associated (FDR ≤ 0.05) with shifts in overall microbial composition. IBD phenotype and NOD2 genotype were also selected as associated with shifts in the relative frequency of the C. coccoides--E. rectales group. IBD phenotype, smoking and IBD medications were selected as associated with shifts in the relative frequency of F. prausnitzii spp. These results indicate

  14. Dopaminreceptorscintigraphy in Parkinson's disease - Clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riklund Aahlstroem, K.E.; Hietala, S.-O.; Johansson, F.

    2002-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a severe, progressive neuro degenerative disorder which is characterised by a degeneration of the dopamine containing cells and loss of dopamine transporters (DA) in substantia nigra. Earlier 123 I-β-CIT SPECT studies have demonstrated this loss of DA content in Parkinson's disease. Recently a new radioligand 123 I-FP-CIT, with faster kinetics than b-CIT became available for imaging of the DA transporter. The applicability of this radioligand was tested in a large clinical material with early and advanced Parkinson's disease using a one day protocol. 123 I-FP-CIT uptake was decreased in patients with Parkinson's disease and this was seen three hours after injection of the radioligand. In the Parkinson's disease group the uptake in the putamen was reduced more than in the caudate nucleus. Specific to non-specific striatal uptake ratios correlated with the Hoehn and Yahr stage. It appeared that 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT allows a significant discrimination between patients with Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. The scintigraphic observations were correlated to clinical findings. The results will be presented and discussed

  15. Stargardt disease: clinical features, molecular genetics, animal models and therapeutic options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, Preena; Strauss, Rupert W; Fujinami, Kaoru; Michaelides, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1; MIM 248200) is the most prevalent inherited macular dystrophy and is associated with disease-causing sequence variants in the gene ABCA4. Significant advances have been made over the last 10 years in our understanding of both the clinical and molecular features of STGD1, and also the underlying pathophysiology, which has culminated in ongoing and planned human clinical trials of novel therapies. The aims of this review are to describe the detailed phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the disease, conventional and novel imaging findings, current knowledge of animal models and pathogenesis, and the multiple avenues of intervention being explored. PMID:27491360

  16. The calcineurin inhibitor Sarah (Nebula) exacerbates Aβ42 phenotypes in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soojin; Bang, Se Min; Hong, Yoon Ki; Lee, Jang Ho; Jeong, Haemin; Park, Seung Hwan; Liu, Quan Feng; Lee, Im-Soon; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2016-03-01

    Expression of the Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) protein, an inhibitor of the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, is elevated in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome (DS) or Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although increased levels of DSCR1 were often observed to be deleterious to neuronal health, its beneficial effects against AD neuropathology have also been reported, and the roles of DSCR1 on the pathogenesis of AD remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of sarah (sra; also known as nebula), a Drosophila DSCR1 ortholog, in amyloid-β42 (Aβ42)-induced neurological phenotypes in Drosophila. We detected sra expression in the mushroom bodies of the fly brain, which are a center for learning and memory in flies. Moreover, similar to humans with AD, Aβ42-expressing flies showed increased Sra levels in the brain, demonstrating that the expression pattern of DSCR1 with regard to AD pathogenesis is conserved in Drosophila. Interestingly, overexpression of sra using the UAS-GAL4 system exacerbated the rough-eye phenotype, decreased survival rates and increased neuronal cell death in Aβ42-expressing flies, without modulating Aβ42 expression. Moreover, neuronal overexpression of sra in combination with Aβ42 dramatically reduced both locomotor activity and the adult lifespan of flies, whereas flies with overexpression of sra alone showed normal climbing ability, albeit with a slightly reduced lifespan. Similarly, treatment with chemical inhibitors of calcineurin, such as FK506 and cyclosporin A, or knockdown of calcineurin expression by RNA interference (RNAi), exacerbated the Aβ42-induced rough-eye phenotype. Furthermore, sra-overexpressing flies displayed significantly decreased mitochondrial DNA and ATP levels, as well as increased susceptibility to oxidative stress compared to that of control flies. Taken together, our results demonstrating that sra overexpression augments Aβ42 cytotoxicity in Drosophila suggest that DSCR1

  17. The calcineurin inhibitor Sarah (Nebula exacerbates Aβ42 phenotypes in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soojin Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1 protein, an inhibitor of the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, is elevated in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome (DS or Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although increased levels of DSCR1 were often observed to be deleterious to neuronal health, its beneficial effects against AD neuropathology have also been reported, and the roles of DSCR1 on the pathogenesis of AD remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of sarah (sra; also known as nebula, a Drosophila DSCR1 ortholog, in amyloid-β42 (Aβ42-induced neurological phenotypes in Drosophila. We detected sra expression in the mushroom bodies of the fly brain, which are a center for learning and memory in flies. Moreover, similar to humans with AD, Aβ42-expressing flies showed increased Sra levels in the brain, demonstrating that the expression pattern of DSCR1 with regard to AD pathogenesis is conserved in Drosophila. Interestingly, overexpression of sra using the UAS-GAL4 system exacerbated the rough-eye phenotype, decreased survival rates and increased neuronal cell death in Aβ42-expressing flies, without modulating Aβ42 expression. Moreover, neuronal overexpression of sra in combination with Aβ42 dramatically reduced both locomotor activity and the adult lifespan of flies, whereas flies with overexpression of sra alone showed normal climbing ability, albeit with a slightly reduced lifespan. Similarly, treatment with chemical inhibitors of calcineurin, such as FK506 and cyclosporin A, or knockdown of calcineurin expression by RNA interference (RNAi, exacerbated the Aβ42-induced rough-eye phenotype. Furthermore, sra-overexpressing flies displayed significantly decreased mitochondrial DNA and ATP levels, as well as increased susceptibility to oxidative stress compared to that of control flies. Taken together, our results demonstrating that sra overexpression augments Aβ42 cytotoxicity in Drosophila suggest that DSCR1

  18. Defining disease phenotypes using national linked electronic health records: a case study of atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine I Morley

    Full Text Available National electronic health records (EHR are increasingly used for research but identifying disease cases is challenging due to differences in information captured between sources (e.g. primary and secondary care. Our objective was to provide a transparent, reproducible model for integrating these data using atrial fibrillation (AF, a chronic condition diagnosed and managed in multiple ways in different healthcare settings, as a case study.Potentially relevant codes for AF screening, diagnosis, and management were identified in four coding systems: Read (primary care diagnoses and procedures, British National Formulary (BNF; primary care prescriptions, ICD-10 (secondary care diagnoses and OPCS-4 (secondary care procedures. From these we developed a phenotype algorithm via expert review and analysis of linked EHR data from 1998 to 2010 for a cohort of 2.14 million UK patients aged ≥ 30 years. The cohort was also used to evaluate the phenotype by examining associations between incident AF and known risk factors.The phenotype algorithm incorporated 286 codes: 201 Read, 63 BNF, 18 ICD-10, and four OPCS-4. Incident AF diagnoses were recorded for 72,793 patients, but only 39.6% (N = 28,795 were recorded in primary care and secondary care. An additional 7,468 potential cases were inferred from data on treatment and pre-existing conditions. The proportion of cases identified from each source differed by diagnosis age; inferred diagnoses contributed a greater proportion of younger cases (≤ 60 years, while older patients (≥ 80 years were mainly diagnosed in SC. Associations of risk factors (hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure with incident AF defined using different EHR sources were comparable in magnitude to those from traditional consented cohorts.A single EHR source is not sufficient to identify all patients, nor will it provide a representative sample. Combining multiple data sources and integrating information on treatment and

  19. The Clinical Phenotype of Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder at Presentation: A Study in 203 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Iranzo, Alex; Serradell, Mónica; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical phenotype of idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (IRBD) at presentation in a sleep center. Clinical history review of 203 consecutive patients with IRBD identified between 1990 and 2014. IRBD was diagnosed by clinical history plus video-polysomnographic demonstration of REM sleep with increased electromyographic activity linked to abnormal behaviors. Patients were 80% men with median age at IRBD diagnosis of 68 y (range, 50-85 y). In addition to the already known clinical picture of IRBD, other important features were apparent: 44% of the patients were not aware of their dream-enactment behaviors and 70% reported good sleep quality. In most of these cases bed partners were essential to convince patients to seek medical help. In 11% IRBD was elicited only after specific questioning when patients consulted for other reasons. Seven percent did not recall unpleasant dreams. Leaving the bed occurred occasionally in 24% of subjects in whom dementia with Lewy bodies often developed eventually. For the correct diagnosis of IRBD, video-polysomnography had to be repeated in 16% because of insufficient REM sleep or electromyographic artifacts from coexistent apneas. Some subjects with comorbid obstructive sleep apnea reported partial improvement of RBD symptoms following continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Lack of therapy with clonazepam resulted in an increased risk of sleep related injuries. Synucleinopathy was frequently diagnosed, even in patients with mild severity or uncommon IRBD presentations (e.g., patients who reported sleeping well, onset triggered by a life event, nocturnal ambulation) indicating that the development of a neurodegenerative disease is independent of the clinical presentation of IRBD. We report the largest IRBD cohort observed in a single center to date and highlight frequent features that were not reported or not sufficiently emphasized in previous publications. Physicians should be aware of

  20. Phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Streptococcus spp. isolated from cases of clinical mastitis in dairy cattle in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorek, E; Małaczewska, J; Wójcik, R; Rękawek, W; Siwicki, A K

    2017-08-01

    Mastitis of dairy cattle is one of the most frequently diagnosed diseases worldwide. The main etiological agents of mastitis are bacteria of the genus Streptococcus spp., in which several antibiotic resistance mechanisms have been identified. However, detailed studies addressing this problem have not been conducted in northeastern Poland. Therefore, the aim of our study was to analyze, on phenotypic and genotypic levels, the antibiotic resistance pattern of Streptococcus spp. isolated from clinical cases of mastitis from dairy cattle in this region of Poland. The research was conducted using 135 strains of Streptococcus (Streptococcus uberis, n = 53; Streptococcus dysgalactiae, n = 41; Streptococcus agalactiae, n = 27; other streptococci, n = 14). The investigation of the antimicrobial susceptibility to 8 active substances applied in therapy in the analyzed region, as well as a selected bacteriocin (nisin), was performed using the minimum inhibitory concentration method. The presence of selected resistance genes (n = 14) was determined via PCR. We also investigated the correlation between the presence of resistance genes and the antimicrobial susceptibility of the examined strains in vitro. The highest observed resistance of Streptococcus spp. was toward gentamicin, kanamycin, and tetracycline, whereas the highest susceptibility occurred toward penicillin, enrofloxacin, and marbofloxacin. Additionally, the tested bacteriocin showed high efficacy. The presence of 13 analyzed resistance genes was observed in the examined strains [gene mef(A) was not detected]. In most strains, at least one resistance gene, mainly responsible for resistance to tetracyclines [tet(M), tet(K), tet(L)], was observed. However, a relationship between the presence of a given resistance gene and antimicrobial susceptibility on the phenotypic level was not always observed. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Simplified method of clinical phenotyping for older men and women using established field-based measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, David H; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Kendall, Kristina L; Moon, Jordan R; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine body composition classification using field-based testing measurements in healthy elderly men and women. The use of isoperformance curves is presented as a method for this determination. Baseline values from 107 healthy Caucasian men and women, over the age of 65years old, who participated in a separate longitudinal study, were used for this investigation. Field-based measurements of age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and handgrip strength were recorded on an individual basis. Relative skeletal muscle index (RSMI) and body fat percentage (FAT%) were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for each participant. Sarcopenia cut-off values for RSMI of 7.26kg·m(-2) for men and 5.45kg·m(-2) for women and elderly obesity cut-off values for FAT% of 27% for men and 38% for women were used. Individuals above the RSMI cut-off and below the FAT% cut-off were classified in the normal phenotype category, while individuals below the RSMI cut-off and above the FAT% cut-off were classified in the sarcopenic-obese phenotype category. Prediction equations for RSMI and FAT% from sex, BMI, and handgrip strength values were developed using multiple regression analysis. The prediction equations were validated using double cross-validation. The final regression equation developed to predict FAT% from sex, BMI, and handgrip strength resulted in a strong relationship (adjusted R(2)=0.741) to DXA values with a low standard error of the estimate (SEE=3.994%). The final regression equation developed to predict RSMI from the field-based testing measures also resulted in a strong relationship (adjusted R(2)=0.841) to DXA values with a low standard error of the estimate (SEE=0.544kg·m(-2)). Isoperformance curves were developed from the relationship between BMI and handgrip strength for men and women with the aforementioned clinical phenotype classification criteria. These visual representations were used to aid in the

  2. Infertility etiologies are genetically and clinically linked with other diseases in single meta-diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel A; Hamatani, Toshio; Cano, Antonio

    2015-04-15

    linked with other diseases in single meta-diseases. This finding opens new insights for clinicians and reproductive biologists to treat infertility problems using a phenomic approach instead of considering infertility as an isolated and exclusive disease of the reproductive system/hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In agreement with a previous validation analysis of the utility of DiseaseConnect web server, the present study does not show a univocal correspondence between common gene expression and clinical comorbid relationship. Further work is needed to untangle the potential genetic, epigenetic and phenotypic relationships that may be present among different infertility etiologies, morbid conditions and physical/cognitive traits.

  3. De Novo and Inherited Loss-of-Function Variants in TLK2: Clinical and Genotype-Phenotype Evaluation of a Distinct Neurodevelopmental Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Margot R F; Miller, Kerry A; Alvi, Mohsan; Goos, Jacqueline A C; Lees, Melissa M; de Burca, Anna; Henderson, Alex; Kraus, Alison; Mikat, Barbara; de Vries, Bert B A; Isidor, Bertrand; Kerr, Bronwyn; Marcelis, Carlo; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Deshpande, Charu; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Baralle, Diana; Blair, Edward M; Engels, Hartmut; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Eason, Jacqueline; Santen, Gijs W E; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Chandler, Kate; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Payne, Katelyn; Helbig, Katherine; Radtke, Kelly; Nugent, Kimberly M; Cremer, Kirsten; Strom, Tim M; Bird, Lynne M; Sinnema, Margje; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; van Dooren, Marieke F; Alders, Marielle; Koopmans, Marije; Brick, Lauren; Kozenko, Mariya; Harline, Megan L; Klaassens, Merel; Steinraths, Michelle; Cooper, Nicola S; Edery, Patrick; Yap, Patrick; Terhal, Paulien A; van der Spek, Peter J; Lakeman, Phillis; Taylor, Rachel L; Littlejohn, Rebecca O; Pfundt, Rolph; Mercimek-Andrews, Saadet; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Kant, Sarina G; McLean, Scott; Joss, Shelagh; Swagemakers, Sigrid M A; Douzgou, Sofia; Wall, Steven A; Küry, Sébastien; Calpena, Eduardo; Koelling, Nils; McGowan, Simon J; Twigg, Stephen R F; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Nellaker, Christoffer; Brunner, Han G; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2018-06-07

    Next-generation sequencing is a powerful tool for the discovery of genes related to neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Here, we report the identification of a distinct syndrome due to de novo or inherited heterozygous mutations in Tousled-like kinase 2 (TLK2) in 38 unrelated individuals and two affected mothers, using whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies, matchmaker databases, and international collaborations. Affected individuals had a consistent phenotype, characterized by mild-borderline neurodevelopmental delay (86%), behavioral disorders (68%), severe gastro-intestinal problems (63%), and facial dysmorphism including blepharophimosis (82%), telecanthus (74%), prominent nasal bridge (68%), broad nasal tip (66%), thin vermilion of the upper lip (62%), and upslanting palpebral fissures (55%). Analysis of cell lines from three affected individuals showed that mutations act through a loss-of-function mechanism in at least two case subjects. Genotype-phenotype analysis and comparison of computationally modeled faces showed that phenotypes of these and other individuals with loss-of-function variants significantly overlapped with phenotypes of individuals with other variant types (missense and C-terminal truncating). This suggests that haploinsufficiency of TLK2 is the most likely underlying disease mechanism, leading to a consistent neurodevelopmental phenotype. This work illustrates the power of international data sharing, by the identification of 40 individuals from 26 different centers in 7 different countries, allowing the identification, clinical delineation, and genotype-phenotype evaluation of a distinct NDD caused by mutations in TLK2. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparing deep learning and concept extraction based methods for patient phenotyping from clinical narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrmann, Sebastian; Dernoncourt, Franck; Li, Yeran; Carlson, Eric T; Wu, Joy T; Welt, Jonathan; Foote, John; Moseley, Edward T; Grant, David W; Tyler, Patrick D; Celi, Leo A

    2018-01-01

    In secondary analysis of electronic health records, a crucial task consists in correctly identifying the patient cohort under investigation. In many cases, the most valuable and relevant information for an accurate classification of medical conditions exist only in clinical narratives. Therefore, it is necessary to use natural language processing (NLP) techniques to extract and evaluate these narratives. The most commonly used approach to this problem relies on extracting a number of clinician-defined medical concepts from text and using machine learning techniques to identify whether a particular patient has a certain condition. However, recent advances in deep learning and NLP enable models to learn a rich representation of (medical) language. Convolutional neural networks (CNN) for text classification can augment the existing techniques by leveraging the representation of language to learn which phrases in a text are relevant for a given medical condition. In this work, we compare concept extraction based methods with CNNs and other commonly used models in NLP in ten phenotyping tasks using 1,610 discharge summaries from the MIMIC-III database. We show that CNNs outperform concept extraction based methods in almost all of the tasks, with an improvement in F1-score of up to 26 and up to 7 percentage points in area under the ROC curve (AUC). We additionally assess the interpretability of both approaches by presenting and evaluating methods that calculate and extract the most salient phrases for a prediction. The results indicate that CNNs are a valid alternative to existing approaches in patient phenotyping and cohort identification, and should be further investigated. Moreover, the deep learning approach presented in this paper can be used to assist clinicians during chart review or support the extraction of billing codes from text by identifying and highlighting relevant phrases for various medical conditions.

