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Sample records for clinical ct-based calculations

  1. Clinical CT-based calculations of dose and positron emitter distributions in proton therapy using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, K.; Ferrari, A.; Sommerer, F.; Paganetti, H.

    2007-07-01

    Clinical investigations on post-irradiation PET/CT (positron emission tomography/computed tomography) imaging for in vivo verification of treatment delivery and, in particular, beam range in proton therapy are underway at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Within this project, we have developed a Monte Carlo framework for CT-based calculation of dose and irradiation-induced positron emitter distributions. Initial proton beam information is provided by a separate Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation modelling the treatment head. Particle transport in the patient is performed in the CT voxel geometry using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The implementation uses a discrete number of different tissue types with composition and mean density deduced from the CT scan. Scaling factors are introduced to account for the continuous Hounsfield unit dependence of the mass density and of the relative stopping power ratio to water used by the treatment planning system (XiO (Computerized Medical Systems Inc.)). Resulting Monte Carlo dose distributions are generally found in good correspondence with calculations of the treatment planning program, except a few cases (e.g. in the presence of air/tissue interfaces). Whereas dose is computed using standard FLUKA utilities, positron emitter distributions are calculated by internally combining proton fluence with experimental and evaluated cross-sections yielding 11C, 15O, 14O, 13N, 38K and 30P. Simulated positron emitter distributions yield PET images in good agreement with measurements. In this paper, we describe in detail the specific implementation of the FLUKA calculation framework, which may be easily adapted to handle arbitrary phase spaces of proton beams delivered by other facilities or include more reaction channels based on additional cross-section data. Further, we demonstrate the effects of different acquisition time regimes (e.g., PET imaging during or after irradiation) on the intensity and spatial distribution of the irradiation

  2. Effects of CT based Voxel Phantoms on Dose Distribution Calculated with Monte Carlo Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Chaobin; Huang Qunying; Wu Yican

    2005-01-01

    A few CT-based voxel phantoms were produced to investigate the sensitivity of Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray beam and electron beam to the proportions of elements and the mass densities of the materials used to express the patient's anatomical structure. The human body can be well outlined by air, lung, adipose, muscle, soft bone and hard bone to calculate the dose distribution with Monte Carlo method. The effects of the calibration curves established by using various CT scanners are not clinically significant based on our investigation. The deviation from the values of cumulative dose volume histogram derived from CT-based voxel phantoms is less than 1% for the given target.

  3. Effects of CT based Voxel Phantoms on Dose Distribution Calculated with Monte Carlo Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaobin; Huang, Qunying; Wu, Yican

    2005-04-01

    A few CT-based voxel phantoms were produced to investigate the sensitivity of Monte Carlo simulations of x-ray beam and electron beam to the proportions of elements and the mass densities of the materials used to express the patient's anatomical structure. The human body can be well outlined by air, lung, adipose, muscle, soft bone and hard bone to calculate the dose distribution with Monte Carlo method. The effects of the calibration curves established by using various CT scanners are not clinically significant based on our investigation. The deviation from the values of cumulative dose volume histogram derived from CT-based voxel phantoms is less than 1% for the given target.

  4. CT-based dose calculations and in vivo dosimetry for lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable CT-based dose calculations and dosimetric quality control are essential for the introduction of new conformal techniques for the treatment of lung cancer. The first aim of this study was therefore to check the accuracy of dose calculations based on CT-densities, using a simple inhomogeneity correction model, for lung cancer patients irradiated with an AP-PA treatment technique. Second, the use of diodes for absolute exit dose measurements and an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for relative transmission dose verification was investigated for 22 and 12 patients, respectively. The measured dose values were compared with calculations performed using our 3-dimensional treatment planning system, using CT-densities or assuming the patient to be water-equivalent. Using water-equivalent calculations, the actual exit dose value under lung was, on average, underestimated by 30%, with an overall spread of 10% (1 SD). Using inhomogeneity corrections, the exit dose was, on average, overestimated by 4%, with an overall spread of 6% (1 SD). Only 2% of the average deviation was due to the inhomogeneity correction model. An uncertainty in exit dose calculation of 2.5% (1 SD) could be explained by organ motion, resulting from the ventilatory or cardiac cycle. The most important reason for the large overall spread was, however, the uncertainty involved in performing point measurements: about 4% (1 SD). This difference resulted from the systematic and random deviation in patient set-up and therefore in diode position with respect to patient anatomy. Transmission and exit dose values agreed with an average difference of 1.1%. Transmission dose profiles also showed good agreement with calculated exit dose profiles. Our study shows that, for this treatment technique, the dose in the thorax region is quite accurately predicted using CT-based dose calculations, even if a simple inhomogeneity correction model is used. Point detectors such as diodes are not suitable for exit

  5. Dual-energy CT-based material extraction for tissue segmentation in Monte Carlo dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Carrier, Jean-François; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2008-05-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations are performed on patient geometries derived from computed tomography (CT) images. For most available MC codes, the Hounsfield units (HU) in each voxel of a CT image have to be converted into mass density (ρ) and material type. This is typically done with a (HU; ρ) calibration curve which may lead to mis-assignment of media. In this work, an improved material segmentation using dual-energy CT-based material extraction is presented. For this purpose, the differences in extracted effective atomic numbers Z and the relative electron densities ρe of each voxel are used. Dual-energy CT material extraction based on parametrization of the linear attenuation coefficient for 17 tissue-equivalent inserts inside a solid water phantom was done. Scans of the phantom were acquired at 100 kVp and 140 kVp from which Z and ρe values of each insert were derived. The mean errors on Z and ρe extraction were 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. Phantom dose calculations were performed for 250 kVp and 18 MV photon beams and an 18 MeV electron beam in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code. Two material assignments were used: the conventional (HU; ρ) and the novel (HU; ρ, Z) dual-energy CT tissue segmentation. The dose calculation errors using the conventional tissue segmentation were as high as 17% in a mis-assigned soft bone tissue-equivalent material for the 250 kVp photon beam. Similarly, the errors for the 18 MeV electron beam and the 18 MV photon beam were up to 6% and 3% in some mis-assigned media. The assignment of all tissue-equivalent inserts was accurate using the novel dual-energy CT material assignment. As a result, the dose calculation errors were below 1% in all beam arrangements. Comparable improvement in dose calculation accuracy is expected for human tissues. The dual-energy tissue segmentation offers a significantly higher accuracy compared to the conventional single-energy segmentation.

  6. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

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    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); Bailly, Pascal [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); CHU d' Amiens, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, unite TEP, Hopital Sud, Amiens cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV{sub MAX} and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV{sub MAX} (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  7. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUVMAX and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUVMAX (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  8. A CT-based analytical dose calculation method for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This article presents an analytical dose calculation method for high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, taking into account the effects of inhomogeneities and reduced photon backscatter near the skin. The adequacy of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) two-dimensional formalism for treatment planning is also assessed. Methods: The proposed method uses material composition and density data derived from computed tomography images. The primary and scatter dose distributions for each dwell position are calculated first as if the patient is an infinite water phantom. This is done using either TG-43 or a database of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions. The latter can be used to account for the effects of shielding in water. Subsequently, corrections for photon attenuation, scatter, and spectral variations along medium- or low-Z inhomogeneities are made according to the radiological paths determined by ray tracing. The scatter dose is then scaled by a correction factor that depends on the distances between the point of interest, the body contour, and the source position. Dose calculations are done for phantoms with tissue and lead inserts, as well as patient plans for head-and-neck, esophagus, and MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy treatments. Gamma indices are evaluated using a dose-difference criterion of 3% and a distance-to-agreement criterion of 2 mm. PTRANCT MC calculations are used as the reference dose distributions. Results: For the phantom with tissue and lead inserts, the percentages of the voxels of interest passing the gamma criteria (Pγ≥1) are 100% for the analytical calculation and 91% for TG-43. For the breast patient plan, TG-43 overestimates the target volume receiving the prescribed dose by 4% and the dose to the hottest 0.1 cm3 of the skin by 9%, whereas the analytical and MC results agree within 0.4%. Pγ≥1 are 100% and 48% for the analytical and TG-43 calculations, respectively. For the head-and-neck and esophagus patient plans, Pγ≥1 are ≥99

  9. Organ dose calculation in CT based on scout image data and automatic image registration

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    Kortesniemi, Mika; Salli, Eero; Seuri, Raija [HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)], E-mail: mika.kortesniemi@hus.fi

    2012-10-15

    Background Computed tomography (CT) has become the main contributor of the cumulative radiation exposure in radiology. Information on cumulative exposure history of the patient should be available for efficient management of radiation exposures and for radiological justification. Purpose To develop and evaluate automatic image registration for organ dose calculation in CT. Material and Methods Planning radiograph (scout) image data describing CT scan ranges from 15 thoracic CT examinations (9 men and 6 women) and 10 abdominal CT examinations (6 men and 4 women) were co-registered with the reference trunk CT scout image. 2-D affine transformation and normalized correlation metric was used for image registration. Longitudinal (z-axis) scan range coordinates on the reference scout image were converted into slice locations on the CT-Expo anthropomorphic male and female models, following organ and effective dose calculations. Results The average deviation of z-location of studied patient images from the corresponding location in the reference scout image was 6.2 mm. The ranges of organ and effective doses with constant exposure parameters were from 0 to 28.0 mGy and from 7.3 to 14.5 mSv, respectively. The mean deviation of the doses for fully irradiated organs (inside the scan range), partially irradiated organs and non-irradiated organs (outside the scan range) was 1%, 5%, and 22%, respectively, due to image registration. Conclusion The automated image processing method to registrate individual chest and abdominal CT scout radiograph with the reference scout radiograph is feasible. It can be used to determine the individual scan range coordinates in z-direction to calculate the organ dose values. The presented method could be utilized in automatic organ dose calculation in CT for radiation exposure tracking of the patients.

  10. Organ dose calculation in CT based on scout image data and automatic image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background Computed tomography (CT) has become the main contributor of the cumulative radiation exposure in radiology. Information on cumulative exposure history of the patient should be available for efficient management of radiation exposures and for radiological justification. Purpose To develop and evaluate automatic image registration for organ dose calculation in CT. Material and Methods Planning radiograph (scout) image data describing CT scan ranges from 15 thoracic CT examinations (9 men and 6 women) and 10 abdominal CT examinations (6 men and 4 women) were co-registered with the reference trunk CT scout image. 2-D affine transformation and normalized correlation metric was used for image registration. Longitudinal (z-axis) scan range coordinates on the reference scout image were converted into slice locations on the CT-Expo anthropomorphic male and female models, following organ and effective dose calculations. Results The average deviation of z-location of studied patient images from the corresponding location in the reference scout image was 6.2 mm. The ranges of organ and effective doses with constant exposure parameters were from 0 to 28.0 mGy and from 7.3 to 14.5 mSv, respectively. The mean deviation of the doses for fully irradiated organs (inside the scan range), partially irradiated organs and non-irradiated organs (outside the scan range) was 1%, 5%, and 22%, respectively, due to image registration. Conclusion The automated image processing method to registrate individual chest and abdominal CT scout radiograph with the reference scout radiograph is feasible. It can be used to determine the individual scan range coordinates in z-direction to calculate the organ dose values. The presented method could be utilized in automatic organ dose calculation in CT for radiation exposure tracking of the patients

  11. Implementation and initial clinical experience of offline PET/CT-based verification of scanned carbon ion treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We report on the implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Centre (HIT) and present first clinical cases for post-activation measurements after scanned carbon ion irradiation. Key ingredient of this in-vivo treatment verification is the comparison of irradiation-induced patient activation measured by a PET scanner with a prediction simulated by means of Monte Carlo techniques. Material and methods: At HIT, a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner has been installed in close vicinity to the treatment rooms. After selected irradiation fractions, the patient either walks to the scanner for acquisition of the activation data or is transported using a shuttle system. The expected activity distribution is obtained from the production of β+-active isotopes simulated by the FLUKA code on the basis of the patient-specific treatment plan, post-processed considering the time course of the respective treatment fraction, the estimated biological washout of the induced activity and a simplified model of the imaging process. Results: We present four patients with different indications of head, head/neck, liver and pelvic tumours. A clear correlation between the measured PET signal and the simulated activity pattern is observed for all patients, thus supporting a proper treatment delivery. In the case of a pelvic tumour patient it was possible to detect minor treatment delivery inaccuracies. Conclusions: The initial clinical experience proves the feasibility of the implemented strategy for offline confirmation of scanned carbon ion irradiation and therefore constitutes a first step towards a comprehensive PET/CT-based treatment verification in the clinical routine at HIT

  12. Cone beam CT based image guided radiotherapy: Implementation and clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kV cone beam CT (C.B.C.T.) consists of an X-ray tube and a flat panel detector placed perpendicularly to the treatment beam, allowing the acquisition of hundreds of projections in one rotation of the gantry about the patient. Available in all new linear accelerators, the C.B.C.T. provides volumetric imaging in treatment position proving the realization of image- and dose-guided radiotherapy (I.G.R.T. and D.G.R.T.). The clinical indications correspond to mobile tumours irradiating with high precision required techniques, such as stereotactic, hypo fractionated or high dose radiotherapy. The clinical experience is still very limited and concerns mainly prostate, head and neck and lung tumours. The registration and treatment protocols are briefly described. Quality control and training are major issues. C.B.C.T. based I.G.R.T. is a new technique which needs to be optimized. However, it should provide significant clinical benefit in combination with intensity modulated radiotherapy and new imaging modalities for target delineation. (authors)

  13. Monte Carlo simulation for dose distribution calculations in a CT-based phantom at the Portuguese gamma irradiation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carlos; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Oliveira, M. Carmo; Ferreira, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    In preview works the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility, UTR, has been simulated using the MCNP code and the product to be irradiated has been drawn using the boolean operators with the MCNP surfaces. However, sometimes the product to be irradiated could have an irregular shape. The paper describes an alternative way for drawing the corresponding volume based on CT image data in a format of a 3D matrix of voxels. This data are read by a specific code called SCMS which transforms it into a MCNP input file. The dimensions of each MCNP voxel depend on the number of elements in the CT-based matrix. Additionally, the new approach allows one to know dose distributions anywhere without extra definitions of surfaces or volumes. Experimental dose measurements were carried out using Amber Perspex dosimeters. This work presents the results of MCNP simulations using both modeling modes - the standard mode and the voxel mode.

  14. How accurate is a CT-based dose calculation on a pencil beam TPS for a patient with a metallic prosthesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of a CT-based dose calculation on a treatment planning system (TPS) for a radiotherapy patient with a metallic prosthesis has not previously been reported. In this study, the accuracy of the CT-based inhomogeneity correction on a pencil beam TPS (Helax TMS) was determined in a phantom containing a metallic prosthesis. A steel prosthesis phantom and a titanium prosthesis phantom were investigated. The phantoms were CT-scanned and dose plans produced on the TPS, using the CT images to provide density information for the inhomogeneity corrections. Verification measurements were performed on a linear accelerator for 6 and 15 MV x-rays. Measured dose profiles at three different depths were compared to the calculations of the TPS. For the titanium prosthesis and for 6 MV x-rays, the TPS overestimated the beam attenuation by approximately 20% at 15 and 20 cm depths in the phantom. This is due to a limitation in the density allocation of this TPS: any Hounsfield number (HN) above a certain threshold is allocated the density of steel. For the steel prosthesis, the TPS performed the correct mapping of HN to mass density. The dose calculation was within 6% for 6 MV x-rays at 15 and 20 cm depths. However, the accuracy of dose calculation varied with beam energy and depth, with large errors in the region close to the prosthesis. The TPS overestimated the dose by 11% for 6 MV and 15% for 15 MV x-rays at 11 cm depth, 2.5 cm beyond the steel prosthesis. These results highlight the limitations in the density allocation of this TPS and demonstrate shortcomings in the pencil beam dose calculation. (author)

  15. NOTE: How accurate is a CT-based dose calculation on a pencil beam TPS for a patient with a metallic prosthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ralph

    2001-09-01

    The accuracy of a CT-based dose calculation on a treatment planning system (TPS) for a radiotherapy patient with a metallic prosthesis has not previously been reported. In this study, the accuracy of the CT-based inhomogeneity correction on a pencil beam TPS (Helax TMS) was determined in a phantom containing a metallic prosthesis. A steel prosthesis phantom and a titanium prosthesis phantom were investigated. The phantoms were CT-scanned and dose plans produced on the TPS, using the CT images to provide density information for the inhomogeneity corrections. Verification measurements were performed on a linear accelerator for 6 and 15 MV x-rays. Measured dose profiles at three different depths were compared to the calculations of the TPS. For the titanium prosthesis and for 6 MV x-rays, the TPS overestimated the beam attenuation by approximately 20% at 15 and 20 cm depths in the phantom. This is due to a limitation in the density allocation of this TPS: any Hounsfield number (HN) above a certain threshold is allocated the density of steel. For the steel prosthesis, the TPS performed the correct mapping of HN to mass density. The dose calculation was within 6% for 6 MV x-rays at 15 and 20 cm depths. However, the accuracy of dose calculation varied with beam energy and depth, with large errors in the region close to the prosthesis. The TPS overestimated the dose by 11% for 6 MV and 15% for 15 MV x-rays at 11 cm depth, 2.5 cm beyond the steel prosthesis. These results highlight the limitations in the density allocation of this TPS and demonstrate shortcomings in the pencil beam dose calculation.

  16. How accurate is a CT-based dose calculation on a pencil beam TPS for a patient with a metallic prosthesis?

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    Roberts, Ralph [Department of Medical Physics, Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals, The Churchill, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2001-09-01

    The accuracy of a CT-based dose calculation on a treatment planning system (TPS) for a radiotherapy patient with a metallic prosthesis has not previously been reported. In this study, the accuracy of the CT-based inhomogeneity correction on a pencil beam TPS (Helax TMS) was determined in a phantom containing a metallic prosthesis. A steel prosthesis phantom and a titanium prosthesis phantom were investigated. The phantoms were CT-scanned and dose plans produced on the TPS, using the CT images to provide density information for the inhomogeneity corrections. Verification measurements were performed on a linear accelerator for 6 and 15 MV x-rays. Measured dose profiles at three different depths were compared to the calculations of the TPS. For the titanium prosthesis and for 6 MV x-rays, the TPS overestimated the beam attenuation by approximately 20% at 15 and 20 cm depths in the phantom. This is due to a limitation in the density allocation of this TPS: any Hounsfield number (HN) above a certain threshold is allocated the density of steel. For the steel prosthesis, the TPS performed the correct mapping of HN to mass density. The dose calculation was within 6% for 6 MV x-rays at 15 and 20 cm depths. However, the accuracy of dose calculation varied with beam energy and depth, with large errors in the region close to the prosthesis. The TPS overestimated the dose by 11% for 6 MV and 15% for 15 MV x-rays at 11 cm depth, 2.5 cm beyond the steel prosthesis. These results highlight the limitations in the density allocation of this TPS and demonstrate shortcomings in the pencil beam dose calculation. (author)

  17. Patient-Specific CT-Based Instrumentation versus Conventional Instrumentation in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study on Clinical Outcomes and In-Hospital Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kotela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a frequently performed procedure in orthopaedic surgery. Recently, patient-specific instrumentation was introduced to facilitate correct positioning of implants. The aim of this study was to compare the early clinical results of TKA performed with patient-specific CT-based instrumentation and conventional technique. A prospective, randomized controlled trial on 112 patients was performed between January 2011 and December 2011. A group of 112 patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in this study and randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. The experimental group comprised 52 patients who received the Signature CT-based implant positioning system, and the control group consisted of 60 patients with conventional instrumentation. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with the KSS scale, WOMAC scale, and VAS scales to assess knee pain severity and patient satisfaction with the surgery. Specified in-hospital data were recorded. Patients were followed up for 12 months. At one year after surgery, there were no statistically significant differences between groups with respect to clinical outcomes and in-hospital data, including operative time, blood loss, hospital length of stay, intraoperative observations, and postoperative complications. Further high-quality investigations of various patient-specific systems and longer follow-up may be helpful in assessing their utility for TKA.

  18. CT-based liver volumetry in a porcine model: impact on clinical volumetry prior to living donated liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Exact preoperative determination of the liver volume is of great importance prior to hepatobiliary surgery, especially in living donated liver transplantation (LDLT). In the current literature, a strong correlation between preoperatively calculated and intraoperatively measured liver volumes has been described. Such accuracy seems questionable, primarily due to a difference in the perfusion state of the liver in situ versus after explantation. Purpose of the study was to asses the influence of the perfusion state on liver volume and the validity of the preoperative liver volumetry prior to LDLT. Methods: In an experimental study, 20 porcine livers were examined. The livers were weighted and their volumes were determined by water displacement prior and after fluid infusion to achieve a pressure physiologically found in the liver veins. The liver volumes in the different perfusion states were calculated based on CT-data. The calculated values were compared with the volume measured by water displacement and the weight of the livers. Results: Assessment of calculated CT volumes and water displacements at identical perfusion states showed a tight correlation and differed on average by 4 ± 5%. However, livers before and after fluid infusion showed a 33 ± 8% (350 ± 150 ml) difference in volume. Conclusion: CT-volumetry acquires highly accurate data as confirmed by water displacement studies. However, the perfusion state has major impact on liver volume, which has to be accounted for in clinical use. (orig.)

  19. Comparison between CT-based volumetric calculations and ICRU reference-point estimates of radiation doses delivered to bladder and rectum during intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare CT-based volumetric calculations and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) reference-point estimates of radiation doses to the bladder and rectum in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with definitive low-dose-rate intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT). Methods and Materials: Between November 2001 and March 2003, 60 patients were prospectively enrolled in a pilot study of ICRT with CT-based dosimetry. Most patients underwent two ICRT insertions. After insertion of an afterloading ICRT applicator, intraoperative orthogonal films were obtained to ensure proper positioning of the system and to facilitate subsequent planning. Treatments were prescribed using standard two-dimensional dosimetry and planning. Patients also underwent helical CT of the pelvis for three-dimensional reconstruction of the radiation dose distributions. The systems were loaded with 137Cs sources using the Selectron remote afterloading system according to institutional practice for low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Three-dimensional dose distributions were generated using the Varian BrachyVision treatment planning system. The rectum was contoured from the bottom of the ischial tuberosities to the sigmoid flexure. The entire bladder was contoured. The minimal doses delivered to the 2 cm3 of bladder and rectum receiving the highest dose (DBV2 and DRV2, respectively) were determined from dose-volume histograms, and these estimates were compared with two-dimensionally derived estimates of the doses to the corresponding ICRU reference points. Results: A total of 118 unique intracavitary insertions were performed, and 93 were evaluated and the subject of this analysis. For the rectum, the estimated doses to the ICRU reference point did not differ significantly from the DRV2 (p = 0.561); the mean (± standard deviation) difference was 21 cGy (± 344 cGy). The median volume of the rectum that received at least the ICRU reference-point dose was 2

  20. Clinical value of CT-based preoperative software assisted lung lobe volumetry for predicting postoperative pulmonary function after lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormanns, Dag; Beyer, Florian; Hoffknecht, Petra; Dicken, Volker; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Lange, Tobias; Thomas, Michael; Heindel, Walter

    2005-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate a morphology-based approach for prediction of postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after lung resection from preoperative CT scans. Fifteen Patients with surgically treated (lobectomy or pneumonectomy) bronchogenic carcinoma were enrolled in the study. A preoperative chest CT and pulmonary function tests before and after surgery were performed. CT scans were analyzed by prototype software: automated segmentation and volumetry of lung lobes was performed with minimal user interaction. Determined volumes of different lung lobes were used to predict postoperative FEV1 as percentage of the preoperative values. Predicted FEV1 values were compared to the observed postoperative values as standard of reference. Patients underwent lobectomy in twelve cases (6 upper lobes; 1 middle lobe; 5 lower lobes; 6 right side; 6 left side) and pneumonectomy in three cases. Automated calculation of predicted postoperative lung function was successful in all cases. Predicted FEV1 ranged from 54% to 95% (mean 75% +/- 11%) of the preoperative values. Two cases with obviously erroneous LFT were excluded from analysis. Mean error of predicted FEV1 was 20 +/- 160 ml, indicating absence of systematic error; mean absolute error was 7.4 +/- 3.3% respective 137 +/- 77 ml/s. The 200 ml reproducibility criterion for FEV1 was met in 11 of 13 cases (85%). In conclusion, software-assisted prediction of postoperative lung function yielded a clinically acceptable agreement with the observed postoperative values. This method might add useful information for evaluation of functional operability of patients with lung cancer.

