WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical disease phenotypes

  1. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  2. Parkinsonian syndroms: Clinical phenotype, differential diagnosis and disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), other neurodegenerative diseases with parkinsonism, the so-called atypical parkinsonian syndromes, and symptomatic parkinsonian syndromes, such as Wilson's disease. IPD is the most frequent disease with parkinsonism as the main clinical feature and is responsible for approx. 80% of all parkinsonian syndromes. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes are the most important differential diagnoses of IPD. The two most frequent types are multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). For clinical diagnosis it is essential to take a careful medical history and to examine the patients physically in regular intervals. However, various clinico-pathological studies have shown that approx. 25% of patients with clinical diagnosis of IPD may have other causes of parkinsonism. Selected technical investigations, in particular functional imaging of the central dopaminergic system using PET or SPECT, may help to make clinical diagnosis more secure. This paper reviews the clinical features and diagnostic findings in diseases with parkinsonism and summarises the difficulties in establishing early and differential diagnoses. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of haptoglobin phenotypes in association with clinical features of patients suffered from preterm labor disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ali Khazaei

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth means the birth before thirty seven week of pregnancy that causes a lot of complications for the baby. Variety factors are suggested to be involved in disease. In this study, we decided to evaluate haptoglobin (Hp phenotypes association with clinical features of patients suffered from premature delivery to understand better the possible correlation of genetic and clinical features in this disease. This cross-sectional analytic descriptive study has been carried out in two groups of 120 women, 60 with preterm and 60 with term labor. Patients were selected with previously diagnosed by gynecologist with preterm birth in the labor during the study period. After performing diagnostic tests, the frequency of each haptoglobin phenotype in the two groups was analyzed using the Chi-square test (X2 test and SPSS software. The maximum serum haptoglobin phenotype frequency in patients with Hp2-2, was 43 (71.7% whereas in healthy individuals, 35 (58.3%. No, statistically significant differences between the two groups were found (p=0.310. But based on some patients clinical features such as their history of preterm delivery, previous history of recurrent abortions and history of preterm delivery in their family, significant association was found with Hp2-2 compared with healthy control (p<0.003. This study showed that Hp2-2 phenotypes levels in the case group was higher than in control but the factors influencing the presence or absence of preterm labor is clinically various.

  4. Sporadic inclusion body myositis: HLA-DRB1 allele interactions influence disease risk and clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastaglia, Frank L; Needham, Merrilee; Scott, Adrian; James, Ian; Zilko, Paul; Day, Timothy; Kiers, Lynette; Corbett, Alastair; Witt, Campbell S; Allcock, Richard; Laing, Nigel; Garlepp, Michael; Christiansen, Frank T

    2009-11-01

    Susceptibility to sIBM is strongly associated with the HLA-DRB1*03 allele and the 8.1 MHC ancestral haplotype (HLA-A1, B8, DRB1*03) but little is known about the effects of allelic interactions at the DRB1 locus or disease-modifying effects of HLA alleles. HLA-A, B and DRB1 genotyping was performed in 80 Australian sIBM cases and the frequencies of different alleles and allele combinations were compared with those in a group of 190 healthy controls. Genotype-phenotype correlations were also investigated. Amongst carriers of the HLA-DRB1*03 allele, DRB1*03/*01 heterozygotes were over-represented in the sIBM group (pHLA-DRB1*03 allele and other alleles at the DRB1 locus can influence disease susceptibility and the clinical phenotype in sIBM. PMID:19720533

  5. Clinical and genetic analysis of 29 Brazilian patients with Huntington’s disease-like phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Guilherme Riccioppo Rodrigues; Walker, Ruth H.; Benedikt Bader; Adrian Danek; Alexis Brice; Cécile Cazeneuve; Odile Russaouen; Iscia Lopes-Cendes; Wilson Marques Jr; Vitor Tumas

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by chorea, behavioral disturbances and dementia, caused by a pathological expansion of the CAG trinucleotide in the HTT gene. Several patients have been recognized with the typical HD phenotype without the expected mutation. The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of diseases such as Huntington’s disease-like 2 (HDL2), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) 1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA7, dentatorubral-pallidol...

  6. Clinical and genetic analysis of 29 Brazilian patients with Huntington's disease-like phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Riccioppo Rodrigues

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by chorea, behavioral disturbances and dementia, caused by a pathological expansion of the CAG trinucleotide in the HTT gene. Several patients have been recognized with the typical HD phenotype without the expected mutation. The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of diseases such as Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA 1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA7, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA and chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc among 29 Brazilian patients with a HD-like phenotype. In the group analyzed, we found 3 patients with HDL2 and 2 patients with ChAc. The diagnosis was not reached in 79.3% of the patients. HDL2 was the main cause of the HD-like phenotype in the group analyzed, and is attributable to the African ancestry of this population. However, the etiology of the disease remains undetermined in the majority of the HD negative patients with HD-like phenotype.

  7. Variability in clinical phenotypes of heterozygous and homozygous cases of Parkin-related Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Amanda J.; Sonja W. Scholz; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardwick, Angela; McFarland, Nikolaus R.; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Parkin mutations are a common cause of early-onset Parkinson’s disease. To study the clinical features and treatment responses of patients with homozygous or heterozygous Parkin mutations, we performed a retrospective chart review in six early-onset parkinsonism patients with pathogenic Parkin mutations. The clinical phenotypes observed in this cohort, all drawn from different families, were variable. All patients had a slowly progressive form of parkinsonism that responded well to dopaminerg...

  8. Genotype-phenotype correlations in a mountain population community with high prevalence of Wilson's disease: genetic and clinical homogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relu Cocoş

    Full Text Available Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by more than 500 mutations in ATP7B gene presenting considerably clinical manifestations heterogeneity even in patients with a particular mutation. Previous findings suggested a potential role of additional genetic modifiers and environment factors on phenotypic expression among the affected patients. We conducted clinical and genetic investigations to perform genotype-phenotype correlation in two large families living in a socio-culturally isolated community with the highest prevalence of Wilson's disease ever reported of 1 ∶ 1130. Sequencing of ATP7B gene in seven affected individuals and 43 family members identified a common compound heterozygous genotype, H1069Q/M769H-fs, in five symptomatic and two asymptomatic patients and detected the presence of two out of seven identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in all affected patients. Symptomatic patients had similar clinical phenotype and age at onset (18 ± 1 years showing dysarthria and dysphagia as common clinical features at the time of diagnosis. Moreover, all symptomatic patients presented Kayser-Fleischer rings and lack of dystonia accompanied by unfavourable clinical outcomes. Our findings add value for understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations in Wilson's disease based on a multifamily study in an isolated population with high extent of genetic and environmental homogeneity as opposed to majority of reports. We observed an equal influence of presumed other genetic modifiers and environmental factors on clinical presentation and age at onset of Wilson's disease in patients with a particular genotype. These data provide valuable inferences that could be applied for predicting clinical management in asymptomatic patients in such communities.

  9. Alzheimer disease-like clinical phenotype in a family with FTDP-17 caused by a MAPT R406W mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S.G.; Holm, I.E.; Schwartz, M.;

    2008-01-01

    We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre-symptomatic and...... hippocampi. Microscopy revealed abundant numbers of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles in all cortical areas and in some brainstem nuclei corresponding to a diagnosis of frontotemporal lobe degeneration on the basis of a MAPT mutation. The clinical and genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant inherited...

  10. Regulatory T Cells Phenotype in Different Clinical Forms of Chagas' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Renato Zuquim Antas, Paulo; Assis Silva Gomes, Juliana; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Otávio Costa Rocha, Manoel; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-01-01

    CD25High CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have been described as key players in immune regulation, preventing infection-induced immune pathology and limiting collateral tissue damage caused by vigorous anti-parasite immune response. In this review, we summarize data obtained by the investigation of Treg cells in different clinical forms of Chagas' disease. Ex vivo immunophenotyping of whole blood, as well as after stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, demonstrated that individuals in the indeterminate (IND) clinical form of the disease have a higher frequency of Treg cells, suggesting that an expansion of those cells could be beneficial, possibly by limiting strong cytotoxic activity and tissue damage. Additional analysis demonstrated an activated status of Treg cells based on low expression of CD62L and high expression of CD40L, CD69, and CD54 by cells from all chagasic patients after T. cruzi antigenic stimulation. Moreover, there was an increase in the frequency of the population of Foxp3+ CD25HighCD4+ cells that was also IL-10+ in the IND group, whereas in the cardiac (CARD) group, there was an increase in the percentage of Foxp3+ CD25High CD4+ cells that expressed CTLA-4. These data suggest that IL-10 produced by Treg cells is effective in controlling disease development in IND patients. However, in CARD patients, the same regulatory mechanism, mediated by IL-10 and CTLA-4 expression is unlikely to be sufficient to control the progression of the disease. These data suggest that Treg cells may play an important role in controlling the immune response in Chagas' disease and the balance between regulatory and effector T cells may be important for the progression and development of the disease. Additional detailed analysis of the mechanisms on how these cells are activated and exert their function will certainly give insights for the rational design of procedure to achieve the appropriate balance between protection and pathology during parasite

  11. Clinical Asthma Phenotypes and Therapeutic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Zedan, M.; Attia, G.; Zedan, M. M.; Osman, A; Abo-Elkheir, N.; Maysara, N.; Barakat, T.; Gamil, N.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that means not all asthmatics respond to the same treatment. We hypothesize an approach to characterize asthma phenotypes based on symptomatology (shortness of breath (SOB), cough, and wheezy phenotypes) in correlation with airway inflammatory biomarkers and FEV1. We aimed to detect whether those clinical phenotypes have an impact on the response to asthma medications. Two hundred three asthmatic children were allocated randomly to receive either montelukast ...

  12. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  13. Familial Parkinsonism and early onset Parkinson's disease in a Brazilian Movement Disorders clinic: Phenotypic characterization and frequency of SNCA, PRKN, PINK1 and LRRK2 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Dornas, Leonardo Oliveira; Momeni, Parastoo; Lees, Andrew; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Cardoso, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency and to perform phenotypic and genotypic characterization of familial Parkinsonism and early onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) in a Brazilian movement disorder unit. We performed a standardized clinical assessment of patients followed by sequencing of PRKN, PINK1, SNCA and LRRK2. During the period of study (January through December, 2006) we examined 575 consecutive patients of whom 226 (39.3%) met the diagnosis of Parkinsonism and idiopathic P...

  14. Variable clinical expression in patients with a germline MEN1 disease gene mutation: clues to a genotype-phenotype correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis J. Lips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is an inherited endocrine tumor syndrome, predominantly characterized by tumors of the parathyroid glands, gastroenteropancreatic tumors, pituitary adenomas, adrenal adenomas, and neuroendocrine tumors of the thymus, lungs or stomach. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is caused by germline mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 tumor suppressor gene. The initial germline mutation, loss of the wild-type allele, and modifying genetic and possibly epigenetic and environmental events eventually result in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 tumors. Our understanding of the function of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 gene product, menin, has increased significantly over the years. However, to date, no clear genotype-phenotype correlation has been established. In this review we discuss reports on exceptional clinical presentations of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, which may provide more insight into the pathogenesis of this disorder and offer clues for a possible genotype-phenotype correlation.

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes: the future of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, MeiLan K; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M; Celli, Bartolome R; Criner, Gerard; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Goldin, Jonathan G; Jones, Paul W; Macnee, William; Make, Barry J; Rabe, Klaus F; Rennard, Stephen I; Sciurba, Frank C; Silverman, Edwin K; Vestbo, Jørgen; Washko, George R; Wouters, Emiel F M; Martinez, Fernando J

    2010-01-01

    Significant heterogeneity of clinical presentation and disease progression exists within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although FEV(1) inadequately describes this heterogeneity, a clear alternative has not emerged. The goal of phenotyping is to identify patient groups with unique...... prognostic or therapeutic characteristics, but significant variation and confusion surrounds use of the term "phenotype" in COPD. Phenotype classically refers to any observable characteristic of an organism, and up until now, multiple disease characteristics have been termed COPD phenotypes. We, however......, propose the following variation on this definition: "a single or combination of disease attributes that describe differences between individuals with COPD as they relate to clinically meaningful outcomes (symptoms, exacerbations, response to therapy, rate of disease progression, or death)." This more...

  16. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FV...

  17. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Sladek, Malgorzata; Murphy, M Stephen; Escher, Johanna C; Pærregaard, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping of...... atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  18. Phenotype standardization for drug-induced kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick T; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur L; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug-induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug-induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular, and nephrolithiasis, along with the primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease, and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug-induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course, and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry, and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is the first step to recognizing drug-induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  19. Lewis phenotype, secretor status, and coeliac disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickey, W; Wylie, J D; Collins, J S; Porter, K G; Watson, R G; McLoughlin, J C

    1994-01-01

    Patients who cannot secrete ABO and Lewis blood group antigens into body fluids, an ability controlled by a single gene on chromosome 19, are known to be at increased risk of certain autoimmune diseases associated with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) markers. This study investigated the possibility of an association with coeliac disease using red cell Lewis (Le) blood group phenotype to infer secretor status. Among 73 patients with coeliac disease who had Le a or b antigen, 48% were non-secreto...

  20. Concepts of pathogenesis in psoriatic arthritis: genotype determines clinical phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-05-07

    This review focuses on the genetic features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and their relationship to phenotypic heterogeneity in the disease, and addresses three questions: what do the recent studies on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tell us about the genetic relationship between cutaneous psoriasis (PsO) and PsA - that is, is PsO a unitary phenotype; is PsA a genetically heterogeneous or homogeneous entity; and do the genetic factors implicated in determining susceptibility to PsA predict clinical phenotype? We first discuss the results from comparing the HLA typing of two PsO cohorts: one cohort providing the dermatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsO without evidence of arthritic disease; and the second cohort providing the rheumatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsA. We show that these two cohorts differ considerably in their predominant HLA alleles, indicating the heterogeneity of the overall PsO phenotype. Moreover, the genotype of patients in the PsA cohort was shown to be heterogeneous with significant elevations in the frequency of haplotypes containing HLA-B*08, HLA-C*06:02, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*38 and HLA-B*39. Because different genetic susceptibility genes imply different disease mechanisms, and possibly different clinical courses and therapeutic responses, we then review the evidence for a phenotypic difference among patients with PsA who have inherited different HLA alleles. We provide evidence that different alleles and, more importantly, different haplotypes implicated in determining PsA susceptibility are associated with different phenotypic characteristics that appear to be subphenotypes. The implication of these findings for the overall pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in PsA is discussed with specific reference to their bearing on the discussion of whether PsA is conceptualised as an autoimmune process or one that is based on entheseal responses.

  1. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-07-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  2. A novel clinical tool to classify facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Giulia; Ruggiero, Lucia; Vercelli, Liliana; Sera, Francesco; Nikolic, Ana; Govi, Monica; Mele, Fabiano; Daolio, Jessica; Angelini, Corrado; Antonini, Giovanni; Berardinelli, Angela; Bucci, Elisabetta; Cao, Michelangelo; D'Amico, Maria Chiara; D'Angelo, Grazia; Di Muzio, Antonio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Maggi, Lorenzo; Moggio, Maurizio; Mongini, Tiziana; Morandi, Lucia; Pegoraro, Elena; Rodolico, Carmelo; Santoro, Lucio; Siciliano, Gabriele; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Villa, Luisa; Tupler, Rossella

    2016-06-01

    Based on the 7-year experience of the Italian Clinical Network for FSHD, we revised the FSHD clinical form to describe, in a harmonized manner, the phenotypic spectrum observed in FSHD. The new Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Form (CCEF) defines various clinical categories by the combination of different features. The inter-rater reproducibility of the CCEF was assessed between two examiners using kappa statistics by evaluating 56 subjects carrying the molecular marker used for FSHD diagnosis. The CCEF classifies: (1) subjects presenting facial and scapular girdle muscle weakness typical of FSHD (category A, subcategories A1-A3), (2) subjects with muscle weakness limited to scapular girdle or facial muscles (category B subcategories B1, B2), (3) asymptomatic/healthy subjects (category C, subcategories C1, C2), (4) subjects with myopathic phenotype presenting clinical features not consistent with FSHD canonical phenotype (D, subcategories D1, D2). The inter-rater reliability study showed an excellent concordance of the final four CCEF categories with a κ equal to 0.90; 95 % CI (0.71; 0.97). Absolute agreement was observed for categories C and D, an excellent agreement for categories A [κ = 0.88; 95 % CI (0.75; 1.00)], and a good agreement for categories B [κ = 0.79; 95 % CI (0.57; 1.00)]. The CCEF supports the harmonized phenotypic classification of patients and families. The categories outlined by the CCEF may assist diagnosis, genetic counseling and natural history studies. Furthermore, the CCEF categories could support selection of patients in randomized clinical trials. This precise categorization might also promote the search of genetic factor(s) contributing to the phenotypic spectrum of disease. PMID:27126453

  3. Clinical phenotypes of COPD: identification, definition and implications for guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravitlles, Marc; Calle, Myriam; Soler-Cataluña, Juan José

    2012-03-01

    The term phenotype in the field of COPD is defined as "a single or combination of disease attributes that describe differences between individuals with COPD as they relate to clinically meaningful outcomes". Among all phenotypes described, there are three that are associated with prognosis and especially are associated with a different response to currently available therapies. There phenotypes are: the exacerbator, the overlap COPD-asthma and the emphysema-hyperinflation. The exacerbator is characterised by the presence of, at least, two exacerbations the previous year, and on top of long-acting bronchodilators, may require the use of antiinflammatory drugs. The overlap phenotype presents symptoms of increased variability of airflow and incompletely reversible airflow obstruction. Due to the underlying inflammatory profile, it uses to have a good therapeutic response to inhaled corticosteroids in addition to bronchodilators. Lastly, the emphysema phenotype presents a poor therapeutic response to the existing antiinflammatory drugs and long-acting bronchodilators together with rehabilitation are the treatments of choice. Identifying the peculiarities of the different phenotypes of COPD will allow us to implement a more personalised treatment, in which the characteristics of the patients, together with their severity will be key to choose the best treatment option. PMID:22196477

  4. RIN2 syndrome: Expanding the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Simonetta; Syx, Delfien; Ivanovski, Ivan; Pollazzon, Marzia; Santodirocco, Daniela; De Marco, Loredana; Beltrami, Marina; Callewaert, Bert; Garavelli, Livia; Malfait, Fransiska

    2016-09-01

    Biallelic defects in the RIN2 gene, encoding the Ras and Rab interactor 2 protein, are associated with a rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder, with only nine patients from four independent families reported to date. The condition was initially termed MACS syndrome (macrocephaly, alopecia, cutis laxa, and scoliosis), based on the clinical features of the first identified family; however, with the expansion of the clinical phenotype in additional families, it was subsequently coined RIN2 syndrome. Hallmark features of this condition include dysmorphic facial features with striking, progressive facial coarsening, sparse hair, normal to enlarged occipitofrontal circumference, soft redundant and/or hyperextensible skin, and scoliosis. Patients with RIN2 syndrome present phenotypic overlap with other conditions, including EDS (especially the dermatosparaxis and kyphoscoliosis subtypes). Here, we describe a 10th patient, the first patient of Caucasian origin and the oldest reported patient so far, who harbors the previously identified homozygous RIN2 mutation c.1878dupC (p. (Ile627Hisfs*7)). Besides the hallmark features, this patient also presents problems not previously associated with RIN2 syndrome, including cervical vertebral fusion, mild hearing loss, and colonic fibrosis. We provide an overview of the clinical findings in all reported patients with RIN2 mutations and summarize some of the possible pathogenic mechanisms that may underlie this condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27277385

  5. Disease phenotype at diagnosis in pediatric Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bie, Charlotte I; Paerregaard, Anders; Kolacek, Sanja;

    2013-01-01

    It has been speculated that pediatric Crohn's disease (CD) is a distinct disease entity, with probably different disease subtypes. We therefore aimed to accurately phenotype newly diagnosed pediatric CD by using the pediatric modification of the Montreal classification, the Paris classification....

  6. FTLD-TDP with motor neuron disease, visuospatial impairment and a progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome: broadening the clinical phenotype of TDP-43 proteinopathies. A report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmerová Iva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin and TDP-43 positive neuronal inclusions represents a novel entity (FTLD-TDP that may be associated with motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND; involvement of extrapyramidal and other systems has also been reported. Case presentation We present three cases with similar clinical symptoms, including Parkinsonism, supranuclear gaze palsy, visuospatial impairment and a behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, associated with either clinically possible or definite MND. Neuropathological examination revealed hallmarks of FTLD-TDP with major involvement of subcortical and, in particular, mesencephalic structures. These cases differed in onset and progression of clinical manifestations as well as distribution of histopathological changes in the brain and spinal cord. Two cases were sporadic, whereas the third case had a pathological variation in the progranulin gene 102 delC. Conclusions Association of a "progressive supranuclear palsy-like" syndrome with marked visuospatial impairment, motor neuron disease and early behavioral disturbances may represent a clinically distinct phenotype of FTLD-TDP. Our observations further support the concept that TDP-43 proteinopathies represent a spectrum of disorders, where preferential localization of pathogenetic inclusions and neuronal cell loss defines clinical phenotypes ranging from frontotemporal dementia with or without motor neuron disease, to corticobasal syndrome and to a progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome.

  7. Temporal abstraction-based clinical phenotyping with Eureka!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Andrew R; Kurc, Tahsin; Willard, Richie; Rathod, Himanshu; Mansour, Michel; Pai, Akshatha Kalsanka; Torian, William M; Agravat, Sanjay; Sturm, Suzanne; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-01-01

    Temporal abstraction, a method for specifying and detecting temporal patterns in clinical databases, is very expressive and performs well, but it is difficult for clinical investigators and data analysts to understand. Such patterns are critical in phenotyping patients using their medical records in research and quality improvement. We have previously developed the Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW), which computes such phenotypes using temporal abstraction but requires software engineers to use. We have extended the AIW's web user interface, Eureka! Clinical Analytics, to support specifying phenotypes using an alternative model that we developed with clinical stakeholders. The software converts phenotypes from this model to that of temporal abstraction prior to data processing. The model can represent all phenotypes in a quality improvement project and a growing set of phenotypes in a multi-site research study. Phenotyping that is accessible to investigators and IT personnel may enable its broader adoption. PMID:24551400

  8. Mechanistic phenotypes: an aggregative phenotyping strategy to identify disease mechanisms using GWAS data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Mosley

    Full Text Available A single mutation can alter cellular and global homeostatic mechanisms and give rise to multiple clinical diseases. We hypothesized that these disease mechanisms could be identified using low minor allele frequency (MAF<0.1 non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs associated with "mechanistic phenotypes", comprised of collections of related diagnoses. We studied two mechanistic phenotypes: (1 thrombosis, evaluated in a population of 1,655 African Americans; and (2 four groupings of cancer diagnoses, evaluated in 3,009 white European Americans. We tested associations between nsSNPs represented on GWAS platforms and mechanistic phenotypes ascertained from electronic medical records (EMRs, and sought enrichment in functional ontologies across the top-ranked associations. We used a two-step analytic approach whereby nsSNPs were first sorted by the strength of their association with a phenotype. We tested associations using two reverse genetic models and standard additive and recessive models. In the second step, we employed a hypothesis-free ontological enrichment analysis using the sorted nsSNPs to identify functional mechanisms underlying the diagnoses comprising the mechanistic phenotypes. The thrombosis phenotype was solely associated with ontologies related to blood coagulation (Fisher's p = 0.0001, FDR p = 0.03, driven by the F5, P2RY12 and F2RL2 genes. For the cancer phenotypes, the reverse genetics models were enriched in DNA repair functions (p = 2×10-5, FDR p = 0.03 (POLG/FANCI, SLX4/FANCP, XRCC1, BRCA1, FANCA, CHD1L while the additive model showed enrichment related to chromatid segregation (p = 4×10-6, FDR p = 0.005 (KIF25, PINX1. We were able to replicate nsSNP associations for POLG/FANCI, BRCA1, FANCA and CHD1L in independent data sets. Mechanism-oriented phenotyping using collections of EMR-derived diagnoses can elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms.

  9. Clinical asthma phenotyping: A trial for bridging gaps in asthma management

    OpenAIRE

    Zedan, Magdy Mohamed; Laimon, Wafaa Nabil; Osman, Amal Mohamed; Zedan, Mohamed Magdy

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a common disease affecting millions of people worldwide and exerting an enormous strain on health resources in many countries. Evidence is increasing that asthma is unlikely to be a single disease but rather a series of complex, overlapping individual diseases or phenotypes, each defined by its unique interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Asthma phenotypes were initially focused on combinations of clinical characteristics, but they are now evolving to link pathophys...

  10. Pathogenesis of biliary atresia: defining biology to understand clinical phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Akihiro; Miethke, Alexander; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a severe cholangiopathy of early infancy that destroys extrahepatic bile ducts and disrupts bile flow. With a poorly defined disease pathogenesis, treatment consists of the surgical removal of duct remnants followed by hepatoportoenterostomy. Although this approach can improve the short-term outcome, the liver disease progresses to end-stage cirrhosis in most children. Further improvement in outcome will require a greater understanding of the mechanisms of biliary injury and fibrosis. Here, we review progress in the field, which has been fuelled by collaborative studies in larger patient cohorts and the development of cell culture and animal model systems to directly test hypotheses. Advances include the identification of phenotypic subgroups and stages of disease based on clinical, pathological and molecular features. Stronger evidence exists for viruses, toxins and gene sequence variations in the aetiology of biliary atresia, triggering a proinflammatory response that injures the duct epithelium and produces a rapidly progressive cholangiopathy. The immune response also activates the expression of type 2 cytokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production by nonparenchymal cells. These advances provide insight into phenotype variability and might be relevant to the design of personalized trials to block progression of liver disease. PMID:26008129

  11. Genetic Association Analysis of Complex Diseases Incorporating Intermediate Phenotype Information

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yafang; Huang, Jian; Amos, Christopher I.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic researchers often collect disease related quantitative traits in addition to disease status because they are interested in understanding the pathophysiology of disease processes. In genome-wide association (GWA) studies, these quantitative phenotypes may be relevant to disease development and serve as intermediate phenotypes or they could be behavioral or other risk factors that predict disease risk. Statistical tests combining both disease status and quantitative risk factors should ...

  12. PEAX: INTERACTIVE VISUAL ANALYSIS AND EXPLORATION OF COMPLEX CLINICAL PHENOTYPE AND GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Hinterberg, Michael A.; Kao, David P; Bristow, Michael R.; Hunter, Lawrence E.; Port, J. David; Görg, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Increasing availability of high-dimensional clinical data, which improves the ability to define more specific phenotypes, as well as molecular data, which can elucidate disease mechanisms, is a driving force and at the same time a major challenge for translational and personalized medicine. Successful research in this field requires an approach that ties together specific disease and health expertise with understanding of molecular data through statistical methods. We present PEAX (Phenotype-...

  13. On-time clinical phenotype prediction based on narrative reports

    OpenAIRE

    Bejan, Cosmin A.; Vanderwende, Lucy; Evans, Heather L.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a natural language processing system which is able to predict whether or not a patient exhibits a specific phenotype using the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with the patient. Furthermore, the phenotypic annotations from our report dataset were performed at the report level which allows us to perform the prediction of the clinical phenotype at any point in time during the patient hospitalization period. Our experiments indicate that an im...

  14. Genotype-phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, R.; Ceballos-Picot, I.; Torres, R.J.; Larovere, L.E.; Yamada, Y.; Nguyen, K.V.; Hegde, M.; Visser, J.E.; Schretlen, D.J.; Nyhan, W.L.; Puig, J.G.; O'Neill, P.J.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype-phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linke

  15. Park sleep: a non-motor dominant Parkinson's disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepa, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was evaluated in our neurology department, for a presumed diagnosis of 'night-time seizures'; however, this diagnosis was quickly dismissed after the patient (and his wife) described how he 'acted out' and talked throughout his dreams, without any seizure-like activity. This problem had been present for ∼10 years. An EEG ruled out epilepsy. The patient also described a 10-year history of constipation, loss of smell and 'frequent collapses'. These symptoms fit in with the recently published criteria of 'prodromal Parkinson's Disease' and prompted a formal assessment for Parkinson's disease (PD). He had no tremor. A subtle festinating gait pattern and a 2-finger tremor in the right hand were noted. The diagnosis of PD was confirmed by a dopamine transporter scan. Clinically, this is one-Park sleep: rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder subtype-of 7 different non-motor dominant PD phenotypes recently described. PMID:27284098

  16. On-time clinical phenotype prediction based on narrative reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, Cosmin A.; Vanderwende, Lucy; Evans, Heather L.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a natural language processing system which is able to predict whether or not a patient exhibits a specific phenotype using the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with the patient. Furthermore, the phenotypic annotations from our report dataset were performed at the report level which allows us to perform the prediction of the clinical phenotype at any point in time during the patient hospitalization period. Our experiments indicate that an important factor in achieving better results for this problem is to determine how much information to extract from the patient reports in the time interval between the patient admission time and the current prediction time. PMID:24551325

  17. The expanding phenotypic spectra of kidney diseases: insights from genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokman, Marijn F; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Giles, Rachel H; Schaefer, Franz; Knoers, Nine V A M; van Eerde, Albertien M

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has led to the identification of previously unrecognized phenotypes associated with classic kidney disease genes. In addition to improving diagnostics for genetically heterogeneous diseases and enabling a faster rate of gene discovery, NGS has enabled an expansion and redefinition of nephrogenetic disease categories. Findings from these studies raise the question of whether disease diagnoses should be made on clinical grounds, on genetic evidence or a combination thereof. Here, we discuss the major kidney disease-associated genes and gene categories for which NGS has expanded the phenotypic spectrum. For example, COL4A3-5 genes, which are classically associated with Alport syndrome, are now understood to also be involved in the aetiology of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. DGKE, which is associated with nephrotic syndrome, is also mutated in patients with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. We examine how a shared genetic background between diverse clinical phenotypes can provide insight into the function of genes and novel links with essential pathophysiological mechanisms. In addition, we consider genetic and epigenetic factors that contribute to the observed phenotypic heterogeneity of kidney diseases and discuss the challenges in the interpretation of genetic data. Finally, we discuss the implications of the expanding phenotypic spectra associated with kidney disease genes for clinical practice, genetic counselling and personalized care, and present our recommendations for the use of NGS-based tests in routine nephrology practice. PMID:27374918

  18. PhenoMiner: from text to a database of phenotypes associated with OMIM diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Nigel; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N; Oellrich, Anika; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2015-10-01

    Analysis of scientific and clinical phenotypes reported in the experimental literature has been curated manually to build high-quality databases such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). However, the identification and harmonization of phenotype descriptions struggles with the diversity of human expressivity. We introduce a novel automated extraction approach called PhenoMiner that exploits full parsing and conceptual analysis. Apriori association mining is then used to identify relationships to human diseases. We applied PhenoMiner to the BMC open access collection and identified 13,636 phenotype candidates. We identified 28,155 phenotype-disorder hypotheses covering 4898 phenotypes and 1659 Mendelian disorders. Analysis showed: (i) the semantic distribution of the extracted terms against linked ontologies; (ii) a comparison of term overlap with the Human Phenotype Ontology (HP); (iii) moderate support for phenotype-disorder pairs in both OMIM and the literature; (iv) strong associations of phenotype-disorder pairs to known disease-genes pairs using PhenoDigm. The full list of PhenoMiner phenotypes (S1), phenotype-disorder associations (S2), association-filtered linked data (S3) and user database documentation (S5) is available as supplementary data and can be downloaded at http://github.com/nhcollier/PhenoMiner under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. Database URL: phenominer.mml.cam.ac.uk. PMID:26507285

  19. Peax: interactive visual analysis and exploration of complex clinical phenotype and gene expression association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterberg, Michael A; Kao, David P; Bristow, Michael R; Hunter, Lawrence E; Port, J David; Görg, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Increasing availability of high-dimensional clinical data, which improves the ability to define more specific phenotypes, as well as molecular data, which can elucidate disease mechanisms, is a driving force and at the same time a major challenge for translational and personalized medicine. Successful research in this field requires an approach that ties together specific disease and health expertise with understanding of molecular data through statistical methods. We present PEAX (Phenotype-Expression Association eXplorer), built upon open-source software, which integrates visual phenotype model definition with statistical testing of expression data presented concurrently in a web-browser. The integration of data and analysis tasks in a single tool allows clinical domain experts to obtain new insights directly through exploration of relationships between multivariate phenotype models and gene expression data, showing the effects of model definition and modification while also exploiting potential meaningful associations between phenotype and miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships. We combine the web visualization capabilities of Shiny and D3 with the power and speed of R for backend statistical analysis, in order to abstract the scripting required for repetitive analysis of sub-phenotype association. We describe the motivation for PEAX, demonstrate its utility through a use case involving heart failure research, and discuss computational challenges and observations. We show that our visual web-based representations are well-suited for rapid exploration of phenotype and gene expression association, facilitating insight and discovery by domain experts. PMID:25592601

  20. Clinical asthma phenotypes in the real world: opportunities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Clementine Bostantzoglou; Vicky Delimpoura; Konstantinos Samitas; Eleftherios Zervas; Frank Kanniess; Mina Gaga

    2015-01-01

    Key Points Asthma is a heterogeneous syndrome ranging from mild disease with barely noticeable symptoms to very severe disease with constant symptoms that may greatly hinder patients’ quality of life.; The aim of asthma treatment is control of asthma and the prevention of risk of exacerbations and fixed airflow limitation.; Asthma management must be individualised; tailored not only to the severity of the disease but importantly, to the phenotypic characteristics of the patient and m...

  1. Matrix and cell phenotype differences in Dupuytren's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beuge, Marike M; Ten Dam, Evert-Jan P M; Werker, Paul M N; Bank, Ruud A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dupuytren's disease is a fibroproliferative disease of the hand and fingers, which usually manifests as two different phenotypes within the same patient. The disease first causes a nodule in the palm of the hand, while later, a cord develops, causing contracture of the fingers. RESULTS:

  2. Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RDCRN? Aims of the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Contact Us RDCRN Members Login Accessibility Disclaimer The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network is an initiative of the Office of Rare ...

  3. Airways Disease: Phenotyping Heterogeneity Using Measures of Airway Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Salman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being widely regarded as heterogeneous diseases, a consensus for an accurate system of classification has not been agreed. Recent studies have suggested that the recognition of subphenotypes of airway disease based on the pattern of airway inflammation may be particularly useful in increasing our understanding of the disease. The use of non-invasive markers of airway inflammation has suggested the presence of four distinct phenotypes: eosinophilic, neutrophilic, mixed inflammatory and paucigranulocytic asthma. Recent studies suggest that these subgroups may differ in their etiology, immunopathology and response to treatment. Importantly, novel treatment approaches targeted at specific patterns of airway inflammation are emerging, making an appreciation of subphenotypes particularly relevant. New developments in phenotyping inflammation and other facets of airway disease mean that we are entering an era where careful phenotyping will lead to targeted therapy.

  4. Phenotype Similarity Regression for Identifying the Genetic Determinants of Rare Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel; Richardson, Sylvia; Turro, Ernest

    2016-03-01

    Rare genetic disorders, which can now be studied systematically with affordable genome sequencing, are often caused by high-penetrance rare variants. Such disorders are often heterogeneous and characterized by abnormalities spanning multiple organ systems ascertained with variable clinical precision. Existing methods for identifying genes with variants responsible for rare diseases summarize phenotypes with unstructured binary or quantitative variables. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) allows composite phenotypes to be represented systematically but association methods accounting for the ontological relationship between HPO terms do not exist. We present a Bayesian method to model the association between an HPO-coded patient phenotype and genotype. Our method estimates the probability of an association together with an HPO-coded phenotype characteristic of the disease. We thus formalize a clinical approach to phenotyping that is lacking in standard regression techniques for rare disease research. We demonstrate the power of our method by uncovering a number of true associations in a large collection of genome-sequenced and HPO-coded cases with rare diseases. PMID:26924528

  5. Airways Disease: Phenotyping Heterogeneity Using Measures of Airway Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui Salman; Brightling Christopher E

    2007-01-01

    Despite asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being widely regarded as heterogeneous diseases, a consensus for an accurate system of classification has not been agreed. Recent studies have suggested that the recognition of subphenotypes of airway disease based on the pattern of airway inflammation may be particularly useful in increasing our understanding of the disease. The use of non-invasive markers of airway inflammation has suggested the presence of four distinct phenotypes: ...

  6. Epilepsy phenotypes in siblings with Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihisa; Arai, Eisuke; Kitamura, Yuri; Abe, Shinpei; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Fujimaki, Takuro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Norrie disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is characterized by congenital blindness. Although epileptic seizures are observed in some patients with Norrie disease, little is known about this phenomenon. Here, we report the manifestation of epilepsy in siblings with Norrie disease to increase our knowledge of epilepsy in this condition. Three brothers with congenital blindness were diagnosed with Norrie disease after genetic analyses indicated the deletion of exon 2 of the NDP gene. The eldest brother had suffered from epileptic seizures since the age of 11years, and his seizures were resistant to antiepileptic drugs. Although the second brother had no epileptic seizures, the youngest sibling had experiences epileptic seizures since the age of 8years. His seizures were controlled using lamotrigine and levetiracetam. An electroencephalography (EEG) revealed epileptiform discharges in the occipital areas in all three brothers. A study of these patients will increase our knowledge of epilepsy in patients with Norrie disease. PMID:25944760

  7. Comprehensive characterisation of hypertensive heart disease left ventricular phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C. L.; Amadu, Antonio Matteo; Dastidar, Amardeep Ghosh; Szantho, Gergley V; Lyen, Stephen M.; Godsave, Cattleya; Ratcliffe, Laura E K; Burchell, Amy E; Hart, Emma C.; Hamilton, Mark C K; Nightingale, Angus K; Paton, Julian F. R.; Manghat, Nathan E; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Myocardial intracellular/extracellular structure and aortic function were assessed among hypertensive left ventricular (LV) phenotypes using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR).METHODS: An observational study from consecutive tertiary hypertension clinic patients referred for CMR (1.5 T) was performed. Four LV phenotypes were defined: (1) normal with normal indexed LV mass (LVM) and LVM to volume ratio (M/V), (2) concentric remodelling with normal LVM but elevated M/V, (3) conc...

  8. Combining Human Disease Genetics and Mouse Model Phenotypes towards Drug Repositioning for Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatments. Here, we present a novel drug repositioning approach to predict new drugs for PD leveraging both disease genetics and large amounts of mouse model phenotypes. First, we identified PD-specific mouse phenotypes using well-studied human disease genes. Then we searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with PD. We demonstrated the validity of our approach u...

  9. Haptoglobin Phenotype Predicts a Low Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, My; Strandhave, Charlotte; Krarup, H.B.;

    F-PO1096 Haptoglobin Phenotype Predicts a Low Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease My Svensson,1 Charlotte Strandhave,1 Henrik My Svensson,1 Charlotte Strandhave,1 HenrikKrarup,2 Jeppe H. Christensen.1 1Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 2...... phenotype-dependent antioxidant capacity where Hp 2-2 exhibits a low antioxidant ability, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. An attenuated heart rate variability (HRV) may be an important predictor of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we examined......Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. Introduction Three major phenotypes for the haptoglobin (Hp) gene has been identified: Hp 1-1, Hp 2-2, and the heterozygous Hp 2-1. Hp 2-2 is associated with a poor outcome in patients with cardiovascular disease. This may be due to a...

  10. The Hartnup phenotype: Mendelian transport disorder, multifactorial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriver, C R; Mahon, B; Levy, H L; Clow, C L; Reade, T M; Kronick, J; Lemieux, B; Laberge, C

    1987-05-01

    The Hartnup mutation affects an amino acid transport system of intestine and kidney used by a large group of neutral charge alpha-amino acids (six essential and several nonessential). We compared developmental outcomes and medical histories of 21 Hartnup subjects, identified through newborn screening, with those of 19 control sibs. We found no significant differences in means of growth percentiles and IQ scores between Hartnup and control groups (but all low academic performance scores were found in the Hartnup group, and various skin lesions occurred in five Hartnup subjects), no significant difference between means of the summed plasma values for amino acids affected by the Hartnup gene in Hartnup and control groups, two Hartnup subjects with clinical manifestations--impaired somatic growth and IQ in one, impaired growth and a "pellagrin" episode in the other--who had the lowest summed plasma amino acid values in the Hartnup group; the corresponding values for their sibs were the low outliers in the control group, and two tissue-specific forms of the Hartnup (transport) phenotype: renal and intestinal involvement (15 families) and renal involvement alone (one family), both forms having been inherited as autosomal recessives (the symptomatic probands had the usual form). Whereas deficient activity of the "Hartnup" transport system is monogenic, the associated plasma amino acid value (measured genotype) is polygenic. The latter describes the parameter of homeostasis and liability to disease. Cause of Hartnup disease is multifactorial. PMID:3578280

  11. Gaucher Disease: The Metabolic Defect, Pathophysiology, Phenotypes And Natural History

    OpenAIRE

    Baris, Hagit N; Cohen, Ian J.; Mistry, Pramod K

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), a prototype lysosomal storage disorder, results from inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to biallelic mutations in GBA. The result is widespread accumulation of macrophages engorged with predominantly lysosomal glucocerebroside. A complex multisystem phenotype arises involving the liver, spleen, bone marrow and occasionally the lungs in type 1 Gaucher disease; in neuronopathic fulminant type 2 and chronic type 3 disease there is in addition progressi...

  12. Prediction of disease and phenotype associations from genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome wide association studies (GWAS have proven useful as a method for identifying genetic variations associated with diseases. In this study, we analyzed GWAS data for 61 diseases and phenotypes to elucidate common associations based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. The study was an expansion on a previous study on identifying disease associations via data from a single GWAS on seven diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adjustments to the originally reported study included expansion of the SNP dataset using Linkage Disequilibrium (LD and refinement of the four levels of analysis to encompass SNP, SNP block, gene, and pathway level comparisons. A pair-wise comparison between diseases and phenotypes was performed at each level and the Jaccard similarity index was used to measure the degree of association between two diseases/phenotypes. Disease relatedness networks (DRNs were used to visualize our results. We saw predominant relatedness between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis for the first three levels of analysis. Expected relatedness was also seen between lipid- and blood-related traits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The predominant associations between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis can be validated by clinical studies. The diseases have been proposed to share a systemic inflammation phenotype that can result in progression of additional diseases in patients with one of these three diseases. We also noticed unexpected relationships between metabolic and neurological diseases at the pathway comparison level. The less significant relationships found between diseases require a more detailed literature review to determine validity of the predictions. The results from this study serve as a first step towards a better understanding of seemingly unrelated diseases and phenotypes with similar symptoms or modes of treatment.

  13. Genetic association analysis of complex diseases incorporating intermediate phenotype information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafang Li

    Full Text Available Genetic researchers often collect disease related quantitative traits in addition to disease status because they are interested in understanding the pathophysiology of disease processes. In genome-wide association (GWA studies, these quantitative phenotypes may be relevant to disease development and serve as intermediate phenotypes or they could be behavioral or other risk factors that predict disease risk. Statistical tests combining both disease status and quantitative risk factors should be more powerful than case-control studies, as the former incorporates more information about the disease. In this paper, we proposed a modified inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis method to combine disease status and quantitative intermediate phenotype information. The simulation results showed that when an intermediate phenotype was available, the inverse-variance weighted method had more power than did a case-control study of complex diseases, especially in identifying susceptibility loci having minor effects. We further applied this modified meta-analysis to a study of imputed lung cancer genotypes with smoking data in 1154 cases and 1137 matched controls. The most significant SNPs came from the CHRNA3-CHRNA5-CHRNB4 region on chromosome 15q24-25.1, which has been replicated in many other studies. Our results confirm that this CHRNA region is associated with both lung cancer development and smoking behavior. We also detected three significant SNPs--rs1800469, rs1982072, and rs2241714--in the promoter region of the TGFB1 gene on chromosome 19 (p = 1.46×10(-5, 1.18×10(-5, and 6.57×10(-6, respectively. The SNP rs1800469 is reported to be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer in cigarette smokers. The present study is the first GWA study to replicate this result. Signals in the 3q26 region were also identified in the meta-analysis. We demonstrate the intermediate phenotype can potentially enhance the power of complex

  14. Mechanisms and impact of the frequent exacerbator phenotype in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wedzicha, J A; Brill, S E; Allinson, J. P.; Donaldson, G C

    2013-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events that carry significant consequences for patients. Some patients experience frequent exacerbations, and are now recognized as a distinct clinical subgroup, the ‘frequent exacerbator’ phenotype. This is relatively stable over time, occurs across disease severity, and is associated with poorer health outcomes. These patients are therefore a priority for research and treatment. The pathophysiology underlying the fr...

  15. Undiagnosed genetic muscle disease in the north of England: an in depth phenotype analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Elizabeth; Laval, Steve; Hudson, Judith; Barresi, Rita; De Waele, Liesbeth; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Sarkozy, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the molecular characterisation of genetic muscle disease has been rapid, as demonstrated by a recent analysis of these conditions in the north of England by Norwood et al (2009), in which a genetic diagnosis was achieved for 75.7% of patients. However, there remain many patients with suspected genetic muscle disease in who a diagnosis is not obtained, often despite considerable diagnostic effort, and these patients are now being considered for the application of new technologies such as next generation sequencing. This study aimed to provide an in-depth phenotype analysis of undiagnosed patients referred to the Northern region muscle clinic with suspected genetic muscle disease, with the intention of gaining insight into these conditions, identifing cases with a shared phenotype who may be amenable to collective diagnostic testing or research, and evaluating the strengths and limitations of our current diagnostic strategy. We used two approaches: a review of clinical findings in patients with undiagnosed muscle disease, and a hierarchical cluster analysis to provide an unbiased interpretation of the phenotype data. These joint approaches identified a correlation of phenotypic features according to the age of disease onset and also delineated several interesting groups of patients, as well as highlighting areas of frequent diagnostic difficulty that could benefit from the use of new high-throughput diagnostic techniques. Correspondence to: anna.sarkozy@ncl.ac.uk. PMID:23788081

  16. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a ...

  17. Microbiome Heterogeneity Characterizing Intestinal Tissue and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea D; Kirsch, Richard; Milgrom, Raquel; Stempak, Joanne M; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Silverberg, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with differential abundance of numerous organisms when compared to healthy controls (HCs); however, few studies have investigated variability in the microbiome across intestinal locations and how this variability might be related to disease location and phenotype. In this study, we have analyzed the microbiome of a large cohort of individuals recruited at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Biopsies were taken from subjects with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and HC, and also individuals having undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for treatment of ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. Microbial 16S rRNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We observed a great deal of variability in the microbiome characterizing different sampling locations. Samples from pouch and afferent limb were comparable in microbial composition. When comparing sigmoid and terminal ileum samples, more differences were observed. The greatest number of differentially abundant microbes was observed when comparing either pouch or afferent limb samples to sigmoid or terminal ileum. Despite these differences, we were able to observe modest microbial variability between inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes and HCs, even when controlling for sampling location and additional experimental factors. Most detected associations were observed between HCs and Crohn's disease, with decreases in specific genera in the families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae characterizing tissue samples from individuals with Crohn's disease. This study highlights important considerations when analyzing the composition of the microbiome and also provides useful insight into differences in the microbiome characterizing these seemingly related phenotypes. PMID:26954709

  18. Patient phenotyping in clinical trials of chronic pain treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Robert R.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Turk, Dennis C.;

    2016-01-01

    that determine the optimal treatments, or treatment combinations, for individual patients) that would presumably improve both the clinical care of patients with pain and the success rates for putative analgesic drugs in phase 2 and 3 clinical trials. However, before implementing this approach, the......There is tremendous interpatient variability in the response to analgesic therapy (even for efficacious treatments), which can be the source of great frustration in clinical practice. This has led to calls for "precision medicine" or personalized pain therapeutics (ie, empirically based algorithms...... stimulation, endogenous pain-modulatory processes, and response to pharmacologic challenge. We provide evidence-based recommendations for core phenotyping domains and recommend measures of each domain....

  19. Variable Clinical Phenotypes of α-Thalassemia Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Titi Singer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic mutations of the α genes are common worldwide. In Asia and particularly Southeast Asia, they can result in clinically significant types of α-thalassemia, namely hemoglobin (Hb H disease and Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis. The latter is generally a fatal intrauterine condition, while Hb H disease results in clinical complications that are frequently overlooked. The high prevalence of the carrier state and the burden of these diseases (and other α-thalassemia variants call for more attention for improved screening methods and better care.

  20. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camiciottoli G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gianna Camiciottoli,1 Stefano Diciotti,2 Francesca Bigazzi,1 Simone Lombardo,3 Maurizio Bartolucci,4 Matteo Paoletti,1 Mario Mascalchi,3 Massimo Pistolesi1 1Section of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi,” University of Bologna, Cesena, Italy; 3Radiodiagnostic Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 4Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Abstract: A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory–expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28 and in females (n=27. Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10 showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory–expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second, and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD

  1. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNA...

  2. The Clinical Phenotypes of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Targoff, Ira N.; Huber, Adam M; Malley, James D; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes and other systemic features. Although juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), the most common form of JIIM, has been well-studied, the other major clinical subgroups of JIIM, including juvenile polymyositis (JPM) and juvenile myositis overlapping with another autoimmune or connective tissue disease (JCTM), have not been well characterized, and their ...

  3. Computational phenotype discovery using unsupervised feature learning over noisy, sparse, and irregular clinical data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Lasko

    Full Text Available Inferring precise phenotypic patterns from population-scale clinical data is a core computational task in the development of precision, personalized medicine. The traditional approach uses supervised learning, in which an expert designates which patterns to look for (by specifying the learning task and the class labels, and where to look for them (by specifying the input variables. While appropriate for individual tasks, this approach scales poorly and misses the patterns that we don't think to look for. Unsupervised feature learning overcomes these limitations by identifying patterns (or features that collectively form a compact and expressive representation of the source data, with no need for expert input or labeled examples. Its rising popularity is driven by new deep learning methods, which have produced high-profile successes on difficult standardized problems of object recognition in images. Here we introduce its use for phenotype discovery in clinical data. This use is challenging because the largest source of clinical data - Electronic Medical Records - typically contains noisy, sparse, and irregularly timed observations, rendering them poor substrates for deep learning methods. Our approach couples dirty clinical data to deep learning architecture via longitudinal probability densities inferred using Gaussian process regression. From episodic, longitudinal sequences of serum uric acid measurements in 4368 individuals we produced continuous phenotypic features that suggest multiple population subtypes, and that accurately distinguished (0.97 AUC the uric-acid signatures of gout vs. acute leukemia despite not being optimized for the task. The unsupervised features were as accurate as gold-standard features engineered by an expert with complete knowledge of the domain, the classification task, and the class labels. Our findings demonstrate the potential for achieving computational phenotype discovery at population scale. We expect such

  4. Phenotype-Optimized Sequence Ensembles Substantially Improve Prediction of Disease-Causing Mutation in Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Masica, David L.; Sosnay, Patrick R.; Cutting, Garry R; Karchin, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation is associated with a phenotypic spectrum that includes cystic fibrosis (CF). The disease liability of some common CFTR mutations is known, but rare mutations are seen in too few patients to categorize unequivocally, making genetic diagnosis difficult. Computational methods can predict the impact of mutation, but prediction specificity is often below that required for clinical utility. Here, we present a novel supervised learn...

  5. Mechanisms and impact of the frequent exacerbator phenotype in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Brill, Simon E; Allinson, James P; Donaldson, Gavin C

    2013-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events that carry significant consequences for patients. Some patients experience frequent exacerbations, and are now recognized as a distinct clinical subgroup, the 'frequent exacerbator' phenotype. This is relatively stable over time, occurs across disease severity, and is associated with poorer health outcomes. These patients are therefore a priority for research and treatment. The pathophysiology underlying the frequent exacerbator phenotype is complex, with increased airway and systemic inflammation, dynamic lung hyperinflation, changes in lower airway bacterial colonization and a possible increased susceptibility to viral infection. Frequent exacerbators are also at increased risk from comorbid extrapulmonary diseases including cardiovascular disease, gastroesophageal reflux, depression, osteoporosis and cognitive impairment. Overall these patients have poorer health status, accelerated forced expiratory volume over 1 s (FEV1) decline, worsened quality of life, and increased hospital admissions and mortality, contributing to increased exacerbation susceptibility and perpetuation of the frequent exacerbator phenotype. This review article sets out the definition and importance of the frequent exacerbator phenotype, with a detailed examination of its pathophysiology, impact and interaction with other comorbidities. PMID:23945277

  6. Primary Sjӧgren's syndrome: Clinical phenotypes, outcome and the development of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goules, Andreas V; Tzioufas, Athanasios G

    2016-07-01

    Primary Sjӧgren's syndrome (pSS) is a complex autoimmune disease with distinct clinical phenotypes and variable outcomes. The systemic form of the disease is characterized by immune complex mediated manifestations and is complicated by lymphoma as a result of a polyclonal B cell hyperactivity that is evolving into B cell malignancy. In the past decades, well-established clinical and serological markers have been described in the literature to identify high-risk patients and to predict lymphoma development. However, specific biologic treatments have proven ineffective to control the disease. Significant research effort has been made to reveal the major underlying biological events in this subgroup and identify biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. In this review, we summarize the current data for the proposed histological, molecular and genetic biomarkers. PMID:26970487

  7. Genotype-phenotype correlation in Pompe disease, a step forward

    OpenAIRE

    De Filippi, Paola; Saeidi, Kolsoum; Ravaglia, Sabrina; Dardis, Andrea; Angelini, Corrado; Mongini, Tiziana; Morandi, Lucia; Moggio, Maurizio; Di Muzio, Antonio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Bembi, Bruno; Giannini, Fabio; Marrosu, Giovanni; Rigoldi, Miriam; Tonin, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Background Pompe’s disease is a progressive myopathy caused by mutations in the lysosomal enzyme acid alphaglucosidase gene (GAA). A wide clinical variability occurs also in patients sharing the same GAA mutations, even within the same family. Methods For a large series of GSDII patients we collected some clinical data as age of onset of the disease, presence or absence of muscular pain, Walton score, 6-Minute Walking Test, Vital Capacity, and Creatine Kinase. DNA was extracted and tested for...

  8. HNF1B-associated clinical phenotypes: the kidney and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockenhauer, Detlef; Jaureguiberry, Graciana

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in HNF1B, the gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β are the most commonly identified genetic cause of renal malformations. HNF1B was first identified as a disease gene for diabetes (MODY5) in 1997, and its involvement in renal disease was subsequently noted through clinical observations in pedigrees affected by MODY5. Since then, a whole spectrum of associated phenotypes have been reported, including genital malformations, autism, epilepsy, gout, hypomagnesaemia, primary hyperparathyroidism, liver and intestinal abnormalities and a rare form of kidney cancer. The most commonly identified mutation, in approximately 50 % of patients, is an entire gene deletion occurring in the context of a 17q12 chromosomal microdeletion that also includes several other genes. Some of the associated phenotypes, especially the neurologic ones, appear to occur only in the context of this microdeletion and thus may not be directly linked to HNF1B. Here we review the spectrum of associated phenotypes and discuss potential implications for clinical management. PMID:26160100

  9. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared...... between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We undertook the largest genotype association study, to date, in widely used clinical subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of further understanding the biological relations between diseases. METHODS: This study included patients from 49...... centres in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australasia. We applied the Montreal classification system of inflammatory bowel disease subphenotypes to 34,819 patients (19,713 with Crohn's disease, 14,683 with ulcerative colitis) genotyped on the Immunochip array. We tested for genotype...

  10. Frailty and sarcopenia as the basis for the phenotypic manifestation of chronic diseases in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Javier; El Assar, Mariam; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2016-08-01

    Frailty is a functional status that precedes disability and is characterized by decreased functional reserve and increased vulnerability. In addition to disability, the frailty phenotype predicts falls, institutionalization, hospitalization and mortality. Frailty is the consequence of the interaction between the aging process and some chronic diseases and conditions that compromise functional systems and finally produce sarcopenia. Many of the clinical manifestations of frailty are explained by sarcopenia which is closely related to poor physical performance. Reduced regenerative capacity, malperfusion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation compose the sarcopenic skeletal muscle alterations associated to the frailty phenotype. Inflammation appears as a common determinant for chronic diseases, sarcopenia and frailty. The strategies to prevent the frailty phenotype include an adequate amount of physical activity and exercise as well as pharmacological interventions such as myostatin inhibitors and specific androgen receptor modulators. Cell response to stress pathways such as Nrf2, sirtuins and klotho could be considered as future therapeutic interventions for the management of frailty phenotype and aging-related chronic diseases. PMID:27370407

  11. Clinic Analysis of Behcet Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjun Lin; Hongni Li; Yixia Huang; Kangkeng Zheng; Zhongxia Zhou; Xiaofeng Lin

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the clinic manifestation and prognosis of Behcet disease.Method: Twenty patients requiring inpatient treatment with Behcet disease were retrospectively analyzed.Results: The morbidity of Behcet disease is 5.5/100 000. In the systemic damage, stomatocace and skin lesion are 95%, eye lesion and genital ulcer 50%, joint lesion 45%,gastrointestinal lesion 35%, Uveitis is the major disease in eye lesion, and followed in order by retinal vasculitis and obstruction of retinal artery. Attack age average 30.3 years old. Diagnosis age average 34.8 years old. The patients stay in hospital for 41 days on the average. Cure rate is 55%, improvement rate 40%, blinding rate of eye lesion is 36%.Conclusions: Behcet disease is a multisystem lesion disease. Stomatocace and skin lesion is the major lesion, the next in common occurrence are eye and genital lesions. Repeated attack of uveitis, complicated cataract and secondary glaucoma are the major causes of blindness.

  12. Disease Modeling and Phenotypic Drug Screening for Diabetic Cardiomyopathy using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye M. Drawnel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a complication of type 2 diabetes, with known contributions of lifestyle and genetics. We develop environmentally and genetically driven in vitro models of the condition using human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes. First, we mimic diabetic clinical chemistry to induce a phenotypic surrogate of diabetic cardiomyopathy, observing structural and functional disarray. Next, we consider genetic effects by deriving cardiomyocytes from two diabetic patients with variable disease progression. The cardiomyopathic phenotype is recapitulated in the patient-specific cells basally, with a severity dependent on their original clinical status. These models are incorporated into successive levels of a screening platform, identifying drugs that preserve cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro during diabetic stress. In this work, we present a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC model of a complex metabolic condition, showing the power of this technique for discovery and testing of therapeutic strategies for a disease with ever-increasing clinical significance.

  13. Multiple Changes of Gene Expression and Function Reveal Genomic and Phenotypic Complexity in SLE-like Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Wilbe; Kozyrev, Sergey V.; Fabiana H. G. Farias; Bremer, Hanna D.; Anna Hedlund; Pielberg, Gerli R.; Seppälä, Eija H; Ulla Gustafson; Hannes Lohi; Örjan Carlborg; Göran Andersson; Helene Hansson-Hamlin; Kerstin Lindblad-Toh

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of clinical manifestations commonly observed in autoimmune disorders poses a major challenge to genetic studies of such diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) affects humans as well as other mammals, and is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in patients' sera and multiple disparate clinical features. Here we present evidence that particular sub-phenotypes of canine SLE-related disease, based on homogenous (ANA(H)) and speckled ANA (ANA(S)) stain...

  14. Immune phenotype in children with therapy-nave remitted and relapsed Crohn’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aron; Cseh; Barna; Vasarhelyi; Kriszta; Molnar; Balazs; Szalay; Peter; Svec; Andras; Treszl; Antal; Dezsofi; Peter; Laszlo; Lakatos; Andras; Arato; Tivadar; Tulassay; Gabor; Veres

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the prevalence of subpopulations of CD4+ cells along with that of major inhibitor or stimulator cell types in therapy-nave childhood Crohn's disease (CD) and to test whether abnormalities of immune phenotype are normalized with the improvement of clinical signs and symptoms of disease. METHODS: We enrolled 26 pediatric patients with CD. 14 therapy-nave CD children; of those, 10 children remitted on conventional therapy and formed the remission group. We also tested another group of 12...

  15. Parkinsonian phenotype in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3: a two-case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos João

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder of late onset, which is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of the ATXN3 gene. This disease presents clinical heterogeneity, which cannot be completely explained by the size of the repeat tract. MJD presents extrapyramidal motor signs, namely Parkinsonism, more frequently than the other subtypes of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias. Although Parkinsonism seems to segregate within MJD families, only a few MJD patients develop parkinsonian features and, therefore, the clinical and genetic aspects of these rare presentations remain poorly investigated. The main goal of this work was to describe two MJD patients displaying the parkinsonian triad (tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity, namely on what concerns genetic variation in Parkinson's disease (PD associated loci (PARK2, LRRK2, PINK1, DJ-1, SNCA, MAPT, APOE, and mtDNA tRNAGln T4336C. Case presentation Patient 1 is a 40 year-old female (onset at 30 years of age, initially with a pure parkinsonian phenotype (similar to the phenotype previously reported for her mother. Patient 2 is a 38 year-old male (onset at 33 years of age, presenting an ataxic phenotype with parkinsonian features (not seen either in other affected siblings or in his father. Both patients presented an expanded ATXN3 allele with 72 CAG repeats. No PD mutations were found in the analyzed loci. However, allelic variants previously associated with PD were observed in DJ-1 and APOE genes, for both patients. Conclusions The present report adds clinical and genetic information on this particular and rare MJD presentation, and raises the hypothesis that DJ-1 and APOE polymorphisms may confer susceptibility to the parkinsonian phenotype in MJD.