  5. Recent clinical trials in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Daniel; Anwaruddin, Saif

    2017-07-01

    With widespread adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, there has been a change in the approach to management of valvular heart disease. New interest has taken hold in transcatheter therapies for valvular heart disease, as well as research into pathophysiology and progression of disease. Additionally, several key trials have further refined our understanding of surgical management of valvular heart disease. This review will elucidate recent clinical trial data leading to changes in practice. There have been several landmark trials expanding the indications for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Additionally, although still early, trials are beginning to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of transcatheter mitral valves. Options for transcatheter management of right-sided valvular disease continue to evolve, and these are areas of active investigation. The emergence of novel therapies for valvular heart disease has expanded the management options available, allowing physicians to better individualize treatment of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will focus on the recent (within 2 years) trials in this field of interest.

  6. Meningococcal disease, a clinical and epidemiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Rodrigo Siqueira; Gomes, Andréia Patrícia; Dutra Gazineo, Jorge Luiz; Balbino Miguel, Paulo Sérgio; Santana, Luiz Alberto; Oliveira, Lisa; Geller, Mauro

    2017-11-01

    Meningococcal disease is the acute infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis, which has humans as the only natural host. The disease is widespread around the globe and is known for its epidemical potential and high rates of lethality and morbidity. The highest number of cases of the disease is registered in the semi-arid regions of sub-Saharan Africa. In Brazil, it is endemic with occasional outbreaks, epidemics and sporadic cases occurring throughout the year, especially in the winter. The major epidemics of the disease occurred in Brazil in the 70's caused by serogroups A and C. Serogroups B, C and Y represent the majority of cases in Europe, the Americas and Australia. However, there has been a growing increase in serogroup W in some areas. The pathogen transmission happens for respiratory route (droplets) and clinically can lead to meningitis and sepsis (meningococcemia). The treatment is made with antimicrobial and supportive care. For successful prevention, we have some measures like vaccination, chemoprophylaxis and droplets' precautions. In this review, we have described and clarify clinical features of the disease caused by N. meningitidis regarding its relevance for healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2017 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Is Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Caused by Wood Smoke a Different Phenotype or a Different Entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Duque, Carlos A; García-Rodriguez, María Carmen; González-García, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Around 40% of the world's population continue using solid fuel, including wood, for cooking or heating their homes. Chronic exposure to wood smoke is a risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In some regions of the world, this can be a more important cause of COPD than exposure to tobacco smoke from cigarettes. Significant differences between COPD associated with wood smoke (W-COPD) and that caused by smoking (S-COPD) have led some authors to suggest that W-COPD should be considered a new COPD phenotype. We present a review of the differences between W-COPD and S-COPD. On the premise that wood smoke and tobacco smoke are not the same and the physiopathological mechanisms they induce may differ, we have analyzed whether W-COPD can be considered as another COPD phenotype or a distinct nosological entity. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Public support for neonatal screening for Pompe disease, a broad-phenotype condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinreich Stephanie

    2012-03-01

    screening for Pompe disease, not only among those who have personal experience of the disease but also among the general public in the Netherlands. Optional screening on the basis of informed parental consent is probably unrealistic, underlining the need for new guidelines to help policymakers in their consideration of newborn screening for broad phenotype conditions.

  9. Mutagenesis and phenotyping resources in zebrafish for studying development and human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important model organism for studying development and human disease. The zebrafish has an excellent reference genome and the functions of hundreds of genes have been tested using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. Recent years have seen an increasing number of large-scale mutagenesis projects and the number of mutants or gene knockouts in zebrafish has increased rapidly, including for the first time conditional knockout technologies. In addition, targeted mutagenesis techniques such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short sequences (CRISPR) or CRISPR-associated (Cas), have all been shown to effectively target zebrafish genes as well as the first reported germline homologous recombination, further expanding the utility and power of zebrafish genetics. Given this explosion of mutagenesis resources, it is now possible to perform systematic, high-throughput phenotype analysis of all zebrafish gene knockouts. PMID:24162064

  10. Phenotype Variation in Human Immunodeficiency virus Type 1 Transmission and Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Cavarelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 infects target cells through interaction with the CD4 molecule and chemokine receptors, mainly CCR5 and CXCR4. Viral isolates can be phenotypically classified based on the co-receptor they utilize to infect target cells. Thus, R5 and X4 virus use respectively CCR5 and CXCR4, whereas R5X4 virus can use either CCR5 or CXCR4. This review describes the central role played by co-receptor expression and usage for HIV-1 cell tropism, transmission and pathogenesis. We discuss various hypotheses proposed to explain the preferential transmission of R5 viruses and the mechanisms driving the change of HIV-1 co-receptor usage in the course of infection. Recent insights in the intrinsic variability of R5 viruses and their role in influencing disease progression in both adults and children are also discussed.

  11. Phenotype variation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission and disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavarelli, Mariangela; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) infects target cells through interaction with the CD4 molecule and chemokine receptors, mainly CCR5 and CXCR4. Viral isolates can be phenotypically classified based on the co-receptor they utilize to infect target cells. Thus, R5 and X4 virus use respectively CCR5 and CXCR4, whereas R5X4 virus can use either CCR5 or CXCR4. This review describes the central role played by co-receptor expression and usage for HIV-1 cell tropism, transmission and pathogenesis. We discuss various hypotheses proposed to explain the preferential transmission of R5 viruses and the mechanisms driving the change of HIV-1 co-receptor usage in the course of infection. Recent insights in the intrinsic variability of R5 viruses and their role in influencing disease progression in both adults and children are also discussed.

  12. Metal Homeostasis Regulators Suppress FRDA Phenotypes in a Drosophila Model of the Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirena Soriano

    Full Text Available Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA, the most commonly inherited ataxia in populations of European origin, is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a decrease in frataxin levels. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the accumulation of iron in several tissues including the brain, and frataxin has been proposed to play a key role in iron homeostasis. We found that the levels of zinc, copper, manganese and aluminum were also increased in a Drosophila model of FRDA, and that copper and zinc chelation improve their impaired motor performance. By means of a candidate genetic screen, we identified that genes implicated in iron, zinc and copper transport and metal detoxification can restore frataxin deficiency-induced phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the metal dysregulation in FRDA includes other metals besides iron, therefore providing a new set of potential therapeutic targets.

  13. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates from two hospitals in Mexico: First detection of VanB phenotype-vanA genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra-Ibarias, Paola; Flores-Treviño, Samantha; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge; Martínez-Landeros, Erik Alan; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Calzada-Güereca, Andrés; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Garza-González, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium has emerged as a multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen involved in outbreaks worldwide. Our aim was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm production, and clonal relatedness of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (VREF) clinical isolates from two hospitals in Mexico. Consecutive clinical isolates (n=56) were collected in two tertiary care hospitals in Mexico from 2011 to 2014. VREF isolates were characterized by phenotypic and molecular methods including pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). VREF isolates were highly resistant to vancomycin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, high-level streptomycin, and teicoplanin, and showed lower resistance to tetracycline, nitrofurantoin and quinupristin-dalfopristin. None of the isolates were resistant to linezolid. The vanA gene was detected in all isolates. Two VanB phenotype-vanA genotype isolates, highly resistant to vancomycin and susceptible to teicoplanin, were detected. Furthermore, 17.9% of the isolates were classified as biofilm producers, and the espfm gene was found in 98.2% of the isolates. A total of 37 distinct PFGE patterns and 6 clones (25% of the isolates as clone A, 5.4% as clone B, and 3.6% each as clone C, D, E, and F) were detected. Clone A was detected in 5 different wards of the same hospital during 14 months of surveillance. The high resistance to most antimicrobial agents and the moderate cross-transmission of VREF detected accentuates the need for continuous surveillance of E. faecium in the hospital setting. This is also the first reported incidence of the E. faecium VanB phenotype-vanA genotype in the Americas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Nontraditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease and visceral adiposity index among different body size phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, T; Zhang, J; Yuan, G; Zhang, M; Zhou, X; Liu, Z; Sun, X; Yu, X

    2015-01-01

    Increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk in metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals remain highly controversial. Several studies suggested risk while others do not. The traditional cardiovascular risk factors may be insufficient to demonstrate the complete range of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals. Hence, we aimed to compare the prevalence of elevated lipoprotein (a), apolipoprotein B, and uric acid (UA) levels, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio, and visceral adiposity index (VAI) scores, and low apolipoprotein A1 levels among 6 body size phenotypes (normal weight with and without metabolic abnormalities, overweight with and without metabolic abnormalities, and obese with or without metabolic abnormalities). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 7765 Chinese adults using data from the nationwide China Health and Nutrition Survey 2009. MHO persons had intermediate prevalence of elevated apolipoprotein B and UA levels, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio and VAI scores, and low apolipoprotein A1 levels between metabolically healthy normal-weight (MHNW) and metabolically abnormal obese individuals (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Elevated apolipoprotein B and UA concentrations, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio, and VAI scores were all strongly associated with the MHO phenotype (all P < 0.01). Prevalence of elevated apolipoprotein B and UA levels, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio and VAI scores, and low levels of apolipoprotein A1 was higher among MHO persons than among MHNW individuals. The elevated levels of the nontraditional risk factors and VAI scores in MHO persons could contribute to the increased cardiovascular disease risk observed in long-term studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. COMPARISON OF MANUAL AND SEMIAUTOMATED FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF MACULAR ATROPHY IN STARGARDT DISEASE PHENOTYPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehlewein, Laura; Hariri, Amir H; Ho, Alexander; Dustin, Laurie; Wolfson, Yulia; Strauss, Rupert W; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Sadda, SriniVas R

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate manual and semiautomated grading techniques for assessing decreased fundus autofluorescence (DAF) in patients with Stargardt disease phenotype. Certified reading center graders performed manual and semiautomated (region finder-based) grading of confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images for 41 eyes of 22 patients. Lesion types were defined based on the black level and sharpness of the border: definite decreased autofluorescence (DDAF), well, and poorly demarcated questionably decreased autofluorescence (WDQDAF, PDQDAF). Agreement in grading between the two methods and inter- and intra-grader agreement was assessed by kappa coefficients (κ) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). The mean ± standard deviation (SD) area was 3.07 ± 3.02 mm for DDAF (n = 31), 1.53 ± 1.52 mm for WDQDAF (n = 9), and 6.94 ± 10.06 mm for PDQDAF (n = 17). The mean ± SD absolute difference in area between manual and semiautomated grading was 0.26 ± 0.28 mm for DDAF, 0.20 ± 0.26 mm for WDQDAF, and 4.05 ± 8.32 mm for PDQDAF. The ICC (95% confidence interval) for method comparison was 0.992 (0.984-0.996) for DDAF, 0.976 (0.922-0.993) for WDQDAF, and 0.648 (0.306-0.842) for PDQDAF. Inter- and intra-grader agreement in manual and semiautomated quantitative grading was better for DDAF (0.981-0.996) and WDQDAF (0.995-0.999) than for PDQDAF (0.715-0.993). Manual and semiautomated grading methods showed similar levels of reproducibility for assessing areas of decreased autofluorescence in patients with Stargardt disease phenotype. Excellent agreement and reproducibility were observed for well demarcated lesions.

  16. Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging: Preliminary evaluation of phenotyping potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Lindsay; Kirby, Miranda; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Wheatley, Andrew; McCormack, David G.; Parraga, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and objectives: Emphysema and small airway obstruction are the pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this pilot study in a small group of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients was to quantify hyperpolarized helium-3 ( 3 He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functional and structural measurements and to explore the potential role for 3 He MRI in detecting the lung structural and functional COPD phenotypes. Materials and methods: We evaluated 20 ex-smokers with stage I (n = 1), stage II (n = 9) and stage III COPD (n = 10). All subjects underwent same-day plethysmography, spirometry, 1 H MRI and hyperpolarized 3 He MRI at 3.0 T. 3 He ventilation defect percent (VDP) was generated from 3 He static ventilation images and 1 H thoracic images and the 3 He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was derived from diffusion-weighted MRI. Results: Based on the relative contribution of normalized ADC and VDP, there was evidence of a predominant 3 He MRI measurement in seven patients (n = 3 mainly ventilation defects or VDP dominant (VD), n = 4 mainly increased ADC or ADC dominant (AD)). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significantly lower ADC for subjects with predominantly elevated VDP (p = 0.02 compared to subjects with predominantly elevated ADC; p = 0.008 compared to mixed group) and significantly decreased VDP for subjects with predominantly elevated ADC (p = 0.003, compared to mixed group). Conclusion: In this small pilot study, a preliminary analysis shows the potential for 3 He MRI to categorize or phenotype COPD ex-smokers, providing good evidence of feasibility for larger prospective studies.