  1. CT-based interstitial HDR brachytherapy

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    Kolotas, C.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N. [Staedtische Kliniken Offenbach (Germany). Strahlenklinik

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT-based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT-based treatment planning has been developed and clinical evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron PLATO BPS treatment planning system for optimization and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are used for optimization of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram based analysis of the dose distribution (COIN analysis) enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumor sites in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results: The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using first a quality assurance phantom and second, a simulated interstitial implant of 12 needles. These were compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs. Both methods gave comparable results with regard to accuracy, but the CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility was proved in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumors, in pretreated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumor volumes treated were in the range 5.1 to 2,741 cm{sup 3}. Analysis of implant quality showed a slightly significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences with respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions: The Offenbach system, incorporating the PROMETHEUS software for interstitial HDR brachytherapy has proved to be extremely valuable

  2. A Cone Beam CT-Based Study for Clinical Target Definition Using Pelvic Anatomy During Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There are no accepted guidelines for target volume definition for online image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP). This study used cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging to generate information for use in post-RP IGRT. Methods and Materials: The pelvic anatomy of 10 prostate cancer patients undergoing post-RP radiation therapy (RT) to 68.4 Gy was studied using CBCT images obtained immediately before treatment. Contoured bladder and rectal volumes on CBCT images were compared with planning CT (CTref) volumes from seminal vesicle stump (SVS) to bladder-urethral junction. This region was chosen to approximate the prostatic fossa (PF) during a course of post-RP RT. Anterior and posterior planning target volume margins were calculated using ICRU report 71 guidelines, accounting for systematic and random error based on bladder and rectal motion, respectively. Results: A total of 176 CBCT study sets obtained 2 to 5 times weekly were analyzed. The rectal and bladder borders were reliably identified in 166 of 176 (94%) of CBCT images. Relative to CTref, mean posterior bladder wall position was anterior by 0.1 to 1.5 mm, and mean anterior rectum wall position was posterior by 1.6 to 2.7 mm. Calculated anterior margin as derived from bladder motion ranged from 5.9 to 7.1 mm. Calculated posterior margin as derived from rectal motion ranged from 8.6 to 10.2 mm. Conclusions: Normal tissue anatomy was definable by CBCT imaging throughout the course of post-RP RT, and the interfraction anteroposterior motion of the bladder and rectum was studied. This information should be considered in devising post-RP RT techniques using image guidance

  3. Intravenous contrast-enhanced CT can be used for CT-based attenuation correction in clinical 111In-octreotide SPECT/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Klausen, Thomas Levin; Mortensen, Jann; de Nijs, Robin; Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Højgaard, Liselotte; Beyer, Thomas; Holm, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Background CT-based attenuation correction (CT-AC) using contrast-enhancement CT impacts 111In-SPECT image quality and quantification. In this study we assessed and evaluated the effect. Methods A phantom (5.15 L) was filled with an aqueous solution of In-111. Three SPECT/CT scans were performed: (A) no IV contrast, (B) with 100-mL IV contrast, and (C) with 200-mL IV contrast added. Scan protocol included a localization CT, a low-dose CT (LD), and a full-dose CT (FD). Phantom, LD and FD scan ...

  4. CT-based attenuation correction in the calculation of semi-quantitative indices of [18F]FDG uptake in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of combined PET/CT systems has a number of advantages, including the utilisation of CT images for PET attenuation correction (AC). The potential advantage compared with existing methodology is less noisy transmission maps within shorter times of acquisition. The objective of our investigation was to assess the accuracy of CT attenuation correction (CTAC) and to study resulting bias and signal to noise ratio (SNR) in image-derived semi-quantitative uptake indices. A combined PET/CT system (GE Discovery LS) was used. Different size phantoms containing variable density components were used to assess the inherent accuracy of a bilinear transformation in the conversion of CT images to 511 keV attenuation maps. This was followed by a phantom study simulating tumour imaging conditions, with a tumour to background ratio of 5:1. An additional variable was the inclusion of contrast agent at different concentration levels. A CT scan was carried out followed by 5 min emission with 1-h and 3-min transmission frames. Clinical data were acquired in 50 patients, who had a CT scan under normal breathing conditions (CTACnb) or under breath-hold with inspiration (CTACinsp) or expiration (CTACexp), followed by a PET scan of 5 and 3 min per bed position for the emission and transmission scans respectively. Phantom and patient studies were reconstructed using segmented AC (SAC) and CTAC. In addition, measured AC (MAC) was performed for the phantom study using the 1-h transmission frame. Comparing the attenuation coefficients obtained using the CT- and the rod source-based attenuation maps, differences of 3% and avg) between the phantom images reconstructed with MAC and those reconstructed with CTAC and SAC respectively. In the case of CTAC, the difference increased up to 27% with the presence of contrast agent. The presence of metallic implants led to underestimation in the surrounding SUVavg and increasing non-uniformity in the proximity of the implant. The patient

  5. CT-based attenuation correction in the calculation of semi-quantitative indices of [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D.; Costa, D.C.; Croasdale, I.; Bomanji, J.; Gacinovic, S.; Ell, P.J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); Lonn, A.H.R. [GE Medical Systems, Slough (United Kingdom)

    2003-03-01

    The introduction of combined PET/CT systems has a number of advantages, including the utilisation of CT images for PET attenuation correction (AC). The potential advantage compared with existing methodology is less noisy transmission maps within shorter times of acquisition. The objective of our investigation was to assess the accuracy of CT attenuation correction (CTAC) and to study resulting bias and signal to noise ratio (SNR) in image-derived semi-quantitative uptake indices. A combined PET/CT system (GE Discovery LS) was used. Different size phantoms containing variable density components were used to assess the inherent accuracy of a bilinear transformation in the conversion of CT images to 511 keV attenuation maps. This was followed by a phantom study simulating tumour imaging conditions, with a tumour to background ratio of 5:1. An additional variable was the inclusion of contrast agent at different concentration levels. A CT scan was carried out followed by 5 min emission with 1-h and 3-min transmission frames. Clinical data were acquired in 50 patients, who had a CT scan under normal breathing conditions (CTAC{sub nb}) or under breath-hold with inspiration (CTAC{sub insp}) or expiration (CTAC{sub exp}), followed by a PET scan of 5 and 3 min per bed position for the emission and transmission scans respectively. Phantom and patient studies were reconstructed using segmented AC (SAC) and CTAC. In addition, measured AC (MAC) was performed for the phantom study using the 1-h transmission frame. Comparing the attenuation coefficients obtained using the CT- and the rod source-based attenuation maps, differences of 3% and <6% were recorded before and after segmentation of the measured transmission maps. Differences of up to 6% and 8% were found in the average count density (SUV{sub avg}) between the phantom images reconstructed with MAC and those reconstructed with CTAC and SAC respectively. In the case of CTAC, the difference increased up to 27% with the

  6. Intravenous contrast-enhanced CT can be used for CT-based attenuation correction in clinical 111In-octreotide SPECT/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Levin; Mortensen, Jann; de Nijs, Robin;

    2015-01-01

    performed: (A) no IV contrast, (B) with 100-mL IV contrast, and (C) with 200-mL IV contrast added. Scan protocol included a localization CT, a low-dose CT (LD), and a full-dose CT (FD). Phantom, LD and FD scan series were performed at 90, 120, and 140 kVp. Phantom data were evaluated looking at mean counts......, (B) 113 ± 8, and (C) 110 ± 9. For all attenuation correction (AC) scans, the mean values increased with increasing iodine concentration. PATIENTS: there were no visible artifacts in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) following CT-AC with contrast-enhanced CT. The average score of......BACKGROUND: CT-based attenuation correction (CT-AC) using contrast-enhancement CT impacts (111)In-SPECT image quality and quantification. In this study we assessed and evaluated the effect. METHODS: A phantom (5.15 L) was filled with an aqueous solution of In-111. Three SPECT/CT scans were...

  7. CT-Based Evaluation of Tumor Volume After Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy of Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Comparison with Clinical Remission Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To assess the volume of locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity and the oropharynx before and after intra-arterial (i.a.) chemotherapy by means of computed tomography and to compare these data with clinically determined treatment response of the same patient population. Methods. Eighty-eight patients with histologically proven, advanced carcinoma of the oral cavity and/or the oropharynx (local tumor stages T3/4) received neoadjuvant i.a. chemotherapy with cisplatin as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen, comprising (1) local chemotherapy, (2) surgery, and (3) combined radio-chemotherapy. Three weeks after the intervention, residual disease was evaluated radiologically by measurement of the tumor volume and clinically by inspection and palpation of the primary tumor according to WHO criteria. Results. Comparison of treatment response according to radiological and clinical criteria respectively revealed complete remission in 5% vs. 8% (p < 0.05), partial remission in 30% vs. 31%, stable disease in 61% vs. 58%, and tumor progression in 5% vs. 2%. Conclusion. Radiological volumetry and clinical evaluation found comparable response rates after local chemotherapy. However, in patients with good response after local treatment, volumetric measurement with CT may help to distinguish between partial and complete remission. Thus, radiological tumor volumetry provides precise and differentiated information about tumor response and should be used as an additional tool in treatment monitoring after local chemotherapy

  8. Clinical impact of 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT-based dosimetry in the radioembolization of liver malignancies with 90Y-loaded microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioembolization with 90Y-loaded microspheres is increasingly used in the treatment of primary and secondary liver cancer. Technetium-99 m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) scintigraphy is used as a surrogate of microsphere distribution to assess lung or digestive shunting prior to therapy, based on tumoral targeting and dosimetry. To date, this has been the sole pre-therapeutic tool available for such evaluation. Several dosimetric approaches have been described using both glass and resin microspheres in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver metastasis. Given that each product offers different specific activities and numbers of spheres injected, their radiobiological properties are believed to lightly differ. This paper summarizes and discusses the available studies focused on MAA-based dosimetry, particularly concentrating on potential confounding factors like clinical context, tumor size, cirrhosis, previous or concomitant therapy, and product used. In terms of the impact of tumoral dose in HCC, the results were concordant and a response relationship and tumoral threshold dose was clearly identified, especially in studies using glass microspheres. Tumoral dose has also been found to influence survival. The concept of treatment intensification has recently been introduced, yet despite several studies publishing interesting findings on the tumor dose-metastasis relationship, no consensus has been reached, and further clarification is thus required. Nor has the maximal tolerated dose to the liver been well documented, requiring more accurate evaluation. Lung dose was well described, despite recently identified factors influencing its evaluation, requiring further assessment. MAA SPECT/CT dosimetry is accurate in HCC and can now be used in order to achieve a fully customized approach, including treatment intensification. Yet further studies are warranted for the metastasis setting and evaluating the maximal tolerated liver dose. (orig.)

  9. Clinical impact of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT-based dosimetry in the radioembolization of liver malignancies with {sup 90}Y-loaded microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garin, Etienne [Cancer Institute Eugene Marquis, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rennes (France); University of Rennes 1, Rennes (France); INSERM, U-991, Liver Metabolisms and Cancer, Rennes (France); Rolland, Yan [Cancer Institute Eugene Marquis, Department of Medical Imaging, Rennes (France); Laffont, Sophie [University of Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Edeline, Julien [University of Rennes 1, Rennes (France); INSERM, U-991, Liver Metabolisms and Cancer, Rennes (France); Cancer Institute Eugene Marquis, Department of Medical Oncology, Rennes (France)

    2016-03-15

    Radioembolization with {sup 90}Y-loaded microspheres is increasingly used in the treatment of primary and secondary liver cancer. Technetium-99 m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) scintigraphy is used as a surrogate of microsphere distribution to assess lung or digestive shunting prior to therapy, based on tumoral targeting and dosimetry. To date, this has been the sole pre-therapeutic tool available for such evaluation. Several dosimetric approaches have been described using both glass and resin microspheres in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver metastasis. Given that each product offers different specific activities and numbers of spheres injected, their radiobiological properties are believed to lightly differ. This paper summarizes and discusses the available studies focused on MAA-based dosimetry, particularly concentrating on potential confounding factors like clinical context, tumor size, cirrhosis, previous or concomitant therapy, and product used. In terms of the impact of tumoral dose in HCC, the results were concordant and a response relationship and tumoral threshold dose was clearly identified, especially in studies using glass microspheres. Tumoral dose has also been found to influence survival. The concept of treatment intensification has recently been introduced, yet despite several studies publishing interesting findings on the tumor dose-metastasis relationship, no consensus has been reached, and further clarification is thus required. Nor has the maximal tolerated dose to the liver been well documented, requiring more accurate evaluation. Lung dose was well described, despite recently identified factors influencing its evaluation, requiring further assessment. MAA SPECT/CT dosimetry is accurate in HCC and can now be used in order to achieve a fully customized approach, including treatment intensification. Yet further studies are warranted for the metastasis setting and evaluating the maximal tolerated liver dose. (orig.)

  10. Application of three-dimensional CT-based rapid prototyping technique in clinical mandibular reconstruction%基于三维CT重建的快速成型技术在下颌骨重建的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑炜荣; 刘雁鸣; 严奉国

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of the three-dimensional (3D)CT-based rapid prototyping technique on clinical man-dibular reconstruction. Methods Seven patients suffering from mandibular lesion were selected,and surgery was designed preoperative-ly on the 3-D model which was created by using the rapid prototyping technique and based on the 3-D CT scanning data. Guided by the preoperative design,the mandibular lesion was excised and the following bone defect was immediately reconstructed with a vascularized iliac osteomyocutaneous flap or a vascularized fibular flap,or just a simple reconstructive titanium plate. The patients were then followed up regularly. Results The mandibular defect was reconstructed with the vascularized iliac flap in three patients,with the vascularized fibular flap in three patients and with a simple titanium plate in one patient. The patients had been followed up for 6-24 months. The contour of the reconstructed mandible was symmetrical in all patients. No malocclusion or limitation of mouth opening was found. The postoperative functions of mastication and speech were satisfactory in all patients. Conclusions Reconstruction of mandibular defect can benefit from the application of the 3D CT-based rapid prototyping technique.%目的:评价基于三维CT 重建的快速成型技术在下颌骨重建中的作用。方法本组选取7例下颌骨病变病例,术前均采用基于三维CT 重建的快速成型技术,制作下颌骨实体模型,并在实体模型上设计下颌骨切骨范围和拟用髂骨瓣或腓骨瓣的骨量和形态。术中按拟定方案切除下颌骨病变,并同期以钛板、血管化游离腓骨瓣或髂骨瓣修复下颌骨缺损,术后定期观察随访。结果采用游离髂骨瓣移植修复者3例,游离腓骨瓣移植者3例,单纯以重建钛板固定者1例。移植骨块均顺利成活。已随访6个月~2年。下颌骨形态和面型基本对称,无下颌偏颌。余留牙咬合关

  11. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients’ lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  ‑180 to  ‑7 for adipose tissue (AT), ‑6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051–65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303–11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1–12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM

  12. CT based HDR brachytherapy for intracavitary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is most commonly used in combination with external radiotherapy for gynecological cancers of cervix, vagina and endometrium. The characteristic rapid fall off of the dose in brachytherapy makes it useful to deliver a localized high dose to tumor. In gynecological applications the dose limiting critical structures are bladder and rectum. The dose received by rectum and bladder has been an interesting issue all these decades. This work presents the dosimetric and planning aspects of CT based High Dose Rate brachytherapy for intracavitary applications

  13. CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with uniform attenuation correction in brain perfusion SPECT imaging for dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Rebecca; Firbank, Michael J.; Lloyd, Jim; O'Brien, John T.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated if the appearance and diagnostic accuracy of HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT images could be improved by using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with the uniform attenuation correction method. A cohort of subjects who were clinically categorized as Alzheimer’s Disease (n=38 ), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (n=29 ) or healthy normal controls (n=30 ), underwent SPECT imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO and a separate CT scan. The SPECT images were processed using: (a) correction map derived from the subject’s CT scan or (b) the Chang uniform approximation for correction or (c) no attenuation correction. Images were visually inspected. The ratios between key regions of interest known to be affected or spared in each condition were calculated for each correction method, and the differences between these ratios were evaluated. The images produced using the different corrections were noted to be visually different. However, ROI analysis found similar statistically significant differences between control and dementia groups and between AD and DLB groups regardless of the correction map used. We did not identify an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in images which were corrected using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction, compared with those corrected using a uniform correction map.

  14. SU-E-T-505: CT-Based Independent Dose Verification for RapidArc Plan as a Secondary Check

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, H; Baba, H [The National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Kamima, T; Takahashi, R [The Cancer Institute Hospital of JFCR, Koto, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To design and develop a CT-based independent dose verification for the RapidArc plan and also to show the effectiveness of inhomogeneous correction in the secondary check for the plan. Methods: To compute the radiological path from the body surface to the reference point and equivalent field sizes from the multiple MLC aperture shapes in the RapidArc MLC sequences independently, DICOM files of CT image, structure and RapidArc plan were imported to our in-house software. The radiological path was computed using a three-dimensional CT arrays for each segment. The multiple MLC aperture shapes were used to compute tissue maximum ratio and phantom scatter factor using the Clarkson-method. In this study, two RapidArc plans for oropharynx cancer were used to compare the doses in CT-based calculation and water-equivalent phantom calculation using the contoured body structure to the dose in a treatment planning system (TPS). Results: The comparison in the one plan shows good agreement in both of the calculation (within 1%). However, in the other case, the CT-based calculation shows better agreement compared to the water-equivalent phantom calculation (CT-based: -2.8% vs. Water-based: -3.8%). Because there were multiple structures along the multiple beam paths and the radiological path length in the CT-based calculation and the path in the water-homogenous phantom calculation were comparatively different. Conclusion: RapidArc treatments are performed in any sites (from head, chest, abdomen to pelvis), which includes inhomogeneous media. Therefore, a more reliable CT-based calculation may be used as a secondary check for the independent verification.

  15. Prospective validation of a risk calculator which calculates the probability of a positive prostate biopsy in a contemporary clinical cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Heidi A.; Kranse, Ries; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Poel, Henk G.; Busstra, Martijn; Kil, Paul; Oomens, Eric H.; de Jong, Igle J.; Bangma, Chris H.; Roobol, Monique J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prediction models need validation to assess their value outside the development setting. Objective: To assess the external validity of the European Randomised study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) Risk Calculator (RC) in a contemporary clinical cohort. Methods: The RC calculates

  16. Comparative evaluation of CT-based and respiratory-gated PET/CT-based planning target volume (PTV) in the definition of radiation treatment planning in lung cancer: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare planning target volume (PTV) defined on respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (RG-PET/CT) to PTV based on ungated free-breathing CT and to evaluate if RG-PET/CT can be useful to personalize PTV by tailoring the target volume to the lesion motion in lung cancer patients. Thirteen lung cancer patients (six men, mean age 70.0 years, 1 small cell lung cancer, 12 non-small cell lung cancer) who were candidates for radiation therapy were prospectively enrolled and submitted to RG-PET/CT. Ungated free-breathing CT images obtained during a PET/CT study were visually contoured by the radiation oncologist to define standard clinical target volumes (CTV1). Standard PTV (PTV1) resulted from CTV1 with the addition of 1-cm expansion of margins in all directions. RG-PET/CT images were contoured by the nuclear medicine physician and radiation oncologist according to a standardized institutional protocol for contouring gated images. Each CT and PET image of the patient's respiratory cycle phases was contoured to obtain the RG-CT-based CTV (CTV2) and the RG-PET/CT-based CTV (CTV3), respectively. RG-CT-based and RG-PET/CT-based PTV (PTV2 and PTV3, respectively) were then derived from gated CTVs with a margin expansion of 7-8 mm in head to feet direction and 5 mm in anterior to posterior and left to right direction. The portions of gated PTV2 and PTV3 geometrically not encompassed in PTV1 (PTV2 out PTV1 and PTV3 out PTV1) were also calculated. Mean ± SD CTV1, CTV2 and CTV3 were 30.5 ± 33.2, 43.1 ± 43.2 and 44.8 ± 45.2 ml, respectively. CTV1 was significantly smaller than CTV2 and CTV3 (p = 0.017 and 0.009 with Student's t test, respectively). No significant difference was found between CTV2 and CTV3. Mean ± SD of PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 were 118.7 ± 94.1, 93.8 ± 80.2 and 97.0 ± 83.9 ml, respectively. PTV1 was significantly larger than PTV2 and PTV3 (p = 0.038 and 0.043 with Student's t test, respectively). No significant

  17. Comparative evaluation of CT-based and respiratory-gated PET/CT-based planning target volume (PTV) in the definition of radiation treatment planning in lung cancer: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Luca; Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); Meregalli, Sofia; Niespolo, Rita [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); Zorz, Alessandra; De Ponti, Elena; Morzenti, Sabrina; Crespi, Andrea [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Brenna, Sarah [University of Milan-Bicocca, School of Radiation Oncology, Monza (Italy); Gardani, Gianstefano [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Messa, Cristina [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to compare planning target volume (PTV) defined on respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (RG-PET/CT) to PTV based on ungated free-breathing CT and to evaluate if RG-PET/CT can be useful to personalize PTV by tailoring the target volume to the lesion motion in lung cancer patients. Thirteen lung cancer patients (six men, mean age 70.0 years, 1 small cell lung cancer, 12 non-small cell lung cancer) who were candidates for radiation therapy were prospectively enrolled and submitted to RG-PET/CT. Ungated free-breathing CT images obtained during a PET/CT study were visually contoured by the radiation oncologist to define standard clinical target volumes (CTV1). Standard PTV (PTV1) resulted from CTV1 with the addition of 1-cm expansion of margins in all directions. RG-PET/CT images were contoured by the nuclear medicine physician and radiation oncologist according to a standardized institutional protocol for contouring gated images. Each CT and PET image of the patient's respiratory cycle phases was contoured to obtain the RG-CT-based CTV (CTV2) and the RG-PET/CT-based CTV (CTV3), respectively. RG-CT-based and RG-PET/CT-based PTV (PTV2 and PTV3, respectively) were then derived from gated CTVs with a margin expansion of 7-8 mm in head to feet direction and 5 mm in anterior to posterior and left to right direction. The portions of gated PTV2 and PTV3 geometrically not encompassed in PTV1 (PTV2 out PTV1 and PTV3 out PTV1) were also calculated. Mean ± SD CTV1, CTV2 and CTV3 were 30.5 ± 33.2, 43.1 ± 43.2 and 44.8 ± 45.2 ml, respectively. CTV1 was significantly smaller than CTV2 and CTV3 (p = 0.017 and 0.009 with Student's t test, respectively). No significant difference was found between CTV2 and CTV3. Mean ± SD of PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 were 118.7 ± 94.1, 93.8 ± 80.2 and 97.0 ± 83.9 ml, respectively. PTV1 was significantly larger than PTV2 and PTV3 (p = 0.038 and 0.043 with Student's t test, respectively). No

  18. CT based three dimensional dose-volume evaluations for high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, high risk clinical target volumes (HR-CTVs) according to GEC-ESTRO guideline were contoured retrospectively based on CT images taken at the time of high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) and correlation between clinical outcome and dose of HR-CTV were analyzed. Methods Our study population consists of 51 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 50 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) using central shield combined with 2–5 times of 6 Gy HDR-ICBT with or without weekly cisplatin. Dose calculation was based on Manchester system and prescribed dose of 6 Gy were delivered for point A. CT images taken at the time of each HDR-ICBT were reviewed and HR-CTVs were contoured. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model (α/β = 10 Gy). Results Three-year overall survival, Progression-free survival, and local control rate was 82.4%, 85.3% and 91.7%, respectively. Median cumulative dose of HR-CTV D90 was 65.0 Gy (52.7-101.7 Gy). Median length from tandem to the most lateral edge of HR-CTV at the first ICBT was 29.2 mm (range, 18.0-51.9 mm). On univariate analysis, both LCR and PFS was significantly favorable in those patients D90 for HR-CTV was 60 Gy or greater (p = 0.001 and 0.03, respectively). PFS was significantly favorable in those patients maximum length from tandem to edge of HR-CTV at first ICBT was shorter than 3.5 cm (p = 0.042). Conclusion Volume-dose showed a relationship to the clinical outcome in CT based brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. PMID:24938757

  19. Postimplant Dosimetry Using a Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Engine: A New Clinical Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To use the Monte Carlo (MC) method as a dose calculation engine for postimplant dosimetry. To compare the results with clinically approved data for a sample of 28 patients. Two effects not taken into account by the clinical calculation, interseed attenuation and tissue composition, are being specifically investigated. Methods and Materials: An automated MC program was developed. The dose distributions were calculated for the target volume and organs at risk (OAR) for 28 patients. Additional MC techniques were developed to focus specifically on the interseed attenuation and tissue effects. Results: For the clinical target volume (CTV) D90 parameter, the mean difference between the clinical technique and the complete MC method is 10.7 Gy, with cases reaching up to 17 Gy. For all cases, the clinical technique overestimates the deposited dose in the CTV. This overestimation is mainly from a combination of two effects: the interseed attenuation (average, 6.8 Gy) and tissue composition (average, 4.1 Gy). The deposited dose in the OARs is also overestimated in the clinical calculation. Conclusions: The clinical technique systematically overestimates the deposited dose in the prostate and in the OARs. To reduce this systematic inaccuracy, the MC method should be considered in establishing a new standard for clinical postimplant dosimetry and dose-outcome studies in a near future

  20. Reliability of CT-based tumor volumetry after intraarterial chemotherapy in patients with small carcinoma of the oral cavity and the oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and consistency of CT-based tumor volumetry in patients with early carcinoma of the oral cavity and the oropharynx before and after intraarterial (IA) chemotherapy, comparing these data with clinical remission rates. Included in the study were 61 patients (mean age 59.3 years; 47 men) with histologically proven small carcinoma of the oral cavity or the oropharynx (local tumor stages T1/2). Patients received IA chemotherapy with high-dose cisplatin as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen and underwent both clinical and radiological examination before and 4 weeks after local chemotherapy. Clinical evaluation of tumor response was possible in all patients (61/61). Radiological assessment of tumor volume was feasible in 42 of 61 patients (69%), but failed in 19 (31%) due to the absence of deep tumoral spread, lack of contrast enhancement or severe dental artifacts. Patients in whom evaluation was possible according to volumetric and clinical criteria revealed comparable remission rates: overall response 54.8% versus 52.4%, stable disease 40.4% versus 47.6%, and tumor progression 4.8% versus 0.0%. Because volume calculation was not feasible in approximately one-third of the patients, it cannot be recommended as a reliable indicator for treatment response in patients with small carcinoma of the oral cavity. (orig.)