  16. Exploring and exploiting disease interactions from multi-relational gene and phenotype networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy A Davis

    Full Text Available The availability of electronic health care records is unlocking the potential for novel studies on understanding and modeling disease co-morbidities based on both phenotypic and genetic data. Moreover, the insurgence of increasingly reliable phenotypic data can aid further studies on investigating the potential genetic links among diseases. The goal is to create a feedback loop where computational tools guide and facilitate research, leading to improved biological knowledge and clinical standards, which in turn should generate better data. We build and analyze disease interaction networks based on data collected from previous genetic association studies and patient medical histories, spanning over 12 years, acquired from a regional hospital. By exploring both individual and combined interactions among these two levels of disease data, we provide novel insight into the interplay between genetics and clinical realities. Our results show a marked difference between the well defined structure of genetic relationships and the chaotic co-morbidity network, but also highlight clear interdependencies. We demonstrate the power of these dependencies by proposing a novel multi-relational link prediction method, showing that disease co-morbidity can enhance our currently limited knowledge of genetic association. Furthermore, our methods for integrated networks of diverse data are widely applicable and can provide novel advances for many problems in systems biology and personalized medicine.

  17. Trichinella infection and clinical disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Meyer, C N; Krantz, T;

    1996-01-01

    Trichinellosis is caused by ingestion of insufficiently cooked meat contaminated with infective larvae of Trichinella species. The clinical course is highly variable, ranging from no apparent infection to severe and even fatal disease. We report two illustrative cases of trichinellosis. Returning...

  18. Prior appendectomy and the phenotype and course of Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacques Cosnes; Philippe Seksik; Isabelle Nion-Larmurier; Laurent Beaugerie; Jean-Pierre Gendre

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether prior appendectomy modifies the phenotype and severity of Crohn's disease.METHODS: Appendectomy status and smoking habits were specified by direct interview in 2838 patients consecutively seen between 1995 and 2004. Occurrence of complications and therapeutic needs were reviewed retrospectively. Additionally, annual disease activity was assessed prospectively between 1995 and 2004 in patients who had not had ileocecal resection and of a matched control group.RESULTS: Compared to 1770 non-appendectomized patients, appendectomized patients more than 5 years before Crohn's disease diagnosis (n=716) were more often females, smokers, with ileal disease. Cox regression showed that prior appendectomy was positively related to the risk of intestinal stricture (adjusted hazard ratio,1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.13 to 1.36; P=0.02)and inversely related to the risk of perianal fistulization (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval,0.68 to 0.83; P=0.002). No difference was observed between the two groups regarding the therapeutic needs, except for an increased risk of surgery in appendectomized patients, attributable to the increased prevalence of ileal disease. Between 1995 and 2004,Crohn's disease was active during 50% of years in appendectomized patients (1318 out of 2637 patient-years) and 51% in non-appendectomized patients (1454out of 2841 patient-years; NS).CONCLUSION: Prior appendectomy is associated with a more proximal disease and has an increased risk of stricture and a lesser risk of anal fistulization. However,the severity of the disease is unaffected.

  19. Phenotyping airways disease: an A to E approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonem, S; Raj, V; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D; Green, R; Siddiqui, S

    2012-12-01

    The airway diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous conditions with overlapping pathophysiological and clinical features. It has previously been proposed that this heterogeneity may be characterized in terms of five relatively independent domains labelled from A to E, namely airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchitis, cough reflex hypersensitivity, damage to the airways and surrounding lung parenchyma, and extrapulmonary factors. Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs in both asthma and COPD, accounting for variable day to day symptoms, although the mechanisms most likely differ between the two conditions. Bronchitis, or airway inflammation, may be predominantly eosinophilic or neutrophilic, with different treatments required for each. Cough reflex hypersensitivity is thought to underlie the chronic dry cough out of proportion to other symptoms that can occur in association with airways disease. Structural changes associated with airway disease (damage) include bronchial wall thickening, airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, bronchiectasis and emphysema. Finally, a variety of extrapulmonary factors may impact upon airway disease, including rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity and dysfunctional breathing. This article discusses the A to E concept in detail and describes how this framework may be used to assess and treat patients with airway diseases in the clinic. PMID:23181785

  20. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H.V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G.C.M.; Brown, D.L.; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.; Helbig, I.; Hurst, J.A.; Jahn, J.; Jackson, L.G.; Kelly, A.M.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Mansour, S.; Martin, C.L.; Moss, C.; Mumford, A.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Park, S.M.; Riggs, E.R.; Scott, R.H.; Sisodiya, S.; Vooren, S. van der; Wapner, R.J.; Wilkie, A.O.; Wright, C.F.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Leeuw, N. de; Vries, B. de; Washingthon, N.L.; Smith, C.L.; Westerfield, M.; Schofield, P.; Ruef, B.J.; Gkoutos, G.V.; Haendel, M.; Smedley, D.; Lewis, S.E.; Robinson, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have d

  1. Thr(118Met amino acid substitution in the peripheral myelin protein 22 does not influence the clinical phenotype of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A due to the 17p11.2-p12 duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Marques Jr.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Thr(118Met substitution in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 gene has been detected in a number of families with demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT1 neuropathy or with the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy, but in none of them has it consistently segregated with the peripheral neuropathy. We describe here a CMT1 family (a 63-year-old man, his brother and his niece in which two mutations on different chromosomes were found in the PMP22 gene, the 17p duplication, detected by fluorescent semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR of microsatellite markers localized within the duplicated region on chromosome 17p11.2-p12, and the Thr(118Met substitution, detected by direct sequencing the four coding exons of the PMP22 gene. A genotype/phenotype correlation study showed that the neuropathy segregates with the duplication and that the amino acid substitution does not seem to modify the clinical characteristics or the severity of the peripheral neuropathy. We did not find any evidence to characterize this substitution as a polymorphism in the population studied and we propose that the high frequency reported for this point mutation in the literature suggests that the Thr(118Met substitution may be a hotspot for mutations in the PMP22 gene.

  2. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of infectious bursal disease virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormitorio, T V; Giambrone, J J; Guo, K; Jackwood, D J

    2007-06-01

    Two infectious bursal disease viruses (IBDVs 1174 and V1) were isolated from IBDV-vaccinated broiler flocks in California and Georgia. These flocks had a history of subclinical immunosuppression. These isolates are commonly used in IBDV progeny challenge studies at Auburn, AL, as well as vaccine manufacturer's vaccine efficacy studies, because they come from populated poultry-producing states, and are requested by poultry veterinarians from those states. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) generated viral genome products for sequencing. A 491-bp segment from the VP2 gene, covering the hypervariable region, from each isolate was analyzed and compared with previously sequenced isolates. Sequence analysis showed that they were more closely related to the Delaware (Del) E antigenic variant than they are to the Animal Health Plant Inspection Service (APHIS) standard, both at the nucleotide level (96%, 97%) and at the amino acid level (94%, 97%). Both isolates had the glutamine to lysine shift in amino acid 249 which has been reported to be critical in binding the virus neutralizing Mab B69. Phenotypic studies showed that both isolates produced rapid atrophy of the bursae and weight loss, without the edematous bursal phase, in 2-wk-old commercial broilers having antibody against IBDV. A progeny challenge study showed both isolates produced more atrophy of the bursae (less percentage of protection) than the Del E isolate. Molecular and phenotypic data of these important IBDV isolates help in the improved detection and control of this continually changing and important viral pathogen of chickens. PMID:17626491

  3. Targeting mitochondrial phenotypes for non-communicable diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengtang Qi; Shuzhe Ding

    2016-01-01

    The concept that“Exercise is Medicine”has been challenged by the rising prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs). This is partly due to the fact that the underlying mechanisms of how exercise influences energy homeostasis and counteracts high-fat diets and physical inactivity is complex and remains relatively poorly understood on a molecular level. In addition to genetic polymorphisms in humans that lead to gross variations in responsiveness to exercise, adaptation in mitochondrial networks is central to physical activity, inactivity, and diet. To harness the benefits of exercise for NCDs, much work still needs to be done to improve health effectively on a societal level such as developing personalized exercise interventions aided by advances in high-throughput genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. We propose that understanding the mitochondrial phenotype according to the molecular information of genotypes, lifestyles, and exercise responsiveness in individuals will optimize exercise effects for prevention of NCDs.

  4. Targeting mitochondrial phenotypes for non-communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengtang Qi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept that “Exercise is Medicine” has been challenged by the rising prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs. This is partly due to the fact that the underlying mechanisms of how exercise influences energy homeostasis and counteracts high-fat diets and physical inactivity is complex and remains relatively poorly understood on a molecular level. In addition to genetic polymorphisms in humans that lead to gross variations in responsiveness to exercise, adaptation in mitochondrial networks is central to physical activity, inactivity, and diet. To harness the benefits of exercise for NCDs, much work still needs to be done to improve health effectively on a societal level such as developing personalized exercise interventions aided by advances in high-throughput genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. We propose that understanding the mitochondrial phenotype according to the molecular information of genotypes, lifestyles, and exercise responsiveness in individuals will optimize exercise effects for prevention of NCDs.

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes and balance impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voica, Alina Sorina; Oancea, Cristian; Tudorache, Emanuela; Crisan, Alexandru F; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Tudorache, Voicu; Timar, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Background/objective Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease that results in airflow limitation and respiratory distress, also having many nonrespiratory manifestations that affect both function and mobility. Preliminary evidence suggests that balance deficits constitute an important secondary impairment in individuals with COPD. Our objective was to investigate balance performance in two groups of COPD patients with different body compositions and to observe which of these groups are more likely to experience falls in the future. Methods We included 27 stable COPD patients and 17 healthy individuals who performed a series of balance tests. The COPD patients were divided in two groups: emphysematous and bronchitic. Patients completed the activities balance confidence scale and the COPD assessment test questionnaire and afterward performed the Berg Balance Scale, timed up and go, single leg stance and 6-minute walking distance test. We analyzed the differences in the balance tests between the studied groups. Results Bronchitic COPD was associated with a decreased value when compared to emphysematous COPD for the following variables: single leg stance (8.7 vs 15.6; P<0.001) and activities balance confidence (53.2 vs 74.2; P=0.001). Bronchitic COPD patients had a significantly higher value of timed up and go test compared to patients with emphysematous COPD (14.7 vs 12.8; P=0.001). Conclusion Patients with COPD have a higher balance impairment than their healthy peers. Moreover, we observed that the bronchitic COPD phenotype is more likely to experience falls compared to the emphysematous phenotype. PMID:27199555

  6. Neuro degenerative diseases: clinical concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the main neuro-degenerative diseases (NDDs) seen clinically. They share some common clinical symptoms and neuro-pathological findings. The increase of life expectancy in the developed countries will inevitably contribute to enhance the prevalence of these diseases. Behavioral disorders, common in NDDs, will produce major care management challenges. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease corresponds to a histopathological diagnosis, based on the observation of a de-pigmentation and a neuronal loss in the substantia nigra, as well as on the presence of intra-neuronal inclusion bodies. AD is insidious with slowly progressive dementia in which the decline in memory constitutes the main complaint. The diagnosis of definite AD requires the presence of clinical criteria as well as the histopathological confirmation of brain lesions. The two main lesions are the presence of senile plaques and neuro-fibrillary tangles. Positron emission tomography (PET) explores cerebral metabolism and neurotransmitter kinetics in NDDs using principally [18F]-deoxyglucose and [18F]-dopa. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic function is altered in PD, as evidenced by the low uptake of [18F]-dopa in the posterior putamen as compared to anterior putamen and caudate nucleus. In contrast, [18F]-dopa uptake is equally depressed in all striatal structures in progressive supra-nuclear palsy. Regional glucose metabolism at rest is preserved in elderly once cerebral atrophy is taken into account. On the contrary, glucose metabolism is globally reduced in AD, with marked decrease in the parietal and temporal regions. PET has proved to be useful to study in vivo neurochemical processes in patients suffering from NDDs. The potential of this approach is still largely unexploited, and depends on new ligand production to establish early diagnosis and treatment follow-up. (author)

  7. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H. V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G C M; Brown, D L; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; Fitzpatrick, D R; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with sev...

  8. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups may influence Fabry disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncini, C; Chico, L; Concolino, D; Sestito, S; Fancellu, L; Boadu, W; Sechi, G P; Feliciani, C; Gnarra, M; Zampetti, A; Salviati, A; Scarpelli, M; Orsucci, D; Bonuccelli, U; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2016-08-26

    While the genetic origin of Fabry disease (FD) is well known, it is still unclear why the disease presents a wide heterogeneity of clinical presentation and progression, even within the same family. Emerging observations reveal that mitochondrial impairment and oxidative stress may be implicated in the pathogenesis of FD. To investigate if specific genetic polymorphisms within the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) could act as susceptibility factors and contribute to the clinical expression of FD, we have genotyped European mtDNA haplogroups in 77 Italian FD patients and 151 healthy controls. Haplogroups H and I, and haplogroup cluster HV were significantly more frequent in patients than controls. However, no correlation with gender, age of onset, organ involvement was observed. Our study seems to provide some evidence of a contribution of mitochondrial variation in FD pathogenesis, at least in Italy. PMID:27365132

  9. Huntington's disease: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Raymund AC

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Huntington disease (HD is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by unwanted choreatic movements, behavioral and psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Prevalence in the Caucasian population is estimated at 1/10,000-1/20,000. Mean age at onset of symptoms is 30-50 years. In some cases symptoms start before the age of 20 years with behavior disturbances and learning difficulties at school (Juvenile Huntington's disease; JHD. The classic sign is chorea that gradually spreads to all muscles. All psychomotor processes become severely retarded. Patients experience psychiatric symptoms and cognitive decline. HD is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by an elongated CAG repeat (36 repeats or more on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 in the Huntingtine gene. The longer the CAG repeat, the earlier the onset of disease. In cases of JHD the repeat often exceeds 55. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and signs in an individual with a parent with proven HD, and is confirmed by DNA determination. Pre-manifest diagnosis should only be performed by multidisciplinary teams in healthy at-risk adult individuals who want to know whether they carry the mutation or not. Differential diagnoses include other causes of chorea including general internal disorders or iatrogenic disorders. Phenocopies (clinically diagnosed cases of HD without the genetic mutation are observed. Prenatal diagnosis is possible by chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis. Preimplantation diagnosis with in vitro fertilization is offered in several countries. There is no cure. Management should be multidisciplinary and is based on treating symptoms with a view to improving quality of life. Chorea is treated with dopamine receptor blocking or depleting agents. Medication and non-medical care for depression and aggressive behavior may be required. The progression of the disease leads to a complete dependency in daily life, which

  10. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Li, Xiaojie; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Mauceri, Joseph; Burm, Hayley B; Toner, Michael; Osipovitch, Mikhail; Jim Xu, Qiwu; Ding, Fengfei; Wang, Fushun; Kang, Ning; Kang, Jian; Curtin, Paul C; Brunner, Daniela; Windrem, Martha S; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Nedergaard, Maiken; Goldman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs), derived from either human embryonic stem cells or mHTT-transduced fetal hGPCs. Here we show that mHTT glia can impart disease phenotype to normal mice, since mice engrafted intrastriatally with mHTT hGPCs exhibit worse motor performance than controls, and striatal neurons in mHTT glial chimeras are hyperexcitable. Conversely, normal glia can ameliorate disease phenotype in transgenic HD mice, as striatal transplantation of normal glia rescues aspects of electrophysiological and behavioural phenotype, restores interstitial potassium homeostasis, slows disease progression and extends survival in R6/2 HD mice. These observations suggest a causal role for glia in HD, and further suggest a cell-based strategy for disease amelioration in this disorder. PMID:27273432

  11. Extracellular microvesicle microRNAs in children with sickle cell anaemia with divergent clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Khalyfa, Ahamed A; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Connes, Phillippe; Romana, Marc; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; Zhang, Chunling; Andrade, Jorge; Gozal, David

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is the most frequent genetic haemoglobinopathy, which exhibits a highly variable clinical course characterized by hyper-coagulable and pro-inflammatory states, as well as endothelial dysfunction. Extracellular microvesicles are released into biological fluids and play a role in modifying the functional phenotype of target cells. We hypothesized that potential differences in plasma-derived extracellular microvesicles (EV) function and cargo from SCA patients may underlie divergent clinical trajectories. Plasma EV from SCA patients with mild, intermediate and severe clinical disease course were isolated, and primary endothelial cell cultures were exposed. Endothelial cell activation, monocyte adhesion, barrier disruption and exosome cargo (microRNA microarrays) were assessed. EV disrupted the endothelial barrier and induced expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in a SCA severity-dependent manner compared to healthy children. Microarray approaches identified a restricted signature of exosomal microRNAs that readily distinguished severe from mild SCA, as well as from healthy children. The microRNA candidates were further validated using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assays, and revealed putative gene targets. Circulating exosomal microRNAs may play important roles in predicting the clinical course of SCA, and in delineation of individually tailored, mechanistically-based clinical treatment approaches of SCA patients in the near future. PMID:27161653

  12. Phenotypic comparison of clinical and plant-beneficial strains of Pantoea agglomerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaterra, Anna; Badosa, Esther; Rezzonico, Fabio; Duffy, Brion; Montesinos, Emilio

    2014-06-01

    Certain strains of Pantoea are used as biocontrol agents for the suppression of plant diseases. However, their commercial registration is hampered in some countries because of biosafety concerns. This study compares clinical and plant-beneficial strains of P. agglomerans and related species using a phenotypic analysis approach in which plant-beneficial effects, adverse effects in nematode models, and toxicity were evaluated. Plant-beneficial effects were determined as the inhibition of apple fruit infection by Penicillium expansum and apple flower infection by Erwinia amylovora. Clinical strains had no general inhibitory activity against infection by the fungal or bacterial plant pathogens, as only one clinical strain inhibited P. expansum and three inhibited E. amylovora. By contrast, all biocontrol strains showed activity against at least one of the phytopathogens, and three strains were active against both. The adverse effects in animals were evaluated in the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne javanica and the bacterial-feeding nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Both models indicated adverse effects of the two clinical strains but not of any of the plant-beneficial strains. Toxicity was evaluated by means of hemolytic activity in blood, and genotoxicity with the Ames test. None of the strains, whether clinical or plant-beneficial, showed any evidence of toxicity. PMID:26418852

  13. Clinical Polymorphism of Stargardt Disease in a Large Consanguineous Tunisian Family; Implications for Nosology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila El Matri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the polymorphic expression of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family with clinical intra- and interfamilial variation of the condition. Methods: Twelve subjects from two related families with autosomal recessive Stargardt disease were enrolled. A detailed clinical examination including visual acuity and visual field measurement, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, electroretinography (ERG and color vision testing was performed for all subjects. Results: The youngest child from family A manifested typical Stargardt disease while her two brothers presented with Stargardt disease-fundus flavimaculatus (STGD-FFM and her two sisters demonstrated a peculiar phenotype overlapping Stargardt disease and cone-rod dystrophy; their phenotypic manifestation corresponded well with ERG groups I, II and III, respectively. This uncommon occurrence of an age-related decline in ERG amplitude and worsening of fundus changes is suggestive of a grading pattern in Stargardt disease. Their two cousins in family B, displayed the STGD-FFM phenotype. Despite clinically similar STGD-FFM patterns in both families, age of onset and progression of the phenotype in family B differed from family A. Conclusion: This is the first report on phenotypic variation of Stargardt disease in a large Tunisian family. Regarding phenotype and severity of visual symptoms, family A demonstrated Stargardt disease at various stages of progression. In addition, STGDFFM appeared to be an independent clinical entity in family B. These findings imply that further parameters are required to classify Stargardt′s disease.

  14. Hearing impairment in Parkinson's disease: expanding the nonmotor phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Carmine; Marcelli, Vincenzo; Allocca, Roberto; Santangelo, Gabriella; Riccardi, Pasquale; Erro, Roberto; Amboni, Marianna; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Cozzolino, Autilia; Longo, Katia; Picillo, Marina; Moccia, Marcello; Agosti, Valeria; Sorrentino, G; Cavaliere, Michele; Marciano, Elio; Barone, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate hearing impairment in patients affected by Parkinson's disease compared with hearing scores observed in normal age- and sex-matched controls. One hundred eighteen consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were screened. Severity of motor symptoms and staging were measured with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (section III) and the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Audiometric evaluation consisted of a comprehensive audiologic case history and questionnaire, visual otoscopic examination, acoustic immittance measures (tympanogram and acoustic reflexes), pure tone audiometry, and measurement of brain stem auditory-evoked potentials. Healthy age- and sex-matched subjects were selected as the control group. One hundred six of 118 patients were enrolled. Pure tone audiometry revealed age-dependent high-frequency hearing loss in patients with Parkinson's disease compared with both normative values and values for healthy age- and sex-matched controls (75/106 [71%], χ(2) = 5.959, P = .02; 92/106 [86.8%] vs 60/106 [56.6%], χ(2) = 23.804, P sensorial inputs occurring over the course of illness remains to be determined. Because α-synuclein is located predominately in the efferent neuronal system within the inner ear, it could affect susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss or presbycusis. It is feasible that the natural aging process combined with neurodegenerative changes intrinsic to Parkinson's disease might interfere with cochlear transduction mechanisms, thus anticipating presbycusis. PMID:23032708

  15. Clustering and classical analysis of clinical and placental phenotypes in fetal growth restriction and constitutional fetal smallness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, Jerzy; Biesiada, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to determine whether placental examination can be used to distinguish between pathologic fetal growth restriction (FGR) and constitutional fetal smallness. Data were extracted from a clinicoplacental database of high risk pregnancies during the period 1994-2013. These data were used to compare the 590 consecutive cases having birth weights below the 10th percentile with the 5201 remaining cases having gestational ages ≥20 weeks. The authors analyzed 20 clinical and 46 placental phenotypes using classical statistics, clustering analysis, and multidimensional scaling. Of the low-birth-weight babies, the following types of cases were compared: Four categories of placental phenotypes (those with features of poor uteroplacental perfusion, postuterine placental pathology, chronic inflammation, and a mixed category) better defined the presumably true FGR than did the clinical phenotypes. Maternal smoking and oligohydramnios were associated with fewer abnormal placental phenotypes than were maternal hypertensive diseases and abnormal Dopplers. Early-onset cases of fetal smallness clustered with placental features of poor uteroplacental perfusion, whereas late onset cases did not. Placental examination helps to retrospectively distinguish constitutionally small fetuses from those that are pathologically growth restricted. The latter correlate best with the clinical risk for FGR and with early-onset FGR. This correlation may have prognostic significance for the child and for future pregnancies, since hypoxic placental lesions can occur without clinical risk factors but with a tendency to recur in future pregnancies. PMID:27238719

  16. Currently Clinical Views on Genetics of Wilson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Chen; Bo Shen; Jia-Jia Xiao; Rong Wu; Sarah Jane Duff Canning; Xiao-Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The objective of this study was to review the research on clinical genetics of Wilson's disease (WD).Data Sources:We searched documents from PubMed and Wanfang databases both in English and Chinese up to 2014 using the keywords WD in combination with genetic,ATP7B gene,gene mutation,genotype,phenotype.Study Selection:Publications about the ATP7B gene and protein function associated with clinical features were selected.Results:Wilson's disease,also named hepatolenticular degeneration,is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by abnormal copper metabolism caused by mutations to the copper-transporting gene A TP7B.Decreased biliary copper excretion and reduced incorporation of copper into apoceruloplasmin caused by defunctionalization of ATP7B protein lead to accumulation of copper in many tissues and organs,including liver,brain,and cornea,finally resulting in liver disease and extrapyramidal symptoms.It is the most common genetic neurological disorder in the onset of adolescents,second to muscular dystrophy in China.Early diagnosis and medical therapy are of great significance for improving the prognosis of WD patients.However,diagnosis of this disease is usually difficult because of its complicated phenotypes.In the last 10 years,an increasing number of clinical studies have used molecular genetics techniques.Improved diagnosis and prediction of the progression of this disease at the molecular level will aid in the development of more individualized and effective interventions,which is a key to transition from molecular genetic research to the clinical study.Conclusions:Clinical genetics studies are necessary to understand the mechanism underlying WD at the molecular level from the genotype to the phenotype.Clinical genetics research benefits newly emerging medical treatments including stem cell transplantation and gene therapy for WD patients.

  17. MRI findings of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease correlated with phenotypes and genetic mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of MRI features and phenotypes and genetic mutations in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. Methods: Sixteen boys with clinical diagnosis of Pelizaeus- Merzbacher disease (PMD) were included in this study. Their ages ranged from 22 months to 9 years. They were examined by pediatric neurologists, and clinical classification was made according to the symptoms and physical signs. An experienced radiologist reviewed the cranial MRI images and analyzed the brain involvement, including pallidus globus, pyramidal tract, corpus callosum, cerebellar white matter, semioval centrum, brain atrophy and tigroid sign. Results: There were 8 patients with classic form, 7 patients with transitional form and one patient with connatal form. They all showed diffuse delayed myelination in the white matter, with involvement of pallidus globus in 13 cases, pyramidal tract in 7 cases, corpus callosum in 11 cases, cerebellar white matter in 7 cases, semioval centrum in 12 cases. Cerebral atrophy was found in 5 patients and cerebellar atrophy was found in one patient. Five cases depicted tigroid sign. In patients with PLP1 gene point mutation, pyramidal tract and cerebellar white matter involvement showed a high incidence. Cerebellar white matter lesions were relatively frequent in children with transitional form and connatal form. In contrast, tigroid sign was often related to classic form, which indicated a better myelination and outcome. Conclusion: PMD patients show distinct imaging features in their brains, which may be correlated with the phenotype and genetic mutation. (authors)

  18. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome): Six unique arylsulfatase B gene alleles causing variable disease phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isbrandt, D.; Arlt, G.; Figura, K. von; Peters, C.; Brooks, D.A.; Hopwood, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ASB), also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase. Multiple clinical phenotypes of this autosomal recessively inherited disease have been described. Recent isolation and characterization of the human ASB gene facilitated the analysis of molecular defects underlying the different phenotypes. Conditions for PCR amplification of the entire open reading frame from genomic DNA and for subsequent direct automated DNA sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments were established. Besides two polymorphisms described elsewhere that cause methionine-for-valine substitutions in the arylsulfatase B gene, six new mutations in six patients were detected: four point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions, a 1-bp deletion, and a 1-bp insertion. The point mutations were two G-to-A and two T-to-C transitions. The G-to-A transitions cause an arginine-for-glycine substitution at residue 144 in a homoallelic patient with a severe disease phenotype and a tyrosine-for-cysteine substitution at residue 521 in a potentially heteroallelic patient with the severe form of the disease. The T-to-C transitions cause an arginine-for-cysteine substitution at amino acid residue 192 in a homoallelic patient with mild symptoms and a proline-for-leucine substitution at amino acid 321 in a homoallelic patient with the intermediate form. The insertion between nucleotides T1284 and G1285 resulted in a loss of the 100 C-terminal amino acids of the wild-type protein and in the deletion of nucleotide C1577 in a 39-amino-acid C-terminal extension of the ASB polypeptide. Both mutations were detected in homoallelic patients with the severe form of the disease. Expression of mutant cDNAs encoding the four amino acid substitutions and the deletion resulted in reduction of both ASB protein levels and arylsulfatase enzyme activity. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  19. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C. M.; Brown, Danielle L.; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R.; Eppig, Janan T.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A.; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G.; Kelly, Anne M.; Ledbetter, David H.; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L.; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Vooren, Steven Van; Wapner, Ronald J.; Wilkie, Andrew O. M.; Wright, Caroline F.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Washingthon, Nicole L.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Robinson, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online. PMID:24217912

  20. Linking human diseases to animal models using ontology-based phenotype annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Washington

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientists and clinicians who study genetic alterations and disease have traditionally described phenotypes in natural language. The considerable variation in these free-text descriptions has posed a hindrance to the important task of identifying candidate genes and models for human diseases and indicates the need for a computationally tractable method to mine data resources for mutant phenotypes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ontological annotation of disease phenotypes will facilitate the discovery of new genotype-phenotype relationships within and across species. To describe phenotypes using ontologies, we used an Entity-Quality (EQ methodology, wherein the affected entity (E and how it is affected (Q are recorded using terms from a variety of ontologies. Using this EQ method, we annotated the phenotypes of 11 gene-linked human diseases described in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM. These human annotations were loaded into our Ontology-Based Database (OBD along with other ontology-based phenotype descriptions of mutants from various model organism databases. Phenotypes recorded with this EQ method can be computationally compared based on the hierarchy of terms in the ontologies and the frequency of annotation. We utilized four similarity metrics to compare phenotypes and developed an ontology of homologous and analogous anatomical structures to compare phenotypes between species. Using these tools, we demonstrate that we can identify, through the similarity of the recorded phenotypes, other alleles of the same gene, other members of a signaling pathway, and orthologous genes and pathway members across species. We conclude that EQ-based annotation of phenotypes, in conjunction with a cross-species ontology, and a variety of similarity metrics can identify biologically meaningful similarities between genes by comparing phenotypes alone. This annotation and search method provides a novel and efficient means to identify

  1. Biallelic Mutations in TMEM126B Cause Severe Complex I Deficiency with a Variable Clinical Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Charlotte L; Compton, Alison G; Formosa, Luke E; Strecker, Valentina; Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Smet, Joél; Stouffs, Katrien; Diakumis, Peter; Ciara, Elżbieta; Cassiman, David; Romain, Nadine; Yarham, John W; He, Langping; De Paepe, Boel; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Seneca, Sara; Feichtinger, René G; Płoski, Rafal; Rokicki, Dariusz; Pronicka, Ewa; Haller, Ronald G; Van Hove, Johan L K; Bahlo, Melanie; Mayr, Johannes A; Van Coster, Rudy; Prokisch, Holger; Wittig, Ilka; Ryan, Michael T; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most common biochemical phenotype observed in individuals with mitochondrial disease. With 44 structural subunits and over 10 assembly factors, it is unsurprising that complex I deficiency is associated with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies including custom, targeted gene panels or unbiased whole-exome sequencing (WES) are hugely powerful in identifying the underlying genetic defect in a clinical diagnostic setting, yet many individuals remain without a genetic diagnosis. These individuals might harbor mutations in poorly understood or uncharacterized genes, and their diagnosis relies upon characterization of these orphan genes. Complexome profiling recently identified TMEM126B as a component of the mitochondrial complex I assembly complex alongside proteins ACAD9, ECSIT, NDUFAF1, and TIMMDC1. Here, we describe the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in six cases of mitochondrial disease from four unrelated families affected by biallelic (c.635G>T [p.Gly212Val] and/or c.401delA [p.Asn134Ilefs(∗)2]) TMEM126B variants. We provide functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of these TMEM126B variants, including evidence of founder effects for both variants, and establish defects within this gene as a cause of complex I deficiency in association with either pure myopathy in adulthood or, in one individual, a severe multisystem presentation (chronic renal failure and cardiomyopathy) in infancy. Functional experimentation including viral rescue and complexome profiling of subject cell lines has confirmed TMEM126B as the tenth complex I assembly factor associated with human disease and validates the importance of both genome-wide sequencing and proteomic approaches in characterizing disease-associated genes whose physiological roles have been previously undetermined. PMID:27374774

  2. The Relation between Diverse Phenotypes of PCOS with Clinical Manifestations, Anthropometric Indices and Metabolic Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Seyedeh Hajar Shahrami; Zahra Abbasi Ranjbar; Forozan Milani; Ehsan Kezem-Nejad; Afagh Hassanzadeh Rad; Seyedeh Fatemeh Dalil Heirat

    2016-01-01

    Critical issue regarding to variation of findings based on different phenotypes led investigators to define whether they are distinct features or overlapping ones. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association between diverse phenotypes of PCOS (Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome) with clinical manifestations, anthropometric indices, and metabolic characteristics. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in 15-39 years old women with PCOS referred to infertility clinics in the nort...

  3. Missing heritability of complex diseases: Enlightenment by genetic variants from intermediate phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Gómez, Adrián; Castillo-Lluva, Sonia; Del Mar Sáez-Freire, María; Hontecillas-Prieto, Lourdes; Mao, Jian Hua; Castellanos-Martín, Andrés; Pérez-Losada, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Diseases of complex origin have a component of quantitative genetics that contributes to their susceptibility and phenotypic variability. However, after several studies, a major part of the genetic component of complex phenotypes has still not been found, a situation known as "missing heritability." Although there have been many hypotheses put forward to explain the reasons for the missing heritability, its definitive causes remain unknown. Complex diseases are caused by multiple intermediate phenotypes involved in their pathogenesis and, very often, each one of these intermediate phenotypes also has a component of quantitative inheritance. Here we propose that at least part of the missing heritability can be explained by the genetic component of intermediate phenotypes that is not detectable at the level of the main complex trait. At the same time, the identification of the genetic component of intermediate phenotypes provides an opportunity to identify part of the missing heritability of complex diseases. PMID:27241833

  4. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  5. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-06-08

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  6. PHENOTYPIC INVESTIGATION OF VIRULENCE PROFILES IN SOME CANDIDA SPP. STRAINS ISOLATED FROM DIFFERENT CLINICAL SPECIMENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Maria Holban

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida species great versatility may explain their wide range of infections occurred in a great variety of hosts. Even though many modern molecular techniques arise, phenotypic assays still provide valuable information and can guide the diagnosis and the treatment of infections. The phenotypic investigation of virulence determinants in some recent nosocomial isolates of Candida spp. revealed that the fungal clinical strains may develop specific virulence profiles depending on the taxonomic affiliation of the tested strains and the source of infection. Our data support the usefulness of phenotypic assays in predicting the clinical outcome of the fungal infections and in the adjustment of the antifungal treatment.

  7. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivka Colen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute (NCI Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research.

  8. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie;

    2016-01-01

    (hGPCs), derived from either human embryonic stem cells or mHTT-transduced fetal hGPCs. Here we show that mHTT glia can impart disease phenotype to normal mice, since mice engrafted intrastriatally with mHTT hGPCs exhibit worse motor performance than controls, and striatal neurons in mHTT glial......The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells...

  9. Persistent systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD: a novel phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvar Agustí

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a heterogeneous condition, the identification of specific clinical phenotypes is key to developing more effective therapies. To explore if the persistence of systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD we assessed patients recruited to the well-characterized ECLIPSE cohort (NCT00292552. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Six inflammatory biomarkers in peripheral blood (white blood cells (WBC count and CRP, IL-6, IL-8, fibrinogen and TNF-α levels were quantified in 1,755 COPD patients, 297 smokers with normal spirometry and 202 non-smoker controls that were followed-up for three years. We found that, at baseline, 30% of COPD patients did not show evidence of systemic inflammation whereas 16% had persistent systemic inflammation. Even though pulmonary abnormalities were similar in these two groups, persistently inflamed patients during follow-up had significantly increased all-cause mortality (13% vs. 2%, p<0.001 and exacerbation frequency (1.5 (1.5 vs. 0.9 (1.1 per year, p<0.001 compared to non-inflamed ones. As a descriptive study our results show associations but do not prove causality. Besides this, the inflammatory response is complex and we studied only a limited panel of biomarkers, albeit they are those investigated by the majority of previous studies and are often and easily measured in clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, these results identify a novel systemic inflammatory COPD phenotype that may be the target of specific research and treatment.

  10. Multiple Changes of Gene Expression and Function Reveal Genomic and Phenotypic Complexity in SLE-like Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbe, Maria; Kozyrev, Sergey V; Farias, Fabiana H G; Bremer, Hanna D; Hedlund, Anna; Pielberg, Gerli R; Seppälä, Eija H; Gustafson, Ulla; Lohi, Hannes; Carlborg, Örjan; Andersson, Göran; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2015-06-01

    The complexity of clinical manifestations commonly observed in autoimmune disorders poses a major challenge to genetic studies of such diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) affects humans as well as other mammals, and is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in patients' sera and multiple disparate clinical features. Here we present evidence that particular sub-phenotypes of canine SLE-related disease, based on homogenous (ANA(H)) and speckled ANA (ANA(S)) staining pattern, and also steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA) are associated with different but overlapping sets of genes. In addition to association to certain MHC alleles and haplotypes, we identified 11 genes (WFDC3, HOMER2, VRK1, PTPN3, WHAMM, BANK1, AP3B2, DAPP1, LAMTOR3, DDIT4L and PPP3CA) located on five chromosomes that contain multiple risk haplotypes correlated with gene expression and disease sub-phenotypes in an intricate manner. Intriguingly, the association of BANK1 with both human and canine SLE appears to lead to similar changes in gene expression levels in both species. Our results suggest that molecular definition may help unravel the mechanisms of different clinical features common between and specific to various autoimmune disease phenotypes in dogs and humans. PMID:26057447

  11. Multiple Changes of Gene Expression and Function Reveal Genomic and Phenotypic Complexity in SLE-like Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wilbe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of clinical manifestations commonly observed in autoimmune disorders poses a major challenge to genetic studies of such diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE affects humans as well as other mammals, and is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA in patients' sera and multiple disparate clinical features. Here we present evidence that particular sub-phenotypes of canine SLE-related disease, based on homogenous (ANA(H and speckled ANA (ANA(S staining pattern, and also steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA are associated with different but overlapping sets of genes. In addition to association to certain MHC alleles and haplotypes, we identified 11 genes (WFDC3, HOMER2, VRK1, PTPN3, WHAMM, BANK1, AP3B2, DAPP1, LAMTOR3, DDIT4L and PPP3CA located on five chromosomes that contain multiple risk haplotypes correlated with gene expression and disease sub-phenotypes in an intricate manner. Intriguingly, the association of BANK1 with both human and canine SLE appears to lead to similar changes in gene expression levels in both species. Our results suggest that molecular definition may help unravel the mechanisms of different clinical features common between and specific to various autoimmune disease phenotypes in dogs and humans.

  12. Clinical phenotype of 5 females with a CDKL5 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, X.L.; Spruijt, L.; Yntema, H.G.; Verrips, A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin dependent kinase like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been reported in approximately 80 patients since the first description in 2003. The clinical presentation partly corresponds with Rett syndrome, considering clinical features as intellectual disability, hypotonia, and poor vi

  13. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  14. Phenotyping of Clinical Time Series with LSTM Recurrent Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lipton, Zachary C.; Kale, David C.; Wetzell, Randall C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel application of LSTM recurrent neural networks to multilabel classification of diagnoses given variable-length time series of clinical measurements. Our method outperforms a strong baseline on a variety of metrics.

  15. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fliers, E.; Wiersinga, W.M.; Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  16. Similarity-based search of model organism, disease and drug effect phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-02-19

    Background: Semantic similarity measures over phenotype ontologies have been demonstrated to provide a powerful approach for the analysis of model organism phenotypes, the discovery of animal models of human disease, novel pathways, gene functions, druggable therapeutic targets, and determination of pathogenicity. Results: We have developed PhenomeNET 2, a system that enables similarity-based searches over a large repository of phenotypes in real-time. It can be used to identify strains of model organisms that are phenotypically similar to human patients, diseases that are phenotypically similar to model organism phenotypes, or drug effect profiles that are similar to the phenotypes observed in a patient or model organism. PhenomeNET 2 is available at http://aber-owl.net/phenomenet. Conclusions: Phenotype-similarity searches can provide a powerful tool for the discovery and investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying an observed phenotypic manifestation. PhenomeNET 2 facilitates user-defined similarity searches and allows researchers to analyze their data within a large repository of human, mouse and rat phenotypes.

  17. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postuma, R.B.; Berg, D; Stern, M.; Poewe, W.; Olanow, C.W.; Oertel, W.; Obeso, J.; Marek, K.; Litvan, I.; Lang, A.E.; Halliday, G.; Goetz, C.G.; Gasser, T.; Dubois, B.; Chan, P.; Bloem, B.R.; Adler, C.H.; Deuschl, G.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical di

  18. Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our mission is to conduct infectious disease clinical research of importance to the military through a unique, adaptive, and collaborative network, to inform health...

  19. Clinical studies of asthma phenotypes focusing on the role of the leukotrienes

    OpenAIRE

    Gyllfors, Per

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation in the airways in connection to asthma is a complex phenomenon and the mechanisms underlying the associated clinical symptoms involve the interaction of many different kinds of cells and mediators, giving rise to different phenotypes. The aim of the present thesis was to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms that results in two of these phenotypes, i.e., aspirinintolerant asthma and allergic asthma. The main focus was on leukotrienes and other eicosa...

  20. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha;

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease com...

  1. Genotype/phenotype analyses for 53 Crohn's disease associated genetic polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Jung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Recent studies reported a role for more than 70 genes or loci in the susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD. However, the impact of these associations in clinical practice remains to be defined. The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes for the main 53 CD-associated polymorphisms. METHOD: A cohort of 798 CD patients with a median follow up of 7 years was recruited by tertiary adult and paediatric gastroenterological centres. A detailed phenotypic description of the disease was recorded, including clinical presentation, response to treatments and complications. The participants were genotyped for 53 CD-associated variants previously reported in the literature and correlations with clinical sub-phenotypes were searched for. A replication cohort consisting of 722 CD patients was used to further explore the putative associations. RESULTS: The NOD2 rare variants were associated with an earlier age at diagnosis (p = 0.0001 and an ileal involvement (OR = 2.25[1.49-3.41] and 2.77 [1.71-4.50] for rs2066844 and rs2066847, respectively. Colonic lesions were positively associated with the risk alleles of IL23R rs11209026 (OR = 2.25 [1.13-4.51] and 6q21 rs7746082 (OR = 1.60 [1.10-2.34] and negatively associated with the risk alleles of IRGM rs13361189 (OR = 0.29 [0.11-0.74] and DEFB1 rs11362 (OR = 0.50 [0.30-0.80]. The ATG16L1 and IRGM variants were associated with a non-inflammatory behaviour (OR = 1.75 [1.22-2.53] and OR = 1.50 [1.04-2.16] respectively. However, these associations lost significance after multiple testing corrections. The protective effect of the IRGM risk allele on colonic lesions was the only association replicated in the second cohort (p = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: It is not recommended to genotype the studied polymorphisms in routine practice.

  2. Association Between Lipoprotein(A) and Small Apo(A) Phenotypes and Coronary Heart Disease in Sudanese Diabetic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background:Recent studies indicate an independent association of apolipoprotein(a) small phenotypes with the diabetes and the onset of coronary heart disease.Apolipoprotein(a)small phenotypes when used together with Lipoprotein(a) levels make powerful markers in assessing the actual risk of developing coronary heart disease in diabetic patients. Objectives: Evaluation of clinical and diagnostic significant of Lipoprotein(a) levels and apolipoprotein(a) small phenotypes and its relation to coronary heart disease in Sudanese diabetic patients. Setting and duration of study: Diabetic patients attending hospitals and medical centers from May 2011-December 2012, in Khartoum, Sudan. Patients and Methods: This was a case control, hospital based study done on 138 Sudanese diabetic patients attending hospitals and medical centers in Khartoum. Patients were divided into 2 groups. One group had diabetic cases with coronary heart disease and the other were diabetic patients without coronary heart disease. Controls were age and gender matched. Blood samples were collected from both groups(patients and controls) and were run for apolipoproteins, lipoproteins and apolipoprotein(a) small phenotype,low-density lipoprotein,high-density lipoprotein and trigeminal ganglia. Results: The levels of Lipoprotein(a) of patients were significantly higher than controls (p<0.05). Apolipoprotein(a)small phenotype distribution showed a significant difference when compared between patients of both groups (diabetics with and without coronary heart disease) and controls (p<0.05). Both low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol showed significant difference in both patient groups and controls (p<0.05). Total cholesterol and triglyceride levels showed no significant difference between patients and controls. Apolipoprotein(a) small phenotypes showed significant distribution in diabetic patients when compared with coronary heart disease patients (more than one low molecular weight

  3. Fenótipos clínicos de asma grave Clinical phenotypes of severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseliane de Souza Araújo Alves

    2008-09-01

    specialized outpatient clinic. A systematic protocol for patient evaluation and follow-up was applied. Treatment compliance and control of the disease at the end of follow-up were defined by clinical and functional data. Patients who did not meet asthma control criteria after six months despite compliance with treatment and correct use of medication were characterized as treatment-resistant. Phenotypes were determined by factorial analysis and compared using various tests. RESULTS: At the end of follow-up, 88 patients were considered treatment compliant and 23 were considered noncompliant. Factorial analysis of the compliant patients identified four phenotypes: phenotype 1 (28 patients comprised patients who were treatment-resistant, more often presenting nocturnal symptoms and exacerbations, as well as more often using rescue bronchodilators; phenotype 2 (48 patients comprised patients with persistent airflow limitation, lower ratios of forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity at baseline, more advanced age and longer duration of symptoms; phenotype 3 (42 patients comprised patients with allergic rhinosinusitis who were nonsmokers and presented predominantly reversible airflow obstruction; and phenotype 4 (15 patients comprised cases with a history of aspirin intolerance to acetylsalicylic acid associated with near-fatal asthma. Conclusions: A significant number of patients with severe asthma are noncompliant with treatment. Although many patients with severe asthma have persistent airflow obstruction, the most relevant clinical phenotype comprises patients who are resistant to the typical treatment.

  4. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Diseases: Concept And Clinical Manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    de Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary “periodic fever syndromes”, familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever synd...

  5. A rare case of haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamee Shastry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a rare case of severe hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN with Bombay phenotype mother. A retrospective study of a case with severe haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother was done. Blood grouping, antibody screening, and lectin study was done on the blood sample of the baby and mother to confirm the diagnosis. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained from the hospital laboratory information system for the analysis. Blood group of the baby was A positive, direct antiglobulin test was negative. Blood group of the mother was confirmed to be Bombay phenotype, Hematological parameters showed all the signs of ongoing hemolysis and the bilirubin level was in the zone of exchange transfusion. Due to the unavailability of this rare phenotype blood unit, baby was managed conservatively. Anticipating the fetal anemia and HDN with mothers having Bombay phenotype and prior notification to the transfusion services will be of great help in optimizing the neonatal care and outcome.

  6. Clinical approaches towards asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on the heterogeneity of disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizawa, N

    2016-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are each heterogeneous disease classifications that include several clinical and pathophysiological phenotypes. This heterogeneity complicates characterization of each disease and, in some cases, hinders the selection of appropriate treatment. Therefore, in recent years, emphasis has been placed on improving our understanding of the various phenotypes of asthma and of COPD and identifying biomarkers for each phenotype. Likewise, the concept of the endotype has been gaining acceptance; an endotype is a disease subtype that is defined by unique or distinctive functional or pathophysiological mechanisms. Endotypes of asthma or COPD may be primarily characterized by increased susceptibility to type 2 inflammation, increased susceptibility to viral infections, bacterial colonization or impaired lung development. The 'Dutch hypothesis' is as follows: gene variants underlying particular endotypes interact with detrimental environmental stimuli (e.g. smoking, viral infection and air pollution) and contribute to the ultimate development of asthma, COPD or both. Novel approaches that involve multidimensional assessment should facilitate identification and management of the components that generate this heterogeneity. Ultimately, patients with chronic inflammatory lung diseases may be treated based on these endotypes as determined by the respective biomarkers that correspond to individual endotypes instead of on disease labels such as asthma, COPD or even asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). PMID:27009427

  7. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, Carlos Walter; Leal, Raquel Franco; Sobrado, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:27438429

  8. Clinical Genetic Testing for the Cardiomyopathies and Arrhythmias: A Systematic Framework for Establishing Clinical Validity and Addressing Genotypic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, John; Tahiliani, Jackie; Johnson, Nicole Marie; Aguilar, Sienna; Beltran, Daniel; Daly, Amy; Decker, Emily; Haverfield, Eden; Herrera, Blanca; Murillo, Laura; Nykamp, Keith; Topper, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing have made large, diagnostic gene panels affordable and efficient. Broad adoption of such panels has begun to deliver on the promises of personalized medicine, but has also brought new challenges such as the presence of unexpected results, or results of uncertain clinical significance. Genetic analysis of inherited cardiac conditions is particularly challenging due to the extensive genetic heterogeneity underlying cardiac phenotypes, and the overlapping, variable, and incompletely penetrant nature of their clinical presentations. The design of effective diagnostic tests and the effective use of the results depend on a clear understanding of the relationship between each gene and each considered condition. To address these issues, we developed simple, systematic approaches to three fundamental challenges: (1) evaluating the strength of the evidence suggesting that a particular condition is caused by pathogenic variants in a particular gene, (2) evaluating whether unusual genotype/phenotype observations represent a plausible expansion of clinical phenotype associated with a gene, and (3) establishing a molecular diagnostic strategy to capture overlapping clinical presentations. These approaches focus on the systematic evaluation of the pathogenicity of variants identified in clinically affected individuals, and the natural history of disease in those individuals. Here, we applied these approaches to the evaluation of more than 100 genes reported to be associated with inherited cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and to a set of related syndromes such as Noonan Syndrome and Fabry disease. These approaches provide a framework for delivering meaningful and accurate genetic test results to individuals with hereditary

  9. Junctophilin 3 (JPH3) expansion mutations causing Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2) are common in South African patients with African ancestry and a Huntington disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Amanda; Mitchell, Claire; Essop, Fahmida; Tager, Susan; Temlett, James; Stevanin, Giovanni; Ross, Christopher; Rudnicki, Dobrila; Margolis, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by abnormal movements, cognitive decline, and psychiatric symptoms, caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene on chromosome 4p. A CAG/CTG repeat expansion in the junctophilin-3 (JPH3) gene on chromosome 16q24.2 causes a Huntington disease-like phenotype (HDL2). All patients to date with HDL2 have some African ancestry. The present study aimed to characterize the genetic basis of the Huntington disease phenotype in South Africans and to investigate the possible origin of the JPH3 mutation. In a sample of unrelated South African individuals referred for diagnostic HD testing, 62% (106/171) of white patients compared to only 36% (47/130) of black patients had an expansion in HTT. However, 15% (20/130) of black South African patients and no white patients (0/171) had an expansion in JPH3, confirming the diagnosis of Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2). Individuals with HDL2 share many clinical features with individuals with HD and are clinically indistinguishable in many cases, although the average age of onset and diagnosis in HDL2 is 5 years later than HD and individual clinical features may be more prominent. HDL2 mutations contribute significantly to the HD phenotype in South Africans with African ancestry. JPH3 haplotype studies in 31 families, mainly from South Africa and North America, provide evidence for a founder mutation and support a common African origin for all HDL2 patients. Molecular testing in individuals with an HD phenotype and African ancestry should include testing routinely for JPH3 mutations. PMID:26079385

  10. Clinical presentation of juvenile Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruocco Heloísa H.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical presentation a group of patients with juvenile onset of Huntington disease. METHOD: All patients were interviewed following a structured clinical questioner. Patients were genotyped for the trinucleotide cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeat in the Huntington Disease gene. High resolution brain MRI was performed in all patients. RESULTS: We identified 4 patients with juvenile onset of disease among 50 patients with Huntington disease followed prospectively in our Neurogenetics clinic. Age at onset varied from 3 to 13 years, there were 2 boys, and 3 patients had a paternal inheritance of the disease. Expanded Huntington disease allele sizes varied from 41 to 69 trinucleotide repeats. The early onset patients presented with rigidity, bradykinesia, dystonia, dysarthria, seizures and ataxia. MRI showed severe volume loss of caudate and putamen nuclei (p=0.001 and reduced cerebral and cerebellum volumes (p=0.01. CONCLUSION: 8% of Huntington disease patients seen in our clinic had juvenile onset of the disease. They did not present with typical chorea as seen in adult onset Huntington disease. There was a predominance of rigidity and bradykinesia. Two other important clinical features were seizures and ataxia, which related with the imaging findings of early cortical atrophy and cerebellum volume loss.

  11. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA: clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariminejad Ariana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA (OMIM 225400 is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4 due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial, independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity.

  12. Clinical characteristics of caroli's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozlem Yonem; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2007-01-01

    Caroli's disease is a rare congenital condition characterized by non-obstructive saccular or fusiform dilatation of larger intrahepatic bile ducts. Cholangitis,liver cirrhosis, and cholangiocarcinoma are its potential complications. The diagnosis of Caroli's disease depends on demonstrating that the cystic lesions are in continuity with the biliary tree which can be showed by ultrasonography, computerized tomography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. Treatment of Caroli's disease relies on the location of the biliary abnormalities. While localized forms confined to one lobe can be treated with surgery, liver transplantation is the only effective modality for diffuse forms. Although a rare disorder;Caroli's disease should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic cholestasis of unknown cause.

  13. Oppositional Defiant Disorder as a Clinical Phenotype in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2008-01-01

    To examine the validity of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) as a clinical phenotype distinct from attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), parents and teachers completed a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale and a background questionnaire for 608 children (ages 3-12 years) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The ASD sample was separated…

  14. Persistence of the extended psychosis phenotype in young people: Link between vulnerability and clinical need

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, J.T.W.

    2011-01-01

    Psychosis is one of the most severe psychiatric conditions, in terms of both individual and societal burden. The pathway from the earliest and mildest expressions of psychosis to clinical disorder is highly variable and heterogeneous. A better understanding of the psychosis phenotype and its develop

  15. Tailoring the Definition of the Clinical Schizophrenia Phenotype in Linkage Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Verena; Krastoshevsky, Olga; Coleman, Michael J.; Bodkin, J. Alexander; Lerbinger, Jan; Boling, Lenore; Johnson, Fred; Gibbs, Anne; Cole, Jonathan O.; Huang, Zhuying; Mendell, Nancy R; Levy, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    The delineation of schizophrenia-related symptomatology is critical to informative clinical phenotyping in linkage studies. A minority of first-degree relatives of schizophrenia and schizoaffective probands (RelSZSA) qualifies for a clinical diagnosis in the schizophrenia spectrum. Schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) is a key component of this spectrum, largely because of its relatively specific familial aggregation in relatives. The criteria for SPD were not developed for the purpose of i...

  16. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  17. PhenoMiner: from text to a database of phenotypes associated with OMIM diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, Nigel; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N; Oellrich, Anika; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of scientific and clinical phenotypes reported in the experimental literature has been curated manually to build high-quality databases such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). However, the identification and harmonization of phenotype descriptions struggles with the diversity of human expressivity. We introduce a novel automated extraction approach called PhenoMiner that exploits full parsing and conceptual analysis. Apriori association mining is then used to identify...

  18. Complex disease and phenotype mapping in the domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Jessica J; Castelhano, Marta G; Oliveira, Kyle C; Corey, Elizabeth; Balkman, Cheryl; Baxter, Tara L; Casal, Margret L; Center, Sharon A; Fang, Meiying; Garrison, Susan J; Kalla, Sara E; Korniliev, Pavel; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Moise, N S; Shannon, Laura M; Simpson, Kenneth W; Sutter, Nathan B; Todhunter, Rory J; Boyko, Adam R

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog is becoming an increasingly valuable model species in medical genetics, showing particular promise to advance our understanding of cancer and orthopaedic disease. Here we undertake the largest canine genome-wide association study to date, with a panel of over 4,200 dogs genotyped at 180,000 markers, to accelerate mapping efforts. For complex diseases, we identify loci significantly associated with hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, idiopathic epilepsy, lymphoma, mast cell tumour and granulomatous colitis; for morphological traits, we report three novel quantitative trait loci that influence body size and one that influences fur length and shedding. Using simulation studies, we show that modestly larger sample sizes and denser marker sets will be sufficient to identify most moderate- to large-effect complex disease loci. This proposed design will enable efficient mapping of canine complex diseases, most of which have human homologues, using far fewer samples than required in human studies. PMID:26795439

  19. Complex disease and phenotype mapping in the domestic dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Jessica J.; Castelhano, Marta G.; Oliveira, Kyle C.; Corey, Elizabeth; Balkman, Cheryl; Baxter, Tara L.; Casal, Margret L.; Center, Sharon A.; Fang, Meiying; Garrison, Susan J.; Kalla, Sara E.; Korniliev, Pavel; Kotlikoff, Michael I.; Moise, N. S.; Shannon, Laura M.; Simpson, Kenneth W.; Sutter, Nathan B.; Todhunter, Rory J.; Boyko, Adam R.

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog is becoming an increasingly valuable model species in medical genetics, showing particular promise to advance our understanding of cancer and orthopaedic disease. Here we undertake the largest canine genome-wide association study to date, with a panel of over 4,200 dogs genotyped at 180,000 markers, to accelerate mapping efforts. For complex diseases, we identify loci significantly associated with hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, idiopathic epilepsy, lymphoma, mast cell tumour and granulomatous colitis; for morphological traits, we report three novel quantitative trait loci that influence body size and one that influences fur length and shedding. Using simulation studies, we show that modestly larger sample sizes and denser marker sets will be sufficient to identify most moderate- to large-effect complex disease loci. This proposed design will enable efficient mapping of canine complex diseases, most of which have human homologues, using far fewer samples than required in human studies. PMID:26795439

  20. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  1. Clinical Significance of Immuno phenotypic Markers in Pediatric T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Cell-marker profiling has led to conflicting conclusions about its prognostic significance in T-ALL. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of the expression of CD34, CD10 and myeloid associated antigens (CD13/ CD33) in childhood T-ALL and to relate their presence to initial clinical and biologic features and early response to therapy. Patients and Methods: This study included 67 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed T-ALL recruited from the Children's Cancer Hospital in Egypt during the time period from July 2007 to June 2008. Immuno phenotypic markers and minimal residual disease (MRD) were studied by five-color flow cytometry. Results: The frequency of CD34 was 34.9%, CD10 33.3%, while CD13/CD33 was 18.8%. No significant association was encountered between CD34, CD10 or myeloid antigen positivity and the presenting clinical features as age, sex, TLC and CNS leukemia. Only CD10+ expression had significant association with initial CNS involvement (p=0.039). CD34 and CD13/CD33 expression was significantly associated with T-cell maturation stages (p<0.05). No relationship was observed for age, TLC, gender, NCI risk or CNS involvement with early response to therapy illustrated by BM as well as MRD day 15 and day 42. CD34+, CD13/CD33+ and early T-cell stage had high MRD levels on day 15 that was statistically highly significant (p<0.01), but CD10+ had statistically significant lower MRD level on day 15 (p=0.049). However, only CD34 retained its significance at an MRD cut-off level of 0.01%. Conclusion: CD34, CD10, CD13/CD33 expression, as well as T-cell maturation stages, may have prognostic significance in pediatric T-ALL as they have a significant impact on early clearance of leukemic cells detected by MRD day 15.

  2. Prevalence and molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Escherichia coli expressing an AmpC phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rikke Lind; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Friis-Møller, Alice; Fjeldsøe-Nielsen, Hans; Schønning, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the prevalence of the AmpC beta-lactamase phenotype in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and characterize the genetic resistance mechanisms causing the observed phenotype. METHODS: Clinical E. coli (n = 74) with reduced susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins...... and resistance to cefoxitin were collected from the Department of Clinical Microbiology at Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark, in 2006. The AmpC disc test was used to confirm expression of AmpC, and test-positive strains were selected for further antimicrobial susceptibility testing and molecular...... characterization. Hyperproduction of AmpC beta-lactamase was confirmed by isoelectric focusing (IEF). The presence of a plasmid-mediated ampC gene (pAmpC) was detected by multiplex PCR. The promoter and the entire reading frame of the chromosomal ampC gene were sequenced to identify promoter mutations associated...

  3. Clinical case of Hailey-Hailey disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpova E.N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a relatively rare case of dermatosis. It is familial benign chronic vesicular fever (Hailey-Hailey disease in a 58-years old female patient which is inherited as an autosomal dominant mode. The data about etiology, pathogenesis, clinical picture and differential diagnosis were summarized. The main ways of treatment of the disease are described.

  4. Clinical case of Hailey-Hailey disease

    OpenAIRE

    Karpova E.N.; Schneider D.A.; Bobko N.K.

    2015-01-01

    The study presents a relatively rare case of dermatosis. It is familial benign chronic vesicular fever (Hailey-Hailey disease) in a 58-years old female patient which is inherited as an autosomal dominant mode. The data about etiology, pathogenesis, clinical picture and differential diagnosis were summarized. The main ways of treatment of the disease are described.

  5. Clinical Features of Interstitial Lung Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Gune-Il; Lee, Kwang Hee; Jeong, Seong Whan; Uh, Soo-taek; Jin, So Young; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Jai Soung; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kang, Chang Hee; Park, Choon Sik

    1996-01-01

    Objectives Interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are heterogenous groups of disorders that involve the interstitium of the lung. Lung biopsy is mandatory in most cases of ILD for diagnosis. In Korea, a few clinical data about ILD were analyzed on the basis of pathologic proof. Thus, we analysed the clinical profiles of patients with ILD who had lung biopsy in a tertiary university hospital. Methods Clinical and pathologic data concerning 100 patients who had open lung biopsy (OLB) and/or transbron...

  6. Currently Clinical Views on Genetics of Wilson′s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chen

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Clinical genetics studies are necessary to understand the mechanism underlying WD at the molecular level from the genotype to the phenotype. Clinical genetics research benefits newly emerging medical treatments including stem cell transplantation and gene therapy for WD patients.