  17. 'Impulsive compulsivity' in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a phenotypic marker of patients with poor clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Himani; Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Miguel, Euripedes C; Ferrão, Ygor A; Torres, Albina R; Shavitt, Roseli G; Ferreira-Garcia, Rafael; do Rosário, Maria C; Yücel, Murat

    2012-09-01

    Although traditionally obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and impulse control disorders (ICD) have represented opposing ends of a continuum, recent research has demonstrated a frequent co-occurrence of impulsive and compulsive behaviours, which may contribute to a worse clinical picture of some psychiatric disorders. We hypothesize that individuals with 'impulsive' OCD as characterized by poor insight, low resistance, and reduced control towards their compulsions will have a deteriorative course, greater severity of hoarding and/or symmetry/ordering symptoms, and comorbid ICD and/or substance use disorders (SUD). The sample consisted of 869 individuals with a minimum score of 16 on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Of these, 65 had poor insight, low resistance, and reduced control towards compulsions ('poor IRC') and 444 had preserved insight, greater resistance and better control over compulsions ('good IRC'). These two groups were compared on a number of clinical and demographic variables. Individuals with poor IRC were significantly more likely to have a deteriorative course (p disorder (p = 0.026), trichotillomania (p = 0.014) and compulsive buying (p = 0.040). Regression analysis revealed that duration of obsessions (p = 0.037) and hoarding severity (p = 0.005) were significant predictors of poor IRC. In the absence of specific measures for impulsivity in OCD, the study highlights the utility of simple measures such as insight, resistance and control over compulsions as a phenotypic marker of a subgroup of OCD with impulsive features demonstrating poor clinical outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic microheterogeneity and phenotypic variation of Helicobacter pylori arginase in clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadafora Domenico

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical isolates of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori display a high level of genetic macro- and microheterogeneity, featuring a panmictic, rather than clonal structure. The ability of H. pylori to survive the stomach acid is due, in part, to the arginase-urease enzyme system. Arginase (RocF hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea, and urease hydrolyzes urea to carbon dioxide and ammonium, which can neutralize acid. Results The degree of variation in arginase was explored at the DNA sequence, enzyme activity and protein expression levels. To this end, arginase activity was measured from 73 minimally-passaged clinical isolates and six laboratory-adapted strains of H. pylori. The rocF gene from 21 of the strains was cloned into genetically stable E. coli and the enzyme activities measured. Arginase activity was found to substantially vary (>100-fold in both different H. pylori strains and in the E. coli model. Western blot analysis revealed a positive correlation between activity and amount of protein expressed in most H. pylori strains. Several H. pylori strains featured altered arginase activity upon in vitro passage. Pairwise alignments of the 21 rocF genes plus strain J99 revealed extensive microheterogeneity in the promoter region and 3' end of the rocF coding region. Amino acid S232, which was I232 in the arginase-negative clinical strain A2, was critical for arginase activity. Conclusion These studies demonstrated that H. pylori arginase exhibits extensive genotypic and phenotypic variation which may be used to understand mechanisms of microheterogeneity in H. pylori.

  19. Screening program for Waardenburg syndrome in Colombia: clinical definition and phenotypic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Marta L; Gelvez, Nancy; Rodriguez, Marcela; Florez, Silvia; Varon, Clara; Medina, David; Bernal, Jaime E

    2008-04-15

    A screening program to detect Waardenburg syndrome (WS) conducted between 2002 and 2005, among 1,763 deaf individuals throughout Columbia identified 95 affected individuals belonging to 95 families, giving a frequency of 5.38% of WS among the institutionalized deaf population. We confirmed the clinical diagnosis of WS in the 95 propositi and, through the family evaluation, we also identified 45 non-institutionalized affected relatives. Audiologic, ophthalmologic, and genetic studies were performed to confirm the diagnosis. Following the classification of the WS consortium, based on the Waardenburg Index (WI), to define the type of WS. We classified 62.1% of the propositi as WS2 and 37.9% as WS1. We present here the results of the study of clinical manifestations, analyzing the presence, severity, and symmetry of clinical findings among this affected population. Overall, among the 95 propositi, in addition to sensorineural deafness in all, the most frequent features were broad nasal root (58.9%), a first degree relative affected (37.9%), heterochromia irides (36.8%), skin hypopigmentation (31.6%), white forelock (28.0%), intense blue iris (27.4%), synophrys (12.6%), premature graying (10.5%), ptosis of the eyelids (9.5%), and hypoplasia alae nasi (1.1%). The majority of individuals had normal psychomotor development (87%), while the remaining 13% had developmental delay. Among the latter, 9.4% corresponded to WS2 and 3.6% to WS1. Our data confirm an interesting inter- and intrafamilial variability in the phenotypic manifestations as well as extremely variable expression. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Nosocomial Legionnaires’ Disease: Clinical and Radiographic Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Marrie

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1981 to 1991, 55 patients (33 males, 22 females, mean age 58.6 years with nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease were studied. The mortality rate was 64%. One-half of the patients developed nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease within three weeks of admission. A surprising clinical feature was the low rate of findings of consolidation on physical examination, despite the fact that 52% of patients had this finding on chest radiograph. More than one-half of patients had pre-existing lung disease, rendering a radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila impossible in 16% of cases despite microbiological confirmation. Nineteen per cent of patients who had blood cultures done had a pathogen other than L pneumophila isolated, suggesting dual infection in at least some of the patients. When the clinical and radiographic findings were combined it was noted that 40% of patients had one of three patterns suggestive of nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease: rapidly progressive pneumonia, lobar opacity and multiple peripheral opacities. However, in 60% of patients there were no distinctive features.

  1. A Framework to Support the Sharing and Reuse of Computable Phenotype Definitions Across Health Care Delivery and Clinical Research Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richesson, Rachel L; Smerek, Michelle M; Blake Cameron, C

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reproducibly identify clinically equivalent patient populations is critical to the vision of learning health care systems that implement and evaluate evidence-based treatments. The use of common or semantically equivalent phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases will support this aim. Currently, there is no single consolidated repository for computable phenotype definitions, making it difficult to find all definitions that already exist, and also hindering the sharing of definitions between user groups. Drawing from our experience in an academic medical center that supports a number of multisite research projects and quality improvement studies, we articulate a framework that will support the sharing of phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases, and highlight gaps and areas that need attention and collaborative solutions. An infrastructure for re-using computable phenotype definitions and sharing experience across health care delivery and clinical research applications includes: access to a collection of existing phenotype definitions, information to evaluate their appropriateness for particular applications, a knowledge base of implementation guidance, supporting tools that are user-friendly and intuitive, and a willingness to use them. We encourage prospective researchers and health administrators to re-use existing EHR-based condition definitions where appropriate and share their results with others to support a national culture of learning health care. There are a number of federally funded resources to support these activities, and research sponsors should encourage their use.

  2. C9orf72-related disorders: expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Sgobbi de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases represent a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions primarily involving dementia, motor neuron disease and movement disorders. They are mostly related to different pathophysiological processes, notably in family forms in which the clinical and genetic heterogeneity are lush. In the last decade, much knowledge has been acumulated about the genetics of neurodegenerative diseases, making it essential in cases of motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia the repeat expansions of C9orf72 gene. This review analyzes the main clinical, radiological and genetic aspects of the phenotypes related to the hexanucleotide repeat expansions (GGGGCC of C9orf72 gene. Future studies will aim to further characterize the neuropsychological, imaging and pathological aspects of the extra-motor features of motor neuron disease, and will help to provide a new classification system that is both clinically and biologically relevant.

  3. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease:A clinical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie A Chaix; Gregor Andelfinger; Paul Khairy

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease(CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient followup. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel.

  4. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  5. Integrating phenotype ontologies with PhenomeNET

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Miguel Angel; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Schofield, Paul N.; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2017-01-01

    in clinical and model organism databases presents complex problems when attempting to match classes across species and across phenotypes as diverse as behaviour and neoplasia. We have previously developed PhenomeNET, a system for disease gene prioritization

  6. Human Retrotransposon Insertion Polymorphisms Are Associated with Health and Disease via Gene Regulatory Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The human genome hosts several active families of transposable elements (TEs, including the Alu, LINE-1, and SVA retrotransposons that are mobilized via reverse transcription of RNA intermediates. We evaluated how insertion polymorphisms generated by human retrotransposon activity may be related to common health and disease phenotypes that have been previously interrogated through genome-wide association studies (GWAS. To address this question, we performed a genome-wide screen for retrotransposon polymorphism disease associations that are linked to TE induced gene regulatory changes. Our screen first identified polymorphic retrotransposon insertions found in linkage disequilibrium (LD with single nucleotide polymorphisms that were previously associated with common complex diseases by GWAS. We further narrowed this set of candidate disease associated retrotransposon polymorphisms by identifying insertions that are located within tissue-specific enhancer elements. We then performed expression quantitative trait loci analysis on the remaining set of candidates in order to identify polymorphic retrotransposon insertions that are associated with gene expression changes in B-cells of the human immune system. This progressive and stringent screen yielded a list of six retrotransposon insertions as the strongest candidates for TE polymorphisms that lead to disease via enhancer-mediated changes in gene regulation. For example, we found an SVA insertion within a cell-type specific enhancer located in the second intron of the B4GALT1 gene. B4GALT1 encodes a glycosyltransferase that functions in the glycosylation of the Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody in such a way as to convert its activity from pro- to anti-inflammatory. The disruption of the B4GALT1 enhancer by the SVA insertion is associated with down-regulation of the gene in B-cells, which would serve to keep the IgG molecule in a pro-inflammatory state. Consistent with this idea, the B4GALT1 enhancer

  7. Molecular genetics of Turner syndrome: correlation with clinical phenotype and response to growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsezou, A; Hadjiathanasiou, C; Gourgiotis, D; Galla, A; Kavazarakis, E; Pasparaki, A; Kapsetaki, M; Sismani, C; Theodoridis, C; Patsalis, P C; Moschonas, N; Kitsiou, S

    1999-12-01

    To correlate the origin of the retained X in Turner syndrome with phenotype, pre-treatment height and response to recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy, systematic clinical assessment and molecular studies were carried out in 33 Greek children with Turner syndrome and their parents including 18 children with 45,X and 15 with X-mosaicism. Microsatellite markers on X chromosomes (DXS101 and DXS337) revealed that the intact X was paternal (Xp) in 15/30 and maternal (Xm) in 15/30 children, while 3/33 families were non-informative. No significant relationship was found between parental origin of the retained X and birth weight/length/gestational age, blepharoptosis, pterygium colli, webbed neck, low hairline, abnormal ears, lymphoedema, short 4th metacarpal, shield chest, widely spaced nipples, cubitus valgus, pigmented naevi, streak gonads, and cardiovascular/renal anomalies. With regard to the children's pre-treatment height, there was a significant correlation with maternal height and target height in both Xm and Xp groups. No differences were found between Xm and Xp groups and the improvement of growth velocity (GV) during the first and second year of rhGH administration, while for both groups GV significantly improved with rhGH by the end of the first and the second year. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to correlate the parental origin of Turner syndrome with the response to rhGH therapy.

  8. Phenotypic and genotypic profile of clinical and animal multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolates from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Montes de Oca, S; Talavera-Rojas, M; Soriano-Vargas, E; Barba-León, J; Vázquez-Navarrete, J; Acosta-Dibarrat, J; Salgado-Miranda, C

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a phenotypic and genotypic profile of Salmonella enterica including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates from food-producing animals and clinical isolates, as well as their genetic relatedness in two different States of Mexico (Jalisco and State of Mexico). A total of 243 isolates were evaluated in terms of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and related genes through a disk diffusion method and PCR respectively; we found 16 MDR isolates, all of them harbouring the bla CMY gene but not qnr genes, these isolates represent less than 10% of the collection. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed a higher genotypic similitude within isolates of State of Mexico than Jalisco. A low percentage of Salmonella isolates were resistant to relevant antibiotics in human health, nevertheless, the AMR and involved genes were similar despite the different serovars and origin of the isolates. This investigation provided an insight of the current status of AMR of Salmonella isolates in two States of Mexico and pinpoint the genes involved in AMR and their epidemiological relationship, the information could help to determine an adequate therapy in human and veterinary medicine. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Lack of association of the Norrie disease gene with retinoschisis phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, B S; Hiraoka, M; Trese, M T

    2000-01-01

    It has been reported recently that mice carrying a disrupted Norrie disease gene produced alterations in the murine eye that are similar to congenital retinoschisis. Therefore, it was of interest to determine whether mutations in the Norrie disease gene can account for the disease in families with retinoschisis that do not carry mutations in the retinoschisis gene. The patient set comprised 5 cases of retinoschisis (1 familial and 4 sporadic), all unrelated to each other. Fundus examination of affected individuals showed foveal and peripheral schisis, and the visual acuity range was 20/40-20/60. Peripheral blood specimens were collected from affected and unaffected family members. DNA was extracted and amplified by polymerase chain reaction amplification of exons of the Norrie disease gene. The amplified products were sequenced by the dideoxy chain termination method. The data revealed no disease-specific sequence alterations in the Norrie disease gene. Although we cannot completely exclude the possibility of the Norrie disease gene as a candidate gene, the above results suggest that the structural and functional changes in the Norrie disease gene are not associated with clinically typical retinoschisis families that do not contain mutations in the coding regions and splice sites of the retinoschisis gene.

  10. Expression of the C- KIT Molecule in Acute Myeloid Leukemias: Implications of the Immuno phenotypes CD117 and CD15 in the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, S.

    2001-01-01

    Study of the c-kit proto-oncogene (CD117) may be of help for the identification of phenotypic profiles that are absent or present at very low frequencies on normal human blast cells and therefore might be of great value for the detection of leukemic cells displaying such immuno phenotypes in patients in complete remission. Design and methods: Ninety patients with acute myeloid leukemias, diagnosed according to FAB criteria and immunological marker studies, were studied for the dual expression on blast cells of the CD117/CD15 immuno phenotype co expression by direct immunofluorescence assay using dual staining combination flow cytometry. Results: In 69/90 acute myeloid leukemia patients analyzed (77%), blast cells expressed the CD117 antigen. Moreover, in 38 of them (42% of acute myeloid leukemia cases), leukemic blasts co expressed the CD117 and CD15 antigens. There was no significant correlation between the FAB classification and the CD117 and CD15 expression in acute myeloid leukemia cases. Conclusions: These results suggest that immunological methods for the detection of MRD based on the existence of aberrant phenotypes could be used in the majority of AML patients. This phenotype CD117/CD15, present in acute myeloid leukemia cases at a relatively high frequency (42%), represents an aberrant phenotype, because it was not detected on normal human blast cells, suggesting that the use of these combinations of monoclonal antibodies could be of help in detecting residual leukemic blasts among normal blast cells. The use of the CD117 antigen in different monoclonal antibodies combinations may be of great help for the detection of minimal residual disease in a high proportion of acute myeloid leukemia cases, especially in those patients displaying the CD117+/CD15+ immuno phenotype, because cells co expressing both antigens in normal blasts, if present, are at very low frequencies. The simultaneous assessment of two or more markers in single cells has facilitated the

  11. Comparing Clinical Profiles in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R. Farlow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Greater understanding of differences in baseline impairment and disease progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD may improve the interpretation of drug effects and the design of future studies. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of three randomized, double-blind rivastigmine databases (one in PDD, two in AD. Impairment on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog, Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL scale, 10-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-10 and the ADCS-Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC was compared [standardized difference (Cohen's d, similar if Results: Patients with AD or PDD had similar levels of impairment on the ADAS-cog and NPI-10. Scores on the ADCS-ADL scale (standardized difference = 0.47 and the ADAS-cog memory domain (total, 0.33; items, 0.10-0.58 were higher in AD; PDD patients were more impaired in the language (0.23 and praxis (0.34 domains. AD patients receiving placebo showed greater deterioration on the ADAS-cog (0.14 and improvement on the NPI-10 (0.11 compared with patients with PDD. Conclusion: Differing patterns of impairment occur in AD and PDD.