  1. SU-E-J-92: On-Line Cone Beam CT Based Planning for Emergency and Palliative Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop the feasibility of on-line cone beam CT based planning for emergency and palliative radiotherapy treatments. Methods: Subsequent to phantom studies, a case library of 28 clinical megavoltage cone beam CT (MVCBCT) was built to assess dose-planning accuracies on MVCBCT for all anatomical sites. A simple emergency treatment plan was created on the MVCBCT and copied to its reference CT. The agreement between the dose distributions of each image pair was evaluated by the mean dose difference of the dose volume and the gamma index of the central 2D axial plane. An array of popular urgent and palliative cases was also evaluated for imaging component clearance and field-of-view. Results: The treatment cases were categorized into four groups (head and neck, thorax/spine, pelvis and extremities). Dose distributions for head and neck treatments were predicted accurately in all cases with a gamma index of >95% for 2% and 2 mm criteria. Thoracic spine treatments had a gamma index as low as 60% indicating a need for better uniformity correction and tissue density calibration. Small anatomy changes between CT and MVCBCT could contribute to local errors. Pelvis and sacral spine treatment cases had a gamma index between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. The limited FOV became an issue for large pelvis patients. Imaging clearance was difficult for cases where the tumor was positioned far off midline. Conclusion: The MVCBCT based dose planning and delivery approach is feasible in many treatment cases. Dose distributions for head and neck patients are unrestrictedly predictable. Some FOV restrictions apply to other treatment sites. Lung tissue is most challenging for accurate dose calculations given the current imaging filters and corrections. Additional clinical cases for extremities need to be included in the study to assess the full range of site-specific planning accuracies. This work is supported by Siemens

  2. Mathematical knowledge and drug dosage calculation: Necessary clinical skills for the nurse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasakis Efstratios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When nurses perform their tasks, they manage situations where maths knowledge is required. Such a situation is the calculation of medication dosage. Aim: The literature review of papers relevant with the mathematical knowledge and drug calculation skills of nurses and nursing students. Material-Method: A search of published research and review articles from January 1989 until March 2012, has been conducted in Pubmed database. The search terms used were: nurses, mathematics skills, numeracy skills and medication dosology calculation skills. Results: Literature review showed that many studies focus in the mathematical knowledge and drug dosage calculation competency of nursing students. Results from these studies revealed that nursing students had poor mathematical knowledge and drug dosage calculation skills. In contrast with students, professional nurses are more likely to have sufficient skills in drug calculations. Apart from the papers analyzing calculation skills' assessment, several studies examined educational interventions in the context of calculation skills enhancement. Accuracy and proficiency in the dosage calculation of medications is a preventive factor of errors made at medication preparation and administration. Conclusion: Mathematical knowledge and drug dosage calculation abilities are interrelated concepts and essential clinical skills for the nurse. The fact that nursing students do not have adequate skills for calculating medications' dosage, might be an issue that schools of nursing education should focus in. Further research of the drug dosage calculation skills is considered essential.

  3. Comparison of analytical and numerical approaches for CT-based aberration correction in transcranial passive acoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections are employed in transcranial ultrasound both for therapy and imaging. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches for calculating aberration corrections based on CT data were compared, with a particular focus on their application to transcranial passive imaging. Two models were investigated: a three-dimensional full-wave numerical model (Connor and Hynynen 2004 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51 1693-706) based on the Westervelt equation, and an analytical method (Clement and Hynynen 2002 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 28 617-24) similar to that currently employed by commercial brain therapy systems. Trans-skull time delay corrections calculated from each model were applied to data acquired by a sparse hemispherical (30 cm diameter) receiver array (128 piezoceramic discs: 2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) passively listening through ex vivo human skullcaps (n  =  4) to emissions from a narrow-band, fixed source emitter (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency). Measurements were taken at various locations within the cranial cavity by moving the source around the field using a three-axis positioning system. Images generated through passive beamforming using CT-based skull corrections were compared with those obtained through an invasive source-based approach, as well as images formed without skull corrections, using the main lobe volume, positional shift, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio as metrics for image quality. For each CT-based model, corrections achieved by allowing for heterogeneous skull acoustical parameters in simulation outperformed the corresponding case where homogeneous parameters were assumed. Of the CT-based methods investigated, the full-wave model provided the best imaging results at the cost of computational complexity. These results highlight the importance of accurately modeling trans-skull propagation when calculating CT-based aberration corrections

  4. Proposed revision of CT-based cervical and thoracic lymph node levels for esophageal cancer in UICC 7th version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To propose revisions of CT-based cervical and thoracic lymph node levels for esophageal cancer in UICC 7th version. Material and methods: One hundred and forty-nine patients who underwent surgery were analyzed retrospectively for hypothesis validation, 338 patients who underwent definitive radiotherapy to evaluate the feasibility in clinical work, and 121 patients from another independent cohort for external evaluation. We redefined Level VI in the RTOG consensus guideline of CT-based cervical lymph node levels, and established a new Level 1 in the IASLC guideline of CT-based thoracic lymph node levels. We also shrunk Level 3p. Lymph nodes were assigned into different levels by three criteria. Results: We encountered stratification problems in 63 patients by JSED criteria and in 24 patients by RTOG criteria. Multivariate analysis showed that nodal status was independently associated with OS in the three cohorts (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found between the Level 1 only group and the mediastinal nodes only group (p > 0.05). Conclusions: The proposed hypothesis clearly defined the boundary area between the cervical and thoracic parts, brought more convenience for stratification, better predicted patients’ OS and provided information for both pre-treatment evaluation and multidisciplinary treatment planning

  5. Do calculation errors by nurses cause medication errors in clinical practice? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kerri

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to examine the literature available to ascertain whether medication errors in clinical practice are the result of nurses' miscalculating drug dosages. The research studies highlighting poor calculation skills of nurses and student nurses have been tested using written drug calculation tests in formal classroom settings [Kapborg, I., 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses, student nurses and physicians. International Journal for Quality in Health Care 6(4): 389 -395; Hutton, M., 1998. Nursing Mathematics: the importance of application Nursing Standard 13(11): 35-38; Weeks, K., Lynne, P., Torrance, C., 2000. Written drug dosage errors made by students: the threat to clinical effectiveness and the need for a new approach. Clinical Effectiveness in Nursing 4, 20-29]; Wright, K., 2004. Investigation to find strategies to improve student nurses' maths skills. British Journal Nursing 13(21) 1280-1287; Wright, K., 2005. An exploration into the most effective way to teach drug calculation skills to nursing students. Nurse Education Today 25, 430-436], but there have been no reviews of the literature on medication errors in practice that specifically look to see whether the medication errors are caused by nurses' poor calculation skills. The databases Medline, CINAHL, British Nursing Index (BNI), Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) and Archives and Cochrane reviews were searched for research studies or systematic reviews which reported on the incidence or causes of drug errors in clinical practice. In total 33 articles met the criteria for this review. There were no studies that examined nurses' drug calculation errors in practice. As a result studies and systematic reviews that investigated the types and causes of drug errors were examined to establish whether miscalculations by nurses were the causes of errors. The review found insufficient evidence to suggest that medication errors are caused by nurses' poor

  6. Calculation of the characteristics of clinical high-energy photon beams with EGS5-MPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A graphite calorimeter has been developed as a Japanese primary standard of absorbed dose to water in the high-energy photon beams from a clinical linac. To obtain conversion factors for the graphite calorimeter, the beam characteristics of the high-energy photon beams from the clinical linac at National Metrology Institute of Japan were calculated with the EGS5 Monte Carlo simulation code. To run the EGS5 code on High Performance Computing machines that have more than 1000 CPU cores, we developed the EGS5 parallelisation package 'EGS5-MPI' by implementing a message-passing interface. We calculated the photon energy spectra, which are in good agreement with those previously calculated by D. Sheikh-Bagheri and D. W. O. Rogers (Med. Phys. 29 3). We also estimated the percentage-depth-dose distributions of photon beams from the linac using the calculated photon energy spectra. These calculated percentage-depth-dose distributions were compared with our measured distributions and were found they are in good agreement as well. We will calculate conversion factors for the graphite calorimeter using our results.

  7. Evaluation of the impact of metal artifacts in CT-based attenuation correction of positron emission tomography scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative ability of PET/CT allows the widespread use in clinical research and cancer staging. However, metal artifacts induced by high-density metal objects degrade the quality of CT images. These artifacts also propagate to the corresponding PET image and cause a false increase of 18F-FDG uptake near the metal implants when the CT-based attenuation correction (AC) is performed. In this study, we applied a model-based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm to reduce the dark and bright streaks in the CT image and compared the differences between PET images with the general CT-based AC (G-AC) and the MAR-corrected-CT AC (MAR-AC). Results showed that the MAR algorithm effectively reduced the metal artifacts in the CT images of the ACR flangeless phantom and two clinical cases. The MAR-AC also removed the false-positive hot spot near the metal implants of the PET images. We conclude that the MAR-AC could be applied in clinical practice to improve the quantitative accuracy of PET images. Additionally, further use of PET/CT fusion images with metal artifact correction could be more valuable for diagnosis.

  8. [Sample size calculation in clinical post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yingkun; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, as the Chinese government and people pay more attention on the post-marketing research of Chinese Medicine, part of traditional Chinese medicine breed has or is about to begin after the listing of post-marketing evaluation study. In the post-marketing evaluation design, sample size calculation plays a decisive role. It not only ensures the accuracy and reliability of post-marketing evaluation. but also assures that the intended trials will have a desired power for correctly detecting a clinically meaningful difference of different medicine under study if such a difference truly exists. Up to now, there is no systemic method of sample size calculation in view of the traditional Chinese medicine. In this paper, according to the basic method of sample size calculation and the characteristic of the traditional Chinese medicine clinical evaluation, the sample size calculation methods of the Chinese medicine efficacy and safety are discussed respectively. We hope the paper would be beneficial to medical researchers, and pharmaceutical scientists who are engaged in the areas of Chinese medicine research. PMID:22292397

  9. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fernando Mata Colodro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS, here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond ® (PTW which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 ± 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD. For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 ± 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans.

  10. Comprehensive evaluation and clinical implementation of commercially available Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aizhen; Wen, Ning; Nurushev, Teamour; Burmeister, Jay; Chetty, Indrin J

    2013-01-01

    A commercial electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm has become available in Eclipse treatment planning system. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the eMC algorithm and investigate the clinical implementation of this system. The beam modeling of the eMC algorithm was performed for beam energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV for a Varian Trilogy and all available applicator sizes in the Eclipse treatment planning system. The accuracy of the eMC algorithm was evaluated in a homogeneous water phantom, solid water phantoms containing lung and bone materials, and an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition, dose calculation accuracy was compared between pencil beam (PB) and eMC algorithms in the same treatment planning system for heterogeneous phantoms. The overall agreement between eMC calculations and measurements was within 3%/2 mm, while the PB algorithm had large errors (up to 25%) in predicting dose distributions in the presence of inhomogeneities such as bone and lung. The clinical implementation of the eMC algorithm was investigated by performing treatment planning for 15 patients with lesions in the head and neck, breast, chest wall, and sternum. The dose distributions were calculated using PB and eMC algorithms with no smoothing and all three levels of 3D Gaussian smoothing for comparison. Based on a routine electron beam therapy prescription method, the number of eMC calculated monitor units (MUs) was found to increase with increased 3D Gaussian smoothing levels. 3D Gaussian smoothing greatly improved the visual usability of dose distributions and produced better target coverage. Differences of calculated MUs and dose distributions between eMC and PB algorithms could be significant when oblique beam incidence, surface irregularities, and heterogeneous tissues were present in the treatment plans. In our patient cases, monitor unit differences of up to 7% were observed between PB and eMC algorithms. Monitor unit calculations were also preformed

  11. Clinical implementation of full Monte Carlo dose calculation in proton beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Hongyu; Parodi, Katia; Slopsema, Roelf; Engelsman, Martijn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2008-09-07

    The goal of this work was to facilitate the clinical use of Monte Carlo proton dose calculation to support routine treatment planning and delivery. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to simulate the treatment head setup, including a time-dependent simulation of modulator wheels (for broad beam modulation) and magnetic field settings (for beam scanning). Any patient-field-specific setup can be modeled according to the treatment control system of the facility. The code was benchmarked against phantom measurements. Using a simulation of the ionization chamber reading in the treatment head allows the Monte Carlo dose to be specified in absolute units (Gy per ionization chamber reading). Next, the capability of reading CT data information was implemented into the Monte Carlo code to model patient anatomy. To allow time-efficient dose calculation, the standard Geant4 tracking algorithm was modified. Finally, a software link of the Monte Carlo dose engine to the patient database and the commercial planning system was established to allow data exchange, thus completing the implementation of the proton Monte Carlo dose calculation engine ('DoC++'). Monte Carlo re-calculated plans are a valuable tool to revisit decisions in the planning process. Identification of clinically significant differences between Monte Carlo and pencil-beam-based dose calculations may also drive improvements of current pencil-beam methods. As an example, four patients (29 fields in total) with tumors in the head and neck regions were analyzed. Differences between the pencil-beam algorithm and Monte Carlo were identified in particular near the end of range, both due to dose degradation and overall differences in range prediction due to bony anatomy in the beam path. Further, the Monte Carlo reports dose-to-tissue as compared to dose-to-water by the planning system. Our implementation is tailored to a specific Monte Carlo code and the treatment planning system XiO (Computerized Medical

  12. Positioning accuracy in a registration-free CT-based navigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to maintain overall navigation accuracy established by a calibration procedure in our CT-based registration-free navigation system, the CT scanner has to repeatedly generate identical volume images of a target at the same coordinates. We tested the positioning accuracy of the prototype of an advanced workplace for image-guided surgery (AWIGS) which features an operating table capable of direct patient transfer into a CT scanner. Volume images (N = 154) of a specialized phantom were analysed for translational shifting after various table translations. Variables included added weight and phantom position on the table. The navigation system's calibration accuracy was determined (bias 2.1 mm, precision ± 0.7 mm, N = 12). In repeated use, a bias of 3.0 mm and a precision of ± 0.9 mm (N = 10) were maintainable. Instances of translational image shifting were related to the table-to-CT scanner docking mechanism. A distance scaling error when altering the table's height was detected. Initial prototype problems visible in our study causing systematic errors were resolved by repeated system calibrations between interventions. We conclude that the accuracy achieved is sufficient for a wide range of clinical applications in surgery and interventional radiology

  13. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning. (paper)

  14. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Zou, W.; Chen, T.; Kim, L.; Khan, A.; Haffty, B.; Yue, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning.

  15. Clinical use of the simple 3D-calculation in scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie; Gassel, F. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we show the clinical application of a simple method for calculating three-dimensional shape in scoliosis by the use of two tables based on normal standard X-rays in the anteroposterior and lateral projections. The three-dimensional alignment should be considered in both conservative and operative correction. In 57 patients with 87 scoliotic curves we measured the well-known Cobb angle ({alpha}) and determined the vertebral rotation according to the method of Nash and Moe. We compared this information with the results of the calculated three-dimensional angles of scoliosis (angle {beta} between the curvature plane and the sagittal plane, angle {sigma} as the true angle of scoliosis in this curvature plane). In 76 curves (87%) our method was practicable. The true angle {sigma} is always higher than the projected angle {alpha}, especially in the clinically relevant range of 20 -40 . Poor correlation is shown between the projected angle {alpha} and the true angle {sigma} (r = 0.41 for thoracic curves and r = 0.57 for lumbar curves) and almost no correlation between vertebral rotation and the true angle {sigma} (r = 0.10 for thoracic curves and r = 0.44 for lumbar curves) and the curvature plane ({beta}) (r = 0). The three-dimensional shape of scoliosis cannot be estimated by the well-established projected angles and indices and we recommend the use of our simple method for the radiological investigation of scoliotic patients. (orig.)

  16. Clinical use of the simple 3D-calculation in scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we show the clinical application of a simple method for calculating three-dimensional shape in scoliosis by the use of two tables based on normal standard X-rays in the anteroposterior and lateral projections. The three-dimensional alignment should be considered in both conservative and operative correction. In 57 patients with 87 scoliotic curves we measured the well-known Cobb angle (α) and determined the vertebral rotation according to the method of Nash and Moe. We compared this information with the results of the calculated three-dimensional angles of scoliosis (angle β between the curvature plane and the sagittal plane, angle σ as the true angle of scoliosis in this curvature plane). In 76 curves (87%) our method was practicable. The true angle σ is always higher than the projected angle α, especially in the clinically relevant range of 20 -40 . Poor correlation is shown between the projected angle α and the true angle σ (r = 0.41 for thoracic curves and r = 0.57 for lumbar curves) and almost no correlation between vertebral rotation and the true angle σ (r = 0.10 for thoracic curves and r = 0.44 for lumbar curves) and the curvature plane (β) (r = 0). The three-dimensional shape of scoliosis cannot be estimated by the well-established projected angles and indices and we recommend the use of our simple method for the radiological investigation of scoliotic patients. (orig.)

  17. Joint kinematic calculation based on clinical direct kinematic versus inverse kinematic gait models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, H; Modenese, L; Lloyd, D G; Maine, S; Walsh, H P J; Carty, C P

    2016-06-14

    Most clinical gait laboratories use the conventional gait analysis model. This model uses a computational method called Direct Kinematics (DK) to calculate joint kinematics. In contrast, musculoskeletal modelling approaches use Inverse Kinematics (IK) to obtain joint angles. IK allows additional analysis (e.g. muscle-tendon length estimates), which may provide valuable information for clinical decision-making in people with movement disorders. The twofold aims of the current study were: (1) to compare joint kinematics obtained by a clinical DK model (Vicon Plug-in-Gait) with those produced by a widely used IK model (available with the OpenSim distribution), and (2) to evaluate the difference in joint kinematics that can be solely attributed to the different computational methods (DK versus IK), anatomical models and marker sets by using MRI based models. Eight children with cerebral palsy were recruited and presented for gait and MRI data collection sessions. Differences in joint kinematics up to 13° were found between the Plug-in-Gait and the gait 2392 OpenSim model. The majority of these differences (94.4%) were attributed to differences in the anatomical models, which included different anatomical segment frames and joint constraints. Different computational methods (DK versus IK) were responsible for only 2.7% of the differences. We recommend using the same anatomical model for kinematic and musculoskeletal analysis to ensure consistency between the obtained joint angles and musculoskeletal estimates. PMID:27139005

  18. Assessing the Clinical Impact of Approximations in Analytical Dose Calculations for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuemann, Jan, E-mail: jschuemann@mgh.harvard.edu; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Moteabbed, Maryam; Min, Chul Hee; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of approximations in current analytical dose calculation methods (ADCs) on tumor control probability (TCP) in proton therapy. Methods: Dose distributions planned with ADC were compared with delivered dose distributions as determined by Monte Carlo simulations. A total of 50 patients were investigated in this analysis with 10 patients per site for 5 treatment sites (head and neck, lung, breast, prostate, liver). Differences were evaluated using dosimetric indices based on a dose-volume histogram analysis, a γ-index analysis, and estimations of TCP. Results: We found that ADC overestimated the target doses on average by 1% to 2% for all patients considered. The mean dose, D95, D50, and D02 (the dose value covering 95%, 50% and 2% of the target volume, respectively) were predicted within 5% of the delivered dose. The γ-index passing rate for target volumes was above 96% for a 3%/3 mm criterion. Differences in TCP were up to 2%, 2.5%, 6%, 6.5%, and 11% for liver and breast, prostate, head and neck, and lung patients, respectively. Differences in normal tissue complication probabilities for bladder and anterior rectum of prostate patients were less than 3%. Conclusion: Our results indicate that current dose calculation algorithms lead to underdosage of the target by as much as 5%, resulting in differences in TCP of up to 11%. To ensure full target coverage, advanced dose calculation methods like Monte Carlo simulations may be necessary in proton therapy. Monte Carlo simulations may also be required to avoid biases resulting from systematic discrepancies in calculated dose distributions for clinical trials comparing proton therapy with conventional radiation therapy.

  19. Flat-detector CT-based electromagnetic navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flat-detector CT coupled to an angiography device provides an imaging technique for interventions which can be used for electromagnetically navigated percutaneous punctures. This report explains the functionality of an electromagnetic navigation system and describes the course of an electromagnetically navigated puncture and the capabilities of such a system in the clinical routine. (orig.)

  20. Statistical Analysis of Clinical Data on a Pocket Calculator, Part 2 Statistics on a Pocket Calculator, Part 2

    CERN Document Server

    Cleophas, Ton J

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this title contained all statistical tests relevant to starting clinical investigations, and included tests for continuous and binary data, power, sample size, multiple testing, variability, confounding, interaction, and reliability. The current part 2 of this title reviews methods for handling missing data, manipulated data, multiple confounders, predictions beyond observation, uncertainty of diagnostic tests, and the problems of outliers. Also robust tests, non-linear modeling , goodness of fit testing, Bhatacharya models, item response modeling, superiority testing, variab

  1. Comparison of CT and integrated PET-CT based radiation therapy planning in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When combined with adequate tumoricidal doses, accurate target volume delineation remains to be the one of the most important predictive factors for radiotherapy (RT) success in locally advanced or medically inoperable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients. Recently, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) has demonstrated significant improvements in diagnosis and accurate staging of MPM. However, role of additional PET data has not been studied in RT planning (RTP) of patients with inoperable MPM or in those who refuse surgery. Therefore, we planned to compare CT with co-registered PET-CT as the basis for delineating target volumes in these patients group. Retrospectively, the CT and co-registered PET-CT data of 13 patients with histologically proven MPM were utilized to delineate target volumes separately. For each patient, target volumes (gross tumor volume [GTV], clinical target volume [CTV], and planning target volume [PTV]) were defined using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. The PTV was measured in two ways: PTV1 was CTV plus a 1-cm margin, and PTV2 was GTV plus a 1-cm margin. We analyzed differences in target volumes. In 12 of 13 patients, compared to CT-based delineation, PET-CT-based delineation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the mean GTV, CTV, PTV1, and PTV2. In these 12 patients, mean GTV decreased by 47.1% ± 28.4%, mean CTV decreased by 38.7% ± 24.7%, mean PTV1 decreased by 31.1% ± 23.1%, and mean PTV2 decreased by 40.0% ± 24.0%. In 4 of 13 patients, hilar lymph nodes were identified by PET-CT that was not identified by CT alone, changing the nodal status of tumor staging in those patients. This study demonstrated the usefulness of PET-CT-based target volume delineation in patients with MPM. Co-registration of PET and CT information reduces the likelihood of geographic misses, and additionally, significant reductions observed in target volumes may potentially allow escalation of RT dose beyond

  2. Monte Carlo calculated stopping power ratio water/air for clinical proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to compute stopping-power ratios water/air for use in clinical proton dosimetry a Monte Carlo code has been developed. The main difference between the present code and other codes for proton transport is the inclusion of the detailed production of secondary electrons along the proton track. For this purpose the code is a Class-II type, where single proton-electron collisions yielding energy losses larger than a specific cut-off are considered individually. Proton multiple scattering is sampled from the complete Moliere distribution. To take into account in an approximate way the effect of inelastic nuclear collisions the fraction of the incident energy that is converted to kinetic energy of charged particles in the interaction is deposited on the spot. The energy that goes to neutral particles is assumed to leave the scoring geometry without any energy deposition. Stopping-power ratios are calculated in-line, i.e. during the transport, thereby reducing the uncertainty of the calculated value. The production and transport of the secondary electrons is used to determine an additional contribution to the stopping-power ratios obtained using the proton spectra alone

  3. A new CT prostate segmentation for CT-based HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for localized prostate cancer. Prostate HDR treatment involves placing 10 to 20 catheters (needles) into the prostate gland, and then delivering radiation dose to the cancerous regions through these catheters. These catheters are often inserted with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance and the HDR treatment plan is based on the CT images. The main challenge for CT-based HDR planning is to accurately segment prostate volume in CT images due to the poor soft tissue contrast and additional artifacts introduced by the catheters. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel approach to segment the prostate in CT images through TRUS-CT deformable registration based on the catheter locations. In this approach, the HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intra-operative TRUS and planning CT images, and then used as landmarks for the TRUS-CT image registration. The prostate contour generated from the TRUS images captured during the ultrasound-guided HDR procedure was used to segment the prostate on the CT images through deformable registration. We conducted two studies. A prostate-phantom study demonstrated a submillimeter accuracy of our method. A pilot study of 5 prostate-cancer patients was conducted to further test its clinical feasibility. All patients had 3 gold markers implanted in the prostate that were used to evaluate the registration accuracy, as well as previous diagnostic MR images that were used as the gold standard to assess the prostate segmentation. For the 5 patients, the mean gold-marker displacement was 1.2 mm; the prostate volume difference between our approach and the MRI was 7.2%, and the Dice volume overlap was over 91%. Our proposed method could improve prostate delineation, enable accurate dose planning and delivery, and potentially enhance prostate HDR treatment outcome.