  7. Clinical diagnosis and management in early Huntington's disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiefer J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Schiefer,1,* Cornelius J Werner,1,* Kathrin Reetz1,2 1Euregional Huntington Center, 2Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA – Translational Brain Medicine, Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This review focuses on clinical diagnosis and both pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapeutic options in early stages of the autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD. The available literature has been reviewed for motor, cognitive, and psychiatric alterations, which are the three major symptom domains of this devastating progressive disease. From a clinical point of view, one has to be aware that the HD phenotype can vary highly across individuals and during the course of the disease. Also, symptoms in juvenile HD can differ substantially from those with adult-onset of HD. Although there is no cure of HD and management is limited, motor and psychiatric symptoms often respond to pharmacotherapy, and nonpharmacological approaches as well as supportive care are essential. International treatment recommendations based on study results, critical statements, and expert opinions have been included. This review is restricted to symptomatic and supportive approaches since all attempts to establish a cure for the disease or modifying therapies have failed so far. Keywords: Neurodegeneration, clinical picture, early symptoms, therapy, treatment

  8. Clinical case seminar in pediatric thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinnai, G; Léger, J; Bauer, A J; Pearce, E N; Ramos, H E; Canalli, M H; Onigata, K; Elisei, R; Radetti, G; Polak, M; Van Vliet, G; Deladoëy, J

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid diseases cover a large spectrum of congenital and acquired forms, ranging from congenital primary or central hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroid disease, iodine deficiency, rare genetic defects of thyroid hormone action, metabolism and cell membrane transport to benign nodules and malignant tumors. The previous 15 papers of the textbook Paediatric Thyroidology gave a systematic overview of the current knowledge and guidelines on all these diseases. In this final paper, the authors collected a series of patient histories from their clinics illustrating frequently encountered clinical problems and providing key learning points and references to each case. Although not fully comprehensive, it aims at providing relevant clinical knowledge on thyroid diseases of the neonate, the child, and the adolescent. PMID:25231455

  9. A study of familial MELAS: Evaluation of A3243G mutation, clinical phenotype, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy-monitored progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunnuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS syndrome are nonspecific and can easily be misdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS-based detection of lactate in the brain has been found to be of diagnostic help in MELAS syndrome, however, the issue of whether MRS features vary by stage remains unresolved. We assessed the causative mutation and radiological features of a family of MELAS. Four of the family members harbored the A3243G mutation, probably of maternal inheritance. However, the clinical phenotypic expression was different in these patients. MRS showed a lactate peak, decreased N-acetylaspartate, choline, and creatine, which became more pronounced with progression of the disease, demonstrating that brain-MRS-based detection of lactate may be a suitable way to monitor the progression and treatment of MELAS.

  10. Clinical presentation of adult coeliac disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajuddin, T

    2012-02-01

    The mode of presentation of coeliac disease has been changing to more atypical or silent disease. Few studies described the clinical presentation of adult coeliac disease in Ireland in recent years. We retrospectively collected the clinical data for all patients who had a diagnosis of coeliac disease made in our centre between January 07 and December 08. Forty seven adults, predominantly females (n = 30), had a confirmed diagnosis of coeliac disease made during the study period. In our patient cohort, the presenting symptom was diarrhoea in 19 (40%) patients, while 16 patients (34%) did not have any G.I. symptoms, 10 (21%) presented with anaemia. Females presented at a significantly younger age compared to males, with median ages at diagnosis of 44.5 and 57 years, respectively (p = 0.04). Females also presented more commonly with non G.I. symptoms (p = 0.07). The reasons behind this gender difference need further study.

  11. F12-46C/T polymorphism as modifier of the clinical phenotype of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speletas, M; Szilágyi, Á; Csuka, D; Koutsostathis, N; Psarros, F; Moldovan, D; Magerl, M; Kompoti, M; Varga, L; Maurer, M; Farkas, H; Germenis, A E

    2015-12-01

    The factors influencing the heterogeneous clinical manifestation of hereditary angioedema due to C1-INH deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) represent one of the oldest unsolved problems of the disease. Considering that factor XII (FXII) levels may affect bradykinin production, we investigated the contribution of the functional promoter polymorphism F12-46C/T in disease phenotype. We studied 258 C1-INH-HAE patients from 113 European families, and we explored possible associations of F12-46C/T with clinical features and the SERPING1 mutational status. Given that our cohort consisted of related subjects, we implemented generalized estimating equations (GEEs), an extension of the generalized linear model accounting for the within-subject correlation. F12-46C/T carriers exhibited a significantly delayed disease onset (P < 0.001) and did not need long-term treatment (P = 0.02). In a GEE linear regression model, the presence of F12-46C/T was significantly associated with a 7-year delay in disease onset (P < 0.0001) regardless of SERPING1 mutational status. It is concluded that F12-46C/T carriage acts as an independent modifier of C1-INH-HAE severity. PMID:26248961

  12. Investigating Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease Based on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome phenotypes in the 18-14 year Old High School Girls in Shiraz 2009

    OpenAIRE

    MH Dabbaghmaneh; T. Naderi; M Akbarzadeh; HR Tabatabaee; Z Zareh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with polycystic ovary syndrome hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia may represent an increased risk for coronary cardiovascular disease .This study aimed to investigate risk factors for cardiovascular disease based on polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes in Shiraz. Methods: This Cross-sectional study was performed on 3200 students aged 18-14. Demographic survey, clinical signs of androgen excess (acne, hirsutism, alopecia), Ultrasound...

  13. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Ehud; Strillacci, Maria Giuseppina; Eitam, Harel; Yishay, Moran; Schiavini, Fausta; Soller, Morris; Bagnato, Alessandro; Shabtay, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP) was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS) to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher) and Low (Non-Kosher) resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs). The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity. PMID:27077383

  14. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitam, Harel; Yishay, Moran; Schiavini, Fausta; Soller, Morris; Bagnato, Alessandro; Shabtay, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP) was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS) to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher) and Low (Non-Kosher) resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs). The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity. PMID:27077383

  15. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings. PMID:27348896

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes and Genotypes Associated with Mutations in Presenilin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadev, Suman; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Stahl, Justin; Klunk, William; Yu, Cheng-En; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 2 are rare causes of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Eighteen presenilin 2 mutations have been reported, although not all have been confirmed pathogenic. Much remains to be learned about the range of phenotypes associated with these mutations. We have analysed our unique collection of 146 affected cases in 11…

  17. The Association of Adiponectin with Computed Tomography Phenotypes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Carolan, Brendan J.; Kim, Yu-Il; Williams, André A.; Kechris, Katerina; Lutz, Sharon; Reisdorph, Nichole; Bowler, Russell P.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disorder associated with systemic manifestations that contribute to its morbidity and mortality. Recent work suggests that biomarker signatures in the blood may be useful in evaluating COPD phenotypes and may provide insight into the pathophysiology of systemic manifestations. Adiponectin, primarily produced by fat cells, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of emphysema.

  18. Clinical Manifestations of Type 1 Gaucher Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab SALEHPOUR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  How to Cite this Article: Salehpour Sh. Clinical Manifestations of Type 1 Gaucher Disease. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6:4 (suppl. 1:13-14.pls see PDF.References 1. Beutler E, Grabowski GA. Gaucher disease. In: Metabolic and molecular bases of inherited disease, Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D (Eds, McGraw-Hill, New York 2001: 3635. 2. Cox TM, Schofield JP.   Gaucher’s disease: clinical features  and   natural   history.   Baillieres   Clin Haematol. 1997 Dec;10(4:657-89.   

  19. Endotypes and phenotypes of chronic rhinosinusitis: a PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Bachert, Claus; Cingi, Cemal; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hellings, Peter W; Naclerio, Robert M; Schleimer, Robert P; Ledford, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a complex disease consisting of several disease variants with different underlying pathophysiologies. Limited knowledge of the mechanisms of these disease subgroups is possibly the greatest obstacle in understanding the causes of CRS and improving treatment. It is generally agreed that there are clinically relevant CRS phenotypes defined by an observable characteristic or trait, such as the presence or absence of nasal polyps. Defining the phenotype of the patient is useful in making therapeutic decisions. However, clinical phenotypes do not provide full insight into all underlying cellular and molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms of CRS. Recognition of the heterogeneity of CRS has promoted the concept that CRS consists of multiple groups of biological subtypes, or "endotypes," which are defined by distinct pathophysiologic mechanisms that might be identified by corresponding biomarkers. Different CRS endotypes can be characterized by differences in responsiveness to different treatments, including topical intranasal corticosteroids and biological agents, such as anti-IL-5 and anti-IgE mAb, and can be based on different biomarkers that are linked to underlying mechanisms. CRS has been regarded as a single disease entity in clinical and genetic studies in the past, which can explain the failure to identify consistent genetic and environmental correlations. In addition, better identification of endotypes might permit individualization of therapy that can be targeted against the pathophysiologic processes of a patient's endotype, with potential for more effective treatment and better patient outcomes. PMID:23587334

  20. Refined phenotyping identifies links between preeclampsia and related diseases in a Norwegian preeclampsia family cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Liv Cecilie Vestrheim; Melton, Philip E.; Tollaksen, Kjersti; Lyslo, Ingvill; Roten, Linda Tømmerdal; Odland, Maria Lisa; Strand, Kristin Melheim; Nygård, Ottar; Sun, Chen; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Austgulen, Rigmor; Moses, Eric; Bjørge, Line

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Preeclampsia is a complex genetic disease of pregnancy with a heterogenous presentation, unknown cause and potential severe outcomes for both mother and child. Preeclamptic women have increased risk for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. We aimed to identify heritabilities and phenotypic correlations of preeclampsia and related conditions in the Norwegian Preeclampsia Family Biobank. Methods: By applying a variance components model, a total of 493 individuals (from 138 fa...

  1. Immuno phenotype of blood lymphocytes in radiation-associated Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immuno phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes has been studied in Hodgkin's disease including patients exposed to radionuclides of the characteristic Chernobyl pattern. The group of patients under study has been characterized by decreasing T- and NK-cell immunity, such a decrease being more pronounced in radiation-associated Hodgkin's lymphoma. The data obtained as well as the evidence of Epstein-Barr virus activation could explain the aggressiveness of the disease in such patients and the difficulties in their treatment

  2. The vascular phenotype in pseudoxanthoma elasticum and related disorders: Contribution of a genetic disease to the understanding of vascular calcification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eLeftheriotis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification is a complex and dynamic process occurring in various physiological conditions such as aging and exercise or in acquired metabolic disorders like diabetes or chronic renal insufficiency. Arterial calcifications are also observed in several genetic diseases revealing the important role of unbalanced or defective anti- or pro-calcifying factors. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE is an inherited disease (OMIM 264800 characterized by elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft conjunctive tissues including the skin, eyes and arterial media. The PXE disease results from mutations in the ABCC6 gene, encoding an ATP-binding cassette transporter primarily expressed in the liver, kidneys suggesting that it is a prototypic metabolic soft-tissue calcifying disease of genetic origin. The clinical expression of the PXE arterial disease is characterized by an increased risk for coronary (myocardial infarction, cerebral (aneurysm and stroke and lower limb peripheral artery disease. However, the structural and functional changes in the arterial wall induced by PXE are still unexplained. The use of a recombinant mouse model inactivated for the Abcc6 gene is an important tool for the understanding of the PXE pathophysiology although the vascular impact in this model remains limited to date. Overlapping of the PXE phenotype with other inherited calcifying diseases could bring important informations to our comprehension of the PXE disease.

  3. Farber disease: clinical presentation, pathogenesis and a new approach to treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Roth Johannes; Zander Axel; Fehse Natalja; Frosch Michael; Ehlert Karoline; Vormoor Josef

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Farber Disease is an autosomal-recessively inherited, lysosomal storage disorder caused by acid ceramidase deficiency and associated with distinct clinical phenotypes. Children with significant neurological involvement usually die early in infancy, whereas patients without or only mild neurological findings suffer from progressive joint deformation and contractures, subcutaneous nodules, inflammatory, periarticular granulomas, a hoarse voice and finally respiratory insuffi...

  4. Environmental lung diseases: Clinical and imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental lung diseases are caused by exposure to adverse environmental conditions, such as atmospheric pressure changes or the ingestion or inhalation of toxic agents. The development of environmental lung diseases depends on the intensity and duration of exposure, the physiological and biological susceptibility of the host, and the toxic effects of the adverse environmental conditions encountered. A combination of clinical features, related exposure history, imaging findings, and a review of previous reports that support an association between exposure and the disease process is required for diagnosis

  5. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Shi

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD.

  6. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongbo; Zhang, Guangde; Zhou, Meng; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Haixiu; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes) showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD. PMID:26849207

  7. Association of immunophenotypic characterization of peripheral lymphocytes with different clinical phenotypes of tuberculosis in Chinese Han children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jing; SHEN A-dong; SUN Lin; WU Xi-rong; MIAO Qing; JIAO Wei-wei; SHEN Chen; SHEN Dan; FENG Wei-xing; LIU Fang

    2012-01-01

    Background Very few researchers have studied the changes in peripheral lymphocyte patterns in adult tuberculosis (TB) and even less researches have been conducted in pediatric TB.In this study,we obtained blood samples from 114 Chinese pediatric TB patients and 116 matched controls to study the association of phenotypic subsets of peripheral lymphocytes with different clinical phenotypes of TB.Methods The subjects were classified as the control group and the TB patients group which were further divided into a pulmonary TB group and an extra-pulmonary TB group (more serious than the former).The distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations,including T lymphocytes,CD4+ T lymphocytes,CD8+ T lymphocytes,B lymphocytes,and natural killer (NK) cells,were quantitatively analyzed by flow cytometry.Results Compared to the healthy controls,TB infection was associated with significantly higher B cell (P <0.0001),and lower T cell (P=0.029) and NK cell (P <0.0001) percentages.Compared to pulmonary TB patients,extra-pulmonary TB was associated with relatively higher B cell (P=0.073),and lower T cell percentages (P=-0.021),higher purified protein derivative (PPD) negative rate (P=-0.061),and poorer PPD response (P=-0.010).Most pulmonary TB cases were primary pulmonary TB (89.1%),and most extra-pulmonary TB cases had TB meningitis (72.1%).Conclusions This study demonstrates changes in the lymhocyte distribution in children suffering from different clinical phenotypes of TB; such as primary pulmonary TB,and TB meningitis.These patterns may have significance in understanding the pathogenesis and prognostic markers of the disease,and for developing immunomodulatory modalities of therapy.

  8. Clinical pattern of heart diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done to determine various causes and clinical presentation of heart disease in children. It was a prospective hospital study conducted in Department of Pediatrics Civil Hospital, Karachi from August 1995 to February 1996. In this study, 70 patients of heart disease upto 12 years of age were inducted. There were 33 (47.14%) cases of congenital heart diseases and 37 (52.85%) cases of acquired heart diseases. The age distribution showed that heart disease was more frequent between 0-11 months of age (41.42%). Congenital heart diseases were also frequent between 0-11 months (28.57%). On the other hand acquired heart diseases were more common between 6-12 years (22.85%). In this study the males were predominantly involved, the male to female ratio was 1.05:1. In congenital heart disease it was 1.3:1 and in acquired heart diseases it was 0.85:1. Ventricular septal defect was the commonest congenital lesion reported (20%). Rheumatic fever and viral myocarditis were two frequently occurring acquired heart-diseases 17.14% each. The common presentation of heart diseases were respiratory distress (94.28%), fever (90%), feeding difficulty (57.14%) and failure to thrive (34.28%). In case of rheumatic fever, chorea was present in 8.57%, arthritis in 11.42% and S/C nodules (2.85%) cases respectively. The early management of the problem may help in decreasing morbidity and mortality due to these disease in children. Prenatal detection of congenital cardiac lesions by fetal echocardiography in high risk pregnancies, early intervention in neonatal period and counseling of the parents may help in prevention of congenital heart diseases in children. Primary prevention of rheumatic fever can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment of streptococcal throat infection. (author)

  9. Longitudinal serum HIV RNA quantification: correlation to viral phenotype at seroconversion and clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, T L; Pedersen, C; Nielsen, C;

    1996-01-01

    . Harbouring syncytium-inducing (SI) virus at seroconversion was associated with faster progression to AIDS than non-SI (NSI; P < 0.005). The increased in vitro replication rate of SI over NSI was not translated into significantly higher serum HIV RNA. CONCLUSION: Serum HIV RNA is high around the time of......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the longitudinal changes in serum HIV RNA, and to clarify whether the viral load early in infection has a predictive value for the clinical outcome; also, to correlate viral phenotype at seroconversion and changes in CD4 cell counts with viral burden. DESIGN: Twenty...... seroconverters with HIV isolates available at seroconversion had HIV RNA quantified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at seroconversion and thereafter every 6 months. Mean follow-up time was 65 months. Patients were classified according to viral phenotype at seroconversion, time to AIDS progression, serum viral...

  10. Associations between NOD2/CARD15 genotype and phenotype in Crohn's disease-Are we there yet?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Graham Radford-Smith; Nirmala Pandeya

    2006-01-01

    There have been multiple NOD2/CARD15 genotypephenotype analyses undertaken in patients with Crohn's disease since the gene's discovery in 2001. This review focuses on the major published series based upon their size and on the presence of specific clinical and genetic information provided in the published material from 2001 to 2005. Twelve studies provided raw data to carry out comparisons of disease location while ten studies included analysis of NOD2/CARD15 genotypes.NOD2/CARD15 variant frequency in ileal disease did not differ significantly among studies, whereas a comparison of disease location demonstrated highly significant differences among studies. Meta-analysis confirmed significant associations between NOD2/CARD15variants and both ileal and ileocolonic disease locations,and with both stricturing and penetrating forms of disease behavior. This review underlines the significant phenotypic differences that exist among populations,including similar ethnic groups, and has demonstrated the need for further studies of patients with long-term "inflammatory" Crohn's disease.

  11. Sex differences in correlates of intermediate phenotypes and prevalent cardiovascular disease in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate B. Schnabel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background-There are marked sex differences in cardiovascular disease [CVD] manifestation. It is largely unknown how the distribution of CVD risk factors or intermediate phenotypes explain sex-specific differences.Methods and Results-In 5000 individuals of the population-based Gutenberg Health Study, mean age 55±11 years, 51% males, we examined sex-specific associations of classical CVD risk factors with intima-media thickness, ankle-brachial index, flow-mediated dilation, peripheral arterial tonometry, echocardiographic and electrocardiographic variables. Intermediate cardiovascular phenotypes were related to prevalent CVD (coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, lower extremity artery disease [LEAD] N=561.We observed differential distributions of CVD risk factors with a higher risk factor burden in men. Manifest coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction and LEAD were more frequent in men; the proportion of heart failure was higher in women. Intermediate phenotypes showed clear sex differences with more beneficial values in women. Fairly linear changes towards less beneficial values with age were observed in both sexes. In multivariable-adjusted regression analyses age, systolic blood pressure and body mass index were consistently associated with intermediate phenotypes in both sexes with different ranking according to random forests, maximum model R² 0.43. Risk factor-adjusted associations with prevalent CVD showed some differences by sex. No interactions by menopausal status were observed. Conclusions-In a population-based cohort we observed sex differences in risk factors and a broad range of intermediate phenotypes of noninvasive cardiovascular structure and function. Their relation to prevalent CVD differed markedly. Our results indicate the need of future investigations to understand sex differences in CVD manifestation.

  12. Dopaminreceptorscintigraphy in Parkinson's disease - Clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson's disease is a severe, progressive neuro degenerative disorder which is characterised by a degeneration of the dopamine containing cells and loss of dopamine transporters (DA) in substantia nigra. Earlier 123 I-β-CIT SPECT studies have demonstrated this loss of DA content in Parkinson's disease. Recently a new radioligand 123I-FP-CIT, with faster kinetics than b-CIT became available for imaging of the DA transporter. The applicability of this radioligand was tested in a large clinical material with early and advanced Parkinson's disease using a one day protocol. 123 I-FP-CIT uptake was decreased in patients with Parkinson's disease and this was seen three hours after injection of the radioligand. In the Parkinson's disease group the uptake in the putamen was reduced more than in the caudate nucleus. Specific to non-specific striatal uptake ratios correlated with the Hoehn and Yahr stage. It appeared that 123I-FP-CIT SPECT allows a significant discrimination between patients with Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. The scintigraphic observations were correlated to clinical findings. The results will be presented and discussed

  13. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-01-15

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  14. Investigating Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease Based on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome phenotypes in the 18-14 year Old High School Girls in Shiraz 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Dabbaghmaneh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In patients with polycystic ovary syndrome hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia may represent an increased risk for coronary cardiovascular disease .This study aimed to investigate risk factors for cardiovascular disease based on polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes in Shiraz. Methods: This Cross-sectional study was performed on 3200 students aged 18-14. Demographic survey, clinical signs of androgen excess (acne, hirsutism, alopecia, Ultrasound were applied in order to find the cyst. Tests included prolactin, dehydroepiandrodion sulfate, and oral glucose tolerance test, fasting blood glucose, blood sugar two hours later, triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein. Data were submitted to SPSS software, version 11.5 and then analyzed by chi-square tests. Results: The serum cholesterol mean in four phenotypes had a statistically significant relationship with non-PCOS patients(p<0.05. Mean of serum cholesterol in oligomenorrhea, Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary phenotype (195.09±30.28 was higher than the other phenotypes. Mean of serum cholesterol and low density lipoprotein(LDL-C were significantly higher in patients with Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovarian phenotype(130.046±26.27 and oligomenorrhea, Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype(138.58±28.34 compared with non-infected individuals. Serum glucose mean in all phenotype was higher than non-infected after two hours and it showed a significant relation in oligomenorrhea and also polycystic ovarian phenotype(98.03 ± 20.98 versus 87.5±12.97 with non-infected individuals. Conclusion: Biochemical factors that lead to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases is increased in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Therefore, it should be attended in prevention programs

  15. Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Diseases: The Clinical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Río, Manuel; Caballero, Manuel Moreno; Górriz Sáez, Juan Manuel; Mínguez-Castellanos, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of clinical questions for which there are no easy answers, even for welltrained doctors. The diagnostic tool commonly used to assess cognitive impairment in neurodegenerative diseases is based on established clinical criteria. However, the differential diagnosis between disorders can be difficult, especially in early phases or atypical variants. This takes on particular importance when it is still possible to use an appropriate treatment. To solve this problem, physicians need to have access to an arsenal of diagnostic tests, such as neurofunctional imaging, that allow higher specificity in clinical assessment. However, the reliability of diagnostic tests may vary from one to the next, so the diagnostic validity of a given investigation must be estimated by comparing the results obtained from "true" criteria to the "gold standard" or reference test. While pathological analysis is considered to be the gold standard in a wide spectrum of diseases, it cannot be applied to neurological processes. Other approaches could provide solutions, including clinical patient follow-up, creation of a data bank or use of computer-aided diagnostic algorithms. In this article, we discuss the development of different methodological procedures related to analysis of diagnostic validity and present an example from our own experience based on the use of I-123-ioflupane-SPECT in the study of patients with movement disorders. The aim of this chapter is to approach the problem of diagnosis from the point of view of the clinician, taking into account specific aspects of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26567736

  16. Severity of disease and risk of malignant change in hereditary multiple exostoses. A genotype-phenotype study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D E; Lonie, L; Fraser, M; Dobson-Stone, C; Porter, J R; Monaco, A P; Simpson, A H R W

    2004-09-01

    We performed a prospective genotype-phenotype study using molecular screening and clinical assessment to compare the severity of disease and the risk of sarcoma in 172 individuals (78 families) with hereditary multiple exostoses. We calculated the severity of disease including stature, number of exostoses, number of surgical procedures that were necessary, deformity and functional parameters and used molecular techniques to identify the genetic mutations in affected individuals. Each arm of the genotype-phenotype study was blind to the outcome of the other. Mutations EXT1 and EXT2 were almost equally common, and were identified in 83% of individuals. Non-parametric statistical tests were used. There was a wide variation in the severity of disease. Children under ten years of age had fewer exostoses, consistent with the known age-related penetrance of this condition. The severity of the disease did not differ significantly with gender and was very variable within any given family. The sites of mutation affected the severity of disease with patients with EXT1 mutations having a significantly worse condition than those with EXT2 mutations in three of five parameters of severity (stature, deformity and functional parameters). A single sarcoma developed in an EXT2 mutation carrier, compared with seven in EXT1 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that sarcomas arose more commonly in families in whom the disease was more severe. The sarcoma risk in EXT1 carriers is similar to the risk of breast cancer in an older population subjected to breast-screening, suggesting that a role for regular screening in patients with hereditary multiple exostoses is justifiable. PMID:15446535

  17. Molecular determination of RhD phenotype by DNA typing: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotorruelo, C; Biondi, C; Borrás, S G; Galizzi, S; Di Mónaco, R; Racca, A

    2000-11-01

    Rhesus D (RhD) typing is performed by agglutination methods; however, in clinical situations where these techniques cannot be performed, RhD DNA typing is an alternative approach. The Rh antigens are encoded by the RHD and RHCE genes. In RhD-negative individuals the RHD gene is absent or grossly deleted, but variations in the arrangement of the RH locus in different populations are emerging. The aim of this study was to analyse the gross organization of the RH genes in our population using a previously described multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method with some modifications. We studied 253 DNA samples from Argentinian blood donors, 15 samples with a reduced expression of the D antigen and 1 Dc- phenotype. We evaluated the clinical utility of this method to ascertain the RhD antigen in 10 patients with warm-type autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA) and 14 samples of amniotic fluids. All Rh phenotypes were properly characterized and no discrepancies with serological typing were found. Analyses performed in the Dc- phenotype suggest the presence of a hybrid RHCE-RHD gene. DNA typing confirmed the RhD-negative type of one AIHA sample in which serological tests were inconclusive. Foetal DNA typing correctly indicated the RhD in every foetus. VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) and STR (short tandem repeats) analysis detected maternal contamination in two amniocentesis samples and confirmed the foetal origin of 12. This multiplex PCR strategy is suitable for RhD determination in clinical situations in which serological typing cannot be accomplished with its usual ease. PMID:11085623

  18. Polymorphism of Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Affects the Clinical Phenotypes of Ischemic Stroke in Korean Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Don; Yun, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hee-Sang; Kim, Su Kang; Kim, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Je, Goun; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Chung, Seung Joon; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2293054 [Ile734Ile], rs1047735 [His902His], rs2293044 [Val1353Val], rs2682826 (3'UTR) of nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are associated with the development and clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke. Methods We enrolled 120 ischemic stroke patients and 314 control subjects. Ischemic stroke patients were divided into subgroups according to the scores of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Survey (NIHSS, <6 and ≥6) and Modified Barthel Index (MBI, <60 and ≥60). SNPStats, SNPAnalyzer, and HelixTree programs were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and p-values. Multiple logistic regression models were performed to analyze genetic data. Results No SNPs of the NOS1 gene were found to be associated with ischemic stroke. However, in an analysis of clinical phenotypes, we found that rs2293054 was associated with the NIHSS scores of ischemic stroke patients in codominant (p=0.019), dominant (p=0.007), overdominant (p=0.033), and log-additive (p=0.0048) models. Also, rs2682826 revealed a significant association in the recessive model (p=0.034). In allele frequency analysis, we also found that the T alleles of rs2293054 were associated with lower NIHSS scores (p=0.007). Respectively, rs2293054 had a significant association in the MBI scores of ischemic stroke in codominant (p=0.038), dominant (p=0.031), overdominant (p=0.045), and log-additive (p=0.04) models. Conclusion These results suggest that NOS1 may be related to the clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke in Korean population. PMID:26949676

  19. Phenotypic rescue of a Drosophila model of mitochondrial ANT1 disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Vartiainen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A point mutation in the Drosophila gene that codes for the major adult isoform of adenine nuclear translocase (ANT represents a model for human diseases that are associated with ANT insufficiency [stress-sensitive B1 (sesB1]. We characterized the organismal, bioenergetic and molecular phenotype of sesB1 flies then tested strategies to compensate the mutant phenotype. In addition to developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures, sesB1 flies have an impaired response to sound, defective male courtship, female sterility and curtailed lifespan. These phenotypes, excluding the latter two, are shared with the mitoribosomal protein S12 mutant, tko25t. Mitochondria from sesB1 adults showed a decreased respiratory control ratio and downregulation of cytochrome oxidase. sesB1 adults exhibited ATP depletion, lactate accumulation and changes in gene expression that were consistent with a metabolic shift towards glycolysis, characterized by activation of lactate dehydrogenase and anaplerotic pathways. Females also showed downregulation of many genes that are required for oogenesis, and their eggs, although fertilized, failed to develop to the larval stages. The sesB1 phenotypes of developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures were alleviated by an altered mitochondrial DNA background. Female sterility was substantially rescued by somatic expression of alternative oxidase (AOX from the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, whereas AOX did not alleviate developmental delay. Our findings illustrate the potential of different therapeutic strategies for ANT-linked diseases, based on alleviating metabolic stress.

  20. Phenotypic rescue of a Drosophila model of mitochondrial ANT1 disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Suvi; Chen, Shanjun; George, Jack; Tuomela, Tea; Luoto, Kaisa R; O'Dell, Kevin M C; Jacobs, Howard T

    2014-06-01

    A point mutation in the Drosophila gene that codes for the major adult isoform of adenine nuclear translocase (ANT) represents a model for human diseases that are associated with ANT insufficiency [stress-sensitive B(1) (sesB(1))]. We characterized the organismal, bioenergetic and molecular phenotype of sesB(1) flies then tested strategies to compensate the mutant phenotype. In addition to developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures, sesB(1) flies have an impaired response to sound, defective male courtship, female sterility and curtailed lifespan. These phenotypes, excluding the latter two, are shared with the mitoribosomal protein S12 mutant, tko(25t). Mitochondria from sesB(1) adults showed a decreased respiratory control ratio and downregulation of cytochrome oxidase. sesB(1) adults exhibited ATP depletion, lactate accumulation and changes in gene expression that were consistent with a metabolic shift towards glycolysis, characterized by activation of lactate dehydrogenase and anaplerotic pathways. Females also showed downregulation of many genes that are required for oogenesis, and their eggs, although fertilized, failed to develop to the larval stages. The sesB(1) phenotypes of developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures were alleviated by an altered mitochondrial DNA background. Female sterility was substantially rescued by somatic expression of alternative oxidase (AOX) from the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, whereas AOX did not alleviate developmental delay. Our findings illustrate the potential of different therapeutic strategies for ANT-linked diseases, based on alleviating metabolic stress. PMID:24812436

  1. PIAS1 Regulates Mutant Huntingtin Accumulation and Huntington's Disease-Associated Phenotypes In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochaba, Joseph; Monteys, Alex Mas; O'Rourke, Jacqueline G; Reidling, Jack C; Steffan, Joan S; Davidson, Beverly L; Thompson, Leslie M

    2016-05-01

    The disruption of protein quality control networks is central to pathology in Huntington's disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The aberrant accumulation of insoluble high-molecular-weight protein complexes containing the Huntingtin (HTT) protein and SUMOylated protein corresponds to disease manifestation. We previously identified an HTT-selective E3 SUMO ligase, PIAS1, that regulates HTT accumulation and SUMO modification in cells. Here we investigated whether PIAS1 modulation in neurons alters HD-associated phenotypes in vivo. Instrastriatal injection of a PIAS1-directed miRNA significantly improved behavioral phenotypes in rapidly progressing mutant HTT (mHTT) fragment R6/2 mice. PIAS1 reduction prevented the accumulation of mHTT and SUMO- and ubiquitin-modified proteins, increased synaptophysin levels, and normalized key inflammatory markers. In contrast, PIAS1 overexpression exacerbated mHTT-associated phenotypes and aberrant protein accumulation. These results confirm the association between aberrant accumulation of expanded polyglutamine-dependent insoluble protein species and pathogenesis, and they link phenotypic benefit to reduction of these species through PIAS1 modulation. PMID:27146268

  2. Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotypes in clinical staphylococcal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Emel Sesli; Gunes, Hayati; Kaya, Selcuk; Aridogan, Buket Cicioglu; Demirci, Mustafa

    2008-04-01

    The prevalence of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance as well as the MLSB resistance phenotypes were investigated by the double-disk diffusion test among 532 clinical staphylococci isolates in a Turkish university hospital. The activity of other antimicrobials, including trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, telithromycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin, was also evaluated. Of 532 isolates, 38.5% were resistant to MLSB antibiotics; 63.9% of the resistant isolates exhibited a constitutive phenotype (cMLSB) whereas 36.1% expressed an inducible resistance phenotype (iMLSB). MLSB resistance was more prevalent among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) strains. Oxacillin-resistant strains exhibited significantly higher MLSB resistance rates compared with oxacillin-susceptible strains (Pquinupristin/dalfopristin, the most effective antibiotics were telithromycin and chloramphenicol among all isolates. Susceptibility rates to other antibiotics tested were higher among isolates without MLS(B) resistance than isolates with MLSB resistance. The detection of a considerable rate (43.5%) of iMLSB resistance among erythromycin-resistant/clindamycin-susceptible strains suggests that the true percentage of clindamycin resistance may be underestimated if testing for inducible resistance is not performed. PMID:18206352

  3. Tailoring the definition of the clinical schizophrenia phenotype in linkage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Verena; Krastoshevsky, Olga; Coleman, Michael J; Bodkin, J Alexander; Lerbinger, Jan; Boling, Lenore; Johnson, Fred; Gibbs, Anne; Cole, Jonathan O; Huang, Zhuying; Mendell, Nancy R; Levy, Deborah L

    2010-02-01

    The delineation of schizophrenia-related symptomatology is critical to informative clinical phenotyping in linkage studies. A minority of first-degree relatives of schizophrenia and schizoaffective probands (RelSZSA) qualifies for a clinical diagnosis in the schizophrenia spectrum. Schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) is a key component of this spectrum, largely because of its relatively specific familial aggregation in relatives. The criteria for SPD were not developed for the purpose of identifying RelSZSA, however, and SPD is not a homogeneous clinical disorder, potentially introducing false positives and false negatives into affectedness classifications. In this study we used logistic regression (LR) to identify the combination of clinical signs and symptoms that maximized the discrimination between nonpsychotic first-degree RelSZSA (n=241) and controls (n=161). Three variables contributed significantly to optimizing this distinction: no close friends or confidants other than family members, social isolation and irritability. The combination of deviant LR scores and schizophrenia-spectrum psychotic disorders had greater sensitivity for identifying RelSZSA, 23.7%, than SPD and schizophrenia-spectrum psychotic disorders, 16%. Importantly, the diagnosis of SPD and deviant LR scores were not significantly correlated. Most individuals with deviant LR scores did not meet criteria for a diagnosis of SPD and only a minority of those who were diagnosed with SPD had deviant LR scores. Since misclassification of gene carriers as non-gene carriers in linkage analyses increases the risk of false negatives, it may be advantageous to tailor the definition of the clinical phenotype to those aspects of social-interpersonal dysfunction that optimize the discrimination of RelSZSA from controls. PMID:19944571

  4. Genetic modifiers of sickle cell anemia in the BABY HUG cohort: influence on laboratory and clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Vivien A; Luo, Zhaoyu; Flanagan, Jonathan M; Howard, Thad A; Thompson, Bruce W; Wang, Winfred C; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ware, Russell E

    2013-07-01

    The recently completed BABY HUG trial investigated the safety and efficacy of hydroxyurea in infants with sickle cell anemia (SCA). To investigate the effects of known genetic modifiers, genomic DNA on 190 randomized subjects were analyzed for alpha thalassemia, beta-globin haplotype, polymorphisms affecting endogenous fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (XmnI, BCL11A, and HBS1L-MYB), UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms, and the common G6PD A(-) mutation. At study entry, infants with alpha thalassemia trait had significantly lower mean corpuscular volume, total bilirubin, and absolute reticulocyte count. Beta-globin haplotypes associated with milder disease had significantly higher hemoglobin and %HbF. BCL11A and XmnI polymorphisms had significant effects on baseline HbF, while UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms significantly influenced baseline serum bilirubin. At study exit, subjects randomized to placebo still exhibited laboratory effects of alpha thalassemia and other modifiers, while those assigned hydroxyurea had treatment effects that exceeded most genetic influences. The pain phenotype was influenced by HbF modifiers in both treatment groups. These data document that genetic polymorphisms do modify laboratory and clinical phenotypes even in very young patients with SCA. The hydroxyurea effects are more potent, however, indicating that treatment criteria should not be limited to certain genetic subsets, and supporting the use of hydroxyurea for all young patients with SCA. PMID:23606168

  5. Maternal transmission of Alzheimer's disease: Prodromal metabolic phenotype and the search for genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosconi Lisa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After advanced age, having a parent affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most significant risk factor for developing AD among cognitively normal (NL individuals. Although rare genetic mutations have been identified among the early-onset forms of familial AD (EOFAD, the genetics of the more common forms of late-onset AD (LOAD remain elusive. While some LOAD cases appear to be sporadic in nature, genetically mediated risk is evident from the familial aggregation of many LOAD cases. The patterns of transmission and biological mechanisms through which a family history of LOAD confers risk to the offspring are not known. Brain imaging studies using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET have shown that NL individuals with a maternal history of LOAD, but not with a paternal family history, express a phenotype characterised by a pattern of progressive reductions of brain glucose metabolism, similar to that in AD patients. As maternally inherited AD may be associated with as many as 20 per cent of the total LOAD population, understanding the causes and mechanisms of expression of this form of AD is of great relevance. This paper reviews known genetic mutations implicated in EOFAD and their effects on brain chemistry, structure and function; epidemiology and clinical research findings in LOAD, including in vivo imaging findings showing selective patterns of hypometabolism in maternally inherited AD; possible genetic mechanisms involved in maternal transmission of AD, including chromosome X mutations, mitochondrial DNA and imprinting; and genetic mechanisms involved in other neurological disorders with known or suspected maternal inheritance. The review concludes with a discussion of the potential role of brain imaging for identifying endophenotypes in NL individuals at risk for AD, and for directing investigation of potential susceptibility genes for AD.

  6. A systematic comparison of feature space effects on disease classifier performance for phenotype identification of five diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotfila, Christopher; Uzuner, Özlem

    2015-12-01

    Automated phenotype identification plays a critical role in cohort selection and bioinformatics data mining. Natural Language Processing (NLP)-informed classification techniques can robustly identify phenotypes in unstructured medical notes. In this paper, we systematically assess the effect of naive, lexically normalized, and semantic feature spaces on classifier performance for obesity, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CAD), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes. We train support vector machines (SVMs) using individual feature spaces as well as combinations of these feature spaces on two small training corpora (730 and 790 documents) and a combined (1520 documents) training corpus. We assess the importance of feature spaces and training data size on SVM model performance. We show that inclusion of semantically-informed features does not statistically improve performance for these models. The addition of training data has weak effects of mixed statistical significance across disease classes suggesting larger corpora are not necessary to achieve relatively high performance with these models. PMID:26241355

  7. The variable in common variable immunodeficiency: a disease of complex phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolles, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common and clinically most important severe primary antibody deficiency and is characterized by low levels of IgG, IgA, and/or IgM, with a failure to produce specific antibodies. This diagnostic category represents a heterogeneous group of disorders, which present not only with acute and chronic infections but also with a range of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders as well as an increased incidence of lymphoma and other malignancies. Patients can now be categorized into distinct clinical phenotypes based on analysis of large cohort studies and be further stratified by immunologic laboratory testing. The biologic importance of this categorization is made clear by the 11-fold increase in mortality if even one of these phenotypes (cytopenias, lymphoproliferation, or enteropathy) is present. Limited progress in defining the underlying molecular causes has been made with known causative single gene defects accounting for only 3% of cases, and, for this and the reasons mentioned above, CVID remains resolute in its variability. This review provides a practical approach to risk stratification of these complex phenotypes by using current clinical categories and laboratory biomarkers. The effects of infection as well as inflammatory and autoimmune complications on different organ systems are discussed alongside strategies to reduce diagnostic delay. Recent developments in diagnostics and therapy are also explored. PMID:24565700

  8. Comparison of the Phenotype and Approach to Pediatric vs Adult Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Valerio; Alisi, Anna; Newton, Kimberly P; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2016-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the main chronic noncommunicable diseases in Westernized societies; its worldwide prevalence has doubled during the last 20 years. NAFLD has serious health implications not only for adults, but also for children. However, pediatric NAFLD is not only an important global problem in itself, but it is likely to be associated with increases in comorbidities, such as metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. There are several differences between NAFLD in children and adults, and it is not clear whether the disease observed in children is the initial phase of a process that progresses with age. The increasing prevalence of pediatric NAFLD has serious implications for the future adult population requiring appropriate action. Studies of NAFLD progression, pathogenesis, and management should evaluate disease phenotypes in children and follow these over the patient's lifetime. We review the similarities and differences of NAFLD between children and adults. PMID:27003600

  9. Clinic Practical Guides for Cerebrovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Angel Buergo Zuaznábar; Otman Fernández Concepción; Jesús Pérez Nellar; Gloria Lara Fernández; Carlos Maya Entenza; Alejandro Pando Cabrera

    2007-01-01

    The clinic practical guides for cerebrovascular diseases are presented. They include different aspects as its concept, classification, and epidemiological data in Cuba as well as worldwide. They also offer its diagnosis, classification, complications and treatment. The frequency of assessment of its application including the tools to measure the quality of life in patients with cerebrovascular accident and the way to proceed with them are shown

  10. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rubén Bembibre Taboada; Diosdania Alfonso Falcón; Julio Héctor Jova Dueñas; Tania Pérez Ramos

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment. Even when this term makes reference to the whole process affecting part of cerebral vessel system and cerebral tissue, this document focuses on the cerebrovascular or acute neurological event abruptly affecting the cerebral tissue and the neurological condition of the patient. This condition is usually cause by an abrupt vessel occlusion, of thrombotic or embolic origin, or by subarachnoid or intraventricular intraparenchymat...

  11. Mild Lafora disease: clinical, neurophysiologic, and genetic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Canafoglia, Laura; Michelucci, Roberto; Gambardella, Antonio; Gennaro, Elena; Pasini, Elena; Riguzzi, Patrizia; Plasmati, Rosaria; Volpi, Lilia; Labate, Angelo; Gasparini, Sara; Villani, Flavio; Casazza, Marina; Viri, Maurizio; Zara, Federico; Minassian, Berge A; Turnbull, Julie; Serratosa, Jose M; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Franceschetti, Silvana; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-12-01

    We report clinical, neurophysiologic, and genetic features of an Italian series of patients with Lafora disease (LD) to identify distinguishing features of those with a slowly progressive course. Twenty-three patients with LD (17 female; 6 male) were recruited. Mean age (± SD) at the disease onset was 14.5 ± 3.9 years and mean follow-up duration was 13.2 ± 8.0 years. NHLRC1 mutations were detected in 18 patients; EPM2A mutations were identified in 5. Patients who maintained >10 years gait autonomy were labeled as "mild" and were compared with the remaining LD patients with a typical course. Six of 23 patients were mild and presented significantly delay in the age at onset, lower neurologic disability score at 4 years after the onset, less severe seizure phenotype, lower probability of showing both photoparoxysmal response on electroencephalography (EEG) and giant somatosensory evoked potentials, as compared to patients with typical LD. However, in both mild and typical LD patients, EEG showed disorganization of background activity and frequent epileptiform abnormalities. Mild LD patients had NHLRC1 mutations and five of six carried homozygous or compound heterozygous D146N mutation. This mutation was found in none of the patients with typical LD. The occurrence of specific NHLRC1 mutations in patients with mild LD should be taken into account in clinical practice for appropriate management and counseling. PMID:25270369

  12. [Oxidation phenotype as a risk factor for development of allergic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiński, P; Orzechowska-Juzwenko, K; Patkowski, J; Wolańczyk-Medrala, A; Nittner-Marszalska, M; Rzemisławska, Z

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between genetically determined polymorphic metabolism and susceptibility to allergic diseases has aroused much interest. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether patients with allergic diseases, like atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis differ from healthy persons in their ability to oxidize sparteine as a model drug. The study was completed by 200 persons, 40 patients with allergic diseases--20 with atopic asthma and 20 with allergic rhinitis and 160 healthy volunteers as a control group. The results of our study revealed a predominance of very extensive metabolizers of sparteine among patients with allergic diseases in comparison with healthy volunteers. The difference in the oxidation metabolic ratio (MR) frequency distribution between patients with allergic diseases and healthy persons was statistically significant. Relative risk (odds ratio) of development of atopic asthma was 3.29 times higher, and that of allergic rhinitis 2.94 times higher for persons with very extensive oxidation phenotype. Our results represent some evidence for a possible relationship between extensive, rapid oxidation phenotype and the higher susceptibility to development of atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis. PMID:10592724

  13. Defining Disease Phenotypes in Primary Care Electronic Health Records by a Machine Learning Approach: A Case Study in Identifying Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Shang-Ming; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Kennedy, Jonathan; Cooksey, Roxanne; Atkinson, Mark; Denaxas, Spiros; Siebert, Stefan; Dixon, William G.; O’Neill, Terence W; Choy, Ernest; Sudlow, Cathie; ,; Brophy, Sinead

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 1) To use data-driven method to examine clinical codes (risk factors) of a medical condition in primary care electronic health records (EHRs) that can accurately predict a diagnosis of the condition in secondary care EHRs. 2) To develop and validate a disease phenotyping algorithm for rheumatoid arthritis using primary care EHRs. Methods This study linked routine primary and secondary care EHRs in Wales, UK. A machine learning based scheme was used to identify patients with rheumat...

  14. Defining disease phenotypes in primary care electronic health records by a machine learning approach: a case study in identifying rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pappalardo, Francesco; Zhou, Shang; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Kennedy, Jonathan; Cooksey, Roxanne; Atkinson, Mark; Denaxas, Spiros; Siebert, Stefan; Dixon, William; O’Neill, Terence; Choy, Ernest; Sudlow, Cathie; Brophy, Sinead

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: 1) To use data-driven method to examine clinical codes (risk factors) of a medical condition in primary care electronic health records (EHRs) that can accurately predict a diagnosis of the condition in secondary care EHRs. 2) To develop and validate a disease phenotyping algorithm for rheumatoid arthritis using primary care EHRs. Methods: This study linked routine primary and secondary care EHRs in Wales, UK. A machine learning based scheme was used to identify patie...

  15. Defining disease phenotypes in primary care electronic health records by a machine learning approach:A case study in identifying rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Shang Ming; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Kennedy, Jonathan; Cooksey, Roxanne; Atkinson, Mark; Denaxas, Spiros; Siebert, Stefan; Dixon, William G.; O'Neill, Terence W.; Choy, Ernest; Sudlow, Cathie; Brophy, Sinead; Danesh, John; Allen, Naomi; Blaveri, Ekaterini

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: 1) To use data-driven method to examine clinical codes (risk factors) of a medical condition in primary care electronic health records (EHRs) that can accurately predict a diagnosis of the condition in secondary care EHRs. 2) To develop and validate a disease phenotyping algorithm for rheumatoid arthritis using primary care EHRs. Methods: This study linked routine primary and secondary care EHRs in Wales, UK. A machine learning based scheme was used to identify patients with rheum...

  16. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Berg, Daniela; Stern, Matthew; Poewe, Werner; Olanow, C Warren; Oertel, Wolfgang; Obeso, José; Marek, Kenneth; Litvan, Irene; Lang, Anthony E; Halliday, Glenda; Goetz, Christopher G; Gasser, Thomas; Dubois, Bruno; Chan, Piu; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Adler, Charles H; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-10-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical diagnosis; the criteria aim to systematize the diagnostic process, to make it reproducible across centers and applicable by clinicians with less expertise in PD diagnosis. Although motor abnormalities remain central, increasing recognition has been given to nonmotor manifestations; these are incorporated into both the current criteria and particularly into separate criteria for prodromal PD. Similar to previous criteria, the Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria retain motor parkinsonism as the core feature of the disease, defined as bradykinesia plus rest tremor or rigidity. Explicit instructions for defining these cardinal features are included. After documentation of parkinsonism, determination of PD as the cause of parkinsonism relies on three categories of diagnostic features: absolute exclusion criteria (which rule out PD), red flags (which must be counterbalanced by additional supportive criteria to allow diagnosis of PD), and supportive criteria (positive features that increase confidence of the PD diagnosis). Two levels of certainty are delineated: clinically established PD (maximizing specificity at the expense of reduced sensitivity) and probable PD (which balances sensitivity and specificity). The Movement Disorder Society criteria retain elements proven valuable in previous criteria and omit aspects that are no longer justified, thereby encapsulating diagnosis according to current knowledge. As understanding of PD expands, the Movement Disorder Society criteria will need continuous revision to accommodate these advances. PMID:26474316

  17. Differential Association of the COMT Val158Met Polymorphism with Clinical Phenotypes in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Goghari, Vina M; Sponheim, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, although diagnostically separate, likely share elements of their genetic etiology. This study assessed whether COMT Val158Met polymorphism has shared or specific associations with clinical phenotypes evident in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Schizophrenia and bipolar patients completed a clinical assessment encompassing premorbid functioning and current and lifetime symptomatology. Multivariate analyses yielded a three-way interaction of diagnosis, COM...

  18. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates from Northern Colombia, South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio A. Guerra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5% were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5% for ST gene, and 6 (15% for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50% and 13 (32.5% isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%. Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST, we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  19. Modulatory effect of BclI GR gene polymorphisms on the obesity phenotype in Brazilian patients with Cushing's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo P.P. Moreira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Patients with Cushing's disease exhibit wide phenotypic variability in the severity of obesity, diabetes and hypertension. In the general population, several glucocorticoid receptor genes (NR3C1 and HSD11B1 polymorphisms are associated with altered glucocorticoid sensitivity and/or metabolism, resulting in an increased or reduced risk of an adverse metabolic profile. Our aim was to analyze the association of NR3C1 and HSD11B1 gene variants with the severity of some clinical and hormonal features of Cushing's disease. METHODS: Sixty-four patients presenting with Cushing's disease were diagnosed based on adrenocorticotrophic hormone levels, high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests and/or inferior petrosal sinus sampling and magnetic resonance imaging. The A3669G, ER22/23EK, N363S BclI-NR3C1 and HSD11B1-rs12086634 variants were screened. RESULTS: The BclI, HSD11B1-rs12086634 and A3669G variants were found in 36%, 19.5% and 14% of alleles, respectively. The N363S and ER22/23EK polymorphisms were identified in heterozygosis once in only two patients (1.5% of alleles. There were no differences in the weight gain or prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in the patients carrying the abovementioned alleles compared to the wild-type carriers. Interestingly, the mean body mass index (BMI of the BclI carriers was significantly higher than the non-carriers (34.4±7 kg/m2 vs. 29.6±4.7 kg/m2, respectively. None of the polymorphisms were associated with the basal adrenocorticotrophic hormone, FU levels or F level after dexamethasone suppression testing. CONCLUSION: Although Cushing's disease results from increased glucocorticoid secretion, we observed that interindividual variability in the peripheral glucocorticoid sensitivity, mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, could modulate the obesity phenotype.

  20. Clinical neurorestorative progress in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lin Chen,1,2 Hongyun Huang,3–5 Wei-Ming Duan,6 Gengsheng Mao3 1Department of Neurosurgery, Yuquan Hospital, Tsinghua University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Center, Tsinghua University, 3Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, 4Center of Cell Research, Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 5Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 6Department of Anatomy, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD is one of the common neurodegenerative diseases. Besides the symptomatic therapies, the increasing numbers of neurorestorative therapies have shown the potential therapeutic value of reversing the neurodegenerative process and improving the patient's quality of life. Currrently available novel clinical neurorestorative strategies include pharmacological managements (glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, selegiline, recombinant human erythropoietin, neuromodulation intervention (deep brain stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, tissue and cell transplantation (fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue, sympathetic neurons, carotid body cells, bone marrow stromal cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, gene therapy, and neurorehabilitative therapy. Herein, we briefly review the progress in this field and describe the neurorestorative mechanisms of the above-mentioned therapies for PD. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, clinical study, neurorestorative treatment, cell transplantation, neuromodulation

  1. Clinical significance of granuloma in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamás Molnár; László Tiszlavicz; Csaba Gyulai; Ferenc Nagy; János Lonovics

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Granuloma is considered the hallmark of microscopic diagnosis in Crohn's disease (CD), but granulomas can be detected in only 21-60% of CD patients. The aim of this studywas to evaluate the frequency of granulomas by multiple endoscopic biopsies in patients with CD and to examine whether group of patients with or without granuloma exhibit a different clinical course.METHODS: Fifty-six patients with newly diagnosed Cdwere included in the study. Jejunoscopy, enteroclysis and ileo-colonoscopy were performed in all patients. At least two biopsy specimens from each examined gastrointestinal segment were examined microscopically searching granuloma. The clinical course was followed in all patients, and extraintestinal manifestations as well as details of any immunosuppressive therapy and surgical intervention were noted.RESULTS: Granuloma was found in 44.6% of the cases (25 patients). Patients with granuloma had higher activity parameters at the time of the biopsies. Extraintestinal manifestations were observed and surgical interventions were performed more often in the granuloma group. The need of immunosuppressive therapy was significantly more frequent in the patients with granuloma. Granuloma formation is more often seen in younger patients, and mainly in the severe, active penetrating disease. CONCLUSION: The significantly higher frequency of surgical interventions and immunosuppressive therapy suggests that granuloma formation is associated with a more severe disease course during the first years of CD.

  2. A Grand Challenge: Unbiased Phenotypic Function of Metabolites from Jaspis splendens against Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Feng, Yunjiang; Murtaza, Mariyam; Wood, Stephen; Mellick, George; Hooper, John N A; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-02-26

    A grand challenge in natural product chemistry is to determine the biological effects of all natural products. A phenotypic approach is frequently used for determining the activity of a compound and its potential impact on a disease state. Chemical investigation of a specimen of Jaspis splendens collected from the Great Barrier Reef resulted in the isolation of a new pterin derivative, jaspterin (1), a new bisindole alkaloid, splendamide (2), and a new imidazole alkaloid, jaspnin A (3) TFA salt. Jaspamycin (8) and 6-bromo-1H-indole-3-carboximidamide (16) are reported for the first time as naturally occurring metabolites. Known nucleosides (4-7, 9, 10), aglycones (11-13), indole alkaloids (14, 15, 17), and jaspamide peptides (18-22) were also isolated. The structures of the three new compounds 1-3 were unambiguously elucidated based on NMR and mass spectroscopic data. Jaspnin A (3) contained a rare thiomethylated imidazolinium unit. Coupling an unbiased phenotypic assay using a human olfactory neurosphere-derived cell model of Parkinson's disease to all of the natural products from the species J. splendens allowed the phenotypic profiles of the metabolites to be investigated. PMID:26883470

  3. Senescence-associated secretory phenotype and its possible role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Seeger, Werner; Voswinckel, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major disease of the lungs. It primarily occurs after a prolonged period of cigarette smoking. Chronic inflammation of airways and the alveolar space as well as lung tissue destruction are the hallmarks of COPD. Recently it has been shown that cellular senescence might play a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Cellular senescence comprises signal transduction program, leading to irreversible cell cycle arrest. The growth arrest in senescence can be triggered by many different mechanisms, including DNA damage and its recognition by cellular sensors, leading to the activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses and activation of DNA repair machinery. Senescence can be induced by several genotoxic factors apart from telomere attrition. When senescence induction is based on DNA damage, senescent cells display a unique phenotype, which has been termed "senescence-associated secretory phenotype" (SASP). SASP may be an important driver of chronic inflammation and therefore may be part of a vicious cycle of inflammation, DNA damage, and senescence. This research perspective aims to showcase cellular senescence with relevance to COPD and the striking similarities between the mediators and secretory phenotype in COPD and SASP. PMID:25171460

  4. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  5. Autosomal dominant C1149R von Willebrand disease: phenotypic findings and their implications

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Almudena; García-Rivero, Aranzazu; Lourés, Esther; López-Fernández, Maria Fernanda; Rodríguez-Trillo, Angela; Batlle, Javier

    2009-01-01

    The classification and even the diagnosis of von Willebrand disease continues to evolve. In this paper, the authors show how a detailed examination of difficult cases using clinical laboratory and molecular analyses can be used to reach a clinically useful conclusion. See related perspective article on page 610.

  6. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes

    OpenAIRE

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2012-01-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a ve...

  7. Clinical Epidemiology of Buruli Ulcer from Benin (2005-2013: Effect of Time-Delay to Diagnosis on Clinical Forms and Severe Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Capela

    Full Text Available Buruli Ulcer (BU is a neglected infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is responsible for severe necrotizing cutaneous lesions that may be associated with bone involvement. Clinical presentations of BU lesions are classically classified as papules, nodules, plaques and edematous infiltration, ulcer or osteomyelitis. Within these different clinical forms, lesions can be further classified as severe forms based on focality (multiple lesions, lesions' size (>15 cm diameter or WHO Category (WHO Category 3 lesions. There are studies reporting an association between delay in seeking medical care and the development of ulcerative forms of BU or osteomyelitis, but the effect of time-delay on the emergence of lesions classified as severe has not been addressed. To address both issues, and in a cohort of laboratory-confirmed BU cases, 476 patients from a medical center in Allada, Benin, were studied. In this laboratory-confirmed cohort, we validated previous observations, demonstrating that time-delay is statistically related to the clinical form of BU. Indeed, for non-ulcerated forms (nodule, edema, and plaque the median time-delay was 32.5 days (IQR 30.0-67.5, while for ulcerated forms it was 60 days (IQR 20.0-120.0 (p = 0.009, and for bone lesions, 365 days (IQR 228.0-548.0. On the other hand, we show here that time-delay is not associated with the more severe phenotypes of BU, such as multi-focal lesions (median 90 days; IQR 56-217.5; p = 0.09, larger lesions (diameter >15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-120; p = 0.92 or category 3 WHO classification (median 60 days; IQR 30-150; p = 0.20, when compared with unifocal (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, small lesions (diameter ≤15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, or WHO category 1+2 lesions (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, respectively. Our results demonstrate that after an initial period of progression towards ulceration or bone involvement, BU lesions become stable regarding size and focal

  8. Frailty phenotype and chronic kidney disease: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R; Macías Núñez, Juan F

    2015-11-01

    Frailty is a construct originally coined by gerontologists to describe cumulative declines across multiple physiological systems that occur with aging and lead individuals to a state of diminished physiological reserve and increased vulnerability to stressors. Fried et al. provided a standardized definition for frailty, and they created the concept of frailty phenotype which incorporates disturbances across interrelated domains (shrinking, weakness, poor endurance and energy, slowness, and low physical activity level) to indentify old people who are at risk of disability, falls, institutionalization, hospitalization, and premature death. Some authors consider the presence of lean mass reduction (sarcopenia) as part of the frailty phenotype. The frailty status has been documented in 7 % of elderly population and 14 % of not requiring dialysis CKD adult patients. Sarcopenia increases progressively along with loss of renal function in CKD patients and is high in dialysis population. It has been documented that prevalence of frailty in hemodialysis adult patients is around 42 % (35 % in young and 50 % in elderly), having a 2.60-fold higher risk of mortality and 1.43-fold higher number of hospitalization, independent of age, comorbidity, and disability. The Clinical Frailty Scale is the simplest and clinically useful and validated tool for doing a frailty phenotype, while the diagnosis of sarcopenia is based on muscle mass assessment by body imaging techniques, bioimpedance analysis, and muscle strength evaluated with a handheld dynamometer. Frailty treatment can be based on different strategies, such as exercise, nutritional interventions, drugs, vitamins, and antioxidant agents. Finally, palliative care is a very important alternative for very frail and sick patients. In conclusion, since the diagnosis and treatment of frailty and sarcopenia is crucial in geriatrics and all CKD patients, it would be very important to incorporate these evaluations in pre

  9. MYH9-related disease: five novel mutations expanding the spectrum of causative mutations and confirming genotype/phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rocco, Daniela; Zieger, Barbara; Platokouki, Helen; Heller, Paula G; Pastore, Annalisa; Bottega, Roberta; Noris, Patrizia; Barozzi, Serena; Glembotsky, Ana C; Pergantou, Helen; Balduini, Carlo L; Savoia, Anna; Pecci, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal dominant syndromic disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene encoding for the heavy chain of non-muscle myosin IIA (myosin-9). MYH9-RD is characterized by congenital macrothrombocytopenia and typical inclusion bodies in neutrophils associated with a variable risk of developing sensorineural deafness, presenile cataract, and/or progressive nephropathy. The spectrum of mutations responsible for MYH9-RD is limited. We report five families, each with a novel MYH9 mutation. Two mutations, p.Val34Gly and p.Arg702Ser, affect the motor domain of myosin-9, whereas the other three, p.Met847_Glu853dup, p.Lys1048_Glu1054del, and p.Asp1447Tyr, hit the coiled-coil tail domain of the protein. The motor domain mutations were associated with more severe clinical phenotypes than those in the tail domain. PMID:23123319

  10. Characterization of isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum associated with coldwater disease or rainbow trout fry syndrome I : phenotypic and genomic studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Ellen; Dalsgaard, Inger; Bernardet, Jean-Francois

    1997-01-01

    characteristics, and compared with previously characterized French and American strains. DNA hybridization studies showed that the Danish isolates were highly related to the type strain, F. psychrophilum NCIMB 1947(T). Plasmid profiling of Danish isolates and those from other European countries revealed...... differences, which might be related to differences in pathogenicity. European isolates originating from clinical outbreaks of either RTFS or CND usually harboured one plasmid of 3.2 kb, whereas isolates originating from fish with different or no disease signs had other profiles. Phenotypically, the Danish...... isolates appeared very homogeneous and shared most characteristics with the type strain, and with French and American strains studied by other authors. Further studies on the importance of the plasmids and the proteolytic activities of the bacterium might help in elucidating possible virulence factors....