  12. Comparing clinical profiles in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlow, Martin R; Schmitt, Frederick; Aarsland, Dag; Grossberg, George T; Somogyi, Monique; Meng, Xiangyi

    2013-01-01

    Greater understanding of differences in baseline impairment and disease progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) may improve the interpretation of drug effects and the design of future studies. This was a retrospective analysis of three randomized, double-blind rivastigmine databases (one in PDD, two in AD). Impairment on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL) scale, 10-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-10) and the ADCS-Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC) was compared [standardized difference (Cohen's d), similar if <0.1]. Patients with AD or PDD had similar levels of impairment on the ADAS-cog and NPI-10. Scores on the ADCS-ADL scale (standardized difference = 0.47) and the ADAS-cog memory domain (total, 0.33; items, 0.10-0.58) were higher in AD; PDD patients were more impaired in the language (0.23) and praxis (0.34) domains. AD patients receiving placebo showed greater deterioration on the ADAS-cog (0.14) and improvement on the NPI-10 (0.11) compared with patients with PDD. Differing patterns of impairment occur in AD and PDD.

  13. Targeted Genetic Screen in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Reveals Novel Genetic Variants with Synergistic Effect on Clinical Phenotype

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    Johnathan Cooper-Knock

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is underpinned by an oligogenic rare variant architecture. Identified genetic variants of ALS include RNA-binding proteins containing prion-like domains (PrLDs. We hypothesized that screening genes encoding additional similar proteins will yield novel genetic causes of ALS. The most common genetic variant of ALS patients is a G4C2-repeat expansion within C9ORF72. We have shown that G4C2-repeat RNA sequesters RNA-binding proteins. A logical consequence of this is that loss-of-function mutations in G4C2-binding partners might contribute to ALS pathogenesis independently of and/or synergistically with C9ORF72 expansions. Targeted sequencing of genomic DNA encoding either RNA-binding proteins or known ALS genes (n = 274 genes was performed in ALS patients to identify rare deleterious genetic variants and explore genotype-phenotype relationships. Genomic DNA was extracted from 103 ALS patients including 42 familial ALS patients and 61 young-onset (average age of onset 41 years sporadic ALS patients; patients were chosen to maximize the probability of identifying genetic causes of ALS. Thirteen patients carried a G4C2-repeat expansion of C9ORF72. We identified 42 patients with rare deleterious variants; 6 patients carried more than one variant. Twelve mutations were discovered in known ALS genes which served as a validation of our strategy. Rare deleterious variants in RNA-binding proteins were significantly enriched in ALS patients compared to control frequencies (p = 5.31E-18. Nineteen patients featured at least one variant in a RNA-binding protein containing a PrLD. The number of variants per patient correlated with rate of disease progression (t-test, p = 0.033. We identified eighteen patients with a single variant in a G4C2-repeat binding protein. Patients with a G4C2-binding protein variant in combination with a C9ORF72 expansion had a significantly faster disease course (t-test, p = 0.025. Our data are

  14. [Tuberous sclerosis: clinical characteristics and their relationship to genotype/phenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, T; Garrido, C; Pina, S; Chorão, R; Carrilho, I; Figueiroa, S; Santos, M; Temudo, T

    2014-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is an inherited disorder with multisystemic involvement and a high phenotypic variability. There are two genes that cause this condition: TSC1 and TSC2. Our goal was to clinically characterize patients with TS followed up in the Pediatric Neurology Clinic of a tertiary hospital during the last 10 years, and correlate the genotype with the severity of neurological manifestations and imaging studies. Retrospective analysis of patients with TS, including review of medical records and available MRI imaging. We studied 35 cases with a median age at diagnosis of ten months. Seizures were the first manifestation in 91.4% of cases, with a predominance of epileptic spasms. Over 50% had cognitive impairment and 49% behavioral disorders. A genetic study was performed on 24 children, and TSC2 mutations identified in 58.3% of them. Of the 11 cases of refractory epilepsy, six had the TSC2 gene mutation. In the group of eight patients with moderate/severe cognitive deficits, five had TSC2 mutations. We reviewed 26 MRI scans, in which it was observed that 76.9% had diffuse involvement of cerebral lobes, which reflects a greater burden of injury. Of the patients who had an MRI scan performed and had TSC2 mutations, all had a high tuber load, and5 of them had refractory epilepsy. In our sample we observe a high percentage of mutations in the TSC2 gene. This mutation carries a worse neurological prognosis, with drug-resistant epilepsy and a more severe cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Further Delineation of the Clinical Phenotype of Cerebellar Ataxia, Mental Retardation, and Disequilibrium Syndrome Type 4

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    Saud Alsahli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, and disequilibrium syndrome (CAMRQ is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that have been grouped by shared clinical features; all of these features are transmitted via an autosomal recessive mechanism. Four variants of this syndrome have been identified so far, and each one differs in terms of both clinical and genotypical features. CAMRQ4 is a rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, ataxia or an inability to walk, dysarthria and, in some patients, quadrupedal gait. Methods: We investigated three Saudi families with CAMRQ4. Blood samples were collected from the affected patients, their parents, and healthy siblings. DNA was extracted from whole blood, and whole-exome sequencing was performed. Findings were confirmed by segregation analysis, which was performed on other family members. Results: Thus far, 17 patients have been affected by CAMRQ4. Genetic analysis of all patients, including our current patients, showed a mutation in the aminophospholipid transporter, class I, type 8A, member 2 gene ( ATP8A2 . A series of common phenotypical features have been reported in these patients, with few exceptions. Ataxia, mental retardation, and hypotonia were present in all patients, consanguinity in 90% and abnormal movements in 50%. Moreover, 40% achieved ambulation at least once in their lifetime, 40% had microcephaly, whereas 30% were mute. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain was normal in 60% of patients. Conclusions: We described the largest cohort of patients with CAMRQ4 syndrome and identified three novel mutations. CAMRQ4 syndrome should be suspected in patients presenting with ataxia, intellectual disability, hypotonia, microcephaly, choreoathetoid movements, ophthalmoplegia, and global developmental delay, even if brain MRI appears normal.

  16. Further Delineation of the Clinical Phenotype of Cerebellar Ataxia, Mental Retardation, and Disequilibrium Syndrome Type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahli, Saud; Alrifai, Muhammad Talal; Al Tala, Saeed; Mutairi, Fuad Al; Alfadhel, Majid

    2018-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, and disequilibrium syndrome (CAMRQ) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that have been grouped by shared clinical features; all of these features are transmitted via an autosomal recessive mechanism. Four variants of this syndrome have been identified so far, and each one differs in terms of both clinical and genotypical features. CAMRQ4 is a rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, ataxia or an inability to walk, dysarthria and, in some patients, quadrupedal gait. We investigated three Saudi families with CAMRQ4. Blood samples were collected from the affected patients, their parents, and healthy siblings. DNA was extracted from whole blood, and whole-exome sequencing was performed. Findings were confirmed by segregation analysis, which was performed on other family members. Thus far, 17 patients have been affected by CAMRQ4. Genetic analysis of all patients, including our current patients, showed a mutation in the aminophospholipid transporter, class I, type 8A, member 2 gene ( ATP8A2 ). A series of common phenotypical features have been reported in these patients, with few exceptions. Ataxia, mental retardation, and hypotonia were present in all patients, consanguinity in 90% and abnormal movements in 50%. Moreover, 40% achieved ambulation at least once in their lifetime, 40% had microcephaly, whereas 30% were mute. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was normal in 60% of patients. We described the largest cohort of patients with CAMRQ4 syndrome and identified three novel mutations. CAMRQ4 syndrome should be suspected in patients presenting with ataxia, intellectual disability, hypotonia, microcephaly, choreoathetoid movements, ophthalmoplegia, and global developmental delay, even if brain MRI appears normal.

  17. Novel Conserved Genotypes Correspond to Antibiotic Resistance Phenotypes of E. coli Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Michelle C; Evangelista, Michael A; Bodine, Truston J; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R; Barth, Patrick; Shah, Minita J; Bormann Chung, Christina A; Stanley, Sarah; McLaughlin, Stephen F; Lee, Clarence C; Sheth, Vrunda; Doan, Quynh; Hamill, Richard J; Steffen, David; Becnel, Lauren B; Sucgang, Richard; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Current efforts to understand antibiotic resistance on the whole genome scale tend to focus on known genes even as high throughput sequencing strategies uncover novel mechanisms. To identify genomic variations associated with antibiotic resistance, we employed a modified genome-wide association study; we sequenced genomic DNA from pools of E. coli clinical isolates with similar antibiotic resistance phenotypes using SOLiD technology to uncover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) unanimously conserved in each pool. The multidrug-resistant pools were genotypically similar to SMS-3-5, a previously sequenced multidrug-resistant isolate from a polluted environment. The similarity was evenly spread across the entire genome and not limited to plasmid or pathogenicity island loci. Among the pools of clinical isolates, genomic variation was concentrated adjacent to previously reported inversion and duplication differences between the SMS-3-5 isolate and the drug-susceptible laboratory strain, DH10B. SNPs that result in non-synonymous changes in gyrA (encoding the well-known S83L allele associated with fluoroquinolone resistance), mutM, ligB, and recG were unanimously conserved in every fluoroquinolone-resistant pool. Alleles of the latter three genes are tightly linked among most sequenced E. coli genomes, and had not been implicated in antibiotic resistance previously. The changes in these genes map to amino acid positions in alpha helices that are involved in DNA binding. Plasmid-encoded complementation of null strains with either allelic variant of mutM or ligB resulted in variable responses to ultraviolet light or hydrogen peroxide treatment as markers of induced DNA damage, indicating their importance in DNA metabolism and revealing a potential mechanism for fluoroquinolone resistance. Our approach uncovered evidence that additional DNA binding enzymes may contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance and further implicate environmental bacteria as a reservoir for

  18. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Philip W. Brownjohn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation. : In this article, Livesey and colleagues perform a phenotypic drug screen in a human stem cell model of Alzheimer's disease. The anthelminthic avermectins are identified as a family of compounds that increase the production of short Aβ peptides over longer more toxic Aβ forms. The effect is analogous to existing γ-secretase modulators, but is independent of the core γ-secretase complex. Keywords: neural stem cells, Alzheimer's disease, phenotypic screening, iPSCs, human neurons, dementia, Down syndrome, amyloid beta, ivermectin, selamectin

  19. MAX to MYCN intracellular ratio drives the aggressive phenotype and clinical outcome of high risk neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Francesca; Ciaccio, Roberto; Monticelli, Sara; Pigini, Paolo; di Giacomo, Simone; Purgato, Stefania; Erriquez, Daniela; Bernardoni, Roberto; Norris, Murray; Haber, Michelle; Milazzo, Giorgio; Perini, Giovanni

    2018-03-01

    Childhood neuroblastoma, a disease of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common solid tumour of infancy, remarkably refractory to therapeutic treatments. One of the most powerful independent prognostic indicators for this disease is the amplification of the MYCN oncogene, which occurs at high levels in approximately 25% of neuroblastomas. Interestingly, amplification and not just expression of MYCN has a strong prognostic value, although this fact appears quite surprising as MYCN is a transcription factor that requires dimerising with its partner MAX, to exert its function. This observation greatly suggests that the role of MYCN in neuroblastoma should be examined in the context of MAX expression. In this report, we show that, in contrast to what is found in normal cells, MAX expression is significantly different among primary NBs, and that its level appears to correlate with the clinical outcome of the disease. Importantly, controlled modulation of MAX expression in neuroblastoma cells with different extents of MYCN amplification, demonstrates that MAX can instruct gene transcription programs that either reinforce or weaken the oncogenic process enacted by MYCN. In general, our work illustrates that it is the MAX to MYCN ratio that can account for tumour progression and clinical outcome in neuroblastoma and proposes that such a ratio should be considered as an important criterion to the design and development of anti-MYCN therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical neurorestorative progress in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lin Chen,1,2 Hongyun Huang,3–5 Wei-Ming Duan,6 Gengsheng Mao3 1Department of Neurosurgery, Yuquan Hospital, Tsinghua University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Center, Tsinghua University, 3Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, 4Center of Cell Research, Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 5Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 6Department of Anatomy, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD is one of the common neurodegenerative diseases. Besides the symptomatic therapies, the increasing numbers of neurorestorative therapies have shown the potential therapeutic value of reversing the neurodegenerative process and improving the patient's quality of life. Currrently available novel clinical neurorestorative strategies include pharmacological managements (glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, selegiline, recombinant human erythropoietin, neuromodulation intervention (deep brain stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, tissue and cell transplantation (fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue, sympathetic neurons, carotid body cells, bone marrow stromal cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, gene therapy, and neurorehabilitative therapy. Herein, we briefly review the progress in this field and describe the neurorestorative mechanisms of the above-mentioned therapies for PD. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, clinical study, neurorestorative treatment, cell transplantation, neuromodulation

  1. A case of variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C accompanying savant syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Mio; Jingami, Naoto; Uemura, Kengo; Nakasone, Naoe; Kinoshita, Hisanori; Yamakado, Hodaka; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-06-22

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, frequent sudden loss of muscle tonus and ataxia for several years. He had a history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. He was given a diagnosis of autism in his childhood, followed by a diagnosis of schizophrenia in his teenage. He also developed a savant skill of calendar calculating. (123)I-IMP-SPECT showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the left frontotemporal lobe as often seen in savant syndrome. Although genetic analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 revealed no pathogenic mutation, filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts from his biopsied skin revealed a certain amount of intracellular cholesterol storage pattern, indicating a variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The diagnosis of adulthood onset NPC is difficult and challenging, especially for neurologists, because the symptoms and signs are not as clear as those in the classical childhood onset NPC and this subtype is not yet widely known. However, the diagnosis can be made by a combination of filipin staining of fibroblast and/or gene analysis. As a disease-specific therapy for NPC has been approved in Japan, the diagnosis of NPC is of significance.

  2. Suppression of Alzheimer's disease-related phenotypes by geranylgeranylacetone in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Hoshino

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Aβ is generated by the secretase-mediated proteolysis of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, and cleared by enzyme-mediated degradation and phagocytosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 stimulates this phagocytosis. We recently reported that the APP23 mouse model for AD showed fewer AD-related phenotypes when these animals were crossed with transgenic mice expressing heat shock protein (HSP 70. We here examined the effect of geranylgeranylacetone, an inducer of HSP70 expression, on the AD-related phenotypes. Repeated oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone to APP23 mice for 9 months not only improved cognitive function but also decreased levels of Aβ, Aβ plaque deposition and synaptic loss. The treatment also up-regulated the expression of an Aβ-degrading enzyme and TGF-β1 but did not affect the maturation of APP and secretase activities. These outcomes were similar to those observed in APP23 mice genetically modified to overexpress HSP70. Although the repeated oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone did not increase the level of HSP70 in the brain, a single oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone significantly increased the level of HSP70 when Aβ was concomitantly injected directly into the hippocampus. Since geranylgeranylacetone has already been approved for use as an anti-ulcer drug and its safety in humans has been confirmed, we propose that this drug be considered as a candidate drug for the prevention of AD.