  4. MicroCT-Based Skeletal Models for Use in Tomographic Voxel Phantoms for Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Florida (UF) proposes to develop two high-resolution image-based skeletal dosimetry models for direct use by ICRP Committee 2's Task Group on Dose Calculation in their forthcoming Reference Voxel Male (RVM) and Reference Voxel Female (RVF) whole-body dosimetry phantoms. These two phantoms are CT-based, and thus do not have the image resolution to delineate and perform radiation transport modeling of the individual marrow cavities and bone trabeculae throughout their skeletal structures. Furthermore, new and innovative 3D microimaging techniques will now be required for the skeletal tissues following Committee 2's revision of the target tissues of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. This target tissue had been defined in ICRP Publication 30 as a 10-(micro)m cell layer on all bone surfaces of trabecular and cortical bone. The revised target tissue is now a 50-(micro)m layer within the marrow cavities of trabecular bone only and is exclusive of the marrow adipocytes. Clearly, this new definition requires the use of 3D microimages of the trabecular architecture not available from past 2D optical studies of the adult skeleton. With our recent acquisition of two relatively young cadavers (males of age 18-years and 40-years), we will develop a series of reference skeletal models that can be directly applied to (1) the new ICRP reference voxel man and female phantoms developed for the ICRP, and (2) pediatric phantoms developed to target the ICRP reference children. Dosimetry data to be developed will include absorbed fractions for internal beta and alpha-particle sources, as well as photon and neutron fluence-to-dose response functions for direct use in external dosimetry studies of the ICRP reference workers and members of the general public

  5. MicroCT-Based Skeletal Models for Use in Tomographic Voxel Phantoms for Radiological Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesley Bolch

    2010-03-30

    ABSTRACT The University of Florida (UF) proposes to develop two high-resolution image-based skeletal dosimetry models for direct use by ICRP Committee 2’s Task Group on Dose Calculation in their forthcoming Reference Voxel Male (RVM) and Reference Voxel Female (RVF) whole-body dosimetry phantoms. These two phantoms are CT-based, and thus do not have the image resolution to delineate and perform radiation transport modeling of the individual marrow cavities and bone trabeculae throughout their skeletal structures. Furthermore, new and innovative 3D microimaging techniques will now be required for the skeletal tissues following Committee 2’s revision of the target tissues of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. This target tissue had been defined in ICRP Publication 30 as a 10-m cell layer on all bone surfaces of trabecular and cortical bone. The revised target tissue is now a 50-m layer within the marrow cavities of trabecular bone only and is exclusive of the marrow adipocytes. Clearly, this new definition requires the use of 3D microimages of the trabecular architecture not available from past 2D optical studies of the adult skeleton. With our recent acquisition of two relatively young cadavers (males of age 18-years and 40-years), we will develop a series of reference skeletal models that can be directly applied to (1) the new ICRP reference voxel man and female phantoms developed for the ICRP, and (2) pediatric phantoms developed to target the ICRP reference children. Dosimetry data to be developed will include absorbed fractions for internal beta and alpha-particle sources, as well as photon and neutron fluence-to-dose response functions for direct use in external dosimetry studies of the ICRP reference workers and members of the general public

  6. MicroCT-Based Skeletal Models for Use in Tomographic Voxel Phantoms for Radiological Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, Wesley [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2010-03-30

    The University of Florida (UF) proposes to develop two high-resolution image-based skeletal dosimetry models for direct use by ICRP Committee 2’s Task Group on Dose Calculation in their forthcoming Reference Voxel Male (RVM) and Reference Voxel Female (RVF) whole-body dosimetry phantoms. These two phantoms are CT-based, and thus do not have the image resolution to delineate and perform radiation transport modeling of the individual marrow cavities and bone trabeculae throughout their skeletal structures. Furthermore, new and innovative 3D microimaging techniques will now be required for the skeletal tissues following Committee 2’s revision of the target tissues of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. This target tissue had been defined in ICRP Publication 30 as a 10-μm cell layer on all bone surfaces of trabecular and cortical bone. The revised target tissue is now a 50-μm layer within the marrow cavities of trabecular bone only and is exclusive of the marrow adipocytes. Clearly, this new definition requires the use of 3D microimages of the trabecular architecture not available from past 2D optical studies of the adult skeleton. With our recent acquisition of two relatively young cadavers (males of age 18-years and 40-years), we will develop a series of reference skeletal models that can be directly applied to (1) the new ICRP reference voxel man and female phantoms developed for the ICRP, and (2) pediatric phantoms developed to target the ICRP reference children. Dosimetry data to be developed will include absorbed fractions for internal beta and alpha-particle sources, as well as photon and neutron fluence-to-dose response functions for direct use in external dosimetry studies of the ICRP reference workers and members of the general public

  7. Clinical audit for occupational therapy intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder: sampling steps and sample size calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Weeks, Scott; Atlas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    A priori sample size calculations are used to determine the adequate sample size to estimate the prevalence of the target population with good precision. However, published audits rarely report a priori calculations for their sample size. This article discusses a process in health services delivery mapping to generate a comprehensive sampling frame, which was used to calculate an a priori sample size for a targeted clinical record audit. We describe how we approached methodological and defini...

  8. A UK national performance evaluation of CT-based IGRT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As part of a UK national health service programme of evaluating medical equipment for NHS purchasing decisions, a technical eval uation was carried out between 2008-2009 on X-ray CT-based IGRT systems from different manufacturers, Elekta Synergy v4.2, Tom therapy HiArt v 3.2 and Varian OBI v 1.5. Systems instaJled in ten radiation oncology centres were evaluated. The objective was to test each system to assess its capability to deliver accurate image guidance and to assess variability between different examples of the same system. The work has been further developed since the report and protocol were published. Tests were carried out to measure: Image quality in a range of conditions, using the Catphan 504 phantom and also pseudo-clinical image quality using the Virtually Human Male Pelvic (VHMP) phantom. Imaging dose, using CTDI and Farmer chambers in doubled up pairs of CTDT phantoms for a range of scanner settings and clinical protocols. IGRT geometric accuracy, including: registration of imaging volume to treatment isocentre for the kV systems, using the Modus Pentaguide Qasar phantom; image-shirt-verify tests to test the ability of the system to correct for patient misalignment to within a required tolerance, using the Pentaguide phantom and also the VHMP for soft tissue alignment. All systems assessed had accurate alignment between tomographic image geometry and treatment volume, to within I mm. Automatic couch corrections accurately re-positioned treatment isocentres to within 1.5 mm and where rotations could be corrected, these were typically to within 10. Imaging doses for typical clinical protocols were from 1.4 mGy per scan for a low dose head protocol to 25 mGy for the highest exposure pelvis protocol. All systems could differen tiate contrast between muscle and fat in the VHMP phantom and at this level were able to provide 3D soft tissue information. Differences were observed between measured image quality parameters on the three systems

  9. CT-based temperature monitoring during hepatic RF ablation : Feasibility in an animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruners, Philipp; Pandeya, Ganga D.; Levit, Elena; Roesch, Eva; Penzkofer, Tobias; Isfort, Peter; Schmidt, Bernhardt; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Kuhl, Christiane K.; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper was to establish non-invasive CT-based temperature monitoring during hepatic radiofrequency (RF) ablation in an ex vivo porcine model followed by transfer of the technique into a feasibility in vivo experiment. Materials and methods: Bipolar RF ablations were performed

  10. Monte Carlo calculations of the impact of a hip prosthesis on the dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the ageing of the population, an increasing number of patients with hip prostheses are undergoing pelvic irradiation. Treatment planning systems (TPS) currently available are not always able to accurately predict the dose distribution around such implants. In fact, only Monte Carlo simulation has the ability to precisely calculate the impact of a hip prosthesis during radiotherapeutic treatment. Monte Carlo phantoms were developed to evaluate the dose perturbations during pelvic irradiation. A first model, constructed with the DOSXYZnrc usercode, was elaborated to determine the dose increase at the tissue-metal interface as well as the impact of the material coating the prosthesis. Next, CT-based phantoms were prepared, using the usercode CTCreate, to estimate the influence of the geometry and the composition of such implants on the beam attenuation. Thanks to a program that we developed, the study was carried out with CT-based phantoms containing a hip prosthesis without metal artefacts. Therefore, anthropomorphic phantoms allowed better definition of both patient anatomy and the hip prosthesis in order to better reproduce the clinical conditions of pelvic irradiation. The Monte Carlo results revealed the impact of certain coatings such as PMMA on dose enhancement at the tissue-metal interface. Monte Carlo calculations in CT-based phantoms highlighted the marked influence of the implant's composition, its geometry as well as its position within the beam on dose distribution

  11. A method of calculating a lung clinical target volume DVH for IMRT with intrafractional motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, J H; Zygmanski, P; Choi, N; Chen, G T Y

    2003-06-01

    The motion of lung tumors from respiration has been reported in the literature to be as large as 1-2 cm. This motion requires an additional margin between the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV). In Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), while such a margin is necessary, the margin may not be sufficient to avoid unintended high and low dose regions to the interior on moving CTV. Gated treatment has been proposed to improve normal tissues sparing as well as to ensure accurate dose coverage of the tumor volume. The following questions have not been addressed in the literature: (a) what is the dose error to a target volume without a gated IMRT treatment? (b) What is an acceptable gating window for such a treatment. In this study, we address these questions by proposing a novel technique for calculating the three-dimensional (3-D) dose error that would result if a lung IMRT plan were delivered without a gated linac beam. The method is also generalized for gated treatment with an arbitrary triggering window. IMRT plans for three patients with lung tumors were studied. The treatment plans were generated with HELIOS for delivery with 6 MV on a CL2100 Varian linear accelerator with a 26 pair MLC. A CTV to PTV margin of 1 cm was used. An IMRT planning system searches for an optimized fluence map phi(x,y) for each port, which is then converted into a dynamic MLC file (DMLC). The DMLC file contains information about MLC subfield shapes and the fractional Monitor Units (MUs) to be delivered for each subfield. With a lung tumor, a CTV that executes a quasiperiodic motion z(t) does not receive phi(x,y), but rather an Effective Incident Fluence EIF(x,y). We numerically evaluate the EIF(x,y) from a given DMLC file by a coordinate transformation to the Target's Eye View (TEV). In the TEV coordinate system, the CTV itself is stationary, and the MLC is seen to execute a motion -z(t) that is superimposed on the DMLC motion. The resulting EIF(x,y) is

  12. A method of calculating a lung clinical target volume DVH for IMRT with intrafractional motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The motion of lung tumors from respiration has been reported in the literature to be as large as 1-2 cm. This motion requires an additional margin between the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV). In Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), while such a margin is necessary, the margin may not be sufficient to avoid unintended high and low dose regions to the interior on moving CTV. Gated treatment has been proposed to improve normal tissues sparing as well as to ensure accurate dose coverage of the tumor volume. The following questions have not been addressed in the literature: (a) what is the dose error to a target volume without a gated IMRT treatment? (b) What is an acceptable gating window for such a treatment. In this study, we address these questions by proposing a novel technique for calculating the three-dimensional (3-D) dose error that would result if a lung IMRT plan were delivered without a gated linac beam. The method is also generalized for gated treatment with an arbitrary triggering window. IMRT plans for three patients with lung tumors were studied. The treatment plans were generated with HELIOS for delivery with 6 MV on a CL2100 Varian linear accelerator with a 26 pair MLC. A CTV to PTV margin of 1 cm was used. An IMRT planning system searches for an optimized fluence map Φ(x,y) for each port, which is then converted into a dynamic MLC file (DMLC). The DMLC file contains information about MLC subfield shapes and the fractional Monitor Units (MUs) to be delivered for each subfield. With a lung tumor, a CTV that executes a quasiperiodic motion z(t) does not receive Φ(x,y), but rather an Effective Incident Fluence EIF(x,y). We numerically evaluate the EIF(x,y) from a given DMLC file by a coordinate transformation to the Target's Eye View (TEV). In the TEV coordinate system, the CTV itself is stationary, and the MLC is seen to execute a motion -z(t) that is superimposed on the DMLC motion. The resulting EIF(x,y) is input

  13. Difference in the Set-up Margin between 2D Conventional and 3D CT Based Planning in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sun Mi; Chun, Mi Sun; Kim, Mi Hwa; Oh, Young Taek; Noh, O Kyu [Ajou University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seung Hee [Inje University, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Simulation using computed tomography (CT) is now widely available for radiation treatment planning for breast cancer. It is an important tool to help define the tumor target and normal tissue based on anatomical features of an individual patient. In Korea, most patients have small sized breasts and the purpose of this study was to review the margin of treatment field between conventional two-dimensional (2D) planning and CT based three-dimensional (3D) planning in patients with small breasts. Twenty-five consecutive patients with early breast cancer undergoing breast conservation therapy were selected. All patients underwent 3D CT based planning with a conventional breast tangential field design. In 2D planning, the treatment field margins were determined by palpation of the breast parenchyma (In general, the superior: base of the clavicle, medial: midline, lateral: mid - axillary line, and inferior margin: 2 m below the inflamammary fold). In 3D planning, the clinical target volume (CTV) ought to comprise all glandular breast tissue, and the PTV was obtained by adding a 3D margin of 1 cm around the CTV except in the skin direction. The difference in the treatment field margin and equivalent field size between 2D and 3D planning were evaluated. The association between radiation field margins and factors such as body mass index, menopause status, and bra size was determined. Lung volume and heart volume were examined on the basis of the prescribed breast radiation dose and 3D dose distribution. The margins of the treatment field were smaller in the 3D planning except for two patients. The superior margin was especially variable (average, 2.5 cm; range, -2.5 to 4.5 cm; SD, 1.85). The margin of these targets did not vary equally across BMI class, menopause status, or bra size. The average irradiated lung volume was significantly lower for 3D planning. The average irradiated heart volume did not decrease significantly. The use of 3D CT based planning reduced the

  14. Clinical relevance of different dose calculation strategies for mediastinal IMRT in Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeck, J.; Stieler, F.; Fleckenstein, J.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Abo-Madyan, Y. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Cairo Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kriz, J.; Mueller, R.P. [Klinikum der Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany). Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: Conventional algorithms show uncertainties in dose calculation already for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) might even increase these. We wanted to assess differences in dose distribution for pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC), and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm for both 3D-CRT and IMRT in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients and methods: Based on 20 computed tomograph (CT) datasets of patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma, we created treatment plans according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) with PB and CC algorithm for 3D-CRT and with PB and MC algorithm for IMRT. Doses were compared for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk. Results: For 3D-CRT, PB overestimated PTV{sub 95} and V{sub 20} of the lung by 6.9% and 3.3% and underestimated V{sub 10} of the lung by 5.8%, compared to the CC algorithm. For IMRT, PB overestimated PTV{sub 95}, V{sub 20} of the lung, V{sub 25} of the heart and V{sub 10} of the female left/right breast by 8.1%, 25.8%, 14.0% and 43.6%/189.1%, and underestimated V{sub 10} of the lung, V{sub 4} of the heart and V{sub 4} of the female left/right breast by 6.3%, 6.8% and 23.2%/15.6%, compared to MC. Conclusion: The PB algorithm underestimates low doses to the organs at risk and overestimates dose to PTV and high doses to the organs at risk. For 3D-CRT, a well-modeled PB algorithm is clinically acceptable; for IMRT planning, however, an advanced algorithm such as CC or MC should be used at least for part of the plan optimization. (orig.)

  15. First macro Monte Carlo based commercial dose calculation module for electron beam treatment planning—new issues for clinical consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X.; Duggan, Dennis M.; Coffey, Charles W.; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Cygler, Joanna E.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to present our experience of commissioning, testing and use of the first commercial macro Monte Carlo based dose calculation algorithm for electron beam treatment planning and to investigate new issues regarding dose reporting (dose-to-water versus dose-to-medium) as well as statistical uncertainties for the calculations arising when Monte Carlo based systems are used in patient dose calculations. All phantoms studied were obtained by CT scan. The calculated dose distributions and monitor units were validated against measurements with film and ionization chambers in phantoms containing two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) type low- and high-density inhomogeneities at different source-to-surface distances. Beam energies ranged from 6 to 18 MeV. New required experimental input data for commissioning are presented. The result of validation shows an excellent agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions. The calculated monitor units were within 2% of measured values except in the case of a 6 MeV beam and small cutout fields at extended SSDs (>110 cm). The investigation on the new issue of dose reporting demonstrates the differences up to 4% for lung and 12% for bone when 'dose-to-medium' is calculated and reported instead of 'dose-to-water' as done in a conventional system. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo calculation is shown to be clinically acceptable even for very complex 3D-type inhomogeneities. As Monte Carlo based treatment planning systems begin to enter clinical practice, new issues, such as dose reporting and statistical variations, may be clinically significant. Therefore it is imperative that a consistent approach to dose reporting is used.

  16. First macro Monte Carlo based commercial dose calculation module for electron beam treatment planning-new issues for clinical consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to present our experience of commissioning, testing and use of the first commercial macro Monte Carlo based dose calculation algorithm for electron beam treatment planning and to investigate new issues regarding dose reporting (dose-to-water versus dose-to-medium) as well as statistical uncertainties for the calculations arising when Monte Carlo based systems are used in patient dose calculations. All phantoms studied were obtained by CT scan. The calculated dose distributions and monitor units were validated against measurements with film and ionization chambers in phantoms containing two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) type low- and high-density inhomogeneities at different source-to-surface distances. Beam energies ranged from 6 to 18 MeV. New required experimental input data for commissioning are presented. The result of validation shows an excellent agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions. The calculated monitor units were within 2% of measured values except in the case of a 6 MeV beam and small cutout fields at extended SSDs (>110 cm). The investigation on the new issue of dose reporting demonstrates the differences up to 4% for lung and 12% for bone when 'dose-to-medium' is calculated and reported instead of 'dose-to-water' as done in a conventional system. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo calculation is shown to be clinically acceptable even for very complex 3D-type inhomogeneities. As Monte Carlo based treatment planning systems begin to enter clinical practice, new issues, such as dose reporting and statistical variations, may be clinically significant. Therefore it is imperative that a consistent approach to dose reporting is used

  17. SU-E-J-72: Dosimetric Study of Cone-Beam CT-Based Radiation Treatment Planning Using a Patient-Specific Stepwise CT-Density Table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess dose calculation accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) based treatment plans using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density conversion table in comparison to conventional CT-based treatment plans. Methods: Unlike CT-based treatment planning which use fixed CT-density table, this study used patient-specific CT-density table to minimize the errors in reconstructed mass densities due to the effects of CBCT Hounsfield unit (HU) uncertainties. The patient-specific CT-density table was a stepwise function which maps HUs to only 6 classes of materials with different mass densities: air (0.00121g/cm3), lung (0.26g/cm3), adipose (0.95g/cm3), tissue (1.05 g/cm3), cartilage/bone (1.6g/cm3), and other (3g/cm3). HU thresholds to define different materials were adjusted for each CBCT via best match with the known tissue types in these images. Dose distributions were compared between CT-based plans and CBCT-based plans (IMRT/VMAT) for four types of treatment sites: head and neck (HN), lung, pancreas, and pelvis. For dosimetric comparison, PTV mean dose in both plans were compared. A gamma analysis was also performed to directly compare dosimetry in the two plans. Results: Compared to CT-based plans, the differences for PTV mean dose were 0.1% for pelvis, 1.1% for pancreas, 1.8% for lung, and −2.5% for HN in CBCT-based plans. The gamma passing rate was 99.8% for pelvis, 99.6% for pancreas, and 99.3% for lung with 3%/3mm criteria, and 80.5% for head and neck with 5%/3mm criteria. Different dosimetry accuracy level was observed: 1% for pelvis, 3% for lung and pancreas, and 5% for head and neck. Conclusion: By converting CBCT data to 6 classes of materials for dose calculation, 3% of dose calculation accuracy can be achieved for anatomical sites studied here, except HN which had a 5% accuracy. CBCT-based treatment planning using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density table can facilitate the evaluation of dosimetry changes resulting from variation in patient anatomy

  18. SU-E-J-72: Dosimetric Study of Cone-Beam CT-Based Radiation Treatment Planning Using a Patient-Specific Stepwise CT-Density Table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S; Le, Q; Mutaf, Y; Yi, B; D’Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess dose calculation accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) based treatment plans using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density conversion table in comparison to conventional CT-based treatment plans. Methods: Unlike CT-based treatment planning which use fixed CT-density table, this study used patient-specific CT-density table to minimize the errors in reconstructed mass densities due to the effects of CBCT Hounsfield unit (HU) uncertainties. The patient-specific CT-density table was a stepwise function which maps HUs to only 6 classes of materials with different mass densities: air (0.00121g/cm3), lung (0.26g/cm3), adipose (0.95g/cm3), tissue (1.05 g/cm3), cartilage/bone (1.6g/cm3), and other (3g/cm3). HU thresholds to define different materials were adjusted for each CBCT via best match with the known tissue types in these images. Dose distributions were compared between CT-based plans and CBCT-based plans (IMRT/VMAT) for four types of treatment sites: head and neck (HN), lung, pancreas, and pelvis. For dosimetric comparison, PTV mean dose in both plans were compared. A gamma analysis was also performed to directly compare dosimetry in the two plans. Results: Compared to CT-based plans, the differences for PTV mean dose were 0.1% for pelvis, 1.1% for pancreas, 1.8% for lung, and −2.5% for HN in CBCT-based plans. The gamma passing rate was 99.8% for pelvis, 99.6% for pancreas, and 99.3% for lung with 3%/3mm criteria, and 80.5% for head and neck with 5%/3mm criteria. Different dosimetry accuracy level was observed: 1% for pelvis, 3% for lung and pancreas, and 5% for head and neck. Conclusion: By converting CBCT data to 6 classes of materials for dose calculation, 3% of dose calculation accuracy can be achieved for anatomical sites studied here, except HN which had a 5% accuracy. CBCT-based treatment planning using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density table can facilitate the evaluation of dosimetry changes resulting from variation in patient anatomy.

  19. Observation of Allende and Antarctic meteorites by monochromatic X-ray CT based on synchrotron radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano,Tatsumi/Funaki,Minoru/Nagata,Takesi/Taguchi,Isamu/ Hamada,Hiroki/Usami,Katsuhisa/Hayakawa,Kazunobu

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional CT images of the Allende meteorite with a high resolution of 10μm have been obtained nondestructively by a monochromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT) based on synchrotron radiation (SR). The metallic minerals, matrix and chondrules can be clearly observed in the CT images. The CT values, which express the image intensity, allow a quantitative elemental analysis including such as difference in the metallic minerals, i. e., pentlandite and troilite, using the comparison of C...

  20. CT-based abdominal aortic calcification score as a surrogate marker for predicting the presence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the value of a CT-based abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) score as a surrogate marker for the presence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). The AAC scores of 373 patients without cardiac symptoms who underwent both screening coronary CT angiography and abdominal CT within one year were calculated according to the Agatston method. Logistic regression was used to derive two multivariate models from traditional cardiovascular risk factors, with and without AAC scores, to predict the presence of CAD. The AAC score and the two multivariate models were compared by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the net reclassification improvement (NRI). The AAC score alone showed a marginally higher AUC (0.823 vs. 0.767, P = 0.061) and significantly better risk classification (NRI = 0.158, P = 0.048) than the multivariate model without AAC. The multivariate model using traditional factors and AAC did not show a significantly higher AUC (0.832 vs. 0.823, P = 0.616) or NRI (0.073, P = 0.13) than the AAC score alone. The optimal cutoff value of the AAC score for predicting CAD was 1025.8 (sensitivity, 79.5 %; specificity, 75.9 %). AAC scores may serve as a surrogate marker for the presence or absence of asymptomatic CAD. (orig.)

  1. CT-based abdominal aortic calcification score as a surrogate marker for predicting the presence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Chansik; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, 50 Yonsei-Ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Sun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Department of Research Affairs, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To assess the value of a CT-based abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) score as a surrogate marker for the presence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). The AAC scores of 373 patients without cardiac symptoms who underwent both screening coronary CT angiography and abdominal CT within one year were calculated according to the Agatston method. Logistic regression was used to derive two multivariate models from traditional cardiovascular risk factors, with and without AAC scores, to predict the presence of CAD. The AAC score and the two multivariate models were compared by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the net reclassification improvement (NRI). The AAC score alone showed a marginally higher AUC (0.823 vs. 0.767, P = 0.061) and significantly better risk classification (NRI = 0.158, P = 0.048) than the multivariate model without AAC. The multivariate model using traditional factors and AAC did not show a significantly higher AUC (0.832 vs. 0.823, P = 0.616) or NRI (0.073, P = 0.13) than the AAC score alone. The optimal cutoff value of the AAC score for predicting CAD was 1025.8 (sensitivity, 79.5 %; specificity, 75.9 %). AAC scores may serve as a surrogate marker for the presence or absence of asymptomatic CAD. (orig.)

  2. Clinical audit for occupational therapy intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder: sampling steps and sample size calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Scott; Atlas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    A priori sample size calculations are used to determine the adequate sample size to estimate the prevalence of the target population with good precision. However, published audits rarely report a priori calculations for their sample size. This article discusses a process in health services delivery mapping to generate a comprehensive sampling frame, which was used to calculate an a priori sample size for a targeted clinical record audit. We describe how we approached methodological and definitional issues in the following steps: (1) target population definition, (2) sampling frame construction, and (3) a priori sample size calculation. We recommend this process for clinicians, researchers, or policy makers when detailed information on a reference population is unavailable. PMID:26122044

  3. Collapsed cone convolution and analytical anisotropic algorithm dose calculations compared to VMC++ Monte Carlo simulations in clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to study and quantify the differences in dose distributions computed with some of the newest dose calculation algorithms available in commercial planning systems. The study was done for clinical cases originally calculated with pencil beam convolution (PBC) where large density inhomogeneities were present. Three other dose algorithms were used: a pencil beam like algorithm, the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), a convolution superposition algorithm, collapsed cone convolution (CCC), and a Monte Carlo program, voxel Monte Carlo (VMC++). The dose calculation algorithms were compared under static field irradiations at 6 MV and 15 MV using multileaf collimators and hard wedges where necessary. Five clinical cases were studied: three lung and two breast cases. We found that, in terms of accuracy, the CCC algorithm performed better overall than AAA compared to VMC++, but AAA remains an attractive option for routine use in the clinic due to its short computation times. Dose differences between the different algorithms and VMC++ for the median value of the planning target volume (PTV) were typically 0.4% (range: 0.0 to 1.4%) in the lung and -1.3% (range: -2.1 to -0.6%) in the breast for the few cases we analysed. As expected, PTV coverage and dose homogeneity turned out to be more critical in the lung than in the breast cases with respect to the accuracy of the dose calculation. This was observed in the dose volume histograms obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations

  4. Mathematical knowledge and drug dosage calculation: Necessary clinical skills for the nurse

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasakis Efstratios

    2013-01-01

    When nurses perform their tasks, they manage situations where maths knowledge is required. Such a situation is the calculation of medication dosage. Aim: The literature review of papers relevant with the mathematical knowledge and drug calculation skills of nurses and nursing students. Material-Method: A search of published research and review articles from January 1989 until March 2012, has been conducted in Pubmed database. The search terms used were: nurses, mathematics skills, numeracy sk...

  5. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy with Monte Carlo simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yanqun; Qi, Guohai; Yin, Gang; Wang, Xianliang; Wang, Pei; Li, Jian; Xiao, Mingyong; Li, Jie; Kang, Shengwei; Liao, Xiongfei

    2014-01-01

    Background The accuracy of dose calculation is crucial to the quality of treatment planning and, consequently, to the dose delivered to patients undergoing radiation therapy. Current general calculation algorithms such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Collapsed Cone Convolution (CCC) have shortcomings in regard to severe inhomogeneities, particularly in those regions where charged particle equilibrium does not hold. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the PBC and CCC alg...