  11. Clinical Features and Molecular Analysis of Hb H Disease in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Chao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia is highly prevalent in Taiwan, but limited data are available about the association between genotypes and clinical manifestations in Taiwanese patients with Hb H disease. Here, we studied α-globin gene abnormalities and clinical features in Taiwanese patients with Hb H disease. Of the 90 patients, sixty-four (71.1% were deletional and twenty-six (28.9% were nondeletional Hb H disease. The (- -SEA type of α0-thalassemia mutation was detected in the majority of patients (>95%. The most common genotype was (- -SEA/-α3.7, followed by (- -SEA/αcsα. After further investigation of the genotype-phenotype correlation in 68 patients, we found that patients with nondeletional Hb H disease had more severe clinical features than those with deletional Hb H disease, including younger age at diagnosis, more requirement of blood transfusions, and larger proportion of patients with splenomegaly, hepatomegaly or jaundice. This is probably a consequence of the lower hemoglobin levels and the higher Hb H levels. The clinical severity was highly variable even among patients with an identical genotype, and the diversity was much more profound among patients with (- -/αcsα genotype. Therefore, predicting the phenotype directly from the genotype in Hb H disease remains relatively difficult in Taiwan.

  12. Rare disease clinical trials: Power in numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklund, Matthew P

    2016-08-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) encompass a collection of genetic muscle diseases with proximal-predominant weakness of the limbs. Thirty-two of these disorders are named via the common nomenclature, including 8 autosomal-dominant (LGMD1A-H) and 24 autosomal-recessive (LGMD2A-X) disorders.(1) In addition, numerous other genetic muscle diseases, including Bethlem myopathy, dystrophinopathies, ryanodine receptor-associated myopathies, and many more, may clinically present with similar proximal-predominant weakness.(2) Therefore, current genetic testing panels targeting neuromuscular weakness frequently encompass >75 genes. These disorders are quite rare, each with minimum prevalence estimates of 0.01-0.60 cases per 100,000 persons.(3) LGMD2A (attributable to mutations in the gene for calpain-3) and LGMD2B (attributable to mutations in the gene for dysferlin) consistently are the 2 most prevalent LGMD subtypes in a variety of ethnic cohorts. PMID:27540592

  13. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Bembibre Taboada

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment. Even when this term makes reference to the whole process affecting part of cerebral vessel system and cerebral tissue, this document focuses on the cerebrovascular or acute neurological event abruptly affecting the cerebral tissue and the neurological condition of the patient. This condition is usually cause by an abrupt vessel occlusion, of thrombotic or embolic origin, or by subarachnoid or intraventricular intraparenchymatous hemorrhage, of aneurism origin, related with hypertension or with a tumour or arteriovenous defects. The main concepts, classification and conduct are reviewed, stressing the cerebrovascular accident. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  14. Large animal models of rare genetic disorders: sheep as phenotypically relevant models of human genetic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pinnapureddy, Ashish R.; Stayner, Cherie; McEwan, John; Baddeley, Olivia; Forman, John; Eccles, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Animals that accurately model human disease are invaluable in medical research, allowing a critical understanding of disease mechanisms, and the opportunity to evaluate the effect of therapeutic compounds in pre-clinical studies. Many types of animal models are used world-wide, with the most common being small laboratory animals, such as mice. However, rodents often do not faithfully replicate human disease, despite their predominant use in research. This discordancy is due in part to physiol...

  15. Clinical and immunological data of nine patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotta, Laura; Scomodon, Omar; Padoan, Rita; Timpano, Silviana; Plebani, Alessandro; Soresina, Annarosa; Lougaris, Vassilios; Concolino, Daniela; Nicoletti, Angela; Giardino, Giuliana; Licari, Amelia; Marseglia, Gianluigi; Pignata, Claudio; Tamassia, Nicola; Facchetti, Fabio; Vairo, Donatella; Badolato, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the heterogeneous clinical phenotype of a cohort of nine patients diagnosed with heterozygous mutations in STAT1. We report data of extended immunophenotyping over time and we show lung damage in four patients. The increased phosphorylation of STAT1 in response to IFNγ and IFNα stimulation proves the gain-of-function nature of the defects. The data are supplemental to our original article concurrently published "Clinical heterogeneity of dominant chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis disease: presenting as treatment-resistant candidiasis and chronic lung disease" [1], where additional results and interpretation of our research can be found. PMID:26981552

  16. Disease profile and differential diagnosis of hereditary transthyretin-related amyloidosis with exclusively cardiac phenotype: An Italian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Rapezzi, Claudio; Quarta, Candida Cristina; Obici, Laura; Perfetto, Federico; Longhi, Simone; Salvi, Fabrizio; Biagini, Elena; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Grigioni, Francesco; Leone, Ornella; Cappelli, Francesco; Palladini, Giovanni; Rimessi, Paola; Ferlini, Alessandra; Arpesella, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Hereditary transthyretin (TTR)-related amyloidosis (ATTR) is mainly considered a neurologic disease. We assessed the phenotypic and genotypic spectra of ATTR in a Caucasian area and evaluated the prevalence, genetic background, and disease profile of cases with an exclusively cardiac phenotype, highlighting possible hints for the differential diagnosis with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA). METHODS AND RESULTS: In this Italian multicentr...

  17. [Linear and adhesive phenotype of tumor lymphocytes and clinical course of chronic leucosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golenkov, A K; Baryshnikov, A Iu; Mitina, T A; Novikov, V V

    2005-01-01

    Determination of chronic lymphatic leukemia immunological phenotype, performed by the authors, was based upon the study of quantitative expression of membrane differentiation antigens on peripheral blood lymphocytes. The research included study of co-expression of adhesion molecules, belonging to the following families: beta 2 integrins (CD 11 beta, CD 18), immunoglobulins (CD 50), and CD 38 on tumor blood B-lymphocytes of various CD-types and T-lymphocytes in chronic leucosis. The authors developed a functional model of trans-endothelial migration of peripheral blood lymphocytes in chronic chronic lymphatic leukemia, taking into account their membrane adhesive characteristics and serum level of CD 50. The researchers determined clinical importance of the expression of linear and adhesive antigens on peripheral blood lymphocytes, and soluble HLA-1 (sHLA-1) serum levels in patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia. PMID:15960204

  18. Mutation screening of familial Mediterranean fever in the Azeri Turkish population: Genotype-phenotype correlation and the clinical profile variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharesouran Jalal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever is known as a most frequent hereditary autoin-Xammatory among the autoinflammatory syndromes characterized by fever, arthritis and serosal inflammation. Clinically, the foremost severe symptom of the disease is amyloidosis, which may cause to renal failure. MEFV renal failure consists of ten exons and conservative mutations clustered in exon ten (M694V, V726A, M680I, M694I and exon two (E148Q are considered more common mutations within this coding region and that they are detected with a distinct frequency changes in line with ethnicity. The aim of this study was to research the spectrum of mutations in Azeri Turkish population. We evaluated the molecular test results of 82 patients and their parents from eighty families identified as having FMF clinical symptoms referred to Molecular Genetics Laboratory of the Department of Medical Genetics. Patients were referred by their physicians for MEFV mutation detection. The most frequent mutations were M694V respectively followed by M680I (G/C, V726A, M694I and E148Q mutations. A phenotypic variability was also ascertained between patients with different mutations and it must be considered within the daily management of FMF patients.

  19. Different mutations at V363 MAPT codon are associated with atypical clinical phenotypes and show unusual structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giacomina; Bastone, Antonio; Piccoli, Elena; Morbin, Michela; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Beeg, Marten; Del Favero, Elena; Cantù, Laura; Motta, Simona; Salsano, Ettore; Pareyson, Davide; Erbetta, Alessandra; Elia, Antonio Emanuele; Del Sorbo, Francesca; Silani, Vincenzo; Morelli, Claudia; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2014-02-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is one of the major genes linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration, a group of neurodegenerative diseases clinically, pathologically, and genetically heterogeneous. In particular, MAPT mutations give rise to the subgroup of tauopathies. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the MAPT mutations so far described are the decreased ability of tau protein to promote microtubule polymerization (missense mutations) or the altered ratio of tau isoforms (splicing mutations), both leading to accumulation of hyperphosphorylated filamentous tau protein. Following a genetic screening of patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration, we identified 2 MAPT mutations, V363I and V363A, leading to atypical clinical phenotypes, such as posterior cortical atrophy. We investigated in vitro features of the recombinant mutated tau isoforms and revealed unusual functional and structural characteristics such as an increased ability to promote microtubule polymerization and a tendency to form oligomeric instead of filamentous aggregates. Thus, we disclosed a greater than expected complexity of abnormal features of mutated tau isoforms. Overall our findings suggest a high probability that these mutations are pathogenic. PMID:24018212

  20. A STUDY OF CLINICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, PULMONARY FUNCTIONS IN PATIENTS OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnukanth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory diseases impose a tremendous health burden on society. As countries industrialize, rising pollution and changes in lifestyle have contributed to increased levels of respiratory disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD refers to a group of disorders characterized by chronic airflow obstruction/limitation. The airway obstruction is persistent and largely irreversible. WHO defines COPD as encompassing two groups of lung diseases, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. The present universally accepted guidelines no longer divide COPD into chronic bronchitis or emphysema as there is not much difference with regard to treatment protocols. AIM: The present study is being undertaken to evaluate the clinical, radiological and pulmonary functions in patients of COPD. An attempt also has been made to classify patients of COPD into chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A total of 153 patients were screened and inclusion and exclusion criteria applied. Forty patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and pulmonary functions including diffusion studies were done. They were phenotypically divided into emphysema predominant and chronic bronchitis predominant. Breathlessness as assessed by MMRC grade and pulmonary functions were equal in both the groups. There was no radiological and phenotypical correlation. CONCLUSION: There is no significant difference in the severity of airflow obstruction as measured by FEV1 between the two phenotypes of COPD (Fisher’s exact test, P>0.05. There is a significant overlapping of symptoms, radiological findings and pulmonary functions among the phenotypes of COPD. Hence it can be reasonably concluded that it is difficult to make a diagnosis of COPD phenotypes based on clinical, radiological, spirometry and DLCo parameters

  1. Phenotype variability of infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease IMNEPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Mignot, Cyril; Doummar, Diane; Hashem, Mais; Faqeih, Eissa; Josset, Patrice; Dubern, Béatrice; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Kraemer, Nadine; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease (IMNEPD) has been recently linked to biallelic mutation of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 gene PTRH2. Two index patients with IMNEPD in the original report had multiple neurological symptoms such as postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability, developmental delay, sensorineural deafness, cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. In addition, distal muscle weakness and abnormalities of thyroid, pancreas, and liver were found. Here, we report five further IMNEPD patients with a different homozygous PTRH2 mutation, broaden the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and differentiate common symptoms and interindividual variability in IMNEPD associated with a unique mutation. We thereby hope to better define IMNEPD and promote recognition and diagnosis of this novel disease entity. PMID:27129381

  2. Genotypes and clinical phenotypes in children with cytochrome-c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darin, N; Moslemi, A-R; Lebon, S; Rustin, P; Holme, E; Oldfors, A; Tulinius, M

    2003-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency has been associated with a wide spectrum of clinical features and may be caused by mutations in different genes of both the mitochondrial and the nuclear DNA. In an attempt to correlate the clinical phenotype with the genotype in 16 childhood cases, mtDNA was analysed for deletion, depletion, and mutations in the three genes encoding COX subunits and the 22 tRNA genes. Furthermore, nuclear DNA was analysed for mutations in the SURF1, SCO2, COX10, and COX17 genes and cases with mtDNA depletion were analysed for mutations in the TK2 gene. SURF1-mutations were identified in three out of four cases with Leigh syndrome while a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA (trp) gene was identified in the fourth. One case with mtDNA depletion had mutations in the TK2 gene. In two cases with leukoencephalopathy, one case with encephalopathy, five cases with fatal infantile myopathy and cardiomyopathy, two cases with benign infantile myopathy, and one case with mtDNA depletion, no mutations were identified. We conclude that COX deficiency in childhood should be suspected in a wide range of clinical settings and although an increasing number of genetic defects have been identified, the underlying mutations remain unclear in the majority of the cases. PMID:14681757

  3. Phenotypic charactheristics of fluorescent pseudomonss, biological control agent of lincat disease of temanggung tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NINING NURUL AZIZAH

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent pseudomonass isolated from local plants-rishosphere in temanggung controlled lincat disease of tobacco. This report describe phenotypic charactheristics of the bacteria in order to be used as a base for the development of the bacteria as a biological control agent of lincat disease. Phenotypic charactheristics of six isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonass which controlled lincat disease in the field were determined in the laboratory of Plant Bacteriology, Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University. Plant pathogenicity tests were conducted by hypersensitive reaction into tobacco leaf and inoculation to tobacco plants. Antagonism test between fluorescent Pseudomonass and other candidate of biological control agents were also conducted. The results indicated that the bacteria were rod shape, Gram negative, positive reaction in catalase and oxidase tests. Nitrate reduce to nitrite, arginine was hydrolysed, fluorescent pigment were produced on King’s B medium, levan formation positive and all bacteria denitrifiy. The bacteria used urea, tween 80 and amylum were not hydrolised, poly--hydroxybutyrate was not accumulated in the cells. Negative reactions were observed for lysine decarboxylation, indol production, VP/MR reaction, and gelatn liquefation. Some compounds could be used as solely carbon sources. All isolates grew on the medium containing 2% NaCl. The best pH for growth was 6-7 and all isolates grew at 20-41C. Negative result were obtained for hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity tests.

  4. Genetics of kidney disease and related cardiometabolic phenotypes in Zuni Indians: The Zuni Kidney Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L Laston

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to identify genetic factors associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD and related cardiometabolic phenotypes among participants of the Genetics of Kidney Disease in Zuni Indians study. The study was conducted as a community-based participatory research project in the Zuni Indians, a small endogamous tribe in rural New Mexico. We recruited 998 members from 28 extended multigenerational families, ascertained through probands with CKD who had at least one sibling with CKD. We used the Illumina Infinium Human1M-Duo v3.0 BeadChips to type 1.1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Prevalence estimates for CKD, hyperuricemia, diabetes and hypertension were 24%, 30%, 17% and 34%, respectively. We found a significant (p<1.58 × 10-7 association for a SNP in a novel gene for serum creatinine (PTPLAD2. We replicated significant associations for genes with serum uric acid (SLC2A9, triglyceride levels (APOA1, BUD13, ZNF259, and total cholesterol (PVRL2. We found novel suggestive associations (p<1.58 × 10-6 for SNPs in genes with systolic (OLFML2B, and diastolic blood pressure (NFIA. We identified a series of genes associated with CKD and related cardiometabolic phenotypes among Zuni Indians, a population with a high prevalence of kidney disease. Illuminating genetic variations that modulate the risk for these disorders may ultimately provide a basis for novel preventive strategies and therapeutic interventions.

  5. Mitochondrial diseases: an overview of genetics, pathogenesis, clinical features and an approach to diagnosis and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhal N

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Defects in structures or functions of mitochondria, mainly involving the oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial biogenesis and other metabolic pathways have been shown to be associated with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. The ubiquitous nature of mitochondria and their unique genetic features contribute to the clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogenecity of mitochondrial diseases. This article focuses on the recent advances in the field of mitochondrial disorders with respect to the consequences for an advanced clinical and genetic diagnostics. In addition, an overview on recently identified genetic defects and their pathogenic molecular mechanisms are given.

  6. Basophil phenotypes in chronic idiopathic urticaria in relation to disease activity and autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, John A; Hamilton, Robert G; Gober, Laura M; Sterba, Patricia M; Saini, Sarbjit S

    2008-08-01

    Potentially pathogenic IgG autoantibodies to IgE or its receptor, Fc epsilonRIalpha, have been detected in approximately 40% of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) patients. CIU patients' basophils display distinct altered Fc epsilonRIalpha-mediated degranulation. CIU patients with basophil histamine release in response to polyclonal goat anti-human IgE > or = 10% are classified as CIU responders (CIU-R) and CIU non-responders (CIU-NR). We compared the presence of autoantibodies to basophil degranulation phenotypes and to disease status (active or inactive). Sera were collected from non-CIU subjects and CIU subjects who participated in a longitudinal study of disease severity and had defined basophil degranulation phenotypes. Immunoenzymetric assays (IEMA) quantified IgG anti-Fc epsilonRIalpha and anti-IgE. IgG anti-Fc epsilonRIalpha antibody was detected in 57% of CIU-R (n=35), 55% of CIU-NR (n=29), and 57% of non-CIU subjects (n=23), whereas IgG anti-IgE was present in 43% of CIU-R, 45% of CIU-NR, and 30% of non-CIU subjects. Both the autoantibody levels and the functional basophil phenotype remained stable in subjects with active disease (n=16), whereas there was an enhancement in basophil function as subjects evolved into a state of remission (n=6), which appears independent of the presence of autoantibody. IEMAs detected a similar frequency of autoantibodies in CIU-R, CIU-NR, and non-CIU subjects. Basophil function may be independent of IEMA-detected autoantibodies. PMID:18356810

  7. Variable content of von Willebrand factor mutant monomer drives the phenotypic variability in a family with von Willebrand disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junmei; Hinckley, Jesse D; Haberichter, Sandra; Jacobi, Paula; Montgomery, Robert; Flood, Veronica H; Wong, Randall; Interlandi, Gianluca; Chung, Dominic W; López, José A; Di Paola, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. We evaluated a 24-member pedigree with VWD type 2 caused by a T>G mutation at position 3911 that predicts a methionine to arginine (M1304R) change in the platelet-binding A1 domain of von Willebrand factor (VWF). This mutation manifests as an autosomal-dominant trait, with clinical and biochemical phenotypic variability among affected individuals, including differences in bleeding tendency and VWF quantity, activity, and multimer pattern. Sequencing of all VWF coding regions in 3 affected individuals did not identify additional mutations. When expressed in heterologous cells, M1304R was secreted in lower quantities, failed to drive formation of storage granules, and was defective in multimerization and platelet binding. When cotransfected in equal quantities with the wild-type complementary DNA, the mutant complementary DNA depressed VWF secretion, although multimerization was only mildly affected. A llama nanobody (AU/VWFa-11) that detects the mutant A1 domain demonstrated highly variable binding to VWF from different affected members, indicating that the VWF contained different percentages of mutant monomers in different individuals. Thus, the observed variability in VWD phenotypes could in part be determined by the extent of mutant monomer incorporation in the final multimer structure of plasma VWF. PMID:26019279

  8. Selective vulnerability in neurodegeneration: insights from clinical variants of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Schott, Jonathan M; Hardy, John; Turner, Martin R; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Selective vulnerability in the nervous system refers to the fact that subpopulations of neurons in different brain systems may be more or less prone to abnormal function or death in response to specific types of pathological states or injury. The concept has been used extensively as a potential way of explaining differences in degeneration patterns and the clinical presentation of different neurodegenerative diseases. Yet the increasing complexity of molecular histopathology at the cellular level in neurodegenerative disorders frequently appears at odds with phenotyping based on clinically-directed, macroscopic regional brain involvement. While cross-disease comparisons can provide insights into the differential vulnerability of networks and neuronal populations, we focus here on what is known about selective vulnerability-related factors that might explain the differential phenotypic expressions of the same disease-in this case, typical and atypical forms of Alzheimer's disease. Whereas considerable progress has been made in this area, much is yet to be elucidated; further studies comparing different phenotypic variants aimed at identifying both vulnerability and resilience factors may provide valuable insights into disease pathogenesis, and suggest novel targets for therapy. PMID:26746185

  9. Phenotypic Variation in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, Emmylou; Mesters, Ilse; Spigt, Mark G; van Eerd, Eva A M; Gosselink, Rik; de Bie, Rob A; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Despite the high number of inactive patients with COPD, not all inactive patients are referred to physical therapy, unlike recommendations of general practitioner (GP) guidelines. It is likely that GPs take other factors into account, determining a subpopulation that is treated by a physical therapist (PT). The aim of this study is to explore the phenotypic differences between inactive patients treated in GP practice and inactive patients treated in GP practice combined with PT. Additionally this study provides an overview of the phenotype of patients with COPD in PT practice. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, COPD patient characteristics were extracted from questionnaires. Differences regarding perceived health status, degree of airway obstruction, exacerbation frequency, and comorbidity were studied in a subgroup of 290 inactive patients and in all 438 patients. Results. Patients treated in GP practice combined with PT reported higher degree of airway obstruction, more exacerbations, more vascular comorbidity, and lower health status compared to patients who were not referred to and treated by a PT. Conclusion. Unequal patient phenotypes in different primary care settings have important clinical implications. It can be carefully concluded that other factors, besides the level of inactivity, play a role in referral to PT. PMID:27148553

  10. Phenotypic Variation in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmylou Beekman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite the high number of inactive patients with COPD, not all inactive patients are referred to physical therapy, unlike recommendations of general practitioner (GP guidelines. It is likely that GPs take other factors into account, determining a subpopulation that is treated by a physical therapist (PT. The aim of this study is to explore the phenotypic differences between inactive patients treated in GP practice and inactive patients treated in GP practice combined with PT. Additionally this study provides an overview of the phenotype of patients with COPD in PT practice. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, COPD patient characteristics were extracted from questionnaires. Differences regarding perceived health status, degree of airway obstruction, exacerbation frequency, and comorbidity were studied in a subgroup of 290 inactive patients and in all 438 patients. Results. Patients treated in GP practice combined with PT reported higher degree of airway obstruction, more exacerbations, more vascular comorbidity, and lower health status compared to patients who were not referred to and treated by a PT. Conclusion. Unequal patient phenotypes in different primary care settings have important clinical implications. It can be carefully concluded that other factors, besides the level of inactivity, play a role in referral to PT.

  11. Correlation of ATP7B genotype with phenotype in Chinese patients with Wilson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qing Liu; Ya-Fen Zhang; Tze-Tze Liu; Kwang-Jen Hsiao; Jian-Ming Zhang; Xue-Fan Gu; Ke-Rong Bao; Li-Hua Yu; Mei-Xian Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the mutational characterization of Ptype ATP7B gene and to explore the correlation of ATP7B genotype to phenotype in Chinese patients with Wilson disease (WD).METHODS: Seventy-five patients with WD from 72 no-kinship families, 44 males and 31 females, were enrolled in this study.The age of onset ranged from 4 to 39 years, ≤18 years in 72 patients. Some exons of ATP7B gene mutations were analyzed in patients with WD by using biochemical methods,polymerase chain reaction-single strand configuration polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequence analysis. A total of 778 coding regions were identified with restriction enzyme Msp I. The activity of Cu-ATPase was assessed by measuring inorganic phosphorus.RESULTS: Sixty-six of 75 patients (88%) had with hepatic manifestations, 39 of them had only hepatic manifestations,27 patients had hepatic and neurological manifestations or other symptoms at the same time (16 patients had associated neurological manifestation, 3 patients had osteopathy, 8patients had other symptoms). Eight of the 75 patients (10.7%) had only neurological symptoms, one patient (5 years old) had no symptom. Twelve changing patterns were detected in ATP7B gene by DNA sequencing, including seven mutations (R778L, C656X, G943D, V1140A, V1106I V1216M and 1384del17), six polymorphisms (IVS4-5t/c, A2495G, C2310G,IVS18+6c/t and IVS20+5a/g). R778L occurred in 49/66patients (74%) with hepatic manifestations, homozygosis of R778L in 16 patients, heterozygosity of R778L in 33 patients. V1106I mutation of ATP7B gene occurred in 2 patients with delaying onset of clinical symptoms. Cu-ATPase activity of three patients with known mutations (R778L/ V1106I/A2495G, R778L/V1216M and R778L/R778L) were determined; and the activity of Cu-ATPase was decreased by 44.55%, 88.23% and 69.49% respectively.CONCLUSION: 1384del17bp is a novel mutation found in WD patients. R778L is the most common mutation of ATP7B gene. There is a correlation between R778L and hepatic

  12. Self-Organizing 3D Human Neural Tissue Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Recapitulate Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem K; Mungenast, Alison E; Lin, Yuan-Ta; Ko, Tak; Abdurrob, Fatema; Seo, Jinsoo; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The dismal success rate of clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD) motivates us to develop model systems of AD pathology that have higher predictive validity. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows us to model pathology and study disease mechanisms directly in human neural cells from healthy individual as well as AD patients. However, two-dimensional culture systems do not recapitulate the complexity of neural tissue, and phenotypes such as extracellular protein aggregation are difficult to observe. We report brain organoids that use pluripotent stem cells derived from AD patients and recapitulate AD-like pathologies such as amyloid aggregation, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and endosome abnormalities. These pathologies are observed in an age-dependent manner in organoids derived from multiple familial AD (fAD) patients harboring amyloid precursor protein (APP) duplication or presenilin1 (PSEN1) mutation, compared to controls. The incidence of AD pathology was consistent amongst several fAD lines, which carried different mutations. Although these are complex assemblies of neural tissue, they are also highly amenable to experimental manipulation. We find that treatment of patient-derived organoids with β- and γ-secretase inhibitors significantly reduces amyloid and tau pathology. Moreover, these results show the potential of this model system to greatly increase the translatability of pre-clinical drug discovery in AD. PMID:27622770

  13. Clinical characteristics of buerger's disease in iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the clinical course of Buerger's disease as observed in two vascular surgery centers located in the capital of Iran. The records of all the patients admitted with Buerger's disease diagnosed on the basis of Shionoya's clinical criteria were studied. Their clinical characteristics, treatment offered and short-term follow-up results are described as frequencies and percentages. A total of 116 patients, aged 41.1+-11.3 years, were enrolled. All patients were males; 99% of them were smokers with an average of 22.9 pack-years of tobacco use. Lower-extremity was affected in 102 (87.9%) patients, upper-extremity in 3 (2.6%) patients and both in 11 (9.5%). The most frequent reasons for being referred to hospital were ischemic ulcers (90.5%), claudication (87.9%), paresthesia (75.9%), rest pain (66.4%), gangrene (60.3%), Raynaud's phenomenon (23.3%) and thrombophlebitis (9.5%). Diagnostic arteriography, vascular bypass surgery and sympathectomy were performed in 60%, 24% and 83% of the patients, respectively. Sixty-eight patients (58.6%) had one of the following amputations: toe 36 (52.9%), transmetatarsal 3 (4.4%), below knee 25 (36.8%), finger 3 (4.4%) and above knee one (1.5%) patient. Since the studied hospitals are the referral centers for vascular surgery in Iran admitting patients with severe symptoms; therefore, a higher number of complications and amputations was found in the present study. Upper extremity involvement as well as the occurrence of thrombophlebitis and Raynaud's phenomenon was rather infrequent among the studied cases. (author)

  14. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B...

  15. CDKD: a clinical database of kidney diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sanjay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main function of the kidneys is to remove waste products and excess water from the blood. Loss of kidney function leads to various health issues, such as anemia, high blood pressure, bone disease, disorders of cholesterol. The main objective of this database system is to store the personal and laboratory investigatory details of patients with kidney disease. The emphasis is on experimental results relevant to quantitative renal physiology, with a particular focus on data relevant for evaluation of parameters in statistical models of renal function. Description Clinical database of kidney diseases (CDKD has been developed with patient confidentiality and data security as a top priority. It can make comparative analysis of one or more parameters of patient’s record and includes the information of about whole range of data including demographics, medical history, laboratory test results, vital signs, personal statistics like age and weight. Conclusions The goal of this database is to make kidney-related physiological data easily available to the scientific community and to maintain & retain patient’s record. As a Web based application it permits physician to see, edit and annotate a patient record from anywhere and anytime while maintaining the confidentiality of the personal record. It also allows statistical analysis of all data.

  16. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine M Hölter

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  17. Phenotypic instability of Arabidopsis alleles affecting a disease Resistance gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Eric J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana strain Columbia – cpr1, snc1, and bal – map to the RPP5 locus, which contains a cluster of disease Resistance genes. The similar phenotypes, gene expression patterns, and genetic interactions observed in these mutants are related to constitutive activation of pathogen defense signaling. However, these mutant alleles respond differently to various conditions. Exposure to mutagens, such as ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS and γ-irradiation, induce high frequency phenotypic instability of the bal allele. In addition, a fraction of the bal and cpr1 alleles segregated from bal × cpr1 F1 hybrids also show signs of phenotypic instability. To gain more insight into the mechanism of phenotypic instability of the bal and cpr1 mutations, we systematically compared the behavior of these unusual alleles with that of the missense gain-of-function snc1 allele in response to DNA damage or passage through F1 hybrids. Results We found that the cpr1 allele is similar to the bal allele in its unstable behavior after EMS mutagenesis. For both the bal and cpr1 mutants, destabilization of phenotypes was observed in more than 10% of EMS-treated plants in the M1 generation. In addition, exceptions to simple Mendelian inheritance were identified in the M2 generation. Like cpr1 × bal F1 hybrids, cpr1 × snc1 F1 hybrids and bal × snc1 F1 hybrids exhibited dwarf morphology. While only dwarf F2 plants were produced from bal × snc1 F1 hybrids, about 10% wild-type F2 progeny were produced from cpr1 × snc1 F1 hybrids, as well as from cpr1 × bal hybrids. Segregation analysis suggested that the cpr1 allele in cpr1 × snc1 crosses was destabilized during the late F1 generation to early F2 generation. Conclusion With exposure to EMS or different F1 hybrid contexts, phenotypic instability is induced for the bal and cpr1 alleles, but not for the snc1 allele. Our results suggest that the RPP5 locus can adopt different

  18. Carbapenem resistance and phenotypic detection of carbapenemases in clinical isolates of acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomty Mahajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-Ab reported worldwide has become one of the most difficult nosocomially acquired Gram-negative pathogens to control and treat. The clinical utility of carbapenems is under threat with the emergence of acquired carbapenemases, particularly Ambler class B metallo-lactamases (MBL. Because of the global increase in the occurrence and dissemination of MBLs, early detection is critical. This study was undertaken to detect resistance to carbapenems in clinical isolates of A. baumannii from hospitalized patients by both disk-diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC methods and to assess the rate of carbapenemase and MBL production among the isolates. Materials and Methods : A. baumannii were identified from various clinical samples and antibiotic susceptibility profile was determined by the standard disk-diffusion method. Meropenem-resistant strains were tested further by agar dilution MIC for meropenem. Resistant isolates were screened for carbapenemase production by the modified Hodge test and positive isolates were further checked for metallo-β-lacatmase production by the EDTA disk synergy test. Results : 42 isolates (31.81% showed resistance to meropenem by the disk diffusion method. 47.6% were carbapenemase positive by the modified Hodge test and 19% were MBL producers phenotypically by the EDTA disc synergy test (EDS. These meropenem-resistant isolates were resistant to most of the other antibiotics tested. These 42 isolates were recovered mostly from patients admitted to intensive care units. Four isolates of the A. baumannii complex were pan drug resistant and showed resistance to even tigecycline and polymyxin B. Conclusion : Carbapenem resistance has been increasingly reported, necessitating their detection. This study reports simple, carbapenemase, and MBL detection method that can be easily incorporated into the daily routine of a clinical laboratory.

  19. Variation in germination of Clostridium difficile clinical isolates correlates to disease severity

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Paul E.; Kaiser, Alyssa M.; McColm, Sarah A.; Bauer, Jessica M.; Vincent B Young; Aronoff, David M.; Hanna, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, Clostridium difficile infections have been increasing in both number and severity throughout the world. As with other spore forming bacteria, germination is a vital step in the life cycle of this pathogen. Studies have examined differences in sporulation and toxin production among a number of C. difficile clinical isolates; however, few have examined differences in germination and the relationship between this phenotype and disease severity. Here, over 100 C. diffic...

  20. The frequency of Listeria monocytogenes strains recovered from clinical and non-clinical samples using phenotypic methods and confirmed by PCR

    OpenAIRE

    abazar pournajaf; lida lotfollahi; gholamreza irajian; abdollah ardebili; Behrooz Sadeghi kalani; mojtabata Taghizadeh armaki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes listeriosis which has extensive clinical manifestations. Infections with L. monocytogenes are a serious threat to immunocompromised persons. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of L. monocytogenes strains recovered from clinical and non-clinical samples using phenotypic methods and confirmed by PCR. Materials and Methods: In this study, 617 specimens were analyzed. All specimens were cu...

  1. Contribution of rs11465788 in IL23R gene to Crohn’s disease susceptibility and phenotype in Chinese population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chen Bin; Zeng Zhirong; Wu Xiaoqin; Chen Minhu; Li Mei; Gao Xiang; Chen Baili; Hu Pinjin

    2009-08-01

    Multiple studies have shown that IL23 cytokine plays an essential role in the development of autoimmune diseases by activating IL17-producing helper T (Th17) cells. Given that the susceptibility loci in IL23R for Crohn’s disease (CD) is present in Western population and not in Asian population; we screened the IL23R gene by DNA sequencing to identify susceptibility loci in a selected CD cohort and confirmed it in all our subjects (134 CD and 131 controls). A novel nonsynonymous SNP (p.Gly149Arg, c.445G>A) and 35 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. Among them, only rs11465788 was implicated in CD susceptibility (P = 4.9 × 10-4, OR = 0.30). Genotype–phenotypic interaction analysis showed that rs11465788 is associated with nonstricturing and nonpenetrating disease behaviour in CD patients ($P = 0.015$). Our results provide the evidence that rs11465788 may influence the susceptibility and clinical features of CD in Chinese population.

  2. Inheritance of Yellow Vein Mosaic Disease Resistance, a Mutant Phenotype from Gamma Radiation Mutagenesis in Okra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The yellow vein mosaic disease (YVMD) is one of the major diseases affecting export-grade okra production in Thailand. YVMD-resistant B4610 mutant was generated through gamma irradiation of the Okura variety of okra. This study aimed at determining the inheritance of YVMD resistance from B4610 through genetic analysis. Segregation analysis of the F2 and BC1F1 progeny from the cross between B4610 and Pichit 03, a susceptible variety, indicated that YVMD resistance phenotype resulted from a single locus mutation (p > 0.05). In addition, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to aid in the assignment of YVMD resistance phenotype. Combinations of primers AV1F1 or AV1F2 with AV1R1 successfully amplified a DNA fragment from infected susceptible individuals but not from resistant individuals. DNA sequencing of the PCR product confirmed the identity of AV1 gene belonging to the yellow vein mosaic virus

  3. Exosomes from adipose-derived stem cells ameliorate phenotype of Huntington's disease in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mijung; Liu, Tian; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2016-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by the aggregation of mutant Huntingtin (mHtt). Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have a potential for use in the treatment of incurable disorders, including HD. ASCs secrete various neurotrophic factors and microvesicles, and modulate hostile microenvironments affected by disease through paracrine mechanisms. Exosomes are small vesicles that transport nucleic acid and protein between cells. Here, we investigated the therapeutic role of exosomes from ASCs (ASC-exo) using in vitro HD model by examining pathological phenotypes of this model. Immunocytochemistry result showed that ASC-exo significantly decreases mHtt aggregates in R6/2 mice-derived neuronal cells. Western blot result further confirmed the reduction in mHtt aggregates level by ASC-exo treatment. ASC-exo up-regulates PGC-1, phospho-CREB and ameliorates abnormal apoptotic protein level in an in vitro HD model. In addition, MitoSOX Red, JC-1 and cell viability assay showed that ASC-exo reduces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis of in vitro HD model. These findings suggest that ASC-exo has a therapeutic potential for treating HD by modulating representative cellular phenotypes of HD. PMID:27177616

  4. Genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian patients with Hb H disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimkhani, Saedieh; Azarkeivan, Azita; Bayat, Nooshin; Houry-Parvin, Mahdieh; Jalil-Nejad, Sayeh; Zand, Shima; Golkar, Zahra; Hadavi, Valeh; Imanian, Hashem; Oberkanins, Christian; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Thalassemia is the most common genetic disorder in Iran. Some α-globin genotypes leading to Hb H disease may cause severe anemia and dependence on regular blood transfusions. In this study, 40 patients were analyzed for the molecular basis and the genotype-phenotype correlation of Hb H disease in Iran. α-Globin molecular analysis was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by agarose gel electrophoresis, reverse hybridization test strips or DNA sequencing. The most frequently observed α-globin genotypes were -α(3.7)/- -(MED) in 10 patients (25%), - -(20.5)/α(-5nt)α in six patients (15%) and - -(20.5)/-α(3.7) in four patients (10%). A subset of the identified Hb H genotypes, including - -(MED)/α(CS)α, - -(MED)/α(PolyA2)α and α(CS)α/α(CS)α, was associated with a need for regular or irregular blood transfusions. Our findings provide a basis for predicting phenotype severity by identifying the Hb H genotype and making more selective decisions for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:21250880

  5. p.R301X Mutation and Variable Phenotypic Appearance of Fabry Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozelsancak, Ruya; Uyar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder. Due to deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A, neutral glycosphingolipids (primarily globotriaosylceramide) progressively accumulate within lysosomes of cells in various organ systems, resulting in a multi-system disorder, affecting both men and women. Misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis are common because of the nature of Fabry disease. CASE REPORT We report a case of Fabry disease with a p.R301X (c.901 C>T) mutation in a 39-year-old man who was being treated for chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis for 2 years. Family screening tests showed that the proband's mother, sister, and daughter had the same mutation with different phenotypes. Levels of α-galactosidase A were low in the proband and his mother and sister. Cornea verticillata and heart involvement were present in multiple family members. Agalsidase alfa treatment was started in patients where indicated. CONCLUSIONS Pedigree analysis is still a powerful, readily available tool to identify individuals at risk for genetic diseases and allows earlier detection and management of disease. PMID:27156739

  6. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques. PMID:26898824

  7. Clinical Survey of Cerebrovascular Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghofrani

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke is defined as the sudden occlusion or rupture of cerebral arteries or veins resulting in focal cerebral damage and clinical neurologic deficits. The risk factors for stroke in children are numerous and differ from those in adults. Identification of these factors can prevent subsequent strokes. The aim of this study is to determine the etiology of stroke in children.Methods: In this descriptive prospective study, children who were referred to pediatric neurology clinic in Mofid Children's Hospital due to acute hemiparesis during 2 years period (Sep 2003-Sep 2005 were evaluated and their diagnosis was cerebrovascular disorders, in the view of physical examination and brain imaging.Findings: The study group consisted of 40 children in age groups between 3 months to 14 years old. The most common age group at presentation was 2 to 5 years old. Occurrence was predominant during autumn and winter (70%. The most common clinical presentations were acute hemiparesis (85% and seizures (40%. The other symptoms were as follow: 15% decreased level of consciousness, 12.5% fever, 7.5% VI nerve palsy, and 2.5% cerebellar signs. 20% of patients suffered from hemorrhagic and 80% had ischemic stroke. In 60% of the patients specific etiologic factors were identified and in the rest of the group, risk factors could be delineated. The most common etiologies were: 17.5% cardiac diseases or procedures and 10% hematologic disorders. Other etiologies included: 7.5% prothrombotic states, 7.5% CNS infection, 5% mitochondriopathy, 2.5% for each of the head trauma, migraine, serum lipid abnormality, hypertension and arteriovenus malformation. The most common risk factors consisted of 40% anemia and 20% infections.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that stroke in children is a multifactorial process. Identification of the underlying risk factors for cerebrovascular disorders is highly desirable because many of the risk factors can be prevented, resulting in

  8. Claudin-19 mutations and clinical phenotype in Spanish patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Claverie-Martín

    Full Text Available Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is an autosomal recessive tubular disorder characterized by excessive renal magnesium and calcium excretion and chronic kidney failure. This rare disease is caused by mutations in the CLDN16 and CLDN19 genes. These genes encode the tight junction proteins claudin-16 and claudin-19, respectively, which regulate the paracellular ion reabsorption in the kidney. Patients with mutations in the CLDN19 gene also present severe visual impairment. Our goals in this study were to examine the clinical characteristics of a large cohort of Spanish patients with this disorder and to identify the disease causing mutations. We included a total of 31 patients belonging to 27 unrelated families and studied renal and ocular manifestations. We then analyzed by direct DNA sequencing the coding regions of CLDN16 and CLDN19 genes in these patients. Bioinformatic tools were used to predict the consequences of mutations. Clinical evaluation showed ocular defects in 87% of patients, including mainly myopia, nystagmus and macular colobomata. Twenty two percent of patients underwent renal transplantation and impaired renal function was observed in another 61% of patients. Results of the genetic analysis revealed CLDN19 mutations in all patients confirming the clinical diagnosis. The majority of patients exhibited the previously described p.G20D mutation. Haplotype analysis using three microsatellite markers showed a founder effect for this recurrent mutation in our cohort. We also identified four new pathogenic mutations in CLDN19, p.G122R, p.I41T, p.G75C and p.G75S. A strategy based on microsequencing was designed to facilitate the genetic diagnosis of this disease. Our data indicate that patients with CLDN19 mutations have a high risk of progression to chronic renal disease.

  9. Role of glutathione S-transferases in the spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguer-Gotay, D; Almaguer-Mederos, L E; Aguilera-Rodríguez, R; Estupiñán-Rodríguez, A; González-Zaldivar, Y; Cuello-Almarales, D; Laffita-Mesa, J M; Vázquez-Mojena, Y

    2014-06-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative and incurable hereditary disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion mutation on ATXN2 gene. The identification of reliable biochemical markers of disease severity is of paramount significance for the development and assessment of clinical trials. In order to evaluate the potential use of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity as a biomarker for SCA2, a case-control study in 38 affected, presymptomatic individuals or healthy controls was conducted. An enlarged sample of 121 affected individuals was set to assess the impact of GST activity on SCA2 clinical expression. There was a significant increase in GST activity in affected individuals relative to controls, although sensibility and specificity were not high. GST activity was not significantly influenced by sex, age, disease duration or CAG repeat size and did not significantly influence disease severity markers. These findings show a disruption of in vivo GST activity in SCA2, suggesting a role for oxidative stress in the neurodegenerative process. PMID:24780439

  10. Mutations in Hirschsprung disease : When does a mutation contribute to the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, RMW; Osinga, J; Buys, CHCM

    1997-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a congenital disorder clinically characterized by the absence of colonic ganglia and genetically by extensive heterogeneity. Genes involved include RET, GDNF, EDNRB and EDN3. Mutations of these genes may give dominant, recessive, or polygenic patterns of inheritance. In parti

  11. Genetic susceptibility and genotype-phenotype association in 588 Danish children with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Cleynen, I; Andersen, Susanne Pia; Vermeire, S; Munkholm, P; Paerregaard, A; Wewer, Anne Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    retrieved and clinical information was extracted. DNA was obtained from Guthrie cards from the Danish National Neonatal Screening Biobank (PKU-biobanken) at Statens Serum Institut and from blood samples. RESULTS: A total of 588 IBD patients (244 Crohn's disease (CD), 318 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 26 IBD...

  12. Defining disease phenotypes using national linked electronic health records: a case study of atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine I Morley

    Full Text Available National electronic health records (EHR are increasingly used for research but identifying disease cases is challenging due to differences in information captured between sources (e.g. primary and secondary care. Our objective was to provide a transparent, reproducible model for integrating these data using atrial fibrillation (AF, a chronic condition diagnosed and managed in multiple ways in different healthcare settings, as a case study.Potentially relevant codes for AF screening, diagnosis, and management were identified in four coding systems: Read (primary care diagnoses and procedures, British National Formulary (BNF; primary care prescriptions, ICD-10 (secondary care diagnoses and OPCS-4 (secondary care procedures. From these we developed a phenotype algorithm via expert review and analysis of linked EHR data from 1998 to 2010 for a cohort of 2.14 million UK patients aged ≥ 30 years. The cohort was also used to evaluate the phenotype by examining associations between incident AF and known risk factors.The phenotype algorithm incorporated 286 codes: 201 Read, 63 BNF, 18 ICD-10, and four OPCS-4. Incident AF diagnoses were recorded for 72,793 patients, but only 39.6% (N = 28,795 were recorded in primary care and secondary care. An additional 7,468 potential cases were inferred from data on treatment and pre-existing conditions. The proportion of cases identified from each source differed by diagnosis age; inferred diagnoses contributed a greater proportion of younger cases (≤ 60 years, while older patients (≥ 80 years were mainly diagnosed in SC. Associations of risk factors (hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure with incident AF defined using different EHR sources were comparable in magnitude to those from traditional consented cohorts.A single EHR source is not sufficient to identify all patients, nor will it provide a representative sample. Combining multiple data sources and integrating information on treatment and

  13. Practical considerations in choosing a factor VIII prophylaxis regimen: Role of clinical phenotype and trough levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Rolf; Fischer, Kathelijn; Carcao, Manuel; Santagostino, Elena; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Mathew, Prasad

    2016-05-01

    Current therapy for haemophilia A is guided by severity of the disease, which in turn is best reflected in patients' endogenous factor VIII activity levels. For patients with severe haemophilia (particularly children), prophylaxis with continuous routine factor replacement has become standard of care in developed countries and is gradually becoming the standard of care in developing countries. The question arises then: what is an appropriate prophylaxis regimen to prevent bleeding events and arthropathy, while also maximizing patient quality of life and taking into consideration the costs of prophylaxis? Should all patients be treated with one standard, fixed prophylaxis regimen, or should prophylaxis be individualised for each patient? If so, what factors need to be considered in choosing the appropriate dose and frequency of factor administration? If prophylaxis is tailored to the individual patient, then patient-related factors (bleeding phenotype, activity profiles, age, joint status) and product-specific factors (half-life of the replacement factor in the individual patient) will determine the choice of regimen, whether it be a fixed-regimen prophylaxis or prophylaxis that is tailored to patient activity and bleeding risk. Regardless of the choice of prophylaxis regimen, for any regimen to be effective, adherence to therapy is key to optimising outcomes. PMID:26791493

  14. Brain ischemia with Alzheimer phenotype dysregulates Alzheimer's disease-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Januszewski, Sławomir; Kocki, Janusz; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-06-01

    There are evidences for the influence of Alzheimer's proteins on postischemic brain injury. We present here an overview of the published evidence underpinning the relationships between β-amyloid peptide, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, presenilins, apolipoproteins, secretases and neuronal survival/death decisions after ischemia and development of postischemic dementia. The interactions of above molecules and their influence and contribution to final ischemic brain degeneration resulting in dementia of Alzheimer phenotype are reviewed. Generation and deposition of β-amyloid peptide and tau protein pathology are essential factors involved in Alzheimer's disease development as well as in postischemic brain dementia. Postischemic injuries demonstrate that ischemia may stimulate pathological amyloid precursor protein processing by upregulation of β- and γ-secretases and therefore are capable of establishing a vicious cycle. Functional postischemic brain recovery is always delayed and incomplete by an injury-related increase in the amount of the neurotoxic C-terminal of amyloid precursor protein and β-amyloid peptide. Finally, we present here the concept that Alzheimer's proteins can contribute to and/or precipitate postischemic brain neurodegeneration including dementia with Alzheimer's phenotype. PMID:26940197

  15. Public support for neonatal screening for Pompe disease, a broad-phenotype condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinreich Stephanie

    2012-03-01

    screening for Pompe disease, not only among those who have personal experience of the disease but also among the general public in the Netherlands. Optional screening on the basis of informed parental consent is probably unrealistic, underlining the need for new guidelines to help policymakers in their consideration of newborn screening for broad phenotype conditions.

  16. AnsNGS: An Annotation System to Sequence Variations of Next Generation Sequencing Data for Disease-Related Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Young-Ji; Cho, Yonglae; Kim, Ju Han

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Next-generation sequencing (NGS) data in the identification of disease-causing genes provides a promising opportunity in the diagnosis of disease. Beyond the previous efforts for NGS data alignment, variant detection, and visualization, developing a comprehensive annotation system supported by multiple layers of disease phenotype-related databases is essential for deciphering the human genome. To satisfy the impending need to decipher the human genome, it is essential to develop a ...

  17. Metal Homeostasis Regulators Suppress FRDA Phenotypes in a Drosophila Model of the Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Sirena; Calap-Quintana, Pablo; Llorens, José Vicente; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Martínez-Sebastián, María José; Botas, Juan; Moltó, María Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the most commonly inherited ataxia in populations of European origin, is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a decrease in frataxin levels. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the accumulation of iron in several tissues including the brain, and frataxin has been proposed to play a key role in iron homeostasis. We found that the levels of zinc, copper, manganese and aluminum were also increased in a Drosophila model of FRDA, and that copper and zinc chelation improve their impaired motor performance. By means of a candidate genetic screen, we identified that genes implicated in iron, zinc and copper transport and metal detoxification can restore frataxin deficiency-induced phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the metal dysregulation in FRDA includes other metals besides iron, therefore providing a new set of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27433942

  18. Pulmonary CT and MRI phenotypes that help explain chronic pulmonary obstruction disease pathophysiology and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric A; Lynch, David A; Barr, R Graham; van Beek, Edwin J R; Parraga, Grace

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary x-ray computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research and development has been motivated, in part, by the quest to subphenotype common chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). For thoracic CT and MRI, the main COPD research tools, disease biomarkers are being validated that go beyond anatomy and structure to include pulmonary functional measurements such as regional ventilation, perfusion, and inflammation. In addition, there has also been a drive to improve spatial and contrast resolution while at the same time reducing or eliminating radiation exposure. Therefore, this review focuses on our evolving understanding of patient-relevant and clinically important COPD endpoints and how current and emerging MRI and CT tools and measurements may be exploited for their identification, quantification, and utilization. Since reviews of the imaging physics of pulmonary CT and MRI and reviews of other COPD imaging methods were previously published and well-summarized, we focus on the current clinical challenges in COPD and the potential of newly emerging MR and CT imaging measurements to address them. Here we summarize MRI and CT imaging methods and their clinical translation for generating reproducible and sensitive measurements of COPD related to pulmonary ventilation and perfusion as well as parenchyma morphology. The key clinical problems in COPD provide an important framework in which pulmonary imaging needs to rapidly move in order to address the staggering burden, costs, as well as the mortality and morbidity associated with COPD. PMID:26199216

  19. Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging: Preliminary evaluation of phenotyping potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rationale and objectives: Emphysema and small airway obstruction are the pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this pilot study in a small group of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients was to quantify hyperpolarized helium-3 (3He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functional and structural measurements and to explore the potential role for 3He MRI in detecting the lung structural and functional COPD phenotypes. Materials and methods: We evaluated 20 ex-smokers with stage I (n = 1), stage II (n = 9) and stage III COPD (n = 10). All subjects underwent same-day plethysmography, spirometry, 1H MRI and hyperpolarized 3He MRI at 3.0 T. 3He ventilation defect percent (VDP) was generated from 3He static ventilation images and 1H thoracic images and the 3He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was derived from diffusion-weighted MRI. Results: Based on the relative contribution of normalized ADC and VDP, there was evidence of a predominant 3He MRI measurement in seven patients (n = 3 mainly ventilation defects or VDP dominant (VD), n = 4 mainly increased ADC or ADC dominant (AD)). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significantly lower ADC for subjects with predominantly elevated VDP (p = 0.02 compared to subjects with predominantly elevated ADC; p = 0.008 compared to mixed group) and significantly decreased VDP for subjects with predominantly elevated ADC (p = 0.003, compared to mixed group). Conclusion: In this small pilot study, a preliminary analysis shows the potential for 3He MRI to categorize or phenotype COPD ex-smokers, providing good evidence of feasibility for larger prospective studies.

  20. Identification of distinct phenotypes of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Teo, Minyuen

    2013-03-01

    A significant number of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma present as locally advanced disease. Optimal treatment remains controversial. We sought to analyze the clinical course of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (LAPC) in order to identify potential distinct clinical phenotypes.

  1. Genetic spectrum of Saudi Arabian patients with antenatal cystic kidney disease and ciliopathy phenotypes using a targeted renal gene panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamed, Mohamed H; Kurdi, Wesam; Alsahan, Nada; Alabdullah, Zainab; Abudraz, Rania; Tulbah, Maha; Alnemer, Maha; Khan, Rubina; Al-Jurayb, Haya; Alahmed, Ahmed; Tahir, Asma I; Khalil, Dania; Edwards, Noel; Al Abdulaziz, Basma; Binhumaid, Faisal S; Majid, Salma; Faquih, Tariq; El-Kalioby, Mohamed; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Altassan, Nada; Monies, Dorota; Meyer, Brian; Sayer, John A; Albaqumi, Mamdouh

    2016-01-01

    Background Inherited cystic kidney disorders are a common cause of end-stage renal disease. Over 50 ciliopathy genes, which encode proteins that influence the structure and function of the primary cilia, are implicated in cystic kidney disease. Methods To define the phenotype and genotype of cystic kidney disease in fetuses and neonates, we correlated antenatal ultrasound examination and postnatal renal ultrasound examination with targeted exon sequencing, using a renal gene panel. A cohort of 44 families in whom antenatal renal ultrasound scanning findings in affected cases included bilateral cystic kidney disease, echogenic kidneys or enlarged kidneys was investigated. Results In this cohort, disease phenotypes were severe with 36 cases of stillbirth or perinatal death. Extra renal malformations, including encephalocele, polydactyly and heart malformations, consistent with ciliopathy phenotypes, were frequently detected. Renal gene panel testing identified causative mutations in 21 out of 34 families (62%), where patient and parental DNA was available. In the remaining 10 families, where only parental DNA was available, 7 inferred causative mutations were found. Together, mutations were found in 12 different genes with a total of 13 novel pathogenic variants, including an inferred novel variant in NEK8. Mutations in CC2D2A were the most common cause of an antenatal cystic kidney disease and a suspected ciliopathy in our cohort. Conclusions In families with ciliopathy phenotypes, mutational analysis using a targeted renal gene panel allows a rapid molecular diagnosis and provides important information for patients, parents and their physicians. PMID:26862157

  2. Expression of the C- KIT Molecule in Acute Myeloid Leukemias: Implications of the Immuno phenotypes CD117 and CD15 in the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of the c-kit proto-oncogene (CD117) may be of help for the identification of phenotypic profiles that are absent or present at very low frequencies on normal human blast cells and therefore might be of great value for the detection of leukemic cells displaying such immuno phenotypes in patients in complete remission. Design and methods: Ninety patients with acute myeloid leukemias, diagnosed according to FAB criteria and immunological marker studies, were studied for the dual expression on blast cells of the CD117/CD15 immuno phenotype co expression by direct immunofluorescence assay using dual staining combination flow cytometry. Results: In 69/90 acute myeloid leukemia patients analyzed (77%), blast cells expressed the CD117 antigen. Moreover, in 38 of them (42% of acute myeloid leukemia cases), leukemic blasts co expressed the CD117 and CD15 antigens. There was no significant correlation between the FAB classification and the CD117 and CD15 expression in acute myeloid leukemia cases. Conclusions: These results suggest that immunological methods for the detection of MRD based on the existence of aberrant phenotypes could be used in the majority of AML patients. This phenotype CD117/CD15, present in acute myeloid leukemia cases at a relatively high frequency (42%), represents an aberrant phenotype, because it was not detected on normal human blast cells, suggesting that the use of these combinations of monoclonal antibodies could be of help in detecting residual leukemic blasts among normal blast cells. The use of the CD117 antigen in different monoclonal antibodies combinations may be of great help for the detection of minimal residual disease in a high proportion of acute myeloid leukemia cases, especially in those patients displaying the CD117+/CD15+ immuno phenotype, because cells co expressing both antigens in normal blasts, if present, are at very low frequencies. The simultaneous assessment of two or more markers in single cells has facilitated the

  3. DNA damage in non-communicable diseases: A clinical and epidemiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Mirta; Frustaci, Alessandra; Del Bufalo, Alessandra; Sánchez-Alarcón, Juana; Valencia-Quintana, Rafael; Russo, Patrizia; Bonassi, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a leading cause of death and disability, representing 63% of the total death number worldwide. A characteristic phenotype of these diseases is the accelerated aging, which is the result of phenomena such as accumulated DNA damage, telomere capping loss and subcellular irreversible/nonrepaired oxidative damage. DNA damage, mostly oxidative, plays a key role in the development of most common NCDs. The present review will gather some of the most relevant knowledge concerning the presence of DNA damage in NCDs focusing on cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and neurodegenerative disorders, and discussing a selection of papers from the most informative literature. The challenge of comorbidity and the potential offered by new systems approaches for introducing these biomarkers into the clinical decision process will be discussed. Systems Medicine platforms represent the most suitable approach to personalized medicine, enabling to identify new patterns in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and prognosis of chronic diseases. PMID:26255943

  4. Exploring links between genotypes, phenotypes, and clinical predictors of response to early intensive behavioural intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsamma eEapen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is amongst the most familial of psychiatric disorders. Twin and family studies have demonstrated a monozygotic concordance rate of 70–90%, dizygotic concordance of around 10% and more than a 20-fold increase in risk for first-degree relatives. Despite major advances in the genetics of autism, the relationship between different aspects of the behavioural and cognitive phenotype and their underlying genetic liability is still unclear. This is complicated by the heterogeneity of autism, which exists at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Given this heterogeneity, one method to find homogeneous entities and link these with specific genotypes would be to pursue endophenotypes. Evidence from neuroimaging, eye tracking and electrophysiology studies supports the hypothesis that, building on genetic vulnerability, ASD emerges from a developmental cascade in which a deficit in attention to social stimuli leads to impaired interactions with primary caregivers. This results in abnormal development of the neurocircuitry responsible for social cognition, which in turn adversely affects later behavioural and functional domains dependent on these early processes, such as language development. Such a model begets a heterogeneous clinical phenotype, and is also supported by studies demonstrating better clinical outcomes with earlier treatment. Treatment response following intensive early behavioural intervention in ASD is also distinctly variable; however, relatively little is known about specific elements of the clinical phenotype that may predict response to current behavioural treatments. This paper overviews the literature regarding genotypes, phenotypes and predictors of response to behavioural intervention in ASD and presents suggestions for future research to explore linkages between these that would enable better identification of, and increased treatment efficacy for, ASD.

  5. Autoinflammatory Disease Reloaded: A Clinical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kastner, Daniel L.; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the etiology of autoinflammatory disease is growing rapidly. Recent advances offer new opportunities for therapeutic intervention and suggest that the definition of what constitutes an autoinflammatory disease should be reassessed.

  6. Rationale and design of the Leipzig (LIFE Heart Study: phenotyping and cardiovascular characteristics of patients with coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Beutner

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We established the Leipzig (LIFE Heart Study, a biobank and database of patients with different stages of coronary artery disease (CAD for studies of clinical, metabolic, cellular and genetic factors of cardiovascular diseases. DESIGN: The Leipzig (LIFE Heart Study (NCT00497887 is an ongoing observational angiographic study including subjects with different entities of CAD. Cohort 1, patients undergoing first-time diagnostic coronary angiography due to suspected stable CAD with previously untreated coronary arteries. Cohort 2, patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI requiring percutaneous revascularization. Cohort 3, patients with known left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD. RESULTS: We present preliminary results of demographics and phenotyping based on a 4-years analysis of a total of 3,165 subjects. Cohort 1 (n=2,274 shows the typical distribution of elective coronary angiography cohorts with 43% cases with obstructive CAD and 37% normal angiograms. Cohorts 2 and 3 consist of 590 and 301 subjects, respectively, adding patients with severe forms of CAD. The suitability of the database and biobank to perform association studies was confirmed by replication of the CAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 9p21 (OR per allele: 1.55 (any CAD, 1.54 (MI, 1.74 (LMCAD, p<10(-6, respectively. A novel finding was that patients with LMCAD had a stronger association with 9p21 than patients with obstructive CAD without LMCAD (OR 1.22, p=0.042. In contrast, 9p21 did not associate with myocardial infarction in excess of stable CAD. CONCLUSION: The Leipzig (LIFE Heart Study provides a basis to identify molecular targets related to atherogenesis and associated metabolic disorders. The study may contribute to an improvement of individual prediction, prevention, and treatment of CAD.