  3. Clinical phenotypes and the biological parameters of Congolese patients suffering from sickle cell anemia: A first report from Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikobi, Tite M; Lukusa Tshilobo, Prosper; Aloni, Michel N; Akilimali, Pierre Z; Mvumbi-Lelo, Georges; Mbuyi-Muamba, Jean Marie

    2017-11-01

    The influence of phenotype on the clinical course and laboratory features of sickle cell anemia (SCA) is rarely described in sub-Saharan Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Kinshasa. A clinical phenotype score was built up. The following definitions were applied: asymptomatic clinical phenotype (ACP; score≤5), moderate clinical phenotype (MCP; score between 6 and 15), and severe clinical phenotype (SCP; score≥16). ANOVA test were used to compare differences among categorical variables. We have studied 140 patients. The mean body mass index (BMI) value of three groups was lower (Sickle cell patients with ACP have a high mean steady-state hemoglobin concentration compared to those with MCP and SCP (Psickle cell anemia clinical and biological variability in our midst. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A novel frameshift GRN mutation results in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with a distinct clinical phenotype in two siblings: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Takashi; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Miura, Takeshi; Mezaki, Naomi; Kasuga, Kensaku; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-09-15

    Progranulin gene (GRN) mutations are major causes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. To date, 68 pathogenic GRN mutations have been identified. However, very few of these mutations have been reported in Asians. Moreover, some GRN mutations manifest with familial phenotypic heterogeneity. Here, we present a novel GRN mutation resulting in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with a distinct clinical phenotype, and we review reports of GRN mutations associated with familial phenotypic heterogeneity. We describe the case of a 74-year-old woman with left frontotemporal lobe atrophy who presented with progressive anarthria and non-fluent aphasia. Her brother had been diagnosed with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) with right-hand limb-kinetic apraxia, aphasia, and a similar pattern of brain atrophy. Laboratory blood examinations did not reveal abnormalities that could have caused cognitive dysfunction. In the cerebrospinal fluid, cell counts and protein concentrations were within normal ranges, and concentrations of tau protein and phosphorylated tau protein were also normal. Since similar familial cases due to mutation of GRN and microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) were reported, we performed genetic analysis. No pathological mutations of MAPT were identified, but we identified a novel GRN frameshift mutation (c.1118_1119delCCinsG: p.Pro373ArgX37) that resulted in progranulin haploinsufficiency. This is the first report of a GRN mutation associated with familial phenotypic heterogeneity in Japan. Literature review of GRN mutations associated with familial phenotypic heterogeneity revealed no tendency of mutation sites. The role of progranulin has been reported in this and other neurodegenerative diseases, and the analysis of GRN mutations may lead to the discovery of a new therapeutic target.

  5. A novel seven-octapeptide repeat insertion in the prion protein gene (PRNP) in a Dutch pedigree with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease phenotype: comparison with similar cases from the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Casper; Voet, Willem; Head, Mark W.; Parchi, Piero; Yull, Helen; Verrips, Aad; Wesseling, Pieter; Meulstee, Jan; Baas, Frank; van Gool, Willem A.; Ironside, James W.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Human prion diseases can be sporadic, inherited or acquired by infection and show considerable phenotypic heterogeneity. We describe the clinical, histopathological and pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) characteristics of a Dutch family with a novel 7-octapeptide repeat insertion (7-OPRI) in

  6. Clinical epidemiology and disease burden of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumpail, Brandon J; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Yoo, Eric R; Cholankeril, George; Kim, Donghee; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as the presence of hepatic fat accumulation after the exclusion of other causes of hepatic steatosis, including other causes of liver disease, excessive alcohol consumption, and other conditions that may lead to hepatic steatosis. NAFLD encompasses a broad clinical spectrum ranging from nonalcoholic fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis, and finally hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the world and NASH may soon become the most common indication for liver transplantation. Ongoing persistence of obesity with increasing rate of diabetes will increase the prevalence of NAFLD, and as this population ages, many will develop cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. There has been a general increase in the prevalence of NAFLD, with Asia leading the rise, yet the United States is following closely behind with a rising prevalence from 15% in 2005 to 25% within 5 years. NAFLD is commonly associated with metabolic comorbidities, including obesity, type II diabetes, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of NAFLD is constantly evolving. Based on NAFLD subtypes, it has the potential to progress into advanced fibrosis, end-stage liver disease and HCC. The increasing prevalence of NAFLD with advanced fibrosis, is concerning because patients appear to experience higher liver-related and non-liver-related mortality than the general population. The increased morbidity and mortality, healthcare costs and declining health related quality of life associated with NAFLD makes it a formidable disease, and one that requires more in-depth analysis. PMID:29307986

  7. Clinical manifestations and management of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare multi-systemic metabolic disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages with damage to haematological, visceral and bone systems. Anaemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities (osteopenia, lytic lesions, pathological fractures, chronic bone pain, bone crisis, bone infarcts, osteonecrosis and skeletal deformities) are typical manifestations of the most prevalent form of the disease, the so-called non-neuronopathic type 1. However, severity and coexistence of different symptoms are highly variable. The determination of deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes or fibroblasts by enzymatic assay is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Gaucher disease. Comprehensive and reproducible evaluation and monitoring of all clinically relevant aspects are fundamental for the effective management of Gaucher disease patients. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucocerebroside storage burden and diminishing the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation. Tailored treatment plan for each patient should be directed to symptom relief, general improvement of quality of life, and prevention of irreversible damage.

  8. Identifying novel phenotypes of acute heart failure using cluster analysis of clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Yu; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Latif, A H M Mahbub; Urayama, Kevin Y; Aoki, Jiro; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Taishi; Sato, Yu; Tanaka, Tetsu; Koseki, Keita; Komiyama, Kota; Nakajima, Hiroyoshi; Hara, Kazuhiro; Tanabe, Kengo

    2018-07-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a heterogeneous disease caused by various cardiovascular (CV) pathophysiology and multiple non-CV comorbidities. We aimed to identify clinically important subgroups to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of AHF and inform clinical decision-making. We evaluated detailed clinical data of 345 consecutive AHF patients using non-hierarchical cluster analysis of 77 variables, including age, sex, HF etiology, comorbidities, physical findings, laboratory data, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and treatment during hospitalization. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to estimate the association between the clusters and clinical outcomes. Three clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (n=108) represented "vascular failure". This cluster had the highest average systolic blood pressure at admission and lung congestion with type 2 respiratory failure. Cluster 2 (n=89) represented "cardiac and renal failure". They had the lowest ejection fraction (EF) and worst renal function. Cluster 3 (n=148) comprised mostly older patients and had the highest prevalence of atrial fibrillation and preserved EF. Death or HF hospitalization within 12-month occurred in 23% of Cluster 1, 36% of Cluster 2 and 36% of Cluster 3 (p=0.034). Compared with Cluster 1, risk of death or HF hospitalization was 1.74 (95% CI, 1.03-2.95, p=0.037) for Cluster 2 and 1.82 (95% CI, 1.13-2.93, p=0.014) for Cluster 3. Cluster analysis may be effective in producing clinically relevant categories of AHF, and may suggest underlying pathophysiology and potential utility in predicting clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical disease registries in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Reza; Hussain, Hussain; Brisk, Robert; Boardman, Leanne; Weston, Clive

    2014-06-26

    Disease registries, containing systematic records of cases, have for nearly 100 years been valuable in exploring and understanding various aspects of cardiology. This is particularly true for myocardial infarction, where such registries have provided both epidemiological and clinical information that was not readily available from randomised controlled trials in highly-selected populations. Registries, whether mandated or voluntary, prospective or retrospective in their analysis, have at their core a common study population and common data definitions. In this review we highlight how registries have diversified to offer information on epidemiology, risk modelling, quality assurance/improvement and original research-through data mining, transnational comparisons and the facilitation of enrolment in, and follow-up during registry-based randomised clinical trials.

  10. Dosha phenotype specific Ayurveda intervention ameliorates asthma symptoms through cytokine modulations: Results of whole system clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kalpana S; Nesari, Tanuja M; Dedge, Amrish P; Dhumal, Vikram R; Shengule, Sushant A; Gadgil, Maithili S; Salvi, Sundeep; Valiathan, Marthanda Varma Sankaran

    2017-02-02

    Over the past few decades, there have been significant scientific advances leading to improved understanding of asthma as a disease and treatment providing immediate relief. However, prevention of recurrent attacks, exacerbations and disease cure remains a challenge. Ayurveda refers to bronchial asthma as Tamaka Swasa and it is well explained in Charaka Samhita. Management of asthma in Ayurveda includes removal of vitiated Kapha through Shodhana, Shamana procedures, herbal and herbomineral formulations in addition to advising a healthy lifestyle and diet. Several clinical trials on Ayurvedic formulations for treatment of asthma are reported, however, whole system management of asthma has rarely been studied in the manner in which it is actually being practiced. Ayurveda therapeutics provides Dosha specific approaches, which needs biological investigation. The objective of our study was to investigate lung functions and cytokine changes in Asthmatic individuals in response to Ayurvedic intervention. The study design was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of Tilak Ayurveda Mahavidyalaya (TAMV) & Sheth Tarachand Ramnath Charitable Ayurveda Hospital and followed guidelines of the Declaration of Helsinki and Tokyo for humans. It was conducted as a whole system individualized pragmatic clinical trial and written consent of patients was collected before enrollment. One hundred and fifteen patients with mild-to-moderate asthma were divided into 2 sub-groups depending on their disease subsets and administered phenotype specific ayurvedic interventions. Seventy six asthma patients completed the treatment. Serum IgE levels, blood eosinophil counts, spirometry and blood cytokine levels were measured before the start of treatment and six months at the end of treatment. Age and sex matched healthy participants (n=69) were recruited in the study for comparison of cytokines levels. Significant improvements in FEV1(% predicted) (p<0.0001) and FVC (% predicted) (p=0

  11. Phenotypic Variation Is Almost Entirely Independent of the Host-Pathogen Relationship in Clinical Isolates of S. aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian D Land

    Full Text Available A key feature of Staphylococcus aureus biology is its ability to switch from an apparently benign colonizer of ~30% of the population to a cutaneous pathogen, to a deadly invasive pathogen. Little is known about the mechanisms driving this transition or the propensity of different S. aureus strains to engender different types of host-pathogen interactions. At the same time, significant weight has been given to the role of specific in vitro phenotypes in S. aureus virulence. Biofilm formation, hemolysis and pigment formation have all been associated with virulence in mice.To determine if there is a correlation between in vitro phenotype and the three types of host-pathogen relationships commonly exhibited by S. aureus in the context of its natural human host, we assayed 300 clinical isolates for phenotypes implicated in virulence including hemolysis, sensitivity to autolysis, and biofilm formation. For comparative purposes, we also assayed phenotype in 9 domesticated S. aureus strains routinely used for analysis of virulence determinants in laboratory settings.Strikingly, the clinical strains exhibited significant phenotypic uniformity in each of the assays evaluated in this study. One exception was a small, but significant, correlation between an increased propensity for biofilm formation and isolation from skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs. In contrast, we observed a high degree of phenotypic variation between common laboratory strains that exhibit virulence in mouse models. These data suggest the existence of significant evolutionary pressure on the S. aureus genome and highlight a role for host factors as a strong determinant of the host-pathogen relationship. In addition, the high degree of variation between laboratory strains emphasizes the need for caution when applying data obtained in one lab strain to the analysis of another.

  12. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Molecular and phenotypic analysis of a family with autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy and Stargardt disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijzer, Suzanne; Born, L.I. van den; Zonneveld, M.N.; Lopez, I.; Ayyagari, R.; Teye-Botchway, L.; Mota-Vieira, L.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the causative gene mutations in three siblings with severe progressive autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (arCRD) and their fifth paternal cousin with Stargardt disease (STGD1) and to specify the phenotypes. METHODS: We evaluated eight sibs of one family, three family

  14. Phenotype and natural history of elderly onset inflammatory bowel disease: a multicentre, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañosa, M; Calafat, M; de Francisco, R; García, C; Casanova, M J; Huelín, P; Calvo, M; Tosca, J; Fernández-Salazar, L; Arajol, C; Zabana, Y; Bastida, G; Hinojosa, J; Márquez, L; Barreiro-de-Acosta, M; Calvet, X; Monfort, D; Gómez-Garcia, M R; Rodríguez, E; Huguet, J M; Rojas-Feria, M; Hervias, D; Atienza, R; Busquets, D; Zapata, E; Dueñas, C; Charro, M; Martínez-Cerezo, F J; Plaza, R; Vázquez, J M; Gisbert, J P; Cañete, F; Cabré, E; Domènech, E

    2018-03-01

    Onset during old age has been reported in upto 10% of total cases of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To evaluate phenotypic characteristics and the use of therapeutic resources in patients with elderly onset IBD. Case-control study including all those patients diagnosed with IBD over the age of 60 years since 2000 who were followed-up for >12 months, identified from the IBD databases. Elderly onset cases were compared with IBD patients aged 18 to 40 years at diagnosis, matched by year of diagnosis, gender and type of IBD (adult-onset). One thousand three hundred and seventy-four elderly onset and 1374 adult-onset cases were included (62% ulcerative colitis (UC), 38% Crohn's disease (CD)). Among UC patients, elderly onset cases had a lower proportion of extensive disease (33% vs 39%; P < 0.0001). In CD, elderly onset cases showed an increased rate of stenosing pattern (24% vs 13%; P < 0.0001) and exclusive colonic location (28% vs 16%; P < 0.0001), whereas penetrating pattern (12% vs 19%; P < 0.0001) was significantly less frequent. Regarding the use of therapeutic resources, there was a significantly lower use of corticosteroids (P < 0.0001), immunosuppressants (P < 0.0001) and anti-TNFs agents (P < 0.0001) in elderly onset cases. Regarding surgery, we found a significantly higher surgery rate among elderly onset UC cases (8.3% vs 5.1%; P < 0.009). Finally, elderly onset cases were characterised by a higher rate of hospitalisations (66% vs 49%; P < 0.0001) and neoplasms (14% vs 0.5%; P < 0.0001). Elderly onset IBD shows specific characteristics and they are managed differently, with a lower use of immunosuppressants and a higher rate of surgery in UC. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. AB073. Classic infantile-onset Pompe disease: phenotypes and outcomes of 5 Vietnamese patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc; Do, Mai Thi Thanh; Can, Ngoc Thi Bich; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Vu, Dung Chi

    2017-01-01

    Background Pompe disease (PD) or glycogen storage disease type II is a lysosomal storage disorder, caused by mutations of GAA gene which results in deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme that involves in metabolism of glycogen in the lysosomes. Its incidence is 1/14,000–1/100,000. PD is divided into three types: classic infantile onset, non-classic infantile onset, and late onset. Early enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) before developing respiratory distress may lead to good outcome. Since 2013, we have identified 16 cases with classic infantile-onset and 5 cases were treated with ERT. Herein, we describe phenotypes and outcomes of five infantile-onset PD patients who received ERT. Methods GAA enzyme assay was done at National Taiwan University Hospital. Results Ages of diagnosis were 12, 38 and 70 days, 5 and 9 months of age. Clinical presentations included macroglossia (5/5), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (5/5), failure to thrive (5/5), facial weakness and hypotonia (3 patients diagnosed after 70 days of age), respiratory failure (1 patient diagnosed at 9 months of age). All patients had mildly elevated plasma CK (270–380 UI/L) and transaminase (60–260 UI/l). Ages at starting ERT were 28 and 58 days, 3, 6 and 10 months. The time intervals from diagnosis to starting ERT were between 14 days and 1 month. The durations of ERT were 4–22 months. The outcomes were good. All patients had improvement of cardiac functions shown on echocardiography, respiratory status, and motor development. The patient who first received ERT at 10 months of age was reportedly dead at home due to food obstruction at 18 months of age. Current ages of the survivors were 5–24 months. Conclusions Patients with classic infantile-onset PD will have good outcomes if ERT is started early. Newborn screening for this disease is necessary to yield an early diagnosis.