  6. The effect of metal artefact reduction on CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging in the vicinity of metallic hip implants. A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if metal artefact reduction (MAR) combined with a priori knowledge of prosthesis material composition can be applied to obtain CT-based attenuation maps with sufficient accuracy for quantitative assessment of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in lesions near metallic prostheses. A custom hip prosthesis phantom with a lesion-sized cavity filled with 0.2 ml 18F-FDG solution having an activity of 3.367 MBq adjacent to a prosthesis bore was imaged twice with a chrome-cobalt steel hip prosthesis and a plastic replica, respectively. Scanning was performed on a clinical hybrid PET/CT system equipped with an additional external 137Cs transmission source. PET emission images were reconstructed from both phantom configurations with CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) and with CT-based attenuation correction using MAR (MARCTAC). To compare results with the attenuation-correction method extant prior to the advent of PET/CT, we also carried out attenuation correction with 137Cs transmission-based attenuation correction (TXAC). CTAC and MARCTAC images were scaled to attenuation coefficients at 511 keV using a trilinear function that mapped the highest CT values to the prosthesis alloy attenuation coefficient. Accuracy and spatial distribution of the lesion activity was compared between the three reconstruction schemes. Compared to the reference activity of 3.37 MBq, the estimated activity quantified from the PET image corrected by TXAC was 3.41 MBq. The activity estimated from PET images corrected by MARCTAC was similar in accuracy at 3.32 MBq. CTAC corrected PET images resulted in nearly 40% overestimation of lesion activity at 4.70 MBq. Comparison of PET images obtained with the plastic and metal prostheses in place showed that CTAC resulted in a marked distortion of the 18F-FDG distribution within the lesion, whereas application of MARCTAC and TXAC resulted in lesion distributions similar to those observed with the plastic replica. (author)

  7. Collapsed cone and analytical anisotropic algorithm dose calculations compared to VMC++ Monte Carlo simulations in clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to study and quantify the differences in dose distributions computed with some of the newest dose calculation algorithms available in commercial planning systems. The study was done for clinical cases where large density inhomogeneities were present. Three dose algorithms were used: a pencil beam like algorithm, the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), a convolution superposition algorithm, collapsed cone convolution (CCC) and a Monte Carlo program, voxel Monte Carlo (VMC++). The dose calculation algorithms were compared under static field irradiations at 6 MV and 15 MV using multileaf collimators and hard wedges where necessary. Five clinical cases were studied: three lung and two breast cases. We found that the CCC algorithm performed overall better than AAA compared to VMC++, but AAA remains an attractive option for routine use in the clinic due to its short computation times. Dose differences between the different algorithms for the median value of the planning target volume (PTV) were typically 0.4% (range: 0.0-1.4%) in the lung and -1.3% (range: -2.1--0.6%) in the breast for the few cases we analysed. As expected, PTV coverage and dose homogeneity turned out to be more critical in the lung than in the breast cases with respect to the accuracy of the dose calculation. This was observed in the dose volume histograms obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations

  8. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy with Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of dose calculation is crucial to the quality of treatment planning and, consequently, to the dose delivered to patients undergoing radiation therapy. Current general calculation algorithms such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Collapsed Cone Convolution (CCC) have shortcomings in regard to severe inhomogeneities, particularly in those regions where charged particle equilibrium does not hold. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the PBC and CCC algorithms in lung cancer radiotherapy using Monte Carlo (MC) technology. Four treatment plans were designed using Oncentra Masterplan TPS for each patient. Two intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms, and two three-dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms. The DICOM-RT files of the treatment plans were exported to the Monte Carlo system to recalculate. The dose distributions of GTV, PTV and ipsilateral lung calculated by the TPS and MC were compared. For 3DCRT and IMRT plans, the mean dose differences for GTV between the CCC and MC increased with decreasing of the GTV volume. For IMRT, the mean dose differences were found to be higher than that of 3DCRT. The CCC algorithm overestimated the GTV mean dose by approximately 3% for IMRT. For 3DCRT plans, when the volume of the GTV was greater than 100 cm3, the mean doses calculated by CCC and MC almost have no difference. PBC shows large deviations from the MC algorithm. For the dose to the ipsilateral lung, the CCC algorithm overestimated the dose to the entire lung, and the PBC algorithm overestimated V20 but underestimated V5; the difference in V10 was not statistically significant. PBC substantially overestimates the dose to the tumour, but the CCC is similar to the MC simulation. It is recommended that the treatment plans for lung cancer be developed using an advanced dose calculation algorithm other than PBC. MC can accurately

  9. Development of free statistical software enabling researchers to calculate confidence levels, clinical significance curves and risk-benefit contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confidence levels, clinical significance curves, and risk-benefit contours are tools improving analysis of clinical studies and minimizing misinterpretation of published results, however no software has been available for their calculation. The objective was to develop software to help clinicians utilize these tools. Excel 2000 spreadsheets were designed using only built-in functions, without macros. The workbook was protected and encrypted so that users can modify only input cells. The workbook has 4 spreadsheets for use in studies comparing two patient groups. Sheet 1 comprises instructions and graphic examples for use. Sheet 2 allows the user to input the main study results (e.g. survival rates) into a 2-by-2 table. Confidence intervals (95%), p-value and the confidence level for Treatment A being better than Treatment B are automatically generated. An additional input cell allows the user to determine the confidence associated with a specified level of benefit. For example if the user wishes to know the confidence that Treatment A is at least 10% better than B, 10% is entered. Sheet 2 automatically displays clinical significance curves, graphically illustrating confidence levels for all possible benefits of one treatment over the other. Sheet 3 allows input of toxicity data, and calculates the confidence that one treatment is more toxic than the other. It also determines the confidence that the relative toxicity of the most effective arm does not exceed user-defined tolerability. Sheet 4 automatically calculates risk-benefit contours, displaying the confidence associated with a specified scenario of minimum benefit and maximum risk of one treatment arm over the other. The spreadsheet is freely downloadable at www.ontumor.com/professional/statistics.htm A simple, self-explanatory, freely available spreadsheet calculator was developed using Excel 2000. The incorporated decision-making tools can be used for data analysis and improve the reporting of results of any

  10. TH-E-BRE-07: Development of Dose Calculation Error Predictors for a Widely Implemented Clinical Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egan, A [Oregon State University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, W [Oregon Health and Science University (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Several shortcomings of the current implementation of the analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA) may lead to dose calculation errors in highly modulated treatments delivered to highly heterogeneous geometries. Here we introduce a set of dosimetric error predictors that can be applied to a clinical treatment plan and patient geometry in order to identify high risk plans. Once a problematic plan is identified, the treatment can be recalculated with more accurate algorithm in order to better assess its viability. Methods: Here we focus on three distinct sources dosimetric error in the AAA algorithm. First, due to a combination of discrepancies in smallfield beam modeling as well as volume averaging effects, dose calculated through small MLC apertures can be underestimated, while that behind small MLC blocks can overestimated. Second, due the rectilinear scaling of the Monte Carlo generated pencil beam kernel, energy is not properly transported through heterogeneities near, but not impeding, the central axis of the beamlet. And third, AAA overestimates dose in regions very low density (< 0.2 g/cm{sup 3}). We have developed an algorithm to detect the location and magnitude of each scenario within the patient geometry, namely the field-size index (FSI), the heterogeneous scatter index (HSI), and the lowdensity index (LDI) respectively. Results: Error indices successfully identify deviations between AAA and Monte Carlo dose distributions in simple phantom geometries. Algorithms are currently implemented in the MATLAB computing environment and are able to run on a typical RapidArc head and neck geometry in less than an hour. Conclusion: Because these error indices successfully identify each type of error in contrived cases, with sufficient benchmarking, this method can be developed into a clinical tool that may be able to help estimate AAA dose calculation errors and when it might be advisable to use Monte Carlo calculations.

  11. The role of nuclear reactions in Monte Carlo calculations of absorbed and biological effective dose distributions in hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brons, S; Elsässer, T; Ferrari, A; Gadioli, E; Mairani, A; Parodi, K; Sala, P; Scholz, M; Sommerer, F

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo codes are rapidly spreading among hadron therapy community due to their sophisticated nuclear/electromagnetic models which allow an improved description of the complex mixed radiation field produced by nuclear reactions in therapeutic irradiation. In this contribution results obtained with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA are presented focusing on the production of secondary fragments in carbon ion interaction with water and on CT-based calculations of absorbed and biological effective dose for typical clinical situations. The results of the simulations are compared with the available experimental data and with the predictions of the GSI analytical treatment planning code TRiP.

  12. Dose calculation and dosimetry tests for clinical implementation of 1D tissue-deficit compensation by a single dynamic absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In this study the possibilities for implementing 1D tissue-deficit compensation techniques by a dynamic single absorber were investigated. This research firstly involved a preliminary examination on the accuracy of a pencil beam-based algorithm, implemented for irregularly shaped photon beams in our 3D treatment planning system (TPS) (Cadplan 2.7, Varian-Dosetek Oy), in calculating dose distributions delivered in 1D non-uniform fields. Once the reliability of the pencil beam (PB) algorithm for dose calculations in non-uniform beams was verified, we proceeded to test the feasibility of tissue-deficit compensation using our single absorber modulator. As an example, we considered a mantle field technique. Materials and methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the method employed in calculating dose distributions delivered in 1D non-uniform fields, three different fluence profiles, which could be considered as a small sample representative of clinically relevant applications, were selected. The incident non-uniform fluences were simulated by the sum of simple blocked fields (i.e. with rectangular 'strip' blocks, one per beam) properly weighed by the 'modulation factors' Fi, defined in each interval of the subdivided profile as the ratio between the desired fluence and the open field fluence. Depth dose distributions in a cubic phantom were then calculated by the TPS and compared with the corresponding doses (at 5 and 10 cm acrylic depths) delivered by the single absorber modulation system. In the present application, the absorber speed profile able to compensate for the tissue deficit along the cranio-caudal direction and then homogenizing the dose distribution on a 'midline' isocentric plane with sufficient accuracy can be directly derived from anatomic data, such as the SSDs (source-skin distances) along the patient contour. The compensation can be verified through portal dosimetry techniques (using a traditional port film system). Results: The

  13. 4D cone beam CT-based dose assessment for SBRT lung cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weixing; Dhou, Salam; Cifter, Fulya; Myronakis, Marios; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Seco, Joao; Lewis, John H.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a 4DCBCT-based dose assessment method for calculating actual delivered dose for patients with significant respiratory motion or anatomical changes during the course of SBRT. To address the limitation of 4DCT-based dose assessment, we propose to calculate the delivered dose using time-varying (‘fluoroscopic’) 3D patient images generated from a 4DCBCT-based motion model. The method includes four steps: (1) before each treatment, 4DCBCT data is acquired with the patient in treatment position, based on which a patient-specific motion model is created using a principal components analysis algorithm. (2) During treatment, 2D time-varying kV projection images are continuously acquired, from which time-varying ‘fluoroscopic’ 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. (3) Lateral truncation artifacts are corrected using planning 4DCT images. (4) The 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach is validated using six modified XCAT phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions derived from patient data. The estimated doses are compared to that calculated using ground-truth XCAT phantoms. For each XCAT phantom, the calculated delivered tumor dose values generally follow the same trend as that of the ground truth and at most timepoints the difference is less than 5%. For the overall delivered dose, the normalized error of calculated 3D dose distribution is generally less than 3% and the tumor D95 error is less than 1.5%. XCAT phantom studies indicate the potential of the proposed method to accurately estimate 3D tumor dose distributions for SBRT lung treatment based on 4DCBCT imaging and motion modeling. Further research is necessary to investigate its performance for clinical patient data.

  14. Correction of oral contrast artifacts in CT-based attenuation correction of PET images using an automated segmentation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadian, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R.; Sarkar, Saeed [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Bidgoli, Javad H. [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); East Tehran Azad University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tehran (Iran); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    Oral contrast is usually administered in most X-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations of the abdomen and the pelvis as it allows more accurate identification of the bowel and facilitates the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT studies. However, the misclassification of contrast medium with high-density bone in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) is known to generate artifacts in the attenuation map ({mu}map), thus resulting in overcorrection for attenuation of positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this study, we developed an automated algorithm for segmentation and classification of regions containing oral contrast medium to correct for artifacts in CT-attenuation-corrected PET images using the segmented contrast correction (SCC) algorithm. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps: first, high CT number object segmentation using combined region- and boundary-based segmentation and second, object classification to bone and contrast agent using a knowledge-based nonlinear fuzzy classifier. Thereafter, the CT numbers of pixels belonging to the region classified as contrast medium are substituted with their equivalent effective bone CT numbers using the SCC algorithm. The generated CT images are then down-sampled followed by Gaussian smoothing to match the resolution of PET images. A piecewise calibration curve was then used to convert CT pixel values to linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. The visual assessment of segmented regions performed by an experienced radiologist confirmed the accuracy of the segmentation and classification algorithms for delineation of contrast-enhanced regions in clinical CT images. The quantitative analysis of generated {mu}maps of 21 clinical CT colonoscopy datasets showed an overestimation ranging between 24.4% and 37.3% in the 3D-classified regions depending on their volume and the concentration of contrast medium. Two PET/CT studies known to be problematic demonstrated the applicability of the technique

  15. Accuracy of CT-based patient-specific guides for total knee arthroplasty in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotanus, M G M; van Haaren, E H; Hendrickx, R P M; Jansen, E J P; Kort, N P

    2015-12-01

    Published clinical trials who studied the accuracy of patient-specific guides (PSG) for total knee arthroplasty exclude patients with articular deformity of the knee joint. We prospectively analysed a series of 30 patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint with use of PSG. At 1 year post-operative, the achieved biomechanical (HKA) axis and varus/valgus of the femur and tibia components were measured on anterior-posterior (AP) long-standing weight-bearing radiographs. Flexion/extension of the femoral and AP slope of the tibia component was measured on standard lateral radiographs. Percentages >3° deviation of the pre-operative planned HKA axis and individual implant components were considered as outliers. Approved and used implant size, median blood loss (ml) and operation time (min) were obtained from the operation records. Pre- and 1-year post-operative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were performed. Eighty-three per cent of the patients had a HKA axis restored <3° of the pre-operative planned alignment. Varus/valgus outliers were 0.0 and 6.7 % for the femoral and tibial components, respectively. Percentages of outliers of flexion/extension were 36.7 % for the femoral component and 10.0 % for the AP slope of the tibial component. Median blood loss was 300 ml (50-700), while operation time was 67 min (44-144). In 20 % of all cases, the approved implant size was changed into one size smaller. One-year post-operative PROMs improved significantly. We conclude that the accuracy of CT-based PSG is not impaired in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis and this modality can restore biomechanical limb alignment. PMID:26265403

  16. Monte Carlo calculated stopping-power ratios, water/air, for clinical proton dosimetry (50-250 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of stopping power ratios, water to air, for the determination of absorbed dose to water in clinical proton beams using ionization chamber measurements have been undertaken using the Monte Carlo method. A computer code to simulate the transport of protons in water (PETRA) has been used to calculate Sw,air-data under different degrees of complexity, ranging from values based on primary protons only to data including secondary electrons and high-energy secondary protons produced in nonelastic nuclear collisions. All numerical data are based on ICRU 49 proton stopping powers. Calculations using primary protons have been compared to the simple continuous slowing-down approximation (c.s.d.a.) analytical technique used in proton dosimetry protocols, not finding significant differences that justify elaborate Monte Carlo simulations except beyond the mean range of the protons (the far side of the Bragg peak). The influence of nuclear nonelastic processes, through the detailed generation and transport of secondary protons, on the calculated stopping-power ratios has been found to be negligible. The effect of alpha particles has also been analysed, finding differences smaller than 0.1% from the results excluding them. Discrepancies of up to 0.6% in the plateau region have been found, however, when the production and transport of secondary electrons are taken into account. The large influence of nonelastic nuclear interactions on proton depth-dose distributions shows that the removal of primary protons from the incident beam decreases the peak-to-plateau ratio by a large factor, up to 40% at 250 MeV. It is therefore emphasized that nonelastic nuclear reactions should be included in Monte Carlo simulations of proton beam depth-dose distributions. (author)

  17. SU-E-T-110: Development of An Independent, Monte Carlo, Dose Calculation, Quality Assurance Tool for Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive end-to-end test for Varian's TrueBeam linear accelerator for head and neck IMRT using a custom phantom designed to utilize multiple dosimetry devices. Purpose: To commission a multiple-source Monte Carlo model of Elekta linear accelerator beams of nominal energies 6MV and 10MV. Methods: A three source, Monte Carlo model of Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams was developed. Energy spectra of two photon sources corresponding to primary photons created in the target and scattered photons originating in the linear accelerator head were determined by an optimization process that fit the relative fluence of 0.25 MeV energy bins to the product of Fatigue-Life and Fermi functions to match calculated percent depth dose (PDD) data with that measured in a water tank for a 10x10cm2 field. Off-axis effects were modeled by a 3rd degree polynomial used to describe the off-axis half-value layer as a function of off-axis angle and fitting the off-axis fluence to a piecewise linear function to match calculated dose profiles with measured dose profiles for a 40×40cm2 field. The model was validated by comparing calculated PDDs and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 3×3cm2 to 30×30cm2 to those obtained from measurements. A benchmarking study compared calculated data to measurements for IMRT plans delivered to anthropomorphic phantoms. Results: Along the central axis of the beam 99.6% and 99.7% of all data passed the 2%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. Dose profiles at depths of dmax, through 25cm agreed with measured data for 99.4% and 99.6% of data tested for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. A comparison of calculated dose to film measurement in a head and neck phantom showed an average of 85.3% and 90.5% of pixels passing a 3%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models respectively. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo multiple-source model for Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams has been developed as a

  18. Effect of CT-based treatment planning on portal field size and outcome in radiation treatment of localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, JWM; Slotman, BJ; Meijer, OWM; Langendijk, HA

    2000-01-01

    The portal field sizes of 361 consecutive patients treated with curative radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer were measured. The introduction of CT-based information resulted in a significant increase of field sizes, leading to an almost doubling of the treated volume, some increase in late re

  19. Systematisation of spatial uncertainties for comparison between a MR and a CT-based radiotherapy workflow for prostate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we compared the spatial uncertainties associated with a MR-based workflow for external radiotherapy of prostate cancer to a standard CT-based workflow. The MR-based workflow relies on target definition and patient positioning based on MR imaging. A solution for patient transport between the MR scanner and the treatment units has been developed. For the CT-based workflow, the target is defined on a MR series but then transferred to a CT study through image registration before treatment planning, and a patient positioning using portal imaging and fiducial markers. An 'open bore' 1.5T MRI scanner, Siemens Espree, has been installed in the radiotherapy department in near proximity to a treatment unit to enable patient transport between the two installations, and hence use the MRI for patient positioning. The spatial uncertainty caused by the transport was added to the uncertainty originating from the target definition process, estimated through a review of the scientific literature. The uncertainty in the CT-based workflow was estimated through a literature review. The systematic uncertainties, affecting all treatment fractions, are reduced from 3-4 mm (1Sd) with a CT based workflow to 2-3 mm with a MR based workflow. The main contributing factor to this improvement is the exclusion of registration between MR and CT in the planning phase of the treatment. Treatment planning directly on MR images reduce the spatial uncertainty for prostate treatments

  20. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xyang43@emory.edu; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    .86%, and the prostate volume Dice overlap coefficient was 91.89% ± 1.19%. Conclusions: The authors have developed a novel approach to improve prostate contour utilizing intraoperative TRUS-based prostate volume in the CT-based prostate HDR treatment planning, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with MRIs. The proposed segmentation method would improve prostate delineations, enable accurate dose planning and treatment delivery, and potentially enhance the treatment outcome of prostate HDR brachytherapy.

  1. Whole-body MRI for initial staging of paediatric lymphoma: prospective comparison to an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littooij, Annemieke S. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Kwee, Thomas C.; Vermoolen, Malou A.; Keizer, Bart de; Beek, Frederik J.A.; Hobbelink, Monique G.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Barber, Ignasi; Enriquez, Goya [Hospital Materno-Infantil Vall d' Hebron, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Granata, Claudio [IRCCS Giannina Gaslini Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Zsiros, Jozsef [University of Amsterdam, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soh, Shui Yen [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Haematology and Oncology service, Department of Paediatric Subspecialities, Singapore (Singapore); Bierings, Marc B. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Haematology-Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    To compare whole-body MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (whole-body MRI-DWI), with FDG-PET/CT for staging newly diagnosed paediatric lymphoma. A total of 36 children with newly diagnosed lymphoma prospectively underwent both whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT. Whole-body MRI-DWI was successfully performed in 33 patients (mean age 13.9 years). Whole-body MRI-DWI was independently evaluated by two blinded observers. After consensus reading, an unblinded expert panel evaluated the discrepant findings between whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT and used bone marrow biopsy, other imaging data and clinical information to derive an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard. Interobserver agreement of whole-body MRI-DWI was good [all nodal sites together (κ = 0.79); all extranodal sites together (κ = 0.69)]. There was very good agreement between the consensus whole-body MRI-DWI- and FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard for nodal (κ = 0.91) and extranodal (κ = 0.94) staging. The sensitivity and specificity of consensus whole-body MRI-DWI were 93 % and 98 % for nodal staging and 89 % and 100 % for extranodal staging, respectively. Following removal of MRI reader errors, the disease stage according to whole-body MRI-DWI agreed with the reference standard in 28 of 33 patients. Our results indicate that whole-body MRI-DWI is feasible for staging paediatric lymphoma and could potentially serve as a good radiation-free alternative to FDG-PET/CT. (orig.)

  2. Whole-body MRI for initial staging of paediatric lymphoma: prospective comparison to an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare whole-body MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (whole-body MRI-DWI), with FDG-PET/CT for staging newly diagnosed paediatric lymphoma. A total of 36 children with newly diagnosed lymphoma prospectively underwent both whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT. Whole-body MRI-DWI was successfully performed in 33 patients (mean age 13.9 years). Whole-body MRI-DWI was independently evaluated by two blinded observers. After consensus reading, an unblinded expert panel evaluated the discrepant findings between whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT and used bone marrow biopsy, other imaging data and clinical information to derive an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard. Interobserver agreement of whole-body MRI-DWI was good [all nodal sites together (κ = 0.79); all extranodal sites together (κ = 0.69)]. There was very good agreement between the consensus whole-body MRI-DWI- and FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard for nodal (κ = 0.91) and extranodal (κ = 0.94) staging. The sensitivity and specificity of consensus whole-body MRI-DWI were 93 % and 98 % for nodal staging and 89 % and 100 % for extranodal staging, respectively. Following removal of MRI reader errors, the disease stage according to whole-body MRI-DWI agreed with the reference standard in 28 of 33 patients. Our results indicate that whole-body MRI-DWI is feasible for staging paediatric lymphoma and could potentially serve as a good radiation-free alternative to FDG-PET/CT. (orig.)

  3. The accuracy of the out-of-field dose calculations using a model based algorithm in a commercial treatment planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lilie; Ding, George X.

    2014-07-01

    The out-of-field dose can be clinically important as it relates to the dose of the organ-at-risk, although the accuracy of its calculation in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs) receives less attention. This study evaluates the uncertainties of out-of-field dose calculated with a model based dose calculation algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), implemented in a commercial radiotherapy TPS, Varian Eclipse V10, by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, in which the entire accelerator head is modeled including the multi-leaf collimators. The MC calculated out-of-field doses were validated by experimental measurements. The dose calculations were performed in a water phantom as well as CT based patient geometries and both static and highly modulated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields were evaluated. We compared the calculated out-of-field doses, defined as lower than 5% of the prescription dose, in four H&N cancer patients and two lung cancer patients treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and IMRT techniques. The results show that the discrepancy of calculated out-of-field dose profiles between AAA and the MC depends on the depth and is generally less than 1% for in water phantom comparisons and in CT based patient dose calculations for static field and IMRT. In cases of VMAT plans, the difference between AAA and MC is <0.5%. The clinical impact resulting from the error on the calculated organ doses were analyzed by using dose-volume histograms. Although the AAA algorithm significantly underestimated the out-of-field doses, the clinical impact on the calculated organ doses in out-of-field regions may not be significant in practice due to very low out-of-field doses relative to the target dose.

  4. The accuracy of the out-of-field dose calculations using a model based algorithm in a commercial treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The out-of-field dose can be clinically important as it relates to the dose of the organ-at-risk, although the accuracy of its calculation in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs) receives less attention. This study evaluates the uncertainties of out-of-field dose calculated with a model based dose calculation algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), implemented in a commercial radiotherapy TPS, Varian Eclipse V10, by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, in which the entire accelerator head is modeled including the multi-leaf collimators. The MC calculated out-of-field doses were validated by experimental measurements. The dose calculations were performed in a water phantom as well as CT based patient geometries and both static and highly modulated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields were evaluated. We compared the calculated out-of-field doses, defined as lower than 5% of the prescription dose, in four H and N cancer patients and two lung cancer patients treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and IMRT techniques. The results show that the discrepancy of calculated out-of-field dose profiles between AAA and the MC depends on the depth and is generally less than 1% for in water phantom comparisons and in CT based patient dose calculations for static field and IMRT. In cases of VMAT plans, the difference between AAA and MC is <0.5%. The clinical impact resulting from the error on the calculated organ doses were analyzed by using dose-volume histograms. Although the AAA algorithm significantly underestimated the out-of-field doses, the clinical impact on the calculated organ doses in out-of-field regions may not be significant in practice due to very low out-of-field doses relative to the target dose. (note)

  5. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  6. Comparison of Airflows in Weibel-based and CT-based Human Lung Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Long; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2004-11-01

    The need for patient specific lung geometry for study of pulmonary air flow and drug delivery has been emphasized recently due to the complexity of individual airway tree geometry. The objective of this paper is to assess the notion of patient specific geometry by comparing airflows in an idealized Weibel-based lung model and two realistic human lung geometries. The Weibel-based model is composed of cylinders of differing diameters for various branching and has been used extensively for modeling airflow in lungs. Here a 4-generation Weibel model is considered. The realistic lung geometries are segmented and reconstructured from computerized tomography (CT) images as part of an effort to build a normative atlas (NIH HL-04368) documenting airway geometry over 4 decades of age in healthy and disease-state adult humans. The custom developed Taylor-Galerkin finite element code, which solves the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, is applied to simulate airflows in these lung geometries. The velocity wave form recorded from a mechanical ventilator is adopted as the inlet pulsatile boundary condition. At the outlets, both the pressure and outflow boundary conditions are applied and compared. The counter-rotating vortices are observed in the Weibel model during both the inspiratory and expiratory cycles, being consistent with previous studies. The flow structures in the CT-based models are much more complicated and counter-rotating vortices are only evident in some regions.