  7. Virulence phenotypes of low-passage clinical isolates of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae assessed using the chinchilla laniger model of otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg Justin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi are associated with a spectrum of respiratory mucosal infections including: acute otitis media (AOM; chronic otitis media with effusion (COME; otorrhea; locally invasive diseases such as mastoiditis; as well as a range of systemic disease states, suggesting a wide range of virulence phenotypes. Genomic studies have demonstrated that each clinical strain contains a unique genic distribution from a population-based supragenome, the distributed genome hypothesis. These diverse clinical and genotypic findings suggest that each NTHi strain possesses a unique set of virulence factors that contributes to the course of the disease. Results The local and systemic virulence patterns of ten genomically characterized low-passage clinical NTHi strains (PittAA – PittJJ obtained from children with COME or otorrhea were stratified using the chinchilla model of otitis media (OM. Each isolate was used to bilaterally inoculate six animals and thereafter clinical assessments were carried out daily for 8 days by blinded observers. There was no statistical difference in the time it took for any of the 10 NTHi strains to induce otologic (local disease with respect to any or all of the other strains, however the differences in time to maximal local disease and the severity of local disease were both significant between the strains. Parameters of systemic disease indicated that the strains were not all equivalent: time to development of the systemic disease, maximal systemic scores and mortality were all statistically different among the strains. PittGG induced 100% mortality while PittBB, PittCC, and PittEE produced no mortality. Overall Pitt GG, PittII, and Pitt FF produced the most rapid and most severe local and systemic disease. A post hoc determination of the clinical origins of the 10 NTHi strains revealed that these three strains were of otorrheic origin, whereas the other 7 were from patients

  8. Clinical study of cardiac diseases during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitha Vijay Kamat

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Cardiac diseases in pregnancy constitute high risk pregnancy and require special attention during antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum period. Rheumatic heart disease was the major contribution of cardiac diseases in pregnancy and is seen to be associated with increased maternal morbidity. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(3.000: 855-859

  9. Sleep Physiology Alterations Precede Plethoric Phenotypic Changes in R6/1 Huntington's Disease Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Lebreton

    Full Text Available In hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD, there exists a growing consideration that sleep and circadian dysregulations may be important symptoms. It is not known, however, whether sleep abnormalities contribute to other behavioral deficits in HD patients and mouse models. To determine the precise chronology for sleep physiology alterations and other sensory, motor, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms of HD, the same R6/1 HD transgenics and their wild-type littermates were recorded monthly for sleep electroencephalogram (EEG together with a wide range of behavioral tests according to a longitudinal plan. We found an early and progressive deterioration of both sleep architecture and EEG brain rhythms in R6/1 mice, which are correlated timely with their spatial working memory impairments. Sleep fragmentation and memory impairments were accompanied by the loss of delta (1-4 Hz power in the transgenic mice, the magnitude of which increased with age and disease progression. These precocious sleep and cognitive impairments were followed by deficits in social behavior, sensory and motor abilities. Our data confirm the existence and importance of sleep physiology alterations in the widely used R6/1 mouse line and highlight their precedence over other plethoric phenotypic changes. The brainwave abnormalities, may represent a novel biomarker and point to innovative therapeutic interventions against HD.

  10. Length of normal alleles of C9ORF72 GGGGCC repeat do not influence disease phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Nicola J.; Heckman, Michael G.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Baker, Matt C.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Stewart, Heather; Finger, Elizabeth; Volkening, Kathryn; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Knopman, David S.; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Neumann, Manuela; Caselli, Richard J.; White, Charles L.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Strong, Michael J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Boylan, Kevin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Expansions of the non-coding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene were recently identified as the long sought-after cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on chromosome 9p. In this study we aimed to determine whether the length of the normal - unexpanded - allele of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 plays a role in the presentation of disease or affects age at onset in C9ORF72 mutation carriers. We also studied whether the GGGGCC repeat length confers risk or affects age at onset in FTD and ALS patients without C9ORF72 repeat expansions. C9ORF72 genotyping was performed in 580 FTD, 995 ALS and 160 FTD-ALS patients and 1444 controls, leading to the identification of 211 patients with pathogenic C9ORF72 repeat expansions and an accurate quantification of the length of the normal alleles in all patients and controls. No meaningful association between the repeat length of the normal alleles of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 and disease phenotype or age at onset was observed in C9ORF72 mutation carriers or non-mutation carriers. PMID:22840558

  11. A case of variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C accompanying savant syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Mio; Jingami, Naoto; Uemura, Kengo; Nakasone, Naoe; Kinoshita, Hisanori; Yamakado, Hodaka; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-06-22

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, frequent sudden loss of muscle tonus and ataxia for several years. He had a history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. He was given a diagnosis of autism in his childhood, followed by a diagnosis of schizophrenia in his teenage. He also developed a savant skill of calendar calculating. (123)I-IMP-SPECT showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the left frontotemporal lobe as often seen in savant syndrome. Although genetic analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 revealed no pathogenic mutation, filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts from his biopsied skin revealed a certain amount of intracellular cholesterol storage pattern, indicating a variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The diagnosis of adulthood onset NPC is difficult and challenging, especially for neurologists, because the symptoms and signs are not as clear as those in the classical childhood onset NPC and this subtype is not yet widely known. However, the diagnosis can be made by a combination of filipin staining of fibroblast and/or gene analysis. As a disease-specific therapy for NPC has been approved in Japan, the diagnosis of NPC is of significance. PMID:27181747

  12. Sleep Physiology Alterations Precede Plethoric Phenotypic Changes in R6/1 Huntington's Disease Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Fanny; Cayzac, Sebastien; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Jeantet, Yannick; Cho, Yoon H

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD), there exists a growing consideration that sleep and circadian dysregulations may be important symptoms. It is not known, however, whether sleep abnormalities contribute to other behavioral deficits in HD patients and mouse models. To determine the precise chronology for sleep physiology alterations and other sensory, motor, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms of HD, the same R6/1 HD transgenics and their wild-type littermates were recorded monthly for sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) together with a wide range of behavioral tests according to a longitudinal plan. We found an early and progressive deterioration of both sleep architecture and EEG brain rhythms in R6/1 mice, which are correlated timely with their spatial working memory impairments. Sleep fragmentation and memory impairments were accompanied by the loss of delta (1-4 Hz) power in the transgenic mice, the magnitude of which increased with age and disease progression. These precocious sleep and cognitive impairments were followed by deficits in social behavior, sensory and motor abilities. Our data confirm the existence and importance of sleep physiology alterations in the widely used R6/1 mouse line and highlight their precedence over other plethoric phenotypic changes. The brainwave abnormalities, may represent a novel biomarker and point to innovative therapeutic interventions against HD. PMID:25966356

  13. Macrophage Phenotype in the Ocular Surface of Experimental Murine Dry Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, In-Cheon; Coursey, Terry G; Bian, Fang; Barbosa, Flavia L; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in the cornea and conjunctiva of C57BL/6 mice with induced experimental dry eye. C57BL/6 mice exposed to desiccating stress (DS) were evaluated at 1, 5, and 10 days and C57BL/6 mice maintained in non-stressed environment were used as controls. Whole eyes and adnexa were excised for histology or used for gene expression analysis. Location and phenotype of macrophages infiltrating the cornea and conjunctiva was evaluated by immunofluorescence analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction evaluated macrophage markers and T cell-related and inflammatory cytokine expression in cornea and conjunctiva. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that macrophages reside in the conjunctiva of control and dry eye mice and their number did not change with DS. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that the level of M1 macrophage marker, iNOS, increased prominently in the conjunctiva at DS 10 days. In contrast, there was a non-significant decrease of the M2 marker Arg1 with DS. The levels of inflammatory cytokine, IL-12a mRNA transcript in the conjunctiva increased significantly at DS1 and decreased at DS5, while levels of IL-18 were significantly increased at DS 10. Macrophages reside in the ocular surface tissues of C57BL/6 mice. Although the number of macrophages in the conjunctiva does not change, evidence of inflammatory M1 activation after desiccating stress was observed. Better understanding of phagocyte diversity and activation in dry eye disease provide a basis for the development of phagocyte-targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:25772203

  14. Exclusion of mutations in the PRNP, JPH3, TBP, ATN1, CREBBP, POU3F2 and FTL genes as a cause of disease in Portuguese patients with a Huntington-like phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Maria do Carmo; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Constante, Marco; Magalhães, Marina; Magalhães, Paula; Cerqueira, Joana; Vale, José; Passão, Vitorina; Barbosa, Célia; Robalo, Conceição; Coutinho, Paula; Barros, José; Santos, Manuela M.; Sequeiros, Jorge; Maciel, Patrícia

    2006-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterised by chorea, cognitive impairment, dementia and personality changes, caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the HD gene. Often, patients with a similar clinical presentation do not carry expansions of the CAG repeat in this gene [Huntington disease-like (HDL) patients]. We report the genetic analysis of 107 Portuguese patients with an HDL phenotype. The HDL genes PRNP and JPH3, encoding the prion prote...

  15. Clinical phenotype clustering in cardiovascular risk patients for the identification of responsive metabotypes after red wine polyphenol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Fresno, Rosa; Llorach, Rafael; Perera, Alexandre; Mandal, Rupasri; Feliz, Miguel; Tinahones, Francisco J; Wishart, David S; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the robustness of clinical and metabolic phenotyping through, for the first time, the identification of differential responsiveness to dietary strategies in the improvement of cardiometabolic risk conditions. Clinical phenotyping of 57 volunteers with cardiovascular risk factors was achieved using k-means cluster analysis based on 69 biochemical and anthropometric parameters. Cluster validation based on Dunn and Figure of Merit analysis for internal coherence and external homogeneity were employed. k-Means produced four clusters with particular clinical profiles. Differences on urine metabolomic profiles among clinical phenotypes were explored and validated by multivariate orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OSC-PLS-DA) models. OSC-PLS-DA of (1)H-NMR data revealed that model comparing "obese and diabetic cluster" (OD-c) against "healthier cluster" (H-c) showed the best predictability and robustness in terms of explaining the pairwise differences between clusters. Considering these two clusters, distinct groups of metabolites were observed following an intervention with wine polyphenol intake (WPI; 733 equivalents of gallic acid/day) per 28days. Glucose was significantly linked to OD-c metabotype (P<.01), and lactate, betaine and dimethylamine showed a significant trend. Tartrate (P<.001) was associated with wine polyphenol intervention (OD-c_WPI and H-c_WPI), whereas mannitol, threonine methanol, fucose and 3-hydroxyphenylacetate showed a significant trend. Interestingly, 4-hydroxyphenylacetate significantly increased in H-c_WPI compared to OD-c_WPI and to basal groups (P<.05)-gut microbial-derived metabolite after polyphenol intake-, thereby exhibiting a clear metabotypic intervention effect. Results revealed gut microbiota responsive phenotypes to wine polyphenols intervention. Overall, this study illustrates a novel metabolomic strategy for characterizing interindividual responsiveness to dietary

  16. Heterogeneity of AmpC Cephalosporinases of Hafnia alvei Clinical Isolates Expressing Inducible or Constitutive Ceftazidime Resistance Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Girlich, Delphine; Naas, Thierry; Bellais, Samuel; Poirel, Laurent; Karim, Amal; Nordmann, Patrice

    2000-01-01

    Ten unrelated Hafnia alvei clinical isolates were grouped according to either their low-level and inducible cephalosporinase production or their high-level and constitutive cephalosporinase production phenotype. Their AmpC sequences shared 85 to 100% amino acid identity. The immediate genetic environment of ampC genes was conserved in H. alvei isolates but was different from that found in other ampC-possessing enterobacterial species.

  17. Behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia with corticobasal degeneration pathology: Phenotypic comparison to bvFTD with Pick’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, Katherine P.; Mayo, Mary Catherine; Seeley, William W.; Lee, Suzee; Rabinovici, Gil; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Boxer, Adam L.; Michael W. Weiner; Trojanowski, John Q.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) pathology present with diverse clinical syndromes also associated with other neuropathologies, including corticobasal syndrome, progressive nonfluent aphasia, and an Alzheimer’s-type dementia. Some present with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), though this subtype still requires more detailed phenotypic characterization. All patients with CBD pathology and clinical assessment were reviewed (N=17) and selected if they initially me...

  18. Anti-MOG antibody: The history, clinical phenotype, and pathogenicity of a serum biomarker for demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2016-04-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a protein exclusively expressed on the surface of oligodendrocytes and myelin in the central nervous system. MOG has been identified as a putative candidate autoantigen and autoantibody target in demyelination for almost three decades, with extensive literature validating its role in murine models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Seminal studies using murine anti-MOG antibodies have highlighted the fact that antibodies that target epitopes of native MOG in its conformational state, rather than linearized or denature`d MOG, are biologically relevant. However, the relevance of anti-MOG antibodies in humans has been difficult to decipher over the years due to varying methods of detection as well as the fact that it was assumed that these antibodies would be clinically associated with multiple sclerosis. There is now international consensus that anti-MOG antibodies are important in both pediatric and adult demyelination, and the clinical association of MOG antibody-associated demyelination has been refined to include acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, relapsing and bilateral optic neuritis, and transverse myelitis. Anti-MOG antibodies are now thought not to be associated with multiple sclerosis in adults. Patients with MOG antibody-associated demyelination appear to have a unique clinical, radiological, and therapeutic profile, which represents a major advance in their diagnosis and management. It is imperative to understand whether anti-MOG antibodies are indeed pathogenic, and if so, their mechanisms of action. As it has become apparent that there are differences in MOG epitope binding between species, translation of animal studies to human demyelination should be analyzed in this context. Further work is required to identify the specific epitope binding sites in human disease and pathogenic mechanisms of anti-MOG antibodies, as well optimal therapeutic strategies to improve prognosis and minimize

  19. The Ames dwarf mutation attenuates Alzheimer's disease phenotype of APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Kendra L; Kulas, Joshua A; Franklin, Whitney; Rakoczy, Sharlene G; Taglialatela, Giulio; Brown-Borg, Holly M; Combs, Colin K

    2016-04-01

    APP/PS1 double transgenic mice expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) demonstrate robust brain amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide containing plaque deposition, increased markers of oxidative stress, behavioral dysfunction, and proinflammatory gliosis. On the other hand, lack of growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone due to a recessive mutation in the Prop 1 gene (Prop1df) in Ames dwarf mice results in a phenotype characterized by potentiated antioxidant mechanisms, improved learning and memory, and significantly increased longevity in homozygous mice. Based on this, we hypothesized that a similar hormone deficiency might attenuate disease changes in the brains of APP/PS1 mice. To test this idea, APP/PS1 mice were crossed to the Ames dwarf mouse line. APP/PS1, wild-type, df/+, df/df, df/+/APP/PS1, and df/df/APP/PS1 mice were compared at 6 months of age through behavioral testing and assessing amyloid burden, reactive gliosis, and brain cytokine levels. df/df mice demonstrated lower brain growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations. This correlated with decreased astrogliosis and microgliosis in the df/df/APP/PS1 mice and, surprisingly, reduced Aβ plaque deposition and Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 concentrations. The df/df/APP/PS1 mice also demonstrated significantly elevated brain levels of multiple cytokines in spite of the attenuated gliosis. These data indicate that the df/df/APP/PS1 line is a unique resource in which to study aging and resistance to disease and suggest that the affected pituitary hormones may have a role in regulating disease progression. PMID:26973101

  20. Bowen diseaseclinic, dermoscopy, patology

    OpenAIRE

    Poklękowska Katarzyna; Brzeziński Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Bowen Disease is squamous cell carcinoma in situ in which the basement membrane is intact on histopathology. Lesions are usually solitary but may be multiple in 10-20 percent of cases. It typically presents as an erythematous enlarging plaque having irregular borders with scaling and crusting. The lesions may be fissured or verrucous or, rarely, pigmented. Ulceration may occur and is often a sign that invasive disease is developing. The risk of progression of Bowen disease to invasive carcin...

  1. OCRL-mutated fibroblasts from patients with Dent-2 disease exhibit INPP5B-independent phenotypic variability relatively to Lowe syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montjean, Rodrick; Aoidi, Rifdat; Desbois, Pierrette; Rucci, Julien; Trichet, Michaël; Salomon, Rémi; Rendu, John; Fauré, Julien; Lunardi, Joël; Gacon, Gérard; Billuart, Pierre; Dorseuil, Olivier

    2015-02-15

    OCRL mutations are associated with both Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease, two rare X-linked conditions. Lowe syndrome is an oculo-cerebro-renal disorder, whereas Dent-2 patients mainly present renal proximal tubulopathy. Loss of OCRL-1, a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase, leads in Lowe patients' fibroblasts to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) accumulation, with defects in F-actin network, α-actinin distribution and ciliogenesis, whereas fibroblasts of Dent-2 patients are still uncharacterized. To search for mechanisms linked to clinical variability observed between these two OCRL mutation-associated pathologies, we compared dermal fibroblasts from independent patients, four affected by Dent-2 disease and six with Lowe syndrome. For the first time, we describe that Dent-2 fibroblasts with OCRL loss-of-function (LOF) mutations exhibit decrease in actin stress fibers, appearance of punctate α-actinin signals and alteration in primary cilia formation. Interestingly, we quantified these phenotypes as clearly intermediate between Lowe and control fibroblasts, thus suggesting that levels of these defects correlate with clinical variations observed between patients with OCRL mutations. In addition, we show that Lowe and Dent-2 fibroblasts display similar PI(4,5)P2 accumulation levels. Finally, we analyzed INPP5B, a paralogous gene already reported to exhibit functional redundancy with OCRL, and report neither differences in its expression at RNA or protein levels, nor specific allelic variations between fibroblasts of patients. Altogether, we describe here differential phenotypes between fibroblasts from Lowe and Dent-2 patients, both associated with OCRL LOF mutations, we exclude direct roles of PI(4,5)P2 and INPP5B in this phenotypic variability and we underline potential key alterations leading to ocular and neurological clinical features in Lowe syndrome. PMID:25305077

  2. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2013-06-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a very unusual phenotype (dysmorphic features, ocular abnormalities, growth delay, rickets, mild mental retardation) in which a digenic inheritance was discovered. Two different, novel disease-causing mutations were detected, both inherited from the patient's healthy mother, that is a truncating mutation in the CLCN5 gene (A249fs*20) and a donor splice-site alteration in the OCRL gene (c.388+3A>G). The mRNA analysis of the patient's leukocytes revealed an aberrantly spliced OCRL mRNA caused by in-frame exon 6 skipping, leading to a shorter protein, but keeping intact the central inositol 5-phosphatase domain and the C-terminal side of the ASH-RhoGAP domain. Only wild-type mRNA was observed in the mother's leukocytes due to a completely skewed X inactivation. Our results are the first to reveal the effect of an epistatic second modifier in Dent's disease too, which can modulate its expressivity. We surmise that the severe Dent disease 2 phenotype of our patient might be due to an addictive interaction of the mutations at two different genes. PMID:23047739

  3. Diseases caused by Botryosphaeriaceae fungi in grapevine: phenotypic and molecular characterization of isolates and sensitivity to fugicides

    OpenAIRE

    Vaz, Ana Teresa de Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Different species in Botryosphaeriaceae fungi are commonly associated with black dead arm, bot canker, dieback, excoriose and esca diseases of grapevine. These grapevine trunk diseases are of major importance in Portugal and in many other grapevine growing regions of the world. The phenotypic and molecular characterisation of 43 Botryosphaeriaceae isolates, obtained from grapevine propagating materials, young and mature vine plants, allowed the identification of B. dothidea (two isolates), “B...

  4. Phenotypic Features of Circulating Leukocytes from Non-human Primates Naturally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Resemble the Major Immunological Findings Observed in Human Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Sathler-Avelar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis represent a feasible model for research on Chagas disease since natural T. cruzi infection in these primates leads to clinical outcomes similar to those observed in humans. However, it is still unknown whether these clinical similarities are accompanied by equivalent immunological characteristics in the two species. We have performed a detailed immunophenotypic analysis of circulating leukocytes together with systems biology approaches from 15 cynomolgus macaques naturally infected with T. cruzi (CH presenting the chronic phase of Chagas disease to identify biomarkers that might be useful for clinical investigations.Our data established that CH displayed increased expression of CD32+ and CD56+ in monocytes and enhanced frequency of NK Granzyme A+ cells as compared to non-infected controls (NI. Moreover, higher expression of CD54 and HLA-DR by T-cells, especially within the CD8+ subset, was the hallmark of CH. A high level of expression of Granzyme A and Perforin underscored the enhanced cytotoxicity-linked pattern of CD8+ T-lymphocytes from CH. Increased frequency of B-cells with up-regulated expression of Fc-γRII was also observed in CH. Complex and imbricate biomarker networks demonstrated that CH showed a shift towards cross-talk among cells of the adaptive immune system. Systems biology analysis further established monocytes and NK-cell phenotypes and the T-cell activation status, along with the Granzyme A expression by CD8+ T-cells, as the most reliable biomarkers of potential use for clinical applications.Altogether, these findings demonstrated that the similarities in phenotypic features of circulating leukocytes observed in cynomolgus macaques and humans infected with T. cruzi further supports the use of these monkeys in preclinical toxicology and pharmacology studies applied to development and testing of new drugs for Chagas disease.

  5. [Castleman's disease: considerations on a clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaghi, A; Costa, D; Gangarossa, I; Albergati, M G; Castoldi, O; Nastasi, G

    1989-01-01

    A case of a patient with angiofollicular lymph-node hyperplasia (Castleman's disease), of the plasma cell type, is described. The course of the disease evolved from an unilateral inguinal adenopathy to a generalised intraabdominal adenopathy which took the patient to death. Diagnostic and therapeutic aspects are discussed. PMID:2739529

  6. Identifying postmenopausal women at risk for cognitive decline within a healthy cohort using a panel of clinical metabolic indicators: potential for detecting an at-Alzheimer's risk metabolic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, Jamaica R; Dang, Ha; Hodis, Howard N; Henderson, Victor W; St John, Jan A; Mack, Wendy J; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2016-04-01

    Detecting at-risk individuals within a healthy population is critical for preventing or delaying Alzheimer's disease. Systems biology integration of brain and body metabolism enables peripheral metabolic biomarkers to serve as reporters of brain bioenergetic status. Using clinical metabolic data derived from healthy postmenopausal women in the Early versus Late Intervention Trial with Estradiol (ELITE), we conducted principal components and k-means clustering analyses of 9 biomarkers to define metabolic phenotypes. Metabolic clusters were correlated with cognitive performance and analyzed for change over 5 years. Metabolic biomarkers at baseline generated 3 clusters, representing women with healthy, high blood pressure, and poor metabolic phenotypes. Compared with healthy women, poor metabolic women had significantly lower executive, global and memory cognitive performance. Hormone therapy provided metabolic benefit to women in high blood pressure and poor metabolic phenotypes. This panel of well-established clinical peripheral biomarkers represents an initial step toward developing an affordable, rapidly deployable, and clinically relevant strategy to detect an at-risk phenotype of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26973115

  7. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Bo Wang; Xiaoqing Zhang; Xue-Jun Li

    2013-01-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease.Here,we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene,survival motor neuron (SMN),in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons.Notably,the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated.Furthermore,these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-A7 (lacking exon 7)knockdown,and were specific to spinal motor neurons.Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes,including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss.Finally,knockdown of SMNFL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors.The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine,a potent antioxidant,which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death.Thus,we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model,which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity,cell type specificity,and phenotype reversibility.Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA.

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease: clinical aspects and treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhoury M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marc Fakhoury,1 Rebecca Negrulj,2 Armin Mooranian,2 Hani Al-Salami2 1Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Biotechnology and Drug Development Research Laboratory, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, School of Pharmacy, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is defined as a chronic intestinal inflammation that results from host-microbial interactions in a genetically susceptible individual. IBDs are a group of autoimmune diseases that are characterized by inflammation of both the small and large intestine, in which elements of the digestive system are attacked by the body's own immune system. This inflammatory condition encompasses two major forms, known as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Patients affected by these diseases experience abdominal symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloody stools, and vomiting. Moreover, defects in intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of patients affected by IBD. In this review, we first describe the types and symptoms of IBD and investigate the role that the epithelial barrier plays in the pathophysiology of IBD as well as the major cytokines involved. We then discuss steps used to diagnose this disease and the treatment options available, and finally provide an overview of the recent research that aims to develop new therapies for such chronic disorders. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, cytokines

  9. Anthropometric, clinical, and metabolic comparisons of the four Rotterdam PCOS phenotypes: A prospective study of PCOS women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Kar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: 1. To study the distribution of various Rotterdam classified phenotypes of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS women, in our population. 2. To compare the four phenotypes with respect to anthropometric, clinical, and metabolic parameters. 3. To report the prevalence of insulin resistance (IR and metabolic syndrome in these women. Settings and Design: Private practice, Prospective cross-sectional comparative study. Materials and Methods: Women attending gynecology outpatient with the primary complains of irregular menses and/or infertility were evaluated. Each of them underwent detailed clinical examination, transvaginal sonography, and biochemical and hormonal assays. Four hundred and ten women with a clinical diagnosis of PCOS based on Rotterdam criteria were included in the study. The four phenotypes were 1 PCO complete, that is oligo/anovulation (O + polycystic ovaries (P + hyperandrogenism (H 2 P + O, 3 P + H, and 4 O + H. All women were also evaluated for metabolic syndrome (American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI, modified Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III 2005 guidelines and IR (homeostatic model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 18. Results: Largest group was PCOS complete (65.6% followed by P + O (22.2%; H + O (11.2%; and P + H (0.9%. Overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 35.07%. Hyperandrogenic phenotyptes; H + O (50% and P + H + O (37.04%, had significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than normoandrogenic P + O phenotype (10% (P ≤ 0.001. Body mass index (BMI ≥ 25 (P = 0.0004; odds ratio (OR = 3.07 (1.6574-5.7108, 95% CI, waist circumference (WC ≥ 80 cm (P = 0.001; OR = 3.68 (1.6807-8.0737, 95% CI and family history of diabetes (P = 0.019; OR 1.82 (1.1008-3.0194, 95% CI, were strongly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The overall prevalence of IR in PCOS women was 30.44% (HOMA-IR cutoff

  10. SPG7 Variant Escapes Phosphorylation-Regulated Processing by AFG3L2, Elevates Mitochondrial ROS, and Is Associated with Multiple Clinical Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif A.M. Almontashiri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS affects many processes in health and disease. SPG7 assembles with AFG3L2 into the mAAA protease at the inner membrane of mitochondria, degrades damaged proteins, and regulates the synthesis of mitochondrial ribosomes. SPG7 is cleaved and activated by AFG3L2 upon assembly. A variant in SPG7 that replaces arginine 688 with glutamine (Q688 is associated with several phenotypes, including toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and (as reported here coronary artery disease. We demonstrate that SPG7 processing is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of AFG3L2. Carriers of Q688 bypass this regulation and constitutively process and activate SPG7 mAAA protease. Cells expressing Q688 produce higher ATP levels and ROS, promoting cell proliferation. Our results thus reveal an unexpected link between the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of the mitochondria mAAA protease affecting ROS production and several clinical phenotypes.

  11. Polycystic liver disease: an overview of pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnossen, Wybrich R; Drenth, Joost P H

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is the result of embryonic ductal plate malformation of the intrahepatic biliary tree. The phenotype consists of numerous cysts spread throughout the liver parenchyma. Cystic bile duct malformations originating from the peripheral biliary tree are called Von Meyenburg complexes (VMC). In these patients embryonic remnants develop into small hepatic cysts and usually remain silent during life. Symptomatic PLD occurs mainly in the context of isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In advanced stages, PCLD and ADPKD patients have massively enlarged livers which cause a spectrum of clinical features and complications. Major complaints include abdominal pain, abdominal distension and atypical symptoms because of voluminous cysts resulting in compression of adjacent tissue or failure of the affected organ. Renal failure due to polycystic kidneys and non-renal extra-hepatic features are common in ADPKD in contrast to VMC and PCLD. In general, liver function remains prolonged preserved in PLD. Ultrasonography is the first instrument to assess liver phenotype. Indeed, PCLD and ADPKD diagnostic criteria rely on detection of hepatorenal cystogenesis, and secondly a positive family history compatible with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Ambiguous imaging or screening may be assisted by genetic counseling and molecular diagnostics. Screening mutations of the genes causing PCLD (PRKCSH and SEC63) or ADPKD (PKD1 and PKD2) confirm the clinical diagnosis. Genetic studies showed that accumulation of somatic hits in cyst epithelium determine the rate-limiting step for cyst formation. Management of adult PLD is based on liver phenotype, severity of clinical features and quality of life. Conservative treatment is recommended for the majority of PLD patients. The primary aim is to halt cyst growth to allow abdominal decompression and ameliorate symptoms. Invasive procedures are required

  12. Impact of socioeconomic status on disease phenotype, genomic landscape and outcomes in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastaglio, Francesca; Bedair, Khaled; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Groves, Michael J; Hyslop, Ann; Keenan, Norene; Hothersall, Eleanor J; Campbell, Peter J; Bowen, David T; Tauro, Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the biological and clinical characteristics of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), but a role for socioeconomic environment remains unclear. Here, socioeconomic status (SES) for 283 MDS patients was estimated using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation tool. Indices were assigned to quintile categorical indicators ranked from SES1 (lowest) to SES5 (highest). Clinicopathological features and outcomes between SES quintiles containing 15%, 20%, 19%, 30% and 16% of patients were compared. Prognostic scores identified lower-risk MDS in 82% of patients, with higher-risk disease in 18%. SES quintiles did not associate with age, gender, cytogenetics, International Prognostic scores or, in sub-analysis (n = 95), driver mutations. The odds ratio of a diagnosis of refractory anaemia was greater than other MDS sub-types in SES5 (OR 1·9, P = 0·024). Most patients (91%) exclusively received supportive care. SES did not associate with leukaemic transformation or cause of death. Cox regression models confirmed male gender (P disease-risk (P disease biology or survival in MDS patients receiving supportive treatment; additional studies are required to determine whether outcomes following disease-modifying therapies are influenced by SES. PMID:27098194

  13. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development. PMID:27273303

  14. Aeromonas spp. clinical microbiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer L; Shaw, Jonathan G

    2011-02-01

    Members of the genus Aeromonas inhabit various aquatic environments and are responsible for, and are implicated in, a number of intestinal and extra-intestinal infections in humans as well as other animals. This review focuses on invasive human infection and disease and summarizes available findings regarding the microbiology and detection of Aeromonas spp., with emphasis on successful identification and diagnosis, and the control of disease in the population. Antimicrobial resistance and therapy of Aeromonas spp. is also discussed. PMID:21163298

  15. Clinical characteristics of Caroli’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yonem, Ozlem; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Caroli’s disease is a rare congenital condition chara-cterized by non-obstructive saccular or fusiform dilatation of larger intrahepatic bile ducts. Cholangitis, liver cirrhosis, and cholangiocarcinoma are its potential complications. The diagnosis of Caroli’s disease depends on demonstrating that the cystic lesions are in continuity with the biliary tree which can be showed by ultrasonography, computerized tomography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, percutaneous transhepatic ...

  16. The clinical examination for neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Eric N; Kent, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Neuromuscular disease can present even the most astute clinician with a challenging diagnostic dilemma. This article focuses on the neuroanatomy and the historical, physical, and neurologic examination findings observed in many of the neuromuscular disorders affecting dogs and cats. In addition, some common laboratory tests and imaging modalities used in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disease, including routine radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, are discussed. A brief discussion of sensory nerve disorders is also presented. PMID:11785724

  17. recA mediated spontaneous deletions of the icaADBC operon of clinical Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates : a new mechanism of phenotypic variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuryastuti, Titik; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Kuijer, Roel; Aman, Abu T.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic variation of Staphylococcus epidermidis involving the slime related ica operon results in heterogeneity in surface characteristics of individual bacteria in axenic cultures. Five clinical S. epidermidis isolates demonstrated phenotypic variation, i.e. both black and red colonies on Congo

  18. Different prion disease phenotypes result from inoculation of cattle with two temporally separated sources of sheep scrapie from Great Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkins Steve AC

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the theoretical proposal that bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE could have originated from sheep scrapie, this study investigated the pathogenicity for cattle, by intracerebral (i.c. inoculation, of two pools of scrapie agents sourced in Great Britain before and during the BSE epidemic. Two groups of ten cattle were each inoculated with pools of brain material from sheep scrapie cases collected prior to 1975 and after 1990. Control groups comprised five cattle inoculated with sheep brain free from scrapie, five cattle inoculated with saline, and for comparison with BSE, naturally infected cattle and cattle i.c. inoculated with BSE brainstem homogenate from a parallel study. Phenotypic characterisation of the disease forms transmitted to cattle was conducted by morphological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and biological methods. Results Disease occurred in 16 cattle, nine inoculated with the pre-1975 inoculum and seven inoculated with the post-1990 inoculum, with four cattle still alive at 83 months post challenge (as at June 2006. The different inocula produced predominantly two different disease phenotypes as determined by histopathological, immunohistochemical and Western immunoblotting methods and biological characterisation on transmission to mice, neither of which was identical to BSE. Whilst the disease presentation was uniform in all scrapie-affected cattle of the pre-1975 group, the post-1990 inoculum produced a more variable disease, with two animals sharing immunohistochemical and molecular profile characteristics with animals in the pre-1975 group. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that cattle inoculated with different pooled scrapie sources can develop different prion disease phenotypes, which were not consistent with the phenotype of BSE of cattle and whose isolates did not have the strain typing characteristics of the BSE agent on transmission to mice.

  19. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, B.W.M. van; Koolen, D.A.; Brueton, L.; McMullan, D.; Lichtenbelt, K.D.; Ades, L.C.; Peters, G.; Gibson, K.; Moloney, S.; Novara, F.; Pramparo, T.; Bernardina, B. Dalla; Zoccante, L.; Balottin, U.; Piazza, F.; Pecile, V.; Gasparini, P.; Guerci, V.; Kets, M.; Pfundt, R.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Veltman, J.A.; Leeuw, N. de; Wilson, M.; Antony, J.; Reitano, S.; Luciano, D.; Fichera, M.; Romano, C.; Brunner, H.G.; Zuffardi, O.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2010-01-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic fea

  20. In Vitro Phenotypic Susceptibility of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Clinical Isolates to Protease Inhibitors▿

    OpenAIRE

    Desbois, Delphine; Roquebert, Bénédicte; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Collin, Gilles; Bénard, Antoine; Campa, Pauline; Matheron, Sophie; Chêne, Geneviève; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane; Anrs Hiv-2 Cohort, French

    2008-01-01

    We determine phenotypic susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) isolates to amprenavir, atazanavir, darunavir, indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, and tipranavir. Saquinavir, lopinavir, and darunavir are potent against wild-type HIV-2 isolates and should be preferred as first-line options for HIV-2-infected patients. Other protease inhibitors are less active against HIV-2 than against HIV-1.

  1. The role of tau in the pathological process and clinical expression of Huntington’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuono, Romina; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; de Silva, Rohan; Cisbani, Giulia; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Spillantini, Maria G.; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal CAG repeat expansion within exon 1 of the huntingtin gene HTT. While several genetic modifiers, distinct from the Huntington’s disease locus itself, have been identified as being linked to the clinical expression and progression of Huntington’s disease, the exact molecular mechanisms driving its pathogenic cascade and clinical features, especially the dementia, are not fully understood. Recently the microtubule associated protein tau, MAPT, which is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, has been implicated in Huntington’s disease. We explored this association in more detail at the neuropathological, genetic and clinical level. We first investigated tau pathology by looking for the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, co-localization of tau with mutant HTT and its oligomeric intermediates in post-mortem brain samples from patients with Huntington’s disease (n = 16) compared to cases with a known tauopathy and healthy controls. Next, we undertook a genotype–phenotype analysis of a large cohort of patients with Huntington’s disease (n = 960) with a particular focus on cognitive decline. We report not only on the tau pathology in the Huntington’s disease brain but also the association between genetic variation in tau gene and the clinical expression and progression of the disease. We found extensive pathological inclusions containing abnormally phosphorylated tau protein that co-localized in some instances with mutant HTT. We confirmed this related to the disease process rather than age, by showing it is also present in two patients with young-onset Huntington’s disease (26 and 40 years old at death). In addition we demonstrate that tau oligomers (suggested to be the most likely neurotoxic tau entity) are present in the Huntington’s disease brains. Finally we highlight the clinical significance of this pathology by demonstrating that the MAPT

  2. Bowen diseaseclinic, dermoscopy, patology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poklękowska Katarzyna

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bowen Disease is squamous cell carcinoma in situ in which the basement membrane is intact on histopathology. Lesions are usually solitary but may be multiple in 10-20 percent of cases. It typically presents as an erythematous enlarging plaque having irregular borders with scaling and crusting. The lesions may be fissured or verrucous or, rarely, pigmented. Ulceration may occur and is often a sign that invasive disease is developing. The risk of progression of Bowen disease to invasive carcinoma is about 3%. Bowen disease is most commonly found in patients over 60 years old. Oher risk factors: include chronic sun exposure, immunosuppression, arsenic exposure and cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV- 16, 18, 34 i 48 infection.The majority of cases of Bowen disease revealed a peculiar dermoscopic pattern characterized by glomerular vesselsProliferation of numerous atypical keratinocytes throughout the entire thickness of the epidermis with hyperkeratosis, mitotic figures, multinucleated cells and dyskeratotic cells, full thickness dysplasia of the squamous epithelum, disorderly maturation of the epidermis, parakeratosis and loss of granular layer.

  3. CLINICAL PROFILE OF INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASES CASES

    OpenAIRE

    Gagiya Ashok K; Suthar Hemang N; Bhagat Gautam R

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are very few studies are done on interstitial lung diseases (ILD) in India. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 30 patients of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) proven interstitial lung diseases in tertiary care centre. Results: Most common etiological causes of ILD were occupational (46.62%), Rheumatoid Arthritis (13.32%), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (33.33 %). Majority were in age group 40-49 years (mean age-45.23 years) and 66.5% male patients. C...

  4. Tau PET patterns mirror clinical and neuroanatomical variability in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Schonhaut, Daniel R; Schöll, Michael; Lockhart, Samuel N; Ayakta, Nagehan; Baker, Suzanne L; O'Neil, James P; Janabi, Mustafa; Lazaris, Andreas; Cantwell, Averill; Vogel, Jacob; Santos, Miguel; Miller, Zachary A; Bettcher, Brianne M; Vossel, Keith A; Kramer, Joel H; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Miller, Bruce L; Jagust, William J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2016-05-01

    SEE SARAZIN ET AL DOI101093/BRAIN/AWW041 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: The advent of the positron emission tomography tracer (18)F-AV1451 provides the unique opportunity to visualize the regional distribution of tau pathology in the living human brain. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that tau pathology is closely linked to symptomatology and patterns of glucose hypometabolism in Alzheimer's disease, in contrast to the more diffuse distribution of amyloid-β pathology. We included 20 patients meeting criteria for probable Alzheimer's disease dementia or mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease, presenting with a variety of clinical phenotypes, and 15 amyloid-β-negative cognitively normal individuals, who underwent (18)F-AV1451 (tau), (11)C-PiB (amyloid-β) and (18)F-FDG (glucose metabolism) positron emission tomography, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotyping and neuropsychological testing. Voxel-wise contrasts against controls (at P memory (medial temporal lobes), visuospatial function (occipital, right temporoparietal cortex) and language (left > right temporoparietal cortex). In conclusion, tau imaging-contrary to amyloid-β imaging-shows a strong regional association with clinical and anatomical heterogeneity in Alzheimer's disease. Although preliminary, these results are consistent with and expand upon findings from post-mortem, animal and cerebrospinal fluid studies, and suggest that the pathological aggregation of tau is closely linked to patterns of neurodegeneration and clinical manifestations of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26962052

  5. HIV seroprevalence surveys in sexually transmitted disease clinics.

    OpenAIRE

    Onorato, I M; McCray, E.; Pappaioanou, M; Johnson, R.; Aral, S; Hardy, A M; Dondero, T J

    1990-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control, in cooperation with State and local health departments, is conducting human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV), seroprevalence surveys, using standard protocols, in sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in selected metropolitan areas throughout the United States. The surveys are blinded (serologic test results not identified with a person) as well as nonblinded (clients voluntarily agreeing to participate). STD clinics are important sentinel sites for t...

  6. One Health and emerging infectious diseases: clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Peter; Conti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    To date, there has been little articulation of specific One Health clinical activities for veterinary and human health care providers regarding emerging infectious diseases, yet they could play a critical role. Under current clinical paradigms, both human and animal health professionals routinely diagnose and treat zoonotic infectious diseases in their patients, but tend to work in parallel with little cross-professional communication or coordination of care. For this to evolve toward a One Health model, both types of clinicians need to see how individual cases can be "sentinel events" indicating environmental risk for disease emergence, and develop mechanisms of rapid communication about these risks. Human and animal clinicians also need to take a more proactive and preventive approach to zoonotic diseases that includes the occupational health of animal workers in farms, laboratories, veterinary clinics, and other settings, as well as the recognition of increased risk among immunocompromised individuals in contact with animals. This requires training in One Health clinical competencies including the ability to diagnose and treat zoonotic diseases, implement preventive care interventions for individual patients, provide occupational health services for animal workers, recognize sentinel cases, report cases to public heath and clinical colleagues, and assess and help to intervene with environmental factors driving infectious disease risk in humans and animals. To provide an evidence base for such competency training, there is a need for development and testing of innovative protocols for One Health clinical collaborations. PMID:22976348

  7. Infantile Pompe disease: Clinical picture, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Kotlukova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is a rare inherited disease that belongs to lysosomal accumulation diseases and can be considered as cardiac glycogenosistype II, as well as a severe neuromuscular disease or metabolic myopathy. Physicians of different specialties very rarely identify this pathology, which is due to both its rarity and clinical and genetic polymorphism. Infantile Pompe disease is the severest form. It is characterized by a progressive pattern and a fatal outcome during the first year of life. The possibility of performing enzyme replacement therapy for this disease, which can improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients, makes the early diagnosis of Pompe disease urgent. The paper describes the clinical presentation of infantile Pompe disease and current methods for its diagnosis and treatment. The authors give their experience in diagnosing and treating infantile Pompe disease, by demonstrating 3 cases of the disease. The characteristics of each infant, which confirm the clinical and genetic variety of this pathology, are discussed.

  8. Graves Disease And Down Sindrome : Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    Scrinic Olesea; Ibadula Seila; Circo E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pacients with Down’s syndrome present an increase revalence of autoimune endocrine disorders. We communicate the case of 14 years and 6 months old pacient known with Down syndrome admitted in Endocrinology department with suspicion of hyperthyroidism, the diagnosis being confirmed by hormonal dosage. The particularity of the case consists in: symptomatology onset during puberty, clinical evolution with mild symptoms, without ocular involvement, morphological and functional remis...

  9. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of Candida albicans strains isolated from infectious disease patients in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lvyin; Du, Xin; Li, Tianming; Song, Yan; Zai, Shubei; Hu, Xiangnan; Zhang, Xiaonan; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, as an opportunistic pathogen, can cause superficial and life-threatening candidiasis in immunocompromised individuals. The formation of surface-associated biofilms and the appearance of drug resistance pose a significant challenge for clinical intervention. In this study, a total of 104 hospital-acquired C. alibcans clinical isolates were collected from sterile sites and mucosal lesions of 92 infectious disease patients in the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center and analysed. The resistance rates to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole were 12.5 %, 15.4 % and 11.5 % respectively. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis identified 63 diploid sequence types (DSTs) with a decentralized phylogeny, of which 37 DSTs (58.7 %) had not been reported in the online MLST database. Loss of heterozygosity was observed in ACC1 and ADP1 sequences obtained from six sequential isolates from a patient receiving antifungal treatment, which exemplified the effect of microevolution on C. albicans genetic alterations. Biofilm formation capability, an important virulence trait of C. albicans, was variable among strains isolated from different anatomical sites (P = 0.0302) and affected by genotypes (P = 0.0185). The mRNA levels of the azole antifungal target ERG11 gene and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1) were detected in 9-18.1 % of azole-resistant and susceptible-dose dependent (S-DD) isolates. Twelve mutations encoding distinct amino acid substitutions in ERG11 were found in azole-resistant and S-DD isolates. Among them, A114S, Y132H and Y257H substitution in the ERG11 gene may be primarily related to azole resistance. Taken together, we observed a high level of diversity within C. albicans isolates. Multiple inter-related underlying mechanisms, including genetic and environmental factors, may account for high surface adhesion or azole resistance in clinical C. albicans infections. PMID:25351710

  10. Clinical features of early onset, familial Alzheimer`s disease linked to chromosome 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullan, M.; Bennett, C.; Figueredo, C.; Crawford, F. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-27

    Early onset familial Alzheimer`s disease (AD) has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Two genes are responsible for the majority of cases of this subtype of AD. Mutations in the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein ({beta}APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been shown to completely cosegregate with the disease. We and others have previously described the clinical features of families with {beta}APP mutations at the codon 717 locus in an attempt to define the phenotype associated with a valine to isoleucine (Val {r_arrow} Ile) or a valine to glycine (Val {r_arrow} Gly) change. More recently, a second locus for very early onset disease has been localized to chromosome 14. The results of linkage studies in some families suggesting linkage to both chromosomes have been explained by the suggestion of a second (centromeric) locus on chromosome 21. Here we report the clinical features and genetic analysis of a British pedigree (F74) with early onset AD in which neither the {beta}APP locus nor any other chromosome 21 locus segregates with the disease, but in which good evidence is seen for linkage on the long arm of chromosome 14. In particular we report marker data suggesting that the chromosome 14 disease locus is close to D14S43 and D14S77. Given the likelihood that F74 represents a chromosome 14 linked family, we describe the clinical features and make a limited clinical comparison with the {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Ile and {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Gly encoded families that have been previously described. We conclude that although several previously reported clinical features occur to excess in early onset familial AD, no single clinical feature demarcates either the chromosome 14 or {beta}APP codon 717 mutated families except mean age of onset. 52 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Clinical highlights in the treatment of pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of pancreatic diseases, they remain clinical challenges. In this review article, the author summarized the key abstracts presented at 9 th Congress of the European Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, held in Cape Town, South Africa, from April 12 th to 16 th , 2011. These studies include the endoscopy, surgery, complications, and other clinical points of the pancreatic treatment.

  12. Effects of Dantrolene Therapy on Disease Phenotype in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, James L; Huynh, Tony; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Tatem, Kathleen; Phadke, Aditi; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Nagaraju, Kannaboyina

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin deficiency causes contraction-induced injury and damage to the muscle fiber, resulting in sustained increase in intracellular calcium levels, activation of calcium-dependent proteases and cell death. It is known that the Ryanodine receptor (RyR1) on the sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) membrane controls calcium release. Dantrolene, an FDA approved skeletal muscle relaxant, inhibits the release of calcium from the SR during excitation-contraction and suppresses uncontrolled calcium release by directly acting on the RyR complex to limit its activation. This study examines whether Dantrolene can reduce the disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We treated mdx mice (4 weeks old) with daily intraperitoneal injections of 40mg/kg of Dantrolene for 6 weeks and measured functional (grip strength, in vitro force contractions), behavioral (open field digiscan), imagining (optical imaging for inflammation), histological (H&E), and molecular (protein and RNA) endpoints in a blinded fashion. We found that treatment with Dantrolene resulted in decreased grip strength and open field behavioral activity in mdx mice. There was no significant difference in inflammation either by optical imaging analysis of cathepsin activity or histological (H&E) analysis. In vitro force contraction measures showed no changes in EDL muscle-specific force, lengthening-contraction force deficit, or fatigue resistance. We found Dantrolene treatment significantly reduces serum CK levels. Further, Dantrolene-treated mice showed decreased SERCA1 but not RyR1 expression in skeletal muscle. These results suggest that Dantrolene treatment alone has no significant beneficial effects at the tested doses in young mdx mice. PMID:24270550

  13. Antennal phenotype of Mexican haplogroups of the Triatoma dimidiata complex, vectors of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May-Concha, Irving; Guerenstein, Pablo G; Ramsey, Janine M; Rojas, Julio C; Catalá, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille) is a species complex that spans North, Central, and South America and which is a key vector of all known discrete typing units (DTU) of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Morphological and genetic studies indicate that T. dimidiata is a species complex with three principal haplogroups (hg) in Mexico. Different markers and traits are still inconclusive regarding if other morphological differentiation may indicate probable behavioral and vectorial divergences within this complex. In this paper we compared the antennae of three Mexican haplogroups (previously verified by molecular markers ND4 and ITS-2) and discussed possible relationships with their capacity to disperse and colonized new habitats. The abundance of each type of sensillum (bristles, basiconics, thick- and thin-walled trichoids) on the antennae of the three haplogroups, were measured under light microscopy and compared using Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric and multivariate non-parametric analyses. Discriminant analyses indicate significant differences among the antennal phenotype of haplogroups either for adults and some nymphal stages, indicating consistency of the character to analyze intraspecific variability within the complex. The present study shows that the adult antennal pedicel of the T. dimidiata complex have abundant chemosensory sensilla, according with good capacity for dispersal and invasion of different habitats also related to their high capacity to adapt to conserved as well as modified habitats. However, the numerical differences among the haplogroups are suggesting variations in that capacity. The results here presented support the evidence of T. dimidiata as a species complex but show females and males in a different way. Given the close link between the bug's sensory system and its habitat and host-seeking behavior, AP characterization could be useful to complement genetic, neurological and ethological studies of the closely

  14. Atypical phenotypes associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants and a proposal for broadening CHARGE syndrome clinical diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Caitlin L; Niederriter, Adrienne N; Green, Glenn E; Martin, Donna M

    2016-02-01

    CHARGE syndrome (Coloboma of the eye, Heart defects, Atresia of the choanae, Retardation of growth and/or development, Genital and/or urinary anomalies, and Ear malformations, including deafness and vestibular disorders) is a genetic condition characterized by a specific and recognizable pattern of features. Heterozygous pathogenic variants in the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) are the major cause of CHARGE syndrome, and have been identified in 70-90% of individuals fulfilling clinical diagnostic criteria. Since 2004, when CHD7 was discovered as the causative gene for CHARGE syndrome, the phenotypic spectrum associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants has expanded. Predicted pathogenic CHD7 variants have been identified in individuals with isolated features of CHARGE including autism and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we present genotype and phenotype data from a cohort of 28 patients who were considered for a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome, including one patient with atypical presentations and a pathogenic CHD7 variant. We also summarize published literature on pathogenic CHD7 variant positive individuals who have atypical clinical presentations. Lastly, we propose a revision to current clinical diagnostic criteria, including broadening of the major features associated with CHARGE syndrome and addition of pathogenic CHD7 variant status as a major criterion. PMID:26590800

  15. Integrating clinical and laboratory data in genetic studies of complex phenotypes: a network-based data management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, F J; Thomas, C J; Koskela, R J; Breschel, T S; Hightower, T C; Rohrer, N; Savino, C; McInnis, M G; Simpson, S G; DePaulo, J R

    1998-05-01

    The identification of genes underlying a complex phenotype can be a massive undertaking, and may require a much larger sample size than thought previously. The integration of such large volumes of clinical and laboratory data has become a major challenge. In this paper we describe a network-based data management system designed to address this challenge. Our system offers several advantages. Since the system uses commercial software, it obviates the acquisition, installation, and debugging of privately-available software, and is fully compatible with Windows and other commercial software. The system uses relational database architecture, which offers exceptional flexibility, facilitates complex data queries, and expedites extensive data quality control. The system is particularly designed to integrate clinical and laboratory data efficiently, producing summary reports, pedigrees, and exported files containing both phenotype and genotype data in a virtually unlimited range of formats. We describe a comprehensive system that manages clinical, DNA, cell line, and genotype data, but since the system is modular, researchers can set up only those elements which they need immediately, expanding later as needed. PMID:9603614

  16. Characterization of human disease phenotypes associated with mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR, and IFIH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Yanick J; Chase, Diana S; Lowenstein Schmidt, Johanna; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Forte, Gabriella M A; Gornall, Hannah L; Oojageer, Anthony; Anderson, Beverley; Pizzino, Amy; Helman, Guy; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M; Ackroyd, Sam; Aeby, Alec; Agosta, Guillermo; Albin, Catherine; Allon-Shalev, Stavit; Arellano, Montse; Ariaudo, Giada; Aswani, Vijay; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Baildam, Eileen M; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bailey, Kathryn M; Barnerias, Christine; Barth, Magalie; Battini, Roberta; Beresford, Michael W; Bernard, Geneviève; Bianchi, Marika; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Blair, Edward M; Bloom, Miriam; Burlina, Alberto B; Carpanelli, Maria Luisa; Carvalho, Daniel R; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Cavallini, Anna; Cereda, Cristina; Chandler, Kate E; Chitayat, David A; Collins, Abigail E; Sierra Corcoles, Concepcion; Cordeiro, Nuno J V; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Dale, Russell C; D'Arrigo, Stefano; De Goede, Christian G E L; De Laet, Corinne; De Waele, Liesbeth M H; Denzler, Ines; Desguerre, Isabelle; Devriendt, Koenraad; Di Rocco, Maja; Fahey, Michael C; Fazzi, Elisa; Ferrie, Colin D; Figueiredo, António; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Gowrinathan, Nirmala R; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Hanrahan, Donncha; Isidor, Bertrand; Kara, Bülent; Khan, Nasaim; King, Mary D; Kirk, Edwin P; Kumar, Ram; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre; Lauffer, Heinz; Laugel, Vincent; La Piana, Roberta; Lim, Ming J; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Linnankivi, Tarja; Mackay, Mark T; Marom, Daphna R; Marques Lourenço, Charles; McKee, Shane A; Moroni, Isabella; Morton, Jenny E V; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Murray, Kevin; Nabbout, Rima; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Nunez-Enamorado, Noemi; Oades, Patrick J; Olivieri, Ivana; Ostergaard, John R; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; Prendiville, Julie S; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Régal, Luc; Ricci, Federica; Rio, Marlène; Rodriguez, Diana; Roubertie, Agathe; Salvatici, Elisabetta; Segers, Karin A; Sinha, Gyanranjan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stödberg, Tommy I; Straussberg, Rachel; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Suri, Mohnish; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Y; te Water Naude, Johann; Wee Teik, Keng; Thomas, Maya Mary; Till, Marianne; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy Noel; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Vassallo, Grace; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Vogt, Julie; Wallace, Geoffrey B; Wassmer, Evangeline; Webb, Hannah J; Whitehouse, William P; Whitney, Robyn N; Zaki, Maha S; Zuberi, Sameer M; Livingston, John H; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Vanderver, Adeline; Orcesi, Simona; Rice, Gillian I

    2015-02-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome is an inflammatory disease occurring due to mutations in any of TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR or IFIH1. We report on 374 patients from 299 families with mutations in these seven genes. Most patients conformed to one of two fairly stereotyped clinical profiles; either exhibiting an in utero disease-onset (74 patients; 22.8% of all patients where data were available), or a post-natal presentation, usually within the first year of life (223 patients; 68.6%), characterized by a sub-acute encephalopathy and a loss of previously acquired skills. Other clinically distinct phenotypes were also observed; particularly, bilateral striatal necrosis (13 patients; 3.6%) and non-syndromic spastic paraparesis (12 patients; 3.4%). We recorded 69 deaths (19.3% of patients with follow-up data). Of 285 patients for whom data were available, 210 (73.7%) were profoundly disabled, with no useful motor, speech and intellectual function. Chilblains, glaucoma, hypothyroidism, cardiomyopathy, intracerebral vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, bowel inflammation and systemic lupus erythematosus were seen frequently enough to be confirmed as real associations with the Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome phenotype. We observed a robust relationship between mutations in all seven genes with increased type I interferon activity in cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and the increased expression of interferon-stimulated gene transcripts in peripheral blood. We recorded a positive correlation between the level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon activity assayed within one year of disease presentation and the degree of subsequent disability. Interferon-stimulated gene transcripts remained high in most patients, indicating an ongoing disease process. On the basis of substantial morbidity and mortality, our data highlight the urgent need to define coherent treatment strategies for the phenotypes associated with mutations in the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome-related genes

  17. Characterization of Human Disease Phenotypes Associated with Mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR, and IFIH1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Yanick J.; Chase, Diana S.; Schmidt, Johanna Lowenstein; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Forte, Gabriella M.A.; Gornall, Hannah L.; Oojageer, Anthony; Anderson, Beverley; Pizzino, Amy; Helman, Guy; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M.; Ackroyd, Sam; Aeby, Alec; Agosta, Guillermo; Albin, Catherine; Allon-Shalev, Stavit; Arellano, Montse; Ariaudo, Giada; Aswani, Vijay; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Baildam, Eileen M.; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bailey, Kathryn M.; Barnerias, Christine; Barth, Magalie; Battini, Roberta; Beresford, Michael W.; Bernard, Geneviève; Bianchi, Marika; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Blair, Edward M.; Bloom, Miriam; Burlina, Alberto B.; Carpanelli, Maria Luisa; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Cavallini, Anna; Cereda, Cristina; Chandler, Kate E.; Chitayat, David A.; Collins, Abigail E.; Corcoles, Concepcion Sierra; Cordeiro, Nuno J.V.; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Dale, Russell C.; D’Arrigo, Stefano; De Goede, Christian G.E.L.; De Laet, Corinne; De Waele, Liesbeth M.H.; Denzler, Ines; Desguerre, Isabelle; Devriendt, Koenraad; Di Rocco, Maja; Fahey, Michael C.; Fazzi, Elisa; Ferrie, Colin D.; Figueiredo, António; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Gowrinathan, Nirmala R.; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Hanrahan, Donncha; Isidor, Bertrand; Kara, Bülent; Khan, Nasaim; King, Mary D.; Kirk, Edwin P.; Kumar, Ram; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre; Lauffer, Heinz; Laugel, Vincent; La Piana, Roberta; Lim, Ming J.; Lin, Jean-Pierre S.-M.; Linnankivi, Tarja; Mackay, Mark T.; Marom, Daphna R.; Lourenço, Charles Marques; McKee, Shane A.; Moroni, Isabella; Morton, Jenny E.V.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Murray, Kevin; Nabbout, Rima; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Nunez-Enamorado, Noemi; Oades, Patrick J.; Olivieri, Ivana; Ostergaard, John R.; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; Prendiville, Julie S.; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Régal, Luc; Ricci, Federica; Rio, Marlène; Rodriguez, Diana; Roubertie, Agathe; Salvatici, Elisabetta; Segers, Karin A.; Sinha, Gyanranjan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stödberg, Tommy I.; Straussberg, Rachel; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Suri, Mohnish; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Y.; Naude, Johann te Water; Teik, Keng Wee; Thomas, Maya Mary; Till, Marianne; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy Noel; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Vassallo, Grace; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Vogt, Julie; Wallace, Geoffrey B.; Wassmer, Evangeline; Webb, Hannah J.; Whitehouse, William P.; Whitney, Robyn N.; Zaki, Maha S.; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Livingston, John H.; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Vanderver, Adeline; Orcesi, Simona; Rice, Gillian I.

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi–Goutières syndrome is an inflammatory disease occurring due to mutations in any of TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR or IFIH1. We report on 374 patients from 299 families with mutations in these seven genes. Most patients conformed to one of two fairly stereotyped clinical profiles; either exhibiting an in utero disease-onset (74 patients; 22.8% of all patients where data were available), or a post-natal presentation, usually within the first year of life (223 patients; 68.6%), characterized by a sub-acute encephalopathy and a loss of previously acquired skills. Other clinically distinct phenotypes were also observed; particularly, bilateral striatal necrosis (13 patients; 3.6%) and non-syndromic spastic paraparesis (12 patients; 3.4%). We recorded 69 deaths (19.3% of patients with follow-up data). Of 285 patients for whom data were available, 210 (73.7%) were profoundly disabled, with no useful motor, speech and intellectual function. Chilblains, glaucoma, hypothyroidism, cardiomyopathy, intracerebral vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, bowel inflammation and systemic lupus erythematosus were seen frequently enough to be confirmed as real associations with the Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome phenotype. We observed a robust relationship between mutations in all seven genes with increased type I interferon activity in cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and the increased expression of interferon-stimulated gene transcripts in peripheral blood. We recorded a positive correlation between the level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon activity assayed within one year of disease presentation and the degree of subsequent disability. Interferon-stimulated gene transcripts remained high in most patients, indicating an ongoing disease process. On the basis of substantial morbidity and mortality, our data highlight the urgent need to define coherent treatment strategies for the phenotypes associated with mutations in the Aicardi–Goutières syndrome

  18. Mitochondrial Diseases: Clinical Features- Management of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Koc

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are unique organells which their own DNA in cells. Human mitochondrial DNA is circular, double-stranded molecule and small. Because all mitochondria are contributed by the ovum during the formation of the zygote, the mitochondrial genom is transmitted by maternal inheritance. Multisystem disorders such as deafness, cardiomyopathy, miyopathy can be seen in mitochondrial diseases. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(0.100: 14-31

  19. Intestinal failure: Pathophysiological elements and clinical diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Lian-An; Li, Jie-Shou

    2004-01-01

    There are two main functions of gastrointestinal tract, digestion and absorption, and barrier function. The latter has an important defensive effect, which keeps the body away from the invading and damaging of bacteria and endotoxin. It maintains the systemic homeostasis. Intestinal dysfunction would happen when body suffers from diseases or harmful stimulations. The lesser dysfunction of GI tract manifests only disorder of digestion and absorption, whereas the more serious intestinal disorde...