  16. The connective tissue phenotype of glaucomatous cupping in the monkey eye - Clinical and research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Reynaud, Juan; Lockwood, Howard; Williams, Galen; Hardin, Christy; Reyes, Luke; Stowell, Cheri; Gardiner, Stuart K; Burgoyne, Claude F

    2017-07-01

    In a series of previous publications we have proposed a framework for conceptualizing the optic nerve head (ONH) as a biomechanical structure. That framework proposes important roles for intraocular pressure (IOP), IOP-related stress and strain, cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFp), systemic and ocular determinants of blood flow, inflammation, auto-immunity, genetics, and other non-IOP related risk factors in the physiology of ONH aging and the pathophysiology of glaucomatous damage to the ONH. The present report summarizes 20 years of technique development and study results pertinent to the characterization of ONH connective tissue deformation and remodeling in the unilateral monkey experimental glaucoma (EG) model. In it we propose that the defining pathophysiology of a glaucomatous optic neuropathy involves deformation, remodeling, and mechanical failure of the ONH connective tissues. We view this as an active process, driven by astrocyte, microglial, fibroblast and oligodendrocyte mechanobiology. These cells, and the connective tissue phenomena they propagate, have primary and secondary effects on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon, laminar beam and retrolaminar capillary homeostasis that may initially be "protective" but eventually lead to RGC axonal injury, repair and/or cell death. The primary goal of this report is to summarize our 3D histomorphometric and optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based evidence for the early onset and progression of ONH connective tissue deformation and remodeling in monkey EG. A second goal is to explain the importance of including ONH connective tissue processes in characterizing the phenotype of a glaucomatous optic neuropathy in all species. A third goal is to summarize our current efforts to move from ONH morphology to the cell biology of connective tissue remodeling and axonal insult early in the disease. A final goal is to facilitate the translation of our findings and ideas into neuroprotective interventions that target

  17. Cognition and gait show a selective pattern of association dominated by phenotype in incident Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eLord

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Reports outlining the association between gait and cognition in Parkinson’s disease (PD are limited because of methodological issues and a bias towards studying advanced disease. This study examines the association between gait and cognition in 121 early PD who were characterized according to motor phenotype, and 184 healthy older adults. Quantitative gait was captured using a 7m GAITrite walkway whilst walking for two minutes under single task conditions and described by five domains (pace, rhythm, variability, asymmetry and postural control. Cognitive outcomes were summarized by six domains (attention, working memory, visual memory, executive function, visuospatial function and global cognition. Partial correlations and multivariate linear regression were used to determine independent associations for all participants and for PD tremor-dominant (TD and postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD phenotypes, controlling for age, sex, and premorbid intelligence using the National Adult Reading Test (NART. Cognitive and gait outcomes were significantly worse for PD. Gait, but not cognitive outcomes, were selectively worse for the PIGD phenotype. Significant associations emerged for two gait domains for controls (pace and postural control and four gait domains for PD (pace, rhythm, variability, and postural control.The strongest correlation was for pace and attention for PD and controls. Associations were not significant for participants with the TD phenotype. In early PD the cognitive correlates of gait are predominantly with fronto-executive functions, and are determined by the PIGD PD phenotype. These associations provide a basis for understanding the complex role of cognition in Parkinsonian gait.

  18. Systemic Right Ventricle in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease: Anatomic and Phenotypic Spectrum and Current Approach to Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brida, Margarita; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2018-01-30

    The systemic right ventricle (SRV) is commonly encountered in congenital heart disease representing a distinctly different model in terms of its anatomic spectrum, adaptation, clinical phenotype, and variable, but overall guarded prognosis. The most common clinical scenarios where an SRV is encountered are complete transposition of the great arteries with previous atrial switch repair, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double inlet right ventricle mostly with previous Fontan palliation, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome palliated with the Norwood-Fontan protocol. The reasons for the guarded prognosis of the SRV in comparison with the systemic left ventricle are multifactorial, including distinct fibromuscular architecture, shape and function, coronary artery supply mismatch, intrinsic abnormalities of the tricuspid valve, intrinsic or acquired conduction abnormalities, and varied SRV adaptation to pressure or volume overload. Management of the SRV remains an ongoing challenge because SRV dysfunction has implications on short- and long-term outcomes for all patients irrespective of underlying cardiac morphology. SRV dysfunction can be subclinical, underscoring the need for tertiary follow-up and timely management of target hemodynamic lesions. Catheter interventions and surgery have an established role in selected patients. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is increasingly used, whereas pharmacological therapy is largely empirical. Mechanical assist device and heart transplantation remain options in end-stage heart failure when other management strategies have been exhausted. The present report focuses on the SRV with its pathological subtypes, pathophysiology, clinical features, current management strategies, and long-term sequelae. Although our article touches on issues applicable to neonates and children, its main focus is on adults with SRV. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Alzheimer's disease: Cerebrovascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and advanced clinical therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marlatt, M.W.; Lucassen, P.J.; Perry, G.; Smith, M.A.; Zhu, X.

    2008-01-01

    Many lines of independent research have provided convergent evidence regarding oxidative stress, cerebrovascular disease, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies spurred by these findings engage basic and clinical communities with tangible results regarding molecular targets and

  20. Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems in clinical disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, JRBJ

    1996-01-01

    Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems are important for clinical disease management. In this review the most important new systems which have reached clinical application are highlighted. Microbiologically controlled drug delivery is important for gastrointestinal diseases like ulcerative

  1. Clinical Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells: Exploring Therapeutic Impact on Human Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Eugene Phillips

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tolerogenic dendritic cell (tDC-based clinical trials for the treatment of autoimmune diseases are now a reality. Clinical trials are currently exploring the effectiveness of tDC to treat autoimmune diseases of type 1 diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis (MS, and Crohn’s disease. This review will address tDC employed in current clinical trials, focusing on cell characteristics, mechanisms of action, and clinical findings. To date, the publicly reported human trials using tDC indicate that regulatory lymphocytes (largely Foxp3+ T-regulatory cell and, in one trial, B-regulatory cells are, for the most part, increased in frequency in the circulation. Other than this observation, there are significant differences in the major phenotypes of the tDC. These differences may affect the outcome in efficacy of recently launched and impending phase II trials. Recent efforts to establish a catalog listing where tDC converge and diverge in phenotype and functional outcome are an important first step toward understanding core mechanisms of action and critical “musts” for tDC to be therapeutically successful. In our view, the most critical parameter to efficacy is in vivo stability of the tolerogenic activity over phenotype. As such, methods that generate tDC that can induce and stably maintain immune hyporesponsiveness to allo- or disease-specific autoantigens in the presence of powerful pro-inflammatory signals are those that will fare better in primary endpoints in phase II clinical trials (e.g., disease improvement, preservation of autoimmunity-targeted tissue, allograft survival. We propose that pre-treatment phenotypes of tDC in the absence of functional stability are of secondary value especially as such phenotypes can dramatically change following administration, especially under dynamic changes in the inflammatory state of the patient. Furthermore, understanding the outcomes of different methods of cell delivery and sites

  2. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome as a rare phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielewicz, Joanna; Szczepańska-Szerej, Anna; Ogórek, Magdalena; Dropko, Piotr; Wojtal, Katarzyna; Rejdak, Konrad

    2018-03-04

    We reported the case of a patient with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKs) as an early clinical manifestation of sporadic Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (sCJD). The 66-year-old female complained of dizziness and imbalance which mostly occurred while walking. A neurological examination revealed a triad of symptoms characteristic for WKs such as gaze paresis, ataxia of limbs and trunk as well as memory disturbances with confabulations. The disturbances increased during the course of the disease, which led to the death of the patient four months after the appearance of the signs. The patient was finally diagnosed with sCJD disease. The most useful ancillary examination results supporting sCJD diagnosis were brain diffusion DWI MRI (diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging) and the presence of 14-3-3 protein in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid). Since that manifestation of sCJD is very unique other causes should be taken into consideration while making a final diagnosis.

  3. Autoantibodies to N-terminally truncated GAD improve clinical phenotyping of individuals with adult-onset diabetes: Action LADA 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Peter; Hawa, Mohammed I; Krause, Stephanie; Lampasona, Vito; Jerram, Samuel T; Williams, Alistair J K; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette G; Leslie, R David

    2018-04-04

    Adult-onset type 1 diabetes, in which the 65 kDa isoform of GAD (GAD65) is a major autoantigen, has a broad clinical phenotype encompassing variable need for insulin therapy. This study aimed to evaluate whether autoantibodies against N-terminally truncated GAD65 more closely defined a type 1 diabetes phenotype associated with insulin therapy. Of 1114 participants with adult-onset diabetes from the Action LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) study with sufficient sera, we selected those designated type 1 (n = 511) or type 2 diabetes (n = 603) and retested the samples in radiobinding assays for human full-length GAD65 autoantibodies (f-GADA) and N-terminally truncated (amino acids 96-585) GAD65 autoantibodies (t-GADA). Individuals' clinical phenotypes were analysed according to antibody binding patterns. Overall, 478 individuals were f-GADA-positive, 431 were t-GADA-positive and 628 were negative in both assays. Risk of insulin treatment was augmented in t-GADA-positive individuals (OR 4.69 [95% CI 3.57, 6.17]) compared with f-GADA-positive individuals (OR 3.86 [95% CI 2.95, 5.06]), irrespective of diabetes duration. Of 55 individuals who were f-GADA-positive but t-GADA-negative, i.e. with antibody binding restricted to the N-terminus of GAD65, the phenotype was similar to type 2 diabetes with low risk of progression to insulin treatment. Compared with these individuals with N-terminal GAD65-restricted GADA, t-GADA-positive individuals were younger at diagnosis (p = 0.005), leaner (p N-terminally truncated GAD65 autoantibodies is associated with the clinical phenotype of autoimmune type 1 diabetes and predicts insulin therapy.

  4. Exploring links between genotypes, phenotypes, and clinical predictors of response to early intensive behavioural intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsamma eEapen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is amongst the most familial of psychiatric disorders. Twin and family studies have demonstrated a monozygotic concordance rate of 70–90%, dizygotic concordance of around 10% and more than a 20-fold increase in risk for first-degree relatives. Despite major advances in the genetics of autism, the relationship between different aspects of the behavioural and cognitive phenotype and their underlying genetic liability is still unclear. This is complicated by the heterogeneity of autism, which exists at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Given this heterogeneity, one method to find homogeneous entities and link these with specific genotypes would be to pursue endophenotypes. Evidence from neuroimaging, eye tracking and electrophysiology studies supports the hypothesis that, building on genetic vulnerability, ASD emerges from a developmental cascade in which a deficit in attention to social stimuli leads to impaired interactions with primary caregivers. This results in abnormal development of the neurocircuitry responsible for social cognition, which in turn adversely affects later behavioural and functional domains dependent on these early processes, such as language development. Such a model begets a heterogeneous clinical phenotype, and is also supported by studies demonstrating better clinical outcomes with earlier treatment. Treatment response following intensive early behavioural intervention in ASD is also distinctly variable; however, relatively little is known about specific elements of the clinical phenotype that may predict response to current behavioural treatments. This paper overviews the literature regarding genotypes, phenotypes and predictors of response to behavioural intervention in ASD and presents suggestions for future research to explore linkages between these that would enable better identification of, and increased treatment efficacy for, ASD.

  5. The role of tau in the pathological process and clinical expression of Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuono, Romina; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; de Silva, Rohan

    2015-01-01

    and progression of Huntington's disease, the exact molecular mechanisms driving its pathogenic cascade and clinical features, especially the dementia, are not fully understood. Recently the microtubule associated protein tau, MAPT, which is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, has been implicated......-mortem brain samples from patients with Huntington's disease (n = 16) compared to cases with a known tauopathy and healthy controls. Next, we undertook a genotype-phenotype analysis of a large cohort of patients with Huntington's disease (n = 960) with a particular focus on cognitive decline. We report...... not only on the tau pathology in the Huntington's disease brain but also the association between genetic variation in tau gene and the clinical expression and progression of the disease. We found extensive pathological inclusions containing abnormally phosphorylated tau protein that co-localized in some...

  6. Phenotype, genotype, and worldwide genetic penetrance of LRRK2-associated Parkinson's disease: a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Daniel G; Falchi, Mario; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Durr, Alexandra; Bressman, Susan; Brice, Alexis; Aasly, Jan; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Goldwurm, Stefano; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Tolosa, Eduardo; Kay, Denise M; Klein, Christine; Williams, David R; Marras, Connie; Lang, Anthony E; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Berciano, Jose; Schapira, Anthony HV; Lynch, Timothy; Bhatia, Kailash P; Gasser, Thomas; Lees, Andrew J; Wood, Nicholas W

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Mutations in LRRK2, the gene that encodes leucine-rich repeat kinase 2, are a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). The International LRRK2 Consortium was established to answer three key clinical questions: can LRRK2-associated PD be distinguished from idiopathic PD; which mutations in LRRK2 are pathogenic; and what is the age-specific cumulative risk of PD for individuals who inherit or are at risk of inheriting a deleterious mutation in LRRK2? Methods Researchers from 21 centres across the world collaborated on this study. The frequency of the common LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was estimated on the basis of data from 24 populations worldwide, and the penetrance of the mutation was defined in 1045 people with mutations in LRRK2 from 133 families. The LRRK2 phenotype was defined on the basis of 59 motor and non-motor symptoms in 356 patients with LRRK2-associated PD and compared with the symptoms of 543 patients with pathologically proven idiopathic PD. Findings Six mutations met the consortium's criteria for being proven pathogenic. The frequency of the common LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was 1% of patients with sporadic PD and 4% of patients with hereditary PD; the frequency was highest in the middle east and higher in southern Europe than in northern Europe. The risk of PD for a person who inherits the LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was 28% at age 59 years, 51% at 69 years, and 74% at 79 years. The motor symptoms (eg, disease severity, rate of progression, occurrence of falls, and dyskinesia) and non-motor symptoms (eg, cognition and olfaction) of LRRK2-associated PD were more benign than those of idiopathic PD. Interpretation Mutations in LRRK2 are a clinically relevant cause of PD that merit testing in patients with hereditary PD and in subgroups of patients with PD. However, this knowledge should be applied with caution in the diagnosis and counselling of patients. Funding UK Medical Research Council; UK Parkinson's Disease Society; UK Brain Research

  7. Identification of distinct phenotypes of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Teo, Minyuen

    2013-03-01

    A significant number of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma present as locally advanced disease. Optimal treatment remains controversial. We sought to analyze the clinical course of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (LAPC) in order to identify potential distinct clinical phenotypes.

  8. CDKD: a clinical database of kidney diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sanjay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main function of the kidneys is to remove waste products and excess water from the blood. Loss of kidney function leads to various health issues, such as anemia, high blood pressure, bone disease, disorders of cholesterol. The main objective of this database system is to store the personal and laboratory investigatory details of patients with kidney disease. The emphasis is on experimental results relevant to quantitative renal physiology, with a particular focus on data relevant for evaluation of parameters in statistical models of renal function. Description Clinical database of kidney diseases (CDKD has been developed with patient confidentiality and data security as a top priority. It can make comparative analysis of one or more parameters of patient’s record and includes the information of about whole range of data including demographics, medical history, laboratory test results, vital signs, personal statistics like age and weight. Conclusions The goal of this database is to make kidney-related physiological data easily available to the scientific community and to maintain & retain patient’s record. As a Web based application it permits physician to see, edit and annotate a patient record from anywhere and anytime while maintaining the confidentiality of the personal record. It also allows statistical analysis of all data.

  9. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Bo Wang; Xiaoqing Zhang; Xue-Jun Li

    2013-01-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease.Here,we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene,survival motor neuron (SMN),in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons.Notably,the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated.Furthermore,these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-A7 (lacking exon 7)knockdown,and were specific to spinal motor neurons.Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes,including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss.Finally,knockdown of SMNFL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors.The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine,a potent antioxidant,which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death.Thus,we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model,which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity,cell type specificity,and phenotype reversibility.Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA.