  7. The skill of surface registration in CT-based navigation system for total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface registration of the CT-based navigation system, which is a matching between computational and real spatial spaces, is a key step to guarantee the accuracy of navigation. However, it has not been well described how the accuracy is affected by the registration skill of surgeon. Here, we reported the difference of the registration error between eight surgeons with the experience of navigation and six apprentice surgeons. A cadaveric pelvic model with an acetabular cup was made to measure the skill and learning curve of registration. After surface registration, two cup angles (inclination and anteversion) were recorded in the navigation system and the variance of these cup angles in ten trials were compared between the experienced surgeons and apprentices. In addition, we investigated whether the accuracy of registration by the apprentices was improved by visual information on how to take the surface points. The results showed that there was statistically significant difference in the accuracy of registration between the two groups. The accuracy of the second ten trials after getting the visual information showed great improvements. (orig.)

  8. Effect of adult weight and CT-based selection on rabbit meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Szendrő

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the meat quality of different genotypes. Maternal (M; adult weight/AW/=4.0-4.5kg; selected for the number of kits born alive, Pannon White (P; AW=4.3-4.8kg and Large type (L; AW=4.8-5.4kg rabbits were analysed. P and L genotypes were selected for carcass traits based on CT/Computer tomography/data. Rabbits were slaughtered at 11wk of age and hindleg (HL meat and M. Longissimus dorsi (LD were analysed for proximate composition and fatty acid (FA profile. Proximate composition was unaffected by the selection programme, even though the meat of P rabbits was leaner and had higher ash content (P<0.10. The LD meat of P rabbits exhibited significantly lower MUFA contents compared to M and L rabbits (25.4 vs 28.0 vs 27.7%; P<0.01 and higher PUFA content compared to M rabbits (31.9 vs 24.9%; P<0.05. This study revealed that long-term CT-based selection is effective in increasing meat leanness and PUFA content.

  9. CT based treatment planning system of proton beam therapy for ocular melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Takashi E-mail: tnakano@med.gunma-u.ac.jp; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Furukawa, Shigeo; Shibayama, Kouichi; Sato, Sinichiro; Hiraoka, Takeshi; Morita, Shinroku; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2003-09-01

    A computed tomography (CT) based treatment planning system of proton beam therapy was established specially for ocular melanoma treatment. A technique of collimated proton beams with maximum energy of 70 MeV are applied for treatment for ocular melanoma. The vertical proton beam line has a range modulator for spreading beams out, a multi-leaf collimator, an aperture, light beam localizer, field light, and X-ray verification system. The treatment planning program includes; eye model, selecting the best direction of gaze, designing the shape of aperture, determining the proton range and range modulation necessary to encompass the target volume, and indicating the relative positions of the eyes, beam center and creation of beam aperture. Tumor contours are extracted from CT/MRI images of 1 mm thickness by assistant by various information of fundus photography and ultrasonography. The CT image-based treatment system for ocular melanoma is useful for Japanese patients as having thick choroid membrane in terms of dose sparing to skin and normal organs in the eye. The characteristics of the system and merits/demerits were reported.

  10. Outcome and prognostic factors in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy with PET-CT-based radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate prognostic factors in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) with PET-CT-based radiotherapy planning. Methods: Fifty nine patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with radiation therapy of 60 Gy or more were enrolled into this study. The impact of prognostic factors on survival was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The following-up rate was 98%. Nineteen patients completed 2 years' followed-up. The overall l-year and 2-year survival rate was 66% and 37%, respectively, with a median survival time of 17 months. At a univariate analysis, cigarette smoking status, T stage, radiation dose, the standardized uptake value, the gross tumor volume and clinical stage were significant prognostic factors (χ2 =7.46, 7.52, 8.37, 4.97, 5.82, 4.37, P =0.006, 0.006, 0.004, 0.026, 0.016, 0.037, respectively). At multivariate analyses, cigarette smoking status, radiation dose, gross tumor volume and clinical stage were significant prognostic factors (χ2 =6.20, 9.69, 6.39, 10.09, P =0.013, 0.002, 0.011, 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: Cigarette smoking status, radiation dose, gross tumor volume and clinical stage are significant prognostic factors on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with RT based on PET-CT radiotherapy planning. (authors)

  11. Comparison of MR-based attenuation correction vs. CT-based attenuation correction of Whole Body PET/MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Knesaurek, Karin; Narula, Jagat; Fuster, Valentin; Machac, Joseph; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this paper was to evaluate the performance of the built-in MR-based attenuation correction method (MRAC) included in the combined whole-body Ingenuity TF PET/MR scanner and compare it to the gold standard CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC). Methods Twenty-six patients undergoing clinical whole body FDG-PET/CT imaging were subsequently scanned on the PET/MR (mean delay 100min). Patients were separated in two groups: alpha group (N=14) with no MR coils during PET/MR imaging and beta group (N=12) including MR coils (Neuro-Vascular, Spine, Cardiac or Torso coils). All images were coregistered to the same space (PET/MR). Voxel- and region-based (10 regions of interest, ROIs) comparisons were made between the 2 PET images from PET/MR: using MRAC and CTAC. Additional comparison of lesions performed by an experienced clinician was also reported. Results Body mass index (BMI) and lung density showed significant differences between alpha and beta groups. Right vs. left lung density was also significantly different within each group. Overall the beta group (with coils) presented higher MRAC PET values than the alpha group when compared to the CTAC (alpha: −0.2±33.6%, R2=0.98, p<0.001, beta: 10.31±69.86%, R2=0.97, p<0.001). Conclusion In comparison to CTAC, PET values with MRAC method were underestimated by less than 10% on average, although some ROIs and lesions do differ by more (such as spine, lung or heart). The beta group (with coils) showed increased overall PET quantification as well as increased variability when compared to the alpha group (no coils). PET reconstructed with MRAC showed some differences when compared to PET reconstructed with CTAC, mostly due to air pockets, metallic implants and attenuation differences in big bone areas (such as pelvis and spine) due to the segmentation limitation of the MRAC method. PMID:24652234

  12. Image-based rendering method for mapping endoscopic video onto CT-based endoluminal views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Lav; Higgins, William E.

    2006-03-01

    One of the indicators of early lung cancer is a color change in airway mucosa. Bronchoscopy of the major airways can provide high-resolution color video of the airway tree's mucosal surfaces. In addition, 3D MDCT chest images provide 3D structural information of the airways. Unfortunately, the bronchoscopic video contains no explicit 3D structural and position information, and the 3D MDCT data captures no color or textural information of the mucosa. A fusion of the topographical information from the 3D CT data and the color information from the bronchoscopic video, however, enables realistic 3D visualization, navigation, localization, and quantitative color-topographic analysis of the airways. This paper presents a method for topographic airway-mucosal surface mapping from bronchoscopic video onto 3D MDCT endoluminal views. The method uses registered video images and CT-based virtual endoscopic renderings of the airways. The visibility and depth data are also generated by the renderings. Uniform sampling and over-scanning of the visible triangles are done before they are packed into a texture space. The texels are then re-projected onto video images and assigned color values based on depth and illumination data obtained from renderings. The texture map is loaded into the rendering engine to enable real-time navigation through the combined 3D CT surface and bronchoscopic video data. Tests were performed on pre-recorded bronchoscopy patient video and associated 3D MDCT scans. Results show that we can effectively accomplish mapping over a continuous sequence of airway images spanning several generations of airways.

  13. Adaptive brachytherapy of cervical cancer, comparison of conventional point A and CT based individual treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Locally advanced cervical cancer is commonly treated with external radiation therapy combined with local brachytherapy. The brachytherapy is traditionally given based on standard dose planning with prescription of dose to point A. Dosimetric aspects when changing from former standard treatment to individualized treatment plans based on computed tomography (CT) images are here investigated. Material and methods. Brachytherapy data from 19 patients with a total of 72 individual treatment fractions were retrospectively reviewed. Standard library plans were analyzed with respect to doses to organs at risk (OARs), and the result was compared to corresponding delivered individualized plans. The theoretical potential of further optimization based on prescription to target volumes was investigated. The treatments were performed with a Fletcher applicator. Results. For standard treatment planning, the tolerance dose limits were exceeded in the bladder, rectum and sigmoid in 26%, 4% and 15% of the plans, respectively. This was observed most often for the smallest target volumes. The individualized planning of the delivered treatment gave the possibility of controlling the dose to critical organs to below certain limits. The dose was still prescribed to point A. An increase in target dose coverage was achieved when additional individual optimization was performed, while still keeping the dose to the OARs below predefined limits. Relatively low average target coverage, especially for the largest volumes was however seen. Conclusion. The individualized delivered treatment plans ensured that doses to OARs were within acceptable limits. This was not the case in 42% of the corresponding standard plans. Further optimized treatment plans were found to give an overall better dose coverage. In lack of MR capacity, it may be favorable to use CT for planning due to possible protection of OARs. The CT based target volumes were, however, not equivalent to the volumes described

  14. Optimization of the scan protocols for CT-based material extraction in small animal PET/CT studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ching-Ching [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Tzu Chi College of Technology, 880, Sec 2, Chien-Kuo Rd., Hualien, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jhih-An [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Bang-Hung [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-11

    We investigated the effects of scan protocols on CT-based material extraction to minimize radiation dose while maintaining sufficient image information in small animal studies. The phantom simulation experiments were performed with the high dose (HD), medium dose (MD) and low dose (LD) protocols at 50, 70 and 80 kV{sub p} with varying mA s. The reconstructed CT images were segmented based on Hounsfield unit (HU)-physical density (ρ) calibration curves and the dual-energy CT-based (DECT) method. Compared to the (HU;ρ) method performed on CT images acquired with the 80 kV{sub p} HD protocol, a 2-fold improvement in segmentation accuracy and a 7.5-fold reduction in radiation dose were observed when the DECT method was performed on CT images acquired with the 50/80 kV{sub p} LD protocol, showing the possibility to reduce radiation dose while achieving high segmentation accuracy.

  15. Uncertainty propagation for SPECT/CT-based renal dosimetry in 177Lu peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Johan; Brolin, Gustav; Cox, Maurice; Ljungberg, Michael; Johansson, Lena; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    A computer model of a patient-specific clinical 177Lu-DOTATATE therapy dosimetry system is constructed and used for investigating the variability of renal absorbed dose and biologically effective dose (BED) estimates. As patient models, three anthropomorphic computer phantoms coupled to a pharmacokinetic model of 177Lu-DOTATATE are used. Aspects included in the dosimetry-process model are the gamma-camera calibration via measurement of the system sensitivity, selection of imaging time points, generation of mass-density maps from CT, SPECT imaging, volume-of-interest delineation, calculation of absorbed-dose rate via a combination of local energy deposition for electrons and Monte Carlo simulations of photons, curve fitting and integration to absorbed dose and BED. By introducing variabilities in these steps the combined uncertainty in the output quantity is determined. The importance of different sources of uncertainty is assessed by observing the decrease in standard deviation when removing a particular source. The obtained absorbed dose and BED standard deviations are approximately 6% and slightly higher if considering the root mean square error. The most important sources of variability are the compensation for partial volume effects via a recovery coefficient and the gamma-camera calibration via the system sensitivity.

  16. Uncertainty propagation for SPECT/CT-based renal dosimetry in (177)Lu peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Johan; Brolin, Gustav; Cox, Maurice; Ljungberg, Michael; Johansson, Lena; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen

    2015-11-01

    A computer model of a patient-specific clinical (177)Lu-DOTATATE therapy dosimetry system is constructed and used for investigating the variability of renal absorbed dose and biologically effective dose (BED) estimates. As patient models, three anthropomorphic computer phantoms coupled to a pharmacokinetic model of (177)Lu-DOTATATE are used. Aspects included in the dosimetry-process model are the gamma-camera calibration via measurement of the system sensitivity, selection of imaging time points, generation of mass-density maps from CT, SPECT imaging, volume-of-interest delineation, calculation of absorbed-dose rate via a combination of local energy deposition for electrons and Monte Carlo simulations of photons, curve fitting and integration to absorbed dose and BED. By introducing variabilities in these steps the combined uncertainty in the output quantity is determined. The importance of different sources of uncertainty is assessed by observing the decrease in standard deviation when removing a particular source. The obtained absorbed dose and BED standard deviations are approximately 6% and slightly higher if considering the root mean square error. The most important sources of variability are the compensation for partial volume effects via a recovery coefficient and the gamma-camera calibration via the system sensitivity. PMID:26458139

  17. Is SPECT or CT Based Attenuation Correction More Quantitatively Accurate for Dedicated Breast SPECT Acquired with Non-Traditional Trajectories?

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Kristy L.; Mann, Steve D.; Pachon, Jan H.; Madhav, Priti; Tornai, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    Attenuation correction is necessary for SPECT quantification. There are a variety of methods to create attenuation maps. For dedicated breast SPECT imaging, it is unclear if either SPECT- or CT-based attenuation map would provide the most accurate quantification and whether or not segmenting the different tissue types will have an effect on the qunatification. For these experiments, 99mTc diluted in methanol and water was filled into geometric and anthropomorphic breast phantoms and was image...

  18. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation with interstitial implants. The clinical relevance of the calculation of skin doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe relative skin dose estimations and their impact on cosmetic outcome in interstitial multicatheter accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Patients and Methods: Between April 2001 and January 2005, 105 consecutive patients with early breast cancer were recruited in Erlangen, Germany, for this substudy of the German-Austrian APBI phase II trial. 51% (54/105) received pulsed-dose-rate (PDR), and 49% (51/105) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Prescribed reference dose for HDR brachytherapy was 32 Gy in eight fractions of 4 Gy, twice daily. Prescribed reference dose in PDR brachytherapy was 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive fractions of 0.6 Gy every hour. Total treatment time was 3-4 days. With a wire cross on the skin surface during the brachytherapy-planning procedure the minimal, mean and maximal relative skin doses (SDmin%, SDmax%, SDmean%) were recorded. Endpoint of this evaluation was the cosmetic outcome in relation to the relative skin doses. Results: Median follow-up time was 38 months (range, 19-65 months). Cosmetic results for all patients were excellent in 57% (60/105), good in 36% (38/105), and fair in 7% (7/105). The SDmin% (27.0% vs. 31.7%; p = 0.032), SDmean% (34.2% vs. 38.1%; p 0.008), and SDmax% (38.2% vs. 46.4%; p 0.003) were significantly lower for patients with excellent cosmetic outcome compared to patients with a suboptimal outcome. SDmean% (37.6% vs. 34.2%; p = 0.026) and SDmax% (45.4% vs. 38.2%; p = 0.008) were significantly higher for patients with good cosmetic outcome compared with the patients with excellent results. Conclusion: The appraisal of skin doses has been shown to be relevant to the achievement of excellent cosmetic outcome. Further investigations are necessary, especially on the basis of CT-based brachytherapy planning, to further improve the treatment results of multicatheter APBI. (orig.)

  19. Performance tests for ray-scan 64 PET/CT based on NEMA NU-2 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suying; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Qiushi; Zhang, Jinming; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2015-03-01

    This paper focuses on evaluating the performance of the Ray-Scan 64 PET/CT system, a newly developed PET/CT in China. It combines a 64 slice helical CT scanner with a high resolution PET scanner based on BGO crystals assembled in 36 rings. The energy window is 350~ 650 keV, and the coincidence window is set at 12 ns in both 2D and 3D mode. The transaxial field of view (FOV) is 600 mm in diameter, and the axial FOV is 163 mm. Method: Performance measurements were conducted focusing on PET scanners based on NEMA NU-2 2007 standard. We reported the full characterization (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, scatter fraction, accuracy of correction, and image quality) in both 2D and 3D mode. In addition, the clinical images from two patients of different types of tumor were presented to further demonstrate this PET/CT system performance in clinical application. Results: using the NEMA NU-2 2007 standard, the main results: (1) the transaxial resolution at 1cm from the gantry center for 2D and 3D was both 4.5mm (FWHM), and at 10cm from the gantry center, the radial (tangential) resolution were 5.6mm (5.3mm) and 5.4mm (5.2mm) in 2D and 3D mode respectively. The axial resolution at 1cm and 10cm off axis was 3.4mm (4.8mm) and 5.5mm (5.8mm) in 2D (3D) mode respectively; (2) the sensitivity for the radial position R0(r=0mm) and R100(r=100mm) were 1.741 kcps/MBq and 1.767 kcps/MBq respectively in 2D mode and 7.157 kcps/MBq and 7.513 kcps/MBq in 3D mode; (3) the scatter fraction was calculated as 18.36% and 42.92% in 2D and 3D mode, respectively; (4) contrast of hot spheres in the image quality phantom in 2D mode was 50.33% (52.87%), 33.34% (40.86%), 20.64% (26.36%), and 10.99% (15.82%), respectively, in N=4 (N=8). Besides, in clinical study, the diameter of lymph tumor was about 2.4 cm, and the diameter of lung cancer was 4.2 cm. This PET/CT system can distinguish the position of cancer easily. Conclusion: The results show that the performance of the newly

  20. Performance tests for ray-scan 64 PET/CT based on NEMA NU-2 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on evaluating the performance of the Ray-Scan 64 PET/CT system, a newly developed PET/CT in China. It combines a 64 slice helical CT scanner with a high resolution PET scanner based on BGO crystals assembled in 36 rings. The energy window is 350∼ 650 keV, and the coincidence window is set at 12 ns in both 2D and 3D mode. The transaxial field of view (FOV) is 600 mm in diameter, and the axial FOV is 163 mm. Method: Performance measurements were conducted focusing on PET scanners based on NEMA NU-2 2007 standard. We reported the full characterization (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, scatter fraction, accuracy of correction, and image quality) in both 2D and 3D mode. In addition, the clinical images from two patients of different types of tumor were presented to further demonstrate this PET/CT system performance in clinical application. Results: using the NEMA NU-2 2007 standard, the main results: (1) the transaxial resolution at 1cm from the gantry center for 2D and 3D was both 4.5mm (FWHM), and at 10cm from the gantry center, the radial (tangential) resolution were 5.6mm (5.3mm) and 5.4mm (5.2mm) in 2D and 3D mode respectively. The axial resolution at 1cm and 10cm off axis was 3.4mm (4.8mm) and 5.5mm (5.8mm) in 2D (3D) mode respectively; (2) the sensitivity for the radial position R0(r=0mm) and R100(r=100mm) were 1.741 kcps/MBq and 1.767 kcps/MBq respectively in 2D mode and 7.157 kcps/MBq and 7.513 kcps/MBq in 3D mode; (3) the scatter fraction was calculated as 18.36% and 42.92% in 2D and 3D mode, respectively; (4) contrast of hot spheres in the image quality phantom in 2D mode was 50.33% (52.87%), 33.34% (40.86%), 20.64% (26.36%), and 10.99% (15.82%), respectively, in N=4 (N=8). Besides, in clinical study, the diameter of lymph tumor was about 2.4 cm, and the diameter of lung cancer was 4.2 cm. This PET/CT system can distinguish the position of cancer easily. Conclusion: The results show that the performance of the

  1. Dose coefficients in pediatric and adult abdominopelvic CT based on 100 patient models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    /DLP values may be used to estimate organ dose, effective dose, and risk index in abdominopelvic CT based on the coefficients derived from a large population of pediatric and adult patients. (paper)

  2. A systematic review on diagnostic accuracy of CT-based detection of significant coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: Systematic review of diagnostic accuracy of contrast enhanced coronary computed tomography (CE-CCT). Background: Noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenosis (CAS) by CE-CCT as an alternative to catheter-based coronary angiography (CCA) may improve patient management. Methods: Forty-one articles published between 1997 and 2006 were included that evaluated native coronary arteries for significant stenosis and used CE-CCT as diagnostic test and CCA as reference standard. Study group characteristics, study methodology and diagnostic outcomes were extracted. Pooled summary sensitivity and specificity of CE-CCT were calculated using a random effects model (1) for all coronary segments, (2) assessable segments, and (3) per patient. Results: The 41 studies totaled 2515 patients (75% males; mean age: 59 years, CAS prevalence: 59%). Analysis of all coronary segments yielded a sensitivity of 95% (80%, 89%, 86%, 98% for electron beam CT, 4/8-slice, 16-slice and 64-slice MDCT, respectively) for a specificity of 85% (77%, 84%, 95%, 91%). Analysis limited to segments deemed assessable by CT showed sensitivity of 96% (86%, 85%, 98%, 97%) for a specificity of 95% (90%, 96%, 96%, 96%). Per patient, sensitivity was 99% (90%, 97%, 99%, 98%) and specificity was 76% (59%, 81%, 83%, 92%). Heterogeneity was quantitatively important but not explainable by patient group characteristics or study methodology. Conclusions: Current diagnostic accuracy of CE-CCT is high. Advances in CT technology have resulted in increases in diagnostic accuracy and proportion of assessable coronary segments. However, per patient, accuracy may be lower and CT may have more limited clinical utility in populations at high risk for CAD

  3. 18F-FDG PET/CT-based gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy in head and neck Cancer: a correlation study between suitable uptake value threshold and tumor parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To define a suitable threshold setting for gross tumor volume (GTV) when using 18Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomogram (PET/CT) for radiotherapy planning in head and neck cancer (HNC). Fifteen HNC patients prospectively received PET/CT simulation for their radiation treatment planning. Biological target volume (BTV) was derived from PET/CT-based GTV of the primary tumor. The BTVs were defined as the isodensity volumes when adjusting different percentage of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), excluding any artifact from surrounding normal tissues. CT-based primary GTV (C-pGTV) that had been previously defined by radiation oncologists was compared with the BTV. Suitable threshold level (sTL) could be determined when BTV value and its morphology using a certain threshold level was observed to be the best fitness of the C-pGTV. Suitable standardized uptake value (sSUV) was calculated as the sTL multiplied by the SUVmax. Our result demonstrated no single sTL or sSUV method could achieve an optimized volumetric match with the C-pGTV. The sTL was 13% to 27% (mean, 19%), whereas the sSUV was 1.64 to 3.98 (mean, 2.46). The sTL was inversely correlated with the SUVmax [sTL = -0.1004 Ln (SUVmax) + 0.4464; R2 = 0.81]. The sSUV showed a linear correlation with the SUVmax (sSUV = 0.0842 SUVmax + 1.248; R2 = 0.89). The sTL was not associated with the value of C-pGTVs. In PET/CT-based BTV for HNC, a suitable threshold or SUV level can be established by correlating with SUVmax rather than using a fixed threshold

  4. The Clinical Role of CT-Based Morphologic Description in Severely Calcified Coronary Arteries Ectasia Encountering Acute Coronary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jen-Yuan Kuo; Jiun-Yi Li; Chung-Lieh Hung; Yen-Yu Liu; Jui-Peng Tsai

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse coronary arteries ectasia combined with calcification is seldom reported. Acute coronary syndrome, a potentially life-threatening disease, accompanied with coronary ectasia and diffuse calcification, made percutaneous coronary intervention difficult and risky owing to increasing complications rate. Dual-source computed tomography and three-dimensional volume rendering images help cardiovascular surgeon easier to localize the ideal site and facilitate the procedure.

  5. Comparison of 2D radiography and a semi-automatic CT-based 3D method for measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to compare the reliability and agreement between a computer tomography-based method (CT) and digitalised 2D radiographs (XR) when measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures. Radiographs from 33 distal radius fractures treated with external fixation were retrospectively analysed. All fractures had been examined using both XR and CT at six times over 6 months postoperatively. The changes in dorsal angulation between the first reference images and the following examinations in every patient were calculated from 133 follow-up measurements by two assessors and repeated at two different time points. The measurements were analysed using Bland-Altman plots, comparing intra- and inter-observer agreement within and between XR and CT. The mean differences in intra- and inter-observer measurements for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were close to zero, implying equal validity. The average intra- and inter-observer limits of agreement for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were ± 4.4 , ± 1.9 and ± 6.8 respectively. For scientific purpose, the reliability of XR seems unacceptably low when measuring changes in dorsal angulation in distal radius fractures, whereas the reliability for the semi-automatic CT-based method was higher and is therefore preferable when a more precise method is requested. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of 2D radiography and a semi-automatic CT-based 3D method for measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christersson, Albert; Larsson, Sune [Uppsala University, Department of Orthopaedics, Uppsala (Sweden); Nysjoe, Johan; Malmberg, Filip; Sintorn, Ida-Maria; Nystroem, Ingela [Uppsala University, Centre for Image Analysis, Uppsala (Sweden); Berglund, Lars [Uppsala University, Uppsala Clinical Research Centre, UCR Statistics, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to compare the reliability and agreement between a computer tomography-based method (CT) and digitalised 2D radiographs (XR) when measuring change in dorsal angulation over time in distal radius fractures. Radiographs from 33 distal radius fractures treated with external fixation were retrospectively analysed. All fractures had been examined using both XR and CT at six times over 6 months postoperatively. The changes in dorsal angulation between the first reference images and the following examinations in every patient were calculated from 133 follow-up measurements by two assessors and repeated at two different time points. The measurements were analysed using Bland-Altman plots, comparing intra- and inter-observer agreement within and between XR and CT. The mean differences in intra- and inter-observer measurements for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were close to zero, implying equal validity. The average intra- and inter-observer limits of agreement for XR, CT, and between XR and CT were ± 4.4 , ± 1.9 and ± 6.8 respectively. For scientific purpose, the reliability of XR seems unacceptably low when measuring changes in dorsal angulation in distal radius fractures, whereas the reliability for the semi-automatic CT-based method was higher and is therefore preferable when a more precise method is requested. (orig.)