  20. Defining Clinical Excellence in Adult Infectious Disease Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Natasha M; Ghanem, Khalil G; Auwaerter, Paul G; Wright, Scott M; Melia, Michael T

    2016-09-01

    Clinical excellence should be recognized, particularly in the current climate that appropriately prioritizes relationship-centered care. In order to develop a recognition model, a definition of clinical excellence must be created and agreed upon. A paradigm recently suggested by C. Christmas describes clinical excellence through the following domains: diagnostic acumen, professionalism and humanism, communication and interpersonal skills, skillful negotiation of the healthcare system, knowledge, taking a scholarly approach to clinical practice, and having passion for clinical medicine. This work references examples of infectious disease (ID) clinical excellence across Christmas' domains and, in doing so, both examines how the definition of clinical excellence applies to ID practice and highlights the importance of ID physicians. Emphasizing such aspirational standards may not only inspire trainees and practicing physicians to pursue their own fulfilling clinical ID careers, it may also encourage health systems to fully value outstanding ID physicians who labor tirelessly to provide patients with exceptional care. PMID:27419186

  1. CLINICAL PROFILE OF INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASES CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagiya Ashok K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are very few studies are done on interstitial lung diseases (ILD in India. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 30 patients of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT proven interstitial lung diseases in tertiary care centre. Results: Most common etiological causes of ILD were occupational (46.62%, Rheumatoid Arthritis (13.32%, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (33.33 %. Majority were in age group 40-49 years (mean age-45.23 years and 66.5% male patients. Common symptoms were breathlessness on exertion (100%, dry cough (43.29%, anorexia (50% and joint pain (16.65%. Clubbing and bilateral crepitations were present in 50% and 63.27% of patients respectively. X- ray chest showed reticulo-nodular pattern (60%. Restrictive pattern (96.57% was present in majority patients in spirometry. Conclusion: Availability of non-invasive investigations like HRCT chest has increased our early recognitions of ILDs. Association of ILD in patients with autoimmune diseases must be ruled out. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(1.000: 2-4

  2. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome presenting with early ichthyosis, associated dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets, hypoglycemia, and later distinctive clinical SDS phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalais, Emmanuel; Connerotte, Anne-Catherine; Despontin, Karine; Biver, Armand; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; Alders, Marielle; Kolivras, Athanassios; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; De Meirleir, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a recessive ribosomopathy, characterized by bone marrow failure and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (ePI) often associated with neurodevelopmental and skeletal abnormalities. The aim of this report is to describe a SDS patient with early ichthyosis associated with dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets (iLDs), hypoglycemia and later a distinctive clinical SDS phenotype. At 3 months of age, she had ichthyosis, growth retardation, and failure to thrive. She had not cytopenia. Ultrasonography (US) showed pancreatic diffuse high echogenicity. Subsequently fasting hypoketotic hypoglycemia occurred without permanent hepatomegaly or hyperlipidemia. Continuous gavage feeding was followed by clinical improvement including ichthyosis and hypoglycemia. After 14 months of age, she developed persistent neutropenia and ePI consistent with SDS. The ichthyotic skin biopsy, performed at 5 months of age, disclosed iLDs in all epidermal layers, in melanocytes, eccrine sweat glands, Schwann cells and dermal fibroblasts. These iLDs were reminiscent of those described in Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome (DCS) or Wolman's disease. Both LIPA and CGI-58 analysis did not revealed pathogenic mutation. By sequencing SBDS, a compound heterozygous for a previously reported gene mutation (c.258 + 2T>C) and a novel mutation (c.284T>G) were found. Defective SBDS may hypothetically interfere as in DCS, with neutral lipid metabolism and play a role in the SDS phenotype such as ichthyosis with dermal and epidermal iLDs and hypoglycemia. This interference with neutral lipid metabolism must most likely occur in the cytoplasm compartment as in DCS and not in the lysosomal compartment as in Wolman's disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27127007

  3. Highlighting intrafamilial clinical heterogeneity in late-onset Pompe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Papadopoulos

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Clinical manifestations in Pompe disease within the same family can be very different. Clinicians should investigate patients' siblings for symptoms throughout the entire spectrum of the disease in order to avoid delays in the diagnosis and to pick-up mildly affected persons as early as possible, when they can benefit the most from enzyme replacement therapy.

  4. Biological and clinical aspects of autoimmune inner ear disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, A J

    1992-01-01

    The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of autoimmune inner ear disease are reviewed. Recent studies indicating an autoimmune etiology and pathogenesis are discussed, along with a comparative analysis of several promising new animal models. Further studies to define the natural history, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of the disease are suggested.

  5. Machine learning on Parkinson's disease? Let's translate into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasa, Antonio

    2016-06-15

    Machine learning techniques represent the third-generation of clinical neuroimaging studies where the principal interest is not related to describe anatomical changes of a neurological disorder, but to evaluate if a multivariate approach may use these abnormalities to predict the correct classification of previously unseen clinical cohort. In the next few years, Machine learning will revolutionize clinical practice of Parkinson's disease, but enthusiasm should be turned down before removing some important barriers. PMID:26743974

  6. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary. PMID:20609317

  7. Selective biologics for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's diseaseclinical utility of vedolizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkau JM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jill MV Petkau, Bertus Eksteen Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD encompasses a cluster of different disease phenotypes which are broadly classified into ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Disease pathogenesis is driven by abnormal host immune responses to their resident gut microbiome in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical disease features and outcomes are heterogenous and not unexpected as over 163 genetic loci are associated with disease susceptibility, and there are great variability in environmental exposures. Despite this variability, there has been relatively few efficacious therapies for particularly moderate-to-severe IBD. Treatment has been dominated by antitumor necrosis alpha agents with significant success but equally potentially serious adverse events. Therapeutic targeting of leucocyte trafficking has emerged as a viable alternative therapy, with vedolizumab being the lead compound. This review focuses primarily on its biological function as a selective gut immunotherapy, its safety and efficacy, and its emerging role as a mainstream therapy in managing IBD. Keywords: adhesion molecule antagonist, anti-α4β7 integrin, inflammatory bowel disease, leukocyte trafficking, monoclonal antibody, selective gut immunotherapy, tumor necrosis factor alpha

  8. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Clinical significance and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease describes the recognition and diagnosis in patients with very mild dementia. Internationally accepted diagnostic criteria support the diagnosis based on clinical evaluation. Recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging as well as studies on specific proteins in the cerebro-spinal fluid that are related to distinct pathophysiological disease processes are most promising approaches to defining biological markers of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.)

  9. Graves Disease And Down Sindrome : Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scrinic Olesea

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pacients with Down’s syndrome present an increase revalence of autoimune endocrine disorders. We communicate the case of 14 years and 6 months old pacient known with Down syndrome admitted in Endocrinology department with suspicion of hyperthyroidism, the diagnosis being confirmed by hormonal dosage. The particularity of the case consists in: symptomatology onset during puberty, clinical evolution with mild symptoms, without ocular involvement, morphological and functional remission obtained relatively soon after the initiation of antithyroid therapy, lack of posttherapy side effects, favorabile evolution under the “block and replace” therapy

  10. Clinical MRI for iron detection in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Maija; Ruottinen, Hanna; Soimakallio, Seppo; Elovaara, Irina; Dastidar, Prasun

    2013-01-01

    We studied nonheme iron in Parkinson's disease (PD) using clinically available MRI in 36 patients and 21 healthy volunteers. The subjects underwent thorough clinical investigation, including 3-T MRI. Quantitative R2* was able to reflect symptoms of PD. In addition, the clinically used susceptibility-weighted imaging differentiated between controls and patients, whereas T2-weighted imaging did not. Disease-related changes were present not only in substantia nigra but also in globus pallidus. Such changes are associated with neurodegeneration, reflecting the severity of motor impairment. PMID:23522789

  11. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C M

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 (th) century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 (st) century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  12. Controlling the Regional Identity of hPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Neuronal Subtype Specificity of Neurological Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Imaizumi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The CNS contains many diverse neuronal subtypes, and most neurological diseases target specific subtypes. However, the mechanism of neuronal subtype specificity of disease phenotypes remains elusive. Although in vitro disease models employing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs have great potential to clarify the association of neuronal subtypes with disease, it is currently difficult to compare various PSC-derived subtypes. This is due to the limited number of subtypes whose induction is established, and different cultivation protocols for each subtype. Here, we report a culture system to control the regional identity of PSC-derived neurons along the anteroposterior (A-P and dorsoventral (D-V axes. This system was successfully used to obtain various neuronal subtypes based on the same protocol. Furthermore, we reproduced subtype-specific phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Alzheimer’s disease (AD by comparing the obtained subtypes. Therefore, our culture system provides new opportunities for modeling neurological diseases with PSCs.

  13. Longitudinal analysis of the behavioral phenotype in a novel transgenic rat model of early stages of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Galeano, Pablo; Martino Adami, Pamela V.; Do Carmo, Sonia; Blanco, Eduardo; Rotondaro, Cecilia; Capani, Francisco; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A. Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid β (iAβ) has been linked to mild cognitive impairment that may precede Alzheimer's disease (AD) onset. This neuropathological trait was recently mimicked in a novel animal model of AD, the hemizygous transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP (Tg(+/-)) rat. The characterization of the behavioral phenotypes in this animal model could provide a baseline of efficacy for earlier therapeutic interventions. The aim of the present study was to undertake a longitudinal study of...

  14. CLINICAL ANALYSIS AND TREATMENT OF 14 CASESOF EXTRAMAMMARY PAGET'S DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To diffrentiate extramammary Paget' s disease ( EPD ) clinically and histologically from other skin diseases. Methods Clinical analysis and excisional treatment of 14 patients with EPD were reviewed from 1987 to 1997. Results Of 14 patients, 12 involved scrotum and penis, one in the groin and the other one in the perianal region. All were positive for cytokeratin and negative for S-100 protein. Follow-up showed 3 recurrences who had positive surgical margin biopsy. One died of other disease. Conclusion Surgery is the first choice for treatment of EPD. Negative margin must be achieved to prevent local recurrence.

  15. IMPULSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDERS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE. CLINICAL CASES

    OpenAIRE

    N. V. Fedorova; Nikitina, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective – a description of clinical cases of impulsive­compulsive disorders in Parkinson,s disease. The first clinical case. Patient N., 75 years old, suffering for 15 years from Parkinson,s disease, akinetic­rigid form of the disease, stage 4 by Hyun–Yar. Since 2009, he received levodopa/carbidopa 250/25 mg 5 times/day (daily dose of 1250 mg of levodopa); pramipexole 3.5 mg per day (daily dose 3.5 mg), amantadine sulfate 100 mg 5 times/day (daily dose 500 mg). While taking antiparkinsonian...

  16. A systems medicine clinical platform for understanding and managing non- communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Alfredo; Auffray, Charles; Agusti, Alvar; Apolone, Giovanni; Balling, Rudi; Barbanti, Piero; Bellia, Alfonso; Boccia, Stefania; Bousquet, Jean; Cardaci, Vittorio; Cazzola, Mario; Dall'Armi, Valentina; Daraselia, Nikolai; Ros, Lucio Da; Bufalo, Alessandra Del; Ducci, Giuseppe; Ferri, Luigi; Fini, Massimo; Fossati, Chiara; Gensini, Gianfranco; Granone, Pierluigi Maria; Kinross, James; Lauro, Davide; Cascio, Gerland Lo; Lococo, Filippo; Lococo, Achille; Maier, Dieter; Marcus, Frederick; Margaritora, Stefano; Marra, Camillo; Minati, Gianfranco; Neri, Monica; Pasqua, Franco; Pison, Christophe; Pristipino, Christian; Roca, Joseph; Rosano, Giuseppe; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Russo, Patrizia; Salinaro, Gianluca; Shenhar, Shani; Soreq, Hermona; Sterk, Peter J; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Torti, Margherita; Volterrani, Maurizio; Wouters, Emiel F M; Frustaci, Alessandra; Bonassi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) are among the most pressing global health problems of the twenty-first century. Their rising incidence and prevalence is linked to severe morbidity and mortality, and they are putting economic and managerial pressure on healthcare systems around the world. Moreover, NCDs are impeding healthy aging by negatively affecting the quality of life of a growing number of the global population. NCDs result from the interaction of various genetic, environmental and habitual factors, and cluster in complex ways, making the complex identification of resulting phenotypes not only difficult, but also a top research priority. The degree of complexity required to interpret large patient datasets generated by advanced high-throughput functional genomics assays has now increased to the point that novel computational biology approaches are essential to extract information that is relevant to the clinical decision-making process. Consequently, system-level models that interpret the interactions between extensive tissues, cellular and molecular measurements and clinical features are also being created to identify new disease phenotypes, so that disease definition and treatment are optimized, and novel therapeutic targets discovered. Likewise, Systems Medicine (SM) platforms applied to extensively-characterized patients provide a basis for more targeted clinical trials, and represent a promising tool to achieve better prevention and patient care, thereby promoting healthy aging globally. The present paper: (1) reviews the novel systems approaches to NCDs; (2) discusses how to move efficiently from Systems Biology to Systems Medicine; and (3) presents the scientific and clinical background of the San Raffaele Systems Medicine Platform. PMID:24641232

  17. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  18. [Kawasaki disease: interdisciplinary and intersocieties consensus (clinical guidelines). Brief version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis. It is the most common cause of acquired heart disease, with the risk of developing coronary artery aneurysms, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Diagnosis is based on the presence of fever in addition to other clinical criteria. The quarter of the Kawasaki disease patients have "incomplete" presentation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin within ten days of fever onset improves clinical outcomes and reduces the incidence of coronary artery dilation to less than 5%. Non-responders to standard therapy have shown a successful response with the use of corticosteroids and/or biological agents. The long-term management must be delineated according to the degree of coronary involvement in a multidisciplinary manner. To facilitate the pediatrician's diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Kawasaki disease, a group of experts from the Argentine Society of Pediatrics and the Argentine Society of Cardiology carried out a consensus to develop practical clinical guidelines. PMID:27399018

  19. NEFL N98S mutation: another cause of dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with heterogeneous early-onset phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, José; Peeters, Kristien; García, Antonio; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; Gallardo, Elena; Hernández-Fabián, Arantxa; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; De Vriendt, Els; Infante, Jon; Jordanova, Albena

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a pedigree with NEFL N98S mutation associated with a dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (DI-CMT) and heterogeneous early-onset phenotype. The pedigree comprised two patients, the proband and her son, aged 38 and 5 years. The proband, evaluated at age 31, showed delayed motor milestones that, as of the second decade, evolved into severe phenotype consisting of sensorimotor neuropathy, pes cavus, clawing hands, gait and kinetic cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus and dysarthria, she being wheelchair bound. By then, a working diagnosis of sporadic early onset cerebellar ataxia with peripheral neuropathy was established. Screening of mutations associated with SCA and autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias was negative. Her son showed a mild phenotype characterized by delayed motor milestones, and lower-limb hypotonia and areflexia. Electrophysiology in both patients showed nerve conduction slowing in the intermediate range, both in proximal and distal nerve segments, but where compound muscle action potentials exhibited severe attenuation there was conduction slowing down to the demyelinating range. In the proband, cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebellar atrophy, electromyography disclosed active denervation in tibialis anterior, and MRI of lower-limb musculature demonstrated widespread and distally accentuated muscle fatty atrophy; furthermore, on water sensitive MRI sequences there was edema of calf muscles. We conclude that the NEFL N98S mutation is associated with a DI-CMT phenotype characterized by early-onset sensorimotor neuropathy delaying motor milestones, which may evolve into a severe and complex clinical picture including cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26645395

  20. Clinical heterogeneity of dominant chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis disease: presenting as treatment-resistant candidiasis and chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotta, Laura; Scomodon, Omar; Padoan, Rita; Timpano, Silviana; Plebani, Alessandro; Soresina, Annarosa; Lougaris, Vassilios; Concolino, Daniela; Nicoletti, Angela; Giardino, Giuliana; Licari, Amelia; Marseglia, Gianluigi; Pignata, Claudio; Tamassia, Nicola; Facchetti, Fabio; Vairo, Donatella; Badolato, Raffaele

    2016-03-01

    In gain-of-function STAT1 mutations, chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis disease (CMCD) represents the phenotypic manifestation of a complex immunodeficiency characterized by clinical and immunological heterogeneity. We aimed to study clinical manifestations, long-term complications, molecular basis, and immune profile of patients with dominant CMCD. We identified nine patients with heterozygous mutations in STAT1, including novel amino acid substitutions (L283M, L351F, L400V). High risk of azole-resistance was observed, particularly when intermittent regimens of antifungal treatment or use of suboptimal dosage occurs. We report a case of Cryptococcosis and various bacterial and viral infections. Risk of developing bronchiectasis in early childhood or gradually evolving to chronic lung disease in adolescent or adult ages emerges. Lymphopenia is variable, likely progressing by adulthood. We conclude that continuous antifungal prophylaxis associated to drug monitoring might prevent resistance to treatment; prompt diagnosis and therapy of lung disease might control long-term progression; careful monitoring of lymphopenia-related infections might improve prognosis. PMID:26732859

  1. Clinical variability and novel mutations in the NHEJ1 gene in patients with a Nijmegen breakage syndrome-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrannoy, Véronique; Demuth, Ilja; Baumann, Ulrich; Schindler, Detlev; Konrat, Kateryna; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Radszewski, Janina; Rothe, Susanne; Schellenberger, Mario T; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Teik, Keng Wee; Nallusamy, Revathy; Reis, André; Sperling, Karl; Digweed, Martin; Varon, Raymonda

    2010-09-01

    We have previously shown that mutations in the genes encoding DNA Ligase IV (LIGIV) and RAD50, involved in DNA repair by nonhomologous-end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination, respectively, lead to clinical and cellular features similar to those of Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS). Very recently, a new member of the NHEJ repair pathway, NHEJ1, was discovered, and mutations in patients with features resembling NBS were described. Here we report on five patients from four families of different ethnic origin with the NBS-like phenotype. Sequence analysis of the NHEJ1 gene in a patient of Spanish and in a patient of Turkish origin identified homozygous, previously reported mutations, c.168C>G (p.Arg57Gly) and c.532C>T (p.Arg178Ter), respectively. Two novel, paternally inherited truncating mutations, c.495dupA (p.Asp166ArgfsTer20) and c.526C>T (p.Arg176Ter) and two novel, maternal genomic deletions of 1.9 and 6.9 kb of the NHEJ1 gene, were found in a compound heterozygous state in two siblings of German origin and in one Malaysian patient, respectively. Our findings confirm that patients with NBS-like phenotypes may have mutations in the NHEJ1 gene including multiexon deletions, and show that considerable clinical variability could be observed even within the same family. PMID:20597108

  2. Phenotypic Spectrum of Granular Corneal Dystrophy Type II in Two Italian Families Presenting an Unusual Granular Corneal Dystrophy Type I Clinical Appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Mazzotta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, instrumental, and genetic findings are reported in Italian families with Type II Granular Corneal Dystrophies (GCD2 presenting an initial unusual presentation of a Granular Corneal Dystrophy Type I (GCD1 phenotypic spectrum in female descendants. Slit-lamp examinations showed the typical phenotypic features of GCD2 in both mothers and a phenotypic appearance of GCD1 in both daughters. Despite the different phenotypic onset, the genetic diagnostic testing revealed the presence of a mutation in the TGFB-I gene, typical of GCD2 in both cases, excluding GCD1. Patients who were clinically suspected of corneal dystrophy need a genetic confirmatory testing for certain diagnosis. Genetic test may help to find the specific mutation distinguishing between different phenotypic spectra with relative diagnostic and prognostic implications. The study demonstrates that the phenotypic spectrum of genetically confirmed granular corneal dystrophies in patients may change over time. Since the R124H mutation has also been described in clinically asymptomatic individuals prior to LASIK, who then develop dramatic deposition, suggesting that this particular mutation and phenotype may be sensitive to, precipitated, or modified by central cornea trauma, a careful familial anamnesis excluding cornel dystrophies and specific preoperative genetic test are recommended prior to LASIK.

  3. Clinical, serological and genetic predictors of inflammatory bowel disease course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurent Beaugerie; Harry Sokol

    2012-01-01

    Patients with extensive or complicated Crohn's disease (CD) at diagnosis should be treated straightaway with immunosuppressive therapy according to the most recent guidelines.In patients with localized and uncomplicated CD at diagnosis,early use of immunosuppressive therapy is debated for preventing disease progression and limiting the disabling clinical impact.In this context,there is a need for predictors of benign or unfavourable subsequent clinical course,in order to avoid over-treating with risky drugs those patients who would have experienced spontaneous mid-term asymptomatic disease without progression towards irreversible intestinal lesions.At diagnosis,an age below 40 years,the presence of perianal lesions and the need for treating the first flare with steroids have been consistently associated with an unfavourable subsequent 5-year or 10-year clinical course.The positive predictive value of unfavourable course in patients with 2 or 3 predictors ranges between 0.75 and 0.95 in population-based and referral centre cohorts.Consequently,the use of these predictors can be integrated into the elements that influence individual decisions.In the CD postoperative context,keeping smoking and history of prior resection are the strongest predictors of disease symptomatic recurrence.However,these clinical predictors alone are not as reliable as severity of early postoperative endoscopic recurrence in clinical practice.In ulcerative colitis (UC),extensive colitis at diagnosis is associated with unfavourable clinical course in the first 5 to 10 years of the disease,and also with long-term colectomy and colorectal inflammation-associated colorectal cancer.In patients with extensive UC at diagnosis,a rapid step-up strategy aiming to achieve sustained deep remission should therefore be considered.At the moment,no reliable serological or genetic predictor of inflammatory bowel disease clinical course has been identified.

  4. 24-HOUR ARTERIAL STIFFNESS VALUES IN MEN WITH DIFFERENT PHENOTYPES OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE CONCURRENT WITH HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Karoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of the daily arterial stiffness (AS profile in men with different phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD concurrent with hypertension. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 78 male patients with COPD and hypertension. The patients were divided according to COPD phenotypes into 2 groups: 1 COPD patients with emphysema; 2 those with bronchitis. The exclusion criteria were less than 40 years and more than 80 years of age; diabetes mellitus; coronary heart disease; vascular diseases; an exacerbation of chronic diseases; bronchial and pulmonary diseases of another etiology. The patients underwent 24-hour blood pressure and AS monitoring, external respiratory function testing: spirography with a short-acting β2-agonist test, a six-minute walk test at baseline and after a hemoglobin oxygen saturation test, and a CAT test. Results. The patients of both groups were observed to have a statistically significant increase in (dP/dtmax as compared to those of the control group (p < 0.05; p < 0.01 in both the daytime and nighttime. In these periods, the COPD patients with emphysema had a higher AIx than those with bronchitis (p < 0.001. There was a statistically significantly (p < 0.001 higher AIx in the nighttime than in the daytime in Groups 1 and 2 patients. Conclusion. The patients with different COPD phenotypes were noted to have impaired arterial elastic properties, circadian AS changes with predominantly nocturnal impaired vascular stiffness. Relationships were found between 24-hour AS values and clinicoanamnestic findings. 

  5. Phenotype, Body Composition, and Prediction Equations (Indian Fatty Liver Index for Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Non-Diabetic Asian Indians: A Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Prakash Bhatt

    Full Text Available In this study, we have attempted comparison of detailed body composition phenotype of Asian Indians with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD vs. those without, in a case controlled manner. We also aim to analyse prediction equations for NAFLD for non-diabetic Asian Indians, and compare performance of these with published prediction equations researched from other populations.In this case-control study, 162 cases and 173 age-and sex-matched controls were recruited. Clinical, anthropometric, metabolic, and body composition profiles, and liver ultrasound were done. Fasting insulin levels, value of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, and serum high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP levels were evaluated. Multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were used to arrive at prediction equations for fatty liver [Indian fatty liver index (IFLI].As compared to those without fatty liver, those with fatty liver exhibited the following; Excess dorsocervical fat ('Buffalo hump', skin tags, xanthelasma, 'double chin', arcus; excess total, abdominal and subcutaneous adiposity, and high blood pressure, blood glucose, measures of insulin resistance (fasting insulin and HOMA-IR values, lipids and hs-CRP levels. Two prediction equations were developed; Clinical [Indian Fatty Liver Index-Clinical; IFLI-C]: 1(double chin +15.5 (systolic blood pressure +13.8 (buffalo hump; and IFLI-Clinical and Biochemical (CB: serum triglycerides+12 (insulin+1(systolic blood pressure +18 (buffalo hump. On ROC Curve analysis, IFLI performed better than all published prediction equations, except one.Non-diabetic Asian Indians with NAFLD researched by us were overweight/obese, had excess abdominal and subcutaneous fat, multiple other phenotypic markers, had higher insulin resistance, glycemia, dyslipidemia and subclinical inflammation than those without. Prediction score developed by us for NAFLD; IFLI-C and IFLI-CB, should be useful for

  6. Phenotypic reversal of the btn1 defects in yeast by chloroquine: a yeast model for Batten disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, D A; Carr, C J; Das, B; Sherman, F

    1999-09-28

    BTN1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an ortholog of CLN3, the human Batten disease gene. We have reported previously that deletion of BTN1, btn1-Delta, resulted in a pH-dependent resistance to D-(-)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1,3-propanediol (ANP). This phenotype was caused by btn1-Delta strains having an elevated ability to acidify growth medium through an elevated activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, resulting from a decreased vacuolar pH during early growth. We have determined that growing btn1-Delta strains in the presence of chloroquine reverses the resistance to ANP, decreases the rate of medium acidification, decreases the activity of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and elevates vacuolar pH. However, an additional effect of this phenotypic reversal is that activity of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is decreased further and vacuolar pH is increased further as btn1-Delta strains continue to grow. This phenotypic reversal of btn1-Delta can be considered for developing a therapy for Batten disease. PMID:10500178

  7. The influence of radiographic phenotype and smoking status on peripheral blood biomarker patterns in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Bon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by both airway remodeling and parenchymal destruction. The identification of unique biomarker patterns associated with airway dominant versus parenchymal dominant patterns would support the existence of unique phenotypes representing independent biologic processes. A cross-sectional study was performed to examine the association of serum biomarkers with radiographic airway and parenchymal phenotypes of COPD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Serum from 234 subjects enrolled in a CT screening cohort was analyzed for 33 cytokines and growth factors using a multiplex protein array. The association of serum markers with forced expiratory volume in one second percent predicted (FEV1% and quantitative CT measurements of airway thickening and emphysema was assessed with and without stratification for current smoking status. Significant associations were found with several serum inflammatory proteins and measurements of FEV1%, airway thickening, and parenchymal emphysema independent of smoking status. The association of select analytes with airway thickening and emphysema was independent of FEV1%. Furthermore, the relationship between other inflammatory markers and measurements of physiologic obstruction or airway thickening was dependent on current smoking status. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Airway and parenchymal phenotypes of COPD are associated with unique systemic serum biomarker profiles. Serum biomarker patterns may provide a more precise classification of the COPD syndrome, provide insights into disease pathogenesis and identify targets for novel patient-specific biological therapies.

  8. Prevalence and molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Escherichia coli expressing an AmpC phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rikke Lind; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Friis-Møller, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    . Hyperproduction of AmpC beta-lactamase was confirmed by isoelectric focusing (IEF). The presence of a plasmid-mediated ampC gene (pAmpC) was detected by multiplex PCR. The promoter and the entire reading frame of the chromosomal ampC gene were sequenced to identify promoter mutations associated...... by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The remaining isolates all had mutations or insertions in the promoter region, which could explain increased expression of the chromosomal AmpC enzyme. Mutations in the ampC gene associated with extended activity were rare and did not cause resistance to cefepime....... Sequencing of ampC showed that most isolates were not clonally related. CONCLUSIONS: E. coli expressing an AmpC phenotype occur sporadically and cause significant resistance to cephalosporins. The majority of these are hyperproducing chromosomal ampC although some isolates have acquired pAmpC....

  9. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    OpenAIRE

    Camiciottoli G; Diciotti S; Bigazzi F.; Lombardo S; Bartolucci M; Paoletti M; Mascalchi M; Pistolesi M

    2015-01-01

    Gianna Camiciottoli,1 Stefano Diciotti,2 Francesca Bigazzi,1 Simone Lombardo,3 Maurizio Bartolucci,4 Matteo Paoletti,1 Mario Mascalchi,3 Massimo Pistolesi1 1Section of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi,” University of Bologna, Cesena, Italy; 3Radiodiagnostic Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Bio...

  10. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of bacteria isolated from diseased cultured sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) in Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the winter–spring from 2004 to 2006 in northeastern China cultured Japanese sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus suffered from a serious disease. Clinical signs included swollen mouth, skin ulceration and massive mortality. Clinical samples taken during this period were studied. Thirty-one bac...

  11. Two Types of Fibrils in ATTR Amyloidosis : Implications for Clinical Phenotype and Treatment Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Ihse, Elisabet

    2011-01-01

    Systemic amyloidoses are a group of lethal diseases where proteins aggregate into fibrillar structures, called amyloid fibrils, that deposits throughout the body. Transthyretin (TTR) causes one type of amyloidosis, in which the aggregates mainly infiltrate nervous and cardiac tissue. Almost a hundred different mutations in the TTR gene are known to trigger the disease, but wild-type (wt) TTR is also incorporated into the fibrils, and may alone form amyloid. Patients with the TTRV30M mutation ...

  12. Oral mucosal stigmata in hereditary-cancer syndromes: From germline mutations to distinctive clinical phenotypes and tailored therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Manfredini, Marco; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2016-05-10

    Numerous familial tumor syndromes are associated with distinctive oral mucosal findings, which may make possible an early diagnosis as an efficacious marker for the risk of developing visceral malignancies. In detail, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), Gardner syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden Syndrome, Gorlin Syndrome, Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndrome and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia show specific lesions of the oral mucosa and other distinct clinical and molecular features. The common genetic background of the above mentioned syndromes involve germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, such as APC, PTEN, PTCH1, STK11, RET, clearly implied in both ectodermal and mesodermal differentiation, being the oral mucosal and dental stigmata frequently associated in the specific clinical phenotypes. The oral and maxillofacial manifestations of these syndromes may become visible several years before the intestinal lesions, constituting a clinical marker that is predictive for the development of intestinal polyps and/or other visceral malignancies. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore necessary for both clinical diagnosis and management of the gene-carriers probands and their family members who have to be referred for genetic testing or have to be investigated for the presence of visceral cancers. PMID:26850131

  13. Three novel presenilin 1 mutations marking the wide spectrum of age at onset and clinical patterns in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeber, Sigrun; Müller-Sarnowski, Felix; Kress, Julia; Edbauer, Dieter; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Tüttelmann, Frank; Schindler, Christoph; Winter, Pia; Arzberger, Thomas; Müller, Ulrich; Danek, Adrian; Kretzschmar, Hans A

    2015-12-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations are the major cause of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD). Here we report three novel PSEN1 mutations: Ile238_Lys239insIle, Ala246Pro and Ala164Val from patients who manifested in their twenties, forties and seventies, respectively, with variant clinical presentations of dementia. These cases exemplify the tremendous heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes and age of onset associated with PSEN1 mutations. The possibility of ADAD--not previously suspected in two of our patients--should always be considered in neurodegenerative conditions albeit they might neither exhibit the typical clinical picture of Alzheimer's disease nor early onset dementia, which is regarded the primary clinical sign of hereditary neurodegeneration. PMID:26350633

  14. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Ferrari, Roberto; Jeppesen, Jørgen Lykke

    2014-01-01

    minute or more. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine, added to standard background therapy, in 19,102 patients who had both stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure and a heart rate of 70 beats per minute or more (including 12...... those without activity-limiting angina (P=0.02 for interaction). The incidence of bradycardia was higher with ivabradine than with placebo (18.0% vs. 2.3%, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients who had stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure, the addition of ivabradine to standard...

  15. Altered Peripheral Blood Monocyte Phenotype and Function in Chronic Liver Disease: Implications for Hepatic Recruitment and Systemic Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Gadd

    Full Text Available Liver and systemic inflammatory factors influence monocyte phenotype and function, which has implications for hepatic recruitment and subsequent inflammatory and fibrogenic responses, as well as host defence.Peripheral blood monocyte surface marker (CD14, CD16, CD163, CSF1R, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, HLA-DR, CD62L, SIGLEC-1 expression and capacity for phagocytosis, oxidative burst and LPS-stimulated TNF production were assessed in patients with hepatitis C (HCV (n = 39 or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD (n = 34 (classified as non-advanced disease, compensated cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls (n = 11 by flow cytometry.The selected markers exhibited similar monocyte-subset-specific expression patterns between patients and controls. Monocyte phenotypic signatures differed between NAFLD and HCV patients, with an increased proportion of CD16+ non-classical monocytes in NAFLD, but increased expression of CXCR3 and CXCR4 in HCV. In both cohorts, monocyte CCR2 expression was reduced and CCR4 elevated over controls. CD62L expression was specifically elevated in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and positively correlated with the model-for-end-stage-liver-disease score. Functionally, monocytes from patients with decompensated cirrhosis had equal phagocytic capacity, but displayed features of dysfunction, characterised by lower HLA-DR expression and blunted oxidative responses. Lower monocyte TNF production in response to LPS stimulation correlated with time to death in 7 (46% of the decompensated patients who died within 8 months of recruitment.Chronic HCV and NAFLD differentially affect circulating monocyte phenotype, suggesting specific injury-induced signals may contribute to hepatic monocyte recruitment and systemic activation state. Monocyte function, however, was similarly impaired in patients with both HCV and NAFLD, particularly in advanced disease, which likely contributes to the increased

  16. Maternal genetic mutations as gestational and early life influences in producing psychiatric disease-like phenotypes in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia eGleason

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for psychiatric disorders have traditionally been classified as genetic or environmental. Risk (candidate genes, although typically possessing small effects, represent a clear starting point to elucidate downstream cellular/molecular pathways of disease. Environmental effects, especially during development, can also lead to altered behavior and increased risk for disease. An important environmental factor is the mother, demonstrated by the negative effects elicited by maternal gestational stress and altered maternal care. These maternal effects can also have a genetic basis (e.g. maternal genetic variability and mutations. The focus of this review is maternal genotype effects that influence the emotional development of the offspring resulting in life-long psychiatric disease-like phenotypes. We have recently found that genetic inactivation of the serotonin1A receptor (5-HT1AR and the fmr-1 gene (encoding the fragile X mental retardation protein in mouse dams results in psychiatric disease-like phenotypes in their genetically unaffected offspring. 5-HT1AR deficiency in dams results in anxiety and increased stress responsiveness in their offspring. Mice with 5-HT1AR deficient dams display altered development of the hippocampus, which could be linked to their anxiety-like phenotype. Maternal inactivation of fmr-1, like its inactivation in the offspring, results in a hyperactivity-like condition and is associated with receptor alterations in the striatum. These data indicate a high sensitivity of the offspring to maternal mutations and suggest that maternal genotype effects can increase the impact of genetic risk factors in a population by increasing the risk of the genetically normal offspring as well as by enhancing the effects of offspring mutations.

  17. Defining Disease Phenotypes in Primary Care Electronic Health Records by a Machine Learning Approach: A Case Study in Identifying Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shang-Ming; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Kennedy, Jonathan; Cooksey, Roxanne; Atkinson, Mark; Denaxas, Spiros; Siebert, Stefan; Dixon, William G.; O’Neill, Terence W.; Choy, Ernest; Sudlow, Cathie; Brophy, Sinead

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 1) To use data-driven method to examine clinical codes (risk factors) of a medical condition in primary care electronic health records (EHRs) that can accurately predict a diagnosis of the condition in secondary care EHRs. 2) To develop and validate a disease phenotyping algorithm for rheumatoid arthritis using primary care EHRs. Methods This study linked routine primary and secondary care EHRs in Wales, UK. A machine learning based scheme was used to identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis from primary care EHRs via the following steps: i) selection of variables by comparing relative frequencies of Read codes in the primary care dataset associated with disease case compared to non-disease control (disease/non-disease based on the secondary care diagnosis); ii) reduction of predictors/associated variables using a Random Forest method, iii) induction of decision rules from decision tree model. The proposed method was then extensively validated on an independent dataset, and compared for performance with two existing deterministic algorithms for RA which had been developed using expert clinical knowledge. Results Primary care EHRs were available for 2,238,360 patients over the age of 16 and of these 20,667 were also linked in the secondary care rheumatology clinical system. In the linked dataset, 900 predictors (out of a total of 43,100 variables) in the primary care record were discovered more frequently in those with versus those without RA. These variables were reduced to 37 groups of related clinical codes, which were used to develop a decision tree model. The final algorithm identified 8 predictors related to diagnostic codes for RA, medication codes, such as those for disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and absence of alternative diagnoses such as psoriatic arthritis. The proposed data-driven method performed as well as the expert clinical knowledge based methods. Conclusion Data-driven scheme, such as ensemble machine learning methods, has

  18. [Morquio disease (Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV-A): clinical aspects, diagnosis and new treatment with enzyme replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politei, Juan; Schenone, Andrea B; Guelbert, Norberto; Fainboim, Alejandro; Szlago, Marina

    2015-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV-A (Morquio A disease) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase, that results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin-6-sulfate and keratan sulfate. Clinical presentations reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe phenotype to an attenuated expression. Accumulation of substrate manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia, including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. Other abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with Morquio disease. Elosulfase alfa showed in clinical trials in children and adults a significant and sustained improvement in endurance and urinary levels of keratan sulfate. Data from the ongoing observational, multinational Morquio A Registry Study will provide valuable information on the long-term efficacy and safety of elosulfase alfa in patients, as well as on the natural history of this very rare disease. PMID:26172013

  19. Clinical features of subacute course of radiation disease

    OpenAIRE

    Krasnyuk V.I.; Konchalovsky M.V.; Ustyugova A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: to show the clinical features of subacute course of subacute course of radiation disease and how they differ from the typical manifestations of acute and chronic radiation syndrome. Material and methods. Materials of the Burnasyan Federal Medical and Biophysical Center Register of acute radiation disease (ARS) in the Former USSR and Russia and Materials of a Burnasyan Federal Medical and Biophysical Center database of workers "Mayak" with chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) were analyzed. T...

  20. Clinical and nursing problems in Crohn’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Iwona Wawrzycka; Martyna Głuszek-Osuch; Stanisław Głuszek

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a transmural, typically granulomatous intestinal inflammation and may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus. The complexity of the course of CD along with its complications (fistulas, perforation, and bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract) requires doctors and nurses to have specialised knowledge that conditions the treatment of this disease. Aim of the research : To present the clinical image and nursing probl...

  1. Whipple's disease. Report of five cases with different clinical features

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Maria de Lourdes de Abreu; Vilela, Eduardo Garcia; FARIA Luciana Costa; Claudia Alves COUTO; SALGADO Célio Jefferson; LEITE Virgínia Rios; BRASILEIRO FILHO Geraldo; Bambirra, Eduardo Alves; MENDES Claudia Maria de Castro; CARVALHO Silas de Castro; Oliveira, Celso Affonso; CUNHA Aloísio Sales da

    2001-01-01

    Whipple's disease (WD) is a rare systemic disease of infectious etiology which involves the small intestine but can virtually affect any organ. We present here five cases (four males and one female) ranging in age from 20 to 59 years. All patients had intestinal involvement associated or not with clinical manifestations linked to this organ. Vegetation in the tricuspid valve was observed in one patient, suggesting endocarditis caused by Tropheryma whippelii, with disappearance of the echocard...

  2. Evaluation of medication treatment for Alzheimer's disease on clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-qiu LI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To formulate the best treatment plan for Alzheimer's disease patients by evaluating the therapeutic efficacy and side effect of various evidence-based programs. Methods Alzheimer's disease, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, memantine, rosiglitazone, etc. were defined as retrieval words. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases were used with applying of manual searching. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCT, controlled clinical trials and case-observation studies were collected and evaluated by Jadad Scale. Results After screening, 33 selected resources included 14 systematic reviews, 14 randomized controlled trials, 4 controlled clinical trials and 1 case-observation study. According to Jadad Scale, total 28 articles were evaluated to be high quality (12 with score 4, 10 score 5, 6 score 7, and 5 were low quality with score 3. It was summarized as follows: 1 Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease for which no cure exists. To date, only symptomatic treatments with cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine and an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor noncompetitive antagonist (memantine, are effective and well tolerated to counterbalance the neurotransmitter disturbance, but cannot limit or impact on disease progression. 2 Disease modifying drug is an potential agent, with persistent effect on slowing the progression of structural damage, and can be detected even after withdrawing the treatment. Many types of disease modifying drugs are undergoing clinical trials. Conclusions Using evidence-based medicine methods can provide best clinical evidence on Alzheimer's disease treatment. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.009

  3. A clinical survey of common avian infectious diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Qing-Ye; Wang, Su-Chun; Li, Jin-Ping; Liu, Dong; Liu, Shuo; Jiang, Wen-Ming; Chen, Ji-Ming

    2014-06-01

    Multiple common avian infectious diseases (CAIDs), namely, avian infectious diseases excluding highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease, such as avian salmonellosis and coccidiosis, cause huge economic loss in poultry production and are of great significance in public health. However, they are usually not covered in the systems for reporting of animal diseases. Consequently, the distribution of CAIDs is not clear in many countries. Here, we report a clinical survey of CAIDs in China based on clinical diagnosis of eight veterinary clinics in 2011 and 2012. This survey provided the distribution data of viral, bacterial, and parasitic CAIDs in different types of avian flocks, seasons, and regions, data that are of great value in the research, prevention, and control of poultry diseases. This survey suggested that avian colibacillosis, infectious serositis in ducks caused by Riemerella anatipestifer, avian salmonellosis, fowl cholera, avian mycoplasmosis, avian aspergillosis, coccidiosis, low pathogenic avian influenza, infectious bronchitis, infectious bursal disease, and infectious laryngotracheitis are likely to be prevalent in the poultry in China. PMID:25055636

  4. Clinical profile of Parkinson's disease in the Gumei community of Minhang district, Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangyong Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:We examined the demographic and clinical profiles of Parkinson's disease in Shanghai, China, to assist in disease management and provide comparative data on Parkinson's disease prevalence, phenotype, and progression among different regions and ethnic groups.METHODS:A door-to-door survey and follow-up clinical examinations identified 180 community-dwelling Han-Chinese Parkinson's disease patients (104 males, 76 females.RESULTS:The average age at onset was 65.16±9.60 years. The most common initial symptom was tremor (112 patients, 62.22%, followed by rigidity (38, 21.11%, bradykinesia (28, 15.56% and tremor plus rigidity (2, 1.11%. Tremor as the initial symptom usually began in a single limb (83.04% of patients. The average duration from onset to mild Parkinson's disease (Hoehn-Yahr phase 1-2 was 52.74±45.64 months. Progression from mild to moderate/severe Parkinson's disease (phase≥3 was significantly slower (87.07±58.72 months; p<0.001, except for patients presenting initially with bradykinesia (53.83±24.49 months. Most patients (149/180, 82.78% took levodopa with or without other drugs. The Hamilton Anxiety Scale revealed symptoms of clinical anxiety in 35 patients, and the Hamilton Depression Scale revealed depressive symptoms in 88 patients. The depressed or anxious subgroup (123 patients demonstrated a significantly younger age at onset (55.54±7.68 years compared with the overall mean (p<0.05.CONCLUSION:Unilateral limb tremor was the most common initial symptom, and motor function deteriorated slowly over ≅4−9 years. Earlier-onset patients experience greater psychiatric dysfunction.

  5. Substitution of arginine-839 by cysteine or histidine in the androgen receptor causes different receptor phenotypes in cultured cells and coordinate degrees of clinical androgen resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Beitel, L K; Kazemi-Esfarjani, P; Kaufman, M; Lumbroso, R; DiGeorge, A M; Killinger, D W; Trifiro, M A; Pinsky, L.

    1994-01-01

    We aim to correlate point mutations in the androgen receptor gene with receptor phenotypes and with clinical phenotypes of androgen resistance. In two families, the external genitalia were predominantly female at birth, and sex-of-rearing has been female. Their androgen receptor mutation changed arginine-839 to histidine. In a third family, the external genitalia were predominantly male at birth, and sex-of-rearing has been male: their codon 839 has mutated to cysteine. In genital skin fibrob...

  6. Chronic granulomatous disease, the McLeod phenotype and the contiguous gene deletion syndrome-a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins Casey E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD, a disorder of the NADPH oxidase system, results in phagocyte functional defects and subsequent infections with bacterial and fungal pathogens (such as Aspergillus species and Candida albicans. Deletions and missense, frameshift, or nonsense mutations in the gp91phox gene (also termed CYBB, located in the Xp21.1 region of the X chromosome, are associated with the most common form of CGD. When larger X-chromosomal deletions occur, including the XK gene deletion, a so-called "Contiguous Gene Deletion Syndrome" may result. The contiguous gene deletion syndrome is known to associate the Kell phenotype/McLeod syndrome with diseases such as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. These patients are often complicated and management requires special attention to the various facets of the syndrome.

  7. GeneYenta: a phenotype-based rare disease case matching tool based on online dating algorithms for the acceleration of exome interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Michael M; Arenillas, David J; Maithripala, Savanie; Maurer, Zachary D; Tarailo Graovac, Maja; Armstrong, Linlea; Patel, Millan; van Karnebeek, Clara; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-04-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have helped reveal causal variants for genetic diseases. In order to establish causality, it is often necessary to compare genomes of unrelated individuals with similar disease phenotypes to identify common disrupted genes. When working with cases of rare genetic disorders, finding similar individuals can be extremely difficult. We introduce a web tool, GeneYenta, which facilitates the matchmaking process, allowing clinicians to coordinate detailed comparisons for phenotypically similar cases. Importantly, the system is focused on phenotype annotation, with explicit limitations on highly confidential data that create barriers to participation. The procedure for matching of patient phenotypes, inspired by online dating services, uses an ontology-based semantic case matching algorithm with attribute weighting. We evaluate the capacity of the system using a curated reference data set and 19 clinician entered cases comparing four matching algorithms. We find that the inclusion of clinician weights can augment phenotype matching. PMID:25703386

  8. Linkage of frontotemporal dementia to chromosome 17: clinical and neuropathological characterization of phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaoka, L.H.; Welsh-Bohmer, K.A.; Hulette, C. M.; Gaskell, P. C.; Murray, M.; Rimmler, J. L.; Helms, B. R.; Guerra, M; Roses, A D; Schmechel, D E; Pericak-Vance, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is a behavioral disorder of insidious onset and variable progression. Clinically, its early features reflect frontal lobe dysfunction characterized by personality change, deterioration in memory and executive functions, and stereotypical and perseverative behaviors. Pathologically, there is degeneration of the neocortex and subcortical nuclei, without distinctive features such as plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, or Pick or Lewy bodies. Within-family variation in neuro...

  9. Deconstructing Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Clinic-Based Evidence for an Anger/Irritability Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine risk factors and co-occurring symptoms associated with mother-reported versus teacher-reported anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in a clinic-based sample of 1,160 youth aged 6 through 18 years. Method: Participants completed a background history questionnaire (mothers), school…

  10. The ENFUMOSA cross-sectional European multicentre study of the clinical phenotype of chronic severe asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, B; Anto, JM; Barreiro, E; Bel, EHD; Bonsignore, G; Bousquet, J; Castellsague, J; Chanez, P; Cibella, F; Cuttitta, G; Dahlen, B; Dahlen, SE; Drews, N; Djukanovic, R; Fabbri, LM; Folkerts, G; Gaga, M; Gratziou, C; Guerrera, G; Holgate, ST; Howarth, PH; Johnston, SL; Kanniess, F; Kips, JC; Kerstjens, HAM; Kumlin, M; Magnussen, H; Nijkamp, FP; Papageorgiou, N; Papi, A; Postma, DS; Pauwels, RA; Rabe, KF; Richter, K; Roldaan, AC; Romagnoli, M; Roquet, A; Sanjuas, C; Siafakas, NM; Timens, W; Tzanakis, N; Vachier, [No Value; Vignola, AM; Watson, L; Yourgioti, G

    2003-01-01

    Since severe asthma is a poorly understood, major health problem, 12 clinical specialist centres in nine European countries formed a European Network For Understanding Mechanisms Of Severe Asthma (ENFUMOSA). In a cross-sectional observational study, a total of 163 subjects with severe asthma were co

  11. Pharmacogenetics in Cardiovascular Disease is there clinical relevance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maitland-Van Der Zee, A.

    2014-01-01

    • Objectives: To give an up-to-date overview of the research in pharmacogenetics of cardiovascular disease, and the clinical implications of this research. • Methods: In this lecture I will focus on these groups cardiovascular drugs where many pharmacogenetics studies have been performed (including

  12. DNA-abzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T E Naumova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-abzymes enzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment T.E. Naumova, O.M. Durova, A.G. Gabibov, Z.S. Alekberova, S. V. Suchkov DNA-hydrolyzing autoantibodies (AAB or DNA-abzymes can be found in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment. Technology of serum express screening for presence of DNA abzymes is described. Comparative study of DNA-hydrolising activity in patients with different forms of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases was performed. Blood of clinically healthy donors was usually free of IgG DNA-abzymes. DNA-abzymes were most often revealed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA less often in patients with organ-specific forms of autoimmune disturbances. The results of the study confirm the hypothesis of autoimmune origin of IgG DNA abzymes and demonstrate the possibility to use them in clinical practice for monitoring to disease activity in SLE and RA.

  13. Clinical surgical and pathological characterization of nodular thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodular thyroid disease is a worrisome endocrine problem due to its association with cancer. To characterize patients hospitalized with this condition according to clinical surgical and pathological aspects, as well as to determine the effectiveness of the cytology by fine-needle aspiration biopsy for diagnosis

  14. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Niurka Mercedes Galende Hernández; Diosdania Alfonso Falcón; Carlos Alberto Martell Alonso; Alexis Díaz Mesa; Inti Santana Carballosa

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. This concept includes simple chronic bronchitis, asthmatic bronchitis, chronic obstructive bronchitis, and pulmonary emphysema; although this two last are the most commonly included. Risk factors, classification and treatment are commented, stressing the strategy of mechanical ventilation and the indications for mechanical invasive and no invasive ventilation. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most i...

  15. Clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity in lysosomal storage diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe history of lysosomal storage diseases dates back to the end of the last century when the first clinical reports appeared of patients suffering from these genetic, metabolic disorders (Tay, 1881; Gaucher, 1882; Sachs, 1887; Fabry, 1898). About seventy years wouid pass before the term

  16. Neuronopathic Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Carlos E.; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lysosomal--autophagocytic system diseases (LASDs) affect multiple body systems including the central nervous system (CNS). The progressive CNS pathology has its onset at different ages, leading to neurodegeneration and early death. Methods: Literature review provided insight into the current clinical neurological findings,…

  17. The immature dentate gyrus represents a shared phenotype of mouse models of epilepsy and psychiatric disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Rick; Kobayashi, Katsunori; Hagihara, Hideo; Kogan, Jeffrey H.; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Walton, Noah M.; Gross, Adam K; Heusner, Carrie L.; Chen, Qian; Tamura, Kouichi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is accumulating evidence to suggest psychiatric disorders, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, share common etiologies, pathophysiologies, genetics, and drug responses with many of the epilepsies. Here, we explored overlaps in cellular/molecular, electrophysiological, and behavioral phenotypes between putative mouse models of bipolar disorder/schizophrenia and epilepsy. We tested the hypothesis that an immature dentate gyrus (iDG), whose association with psychosis in ...

  18. Phenotypic reversal of the btn1 defects in yeast by chloroquine: A yeast model for Batten disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, David A.; Carr, Carrie J.; Das, Biswadip; Sherman, Fred

    1999-01-01

    BTN1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an ortholog of CLN3, the human Batten disease gene. We have reported previously that deletion of BTN1, btn1-Δ, resulted in a pH-dependent resistance to d-(−)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1,3-propanediol (ANP). This phenotype was caused by btn1-Δ strains having an elevated ability to acidify growth medium through an elevated activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, resulting from a decreased vacuolar pH during early growth. We have determined that ...

  19. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB may predominantly present with an attenuated clinical phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Valstar, Marlies; Brüggenwirth, Hennie; Olmer, Renske; Wevers, R. A.; Verheijen, Frans; Poorthuis, Ben; Halley, Dicky; Wijburg, Frits

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB, Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme N-acetyl-α-D-glucosaminidase (NAGLU). Information on the natural course of MPS IIIB is scarce but much needed in view of emerging therapies. To improve knowledge on the natural course, data on all 52 MPS IIIB patients ever identified by enzymatic studies in the Netherlands were gathered. Clinical data on 44 patients could be retrieved. Only a sm...

  20. Adenomyosis: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, Clinical Phenotype and Surgical and Interventional Alternatives to Hysterectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Taran, F. A.; Stewart, E. A.; Brucker, S.

    2013-01-01

    Adenomyosis is an important clinical challenge in gynecology and healthcare economics; in its fully developed form, hysterectomy is often used to treat it in premenopausal and perimenopausal women. Symptoms of adenomyosis typically include menorrhagia, pelvic pain and dysmenorrhea. Moreover, adenomyosis and leiomyomas commonly coexist in the same uterus, and differentiating the symptoms for each pathological process can be problematic. Although it has been recognized for ove...

  1. Clinical spectrum of SIX3-associated mutations in holoprosencephaly: correlation between genotype, phenotype and function

    OpenAIRE

    Lacbawan, F; Solomon, B.D.; Roessler, E.; El-Jaick, K.; Domené, S.; Vélez, J I; Zhou, N.; Hadley, D; Balog, J Z; Long, R.(Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom); Fryer, A.; Smith, W.; Omar, S; McLean, S.D.; Clarkson, K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common structural malformation of the human forebrain. There are several important HPE mutational target genes, including the transcription factor SIX3, which encodes an early regulator of Shh, Wnt, Bmp and Nodal signalling expressed in the developing forebrain and eyes of all vertebrates. OBJECTIVE: To characterise genetic and clinical findings in patients with SIX3 mutations. METHODS: Patients with HPE and their family members were tested for ...

  2. PHENOTYPIC DETECTION OF CARBAPENEM RESISTANCE IN CLINICAL ISOLATES OF ACINETOBACTER BAUMANII IN KANCHIPURAM

    OpenAIRE

    Sivasankari S; Senthamarai; Anitha C; Apurba Sastry; Sandhya bhatt; Kumudhavathi M.S; Amshavadhani S.K

    2014-01-01

    Acinctobacter species are common non fermentative gram negative bacilli isolated in clinical laboratory most frequently encountered species. Acinetobacter resistance is develop due to acquired resistance. Because of frequent multidrug resistance isolates carbapenems have become important for treating resistant strains. There is a need for rapid screening & detection of MBL in Acinetobacter to modify the treatment. The present study was aim to determine the resistance of A.baumanii complese to...

  3. Do clinical factors help to predict disease course in inflammatory bowel disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edouard; Louis; Jacques; Belaiche; Catherine; Reenaers

    2010-01-01

    While therapeutic strategies able to change the natural history of the disease are developing,it is of major importance to have available predictive factors for aggressive disease to try and target these therapeutic strategies.Clinical predictors have probably been the most broadly studied.In both Crohn's disease(CD) and ulcerative colitis(UC),age at diagnosis,disease location and smoking habit are currently the strongest predictors of disease course.A younger age at onset is associated with more aggressive...

  4. Wilson's disease clinical correlation with cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial computed tomograms of 12 patients with proven Wilson's disease were correlated with clinical disturbances. CT abnormalities occurred only in the eight patients with neurological manifestations. The presence of atrophy and low density lesions of the basal ganglia shown on CT correlated well with clinical signs of extrapyramidal dysfunction. Cerebral atrophy and cerebellar cortical atrophy were only moderately related to the degree of intellectual dysfunction and ataxia, respectively; there were no specific clinical signs in cases with brainstem involvement. Abnormalities may be marked in scans taken within a year of neuropsychiatric symptoms, but the most severly abnormal CT scans occurred in patients with a relatively longer duration of untreated disease. Computed tomography provides the opportunity to follow the response of the abnormalities of the brain to cupruresis and can give some assistance in management. (orig.)

  5. Cranial Paget's disease - clinical case of symptomatic secondary basilar impression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A clinical case of 52 years old woman with history of periodic headaches for many years. The headache became more intensive and constant during the last 4-6 months. Instability by walking and stagger occurred as well as weakness in all 4 extremities, difficult swallowing and speech changes. Bulbar, quadripyramidal and archicerebellar symptoms were in hand. Pagets disease was ascertained engaging the skull with secondary basilar impression and compression of the cerebellum and the brain-stem leading to the above described clinical signs. Decompressive median suboccipital craniectomy was performed with laminectomy of C1. Occipital squama was thickened and highly vascularized.. Secondary basilar impression could occur in cranial Pagets disease with clinical symptoms resulting from the compression of the cerebellum and the brain-stem

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells mediate the clinical phenotype of inflammatory breast cancer in a preclinical model

    OpenAIRE

    Lacerda, Lara; Debeb, Bisrat G; Smith, Daniel; Larson, Richard; Solley, Travis; Xu, Wei; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Gong, Yun; Levy, Lawrence B; Buchholz, Thomas; Ueno, Naoto T.; Klopp, Ann; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive type of breast cancer, characterized by very rapid progression, enlargement of the breast, skin edema causing an orange peel appearance (peau d’orange), erythema, thickening, and dermal lymphatic invasion. It is characterized by E-cadherin overexpression in the primary and metastatic disease, but to date no robust molecular features that specifically identify IBC have been reported. Further, models that recapitulate all of these c...

  7. [Location of disease: acupoint view from the angle of clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Bin; Zou, Yang-Yang; Hu, Guang-Yong; Wu, Jiu-Long; Bai, Jie-Jing; Zhang, Shu-Jian

    2014-12-01

    Doctor WANG Zhi-zhong in the Southern Song Dynasty proposed the acupoint view of "location of disease", which explained the connotation of acupoints from the angle of clinic. Its meaning included two levels, one level meant pathological change on the body surface, that was the location of acupuncture diagnosis-treatment, and the other one indicated that the body surface which was the reflecting point of pathological change on the distal area or inside the body was the location of acupuncture diagnosis-treatment. The specific connotations of clinical acupoints were: location of pathogenic factors or reflection of pathogenic factors, regularity between acupoints un- der disease and specific organ, morphological differences and positioning variability after acupoints under disease, and acupoints examination, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25876353

  8. CSF Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease: Impact on Disease Concept, Diagnosis, and Clinical Trial Design

    OpenAIRE

    Fagan, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Data from clinicopathologic and biomarker studies have converged to support the view of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as a continuum, with pathology developing decades prior to the onset of cognitive symptoms which culminate as dementia at the end stage of the disease. This concept is impacting disease nomenclature, diagnostic criteria, prognostic potential, and clinical trial design. Revisions to diagnostic criteria to incorporate biomarker results have recently been proposed in order to increase...

  9. GENDER-RELATED DIFFERENCES IN CLINICAL COURSE OF CROHN?S DISEASE IN AN ASIAN POPULATION: a retrospective cohort review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-tong LAW

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Data from Asian populations about gender-related differences in Crohn’s disease are few. Objectives This study was to analyze the clinical characteristics between women and men affected by Crohn’s disease. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study to analyze consecutive Crohn’s disease patients from Jan 2000 to Dec 2012. Clinical and phenotypic characteristics and treatment outcomes were evaluated. Results 79 patients (55 male and two of them with positive family history were diagnosed with Crohn’s disease. Ileocolonic disease and inflammatory lesion was the most dominant site of involvement and disease behavior respectively in both men and women. Apart from higher frequency of nausea (45.83 vs 23.64%, P 0.024 and lower body mass index (19.44 vs 22.03 kg/m2, P 0.003 reported in women, no significant gender-related differences in clinical characteristics were observed. Women were more associated with delay use of immunosuppressive therapy (12 vs 36 months, P = 0.028, particularly for those aged less than 40 years old (85 vs 62.6%, P = 0.023. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis revealed that active smoking (HR, 4.679; 95% CI, 1.03-21.18 and delayed use of immunosuppressive therapy (HR, 4.13; 95% CI, 1.01-16.88 were only independent risk factors associated with increased risk of complications. Conclusions There were no significant gender-specific differences in clinical and phenotypic characteristics between male and female Crohn’s disease patients. Smoking history and delay use of immunosuppressive therapy were associated with higher risk of complications.

  10. Analysis of clinical manifestations of symptomatic acquired jejunoileal diverticular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chia-Yuan Liu; Wen-Hsiung Chang; Shee-Chan Lin; Cheng-Hsin Chu; Tsang-En Wang; Shou-Chuan Shih

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze systematically our experience over 22 years with symptomatic acquired diverticular disease of the jejunum and ileum, exploring the clinical manifestations and diagnosis of this rare but life-threatening disease.METHODS: The medical records of patients with surgically confirmed symptomatic jejunoileal diverticular disease were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included demographic data, laboratory results, clinical course (acute or chronic), preoperative diagnosis, and operative findings. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) surgical confirmation of jejunoileal diverticular disease and (2)exclusion of congenital diverticula (e.g. Meckel's diverticulum).RESULTS: From January 1982 to July 2004, 28 patients with a total of 29 operations met the study criteria. The male:female ratio was 14:14, and the mean age was 62.6±3.5 years. The most common manifestation was abdominal pain. In nearly half of the patients, the symptoms were chronic. Two patients died after surgery. Only four cases were correctly diagnosed prior to surgery, three by small bowel series.CONCLUSION: Symptomatic acquired small bowel diverticular disease is difficult to diagnose. It should be considered in older patients with unexplained chronic abdominal symptoms. A small bowel series may be helpful in diagnosing this potentially life-threatening disease.

  11. Highly variable clinical phenotype of carbamylphosphate synthetase 1 deficiency in one family: an effect of allelic variation in gene expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klaus, V; Vermeulen, T; Minassian, B;

    2009-01-01

    Deficiency of the urea cycle enzyme carbamylphosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) causes hyperammonemia with a vast range of clinical severity from neonatal onset with early lethality to onset after age 40 with rare episodes of hyperammonemic confusion. The cause for this variability is not understood. We...... report two patients from one family with highly divergent clinical course, one presenting neonatally with a fatal form and the other at age 45 with benign diet-responsive disease. The patients are compound heterozygous for two mutations of the CPS1 gene, c.3558 + 1G > C and c.4101 + 2T > C...