  10. Four novel connexin 32 mutations in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Phenotypic variability and central nervous system involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Georgia; Koutsis, Georgios; Raftopoulou, Maria; Floroskufi, Paraskewi; Karletidi, Karolina-Maria; Panas, Marios

    2014-06-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, the most common hereditary neuropathy, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. X-linked CMT (CMTX) is usually caused by mutations in the gap junction protein b 1 gene (GJB1) coding for connexin 32 (Cx32). The clinical manifestations of CMTX are characterized by significant variability, with some patients exhibiting central nervous system (CNS) involvement. We report four novel mutations in GJB1, c.191G>A (p.Cys64Tyr), c.508G>T (p.Val170Phe), c.778A>G (p.Lys260Glu) and c.300C>G (p.His100Gln) identified in four unrelated Greek families. These mutations were characterized by variable phenotypic expression, including a family with the Roussy-Lévy syndrome, and three of them were associated with mild clinical CNS manifestations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Genotypic and phenotypic aspects of primary immunodeficiency diseases of the lymphoid system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Noordzij

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the immunological phenotype, the mutation analysis, and the residual activity of mutated proteins in patients with PID of the lymphoid system. During this project, we have investigated possible genotype-(immuno)phenotype relationships in patients with antibody

  12. Infantile Alexander Disease: Spectrum of GFAP Mutations and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Diana; Gauthier, Fernande; Bertini, Enrico; Bugiani, Marianna; Brenner, Michael; N'guyen, Sylvie; Goizet, Cyril; Gelot, Antoinette; Surtees, Robert; Pedespan, Jean-Michel; Hernandorena, Xavier; Troncoso, Monica; Uziel, Graziela; Messing, Albee; Ponsot, Gérard; Pham-Dinh, Danielle; Dautigny, André; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2001-01-01

    Heterozygous, de novo mutations in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene have recently been reported in 12 patients affected by neuropathologically proved Alexander disease. We searched for GFAP mutations in a series of patients who had heterogeneous clinical symptoms but were candidates for Alexander disease on the basis of suggestive neuroimaging abnormalities. Missense, heterozygous, de novo GFAP mutations were found in exons 1 or 4 for 14 of the 15 patients analyzed, including patients without macrocephaly. Nine patients carried arginine mutations (four had R79H; four had R239C; and one had R239H) that have been described elsewhere, whereas the other five had one of four novel mutations, of which two affect arginine (2R88C and 1R88S) and two affect nonarginine residues (1L76F and 1N77Y). All mutations were located in the rod domain of GFAP, and there is a correlation between clinical severity and the affected amino acid. These results confirm that GFAP mutations are a reliable molecular marker for the diagnosis of infantile Alexander disease, and they also form a basis for the recommendation of GFAP analysis for prenatal diagnosis to detect potential cases of germinal mosaicism. PMID:11567214

  13. The dynamics of herpesvirus reactivations during and after severe drug eruptions: their relation to the clinical phenotype and therapeutic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, T; Kano, Y; Mizukawa, Y; Shiohara, T

    2014-06-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DIHS/DRESS) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) represent contrasting poles of severe drug eruptions, and sequential reactivations of several herpesviruses have exclusively been demonstrated in the former. No previous studies, however, were extended beyond the acute stage. We sought to investigate whether herpesvirus reactivations could also be observed in SJS/TEN and beyond the acute stage of both diseases. Patients with SJS (n = 16), SJS/TEN overlap (n = 2), TEN (n = 10), and DIHS/DRESS (n = 34) were enrolled. We performed a retrospective analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA loads sequentially determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction during a 2-year period after onset. Persistently increased EBV loads were detected in SJS during the acute stage and long after resolution, but not in others. In contrast, high HHV-6 loads were exclusively detected in DIHS/DRESS during the acute stage. The dynamics of herpesvirus reactivation varied in DIHS/DRESS according to the use of systemic corticosteroids: While EBV loads were higher in patients not receiving systemic corticosteroids, CMV and HHV-6 loads were higher in those receiving them. Distinct patterns of herpesvirus reactivation according to the pathological phenotype and to the use of systemic corticosteroids were observed during the acute stage and follow-up period, which may contribute, at least in part, to the difference in the clinical manifestations and long-term outcomes. Systemic corticosteroids during the acute stage may improve the outcomes in DIHS/DRESS. © 2014 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Motivators for Alzheimer's disease clinical trial participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Holmes, Sarah D; Jicha, Gregory A

    2018-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) research progress is impeded due to participant recruitment challenges. This study seeks to better understand, from the perspective of individuals engaged in clinical trials (CTs), research motivations. Participants, or their caregivers, from AD treatment and prevention CTs were surveyed about research motivators. The 87 respondents had a mean age of 72.2, were predominantly Caucasian, 55.2% were male, and 56.3% had cognitive impairment. An overwhelming majority rated the potential to help themselves or a loved one and the potential to help others in the future as important motivators. Relatively few respondents were motivated by free healthcare, monetary rewards, or to make others happy. Recruitment efforts should focus on the potential benefit for the individual, their loved ones, and others in the future rather than free healthcare or monetary rewards.

  15. A Rare Clinical Presentation of Darier's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferizi, Mybera; Begolli-Gerqari, Antigona; Luzar, Bostjan; Kurshumliu, Fisnik; Ferizi, Mergita

    2013-01-01

    Darier's disease, also known as keratosis follicularis or dyskeratosis follicularis, is a rare disorder of keratinization. It is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Its manifestation appears as hyperkeratotic papules, primarily affecting seborrheic areas on the head, neck, and thorax and less frequently on the oral mucosa. When oral manifestations are present, the palatal and alveolar mucosae are primarily affected. They are usually asymptomatic and are discovered in routine dental examination. Histologically, the lesions are presented as suprabasal clefts in the epithelium with acantholytic and dyskeratotic cells represented by “corps ronds and grains”. This paper reports a case of a 53-year-old woman that was admitted to our clinic with more than 10-year history of keratotic papules, presented on the hands and feet, nose, ears, genitalia, and whitish lesions on palatal mucosae. PMID:23573430

  16. The Impact of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus on the Clinical Phenotype of Antiphospholipid Antibody Positive Patients: Results from AntiPhospholipid Syndrome Alliance for Clinical Trials and InternatiOnal Networking (APS ACTION) Clinical Database and Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Ozan; Erkan, Doruk; Barbhaiya, Medha; Andrade, Danieli; Nascimento, Iana; Rosa, Renata; Banzato, Alessandra; Pengo, Vittorio; Ugarte, Amaia; Gerosa, Maria; Ji, Lanlan; Efthymiou, Maria; Branch, D Ware; de Jesus, Guilherme Raires; Tincani, Angela; Belmont, H Michael; Fortin, Paul R; Petri, Michelle; Rodriguez, Esther; Pons-Estel, Guillermo J; Knight, Jason S; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Willis, Rohan; Zuily, Stephane; Tektonidou, Maria G

    2018-04-18

    Although systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common autoimmune disease associated with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), limited data exist on the impact of SLE on the clinical phenotype of aPL-positive patients. The primary objective was to compare the clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics of aPL-positive patients with or without SLE. A secure web-based data capture system stores patient demographics, and aPL-related clinical and laboratory characteristics. Inclusion criteria include aPL positivity according to the Updated Sapporo Classification Criteria. Patients fulfilling the SLE Classification Criteria and those with no other autoimmune diseases were included in the analysis. 672 aPL-positive patients were recruited from 24 international centers; 426 were without other autoimmune diseases and 197 with SLE. The aPL with SLE group had higher rates of thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, low complements, and IgA anti-β 2 glycoprotein-I antibodies (aβ₂GPI), whereas the aPL only group had higher rates of cognitive dysfunction and IgG aβ₂GPI. The frequency of arterial and venous thromboses (including recurrent) as well as the pregnancy morbidity were similar between the groups. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors at the registry entry did not differ between the two groups, except current smoking, which was more frequent in aPL with SLE group. Although the frequencies of thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity are similar between aPL-positive patients with or without SLE, the diagnosis of SLE in persistently aPL-positive patients is associated with an increased frequency of thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, low complements, and IgA aβ₂GPI positivity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Elevated plasma glucosylsphingosine in Gaucher disease: relation to phenotype, storage cell markers, and therapeutic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Nick; van Dussen, Laura; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Overkleeft, Herman; Scheij, Saskia; Ghauharali, Karen; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Ferraz, Maria J.; Groener, Johanna E. M.; Maas, Mario; Wijburg, Frits A.; Speijer, Dave; Tylki-Szymanska, Anna; Mistry, Pramod K.; Boot, Rolf G.

    2011-01-01

    Gaucher disease, caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, leads to prominent glucosylceramide accumulation in lysosomes of tissue macrophages (Gaucher cells). Here we show glucosylsphingosine, the deacylated form of glucosylceramide, to be markedly increased in plasma of symptomatic nonneuronopathic (type 1) Gaucher patients (n = 64, median = 230.7nM, range 15.6-1035.2nM; normal (n = 28): median 1.3nM, range 0.8-2.7nM). The method developed for mass spectrometric quantification of plasma glucosylsphingosine is sensitive and robust. Plasma glucosylsphingosine levels correlate with established plasma markers of Gaucher cells, chitotriosidase (ρ = 0.66) and CCL18 (ρ = 0.40). Treatment of Gaucher disease patients by supplementing macrophages with mannose-receptor targeted recombinant glucocerebrosidase results in glucosylsphingosine reduction, similar to protein markers of Gaucher cells. Since macrophages prominently accumulate the lysoglycosphingolipid on glucocerebrosidase inactivation, Gaucher cells seem a major source of the elevated plasma glucosylsphingosine. Our findings show that plasma glucosylsphingosine can qualify as a biomarker for type 1 Gaucher disease, but that further investigations are warranted regarding its relationship with clinical manifestations of Gaucher disease. PMID:21868580

  18. Veno occlusive disease: Update on clinical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzolo, M; Germani, G; Cholongitas, E; Burra, P; Burroughs, AK

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease is a clinical syndrome characterized by hepatomegaly, ascites, weight gain and jaundice, due to sinusoidal congestion which can be caused by alkaloid ingestion, but the most frequent cause is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (STC) and is also seen after solid organ transplantation. The incidence of veno occlusive disease (VOD) after STC ranges from 0 to 70%, but is decreasing. Survival is good when VOD is a mild form, but when it is severe and associated with an increase of hepatic venous pressure gradient > 20 mmHg, and mortality is about 90%. Prevention remains the best therapeutic strategy, by using non-myeloablative conditioning regimens before STC. Prophylactic administration of ursodeoxycholic acid, being an antioxidant and antiapoptotic agent, can have some benefit in reducing overall mortality. Defibrotide, which has pro-fibrinolytic and antithrombotic properties, is the most effective therapy; decompression of the sinusoids by a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) can be tried, especially to treat VOD after liver transplantation and when multiorgan failure (MOF) is not present. Liver transplantation can be the last option, but can not be considered a standard rescue therapy, because usually the concomitant presence of multiorgan failure contraindicates this procedure. PMID:17663504

  19. [Gene mutation and clinical phenotype analysis of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Ding, W W; Han, L; Liu, X R; Xiao, Y Y; Yang, J; Mo, Y

    2017-10-02

    Objective: To analyze the gene mutations and clinical features of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Method: Determined the mutation domain in five cases diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and identified the relationship between the mutant domain and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by searching relevant articles in pubmed database. Result: Three mutant genes (PTPN11 gene in chromosome 12, RIT1 gene in chromosome 1 and RAF1 gene in chromosome 3) in five cases all had been reported to be related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The reported hypertrophic cardiomyopathy relevant genes MYPN, MYH6 and MYBP3 had also been found in case 1 and 2. Patients with same gene mutation had different clinical manifestations. Both case 4 and 5 had RAF1 mutation (c.770C>T). However, case 4 had special face, low IQ, mild pulmonary artery stenosis, and only mild ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Noonan syndrome is a genetic heterogeneity disease. Our study identified specific gene mutations that could result in Noonan syndrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through molecular biology methods. The results emphasize the importance of gene detection in the management of Noonan syndrome.

  20. Virulence phenotypes of low-passage clinical isolates of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae assessed using the chinchilla laniger model of otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg Justin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi are associated with a spectrum of respiratory mucosal infections including: acute otitis media (AOM; chronic otitis media with effusion (COME; otorrhea; locally invasive diseases such as mastoiditis; as well as a range of systemic disease states, suggesting a wide range of virulence phenotypes. Genomic studies have demonstrated that each clinical strain contains a unique genic distribution from a population-based supragenome, the distributed genome hypothesis. These diverse clinical and genotypic findings suggest that each NTHi strain possesses a unique set of virulence factors that contributes to the course of the disease. Results The local and systemic virulence patterns of ten genomically characterized low-passage clinical NTHi strains (PittAA – PittJJ obtained from children with COME or otorrhea were stratified using the chinchilla model of otitis media (OM. Each isolate was used to bilaterally inoculate six animals and thereafter clinical assessments were carried out daily for 8 days by blinded observers. There was no statistical difference in the time it took for any of the 10 NTHi strains to induce otologic (local disease with respect to any or all of the other strains, however the differences in time to maximal local disease and the severity of local disease were both significant between the strains. Parameters of systemic disease indicated that the strains were not all equivalent: time to development of the systemic disease, maximal systemic scores and mortality were all statistically different among the strains. PittGG induced 100% mortality while PittBB, PittCC, and PittEE produced no mortality. Overall Pitt GG, PittII, and Pitt FF produced the most rapid and most severe local and systemic disease. A post hoc determination of the clinical origins of the 10 NTHi strains revealed that these three strains were of otorrheic origin, whereas the other 7 were from patients

  1. Anthropometric, clinical, and metabolic comparisons of the four Rotterdam PCOS phenotypes: A prospective study of PCOS women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Kar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: 1. To study the distribution of various Rotterdam classified phenotypes of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS women, in our population. 2. To compare the four phenotypes with respect to anthropometric, clinical, and metabolic parameters. 3. To report the prevalence of insulin resistance (IR and metabolic syndrome in these women. Settings and Design: Private practice, Prospective cross-sectional comparative study. Materials and Methods: Women attending gynecology outpatient with the primary complains of irregular menses and/or infertility were evaluated. Each of them underwent detailed clinical examination, transvaginal sonography, and biochemical and hormonal assays. Four hundred and ten women with a clinical diagnosis of PCOS based on Rotterdam criteria were included in the study. The four phenotypes were 1 PCO complete, that is oligo/anovulation (O + polycystic ovaries (P + hyperandrogenism (H 2 P + O, 3 P + H, and 4 O + H. All women were also evaluated for metabolic syndrome (American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI, modified Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III 2005 guidelines and IR (homeostatic model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 18. Results: Largest group was PCOS complete (65.6% followed by P + O (22.2%; H + O (11.2%; and P + H (0.9%. Overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 35.07%. Hyperandrogenic phenotyptes; H + O (50% and P + H + O (37.04%, had significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than normoandrogenic P + O phenotype (10% (P ≤ 0.001. Body mass index (BMI ≥ 25 (P = 0.0004; odds ratio (OR = 3.07 (1.6574-5.7108, 95% CI, waist circumference (WC ≥ 80 cm (P = 0.001; OR = 3.68 (1.6807-8.0737, 95% CI and family history of diabetes (P = 0.019; OR 1.82 (1.1008-3.0194, 95% CI, were strongly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The overall prevalence of IR in PCOS women was 30.44% (HOMA-IR cutoff

  2. Anthropometric, clinical, and metabolic comparisons of the four Rotterdam PCOS phenotypes: A prospective study of PCOS women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sujata