  7. Accuracy of the phase space evolution dose calculation model for clinical 25 MeV electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase space evolution (PSE) model is a dose calculation model for electron beams in radiation oncology developed with the aim of a higher accuracy than the commonly used pencil beam (PB) models and with shorter calculation times than needed for Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. In this paper the accuracy of the PSE model has been investigated for 25 MeV electron beams of a MM50 racetrack microtron (Scanditronix Medical AB, Sweden) and compared with the results of a PB model. Measurements have been performed for tests like non-standard SSD, irregularly shaped fields, oblique incidence and in phantoms with heterogeneities of air, bone and lung. MC calculations have been performed as well, to reveal possible errors in the measurements and/or possible inaccuracies in the interaction data used for the bone and lung substitute materials. Results show a good agreement between PSE calculated dose distributions and measurements. For all points the differences - in absolute dose - were generally well within 3% and 3 mm. However, the PSE model was found to be less accurate in large regions of low-density material and errors of up to 6% were found for the lung phantom. Results of the PB model show larger deviations, with differences of up to 6% and 6 mm and of up to 10% for the lung phantom; at shortened SSDs the dose was overestimated by up to 6%. The agreement between MC calculations and measurement was good. For the bone and the lung phantom maximum deviations of 4% and 3% were found, caused by uncertainties about the actual interaction data. In conclusion, using the phase space evolution model, absolute 3D dose distributions of 25 MeV electron beams can be calculated with sufficient accuracy in most cases. The accuracy is significantly better than for a pencil beam model. In regions of lung tissue, a Monte Carlo model yields more accurate results than the current implementation of the PSE model. (author)

  8. Accuracy of the phase space evolution dose calculation model for clinical 25 MeV electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korevaar, Erik W.; Akhiat, Abdelhafid; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Huizenga, Henk

    2000-10-01

    The phase space evolution (PSE) model is a dose calculation model for electron beams in radiation oncology developed with the aim of a higher accuracy than the commonly used pencil beam (PB) models and with shorter calculation times than needed for Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. In this paper the accuracy of the PSE model has been investigated for 25 MeV electron beams of a MM50 racetrack microtron (Scanditronix Medical AB, Sweden) and compared with the results of a PB model. Measurements have been performed for tests like non-standard SSD, irregularly shaped fields, oblique incidence and in phantoms with heterogeneities of air, bone and lung. MC calculations have been performed as well, to reveal possible errors in the measurements and/or possible inaccuracies in the interaction data used for the bone and lung substitute materials. Results show a good agreement between PSE calculated dose distributions and measurements. For all points the differences - in absolute dose - were generally well within 3% and 3 mm. However, the PSE model was found to be less accurate in large regions of low-density material and errors of up to 6% were found for the lung phantom. Results of the PB model show larger deviations, with differences of up to 6% and 6 mm and of up to 10% for the lung phantom; at shortened SSDs the dose was overestimated by up to 6%. The agreement between MC calculations and measurement was good. For the bone and the lung phantom maximum deviations of 4% and 3% were found, caused by uncertainties about the actual interaction data. In conclusion, using the phase space evolution model, absolute 3D dose distributions of 25 MeV electron beams can be calculated with sufficient accuracy in most cases. The accuracy is significantly better than for a pencil beam model. In regions of lung tissue, a Monte Carlo model yields more accurate results than the current implementation of the PSE model.

  9. CT-based quantitative evaluation of radiation-induced lung fibrosis: a study of interobserver and intraobserver variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jae Sung; Cho, Oyeon; Noh, O Kyu; Oh, Young Taek; Chun, Misun; Kim, Mi Hwa; Park, Jae Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The degree of radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) can be measured quantitatively by fibrosis volume (VF) on chest computed tomography (CT) scan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interobserver and intraobserver variability in CT-based measurement of VF. We selected 10 non-small cell lung cancer patients developed with RILF after postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) and delineated VF on the follow-up chest CT scanned at more than 6 months after radiotherapy. Three radiation oncologists independently delineated VF to investigate the interobserver variability. Three times of delineation of VF was performed by two radiation oncologists for the analysis of intraobserver variability. We analysed the concordance index (CI) and inter/intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The median CI was 0.61 (range, 0.44 to 0.68) for interobserver variability and the median CIs for intraobserver variability were 0.69 (range, 0.65 to 0.79) and 0.61(range, 0.55 to 0.65) by two observers. The ICC for interobserver variability was 0.974 (p < 0.001) and ICCs for intraobserver variability were 0.996 (p < 0.001) and 0.991 (p < 0.001), respectively. CT-based measurement of VF with patients who received PORT was a highly consistent and reproducible quantitative method between and within observers.

  10. CT-based radiomic signature predicts distant metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiomics provides opportunities to quantify the tumor phenotype non-invasively by applying a large number of quantitative imaging features. This study evaluates computed-tomography (CT) radiomic features for their capability to predict distant metastasis (DM) for lung adenocarcinoma patients. Material and methods: We included two datasets: 98 patients for discovery and 84 for validation. The phenotype of the primary tumor was quantified on pre-treatment CT-scans using 635 radiomic features. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate radiomics performance using the concordance index (CI). Results: Thirty-five radiomic features were found to be prognostic (CI > 0.60, FDR < 5%) for DM and twelve for survival. It is noteworthy that tumor volume was only moderately prognostic for DM (CI = 0.55, p-value = 2.77 × 10−5) in the discovery cohort. A radiomic-signature had strong power for predicting DM in the independent validation dataset (CI = 0.61, p-value = 1.79 × 10−17). Adding this radiomic-signature to a clinical model resulted in a significant improvement of predicting DM in the validation dataset (p-value = 1.56 × 10−11). Conclusions: Although only basic metrics are routinely quantified, this study shows that radiomic features capturing detailed information of the tumor phenotype can be used as a prognostic biomarker for clinically-relevant factors such as DM. Moreover, the radiomic-signature provided additional information to clinical data

  11. Dosimetric investigation of proton therapy on CT-based patient data using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongsan, T.; Liamsuwan, T.; Tangboonduangjit, P.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of radiotherapy is to deliver high radiation dose to the tumor with low radiation dose to healthy tissues. Protons have Bragg peaks that give high radiation dose to the tumor but low exit dose or dose tail. Therefore, proton therapy is promising for treating deep- seated tumors and tumors locating close to organs at risk. Moreover, the physical characteristic of protons is suitable for treating cancer in pediatric patients. This work developed a computational platform for calculating proton dose distribution using the Monte Carlo (MC) technique and patient's anatomical data. The studied case is a pediatric patient with a primary brain tumor. PHITS will be used for MC simulation. Therefore, patient-specific CT-DICOM files were converted to the PHITS input. A MATLAB optimization program was developed to create a beam delivery control file for this study. The optimization program requires the proton beam data. All these data were calculated in this work using analytical formulas and the calculation accuracy was tested, before the beam delivery control file is used for MC simulation. This study will be useful for researchers aiming to investigate proton dose distribution in patients but do not have access to proton therapy machines.

  12. Theoretical thermal dosimetry produced by an annular phased array system in CT-based patient models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical calculations for the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the resulting temperature distributions produced by an annular phased array (APA) type system are made. The finite element numerical method is used in the formulation of both the electromagnetic (EM) and the thermal boundary value problems. A number of detailed patient models based on CT-scan data from the pelvic, visceral, and thoracic regions are generated to stimulate a variety of tumor locations and surrounding normal tissues. The SAR values from the EM solution are input into the bioheat transfer equation, and steady-rate temperature distributions are calculated for a wide variety of blood flow rates. Based on theoretical modeling, the APA shows no preferential heating of superficial over deep-seated tumors. However, in most cases satisfactory thermal profiles (therapeutic volume near 60%) are obtained in all three regions of the human trunk only for tumors with little or no blood flow. Unsatisfactory temperature patterns (therapeutic volume <50%) are found for tumors with moderate to high perfusion rates. These theoretical calculations should aid the clinician in the evaluation of the effectiveness of APA type devices in heating tumors located in the trunk region

  13. Development of a CT based radiation treatment planning system for high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An external beam radiation treatment planning system based on CT images has been developed. The main functions built in this system are as follows: (1) Three dimensional dose calculations based on the tissue-air ratio (TAR) and off-center axis ratio (OCR) method for rectangular fields and on the scatter-air ratio (SAR) method for irregularly shaped fields, (2) Inhomogeneity corrections by pixel-by-pixel and inhomogeneity region methods utilizing the CT numbers, (3) Display of isodose distributions superimposed on the CT images, (4) Measurement of point-to-point vertical and horizontal distances on the CT images using a light pen, (5) Automatic calculation and drawing of an irradiation field shape from target volumes delineated on the CT images, (6) Dose distribution analysis program such as calculation of statistical values of dose in a target volume, and of integral dose and dose spectrum in any region(s) of interest. Examples of plans and initial verification results are discussed. (author)

  14. The surgical rate and recurrence rate in right colonic diverticulitis using the CT-based modified hinchey classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to retrospectively analyze the need for surgery, and the recurrence rate, using a CT-based method in patients with right colonic diverticulitis. For the purposes of our study, we included 416 patients with a mean age of 41.9 (238 of which were men), with a diagnosis of colonic diverticulitis that was based on CT findings. These findings were reviewed by two independent radiologists, who localized diverticulitis and determined it using a modified Hinchey classification. We were able to follow-up with 384 patients over a period of 30 months. Out of the 416 patients, 396 of them had right colonic diverticulitis. In right colonic diverticulitis, the κ value in determining the modified Hinchey classification was 0.80. 98.2% (389/396) of the patients with right colonic diverticulitis had stages Ia-II. The surgery rate was 4.6% (17/366) and 28% (5/18) for right and left colonic diverticulitis, respectively (p < 0.001). In the instances of right colonic diverticulitis, the surgery rate was 2.8% (10/359) for stages Ia-II, while all seven patients with stage III or IV underwent surgery. The recurrence rate was 6.5% (23/356) and 15% (2/13) for right and left colonic diverticulitis, respectively (p = 0.224). The CT-based modified Hinchey classification of right colonic diverticulitis showed good interobserver agreement. Most patients with right colonic diverticulitis had lower stages (Ia-II) at the point of CT, rarely needed surgery, and had a low recurrence rate

  15. Numerical study of high-frequency oscillatory air flow and convective mixing in a CT-based human airway model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiwoong; Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-12-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is considered an efficient and safe respiratory technique to ventilate neonates and patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. HFOV has very different characteristics from normal breathing physiology, with a much smaller tidal volume and a higher breathing frequency. In this study, the high-frequency oscillatory flow is studied using a computational fluid dynamics analysis in three different geometrical models with increasing complexity: a straight tube, a single-bifurcation tube model, and a computed tomography (CT)-based human airway model of up to seven generations. We aim to understand the counter-flow phenomenon at flow reversal and its role in convective mixing in these models using sinusoidal waveforms of different frequencies and Reynolds (Re) numbers. Mixing is quantified by the stretch rate analysis. In the straight-tube model, coaxial counter flow with opposing fluid streams is formed around flow reversal, agreeing with an analytical Womersley solution. However, counter flow yields no net convective mixing at end cycle. In the single-bifurcation model, counter flow at high Re is intervened with secondary vortices in the parent (child) branch at end expiration (inspiration), resulting in an irreversible mixing process. For the CT-based airway model three cases are considered, consisting of the normal breathing case, the high-frequency-normal-Re (HFNR) case, and the HFOV case. The counter-flow structure is more evident in the HFNR case than the HFOV case. The instantaneous and time-averaged stretch rates at the end of two breathing cycles and in the vicinity of flow reversal are computed. It is found that counter flow contributes about 20% to mixing in HFOV. PMID:20614248

  16. Numerical study of high frequency oscillatory air flow and convective mixing in a CT-based human airway model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiwoong; Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    High frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is considered an efficient and safe respiratory technique to ventilate neonates and patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. HFOV has very different characteristics from normal breathing physiology, with a much smaller tidal volume and a higher breathing frequency. In this work, the high frequency oscillatory flow is studied using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis in three different geometrical models with increasing complexity: a straight tube, a single-bifurcation tube model, and a computed-tomography (CT)-based human airway model of up to seven generations. We aim to understand the counter-flow phenomenon at flow reversal and its role in convective mixing in these models using sinusoidal waveforms of different frequencies and Reynolds numbers. Mixing is quantified by the stretch rate analysis. In the straight-tube model, coaxial counter flow with opposing fluid streams is formed around flow reversal, agreeing with an analytical Womersley solution. However, counter flow yields no net convective mixing at end cycle. In the single-bifurcation model, counter flow at high Re is intervened with secondary vortices in the parent (child) branch at end expiration (inspiration), resulting in an irreversible mixing process. For the CT-based airway model three cases are considered, consisting of the normal breathing case, the high-frequency-normal-Re case, and the HFOV case. The counter-flow structure is more evident in the high-frequency-normal-Re case than the HFOV case. The instantaneous and time-averaged stretch rates at the end of two breathing cycles and in the vicinity of flow reversal are computed. It is found that counter flow contributes about 20% to mixing in HFOV. PMID:20614248

  17. The surgical rate and recurrence rate in right colonic diverticulitis using the CT-based modified hinchey classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hyuk Jung; Jang, Suk Ki; Yeon, Jae Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Daejin Medical Center Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Ko, You Sun; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to retrospectively analyze the need for surgery, and the recurrence rate, using a CT-based method in patients with right colonic diverticulitis. For the purposes of our study, we included 416 patients with a mean age of 41.9 (238 of which were men), with a diagnosis of colonic diverticulitis that was based on CT findings. These findings were reviewed by two independent radiologists, who localized diverticulitis and determined it using a modified Hinchey classification. We were able to follow-up with 384 patients over a period of 30 months. Out of the 416 patients, 396 of them had right colonic diverticulitis. In right colonic diverticulitis, the κ value in determining the modified Hinchey classification was 0.80. 98.2% (389/396) of the patients with right colonic diverticulitis had stages Ia-II. The surgery rate was 4.6% (17/366) and 28% (5/18) for right and left colonic diverticulitis, respectively (p < 0.001). In the instances of right colonic diverticulitis, the surgery rate was 2.8% (10/359) for stages Ia-II, while all seven patients with stage III or IV underwent surgery. The recurrence rate was 6.5% (23/356) and 15% (2/13) for right and left colonic diverticulitis, respectively (p = 0.224). The CT-based modified Hinchey classification of right colonic diverticulitis showed good interobserver agreement. Most patients with right colonic diverticulitis had lower stages (Ia-II) at the point of CT, rarely needed surgery, and had a low recurrence rate.

  18. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  19. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David [Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); School of Computing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, Zhengzhou 450003 (China); Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 580 S. Aiken Avenue, Suite 400, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  20. SU-E-J-141: Comparison of Dose Calculation On Automatically Generated MRBased ED Maps and Corresponding Patient CT for Clinical Prostate EBRT Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of computing radiation dose on automatically generated MR-based simulated CT images compared to true patient CTs. Methods: Six prostate cancer patients received a regular planning CT for RT planning as well as a conventional 3D fast-field dual-echo scan on a Philips 3.0T Achieva, adding approximately 2 min of scan time to the clinical protocol. Simulated CTs (simCT) where synthesized by assigning known average CT values to the tissue classes air, water, fat, cortical and cancellous bone. For this, Dixon reconstruction of the nearly out-of-phase (echo 1) and in-phase images (echo 2) allowed for water and fat classification. Model based bone segmentation was performed on a combination of the DIXON images. A subsequent automatic threshold divides into cortical and cancellous bone. For validation, the simCT was registered to the true CT and clinical treatment plans were re-computed on the simCT in pinnacle3. To differentiate effects related to the 5 tissue classes and changes in the patient anatomy not compensated by rigid registration, we also calculate the dose on a stratified CT, where HU values are sorted in to the same 5 tissue classes as the simCT. Results: Dose and volume parameters on PTV and risk organs as used for the clinical approval were compared. All deviations are below 1.1%, except the anal sphincter mean dose, which is at most 2.2%, but well below clinical acceptance threshold. Average deviations are below 0.4% for PTV and risk organs and 1.3% for the anal sphincter. The deviations of the stratifiedCT are in the same range as for the simCT. All plans would have passed clinical acceptance thresholds on the simulated CT images. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the clinical usability of MR based dose calculation with the presented Dixon acquisition and subsequent fully automatic image processing. N. Schadewaldt, H. Schulz, M. Helle and S. Renisch are employed by Phlips Technologie Innovative Techonologies, a subsidiary of

  1. Characterization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions using a novel CT-based volume perfusion (VPCT) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Quantification of perfusion with VPCT has great potential for functional imaging. • We present our preliminary results of perfusion parameters (Blood Flow, Blood Volume and kk-trans) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in terms of using VPCT and two different calculation methods, compare their results and look for correlation between tumor arterialization and lesion size. • VPCT can measure tumor volume perfusion non-invasively and enables quantification of the degree of HCC arterialization. Results are dependent on the technique used with best inter-method correlation for Blood Flow. • Tumor arterialization did not proved size-dependent. - Abstract: Objective: To characterize hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in terms of perfusion parameters using volume perfusion CT (VPCT) and two different calculation methods, compare their results, look for interobserver agreement of measurements and correlation between tumor arterialization and lesion size. Material and methods: This study was part of a prospective monitoring study in patients with HCC undergoing TACE, which was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. 79 HCC-patients (mean age, 64.7) with liver cirrhosis were enrolled. VPCT was performed for 40 s covering the involved liver (80 kV, 100/120 mAs) using 64 mm × 0.6 mm collimation, 26 consecutive volume measurements, 50 mL iodinated contrast IV and 5 mL/s flow rate. Mean/maximum blood flow (BF; ml/100 mL/min), blood volume (BV) and k-trans were determined both with the maximum slope + Patlak vs. deconvolution method. Additionally, the portal venous liver perfusion (PVP), the arterial liver perfusion (ALP) and the hepatic perfusion index (HPI) were determined for each tumor including size measurements. Interobserver agreement for all perfusion parameters was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Results: The max. slope + Patlak method yielded: BFmean/max = 37.8/57 mL/100 g-tissue/′, BVmean/max = 9.8/11.1 mL/100 g

  2. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moteabbed, M., E-mail: mmoteabbed@partners.org; Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Trofimov, A.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the DIR method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. PLASTIMATCH, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  3. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the DIR method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. PLASTIMATCH, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  4. Uncertainties in CT-Based Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Associated with Patient Breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties associated with treatment-planning computed tomography (CT) data obtained with the patient breathing freely. Methods and Materials: Patients with thoracic or abdominal tumors underwent a standard treatment-planning CT study while breathing quietly and freely, followed by CT scans while holding their breath at normal inhalation and normal exhalation. Identical treatment plans on all three CT data sets for each patient pointed out differences in: (a) radiation path lengths; (b) positions of the organs; (c) physical volumes of the lung, liver, and kidneys; (d) the interpretation of plan evaluation tools such as dose-volume histograms and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models; and (e) how well the planning CT data set represented the average of the inhalation and exhalation studies. Results: Inhalation and exhalation data differ in terms of radiation path length (nearly one quarter of the cases had path-length differences > 1 cm), although the free breathing and average path lengths do not exhibit large differences (0-9 mm). Liver and kidney movements averaged 2 cm, whereas differences between the free breathing and average positions averaged 0.6 cm. The physical volume of the liver between the free breathing and static studies varied by as much as 12%. The NTCP calculations on exhale and inhale studies varied from 3 to 43% for doses that resulted in a 15% NTCP on the free-breathing studies. Conclusion: Free-breathing CT studies may improperly estimate the position and volume of critical structures, and thus may mislead evaluation of plans based on such volume dependent criteria such as dose-volume histograms and NTCP calculations

  5. Dosimetric accuracy and clinical quality of Acuros XB and AAA dose calculation algorithm for stereotactic and conventional lung volumetric modulated arc therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the current study was to assess the dosimetric accuracy and clinical quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for stereotactic (stage I) and conventional (stage III) lung cancer treatments planned with Eclipse version 10.0 Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm. The dosimetric impact of using AAA instead of AXB, and grid size 2.5 mm instead of 1.0 mm for VMAT treatment plans was evaluated. The clinical plan quality of AXB VMAT was assessed using 45 stage I and 73 stage III patients, and was compared with published results, planned with VMAT and hybrid-VMAT techniques. The dosimetric impact on near-minimum PTV dose (D98%) using AAA instead of AXB was large (underdose up to 12.3%) for stage I and very small (underdose up to 0.8%) for stage III lung treatments. There were no significant differences for dose volume histogram (DVH) values between grid sizes. The calculation time was significantly higher for AXB grid size 1.0 than 2.5 mm (p < 0.01). The clinical quality of the VMAT plans was at least comparable with clinical qualities given in literature of lung treatment plans with VMAT and hybrid-VMAT techniques. The average mean lung dose (MLD), lung V20Gy and V5Gy in this study were respectively 3.6 Gy, 4.1% and 15.7% for 45 stage I patients and 12.4 Gy, 19.3% and 46.6% for 73 stage III lung patients. The average contra-lateral lung dose V5Gy-cont was 35.6% for stage III patients. For stereotactic and conventional lung treatments, VMAT calculated with AXB grid size 2.5 mm resulted in accurate dose calculations. No hybrid technique was needed to obtain the dose constraints. AXB is recommended instead of AAA for avoiding serious overestimation of the minimum target doses compared to the actual delivered dose

  6. Usefulness of CT based SPECT Fusion Image in the lung Disease : Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Lyu, Kwang Yeul [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung [Dept. of Radiological Science, Kangwon National University, Samcheok (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ji Yun [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Cheongju National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Recently, SPECT/CT system has been applied to many diseases, however, the application is not extensively applied at pulmonary disease. Especially, in case that, the pulmonary embolisms suspect at the CT images, SPECT is performed. For the accurate diagnosis, SPECT/CT tests are subsequently undergoing. However, without SPECT/CT, there are some limitations to apply these procedures. With SPECT/CT, although, most of the examination performed after CT. Moreover, such a test procedures generate unnecessary dual irradiation problem to the patient. In this study, we evaluated the amount of unnecessary irradiation, and the usefulness of fusion images of pulmonary disease, which independently acquired from SPECT and CT. Using NEMA PhantomTM (NU2-2001), SPECT and CT scan were performed for fusion images. From June 2011 to September 2010, 10 patients who didn't have other personal history, except lung disease were selected (male: 7, female: 3, mean age: 65.3{+-}12.7). In both clinical patient and phantom data, the fusion images scored higher than SPECT and CT images. The fusion images, which is combined with pulmonary vessel images from CT and functional images from SPECT, can increase the detection possibility in detecting pulmonary embolism in the resin of lung parenchyma. It is sure that performing SPECT and CT in integral SPECT/CT system were better. However, we believe this protocol can give more informative data to have more accurate diagnosis in the hospital without integral SPECT/CT system.

  7. Usefulness of CT based SPECT Fusion Image in the lung Disease : Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, SPECT/CT system has been applied to many diseases, however, the application is not extensively applied at pulmonary disease. Especially, in case that, the pulmonary embolisms suspect at the CT images, SPECT is performed. For the accurate diagnosis, SPECT/CT tests are subsequently undergoing. However, without SPECT/CT, there are some limitations to apply these procedures. With SPECT/CT, although, most of the examination performed after CT. Moreover, such a test procedures generate unnecessary dual irradiation problem to the patient. In this study, we evaluated the amount of unnecessary irradiation, and the usefulness of fusion images of pulmonary disease, which independently acquired from SPECT and CT. Using NEMA PhantomTM (NU2-2001), SPECT and CT scan were performed for fusion images. From June 2011 to September 2010, 10 patients who didn't have other personal history, except lung disease were selected (male: 7, female: 3, mean age: 65.3±12.7). In both clinical patient and phantom data, the fusion images scored higher than SPECT and CT images. The fusion images, which is combined with pulmonary vessel images from CT and functional images from SPECT, can increase the detection possibility in detecting pulmonary embolism in the resin of lung parenchyma. It is sure that performing SPECT and CT in integral SPECT/CT system were better. However, we believe this protocol can give more informative data to have more accurate diagnosis in the hospital without integral SPECT/CT system.

  8. Scatter correction method for cone-beam CT based on interlacing-slit scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has the notable features of high efficiency and high precision, and is widely used in areas such as medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing. However, the presence of the ray scatter reduces the quality of CT images. By referencing the slit collimation approach, a scatter correction method for CBCT based on the interlacing-slit scan is proposed. Firstly, according to the characteristics of CBCT imaging, a scatter suppression plate with interlacing slits is designed and fabricated. Then the imaging of the scatter suppression plate is analyzed, and a scatter correction calculation method for CBCT based on the image fusion is proposed, which can splice out a complete set of scatter suppression projection images according to the interlacing-slit projection images of the left and the right imaging regions in the scatter suppression plate, and simultaneously complete the scatter correction within the flat panel detector (FPD). Finally, the overall process of scatter suppression and correction is provided. The experimental results show that this method can significantly improve the clarity of the slice images and achieve a good scatter correction. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  9. Scatter correction method for cone-beam CT based on interlacing-slit scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kui-Dong; Zhang, Hua; Shi, Yi-Kai; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Zhe

    2014-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has the notable features of high efficiency and high precision, and is widely used in areas such as medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing. However, the presence of the ray scatter reduces the quality of CT images. By referencing the slit collimation approach, a scatter correction method for CBCT based on the interlacing-slit scan is proposed. Firstly, according to the characteristics of CBCT imaging, a scatter suppression plate with interlacing slits is designed and fabricated. Then the imaging of the scatter suppression plate is analyzed, and a scatter correction calculation method for CBCT based on the image fusion is proposed, which can splice out a complete set of scatter suppression projection images according to the interlacing-slit projection images of the left and the right imaging regions in the scatter suppression plate, and simultaneously complete the scatter correction within the flat panel detector (FPD). Finally, the overall process of scatter suppression and correction is provided. The experimental results show that this method can significantly improve the clarity of the slice images and achieve a good scatter correction.