  12. Elevated Serum IgG4 Defines Specific Clinical Phenotype of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To explore the correlation of serum IgG4 (sIgG4) with clinical manifestations or therapeutic response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Consecutive 136 RA patients were recruited and followed up at regular interval. SIgG4 was detected by immunonephelometry. Serial synovial tissue sections from 46 RA patients were stained immunohistochemically for IgG4. Results. Forty-six percent of 136 RA patients had elevated sIgG4. Patients with elevated sIgG4 had higher sIgG4/sIgG ratio, C...

  13. Clinical classification of cancer cachexia: phenotypic correlates in human skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Johns

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cachexia affects the majority of patients with advanced cancer and is associated with a reduction in treatment tolerance, response to therapy, and duration of survival. One impediment towards the effective treatment of cachexia is a validated classification system. METHODS: 41 patients with resectable upper gastrointestinal (GI or pancreatic cancer underwent characterisation for cachexia based on weight-loss (WL and/or low muscularity (LM. Four diagnostic criteria were used >5%WL, >10%WL, LM, and LM+>2%WL. All patients underwent biopsy of the rectus muscle. Analysis included immunohistochemistry for fibre size and type, protein and nucleic acid concentration, Western blots for markers of autophagy, SMAD signalling, and inflammation. FINDINGS: Compared with non-cachectic cancer patients, patients with LM or LM+>2%WL, mean muscle fibre diameter was reduced by about 25% (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001 respectively. No significant difference in fibre diameter was observed if patients had WL alone. Regardless of classification, there was no difference in fibre number or proportion of fibre type across all myosin heavy chain isoforms. Mean muscle protein content was reduced and the ratio of RNA/DNA decreased in patients with either >5%WL or LM+>2%WL. Compared with non-cachectic patients, SMAD3 protein levels were increased in patients with >5%WL (p = 0.022 and with >10%WL, beclin (p = 0.05 and ATG5 (p = 0.01 protein levels were increased. There were no differences in phospho-NFkB or phospho-STAT3 levels across any of the groups. CONCLUSION: Muscle fibre size, biochemical composition and pathway phenotype can vary according to whether the diagnostic criteria for cachexia are based on weight loss alone, a measure of low muscularity alone or a combination of the two. For intervention trials where the primary end-point is a change in muscle mass or function, use of combined diagnostic criteria may allow identification of a more

  14. IMPULSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDERS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE. CLINICAL CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Fedorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – a description of clinical cases of impulsive­compulsive disorders in Parkinson,s disease. The first clinical case. Patient N., 75 years old, suffering for 15 years from Parkinson,s disease, akinetic­rigid form of the disease, stage 4 by Hyun–Yar. Since 2009, he received levodopa/carbidopa 250/25 mg 5 times/day (daily dose of 1250 mg of levodopa; pramipexole 3.5 mg per day (daily dose 3.5 mg, amantadine sulfate 100 mg 5 times/day (daily dose 500 mg. While taking antiparkinsonian drugs the patient developed behavioral disorders such as dopamine disregulatory syndrome combined with punding, hypersexuality and compulsive shopping accompanied by visual hallucinations. The total equivalent dose of levodopa was 1600 mg per day. The second clinical case. Patient R., 52 years old, suffers from Parkinson,s disease about 5 years, a mixed form. She complained of slowness of movement, tremor in her left hand, sleep disturbances, poor mood. The clinic was appointed piribedil 50 mg 3 times per day. Despite the fact that the patient took only one of dopaminergic drugs in a therapeutic daily dose, she developed impulsive­compulsive disorder as hyper­ sexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Results. In the first clinical case for correction of behavioral disorders in patients with Parkinson,s disease levodopa/carbidopa dose was reduced to 750 mg per day (3/4 Tab. 4 times a day; added to levodopa/benserazide dispersible 100 mg morning and levodopa/benserazide 100 mg before sleep (total dose of levodopa of 950 mg per day. Amantadine sulfate and pramipexole were canceled. It was added to the therapy of atypical neuroleptic clozapine dose 6,25 mg overnight. After 3 months marked improvement, regressed visual hallucina­ tions, improved family relationships, background mood became more stable. The patient continue to sing karaoke, but this hobby has be­ come less intrusive. In the second clinical event correction impulsive

  15. Use of Ultra-high Field MRI in Small Rodent Models of Polycystic Kidney Disease for In Vivo Phenotyping and Drug Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazabal, Maria V; Mishra, Prasanna K; Torres, Vicente E; Macura, Slobodan I

    2015-01-01

    Several in vivo pre-clinical studies in Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) utilize orthologous rodent models to identify and study the genetic and molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease, and are very convenient for rapid drug screening and testing of promising therapies. A limiting factor in these studies is often the lack of efficient non-invasive methods for sequentially analyzing the anatomical and functional changes in the kidney. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the current gold standard imaging technique to follow autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients, providing excellent soft tissue contrast and anatomic detail and allowing Total Kidney Volume (TKV) measurements.A major advantage of MRI in rodent models of PKD is the possibility for in vivo imaging allowing for longitudinal studies that use the same animal and therefore reducing the total number of animals required. In this manuscript, we will focus on using Ultra-high field (UHF) MRI to non-invasively acquire in vivo images of rodent models for PKD. The main goal of this work is to introduce the use of MRI as a tool for in vivo phenotypical characterization and drug monitoring in rodent models for PKD. PMID:26132821

  16. Atrophy, hypometabolism and clinical trajectories in patients with amyloid-negative Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chételat, Gaël; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Villemagne, Victor L; Perrotin, Audrey; Landeau, Brigitte; Mézenge, Florence; Jagust, William J; Dore, Vincent; Miller, Bruce L; Egret, Stéphanie; Seeley, William W; van der Flier, Wiesje M; La Joie, Renaud; Ames, David; van Berckel, Bart N M; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Rowe, Christopher C; Masters, Colin L; de La Sayette, Vincent; Bouwman, Femke; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2016-09-01

    See O'Sullivan and Vann (doi:10.1093/aww166) for a scientific commentary on this article.About 15% of patients clinically diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease do not show high tracer retention on amyloid positon emission tomography imaging. The present study investigates clinical and demographic features, patterns of brain atrophy and hypometabolism and longitudinal clinical trajectories of these patients. Forty amyloid-negative patients carrying a pre-scan diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease dementia from four centres were included (11/29 females/males; mean age = 67 ± 9). Detailed clinical histories, including the clinical diagnoses before and after the amyloid scan and at follow-up, were collected. Patients were classified according to their pre-scan clinical phenotype as amnestic (memory predominant), non-amnestic (predominant language, visuospatial or frontal symptoms), or non-specific (diffuse cognitive deficits). Demographic, clinical, neuropsychological, magnetic resonance imaging and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positon emission tomography data were compared to 27 amyloid-positive typical Alzheimer's disease cases (14/13 females/males; mean age = 71 ± 10) and 29 amyloid-negative controls (15/14 females/males; mean age = 69 ± 12) matched for age, gender and education. There were 21 amnestic, 12 non-amnestic, and seven non-specific amyloid-negative Alzheimer's disease cases. Amyloid-negative subgroups did not differ in age, gender or education. After the amyloid scan, clinicians altered the diagnosis in 68% of amyloid-negative patients including 48% of amnestic versus 94% of non-amnestic and non-specific cases. Amnestic amyloid-negative cases were most often reclassified as frontotemporal dementia, non-amnestic as frontotemporal dementia or corticobasal degeneration, and non-specific as dementia with Lewy bodies or unknown diagnosis. The longer-term clinical follow-up was consistent with the post-scan diagnosis in most cases (90%), including in amnestic amyloid

  17. Relationships between serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism, platelet serotonin transporter binding and clinical phenotype in suicidal and non-suicidal adolescent inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalsman, G; Anderson, G M; Peskin, M; Frisch, A; King, R A; Vekslerchik, M; Sommerfeld, E; Michaelovsky, E; Sher, L; Weizman, A; Apter, A

    2005-02-01

    Relationships between the serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR), platelet serotonin transporter (SERT) binding and clinical phenotype were examined in 32 suicidal and 28 non-suicidal Ashkenazi Israeli adolescent psychiatric inpatients. The 5-HTTLPR polymorphism was not associated with transporter binding or with suicidality or other clinical phenotypes. However, in the suicidal group, a significant positive correlation between platelet SERT density and anger scores (n=32, r=.40; p=.027) and a negative correlation between platelet count and trait anxiety (n=32, r=-.42; p=.034) were observed. PMID:15657646

  18. Searching for Tourette’s syndrome gene. Part 1. Heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The French neuropsychiatrist Georges Gilles de la Tourette described in 1885 the “Maladie des Tics” which later was named after him, as Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by simple and complex motor and vocal tics with multiple neuropsychiatric comorbidities. GTS is often concurrent with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. There are several clinical GTS subtypes: GTS only, GTS OCD, and GTS OCD ADHD. Additional clinical aspects of the disorder include occurrence of anger episodes, anxiety and mood disorders, and learning and sleeping disturbances. The genetics of GTS is complex and remains unclear. So far, no causative candidate genes have been identified. However, segregation studies in families and twins with GTS provide strong evidence for the existence of a genetic background associated with a multifactorial mode of inheritance. Progress in studies on genome variability among patients with GTS is necessary to improve pharmacotherapeutic strategies of the disorder.

  19. Adult-Onset Autoimmune Diabetes in Europe Is Prevalent With a Broad Clinical Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawa, Mohammed I; Kolb, Hubert; Schloot, Nanette;

    2013-01-01

    autoantibody-negative type 2 diabetes. Similarly, more GADA patients with high (>200 WHO IU) (n = 403) compared with low (n = 138) titer were female, lean, and insulin treated (54.6 vs. 39.7%) (P <0.02 for each). Autoantibody-positive patients usually had GADA (541 of 598; 90.5%) and had LADA more often than......OBJECTIVESSpecific autoantibodies characterize type 1 diabetes in childhood but are also found in adult-onset diabetes, even when initially non-insulin requiring, e.g., with latent autoimmune diabetes (LADA). We aimed to characterize adult-onset autoimmune diabetes.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSWe...... consecutively studied 6,156 European diabetic patients attending clinics within 5 years of diagnosis (age range, 30-70 years) examined cross-sectionally clinically and for GAD antibodies (GADA) and antibodies to insulinoma-associated antigen-2 (IA-2A) and zinc-transporter 8 (ZnT8A).RESULTSOf 6,156 patients, 541...

  20. Design and evaluation of a bacterial clinical infectious diseases ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Claire L; Pouch, Stephanie; Cowell, Lindsay G; Boland, Mary Regina; Platt, Heather L; Goldfain, Albert; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    With antimicrobial resistance increasing worldwide, there is a great need to use automated antimicrobial decision support systems (ADSSs) to lower antimicrobial resistance rates by promoting appropriate antimicrobial use. However, they are infrequently used mostly because of their poor interoperability with different health information technologies. Ontologies can augment portable ADSSs by providing an explicit knowledge representation for biomedical entities and their relationships, helping to standardize and integrate heterogeneous data resources. We developed a bacterial clinical infectious diseases ontology (BCIDO) using Protégé-OWL. BCIDO defines a controlled terminology for clinical infectious diseases along with domain knowledge commonly used in hospital settings for clinical infectious disease treatment decision-making. BCIDO has 599 classes and 2355 object properties. Terms were imported from or mapped to Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine, Unified Medical Language System, RxNorm and National Center for Bitechnology Information Organismal Classification where possible. Domain expert evaluation using the "laddering" technique, ontology visualization, and clinical notes and scenarios, confirmed the correctness and potential usefulness of BCIDO. PMID:24551353

  1. How implementation of systems biology into clinical trials accelerates understanding of diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BibianaBielekova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology comprises a series of concepts and approaches that have been used successfully both to delineate novel biological mechanisms and to drive translational advances. The goal of systems biology is to re-integrate putatively critical elements extracted from multi-modality datasets in order to understand how interactions among multiple components form functional networks at the organism/patient-level, and how dysfunction of these networks underlies a particular disease. Due to the genetic and environmental diversity of human subjects, identification of critical elements related to a particular disease process from cross-sectional studies requires prohibitively large cohorts. Alternatively, implementation of systems biology principles to interventional clinical trials represents a unique opportunity to gain predictive understanding of complex diseases in comparatively small cohorts of patients. This paper reviews systems biology principles applicable to translational research, focusing on lessons from systems approaches to inflammation applied to multiple sclerosis (MS. We suggest that employing systems biology methods in the design and execution of biomarker-supported, proof-of-principle clinical trials provides a singular opportunity to merge therapeutic development with a basic understanding of disease processes. The ultimate goal is to develop predictive computational models of the disease, which will revolutionize diagnostic process and provide mechanistic understanding necessary for personalized therapeutic approaches. Added, biologically-meaningful information can be derived from diagnostic tests, if they are interpreted in functional relationships, rather than as independent measurements. Such systems-biology based diagnostics will transform disease taxonomies from phenotypical to molecular and will allow physicians to select optimal therapeutic regimens for individual patients.

  2. Utilization of Gene Mapping and Candidate Gene Mutation Screening for Diagnosing Clinically Equivocal Conditions:A Norrie Disease Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasiliki Chini; Danai Stambouli; Florina Mihaela Nedelea; George Alexandru Filipescu; Diana Mina; Marios Kambouris; Hatem El-Shanti

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis was requested for an undiagnosed eye disease showing X-linked inheritance in a family. No medical records existed for the affected family members..Mapping of the X chromosome and candidate gene mutation screening i-dentified a c.C267A[p.F89L] mutation in NPD previously de-scribed as possibly causing Norrie disease..The detection of the c.C267A[p.F89L] variant in another unrelated family con-firms the pathogenic nature of the mutation for the Norrie dis-ease phenotype. Gene mapping, haplotype analysis, and can-didate gene screening have been previously utilized in research applications but were applied here in a diagnostic setting due to the scarcity of available clinical information..The clinical diagnosis and mutation identification were critical for provid-ing proper genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for this family.

  3. Wilson's disease: cranial MRI observations and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of MRI changes may be useful in diagnosis, prognosis and better understanding of the pathophysiology of Wilson's disease (WD). We aimed to describe and correlate the MRI abnormalities of the brain with clinical features in WD. MRI evaluation was carried out in 100 patients (57 males, 43 females; mean age 19.3±8.9 years) using standard protocols. All but 18 patients were on de-coppering agents. Their history, clinical manifestations and scores for severity of disease were noted. The mean duration of illness and treatment were 8.3±10.8 years and 7.5±7.1 years respectively. MRI of the brain was abnormal in all the 93 symptomatic patients. The most conspicuous observations were atrophy of the cerebrum (70%), brainstem (66%) and cerebellum (52%). Signal abnormalities were also noted: putamen (72%), caudate (61%), thalami (58%), midbrain (49%), pons (20%), cerebral white matter (25%), cortex (9%), medulla (12%) and cerebellum (10%). The characteristic T2-W globus pallidal hypointensity (34%), ''Face of giant panda'' sign (12%), T1-W striatal hyperintensity (6%), central pontine myelinosis (7%), and bright claustral sign (4%) were also detected. MRI changes correlated with disease severity scores (P<0.001) but did not correlate with the duration of illness. MRI changes were universal but diverse and involved almost all the structures of the brain in symptomatic patients. A fair correlation between MRI observations and various clinical features provides an explanation for the protean manifestations of the disease. (orig.)

  4. Clinical Characters of Gastrointestinal Lesions in Intestinal Behcet's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-bin Wang; Yu-pei Zhao; Lin Cong; Hao Jing; Quan Liao; Tai-ping Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features, diagnosis methods, therapeutic principles of intestinal Behcet's disease.Methods The clinical data of 45 patients with confirmed intestinal Behcet's disease admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital from August 1998 to April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed.Results The clinical courses of patients with intestinal Behcet's disease were from 26 days to 33 years, and the average duration was 6.32±1.01 years. The appearance of extra-gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly earlier than that of gastrointestinal symptoms (7.35±1.39 years vs.3.24±0.82 years,P<0.05). The predominant gastrointestinal manifestations were right lower quadrant pain (95.56%) and hematochezia or melena (40.00%). Misdiagnosis occurred in 17 cases. In patients without systemic medicine therapy before surgery, the incidence of postoperative infection of incision site and abdominal cavity was significantly higher than that in those undergoing systemic medicine therapy (80.00% vs.0%, P<0.05).Conclusions Because of the diversity of gastrointestinal manifestations, intestinal Behcet's disease is easily misdiagnosed. The systemic medical therapy before surgery could decrease the incidence of infection of incision and abdominal cavity.

  5. Oxidative stress treatment for clinical trials in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Orsucci, Daniele; Ricci, Giulia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a metabolic condition arising from imbalance between the production of potentially reactive oxygen species and the scavenging activities. Mitochondria are the main providers but also the main scavengers of cell oxidative stress. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is well documented. Therefore, therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage hold great promise in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this evidence, human experience with antioxidant neuroprotectants has generally been negative with regards to the clinical progress of disease, with unclear results in biochemical assays. Here we review the antioxidant approaches performed so far in neurodegenerative diseases and the future challenges in modern medicine. PMID:21422516

  6. Characterization of clinical-imaging characteristics of the binswanger's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review was made to go deep into the understanding of vascular dementias that behave as the second cause of dementia in practice. Binswanger's disease is one of the most important among them. Its detection has progressively increased with the continual improvement of the radiological diagnostic tools that allow to identify the ischemic damage of the hemispherical cerebral white matter and the presence of lacunar infarctions. It is a disease of chronic course and inexorably progressive that is characterized by the association of subcortical cognitive dysfunction, evidence of cerebrovascular disease, Parkinsonian rigidity and vesicle dysfunction with a characteristic imaging picture. The clinical picture and the main imaging characteristics are explained in this paper and the pathogens of the disease is briefly described

  7. The frequency of Listeria monocytogenes strains recovered from clinical and non-clinical samples using phenotypic methods and confirmed by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abazar pournajaf

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes listeriosis which has extensive clinical manifestations. Infections with L. monocytogenes are a serious threat to immunocompromised persons. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of L. monocytogenes strains recovered from clinical and non-clinical samples using phenotypic methods and confirmed by PCR. Materials and Methods: In this study, 617 specimens were analyzed. All specimens were cultured in the specific PALCAM agar. Colonies were initially identified by routine biochemical tests. Finally, PCR assays using primers specific for inlA gene were performed. Results: In all, 46 (8.2% L. monocytogenes isolates were recovered from 617 specimens. Fourteen (8.2% strains, including 4 (7.5%, 2 (5.7%, 5 (14.2% and 3 (8.5% isolates were obtained from placental tissue, urine, vaginal and rectal swabs, respectively. In addition, 9 (7.4% strains of L. monocytogenes which were isolated from 107 different dairy products originated from cheese 5 (7.1%, cream 2 (10% and kashk 2 (11.7%, respectively. Among 11 (5.2% strains isolated from 210 different meat products, 5 (5.5%, 4 (7.2% and 2 (3% strains belonged to sausage, meat and poultry extracts, respectively. Finally, 12 (9.2% Listeria strains were recovered from 130 animal specimens that included 6 (10%, 4 (8% and 2 (10% strains from goat, sheep and cattle, respectively. Furthermore, all Listeria isolates (100% were found to be carriers of  inlA gene in PCR assay. Conclusion: The present study showed that the clinical and non-clinical specimens were contaminated with L. monocytogenes. So, it seems necessary to use a simple and standard technique such as PCR for rapid detection of this organism from various sources.

  8. Clinical Audits in Outpatient Clinics for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Methodological Considerations and Workflow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis López-Campos

    Full Text Available Previous clinical audits for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have provided valuable information on the clinical care delivered to patients admitted to medical wards because of COPD exacerbations. However, clinical audits of COPD in an outpatient setting are scarce and no methodological guidelines are currently available. Based on our previous experience, herein we describe a clinical audit for COPD patients in specialized outpatient clinics with the overall goal of establishing a potential methodological workflow.A pilot clinical audit of COPD patients referred to respiratory outpatient clinics in the region of Andalusia, Spain (over 8 million inhabitants, was performed. The audit took place between October 2013 and September 2014, and 10 centers (20% of all public hospitals were invited to participate. Cases with an established diagnosis of COPD based on risk factors, clinical symptoms, and a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.70 were deemed eligible. The usefulness of formally scheduled regular follow-up visits was assessed. Two different databases (resources and clinical database were constructed. Assessments were planned over a year divided by 4 three-month periods, with the goal of determining seasonal-related changes. Exacerbations and survival served as the main endpoints.This paper describes a methodological framework for conducting a clinical audit of COPD patients in an outpatient setting. Results from such audits can guide health information systems development and implementation in real-world settings.

  9. The structure of prion: is it enough for interpreting the diverse phenotypes of prion diseases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chan Tian; Xiaoping Dong

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases,or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,are neurodegenerative diseases,which affect human and many species of animals with 100% fatality rate.The most accepted etiology for prion disease is 'prion',which arises from the conversion from cellular PrPC to the pathological PrPsc.This review discussed the characteristic structure of PrP,including PRNP gene,PrPC,PrPSc,PrP amyloid,and prion strains.

  10. Molecularly Defined Adult Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Ovary: The Clinical Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConechy, Melissa K; Färkkilä, Anniina; Horlings, Hugo M; Talhouk, Aline; Unkila-Kallio, Leila; van Meurs, Hannah S; Yang, Winnie; Rozenberg, Nirit; Andersson, Noora; Zaby, Katharina; Bryk, Saara; Bützow, Ralf; Halfwerk, Johannes B G; Hooijer, Gerrit K J; van de Vijver, Marc J; Buist, Marrije R; Kenter, Gemma G; Brucker, Sara Y; Krämer, Bernhard; Staebler, Annette; Bleeker, Maaike C G; Heikinheimo, Markku; Kommoss, Stefan; Blake Gilks, C; Anttonen, Mikko; Huntsman, David G

    2016-11-01

    The histopathologic features of adult granulosa cell tumors (AGCTs) are relatively nonspecific, resulting in misdiagnosis of other cancers as AGCT, a problem that has not been well characterized. FOXL2 mutation testing was used to stratify 336 AGCTs from three European centers into three categories: 1) FOXL2 mutant molecularly defined AGCT (MD-AGCT) (n = 256 of 336), 2) FOXL2 wild-type AGCT (n = 17 of 336), 3) misdiagnosed other tumor types (n = 63 of 336). All statistical tests were two-sided. The overall and disease-specific survival of the misdiagnosed cases was lower than in the MD-AGCTs (P cure and long survival even after relapse. PMID:27297428

  11. Phenotypic methods for detection of various β-lactamases in Gram-negative clinical isolates: Need of the hour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena V Nagdeo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many clinical laboratories have problems detecting various β-lactamases. Confusion exists about the importance of these resistance mechanisms, optimal test methods, and appropriate reporting conventions. It is more imperative to use various phenotypic methods for detection of various β-lactamases in routine microbiology laboratory on day-to-day basis to prevent antimicrobial resistance by evidence-based judicious use of antimicrobials. Aims: In view of the multidrug-resistant organisms being reported world over, we planned a cross-sectional prospective analytical study to determine resistance mechanism by various β-lactamases in Gram-negative clinical isolates using various phenotypic methods. Materials and Methods: All nonrepeat, nonenteric clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacilli, resistant to at least two third-generation cephalosporins, were first screened by Novel disc placement method, and isolates showing multiple mechanisms of resistance and reduced zone of inhibition for imipenem were further confirmed for AmpC and metallo β-lactamases. Statistical Analysis: All the data was managed and analyzed in Microsoft Excel. Results: Out of 807 isolates tested, as many as 795 (98.51% revealed the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs. Only 10 isolates of Escherichia coli and 2 of Klebsiella pneumoniae did not show production of ESBL. A total of 450 (55.76% isolates produced single enzyme,while 345 (42.75% strains revealed multiple enzyme production simultaneously. Only ESBL production was seen in 315 (39.03% strains, only AmpC in 75 (9.29% and only MBL in 60 (7.44% strains, while ESBL and AmpC together were seen in 219 (27.14% and AmpC plus MBL in 92 (11.40% strains. However, ESBL plus MBL were never observed together. All three enzymes were simultaneously detected in 34 (4.21% strains. Conclusion: This innovative method of disc placement makes it easy, affordable, and reliable method for routine use by basic

  12. Cigarette smoking in male patients with chronic schizophrenia in a Chinese population: prevalence and relationship to clinical phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available The high prevalence of smoking in schizophrenia of European background may be related to smoking's reducing clinical symptoms and medication side effects. Because smoking prevalence and its associations with clinical phenotypes are less well characterized in Chinese than European patients with schizophrenia, we assessed these smoking behaviors using clinician-administered questionnaires and the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND in 776 Chinese male schizophrenia and 560 control subjects. Patients also were rated on the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS, the Simpson and Angus Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (SAES, and the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS. We found that the schizophrenia patients had a higher lifetime incidence of smoking (79% vs 63%, were more likely to be heavy smokers (61% vs 31%, and had lower smoking cessation rates (4% vs 9% (all p0.05 than the non-smoking patients. These results suggest that Chinese males with schizophrenia smoke more frequently than the general population. Further, smokers with schizophrenia may display fewer negative symptoms and possibly less parkinsonism than non-smokers with schizophrenia.

  13. Evaluation of different phenotypic methods for detection of amp c beta-lactamase producing bacteria in clinical isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the sensitivity and specificity of different phenotypic methods for detection of Amp C betalactamase producing bacteria. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College / National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad, Pakistan, from June 2010 to December 2010. Methodology: A total of 150 clinical isolates were screened for presence of Amp C beta-lactamase by using the cefoxitin disc. The confirmatory methods evaluated were inhibitor based assay (boronic acid), Amp C disc test and Amp C Etest. Three dimensional enzyme extract assay was used as the reference method for determining the sensitivity and specificity. Results: Among the total isolates tested, 62.8% bacteria showed the presence of Amp C beta-lactamase by standard three dimensional enzyme extract assay. Among the three methods compared, boronic acid disk test found out to be highly sensitive (88%) and specific (92%) for the detection of Amp C beta-lactamase producing bacteria. Conclusion: Detection of Amp C production is crucial in order to establish the antibiotic therapy and to attain the favourable clinical outcomes. Implementation of simple tests like boronic acid disk tests in the laboratories will help to alleviate the spread of Amp C beta-lactamase harboring organisms. (author)

  14. A comparison of interventional clinical trials in rare versus non-rare diseases: an analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Stuart A; Tudur Smith, Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To provide a comprehensive characterisation of rare disease clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, and compare against characteristics of trials in non-rare diseases. Design Registry based study of ClinicalTrials.gov registration entries. Methods The ClinicalTrials.gov registry comprised 133,128 studies registered to September 27, 2012. By annotating medical subject heading descriptors to condition terms we could identify rare and non-rare disease trials. A total of 24,0...

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic applications for the differentiation and species-level identification of achromobacter for clinical diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomila, Margarita; Prince-Manzano, Claudia; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Busquets, Antonio; Erhard, Marcel; Martínez, Deny L; Lalucat, Jorge; Moore, Edward R B

    2014-01-01

    The Achromobacter is a genus in the family Alcaligenaceae, comprising fifteen species isolated from different sources, including clinical samples. The ability to detect and correctly identify Achromobacter species, particularly A. xylosoxidans, and differentiate them from other phenotypically similar and genotypically related Gram-negative, aerobic, non-fermenting species is important for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), as well as for nosocomial and other opportunistic infections. Traditional phenotypic profile-based analyses have been demonstrated to be inadequate for reliable identifications of isolates of Achromobacter species and genotypic-based assays, relying upon comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses are not able to insure definitive identifications of Achromobacter species, due to the inherently conserved nature of the gene. The uses of alternative methodologies to enable high-resolution differentiation between the species in the genus are needed. A comparative multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four selected 'house-keeping' genes (atpD, gyrB, recA, and rpoB) assessed the individual gene sequences for their potential in developing a reliable, rapid and cost-effective diagnostic protocol for Achromobacter species identifications. The analysis of the type strains of the species of the genus and 46 strains of Achromobacter species showed congruence between the cluster analyses derived from the individual genes. The MLSA gene sequences exhibited different levels of resolution in delineating the validly published Achromobacter species and elucidated strains that represent new genotypes and probable new species of the genus. Our results also suggested that the recently described A. spritinus is a later heterotypic synonym of A. marplatensis. Strains were analyzed, using whole-cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), as an alternative phenotypic profile-based method with the potential to

  16. Genotypic and phenotypic applications for the differentiation and species-level identification of achromobacter for clinical diagnoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Gomila

    Full Text Available The Achromobacter is a genus in the family Alcaligenaceae, comprising fifteen species isolated from different sources, including clinical samples. The ability to detect and correctly identify Achromobacter species, particularly A. xylosoxidans, and differentiate them from other phenotypically similar and genotypically related Gram-negative, aerobic, non-fermenting species is important for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, as well as for nosocomial and other opportunistic infections. Traditional phenotypic profile-based analyses have been demonstrated to be inadequate for reliable identifications of isolates of Achromobacter species and genotypic-based assays, relying upon comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses are not able to insure definitive identifications of Achromobacter species, due to the inherently conserved nature of the gene. The uses of alternative methodologies to enable high-resolution differentiation between the species in the genus are needed. A comparative multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA of four selected 'house-keeping' genes (atpD, gyrB, recA, and rpoB assessed the individual gene sequences for their potential in developing a reliable, rapid and cost-effective diagnostic protocol for Achromobacter species identifications. The analysis of the type strains of the species of the genus and 46 strains of Achromobacter species showed congruence between the cluster analyses derived from the individual genes. The MLSA gene sequences exhibited different levels of resolution in delineating the validly published Achromobacter species and elucidated strains that represent new genotypes and probable new species of the genus. Our results also suggested that the recently described A. spritinus is a later heterotypic synonym of A. marplatensis. Strains were analyzed, using whole-cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, as an alternative phenotypic profile-based method with the

  17. Clinical heterogeneity in patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease: a cluster analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping LIU; Tao FENG; Yong-jun WANG; Xuan ZHANG; Biao CHEN

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease (PD) among a cohort of Chinese patients in early stages.Clinical data on demographics,motor variables,motor phenotypes,disease progression,global cognitive function,depression,apathy,sleep quality,constipation,fatigue,and L-dopa complications were collected from 138 Chinese PD subjects in early stages (Hoehn and Yahr stages 1-3).The PD subject subtypes were classified using k-means cluster analysis according to the clinical data from five- to three-cluster consecutively.Kappa statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the consistency among different subtype solutions.The cluster analysis indicated four main subtypes:the non-tremor dominant subtype (NTD,n=28,20.3%),rapid disease progression subtype (RDP,n=7,5.1%),young-onset subtype (YO,n=50,36.2%),and tremor dominant subtype (TD,n=53,38.4%).Overall,78.3% (108/138) of subjects were always classified between the same three groups (52 always in TD,7 in RDP,and 49 in NTD),and 98.6% (136/138) between five- and four-cluster solutions.However,subjects classified as NTD in the four-cluster analysis were dispersed into different subtypes in the three-cluster analysis,with low concordance between four- and three-cluster solutions (kappa value=-0.139,P=0.001 ).This study defines clinical heterogeneity of PD patients in early stages using a data-driven approach.The subtypes generated by the four-cluster solution appear to exhibit ideal internal cohesion and external isolation.

  18. Clinical trials in Huntington's disease: Interventions in early clinical development and newer methodological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Cristina; Borowsky, Beth; Reilmann, Ralf

    2014-09-15

    Since the identification of the Huntington's disease (HD) gene, knowledge has accumulated about mechanisms directly or indirectly affected by the mutated Huntingtin protein. Transgenic and knock-in animal models of HD facilitate the preclinical evaluation of these targets. Several treatment approaches with varying, but growing, preclinical evidence have been translated into clinical trials. We review major landmarks in clinical development and report on the main clinical trials that are ongoing or have been recently completed. We also review clinical trial settings and designs that influence drug-development decisions, particularly given that HD is an orphan disease. In addition, we provide a critical analysis of the evolution of the methodology of HD clinical trials to identify trends toward new processes and endpoints. Biomarker studies, such as TRACK-HD and PREDICT-HD, have generated evidence for the potential usefulness of novel outcome measures for HD clinical trials, such as volumetric imaging, quantitative motor (Q-Motor) measures, and novel cognitive endpoints. All of these endpoints are currently applied in ongoing clinical trials, which will provide insight into their reliability, sensitivity, and validity, and their use may expedite proof-of-concept studies. We also outline the specific opportunities that could provide a framework for a successful avenue toward identifying and efficiently testing and translating novel mechanisms of action in the HD field. PMID:25216371

  19. PHENOTYPIC DETECTION OF CARBAPENEM RESISTANCE IN CLINICAL ISOLATES OF ACINETOBACTER BAUMANII IN KANCHIPURAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivasankari S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acinctobacter species are common non fermentative gram negative bacilli isolated in clinical laboratory most frequently encountered species. Acinetobacter resistance is develop due to acquired resistance. Because of frequent multidrug resistance isolates carbapenems have become important for treating resistant strains. There is a need for rapid screening & detection of MBL in Acinetobacter to modify the treatment. The present study was aim to determine the resistance of A.baumanii complese to various classes of drugs and to carbapenems and MBL production. Samples such as urine, blood, sputum, pus & body fluids. All samples were processed as per CLSI guidelines. Meropenem resistant strains were screened for carbapenemase and MBL production. Out of 92 Acinetobacter 85 (92.39% were Acinetobacter baumanii. More than 80% resistance is seen in 3rd generation Cephalosporins. Out of 21 meropenem resistant strains 14 were carbapenemase positive and 3 were MBL producers. Our study shows raising trend of multidrug resistance and carbapenem. This will help in early detection and better treatment modalities.

  20. Late-onset Pompe disease with phenotype of the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kurbatov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease, also known as type II glycogenosis, is a rare autosomal recessive disease. Two main types include early-onset Pompe disease – severe, rapidly progressive multisystem deficency, manifestating on the first year of life, and late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD, with the age of onset ranging from the first year till late adulthood. Both types are caused by the deficiency of lysosomal acid-α-glucosidase due to the mutations in GAA gene, leading to an excessive storage of glycogen in body cells. LOPD is a slowly progressive disease with a primary lesion of a skeletal, respiratory and cardiac muscles, affected in different grade, and moderately elevated сreatine kinase. It is often difficult to perform differential diagnosis with a large group of hereditary and non-hereditary myopathies. We present a case report of LOPD with signs of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

  1. Disease: H00567 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rdiomyopathy (HCM) Caveolinopathies are a group of muscle diseases and can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical... phenotypes. The same mutation could lead to heterogeneous clinical phenotypes..., an autosomal recessive inheritance was considered. The clinical findings that may suggest the diagnosis of

  2. Clinical significance of HLA-DR+, CD19+, CD10+ immature B-cell phenotype and CD34+ cell detection in bone marrow lymphocytes from children affected with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callea, V; Comis, M; Iaria, G; Sculli, G; Morabito, F; Lombardo, V T

    1997-01-01

    In children with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), bone marrow lymphocytes can express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) pattern with no evidence of leukemia or lymphoma. Bone marrow lymphocytes from 23 children and 20 adults affected with ITP were studied to determine the incidence and the clinical impact of lymphocytes with the immature B-cell phenotype and CD34+ cell expression. In this investigation we identified a group consisting of 52% of the children who showed the immature B phenotype, while the remaining 48%, similarly to adult ITP displayed an increase of T-cell antigens. CD34 was positive in 53% of children, but it was present in only half of the patients with the immature B phenotype and it was always absent in adults. IgH genes disclosed a germline configuration in all six patients in the immature B phenotype group. No difference was found in the two groups of children in terms of age, presentation of the disease or final outcome. Finally, no patient in either children's group has developed an acute lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:9299867

  3. [Sudeck disease--pathology, clinical aspects and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, R H; Buch, K

    1998-06-01

    In our opinion the etiology of Sudeck's disease (acute reflex bone atrophy) plays a decisive role in therapeutic planning. The therapy is based on clinical and radiological findings. Physiotherapy addresses the symptom complex of pain, hyperemia, edema formation, and limitations of movement which act in a vicious circle and its intensity is modified according to the prevailing clinical and possibly also radiological findings. A strict coupling of the therapy to a classification according to stage is not recommended. Pharmacological therapy is merely a supporting element and focuses on the sympathetic overexcitability. The best therapy for Sudeck's disease is prophylaxis. Interventions collected under the general term early functional mobilization are, especially after surgical measures, a major factor in the avoidance of neurovegetative dysregulation in the sense of sympathetic reflex dystrophy. PMID:9738286

  4. Altered monocyte and fibrocyte phenotype and function in scleroderma interstitial lung disease: reversal by caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourkina Elena

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, or SSc. Fibrocytes are a monocyte-derived cell population implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosing disorders. Given the recently recognized importance of caveolin-1 in regulating function and signaling in SSc monocytes, in the present study we examined the role of caveolin-1 in the migration and/or trafficking and phenotype of monocytes and fibrocytes in fibrotic lung disease in human patients and an animal model. These studies fill a gap in our understanding of how monocytes and fibrocytes contribute to SSc-ILD pathology. We found that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-positive (CXCR4+/collagen I-positive (ColI+, CD34+/ColI+ and CD45+/ColI+ cells are present in SSc-ILD lungs, but not in control lungs, with CXCR4+ cells being most prevalent. Expression of CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (CXCL12, are also highly upregulated in SSc-ILD lung tissue. SSc monocytes, which lack caveolin-1 and therefore overexpress CXCR4, exhibit almost sevenfold increased migration toward CXCL12 compared to control monocytes. Restoration of caveolin-1 function by administering the caveolin scaffolding domain (CSD peptide reverses this hypermigration. Similarly, transforming growth factor β-treated normal monocytes lose caveolin-1, overexpress CXCR4 and exhibit 15-fold increased monocyte migration that is CSD peptide-sensitive. SSc monocytes exhibit a different phenotype than normal monocytes, expressing high levels of ColI, CD14 and CD34. Because ColI+/CD14+ cells are prevalent in SSc blood, we looked for such cells in lung tissue and confirmed their presence in SSc-ILD lungs but not in normal lungs. Finally, in the bleomycin model of lung fibrosis, we show that CSD peptide diminishes fibrocyte accumulation in the lungs. Our results suggest that low caveolin-1 in SSc monocytes contributes to ILD via effects on cell migration and

  5. Clinical features and management of Crohn's disease in Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑家驹; 史晓华; 褚行琦; 贾黎明; 王风鸣

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing incidence of Crohn' s disease has been found in China in recent years.Our study has been focused on evaluating the diversity of the clinical manifestations of Crohn' s disease in order to improve early diagnostic accuracy and therapeutic efficacy.Methods Thirty patients with active Crohn's disease were enrolled and their clinical data, including diagnostic and therapeutic results, were analyzed. Endoscopy combined with histological examination of biopsy specimens provided characteristic features of the disease. Transabdominal bowel sonography (TABS) was used for detecting intestinal complications. Nutritional supportive therapy was given to 20 subjects with active cases of the disease.Results Most patients were young adults with a higher proportion of females to males (ratio: 1.14:1). The disease affects any segment or a combination of segments along with the alimentary tract(from the mouth to the anus). In this study, the colon and small bowel were the major sites involved.Recurrent episodes of abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant and watery diarrhea were the most common symptoms. Granulomas were identifiable in nearly one-third (30.8%) of all biopsy specimens. In moderate cases of the disease, remission was achieved more quickly through the use of oral prednisone therapy than with SASP or 5-ASA. Beneficial effects on the host' s nutritional status were observed. Immunosuppressives were used on an individual basis and showed variable therapeutic effects. Sixteen patients had surgery due to intestinal obstruction or failure to respond to drug therapies. Rapid improvement after surgery was reported. Conclusion Endoscopy (with biopsy) and TABS were both crucial procedures for diagnosis. SASP(or 5-ASA) and prednisone were effective as inductive therapies. Azathioprine has demonstrable benefits after induction therapy with prednisone. Surgery, as an alternative treatment, provided another effective choice in selected patients.

  6. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS. We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison. Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (−) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73–0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = −0.73 to −0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = −0.81 to −0.91, P < 0.05). Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  7. Identification of a Novel Mutation (867delA) in the Glucose-6-phosphatase Gene in Two Siblings with Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia with Different Phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rake, Jan Peter; ten Berge, Annelies M.; Visser, Gepke; Verlind, Edwin; Niezen-Koning, Klary E.; Buys, Charles H. C. M.; Smit, G. Peter A.; Scheffer, Hans

    2000-01-01

    We identified a novel mutation (867delA) in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene of two siblings with glycogen storage disease type Ia. Although both siblings share the same mutations, their phenotype regarding adult height and hepatomegaly differs. In glycogen storage disease type Ia, substantial heterog

  8. Clinical approach to chronic beryllium disease and other nonpneumoconiotic interstitial lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Lisa A

    2002-10-01

    Exposures in the workplace result in a diverse set of diseases ranging from the pneumoconiosis to other interstitial lung diseases to acute lung injury. Physician awareness of the potential disease manifestations associated with specific exposures is important in defining these diseases and in preventing additional disease. Most occupational diseases mimic other forms of lung disease, including pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and bronchiolitis. A "sarcoidosis"-like syndrome, usually limited to the lungs, may result from exposure to bioaerosols and a number of metals. Exposure to beryllium in the workplace produces a granulomatous lung disease clinically indistinguishable from sarcoidosis, chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Beryllium's ability to produce a beryllium-specific immune response is used in the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation tests to confirm a diagnosis of CBD and exclude sarcoidosis. Exposure to other metals must also be considered in the differential diagnosis of sarcoidosis. When an individual presents acutely with ARDS or acute lung injury, an acute inhalational exposure must be considered. Exposure to a number of irritant substances at high levels may cause a "chemical pneumonitis" or acute lung injury, depending on the solubility and physicochemical properties of the substance. Some of the most notable agents include nitrogen and sulfur oxides, phosgene, and smoke breakdown products. Ingestion of paraquat may also result in an ARDS syndrome, with pulmonary fibrosis eventually resulting. Bronchiolitis is a rare manifestation of inhalational exposures but must also be considered in the clinical evaluation of inhalational exposure. PMID:12362066

  9. Clinical applications of TSH receptor antibodies in thyroid diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Bo Youn

    2002-01-01

    The cloning and sequencing of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR), combined with advances in molecular techniques, have facilitated the understanding of the interaction of the TSHR antibodies (TSHRAbs) with the TSHR at the molecular level and have allowed the delineation of their clinical role. TSHRAbs in vivo are functionally heterogeneous; the stimulating TSHRAbs cause hyperthyroidism and diffuse goiter in patients with Graves' disease, whereas, the blocking TSHRAbs cause hypo...

  10. Clinical efficacy of Yingliu treatment for Graves disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hua; Bi, Xiaojuan; Tang, Hong; Zeng, Juanhua; Cong, Yilei; Wu, Tengfei; Chen, Qiuye

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy and safety of the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) mixture Yingliu combined with methimazole medication for the treatment of Graves disease (GD). Method: In a randomized, paralleled control study, 92 GD patients were randomized into a Yingliu mixture treatment and a control treatment group, both receiving methimazole. Both treatments lasted for 12 weeks and outcome parameter were thyroid function, thyroid autoantibodies, TCM symptome scores and sa...

  11. Clinical neurogenetics: behavioral management of inherited neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Psychiatric symptoms often manifest years before overt neurologic signs in patients with inherited neurodegenerative disease. The most frequently cited example of this phenomenon is the early onset of personality changes in "presymptomatic" Huntington patients. In some cases the changes in mood and cognition are even more debilitating than their neurologic symptoms. The goal of this article is to provide the neurologist with a concise primer that can be applied in a busy clinic or private practice. PMID:24176427

  12. Demographics, clinical features and treatment of pediatric celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tapsas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by ingestion of gluten-containing food in genetically predisposed subjects. The enteropathy is presented with a wide variety of clinical manifestations, which can occur even outside the gastrointestinal tract. In the majority of cases, the diagnosis of CD is based on a small intestinal biopsy showing mucosal alterations, i.e. intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy. The treatm...

  13. Clinical Trials and Statistics in Cardiology Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomečková, Marie

    Prague : EuroMISE, 2004 - (Zvárová, J.; Hanzlíček, P.; Peleška, J.; Přečková, P.; Svátek, V.; Valenta, Z.). s. 28 ISBN 80-903431-0-4. [International Joint Meeting EuroMISE 2004. 12.04.2004-16.04.2004, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : atherosclerosis * clinical trials Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  14. Weber-Christian disease (idiopathic panniculitis: Clinical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Egorova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Weber-Christian disease (WCD, or idiopathic panniculitis, refers to rare diseases from a group of systemic connective tissue diseases. To verify the diagnosis of WCD is a difficult task, for there are no precise diagnostic tests for this disease.Objective: to study the clinical features and additional investigation data of WCD as one of the variants of lobular panniculitis (LP.Subjects and methods. Nineteen patients (2 men and 17 women aged 32 to 71 years with WCD were examined. The average disease duration was 65.1±11.3 months.Results. The medical history data of 12 patients could identify three suspected factors of disease development: surgical intervention (n = 6; supercooling (n=4, and acute respiratory viral infection (n=2. In 10 (53% patients aged 47–71 years, the Quetelet index was as high as 31.8±7.2 cm/kg, which allowed grade 2 obesity to be diagnosed. According to its clinical manifestations, there were 3 WCD forms: nodular (n=10, plaque (n=6, and infiltrative (n=3. The saucer symptom was present in 74%, including in all cases of the chronic course (p=0.02. The number of affected areas significantly differed in the nodular and plaque forms (p=0.01. ROC analysis showed that the optimal values of sensitivity (80% and specificity (83% on visual analog scale (VAS in patients with these forms corresponded to a separation point of 60 mm, with the prognostic value of a positive result being 0.89 (CI 0.71–1.1; p=0.011. The infiltrative form showed a typical clinical picture (VAS, 83.1±12.5 mm in 3 patients, one of them was found to have mesenteric panniculitis. The level of C-reactive protein was shown to be correlated with the form of the disease; the former being maximal in infiltrative WCD. The pathomorphological examination of skin and subcutaneous fat biopsy specimens from the nodule of all the patients detected diffuse leukolymphocytic infiltration, single multinucleated cells, necrotic foci, and lipocyte proliferation

  15. Clinical features of subacute course of radiation disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnyuk V.I.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to show the clinical features of subacute course of subacute course of radiation disease and how they differ from the typical manifestations of acute and chronic radiation syndrome. Material and methods. Materials of the Burnasyan Federal Medical and Biophysical Center Register of acute radiation disease (ARS in the Former USSR and Russia and Materials of a Burnasyan Federal Medical and Biophysical Center database of workers "Mayak" with chronic radiation syndrome (CRS were analyzed. There were selected 22 patients with radiation syndrome due to fractionated or prolonged accidental exposure (the main group of patients. There were formed two subgroups for comparison: patients with a typical marrowy syndrome of acute radiation disease and with chronic radiation syndrome. Statistical analysis of results was made by means of statistical software package Statistica v. 6.1 for Windows (StatSoft Inc., USA and Microsoft Excel 2010. Results. It was found that subacute course of radiation syndrome is possible under radiation exposure with medium dose rate in the range of 0.1-0.3 Gy/day Early symptoms of the disease as a primary reaction symptoms are completely absent. First complaints appeared in the earliest one month after the start of work in adverse conditions, on the average 6 months. In the period of formation there is a pancytopenia in the peripheral blood. Duration of the formation period was also determined. In this case radiation cataracts in patients are not observed. After the termination of radiation exposure hematopoietic recovery is slow, possibly incomplete with a high probability of hemoblastosis development. Conclusions. There has been described the subacute course of radiation disease by analyzing the clinical material of patients with radiation syndrome, there has been analyzed the clinical criteria that distinguish subacute radiation syndrome from acute and chronic.

  16. Pulmonary function tests, sputum induction, and bronchial provocation tests: diagnostic tools in the challenge of distinguishing asthma and COPD phenotypes in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrossini Dima

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Efrossini Dima1,2*, Nikoletta Rovina1,2*, Christina Gerassimou2, Charis Roussos1,2,3, Christina Gratziou2,31“Sotiria” Hospital for Diseases of the Chest, Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece; 2“M. Simos” Laboratories, Department of Critical Care and Pulmonary Services, Evangelismos Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; 3Asthma and Allergy Center, Evgenidion Hospital, Pulmonary and Critical Care Department, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Despite a number of important differences in the pathogenesis, course, and prognosis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have many features in common. Furthermore, smoking induces considerable overlap in pathogenesis and clinical features between these conditions. This study aimed to reveal what inflammatory patterns prevail in clinically established diagnosis groups, including overlap phenotypes of asthma and COPD, and to evaluate the correlation with airway reversibility and hyperreactivity in these overlapping conditions.Methods: A total of 110 patients (17 healthy subjects; 16 “healthy” smokers; 46 asthma patients: 24 smokers and 22 non-smokers; and 31 COPD patients: 10 COPD patients with reversibility and 21 without participated in the study. Induced sputum, reversibility testing, methacholine and adenosine 5’monophosphate (AMP provocation challenges, and skin prick testing were performed. Airways inflammation was assessed by differential cell counts, and cytokines (interleukin-8 [IL-8] and tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α] were measured in induced sputum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.Results: COPD patients with reversibility had increased sputum neutrophils, IL-8, and TNF-α levels compared to smoking asthmatics. No difference was found in inflammatory cells and cytokines between COPD subgroups. Sputum neutrophilia

  17. Evaluation of phenotypic tests for detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase and metallo-beta-lactamase in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Chauhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Carbapenemase production is an important mechanism responsible for carbapenem resistance. Aims: Phenotypic detection and differentiation of types of carbapenemase in carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae is important for proper infection control and appropriate patient management. Settings and Design: We planned a study to determine the occurrence of Class A Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC type and Class B Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL type carbapenemase in hospital and community. Materials and Methods: Clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species and simultaneously evaluate different phenotypic methods for detection of carbapenemases. Results: It was observed that 20.72% clinical isolates of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were resistant to carbapenem on screening of which, 14.64% were E. coli and 29.69% were Klebsiella spp. Using phenotypic confirmatory tests the occurrence of carbapenemase production was found to be 87.01% in E. coli and 91.51% in Klebsiella spp. using both modified Hodge test (MHT and combined disk test (CDT using imipenem-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Conclusions: Both MBL and KPC type carbapenemases were seen among clinical isolates of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. CDT is simple, rapid and technically less demanding procedure, which can be used in all clinical laboratories. Supplementing MHT with CDT is reliable phenotypic tests to identify the class A and class B carbapenemase producers.

  18. Advance in clinical research of radiation-induced heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is one of common late side effects derived by thoracic radiotherapy. RIHD is often subclinical and there is an extremely long clinical latent period between radiation therapy and the first clinical presentation of radiation injury, and it did not cause clinical attention for a long time. Until the 1990s, epidemiologic investigations demonstrate that thoracic cancer radiotherapy increased rates of cardiac mortality, RIHD has partly offset the survival benefit provided by adjuvant RT. Radiotherapy techniques has undergone many improvements over the last decades, these improvements decreased both the volume and dose of radiation delivered to the heart, seem to have decreased the incidence of RIHD. Nonetheless, recent studies indicate that the problem of RIHD may persist. For instance, patients with Hodgkin's Disease, lung cancer, and esophageal may still receive either a high dose of radiation to a small part of the heart or a lower dose to the whole heart in radiotherapy. Therefore, long-term cardiac followup of these patients is essential. This article briefly review the clinical presentations, influence factors, prevention and managements, diagnosis and study advances of RIHD. (authors)

  19. Molecular Phylogeny of the Psittacid Herpesviruses Causing Pacheco's Disease: Correlation of Genotype with Phenotypic Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K.; Kaleta, Erhard F.; Phalen, David N

    2003-01-01

    Fragments of 419 bp of the UL16 open reading frame from 73 psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs) from the United States and Europe were sequenced. All viruses caused Pacheco's disease, and serotypes of the European isolates were known. A phylogenetic tree derived from these sequences demonstrated that the PsHVs that cause Pacheco's disease comprised four major genotypes, with each genotype including between two and four variants. With the exception of two viruses, the serotypes of the virus isolate...

  20. Gene-Environment Interactions in the Development of Complex Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Olden

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of knowledge about the earliest events in disease development is due to the multi-factorial nature of disease risk. This information gap is the consequence of the lack of appreciation for the fact that most diseases arise from the complex interactions between genes and the environment as a function of the age or stage of development of the individual. Whether an environmental exposure causes illness or not is dependent on the efficiency of the so-called “environmental response machinery” (i.e., the complex of metabolic pathways that can modulate response to environmental perturbations that one has inherited. Thus, elucidating the causes of most chronic diseases will require an understanding of both the genetic and environmental contribution to their etiology. Unfortunately, the exploration of the relationship between genes and the environment has been hampered in the past by the limited knowledge of the human genome, and by the inclination of scientists to study disease development using experimental models that consider exposure to a single environmental agent. Rarely in the past were interactions between multiple genes or between genes and environmental agents considered in studies of human disease etiology. The most critical issue is how to relate exposure-disease association studies to pathways and mechanisms. To understand how genes and environmental factors interact to perturb biological pathways to cause injury or disease, scientists will need tools with the capacity to monitor the global expression of thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites simultaneously. The generation of such data in multiple species can be used to identify conserved and functionally significant genes and pathways involved in geneenvironment interactions. Ultimately, it is this knowledge that will be used to guide agencies such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in decisions regarding biomedical research funding

  1. Prognosis of complicated clinical course of varicose veins of lower extremities on the basis of analysis of phenotypic characteristics of connective tissue dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsarev О.А.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to identify the phenotypic characteristics of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia, which help to predict the progression of varicose veins of lower extremities and disease recurrence after surgery. Material and Methods. The long-term results of surgical treatment of 60 patients with varicose veins of lower extremities in a 5-year period after phlebectomy were analyzed. The phenotypic characteristics of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia were researched. 24 patients had recurrence of varicose veins of lower extremities associated with disease progression; 36 patients did not have recurrence of varicose veins of lower extremities. Results. All the patients demonstrated the signs of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia, whereas their frequency was different. There were specified nine phenotypic characteristics of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia, which were significantly more frequent for patients with recurrence of varicose vein disease of lower extremities: 1 postural abnormality, 2 flat foot, 3 skin pallor, 4 hyperextension of skin, 5 positive "wrist test", 6 positive "pollex test", 7 diastasis recti abdominis, 8 myopia, 9 hematomas which form quickly. Conclusion. The determined sum of phenotypic characters of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia allows to predict progression of varicose vein disease of lower extremities, and offers new opportunities for improving the results of surgical treatment via developing special therapeutic measures aimed at improving lifestyle and dysplasia treatment.

  2. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management

    OpenAIRE

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Minter, Alex R; Korde, Neha; TAN, ESTHER; Landgren, Ola

    2011-01-01

    The manifestations of bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) can have devastating clinical effects and increase mortality. Recent studies demonstrate that patients with the precursor conditions smoldering MM (SMM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) show evidence of bone disease and increased risk of fractures. The understanding of the pathogenesis of bone disease in MM has expanded in recent years. The traditional skeletal survey will probably be re...

  3. Systems medicine approaches for the definition of complex phenotypes in chronic diseases and ageing. From concept to implementation and policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Jean; Jorgensen, Christian; Dauzat, Michel; Cesario, Alfredo; Camuzat, Thierry; Bourret, Rodolphe; Best, Nicolas; Anto, Josep M; Abecassis, Frederic; Aubas, Pierre; Avignon, Antoine; Badin, Melanie; Bedbrook, Anna; Blain, Hubert; Bourdin, Arnaud; Bringer, Jacques; Camu, William; Cayla, Guilhaume; Costa, David J; Courtet, Philippe; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Demoly, Pascal; de la Coussaye, Jean-Emmanuel; Fesler, Pierre; Gouzi, Fares; Gris, Jean-Christophe; Guillot, Bernard; Hayot, Maurice; Jeandel, Claude; Jonquet, Olivier; Journot, Laurent; Lehmann, Sylvain; Mathieu, Gwenaelle; Morel, Jacques; Ninot, Gregory; Pelissier, Jacques; Picot, Marie-Christine; Radier-Pontal, Francoise; Robine, Jean-Marie; Rodier, Michel; Roubille, Francois; Sultan, Ariane; Wojtusciszyn, Anne; Auffray, Charles; Balling, Rudi; Barbara, Cristina; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Chavannes, Niels H; Chuchalin, Alexander; Crooks, George; Dedeu, Antoni; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Hajjam, Jawad; Melo Gomes, Elisabete; Palkonen, Susana; Piette, Francois; Pison, Christophe; Price, David; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Schunemann, Holger J; Sterk, Peter J; Yiallouros, Panayiotis; Roca, Josep; Van de Perre, Philippe; Mercier, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are diseases of long duration and slow progression. Major NCDs (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes, rheumatologic diseases and mental health) represent the predominant health problem of the Century. The prevention and control of NCDs are the priority of the World Health Organization 2008 Action Plan, the United Nations 2010 Resolution and the European Union 2010 Council. The novel trend for the management of NCDs is evolving towards integrative, holistic approaches. NCDs are intertwined with ageing. The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) has prioritised NCDs. To tackle them in their totality in order to reduce their burden and societal impact, it is proposed that NCDs should be considered as a single expression of disease with different risk factors and entities. An innovative integrated health system built around systems medicine and strategic partnerships is proposed to combat NCDs. It includes (i) understanding the social, economic, environmental, genetic determinants, as well as the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying NCDs; (ii) primary care and practice-based interprofessional collaboration; (iii) carefully phenotyped patients; (iv) development of unbiased and accurate biomarkers for comorbidities, severity and follow up of patients; (v) socio-economic science; (vi) development of guidelines; (vii) training; and (viii) policy decisions. The results could be applicable to all countries and adapted to local needs, economy and health systems. This paper reviews the complexity of NCDs intertwined with ageing. It gives an overview of the problem and proposes two practical examples of systems medicine (MeDALL) applied to allergy and to NCD co-morbidities (MACVIA-LR, Reference Site of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing). PMID:24641234

  4. MultiPhen: Joint Model of Multiple Phenotypes Can Increase Discovery in GWAS

    OpenAIRE

    O’Reilly, Paul F.; Hoggart, Clive J.; Pomyen, Yotsawat; Calboli, Federico C. F.; Elliott, Paul; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Coin, Lachlan J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach has discovered hundreds of genetic variants associated with diseases and quantitative traits. However, despite clinical overlap and statistical correlation between many phenotypes, GWAS are generally performed one-phenotype-at-a-time. Here we compare the performance of modelling multiple phenotypes jointly with that of the standard univariate approach. We introduce a new method and software, MultiPhen, that models multiple phenotypes simultane...

  5. Enteric Glial Cells: A New Frontier in Neurogastroenterology and Clinical Target for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Turco, Fabio; Linan-Rico, Andromeda; Soghomonyan, Suren; Whitaker, Emmett; Wehner, Sven; Cuomo, Rosario; Christofi, Fievos L

    2016-02-01

    The word "glia" is derived from the Greek word "γλoια," glue of the enteric nervous system, and for many years, enteric glial cells (EGCs) were believed to provide mainly structural support. However, EGCs as astrocytes in the central nervous system may serve a much more vital and active role in the enteric nervous system, and in homeostatic regulation of gastrointestinal functions. The emphasis of this review will be on emerging concepts supported by basic, translational, and/or clinical studies, implicating EGCs in neuron-to-glial (neuroglial) communication, motility, interactions with other cells in the gut microenvironment, infection, and inflammatory bowel diseases. The concept of the "reactive glial phenotype" is explored as it relates to inflammatory bowel diseases, bacterial and viral infections, postoperative ileus, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and motility disorders. The main theme of this review is that EGCs are emerging as a new frontier in neurogastroenterology and a potential therapeutic target. New technological innovations in neuroimaging techniques are facilitating progress in the field, and an update is provided on exciting new translational studies. Gaps in our knowledge are discussed for further research. Restoring normal EGC function may prove to be an efficient strategy to dampen inflammation. Probiotics, palmitoylethanolamide (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α), interleukin-1 antagonists (anakinra), and interventions acting on nitric oxide, receptor for advanced glycation end products, S100B, or purinergic signaling pathways are relevant clinical targets on EGCs with therapeutic potential. PMID:26689598

  6. Moyamoya angiopathy - Is there a Western phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hever, Pennylouise; Alamri, Alexander; Tolias, Christos

    2015-12-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic cerebrovascular disease involving progressive bilateral stenosis of the intracranial segments of the internal carotid arteries. It results in the development of a rich, but friable collateral supply, prone to rupture. The disease is well described in Japanese literature and was originally thought to be a predozminantly Eastern disease. However, the recent literature describes a Western phenotype that may present with a different clinical course. This review aims to describe the variations in the epidemiology of the MMD between Eastern and Western populations, the possible reasons for them and highlight their implications for clinical practise and future research. PMID:26473792

  7. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashri Kolte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patterns of periodontal destruction based on vertical and horizontal attachment loss. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 extracted teeth were obtained from chronic periodontitis patients. Prior to extraction, clinical measurements were recorded and after extraction, the teeth were stained with crystal violet. Root length, vertical and horizontal attachment loss were measured using digital caliper. Results: There was a significant difference between clinical attachment level and vertical attachment loss for both maxillary and mandibular teeth. Mean vertical attachment loss varied between 5.17 mm and 9.17 mm. Interproximal surfaces exhibited statistically significant vertical attachment loss in both maxillary and mandibular dentition. Results indicated that vertical attachment loss was more severe with teeth belonging to the anterior sextant whereas the horizontal attachment loss was more pronounced with posterior teeth. Conclusion: Both vertical and horizontal attachment loss were observed in all periodontally involved teeth. There was a difference in clinical measurements and actual periodontal status denoted by postextraction staining. These findings have an impact on determining the prognosis and appropriate treatment plan for patients.