    2013-07-01

    1. To study the distribution of various Rotterdam classified phenotypes of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) women, in our population. 2. To compare the four phenotypes with respect to anthropometric, clinical, and metabolic parameters. 3. To report the prevalence of insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome in these women. Private practice, Prospective cross-sectional comparative study. Women attending gynecology outpatient with the primary complains of irregular menses and/or infertility were evaluated. Each of them underwent detailed clinical examination, transvaginal sonography, and biochemical and hormonal assays. Four hundred and ten women with a clinical diagnosis of PCOS based on Rotterdam criteria were included in the study. The four phenotypes were 1) PCO complete, that is oligo/anovulation (O) + polycystic ovaries (P) + hyperandrogenism (H) 2) P + O, 3) P + H, and 4) O + H. All women were also evaluated for metabolic syndrome (American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI), modified Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III 2005 guidelines) and IR (homeostatic model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR)). Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18. Largest group was PCOS complete (65.6%) followed by P + O (22.2%); H + O (11.2%); and P + H (0.9%). Overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 35.07%. Hyperandrogenic phenotyptes; H + O (50%) and P + H + O (37.04%), had significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than normoandrogenic P + O phenotype (10%) (P ≤ 0.001). Body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 (P = 0.0004; odds ratio (OR) = 3.07 (1.6574-5.7108, 95% CI)), waist circumference (WC) ≥ 80 cm (P = 0.001; OR = 3.68 (1.6807-8.0737, 95% CI)) and family history of diabetes (P = 0.019; OR 1.82 (1.1008-3.0194, 95% CI)), were strongly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The overall prevalence of IR in PCOS women was 30.44% (HOMA-IR cutoff ≥ 3.8) and 34.94% (HOMA-IR cutoff ≥ 3.5). The prevalence of

  3. Obesity phenotype and coronary heart disease risk as estimated by the Framingham risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Soon; Kim, Jun-Su

    2012-03-01

    There are conflicting data as to whether general or abdominal obesity is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk. This cross-sectional study involved 4,573 subjects aged 30 to 74 yr who participated in the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2008. Obesity phenotype was classified by means of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and participants were categorized into 4 groups. Individuals' 10-yr risk of coronary heart diseases (CHD) was determined from the Framingham risk score. Subjects with obese WC had a higher proportion of high risk for CHD compared to the normal WC group, irrespective of BMI level. Relative to subjects with normal BMI/normal WC, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of normal BMI/obese WC group (OR 2.93 [1.70, 5.04] and OR 3.10 [1.49, 6.46]) for CHD risk in male were higher than obese BMI/obese WC group (OR 1.91 [1.40, 2.61] and OR 1.70 [1.16, 2.47]), whereas the adjusted ORs of obese BMI/obese WC group (OR 1.94 [1.24, 3.04] and OR 3.92 [1.75, 8.78]) were higher than the others in female. Subjects with obese BMI/normal WC were not significantly associated with 10-yr CHD risk in men (P = 0.449 and P = 0.067) and women (P = 0.702 and P = 0.658). WC is associated with increased CHD risk regardless of the level of BMI. Men with normal BMI and obese WC tend to be associated with CHD risk than those with obese BMI and obese WC.

  4. Clear correlation of genotype with disease phenotype in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Olpin, S; Poorthuis, B J

    1999-01-01

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) catalyzes the initial rate-limiting step in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation. VLCAD deficiency is clinically heterogenous, with three major phenotypes: a severe childhood form, with early onset, high mortality, and high incidence of cardiomyop......Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) catalyzes the initial rate-limiting step in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation. VLCAD deficiency is clinically heterogenous, with three major phenotypes: a severe childhood form, with early onset, high mortality, and high incidence...... of cardiomyopathy; a milder childhood form, with later onset, usually with hypoketotic hypoglycemia as the main presenting feature, low mortality, and rare cardiomyopathy; and an adult form, with isolated skeletal muscle involvement, rhabdomyolysis, and myoglobinuria, usually triggered by exercise or fasting......-phenotype relationship is in sharp contrast to what has been observed in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, in which no correlation between genotype and phenotype can be established....

  5. Carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible: a worrisome phenotype among Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Eloiza Helena; Xavier, Danilo Elias; Petrolini, Fernanda Villas-Boas; Cordeiro-Moura, Jhonatha Rodrigo; Araujo, Maria Rita Elmor de; Gales, Ana Cristina

    The mechanisms involved in the uncommon resistance phenotype, carbapenem resistance and broad-spectrum cephalosporin susceptibility, were investigated in 25 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that exhibited this phenotype, which were recovered from three different hospitals located in São Paulo, Brazil. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined by CLSI broth microdilution. β-lactamase-encoding genes were investigated by PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Carbapenem hydrolysis activity was investigated by spectrophotometer and MALDI-TOF assays. The mRNA transcription level of oprD was assessed by qRT-PCR and the outer membrane proteins profile was evaluated by SDS-PAGE. Genetic relationship among P. aeruginosa isolates was assessed by PFGE. Carbapenems hydrolysis was not detected by carbapenemase assay in the carbapenem-resistant and cephalosporin-susceptible P. aueruginosa clinical isolates. OprD decreased expression was observed in all P. aeruginosa isolates by qRT-PCR. The outer membrane protein profile by SDS-PAGE suggested a change in the expression of the 46kDa porin that could correspond to OprD porin. The isolates were clustered into 17 genotypes without predominance of a specific PFGE pattern. These results emphasize the involvement of multiple chromosomal mechanisms in carbapenem-resistance among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, alert for adaptation of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates under antimicrobial selective pressure and make aware of the emergence of an uncommon phenotype among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. SPG7 Variant Escapes Phosphorylation-Regulated Processing by AFG3L2, Elevates Mitochondrial ROS, and Is Associated with Multiple Clinical Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif A.M. Almontashiri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS affects many processes in health and disease. SPG7 assembles with AFG3L2 into the mAAA protease at the inner membrane of mitochondria, degrades damaged proteins, and regulates the synthesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. SPG7 is cleaved and activated by AFG3L2 upon assembly. A variant in SPG7 that replaces arginine 688 with glutamine (Q688 is associated with several phenotypes, including toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and (as reported here coronary artery disease. We demonstrate that SPG7 processing is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of AFG3L2. Carriers of Q688 bypass this regulation and constitutively process and activate SPG7 mAAA protease. Cells expressing Q688 produce higher ATP levels and ROS, promoting cell proliferation. Our results thus reveal an unexpected link between the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of the mitochondria mAAA protease affecting ROS production and several clinical phenotypes.

  7. The link between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes and histological subtypes of lung cancer: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Wei Wang,* Mengshuang Xie,* Shuang Dou, Liwei Cui, Chunyan Zheng, Wei Xiao Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: COPD is considered an independent risk factor for lung cancer. COPD and lung cancer are both very heterogeneous diseases, and the study herein investigates the link between COPD phenotypes and specific histological subtypes of lung cancer.Methods: This case–control study comprised 2,283 patients with newly diagnosed pathological lung cancer and 2,323 non-lung cancer controls. All participants underwent pulmonary function tests. The diagnosis of COPD was based on Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criteria. Subtypes of the two diseases were categorized according to 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung cancer and computer quantification of airway collapse on maximum expiratory flow volume. ORs were estimated using logistic regression analysis.Results: The prevalence of COPD was higher (32.8% in lung cancer patients compared to controls (16.0%. After adjustment for age, sex, body-mass index, and smoking status, the presence of COPD significantly increased the risk of lung cancer (OR 2.88, 95% CI 2.48–3.34 and all common histological subtypes (ORs 2.04–5.26. Both emphysema-predominant and non-emphysema-predominant phenotypes of COPD significantly increased the risk of lung cancer (OR 4.43, 95% CI 2.85–6.88; OR 2.82, 95% CI 2.40–3.31. Higher risk of squamous-cell carcinoma and small-cell lung cancer was observed in patients with the emphysema-predominant than the non-emphysema-predominant phenotype (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.03–2.89; OR 3.74, 95% CI 1.64–8.53. Conclusion: COPD was an independent risk factor for lung cancer and all common histological subtypes. Both emphysema-predominant and non-emphysema-predominant phenotypes of COPD significantly increased the risk of lung cancer

  8. Machine Learning Methods Improve Prognostication, Identify Clinically Distinct Phenotypes, and Detect Heterogeneity in Response to Therapy in a Large Cohort of Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tariq; Lund, Lars H; Rao, Pooja; Ghosh, Rohit; Warier, Prashant; Vaccaro, Benjamin; Dahlström, Ulf; O'Connor, Christopher M; Felker, G Michael; Desai, Nihar R

    2018-04-12

    Whereas heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome, conventional approaches to its management have treated it as a singular disease, leading to inadequate patient care and inefficient clinical trials. We hypothesized that applying advanced analytics to a large cohort of HF patients would improve prognostication of outcomes, identify distinct patient phenotypes, and detect heterogeneity in treatment response. The Swedish Heart Failure Registry is a nationwide registry collecting detailed demographic, clinical, laboratory, and medication data and linked to databases with outcome information. We applied random forest modeling to identify predictors of 1-year survival. Cluster analysis was performed and validated using serial bootstrapping. Association between clusters and survival was assessed with Cox proportional hazards modeling and interaction testing was performed to assess for heterogeneity in response to HF pharmacotherapy across propensity-matched clusters. Our study included 44 886 HF patients enrolled in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry between 2000 and 2012. Random forest modeling demonstrated excellent calibration and discrimination for survival (C-statistic=0.83) whereas left ventricular ejection fraction did not (C-statistic=0.52): there were no meaningful differences per strata of left ventricular ejection fraction (1-year survival: 80%, 81%, 83%, and 84%). Cluster analysis using the 8 highest predictive variables identified 4 clinically relevant subgroups of HF with marked differences in 1-year survival. There were significant interactions between propensity-matched clusters (across age, sex, and left ventricular ejection fraction and the following medications: diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, and nitrates, P <0.001, all). Machine learning algorithms accurately predicted outcomes in a large data set of HF patients. Cluster analysis identified 4 distinct phenotypes that differed significantly in outcomes and in

  9. recA mediated spontaneous deletions of the icaADBC operon of clinical Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates : a new mechanism of phenotypic variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuryastuti, Titik; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Kuijer, Roel; Aman, Abu T.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    Phenotypic variation of Staphylococcus epidermidis involving the slime related ica operon results in heterogeneity in surface characteristics of individual bacteria in axenic cultures. Five clinical S. epidermidis isolates demonstrated phenotypic variation, i.e. both black and red colonies on Congo

  10. Normalization of Phenotypic Data from a Clinical Data Warehouse: Case Study of Heterogeneous Blood Type Data with Surprising Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data warehouses often contain analogous data from disparate sources, resulting in heterogeneous formats and semantics. We have developed an approach that attempts to represent such phenotypic data in its most atomic form to facilitate aggregation. We illustrate this approach with human blood antigen typing (ABO-Rh) data drawn from the National Institutes of Health's Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS). In applying the method to actual patient data, we discovered a 2% incidence of changed blood types. We believe our approach can be applied to any institution's data to obtain comparable patient phenotypes. The actual discrepant blood type data will form the basis for a future study of the reasons for blood typing variation.

  11. Clinical and Cognitive Phenotype of Mild Cognitive Impairment Evolving to Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annachiara Cagnin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine which characteristics could better distinguish dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB from Alzheimer's disease (AD at the mild cognitive impairment (MCI stage, with particular emphasis on visual space and object perception abilities. Methods: Fifty-three patients with mild cognitive deficits that were eventually diagnosed with probable DLB (MCI-DLB: n = 25 and AD (MCI-AD: n = 28 at a 3-year follow-up were retrospectively studied. At the first visit, the patients underwent cognitive assessment including the Qualitative Scoring Mini Mental State Examination Pentagon Test and the Visual Object and Space Perception Battery. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS and questionnaires for cognitive fluctuations and sleep disorders were also administered. Results: The best clinical predictor of DLB was the presence of soft extrapyramidal signs (mean UPDRS score: 4.04 ± 5.9 detected in 72% of patients, followed by REM sleep behavior disorder (60% and fluctuations (60%. Wrong performances in the pentagon's number of angles were obtained in 44% of DLB and 3.7% of AD patients and correlated with speed of visual attention. Executive functions, visual attention and visuospatial abilities were worse in DLB, while verbal episodic memory impairment was greater in AD. Deficits in the visual-perceptual domain were present in both MCI-DLB and AD. Conclusions: Poor performance in the pentagon's number of angles is specific of DLB and correlates with speed of visual attention. The dorsal visual stream seems specifically more impaired in MCI-DLB with respect to the ventral visual stream, the latter being involved in both DLB and AD. These cognitive features, associated with subtle extrapyramidal signs, should alert clinicians to a diagnostic hypothesis of DLB.

  12. Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease: clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD disease is an arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP crystal deposits in articular tissues, most commonly fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. According to EULAR, four different clinical presentations can be observed: 1 asymptomatic CPPD; 2 osteoarthritis (OA with CPPD; 3 acute CPP crystal arthritis; 4 chronic CPP inflammatory crystal arthritis. Acute CPP crystal arthritis is characterized by sudden onset of pain, swelling and tenderness with overlying erythema, usually in a large joint, most often the knee, wrist, shoulder, and hip. Occasionally, ligaments, tendons, bursae, bone and the spine can be involved. CPPD of the atlanto-occipital joint (crowned dens syndrome can cause periodic acute cervico-occipital pain with fever, neck stiffness and laboratory inflammatory syndrome. Chronic inflammatory arthritis is characterized by joint swelling, morning stiffness, pain, and high ESR and CRP. The relationship between OA and CPPD is still unclear. The main problem is whether such crystals are directly involved in the pathogenesis of OA or if they are the result of joint degeneration. Diagnosis is based on evaluation of history and clinical features, conventional radiology, and synovial fluid examination. Non-polarized light microscopy should be used initially to screen for CPPD crystals based upon their characteristic morphology, and compensated polarized light microscopy, showing the crystals to be weakly positive birefringent, is recommended for definitive identification, although this last pattern only occurs in about 20% of samples. The main goals of CPPD therapy are control of the acute or chronic inflammatory reaction and prevention of further episodes.

  13. Controlling the Regional Identity of hPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Neuronal Subtype Specificity of Neurological Disease Phenotypes

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    Kent Imaizumi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The CNS contains many diverse neuronal subtypes, and most neurological diseases target specific subtypes. However, the mechanism of neuronal subtype specificity of disease phenotypes remains elusive. Although in vitro disease models employing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs have great potential to clarify the association of neuronal subtypes with disease, it is currently difficult to compare various PSC-derived subtypes. This is due to the limited number of subtypes whose induction is established, and different cultivation protocols for each subtype. Here, we report a culture system to control the regional identity of PSC-derived neurons along the anteroposterior (A-P and dorsoventral (D-V axes. This system was successfully used to obtain various neuronal subtypes based on the same protocol. Furthermore, we reproduced subtype-specific phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Alzheimer’s disease (AD by comparing the obtained subtypes. Therefore, our culture system provides new opportunities for modeling neurological diseases with PSCs.

  14. Physiological Aβ Concentrations Produce a More Biomimetic Representation of the Alzheimer's Disease Phenotype in iPSC Derived Human Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Bonnie J; Smith, Alec S T; Long, Christopher J; Martin, Candace C; Hickman, James J

    2018-05-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by slow, progressive neurodegeneration leading to severe neurological impairment, but current drug development efforts are limited by the lack of robust, human-based disease models. Amyloid-β (Aβ) is known to play an integral role in AD progression as it has been shown to interfere with neurological function. However, studies into AD pathology commonly apply Aβ to neurons for short durations at nonphysiological concentrations to induce an exaggerated dysfunctional phenotype. Such methods are unlikely to elucidate early stage disease dysfunction, when treatment is still possible, since damage to neurons by these high concentrations is extensive. In this study, we investigated chronic, pathologically relevant Aβ oligomer concentrations to induce an electrophysiological phenotype that is more representative of early AD progression compared to an acute high-dose application in human cortical neurons. The high, acute oligomer dose resulted in severe neuronal toxicity as well as upregulation of tau and phosphorylated tau. Chronic, low-dose treatment produced significant functional impairment without increased cell death or accumulation of tau protein. This in vitro phenotype more closely mirrors the status of early stage neural decline in AD pathology and could provide a valuable tool to further understanding of early stage AD pathophysiology and for screening potential therapeutic compounds.