  8. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolte, Rajashri; Kolte, Abhay; Wattamwar, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patterns of periodontal destruction based on vertical and horizontal attachment loss. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 extracted teeth were obtained from chronic periodontitis patients. Prior to extraction, clinical measurements were recorded and after extraction, the teeth were stained with crystal violet. Root length, vertical and horizontal attachment loss were measured using digital caliper. Results: There was a significant difference between clinical attachment level and vertical attachment loss for both maxillary and mandibular teeth. Mean vertical attachment loss varied between 5.17 mm and 9.17 mm. Interproximal surfaces exhibited statistically significant vertical attachment loss in both maxillary and mandibular dentition. Results indicated that vertical attachment loss was more severe with teeth belonging to the anterior sextant whereas the horizontal attachment loss was more pronounced with posterior teeth. Conclusion: Both vertical and horizontal attachment loss were observed in all periodontally involved teeth. There was a difference in clinical measurements and actual periodontal status denoted by postextraction staining. These findings have an impact on determining the prognosis and appropriate treatment plan for patients. PMID:27143828

  9. Molecular phylogeny of the psittacid herpesviruses causing Pacheco's disease: correlation of genotype with phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K; Kaleta, Erhard F; Phalen, David N

    2003-10-01

    Fragments of 419 bp of the UL16 open reading frame from 73 psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs) from the United States and Europe were sequenced. All viruses caused Pacheco's disease, and serotypes of the European isolates were known. A phylogenetic tree derived from these sequences demonstrated that the PsHVs that cause Pacheco's disease comprised four major genotypes, with each genotype including between two and four variants. With the exception of two viruses, the serotypes of the virus isolates could be predicted by the genotypes. Genotypes 1 and 4 corresponded to serotype 1 isolates, genotype 2 corresponded to serotype 2 isolates, and genotype 3 corresponded to serotype 3 isolates. The single serotype 4 virus mapped to genotype 4. DNA from a virus with a unique serotype could not be amplified with primers that amplified DNA from all other PsHVs, and its classification remains unknown. Viruses representing all four genotypes were found in both the United States and Europe, and it was therefore predicted that serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in the United States. Serotype 4 was represented by a single European isolate that could not be genetically distinguished from serotype 1 viruses; therefore, the presence of serotype 4 in the United States could not be predicted. Viruses of genotype 4 were found to be the most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease in macaws and conures and were least likely to be isolated in chicken embryo fibroblasts in the United States. All four genotypes caused deaths in Amazon parrots, but genotype 4 was associated with Pacheco's disease only in Amazons in Europe. Genotypes 2, 3, and 4, but not 1, were found in African grey parrots. Although parrots from the Pacific distribution represent a relatively small percentage of the total number of birds with Pacheco's disease, all four genotypes were found to cause disease in these species. PMID:14512573

  10. Early phenotypic activation of circulating helper memory T cells in scleroderma: correlation with disease activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Fiocco, U; Rosada, M; L. Cozzi; Ortolani, C; Silvestro, G.; A. Ruffatti; Cozzi, E; Gallo, C; S. Todesco

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The differential expression of several accessory/activation molecules (CD26, CD29, CD45RA, CD25, MLR4, HLA-DR) on peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in patients with scleroderma was compared with that in controls and patients with other connective systemic diseases to look for evidence of the involvement of T cells in the disease process of scleroderma. METHODS--The two colour expression of surface molecules by circulating T cells was analysed with a panel of monoclonal ...

  11. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Latha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dupuytren's contracture (DC is a fibroproliferative disorder characterized by the progressive development of a scar-like collagen-rich cord that affects the palmar fascia of the hand and leads to digital flexion contractures. DC is most commonly treated by surgical resection of the diseased tissue, but has a high reported recurrence rate ranging from 27% to 80%. We sought to determine if the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts derived from DC-affected palmar fascia, adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia, and non-DC palmar fascial tissues might provide mechanistic clues to understanding the puzzle of disease predisposition and recurrence in DC. Methods To achieve this, total RNA was obtained from fibroblasts derived from primary DC-affected palmar fascia, patient-matched unaffected palmar fascia, and palmar fascia from non-DC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (6 patients in each group. These cells were grown on a type-1 collagen substrate (to better mimic their in vivo environments. Microarray analyses were subsequently performed using Illumina BeadChip arrays to compare the transcriptomic profiles of these three cell populations. Data were analyzed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM v3.02, hierarchical clustering, concordance mapping and Venn diagram. Results We found that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected fascia of DC patients exhibited a much greater overlap than fibroblasts derived from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. Quantitative real time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of select genes validating the microarray data analyses. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that predisposition and recurrence in DC may stem, at least in part, from intrinsic similarities in the basal gene expression of diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia fibroblasts. These data also demonstrate that

  12. Occupational Lung Disease: Clinical-Pathological-Radiological Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    People are exposed to hundreds of substances daily, some of which may induce pulmonary injury. Occupational Lung Disease diagnosis requires 4 elements: Exposure to the harmful agent, adequate latency between exposure and beginning of the symptoms, syndrome with post-exposure abnormalities, and exclusion of other conditions which may otherwise explain signs and symptoms. Several occupational lung disease classifications based on structural or functional injury, type of agent, or both have been proposed. Generally, 5 groups are considered: Pneumoconiosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, toxic fumes exposure, asthma, and occupational lung infections. Conventional radiographs and in specific situations, CT, are crucial elements for the diagnosis of Occupational Lung Disease. In the patient with respiratory symptoms and altered imaging studies, the possibility of Occupational Lung Disease should be considered. Radiologist should be familiar the variety of substances that cause these entities and their radiological features. In this article Occupational Lung diseases are reviewed, including diagnostic criteria, classification, physiopathology, clinical and radiological manifestations as well as their corresponding histopathological features.

  13. Mucopolysaccharidosis-like phenotype in feline Sandhoff disease and partial correction after AAV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Brunson, Brandon L; Holland, Merrilee; Hespel, Adrien-Maxence; Bradbury, Allison M; McCurdy, Victoria J; Beadlescomb, Patricia M; Randle, Ashley N; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S; Beyers, Ronald J; Johnson, Aime K; Voyles, Meredith L; Montgomery, Ronald D; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. Children with infantile onset SD develop seizures, loss of motor tone and swallowing problems, eventually reaching a vegetative state with death typically by 4years of age. Other symptoms include vertebral gibbus and cardiac abnormalities strikingly similar to those of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Isolated fibroblasts from SD patients have impaired catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). To evaluate mucopolysaccharidosis-like features of the feline SD model, we utilized radiography, MRI, echocardiography, histopathology and GAG quantification of both central nervous system and peripheral tissues/fluids. The feline SD model exhibits cardiac valvular and structural abnormalities, skeletal changes and spinal cord compression that are consistent with accumulation of GAGs, but are much less prominent than the severe neurologic disease that defines the humane endpoint (4.5±0.5months). Sixteen weeks after intracranial AAV gene therapy, GAG storage was cleared in the SD cat cerebral cortex and liver, but not in the heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, skin, or urine. GAG storage worsens with time and therefore may become a significant source of pathology in humans whose lives are substantially lengthened by gene therapy or other novel treatments for the primary, neurologic disease. PMID:25971245

  14. Loss of dopamine phenotype among midbrain neurons in Lesch-Nyhan disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottle, M.; Prudente, C.N.; Fu, R.; Sutcliffe, D.; Pang, H.; Cooper, D.; Veledar, E.; Glass, J.D.; Gearing, M.; Visser, J.E.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is caused by congenital deficiency of the purine recycling enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt). Affected patients have a peculiar neurobehavioral syndrome linked with reductions of dopamine in the basal ganglia. The purpose of the curre

  15. Multi-omic profiles of human non-alcoholic fatty liver disease tissue highlight heterogenic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wruck, Wasco; Kashofer, Karl; Rehman, Samrina; Daskalaki, Andriani; Berg, Daniela; Gralka, Ewa; Jozefczuk, Justyna; Drews, Katharina; Pandey, Vikash; Regenbrecht, Christian; Wierling, Christoph; Turano, Paola; Korf, Ulrike; Zatloukal, Kurt; Lehrach, Hans; Westerhoff, Hans V; Adjaye, James

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a consequence of sedentary life style and high fat diets with an estimated prevalence of about 30% in western countries. It is associated with insulin resistance, obesity, glucose intolerance and drug toxicity. Additionally, polymorphisms within, e.g., APOC3, PNPLA3, NCAN, TM6SF2 and PPP1R3B, correlate with NAFLD. Several studies have already investigated later stages of the disease. This study explores the early steatosis stage of NAFLD with the aim of identifying molecular mechanisms underlying the etiology of NAFLD. We analyzed liver biopsies and serum samples from patients with high- and low-grade steatosis (also pre-disease states) employing transcriptomics, ELISA-based serum protein analyses and metabolomics. Here, we provide a detailed description of the various related datasets produced in the course of this study. These datasets may help other researchers find new clues for the etiology of NAFLD and the mechanisms underlying its progression to more severe disease states. PMID:26646939

  16. Hyperpolarized {sup 3}He magnetic resonance imaging: Preliminary evaluation of phenotyping potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Lindsay, E-mail: lmathew@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Kirby, Miranda, E-mail: mkirby@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Etemad-Rezai, Roya, E-mail: Roya.EtemadRezai@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Wheatley, Andrew, E-mail: awheat@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); McCormack, David G., E-mail: David.McCormack@lhsc.on.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London (Canada); Parraga, Grace, E-mail: gep@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Rationale and objectives: Emphysema and small airway obstruction are the pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this pilot study in a small group of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients was to quantify hyperpolarized helium-3 ({sup 3}He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functional and structural measurements and to explore the potential role for {sup 3}He MRI in detecting the lung structural and functional COPD phenotypes. Materials and methods: We evaluated 20 ex-smokers with stage I (n = 1), stage II (n = 9) and stage III COPD (n = 10). All subjects underwent same-day plethysmography, spirometry, {sup 1}H MRI and hyperpolarized {sup 3}He MRI at 3.0 T. {sup 3}He ventilation defect percent (VDP) was generated from {sup 3}He static ventilation images and {sup 1}H thoracic images and the {sup 3}He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was derived from diffusion-weighted MRI. Results: Based on the relative contribution of normalized ADC and VDP, there was evidence of a predominant {sup 3}He MRI measurement in seven patients (n = 3 mainly ventilation defects or VDP dominant (VD), n = 4 mainly increased ADC or ADC dominant (AD)). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significantly lower ADC for subjects with predominantly elevated VDP (p = 0.02 compared to subjects with predominantly elevated ADC; p = 0.008 compared to mixed group) and significantly decreased VDP for subjects with predominantly elevated ADC (p = 0.003, compared to mixed group). Conclusion: In this small pilot study, a preliminary analysis shows the potential for {sup 3}He MRI to categorize or phenotype COPD ex-smokers, providing good evidence of feasibility for larger prospective studies.

  17. Clinical and immunological features of retinal vasculitis in systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Vasculitis is a clinical, pathologic process characterized by inflammation and necrosis of blood vessel occurring anywhere in the body. The aim of the study was to present some clinical and immunologic features of retinal vasculitis in systemic diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, Behcet's diseases, and others. Methods. A total of 1 254 patients with uveitis were included in the study. The immunochemical diagnostic methods were used to determine the pathogenesis of ocular manifestations. Ocular manifestations were examined using biomicroscope, direct or indirect ophtalmoscopy. Results. Primary retinal vasculitis was diagnosed in 85/1254 (6.8% of total uveitis. In more than half of the cases of vasculitis (58.8%, both arteries and veins were involved in inflammatory process. Periphlebitis was diagnosed far more commonly (36.5% than periarteritis (4.7%. Retinal vasculitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus was characterized by microinfarctions and the consequent foci of inflammatory cells or diseases of large arteries manifesting in vasospasm and occlusions. Cotton wool spots occurred in 38.3% and retinal hemorrhages in 34% of the cases. In this study periphlebitis of the retina was one of the less frequent ocular manifestations of multiple sclerosis. Comparing with the other changes of the retinal blood vessels, venous sheating occurred in 25.1% and occlusion and vein trombosis in 43.75% of the cases. Retinal vasculitis associated with chronic sarcoidosis occured in 37.5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The most frequent manifestation of ocular sarcoidosis was intermediary uveitis (43.75%. Anterior granulomatous uveitis occured in 37.5% of patients with sarcoidoses. Immune complexes occurred in 13/20 (65% of the patients. Antiretinal anti-S antibody in the serum occurred in 73% of the patients with retinal detachment as a complication of primary disease and in 25% those with vasculitis

  18. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice L. Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To characterize the clinical, laboratory, and anthropometric profile of a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease type I managed at an outpatient referral clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional outpatient study based on a convenience sampling strategy. Data on diagnosis, management, anthropometric parameters, and follow-up were assessed. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were included (median age 10 years, range 1-25 years, all using uncooked cornstarch therapy. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (range, 1-132 months, and 19 patients underwent liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Overweight, short stature, hepatomegaly, and liver nodules were present in 16 of 21, four of 21, nine of 14, and three of 14 patients, respectively. A correlation was found between height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores (r = 0.561; p = 0.008. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients.

  19. Prevalence of clinical signs of disease in Danish finisher pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, H H; Nielsen, E O; Hassing, A-G; Ersbøll, A K; Nielsen, J P

    2008-03-22

    Between December 1999 and February 2001, two visits, eight weeks apart, were made to 90 herds of Danish finisher pigs. The prevalence of clinical signs was recorded by three veterinary technicians from the Danish Bacon and Meat Council according to a standardised procedure; they had been trained and their observations were monitored and validated before and during the study. A total of 154,347 finisher pigs were examined and 22,136 clinical signs were recorded. Vices accounted for 43 per cent of the signs. The highest mean prevalence was observed for ear necrosis (4.44 per cent), followed by respiratory signs (2.17 per cent), lameness (1.92 per cent), other skin diseases (1.73 per cent), tail bites (1.26 per cent), umbilical hernia (0.78 per cent), flank bites (0.52 per cent), diarrhoea (0.27 per cent), respiratory distress (0.12 per cent), atrophic rhinitis (0.10 per cent), recumbency (0.09 per cent) and central nervous disease (0.05 per cent). The prevalence of atrophic rhinitis was higher in conventional herds than in specific pathogen-free herds. The prevalence of clinical signs of atrophic rhinitis was higher among finishers weighing 51 to 75 kg than among finishers weighing up to 50 kg, and the prevalence of respiratory signs was higher among finishers weighing 51 to 75 kg then among finishers weighing 76 to 100 kg. PMID:18359931

  20. Whipple's disease. Report of five cases with different clinical features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERRARI Maria de Lourdes de Abreu

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Whipple's disease (WD is a rare systemic disease of infectious etiology which involves the small intestine but can virtually affect any organ. We present here five cases (four males and one female ranging in age from 20 to 59 years. All patients had intestinal involvement associated or not with clinical manifestations linked to this organ. Vegetation in the tricuspid valve was observed in one patient, suggesting endocarditis caused by Tropheryma whippelii, with disappearance of the echocardiographic alterations after treatment. In one of the male patients the initial clinical manifestation was serologically negative spondylitis, with no diarrhea occurring at any time during follow-up. Ocular involvement associated with intestinal malabsorption and significant weight loss were observed in one case. In the other two cases, diarrhea was the major clinical manifestation. All patients were diagnosed by histological examination of the jejunal mucosa and, when indicated, of extraintestinal tissues by light and electron microscopy. After antibiotic treatment, full remission of symptoms occurred in all cases. A control examination of the intestinal mucosa performed after twelve months of treatment with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim revealed the disappearance of T. whippelii in four patients. The remaining patient was lost to follow-up.

  1. Crohn's disease: Clinical-surgical questions and imaging answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterized by a relapsing clinical pattern that typically affects people during their adult and economically productive lives. Affected patients require clinical follow-up because of the periodic flare-up of the disease and of the risk of long-term complications. Extensive diagnostic procedures, medical and surgical treatments are often needed over a lifetime. The challenge posed by the management of IBD is better faced by a multidisciplinary team that includes health care providers with complementary diagnostic or therapeutic skills. The team is expected to provide the best practice to manage IBD by defining a realistic 'diagnostic and therapeutic pathway' for the patients to follow based on the locally available professional, structural and technological resources. For such a 'pathway' the correct questions and answers are essential. Sometimes it is not easy to make sense out of these questions. To ask a right question is not simple. Of course, different surgeons and gastroenterologists ask different questions. If radiologists want to choose the right imaging method, they must know these questions. There exist a simple equation: good question = correct imaging method = right answer.

  2. Obesity Differentially Affects Phenotypes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Moran; Monica Arriaga; Gustavo Rodriguez; Segundo Moran

    2012-01-01

    Obesity or overweight affect most of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Phenotypes are the clinical characteristics produced by the interaction of heredity and environment in a disease or syndrome. Phenotypes of PCOS have been described on the presence of clinical hyperandrogenism, oligoovulation and polycystic ovaries. The insulin resistance is present in the majority of patients with obesity and/or PCOS and it is more frequent and of greater magnitude in obese than in non obese...

  3. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  4. Wilson's disease in children: clinical and diagnostic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the clinical and diagnostic laboratory features of Wilsons disease in children and adolescents. Design: A prospective cohort study. Place and Duration of study: The study included patients diagnosed as Wilson s disease at the Department of Pediatrics Allied Hospital, Punjab medical College, Faisalabad from May 1997 to June 2001. Patients and methods: Patients presenting with liver or suggestive neurological disease were investigated. Others were diagnosed as a result of family screening. Diagnosis of neurologic disease was made if two of the following were present: Typical neurological findings, Kayser Fleischer corneal rings and low serum ceruloplasmin (100 mu gm) free serum copper (>10 mu gm/dl). In other forms and for family screening, 24 hours. Urinary copper (> 100 mu gm), free serum copper (>10 mu gm/dl), and wherever possible liver biopsy for histopathology and cytochemical staining by rubeanic acid was also done. Results: Twenty-seven patients with a mean age of 10.2 years were diagnosed as suffering from Wilson disease. Mean age for hepatic and neurological disease was 9 years and 11.5 years respectively. Youngest patient (neurologic) was 6 years old. 48% cases presented with neurological, 41% with hepatic and 4% with skeletal manifestations while 7 % were asymptomatic. Mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 6.1 months. Dysarthria (84.6%), tremors (69.2%), rigidity and poor school performance and hand writing (61.5%), dysphagia (46.1%) and dystonia (38.5%), were the most common neurologic findings. Chronic liver disease was seen in 73 % while acute forms were seen in 27 % cases. Two cases presented with fulminant hepatic failure. Consanguineous marriage of the parents was found in 70 % and family history of disease was present in 65 % cases. K-F (Kayser Fleischer) rings and low serum ceruloplasmin(<20 mg/dl) was found in 85% of all patients. In non neurologic types other tests of copper metabolism were done. Elevated urinary

  5. Vanishing white matter disease: Phenotypic, MR imaging and 1H spectroscopic observations

    OpenAIRE

    Ravishankar S; Sinha S; Taly A; Panicker J

    2006-01-01

    We report MR imaging features of vanishing white matter disease in a 7-year-old boy, who manifested with seizures, aphasia, spastic quadriparesis and myoclonic jerks. MRI of brain showed diffuse white matter signal changes of CSF intensity in all the sequences. MR spectroscopy of white matter showed severe decrease in NAA, choline and creatine and presence of lactate peak. Additional notable findings were diffuse extensive brain stem and thalamic atrophy. The clinico-radiological correlation ...

  6. Vanishing white matter disease: Phenotypic, MR imaging and 1H spectroscopic observations

    OpenAIRE

    Ravishankar, S.; Sinha, S; Taly, A. B.; Panicker, J.

    2006-01-01

    We report MR imaging features of vanishing white matter disease in a 7-year-old boy, who manifested with seizures, aphasia, spastic quadriparesis and myoclonic jerks. MRI of brain showed diffuse white matter signal changes of CSF intensity in all the sequences. MR spectroscopy of white matter showed severe decrease in NAA, choline and creatine and presence of lactate peak. Additional notable findings were diffuse extensive brain stem and thalamic atrophy. The clinico-radiological correlation ...

  7. Phenotypic Conversions of “Protoplasmic” to “Reactive” Astrocytes in Alexander Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sosunov, Alexander A.; Guilfoyle, Eileen; Wu, Xiaoping; Guy M McKhann; Goldman, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Alexander Disease (AxD) is a primary disorder of astrocytes, caused by heterozygous mutations in GFAP, which encodes the major astrocyte intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Astrocytes in AxD display hypertrophy, massive increases in GFAP, and the accumulation of Rosenthal fibers, cytoplasmic protein inclusions containing GFAP and small heat shock proteins. To study the effects of GFAP mutations on astrocyte morphology and physiology we have examined hippocam...

  8. Splice mutations preserve myophosphorylase activity that ameliorates the phenotype in McArdle disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Duno, Morten; Schwartz, Marianne;

    2009-01-01

    features of two patients with a variant form of McArdle disease, associated with unusually high exercise capacity. Physiologic findings were compared to those in 47 patients with typical McArdle disease, and 17 healthy subjects. Subjects performed an ischaemic forearm exercise test to assess lactate...... and ammonia production. Peak oxidative capacity (VO2max) and cardiac output were determined, using cycle ergometry as the exercise modality. The two patients with atypical McArdle disease carried common mutations on one allele (R50X and G205S), and novel splice mutations in introns 3 [IVS3-26A>G (c.425-26A......>G)] and 5 [IVS5-601G>A (c.856-601G>A)] on the other allele. Plasma lactate after ischaemic exercise decreased in all typical McArdle patients, but increased in the two atypical McArdle patients (10% of that in healthy subjects). Peak workload and oxidative capacity were 2-fold higher in patients...

  9. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires’ Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires’ disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms.

  10. Clinical aspects of indirect immunofluorescence for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanadan, Alireza; Saghazadeh, Amene; Jahanzad, Issa; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-05-01

    Because the most common term used in conversations considering autoimmunity is autoantibodies, it is well-expected that the indirect immunofluorescence assay, which detects antibodies directed against various antigens, is one of our most impressive techniques for investigating autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Roughly speaking, the current literature corroborates that this immunopathologic investigation means that autoantibodies detection makes a considerable contribution to both diagnostic and prognostic aspects of AIDs in the clinical setting. However, it varies between different AIDs, autoantibodies, ethnicities or detection methodologies. Directly focusing on the indirect immunofluorescence assay, we present evidence to support this multidimensional variation regarding the subject via reviewing briefly the best-investigated autoantibodies in the well-documented AIDs, including vasculitis, inflammatory bowel disease, scleroderma, autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:25786676

  11. Imaging and clinical characteristics of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Shun-chang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Five patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD presented rapidly progressive dementia which were subacute onset from 1 to 4 months. Among these cases, periodic synchronous discharge (PSD of electroencephalography (EEG was seen in 2 patients. Besides, 4 patients obtained positive results in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis for 14-3-3 protein. The cranial MRI examination showed symmetrical or asymmetrical colored-ribbon-shaped high signals in cerebral cortex or basal ganglia by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, suggesting that DWI had high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of sCJD as a preferred method in the clinical examination of sCJD.

  12. The significance of mammographic signs in clinically occult disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance of various radiographic signs in 183 patients with clinically occult breast disease is described. 30.6% hat a carcinoma of the breast or a carcinoma in situ. The radiological features have varying predictive values and there is variation in the incidence of lymph node metastases. It is considered useful to classify the radiological appearances under the headings of round foci, star-shaped opacities, diffuse opacities, opacities with calcification and groups of micro-calcification. Despite the early diagnosis, 24% of patients already had lymph node metastases. (orig.)

  13. Clinical and genetic study of a juvenile-onset Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Ying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant hereditary progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a distinct phenotype characterized by chorea, dementia, cognitive and affective impairment. There are selective neural cell loss and atrophy in the caudate and putamen. Dr. George Huntington firstly described the disease accurately and insightfully, which led to a widespread recognition of the inherited chorea that now bears his name. Huntington disease gene (IT15 locus on chromosome 4p16.3, and encompasses 67 exons with a trinucleotide repeat (CAG in the first exon. The CAG repeat length is highly polymorphic in the population and expanded on at least one chromosome of individuals with HD. Clinically, patient with HD are often onset in adulthood. Juvenile-onset HD is relatively rare. Adult-onset HD patients usually have a CAG expansion from 40 to 55 whereas those with juvenile-onset greater than 60 which are often inherited from the father. We investigated the clinical features of a juvenile-onset case with Huntington disease and dynamic mutation of his family. Methods The CAG repeats of IT15 gene were detected using polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis in 115 individuals with preliminary diagnosis as Huntington disease. The repeat numbers of some samples carried expanded or intermediate alleles were verified by the pMD18-T vector clone sequencing. Results Fragment analysis showed that one juvenile-onset case presenting with cognitive dysfunction and hypokinesis carried 15/68 CAG repeats of IT15. His father carried 17/37 and mother carried 15/17. Conclusion 1 The juvenile-onset case of HD presented with different clinical features compared with adult-onset cases. The typical signs of adult-onset cases include progressive chorea, rigidity and dementia. The most common sign of juvenile-onset Huntington disease is cognitive decline. 2 The dynamic mutation of IT15 gene expansion of the CAG repeats in the

  14. Length of normal alleles of C9ORF72 GGGGCC repeat do not influence disease phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Rutherford, Nicola J.; Heckman, Michael G.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Baker, Matt C.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Stewart, Heather; Finger, Elizabeth; Volkening, Kathryn; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H; Lippa, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Expansions of the non-coding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene were recently identified as the long sought-after cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on chromosome 9p. In this study we aimed to determine whether the length of the normal - unexpanded - allele of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 plays a role in the presentation of disease or affects age at onset in C9ORF72 mutation carriers. We also studie...

  15. Nutritional Risk, Micronutrient Status and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study in an Infectious Disease Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Sıtkı Dizdar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status and micronutrient levels of hospitalized patients in an infectious disease clinic and investigate their association with adverse clinical outcomes. The nutritional status of the study participants was assessed using the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002 and micronutrient levels and routine biochemical parameters were tested within the first 24 h of the patient’s admission. The incidence of zinc, selenium, thiamine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 deficiency were 66.7% (n = 40, 46.6% (n = 29, 39.7% (n = 27, 35.3% (n = 24, 14.1% (n = 9, respectively. Selenium levels were significantly higher in patients with urinary tract infections, but lower in soft tissue infections. Copper levels were significantly higher in patients with soft tissue infections. In the Cox regression models, lower albumin, higher serum lactate dehydrogenase levels and higher NRS-2002 scores were associated with increased death. Thiamine, selenium, zinc and vitamin B6 deficiencies but not chromium deficiencies are common in infectious disease clinics. New associations were found between micronutrient levels and infection type and their adverse clinical outcomes. Hypoalbuminemia and a high NRS-2002 score had the greatest accuracy in predicting death, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis on admission.

  16. Nutritional Risk, Micronutrient Status and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study in an Infectious Disease Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdar, Oguzhan Sıtkı; Baspınar, Osman; Kocer, Derya; Dursun, Zehra Bestepe; Avcı, Deniz; Karakükcü, Cigdem; Çelik, İlhami; Gundogan, Kursat

    2016-03-01

    Malnutrition has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status and micronutrient levels of hospitalized patients in an infectious disease clinic and investigate their association with adverse clinical outcomes. The nutritional status of the study participants was assessed using the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) and micronutrient levels and routine biochemical parameters were tested within the first 24 h of the patient's admission. The incidence of zinc, selenium, thiamine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 deficiency were 66.7% (n = 40), 46.6% (n = 29), 39.7% (n = 27), 35.3% (n = 24), 14.1% (n = 9), respectively. Selenium levels were significantly higher in patients with urinary tract infections, but lower in soft tissue infections. Copper levels were significantly higher in patients with soft tissue infections. In the Cox regression models, lower albumin, higher serum lactate dehydrogenase levels and higher NRS-2002 scores were associated with increased death. Thiamine, selenium, zinc and vitamin B6 deficiencies but not chromium deficiencies are common in infectious disease clinics. New associations were found between micronutrient levels and infection type and their adverse clinical outcomes. Hypoalbuminemia and a high NRS-2002 score had the greatest accuracy in predicting death, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis on admission. PMID:26938553

  17. Clinical, psychophysiological and psychological aspects of risk factors of periodontal disease development in clinically healthy persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Nikulina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine risk factors of periodontal disease development, psychophysiological personal types and their interrelations in clinically healthy persons. 47 first-year cadets of St.-Petersburg Military School of radio electronics have been examined. This group of respondents has been chosen by presence of such social stressor as change of place of living (97,9% cadets have arrived in St.-Petersburg from other cities and republics of the Russian Federation and strict disciplinary conditions. The research has revealed a low level of oral hygiene, cases of mild gingivitis in most respondents. The general mental state of group under study is characterized by raised level of personal anxiety and low indices of reactive anxiety. The examined group has demonstrated anxiety, tension, indecision and lowered stress stability. Clinically healthy persons are more liable to develop inflammatory and inflammatory-destructive periodontal diseases. It was possible to determine psychophysiological features correlated with physiological parameters of risk degree of periodontal diseases. It may have a great significance in defining of periodontal disease etiology and pathogenesis

  18. Sleep Physiology Alterations Precede Plethoric Phenotypic Changes in R6/1 Huntington’s Disease Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Fanny; Cayzac, Sebastien; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Jeantet, Yannick; Cho, Yoon H.

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington’s disease (HD), there exists a growing consideration that sleep and circadian dysregulations may be important symptoms. It is not known, however, whether sleep abnormalities contribute to other behavioral deficits in HD patients and mouse models. To determine the precise chronology for sleep physiology alterations and other sensory, motor, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms of HD, the same R6/1 HD transgenics and their wild-type littermates were recorded monthly for sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) together with a wide range of behavioral tests according to a longitudinal plan. We found an early and progressive deterioration of both sleep architecture and EEG brain rhythms in R6/1 mice, which are correlated timely with their spatial working memory impairments. Sleep fragmentation and memory impairments were accompanied by the loss of delta (1-4Hz) power in the transgenic mice, the magnitude of which increased with age and disease progression. These precocious sleep and cognitive impairments were followed by deficits in social behavior, sensory and motor abilities. Our data confirm the existence and importance of sleep physiology alterations in the widely used R6/1 mouse line and highlight their precedence over other plethoric phenotypic changes. The brainwave abnormalities, may represent a novel biomarker and point to innovative therapeutic interventions against HD. PMID:25966356

  19. Identification, expression, and biochemical characterization of N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase mutations and relationship with clinical phenotype in MPS-VI patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litjens, T.; Brooks, D.A.; Hopwood, J.J. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS-VI), is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the defective degradation of dermatan sulfate due to the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase (4S). The clinical severity of MPS-VI ranges in a continuum from mildly affected to severely affected patients. Mutations in MPS-VI patient samples were identified by chemical cleavage and direct DNA sequencing of PCR products derived from patient cDNA. Five amino acid substitutions were identified (T92M, R95Q, Y210C, H393P, and L498P), individually introduced into the wild-type 4S cDNA by site-directed in vitro mutagenesis, and transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells. Three of the five mutations (R95Q, Y210C, and H393P) were observed in > 1 of 25 unrelated MPS-VI patients; however, the mutations were not found in 20 control individuals. The residual 4S activity and protein (biochemical phenotype) were determined for each mutant in order to confirm their identity as mutations and to dissect the contribution of each mutant allele to the overall clinical phenotype of the patient. For each patient, the combined biochemical phenotypes of the two 4S mutant alleles demonstrated a good correspondence with the observed clinical phenotype (with the possible exception of a patient who was a compound heterozygote for T92M and L498P). This preliminary correspondence between genotype and the phenotype in MPS-VI may, with further refinement, contribute to the assessment of therapeutic approaches for MPS-VI patients. 30 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Ralstonia pickettii and Ralstonia insidiosa isolates from clinical and environmental sources including High-purity Water.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Michael P

    2011-08-30

    Abstract Background Ralstonia pickettii is a nosocomial infectious agent and a significant industrial contaminant. It has been found in many different environments including clinical situations, soil and industrial High Purity Water. This study compares the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of a selection of strains of Ralstonia collected from a variety of sources. Results Ralstonia isolates (fifty-nine) from clinical, industrial and environmental origins were compared genotypically using i) Species-specific-PCR, ii) PCR and sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA Interspatial region (ISR) iii) the fliC gene genes, iv) RAPD and BOX-PCR and v) phenotypically using biochemical testing. The species specific-PCR identified fifteen out of fifty-nine designated R. pickettii isolates as actually being the closely related species R. insidiosa. PCR-ribotyping of the 16S-23S rRNA ISR indicated few major differences between the isolates. Analysis of all isolates demonstrated different banding patterns for both the RAPD and BOX primers however these were found not to vary significantly. Conclusions R. pickettii species isolated from wide geographic and environmental sources appear to be reasonably homogenous based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. R. insidiosa can at present only be distinguished from R. pickettii using species specific PCR. R. pickettii and R. insidiosa isolates do not differ significantly phenotypically or genotypically based on environmental or geographical origin.

  1. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Akın

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to evaluate clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with Kawasaki disease (KD in Konya region of Turkey. Methods: The hospital records of patients who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of KD in the Pediatrics Clinics of Konya Training and Research Hospital between May 2010 and June 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Seven cases were found to have the diagnosis of KD, two of whom were incomplete KD. Oropharynx changes were the most common (100% feature in our patients. Five (71% patients had bulbar conjunctivitis. Three (43% patients had erythema at the site of BCG inoculation. Adenopathy was present in all of our patients with the classical form. A desquamation was observed in one case at the seventh day of fever. No cardiac manifestation was seen. Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and thrombocytosis were present in all patients. All of the patients were received intravenous immunoglobulin in the first ten days of the fever. Conclusion: KD should be considered as a possible diagnosis in any child presenting with prolonged fever. BCG reaction can be attributed as a diagnostic criterion for incomplete form of the disease especially in countries where BCG vaccination is routinely performed. Early treatment is essential to prevent cardiovascular complications.

  2. Benzyl-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosaminide induces a storage disease-like phenotype by perturbing the endocytic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Fausto; Real, Francisco X

    2003-04-01

    The sugar analog O-benzyl-N-acetyl-alpha-d-galactosaminide (BG) is an inhibitor of glycan chain elongation and inhibits alpha2,3-sialylation in mucus-secreting HT-29 cells. Long-term exposure of these cells to BG is associated with the accumulation of apical glycoproteins in cytoplasmic vesicles. The mechanisms involved therein and the nature of the vesicles have not been elucidated. In these cells, a massive amount of BG metabolites is synthesized. Because sialic acid is mainly distributed apically in epithelial cells, it has been proposed that the BG-induced undersialylation of apical membrane glycoproteins is responsible for their intracellular accumulation due to a defect in anterograde traffic and that sialic acid may constitute an apical targeting signal. In this work, we demonstrate that the intracellular accumulation of membrane glycoproteins does not result mainly from defects in anterograde traffic. By contrast, in BG-treated cells, endocytosed membrane proteins were retained intracellularly for longer periods of time than in control cells and colocalized with accumulated MUC1 and beta(1) integrin in Rab7/lysobisphosphatidic acid(+) vesicles displaying features of late endosomes. The phenotype of BG-treated cells is reminiscent of that observed in lysosomal storage disorders. Sucrose induced a BG-like, lysosomal storage disease-like phenotype without affecting sialylation, indicating that undersialylation is not a requisite for the intracellular accumulation of membrane glycoproteins. Our findings strongly support the notion that the effects observed in BG-treated cells result from the accumulation of BG-derived metabolites and from defects in the endosomal pathway. We propose that abnormal subcellular distribution of membrane glycoproteins involved in cellular communication and/or signaling may also take place in lysosomal storage disorders and may contribute to their pathogenesis. PMID:12538583

  3. Identification of novel genetic markers associated with clinical phenotypes of systemic sclerosis through a genome-wide association strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gorlova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS, the genetic components contributing to different clinical sub-phenotypes of systemic sclerosis (SSc. We considered limited (lcSSc and diffuse (dcSSc cutaneous involvement, and the relationships with presence of the SSc-specific auto-antibodies, anti-centromere (ACA, and anti-topoisomerase I (ATA. Four GWAS cohorts, comprising 2,296 SSc patients and 5,171 healthy controls, were meta-analyzed looking for associations in the selected subgroups. Eighteen polymorphisms were further tested in nine independent cohorts comprising an additional 3,175 SSc patients and 4,971 controls. Conditional analysis for associated SNPs in the HLA region was performed to explore their independent association in antibody subgroups. Overall analysis showed that non-HLA polymorphism rs11642873 in IRF8 gene to be associated at GWAS level with lcSSc (P = 2.32×10(-12, OR = 0.75. Also, rs12540874 in GRB10 gene (P = 1.27 × 10(-6, OR = 1.15 and rs11047102 in SOX5 gene (P = 1.39×10(-7, OR = 1.36 showed a suggestive association with lcSSc and ACA subgroups respectively. In the HLA region, we observed highly associated allelic combinations in the HLA-DQB1 locus with ACA (P = 1.79×10(-61, OR = 2.48, in the HLA-DPA1/B1 loci with ATA (P = 4.57×10(-76, OR = 8.84, and in NOTCH4 with ACA P = 8.84×10(-21, OR = 0.55 and ATA (P = 1.14×10(-8, OR = 0.54. We have identified three new non-HLA genes (IRF8, GRB10, and SOX5 associated with SSc clinical and auto-antibody subgroups. Within the HLA region, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1/B1, and NOTCH4 associations with SSc are likely confined to specific auto-antibodies. These data emphasize the differential genetic components of subphenotypes of SSc.

  4. Correlation between "ABO" blood group phenotypes and periodontal disease: Prevalence in south Kanara district, Karnataka state, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpur Prakash Pai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The correlation between certain systemic diseases and ABO blood group is a well-documented fact. The association between periodontal disease and ABO blood group is not studied in relation to a specific geographic location. Here is a study conducted on a group of patients belonging to South Kanara district of Karnataka state. Materials and Methods: A total of 750 subjects aged between 30and 38 years belonging to South Kanara district were selected on random basis. The study subjects were segregated into healthy/mild gingivitis, moderate/severe gingivitis, and periodontitis group, based on Loe and Silness index and clinical attachment loss as criteria. The study group was further categorized and graded using Ramfjord′s periodontal disease index. Blood samples were collected to identify ABO blood group. Results: Prevalence of blood group O was more in South Kanara district, followed by blood groups B and A, and the least prevalent was AB. The percentage distribution of subjects with blood groups O and AB was more in healthy/mild gingivitis group (group I and moderate/severe gingivitis group (group II, while subjects with blood groups B and A were more in periodontitis group III. There was increased prevalence of subjects with blood groups O and AB with healthy periodontium, while subjects with blood groups B and A showed inclination toward diseased periodontium. Conclusion: There is a correlation existing between periodontal disease and ABO blood group in this geographic location. This association can be due to various blood group antigens acting as receptors for infectious agents associated with periodontal disease. This broad correlation between periodontal disease and ABO blood group also points toward susceptibility ofthe subjects with certain blood groups to periodontal disease.

  5. Therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godyń, Justyna; Jończyk, Jakub; Panek, Dawid; Malawska, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is considered to be the most common cause of dementia and is an incurable, progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Current treatment of the disease, essentially symptomatic, is based on three cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, affecting the glutamatergic system. Since 2003, no new drugs have been approved for treatment of AD. This article presents current directions in the search for novel, potentially effective agents for the treatment of AD, as well as selected promising treatment strategies. These include agents acting upon the beta-amyloid, such as vaccines, antibodies and inhibitors or modulators of γ- and β-secretase; agents directed against the tau protein as well as compounds acting as antagonists of neurotransmitter systems (serotoninergic 5-HT6 and histaminergic H3). Ongoing clinical trials with Aβ antibodies (solanezumab, gantenerumab, crenezumab) seem to be promising, while vaccines against the tau protein (AADvac1 and ACI-35) are now in early-stage trials. Interesting results have also been achieved in trials involving small molecules such as inhibitors of β-secretase (MK-8931, E2609), a combination of 5-HT6 antagonist (idalopirdine) with donepezil, inhibition of advanced glycation end product receptors by azeliragon or modulation of the acetylcholine response of α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by encenicline. Development of new effective drugs acting upon the central nervous system is usually a difficult and time-consuming process, and in the case of AD to-date clinical trials have had a very high failure rate. Most phase II clinical trials ending with a positive outcome do not succeed in phase III, often due to serious adverse effects or lack of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26721364

  6. Clinical results of neurotransmission SPECT in extra-pyramidal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present some methodological aspects and clinical applications of dopamine D2 receptor and transporter SPECT using new radiotracers radiolabeled with iodine 123. The gamma camera quality control and standardisation has to be adapted to the small volume and deep location of striata, where receptors and transporters are present. Phantom containing hollow spheres of different diameters which can be filled with different amounts of 99mTc or 123I. The semi quantitation of receptor and transporter molecular concentration is based on an equilibrium binding model. According to this model, the binding potential (Bmax. Ka) is equal to the ratio between specific binding in the striatum and circulating activity in a reference region of interest in the occipital cortex. By comparing ECD and ILIS SPECT, it has been shown that striatal ILIS binding does not depend on the local perfusion. The clinical applications mainly concern the extra-pyramidal pathology: ILIS and IBZM SPECT are able to differentiate pre- and post-synaptic lesions. In Parkinson disease the nigrostriatal pathway is damaged and D2 receptors are normal or increased, as shown by normal or elevated IBZM or ILIS uptake. In other extra pyramidal degenerative diseases as progressive supra nuclear palsy or multiple system atrophy striatal D2 receptors are damaged as shown by decreased IBZM or ILIS uptake. In our experience, 88 per cent of patients are correctly classified by ILIS SPECT and 86 per cent with IBZM SPECT. Dopamine transporter SPECT with βCIT and PE2I provides an evaluation of the presynaptic neuronal density in the striatum. One can expect an help for the early diagnosis and the evaluation of Parkinson disease. Another potential application of dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT is the evaluation of neuronal loss after hypoxo-ischemia. We conclude that dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT using specific ligands should become a useful diagnosis tool to study a large number of brain dysfunctions. (author)

  7. Clinical criteria for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) follows the UK Brain Bank Criteria, which demands bradykinesia and one additional symptom, i.e. rigidity, resting tremor or postural instability. The latter is not a useful sign for the early diagnosis of PD, because it does not appear before Hoehn and Yahr stage 3. Early symptoms of PD which precede the onset of motor symptoms are hyposmia, REM sleep behavioral disorder, constipation, and depression. In addition, an increasing number of patients whose PD is related to a genetic defect are being described. Thus, genetic testing may eventually develop into a tool to identify at-risk patients. The clinical diagnosis of PD can be supported by levodopa or apomorphine tests. Imaging studies such as cranial CT or MRI are helpful to distinguish idiopathic PD from atypical or secondary PD. SPECT and PET methods are valuable to distinguish PD tremor from essential tremor if this is clinically not possible. Using all of these methods, we may soon be able to make a premotor diagnosis of PD, which will raise the question whether early treatment is possible and ethically and clinically advisable. PMID:20616563

  8. Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammi, Matthew R.; Baughman, Robert P.; Birring, Surinder S.; Russell, Anne-Marie; Ryu, Jay H.; Scholand, Marybeth; Distler, Oliver; LeSage, Daphne; Sarver, Catherine; Antoniou, Katerina; Highland, Kristin B.; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia; Lasky, Joseph A.; Wells, Athol U.; Saketkoo, Lesley Ann

    2015-01-01

    The chronic fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) are a group of heterogeneous pulmonary parenchymal disorders described by radiologic and histological patterns termed usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). These include idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and those related to connective tissue disease (CTD) and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Beyond the importance of establishing an appropriate diagnosis, designing optimal clinical trials for IIPs has been fraught with difficulties in consistency of clinical endpoints making power analyses, and the establishment of efficacy and interpretation of results across trials challenging. Preliminary recommendations, developed by rigorous consensus methods, proposed a minimum set of outcome measures, a ‘core set’, to be incorporated into future clinical trials (Saketkoo et al, THORAX. 2014.). This paper sets out to examine the candidate instruments for each domain (Dyspnea, Cough, Health Related Quality of Life, Imaging, Lung Physiology and Function, Mortality). Candidate measures that were not selected as well as measures that were not available for examination at the time of the consensus process will also be discussed. PMID:27019654

  9. Increased plasma nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is associated with a hyperproliferative phenotype and restrains disease progression in MPN-associated myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosti, Vittorio; Campanelli, Rita; Massa, Margherita; Viarengo, Gianluca; Villani, Laura; Poletto, Valentina; Bonetti, Elisa; Catarsi, Paolo; Magrini, Umberto; Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina; Genazzani, Armando A; Barosi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN)-associated myelofibrosis is a clonal, neoplastic disorder of the hematopoietic stem cells, in which inflammation and immune dysregulation play an important role. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (eNAMPT), also known as visfatin, is a cytokine implicated in a number of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Here plasma levels of eNAMPT in patients with MPN-associated myelofibrosis and their effects on disease phenotype and outcomes were examined. The concordance of eNAMPT levels with the marker of general inflammation high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was also studied. A total of 333 MPN-associated myelofibrosis patients (187 males and 146 females) and 31 age- and gender-matched normal-weight healthy subjects were enrolled in the study main body. Levels of eNAMPT and hs-CRP were simultaneously assayed in 209 MPN-associated myelofibrosis patients. Twenty-four polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia patients were used as controls. eNAMPT was over expressed in MPN-associated myelofibrosis, and eNAMPT expression was correlated with higher white blood cell count, higher hemoglobin, and higher platelet count, suggesting that eNAMPT is an indispensable permissive agent for myeloproliferation of MPN-associated myelofibrosis. The lack of correlation between eNAMPT and hs-CRP revealed that eNAMPT in MPN-associated myelofibrosis does not behave as a canonical inflammatory cytokine. In addition, higher levels of eNAMPT predicted longer time to blast transformation, and protected against progression toward thrombocytopenia and large splenomegaly. In conclusion, in MPN-associated myelofibrosis high levels of eNAMPT mark the myeloproliferative potential and, at variance with a high number of cancers, are protective against disease progression. Am. J. Hematol. 91:709-713, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27074203

  10. A locus-specific database for mutations in GDAP1 allows analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations in Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases type 4A and 2K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassereau Julien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 gene (GDAP1, which is involved in the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT, the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy, encodes a protein anchored to the mitochondrial outer membrane. The phenotypic presentations of patients carrying GDAP1 mutations are heterogeneous, making it difficult to determine genotype-phenotype correlations, since the majority of the mutations have been found in only a few unrelated patients. Locus-specific databases (LSDB established in the framework of the Human Variome Project provide powerful tools for the investigation of such rare diseases. Methods and Results We report the development of a publicly accessible LSDB for the GDAP1 gene. The GDAP1 LSDB has adopted the Leiden Open-source Variation Database (LOVD software platform. This database, which now contains 57 unique variants reported in 179 cases of CMT, offers a detailed description of the molecular, clinical and electrophysiological data of the patients. The usefulness of the GDAP1 database is illustrated by the finding that GDAP1 mutations lead to primary axonal damage in CMT, with secondary demyelination in the more severe cases of the disease. Conclusion Findings of this nature should lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of CMT. Finally, the GDAP1 LSDB, which is part of the mitodyn.org portal of databases of genes incriminated in disorders involving mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetics, should yield new insights into mitochondrial diseases.

  11. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Hardavella, Georgia; George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer ...

  12. Phenomics Research on Coronary Heart Disease Based on Human Phenotype Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi; Gao, Kuo; Zhao, Huihui; Wang, Juan; Zhai, Xing; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of holistic, dynamics, complexity, and spatial and temporal features enable “Omics” and theories of TCM to interlink with each other. HPO, namely, “characterization,” can be understood as a sorting and generalization of the manifestations shown by people with diseases on the basis of the phenomics. Syndrome is the overall “manifestation” of human body pathological and physiological changes expressed by four diagnostic methods' information. The four diagnostic methods' data could be the most objective and direct manifestations of human body under morbid conditions. In this aspect, it is consistent with the connation of “characterization.” Meanwhile, the four diagnostic methods' data also equip us with features of characterization in HPO. In our study, we compared 107 pieces of four diagnostic methods' information with the “characterization database” to further analyze data of four diagnostic methods' characterization in accordance with the common characteristics of four diagnostic methods' information and characterization and integrated 107 pieces of four diagnostic methods' data to relevant items in HPO and finished the expansion of characterization information in HPO. PMID:25610858

  13. Latent cluster analysis of ALS phenotypes identifies prognostically differing groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeban Ganesalingam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a degenerative disease predominantly affecting motor neurons and manifesting as several different phenotypes. Whether these phenotypes correspond to different underlying disease processes is unknown. We used latent cluster analysis to identify groupings of clinical variables in an objective and unbiased way to improve phenotyping for clinical and research purposes. METHODS: Latent class cluster analysis was applied to a large database consisting of 1467 records of people with ALS, using discrete variables which can be readily determined at the first clinic appointment. The model was tested for clinical relevance by survival analysis of the phenotypic groupings using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: The best model generated five distinct phenotypic classes that strongly predicted survival (p<0.0001. Eight variables were used for the latent class analysis, but a good estimate of the classification could be obtained using just two variables: site of first symptoms (bulbar or limb and time from symptom onset to diagnosis (p<0.00001. CONCLUSION: The five phenotypic classes identified using latent cluster analysis can predict prognosis. They could be used to stratify patients recruited into clinical trials and generating more homogeneous disease groups for genetic, proteomic and risk factor research.

  14. Behavioral phenotyping of Parkin-deficient mice: looking for early preclinical features of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rial

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence showing that the neurodegenerative processes that lead to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD begin many years before the appearance of the characteristic motor symptoms. Neuropsychiatric, sensorial and cognitive deficits are recognized as early non-motor manifestations of PD, and are not attenuated by the current anti-parkinsonian therapy. Although loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene cause early-onset familial PD, Parkin-deficient mice do not display spontaneous degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway or enhanced vulnerability to dopaminergic neurotoxins such as 6-OHDA and MPTP. Here, we employed adult homozygous C57BL/6 mice with parkin gene deletion on exon 3 (parkin-/- to further investigate the relevance of Parkin in the regulation of non-motor features, namely olfactory, emotional, cognitive and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Parkin-/- mice displayed normal performance on behavioral tests evaluating olfaction (olfactory discrimination, anxiety (elevated plus-maze, depressive-like behavior (forced swimming and tail suspension and motor function (rotarod, grasping strength and pole. However, parkin-/- mice displayed a poor performance in the open field habituation, object location and modified Y-maze tasks suggestive of procedural and short-term spatial memory deficits. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP. These findings indicate that the genetic deletion of parkin causes deficiencies in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, resulting in memory deficits with no major olfactory, emotional or motor impairments. Therefore, parkin-/- mice may represent a promising animal model to study the early stages of PD and for testing new therapeutic strategies to restore learning and memory and synaptic plasticity impairments in PD.

  15. Behavioral phenotyping of Parkin-deficient mice: looking for early preclinical features of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial, Daniel; Castro, Adalberto A; Machado, Nuno; Garção, Pedro; Gonçalves, Francisco Q; Silva, Henrique B; Tomé, Angelo R; Köfalvi, Attila; Corti, Olga; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable evidence showing that the neurodegenerative processes that lead to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) begin many years before the appearance of the characteristic motor symptoms. Neuropsychiatric, sensorial and cognitive deficits are recognized as early non-motor manifestations of PD, and are not attenuated by the current anti-parkinsonian therapy. Although loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene cause early-onset familial PD, Parkin-deficient mice do not display spontaneous degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway or enhanced vulnerability to dopaminergic neurotoxins such as 6-OHDA and MPTP. Here, we employed adult homozygous C57BL/6 mice with parkin gene deletion on exon 3 (parkin-/-) to further investigate the relevance of Parkin in the regulation of non-motor features, namely olfactory, emotional, cognitive and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Parkin-/- mice displayed normal performance on behavioral tests evaluating olfaction (olfactory discrimination), anxiety (elevated plus-maze), depressive-like behavior (forced swimming and tail suspension) and motor function (rotarod, grasping strength and pole). However, parkin-/- mice displayed a poor performance in the open field habituation, object location and modified Y-maze tasks suggestive of procedural and short-term spatial memory deficits. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). These findings indicate that the genetic deletion of parkin causes deficiencies in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, resulting in memory deficits with no major olfactory, emotional or motor impairments. Therefore, parkin-/- mice may represent a promising animal model to study the early stages of PD and for testing new therapeutic strategies to restore learning and memory and synaptic plasticity impairments in PD. PMID:25486126

  16. Enhanced expression of polysialic acid correlates with malignant phenotype in breast cancer cell lines and clinical tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Xiang; Zeng, Ying-Nan; He, Fa; Yang, Xiao-Min; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is highly expressed during embryonic development, but barely expressed during postnatal development, and may be 're-expressed' in cancer tissues. In this study, motility and migration assays were performed to compare the changes in cell behavior between non-malignant and maligant cells. Next, the expression levels of PSA were evaluated in 4 human and mouse normal breast or breast cancer (BC) cell lines using 1,2-diamino-4,5-methylenedioxybenzene-labeling HPLC technology, as well as in human clinical BC tissue samples. PSA expression was significantly higher in malignant cells (where it appeared to facilitate cell migration and motility) than in non-malignant cells. Enhanced PSA expression levels were also observed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a leading cause of cancer cell metastasis, which was induced in the NMuMG and MCF10A cells by treatment with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). An increased PSA expression also correlated with the disease stage in the patients with BC (PPST) and polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII (STX), which are responsible for PSA synthesis, were differently expressed in the tested BC samples. However, PST, but not STX, was re-expressed in 14 out of 20 clinical BC samples. The findings of the present study indicate that the pathophysiology of BC involves the aberrant regulation of PSA expression and PST gene expression. PMID:26530860

  17. Male breast disease: clinical, mammographic, and ultrasonographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenhan-Bilgen, Isil E-mail: isilbilgen@hotmail.com; Bozkaya, Halil; Uestuen, Esin Emin; Memis, Aysenur

    2002-09-01

    Purpose: To describe and quantitate the radiological (mammographic and ultrasonographic) characteristics of male breast disease and to report the clinical and pathological findings. Materials and methods: Two-hundred-thirty-six male patients with different male breast diseases, diagnosed at our institution between January 1990 and July 2001, were retrospectively evaluated. The history, physical examination, mammographic and ultrasonographic findings were analyzed. Results: The spectrum of the disease in 236 male patients were gynecomastia (n=206), primary breast carcinoma (n=14), fat necrosis (n=5), lipoma (n=3), subareolar abscess (n=2), epidermal inclusion cyst (n=1), sebaceous cyst (n=1), hematoma (n=1), myeloma (n=1), and metastatic carcinoma (n=2). The distribution of patterns of gynecomastia were; 34% (n=71) nodular, 35% (n=73) dendritic and 31% (n=62) diffuse glandular. Gynecomastia was unilateral in 55% (n=113) and bilateral in 45% (n=93) of the patients. Male breast cancer presented as a mass without microcalcifications in 86% (n=12) and with microcalcifications in 7% (n=1) of patients. The mass was obscured by gynecomastia, partially in two, totally in one patient. The location of the mass was retroareolar in 46% (n=6) and eccentric to the nipple in 54% (n=7) of patients. On ultrasonography (US), the contours were well-circumscribed in 20% (n=3) and irregular in 80% (n=12) of the masses. Conclusion: Male breast has a wide spectrum of diseases, some of which have characteristic radiological appearances that can be correlated with their pathologic diagnosis. In the evaluation of the male breast, mammography and US are essential and should be performed along with physical examination.

  18. Clinical and nursing problems in Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Wawrzycka

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crohn’s disease (CD is a transmural, typically granulomatous intestinal inflammation and may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus. The complexity of the course of CD along with its complications (fistulas, perforation, and bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract requires doctors and nurses to have specialised knowledge that conditions the treatment of this disease. Aim of the research : To present the clinical image and nursing problems of CD patients, based on the analysis of medical documentation of the Clinical Department of General, Oncological and Endocrine Surgery. Material and methods: The group under study was formed out of 34 patients with diagnosed CD, hospitalised within the years 2003–2011. The criteria for inclusion into the group were as follows: diagnosed CD, age of 18–80, male and female gender. The criteria for exclusion were connected with other inflammatory diseases of the intestines, the age being below 18, or admission due to another reason, e.g. a planned cholelithiasis surgery during a remission of CD. Results : Analysis of medical documentation concerned 34 patients with CD. There were 15 women (44.1% and 19 men (55.9% in the group; the minimal age was 20 and the maximal 77; the average age was 47.2 and the median 47. The minimum length of stay was 1 day, the maximum 32 days, the average 8.29, and the median 6.5. Analysis of the data showed that the duration of hospitalisation increases with age. There is no statistical interrelation between the length of stay at the hospital and the nature of the stay (emergency, planned. The duration of the disease was most often from 2 to 5 years in 12 cases (35.3%, in 7 cases (20.6% this was 5 to 10 years, and in one person (2.9% it was above 10 years. In 23.5% of patients, it was aches and pains that were the cause of going to hospital; other symptoms such as bleeding, diarrhoea and vomiting were a separate rarer cause of

  19. Farber disease: clinical presentation, pathogenesis and a new approach to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth Johannes

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farber Disease is an autosomal-recessively inherited, lysosomal storage disorder caused by acid ceramidase deficiency and associated with distinct clinical phenotypes. Children with significant neurological involvement usually die early in infancy, whereas patients without or only mild neurological findings suffer from progressive joint deformation and contractures, subcutaneous nodules, inflammatory, periarticular granulomas, a hoarse voice and finally respiratory insufficiency caused by granuloma formation in the respiratory tract and interstitial pneumonitis leading to death in the third or fourth decade of live. As the inflammatory component of this disorder is caused by some kind of leukocyte dysregulation, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can restore a healthy immune system and thus may provide a curative option in Farber Disease patients without neurological involvement. Previous stem cell transplantations in two children with severe neurological involvement had resulted in a disappointing outcome, as both patients died of progressive deterioration of their neurological status. As a consequence, stem cell transplantation does not appear to be able to abolish or even reduce the neurotoxic effects of the abundant ceramide storage in the brain. Methods After myeloablative, busulfan-based preparative regimens, four Farber Disease patients without neurological involvement received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from related and unrelated donors. Stem cell source was BM in three patients and PBSC in one patient; GvHD-prophylaxis consisted of CsA and short course MTX. Results and discussion In all patients, HSCT resulted in almost complete resolution of granulomas and joint contractures, considerable improvement of mobility and joint motility without relevant therapy-related morbidities. All patients are alive and well at this point with stabile donor cell chimerism and without

  20. Lumpy Skin Disease in Jordan: Disease Emergence, Clinical Signs, Complications and Preliminary-associated Economic Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutarbush, S M; Ababneh, M M; Al Zoubi, I G; Al Sheyab, O M; Al Zoubi, M G; Alekish, M O; Al Gharabat, R J

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to report the emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Jordan and associated clinical signs, complications and preliminary economic losses. In mid-April, 2013, two adult dairy cattle developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD and were confirmed as positive by PCR. The two cases were in Bani Kenanah district, Irbid governorate, on the Jordanian border of Israel and Syria. The disease spread rapidly to all the districts of Irbid governorate. During the month following the emergence of the disease, data were collected related to the epidemiology of the disease and the numbers of affected cattle on the premises. Forty-one dairy cattle holdings were surveyed. The morbidity rate ranged from 3% to 100%, (Mean = 35.1%, SD ±28.5%). The mortality rate ranged from 0% to 20%, (Mean = 1.3%, SD ±4.4%). The case fatality rate ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 6.2%, SD ±22%). The overall morbidity rate was 26%, mortality rate 1.9% and case fatality rate 7.5%. Skin nodules, anorexia, decreased milk production and decreased body weight were common clinical signs, while mastitis and myiasis were seen as complications in a few affected animals. Decreased body weight ranged from 0% to 80%, (Mean = 23.1%, SD ±15.7%). Decreased milk production ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 51.5%, SD ±22.2%). Affected cattle were treated mainly with broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. The cost of treatment ranged from 0 to 84.3 British Pound/animal, (Mean = 27.9 GBP, SD ±22.5 GBP). LSD continues to spread through the Middle East region and poses a serious threat to the rest of Asia and Europe. International collaboration and communication is warranted to prevent the further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe. PMID:24148185