  10. Carbon-11 acetate PET/CT based dose escalated IMRT in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of [11C]acetate PET/CT in delineating the malignant intraprostatic lesions (IPL's) in prostate cancer and to use the data in external beam radiotherapy to boost the biologically defined target volume (BTV). Methods and materials: Twelve men with intracapsular prostate carcinoma were imaged with [11C]acetate PET/CT and the data were used to delineate the BTV. Six dynamic IMRT plans were generated to each patient: a standard IMRT (sIMRT) plan with a 77.9 Gy dose to PTV (prostate gland with a 6-mm margin) and a simultaneous integrated boost IMRT (SIBIMRT) plan to deliver 77.9 Gy, 81 Gy, 84 Gy, 87 Gy and 90 Gy to the BTV and 72 Gy to the rest of PTV. To study the theoretical dose escalation based on the delineation of BTV, tumor control probabilities (TCPs) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) of bladder and rectum were calculated and compared between the treatment plans. Results: [11C]Acetate was used to delineate the IPL's of all 12 patients. With every patient the TCP was increased with SIBIMRT without increasing the NTCP of the bladder or rectum. The probability of uncomplicated control (PUC) was increased on average by 28% with the SIBIMRT treatment plans. The highest PUC was achieved with an average dose of 82.1 Gy to the BTV. Conclusions: Our study indicates that [11C]acetate can be used to define the IPL's and in combination with SIBIMRT the defined areas can theoretically be treated to ultra high doses without increasing the treatment toxicity. These results motivate the formal validation of [11C]acetate PET for biological dose planning in prostate cancer.

  11. Femoral head-neck offset in the Indian population: A CT based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Malhotra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Femoroacetabular impingement has been postulated as the important cause of primary osteoarthritis in non dysplastic hips. We postulated that the rarity of primary osteoarthritis of hip in Indian population could be attributable to morphological differences, specifically to a lower prevalence of abnormal head-neck morphology. We conducted an anthropometric study to evaluate the prevalence of abnormal head-neck offset in Indian population and to correlate it with the low prevalence of primary osteoarthrosis in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: The computed tomography (CT images of 85 apparently normal hips were analysed. An axial image was created parallel to the central axis of the femoral neck and passing through the center of the femoral head using coronal scout view. This image was then used to calculate alpha and beta angles and the head-neck offset ratio. The measurements were made by two independent observers on two different occasions. Results: The prevalence of abnormal head-neck offset ratio was 11.7% and the mean alpha and beta angles were 45.6° and 40.6°, respectively. Pearson correlation coefficients for intra-observer and inter-observer agreement were, respectively, 0.84 and 0.80 for alpha angle, 0.80 and 0.77 for beta angle and 0.78 and 0.75 for head-neck offset ratio. The values were similar to those reported in the western population. Conclusion: The differences in the prevalence of hip osteoarthritis in Indian and western populations are not attributable to variation in the prevalence of abnormal head-neck offset.

  12. Accuracy and Radiation Dose of CT-Based Attenuation Correction for Small Animal PET: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -Small animal PET allows qualitative assessment and quantitative measurement of biochemical processes in vivo, but the accuracy and reproducibility of imaging results can be affected by several parameters. The first aim of this study was to investigate the performance of different CT-based attenuation correction strategies and assess the resulting impact on PET images. The absorbed dose in different tissues caused by scanning procedures was also discussed to minimize biologic damage generated by radiation exposure due to PET/CT scanning. A small animal PET/CT system was modeled based on Monte Carlo simulation to generate imaging results and dose distribution. Three energy mapping methods, including the bilinear scaling method, the dual-energy method and the hybrid method which combines the kVp conversion and the dual-energy method, were investigated comparatively through assessing the accuracy of estimating linear attenuation coefficient at 511 keV and the bias introduced into PET quantification results due to CT-based attenuation correction. Our results showed that the hybrid method outperformed the bilinear scaling method, while the dual-energy method achieved the highest accuracy among the three energy mapping methods. Overall, the accuracy of PET quantification results have similar trend as that for the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients, whereas the differences between the three methods are more obvious in the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients than in the PET quantification results. With regards to radiation exposure from CT, the absorbed dose ranged between 7.29-45.58 mGy for 50-kVp scan and between 6.61-39.28 mGy for 80-kVp scan. For 18F radioactivity concentration of 1.86x105 Bq/ml, the PET absorbed dose was around 24 cGy for tumor with a target-to-background ratio of 8. The radiation levels for CT scans are not lethal to the animal, but concurrent use of PET in longitudinal study can increase the risk of biological effects. The

  13. The European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology-European Institute of Radiotherapy (ESTRO-EIR) report on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance systems: A practical and technical review and guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past decade has provided many technological advances in radiotherapy. The European Institute of Radiotherapy (EIR) was established by the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) to provide current consensus statement with evidence-based and pragmatic guidelines on topics of practical relevance for radiation oncology. This report focuses primarily on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance (3DCT-IGRT) systems. It will provide an overview and current standing of 3DCT-IGRT systems addressing the rationale, objectives, principles, applications, and process pathways, both clinical and technical for treatment delivery and quality assurance. These are reviewed for four categories of solutions; kV CT and kV CBCT (cone-beam CT) as well as MV CT and MV CBCT. It will also provide a framework and checklist to consider the capability and functionality of these systems as well as the resources needed for implementation. Two different but typical clinical cases (tonsillar and prostate cancer) using 3DCT-IGRT are illustrated with workflow processes via feedback questionnaires from several large clinical centres currently utilizing these systems. The feedback from these clinical centres demonstrates a wide variability based on local practices. This report whilst comprehensive is not exhaustive as this area of development remains a very active field for research and development. However, it should serve as a practical guide and framework for all professional groups within the field, focussed on clinicians, physicists and radiation therapy technologists interested in IGRT.

  14. Simulation of dosimetric consequences of 4D-CT-based motion margin estimation for proton radiotherapy using patient tumor motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koybasi, Ozhan; Mishra, Pankaj; St. James, Sara; Lewis, John H.; Seco, Joao

    2014-02-01

    demonstrated that proton therapy using the pre-treatment 4D-CT based ITV method can lead to significant under-dosage of the tumor, highlighting the need for daily customization to generate a target volume that represents tumor positions during the treatment more accurately.

  15. Simulation of dosimetric consequences of 4D-CT-based motion margin estimation for proton radiotherapy using patient tumor motion data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    for the patient with relatively regular breathing. We have demonstrated that proton therapy using the pre-treatment 4D-CT based ITV method can lead to significant under-dosage of the tumor, highlighting the need for daily customization to generate a target volume that represents tumor positions during the treatment more accurately. (paper)

  16. Intra-fractional uncertainties in cone-beam CT based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of pulmonary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intra-fractional variability of tumor position and breathing motion was evaluated in cone-beam CT (CB-CT) based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of pulmonary tumors. Materials and methods: Twenty-four patients (27 lesions: prim. NSCLC n = 6; metastases n = 21) were treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) (one to eight fractions). Prior to every treatment fraction (n = 66) and immediately after treatment a CB-CT was acquired. Patient motion, absolute drift and drift of the tumor relative to the bony anatomy were measured. Tumor motion was investigated based on the density distribution in the CB-CT. Results: Absolute intra-fractional drift (3D vector) of the tumor position was 2.8 mm ± 1.6 mm (mean ± SD), maximum 7.2 mm. Poor correlation between patient motion and absolute tumor drift was observed. Changes of the tumor position due to patient motion and due to drifts independently from the bony anatomy were of similar magnitude with 2.1 mm ± 1.4 mm and 2.3 mm ± 1.6 mm, respectively. No systematic increase or decrease of breathing motion was seen. The intra-fractional change of breathing motion was more than 2 mm and 3 mm in 39% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Intra-fractional tumor position and breathing motion were stable. In IGRT of pulmonary tumors we suggest an ITV-to-PTV margin of 5 mm to compensate intra-fractional changes

  17. Comparison of MR-based attenuation correction and CT-based attenuation correction of whole-body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, New York, NY (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Sawiak, Stephen J. [University of Cambridge, Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Knesaurek, Karin; Machac, Joseph [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Narula, Jagat [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Fayad, Zahi A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the built-in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC) included in the combined whole-body Ingenuity TF PET/MR scanner and compare it to the performance of CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) as the gold standard. Included in the study were 26 patients who underwent clinical whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging and subsequently PET/MR imaging (mean delay 100 min). Patients were separated into two groups: the alpha group (14 patients) without MR coils during PET/MR imaging and the beta group (12 patients) with MR coils present (neurovascular, spine, cardiac and torso coils). All images were coregistered to the same space (PET/MR). The two PET images from PET/MR reconstructed using MRAC and CTAC were compared by voxel-based and region-based methods (with ten regions of interest, ROIs). Lesions were also compared by an experienced clinician. Body mass index and lung density showed significant differences between the alpha and beta groups. Right and left lung densities were also significantly different within each group. The percentage differences in uptake values using MRAC in relation to those using CTAC were greater in the beta group than in the alpha group (alpha group -0.2 ± 33.6 %, R{sup 2} = 0.98, p < 0.001; beta group 10.31 ± 69.86 %, R{sup 2} = 0.97, p < 0.001). In comparison to CTAC, MRAC led to underestimation of the PET values by less than 10 % on average, although some ROIs and lesions did differ by more (including the spine, lung and heart). The beta group (imaged with coils present) showed increased overall PET quantification as well as increased variability compared to the alpha group (imaged without coils). PET data reconstructed with MRAC and CTAC showed some differences, mostly in relation to air pockets, metallic implants and attenuation differences in large bone areas (such as the pelvis and spine) due to the segmentation limitation of the MRAC method. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of MR-based attenuation correction and CT-based attenuation correction of whole-body PET/MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the built-in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC) included in the combined whole-body Ingenuity TF PET/MR scanner and compare it to the performance of CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) as the gold standard. Included in the study were 26 patients who underwent clinical whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging and subsequently PET/MR imaging (mean delay 100 min). Patients were separated into two groups: the alpha group (14 patients) without MR coils during PET/MR imaging and the beta group (12 patients) with MR coils present (neurovascular, spine, cardiac and torso coils). All images were coregistered to the same space (PET/MR). The two PET images from PET/MR reconstructed using MRAC and CTAC were compared by voxel-based and region-based methods (with ten regions of interest, ROIs). Lesions were also compared by an experienced clinician. Body mass index and lung density showed significant differences between the alpha and beta groups. Right and left lung densities were also significantly different within each group. The percentage differences in uptake values using MRAC in relation to those using CTAC were greater in the beta group than in the alpha group (alpha group -0.2 ± 33.6 %, R2 = 0.98, p 2 = 0.97, p < 0.001). In comparison to CTAC, MRAC led to underestimation of the PET values by less than 10 % on average, although some ROIs and lesions did differ by more (including the spine, lung and heart). The beta group (imaged with coils present) showed increased overall PET quantification as well as increased variability compared to the alpha group (imaged without coils). PET data reconstructed with MRAC and CTAC showed some differences, mostly in relation to air pockets, metallic implants and attenuation differences in large bone areas (such as the pelvis and spine) due to the segmentation limitation of the MRAC method. (orig.)

  19. Assessment of errors caused by X-ray scatter and use of contrast medium when using CT-based attenuation correction in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ay, Mohammad R. [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib

    2006-11-15

    Quantitative image reconstruction in positron emission tomography (PET) requires an accurate attenuation map of the object under study for the purpose of attenuation correction. Current dual-modality PET/CT systems offer significant advantages over stand-alone PET, including decreased overall scanning time and increased accuracy in lesion localisation and detectability. However, the contamination of CT data with scattered radiation and misclassification of contrast medium with high-density bone in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) are known to generate artefacts in the attenuation map and thus the resulting PET images. The purpose of this work was to quantitatively measure the impact of scattered radiation and contrast medium on the accuracy of CTAC. Our recently developed MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo X-ray CT simulator for modelling both fan- and cone-beam CT scanners and the Eidolon dedicated 3D PET Monte Carlo simulator were used to generate realigned PET/CT data sets. The impact of X-ray scattered radiation on the accuracy of CTAC was investigated through simulation of a uniform cylindrical water phantom for both a commercial fan-beam multi-slice and a prototype cone-beam flat panel detector-based CT scanner. The influence of contrast medium was studied by simulation of a cylindrical phantom containing different concentrations of contrast medium. Moreover, an experimental study using an anthropomorphic striatal phantom was conducted for quantitative evaluation of errors arising from the presence of contrast medium by calculating the apparent recovery coefficient (ARC) in the presence of different concentrations of contrast medium. The analysis of attenuation correction factors (ACFs) for the simulated cylindrical water phantom in both fan- and cone-beam CT scanners showed that the contamination of CT data with scattered radiation in the absence of scatter removal causes underestimation of the true ACFs, namely by 7.3% and 28.2% in the centre for the two

  20. Impact of metallic dental implants on CT-based attenuation correction in a combined PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to study the effect of metal-induced artifacts on the accuracy of the CT-based anatomic map as a prerequisite for attenuation correction of the positron emission tomography (PET) emission data. Twenty-seven oncology patients with dental metalwork were enrolled in the present study. Data acquisition was performed on a PET/CT in-line system (Discovery LS, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.). Attenuation correction of emission data was done twice, using an 80-mA CT scan (PETCT80) and a 68Ge transmission scan (PET68Ge). Average count in kBq/cc was measured in regions with and without artifacts and compared for PETCT80 and PET68Ge. Data analysis of region of interests (ROIs) revealed that the ratio (ROIs PETCT80/ROIs PET68Ge) and the difference (ROIs PETCT80 minus ROIs PET68Ge) had a higher mean of values in regions with artifacts than in regions without artifacts (1.2±0.17 vs 1.06±0.06 and 0.68±0.67 vs 0.15±0.17 kBq/cc, respectively). For most of the studied artifactual ROIs, the PETCT80 values were higher than those of the PET68Ge. Attenuation correction of PET emission data using an artifactual CT map yields false values in regions nearby artifacts caused by dental metalwork. This may falsely estimate PET quantitative studies and may disturb the visual interpretation of PET scan. (orig.)

  1. Importance of the CT/MRI fusion method as a learning tool for CT-based postimplant dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To compare the CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry after permanent prostate brachytherapy and to evaluate the improvement in CT-based dosimetry by physicians with or without experience in using the CT/MRI fusion method. Patients and methods: Thirty-eight consecutive patients agreed to participate in a prospective study. The prostate contours from CT/MRI fusion are the gold standard for determining the prostate volume and dose volume histogram (DVH). CT-based postimplant dosimetries were performed by two physicians. Observer 1 was a radiologist who had never used CT/MRI fusion method for postimplant dosimetric analysis. Observer 2 was a radiation oncologist experienced in postimplant analysis using the CT/MRI fusion method. The prostate dosimetry was evaluated by prostate D90 and V100. Results: No significant difference was observed in the mean prostate volumes between the two observers and the CT/MRI fusion data. However, the correlation coefficient value for observer 2 (R 2 = 0.932) was greater than that for observer 1 (R 2 = 0.793). The D90 and V100 values as evaluated by the two observers were significantly underestimated in comparison to those evaluated using the CT/MRI fusion methods. The DVH related parameters were underestimated more frequently by observer 1 than by observer 2: (prostate D90: 99.56% for observer 1, 102.97% for observer 2, 109.37% for CT/MRI fusion. Prostate V100: 88.12% for observer 1, 90.14% for observer 2, 91.91% for CT/MRI fusion). Conclusions: The difference in the mean value in D90 and V100 by observer 1 was significantly greater than that for observer 2. These findings suggest that the CT/MRI fusion method provides accurate feedback which thereby improves CT-based postimplant dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy

  2. CT-based three-dimensional reconstruction navigation technique assisted pedicle screw placement in lumbar and sacral bone%腰骶骨椎弓根螺钉置入内固定:CT三维重建虚拟导航的辅助

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓明; 陈前芬; 肖增明; 宗少晖

    2015-01-01

      结果与结论:共置入腰骶椎椎弓根螺钉1088枚,其中1068枚螺钉位置为Ⅰ级,置钉准确率达98.2%。152例获得随访,随访时间12个月,无内固定物移位、断裂等并发症。术前CT三维重建虚拟导航技术能为腰骶骨椎弓根螺钉内固定提供三维立体的解剖信息,制定最优置钉计划,使置钉更加精确安全,从而提高整体的修复质量。%BACKGROUND:Pedicle screw fixation techniques have been widely used in the treatment of lumbar and sacral disease, such as trauma, deformity, tumor and degeneration. How to improve the accuracy of screw placement is a hot topic. CT-based three-dimensional reconstruction navigation technique provides real-time, multi-perspective, three-dimensional visualization of lumbar and sacral anatomy, and surgeons can perform the pedicle screw insertion procedures confidently with increase of accuracy and safety. OBJECTIVE:To study the clinical value of CT-based three-dimensional reconstruction navigation technique in the application of lumbar and sacral pedicle screw placement. METHODS:A total of 203 patients with lumbar and sacral diseases, including lumbar fracture, lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar spinal stenosis, were recruited from Department of Spine&Osteopathy, the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between July 2008 and November 2014. Patients received pedicle screw placement in lumbar and sacral bone under the guidance of CT-based three-dimensional reconstruction navigation. Postoperative X-ray films and three-dimensional CT scan of lumbar bone were routinely examined in each patient. The accuracy of pedicle screw insertion was evaluated with postoperative CT scan according to Andrew classification. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:A total of 1 088 screws were inserted in the lumbar and sacral bone. The accuracy of pedicle screw insertion was rated as grade I in 1 068 screws (98.2%) according to postoperative CT scan. 152 cases were fol owed

  3. Study on pedicle screw fixation of cervical spine assisted CT-based navigation system compared with the individual cervical peddle screws placement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore a safe and effective method for placing the cervical pedicle screws. Methods: There were ten adult cadaver specimens of cervica spine (C1-C7) with intact structures including ligament and perivertebral muscles. The spiral computed tomography scan (Elscint CT Twin flash) at the section of 1 mm and three-dimensional reconstruction of all 10 cervical specimens were taken. By CT scan, the parameters of the cervical pedicles were measure,Then taking randomly 5 cervical specimens, according to the CT measurements, an appropriate screw was inserted into pedicle individually. In the other 5 human cadaver cervical vertebraes, Φ3.5 mm screws were inserted into the C2-C7 pedicles by assisted by CT-based navigation system. Cortical integrity of every sample was examined by anatomic dissection, the spiral computed tomography scan and arrows,and coronal reconstruction. Results: Sixty screws was inserted into pedicle individually, and the achievement ratio was 90%, the perfectness ratio was 75%, 60 screws was placed into pedicle assisted by CT-based navigation system, and the achievement ratio was 96.6%, the perfectness ratio was 90%. By chi-square test for statistical analysis, there were no statistical significance between the accuracy rate of two methods(P>0.05). However there was statistical significance between the perfectness ratio between two methods(P<0.05). Conclusion: Compared with the individual cervical peddle screws placement technique, the perfectness ratio of pedicle screw fixation of cervical spine assisted by CT-based navigation system is higher, but there are no significant difference in accuracy. (authors)

  4. μCT-Based, In Vivo Dynamic Bone Histomorphometry Allows 3D Evaluation of the Early Responses of Bone Resorption and Formation to PTH and Alendronate Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bakker, Chantal M. J.; Altman, Allison R.; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Tribble, Mary Beth; Li, Connie; Chandra, Abhishek; Qin, Ling; Liu, X. Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Current osteoporosis treatments improve bone mass by increasing net bone formation: anti-resorptive drugs such as bisphosphonates block osteoclast activity, while anabolic agents such as parathyroid hormone (PTH) increase bone remodeling, with a greater effect on formation. Although these drugs are widely used, their role in modulating formation and resorption is not fully understood, due in part to technical limitations in the ability to longitudinally assess bone remodeling. Importantly, it is not known whether or not PTH-induced bone formation is independent of resorption, resulting in controversy over the effectiveness of combination therapies that use both PTH and an anti-resorptive. In this study, we developed a μCT-based, in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry technique for rat tibiae, and applied this method to longitudinally track changes in bone resorption and formation as a result of treatment with alendronate (ALN), PTH, or combination therapy of both PTH and ALN (PTH+ALN). Correlations between our μCT-based measures of bone formation and measures of bone formation based on calcein-labeled histology (r = 0.72 - 0.83) confirm the accuracy of this method. Bone remodeling parameters measured through μCT-based in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry indicate an increased rate of bone formation in rats treated with PTH and PTH+ALN, together with a decrease in bone resorption measures in rats treated with ALN and PTH+ALN. These results were further supported by traditional histology-based measurements, suggesting that PTH was able to induce bone formation while bone resorption was suppressed. PMID:25554598

  5. μ-CT-based finite element analysis on imperfections in open-celled metal foam: Mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study digitally identifies and repairs defects produced in the manufacturing of an open-cell metal foam for the first time. Finite element calculations are based on microcomputed tomography data of actual samples. The effective Young’s modulus and 0.2% offset yield strength are calculated and equivalent plastic strain is used to identify weakness within the material. In areas of high plastic deformation, the structure is digitally repaired locally and the calculations are repeated in order to quantify the change in material properties.

  6. Dosimetric accuracy of the cone-beam CT-based treatment planning of the Vero system: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Indra; Prasetio, Heru; Kallis, Karoline; Bert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We report an investigation on the accuracy of dose calculation based on the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of the nonbowtie filter kV imaging system of the Vero linear accelerator. Different sets of materials and tube voltages were employed to generate the Hounsfield unit lookup tables (HLUTs) for both CBCT and fan-beam CT (FBCT) systems. The HLUTs were then implemented for the dose calculation in a treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric evaluation was carried out on an in-house-developed cube phantom that consists of water-equivalent slabs and inhomogeneity inserts. Two independent dosimeters positioned in the cube phantom were used in this study for point-dose and two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution measurements. The differences of HLUTs from various materials and tube voltages in both CT systems resulted in differences in dose calculation accuracy. We found that the higher the tube voltage used to obtain CT images, the better the point-dose calculation and the gamma passing rate of the 2D dose distribution agree to the values determined in the TPS. Moreover, the insert materials that are not tissue-equivalent led to higher dose-calculation inaccuracy. There were negligible differences in dosimetric evaluation between the CBCT- and FBCT-based treatment planning if the HLUTs were generated using the tissue-equivalent materials. In this study, the CBCT images of the Vero system from a complex inhomogeneity phantom can be applied for the TPS dose calculation if the system is calibrated using tissue-equivalent materials scanned at high tube voltage (i.e., 120 kV). PMID:27455496

  7. Novel Computed Tomography-based Metric Reliably Estimates bone Strength, Offering Potentially Meaningful Enhancement in Clinical Fracture Risk Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Imran A. Shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis with resultant fractures is a major global health problem with huge socio-economic implications for patients, families and healthcare services. Areal (2D bone mineral density (BMD assessment is commonly used for predicting such fracture risk, but is unreliable, estimating only about 50% of bone strength. By contrast, computed tomography (CT based techniques could provide improved metrics for estimating bone strength such as bone volume fraction (BVF; a 3D volumetric measure of mineralised bone, enabling cheap, safe and reliable strategies for clinical application, and to help divert resources to patients identified as most likely to benefit, meeting an unmet need. Here we describe a novel method for measuring BVF at clinical-CT like low-resolution (550µm voxel size. Femoral heads (n=8 were micro-CT scanned ex-vivo. Micro-CT data were downgraded in resolution from 30µm to 550µm voxel size and BVF calculated at high and low resolution. Experimental mechanical testing was applied to measure ex vivo bone strength of samples. BVF measures collected at high-resolution showed high correlation (correlation coefficient r2=0.95 with low-resolution data. Low-resolution BVF metrics showed high correlation (r2=0.96 with calculated sample strength. These results demonstrate that measuring BVF at low resolution is feasible, which also predicts bone strength. Measures of BVF should be useful for clinically estimating bone strength and fracture risk. The method needs to be validated using clinical CT scans.

  8. Clinical role of18F-FDG PET/CT-based simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy treatment plan-ning for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianshe Wang; Tianyou Tang Co-first author; Jing Xu; Andrew Z Wang; Liang Li; Junnian Zheng; Longzhen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the long-term local control, overal survival, and late toxicities of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided dose escalation radio-therapy versus conventional radiotherapy in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy treatment of local y ad-vanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods A total of 48 patients with stage III–IVa NPC were recruited and randomly administered PET/CT-guided dose escalation chemoradiotherapy (group A) or conventional chemoradiotherapy (group B). The dose-escalation radiotherapy was performed using the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy technique at prescribed doses of 77 gray (Gy) in 32 fractions (f) to the gross target volume (GTV): planning target volume (PTV) 1 received 64 Gy/32 f, while PTV2 received 54.4 Gy/32 f. Patients in group B received uniform-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy, PTV1 received 70 Gy/35 f and PTV2 received 58 Gy/29 f. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin [20 mg/m2 intravenous (IV) on days 1–4] and docetaxel (75 mg/m2 IV on days 1 and 8) administered during treatment weeks 1 and 4. Al patients received 2–4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy of the same dose and drug regimen. Results The use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT significantly reduced the treat-ment volume delineation of the GTV in 83.3% (20/24) of patients. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of the two groups were 100% and 79.2%, respectively (P = 0.019). The 5-year disease free survival (DFS) rates were 95.8% and 75.0%, respectively (P = 0.018). The 5-year local progression-free survival and DFS rates were significantly dif erent. The 5-year overal survival (OS) rates were 95.8% and 79.2%, re-spectively. Dif erences in OS improvement were insignificant (P = 0.079). Late toxicities were similar in the two groups. The most common late toxicities of the two arms were grade 1–2 skin dystrophy, xerostomia, subcutaneous fibrosis, and hearing loss. There were no cases of grade 4 late toxicity. Conclusion The use of 18F-FDG PET/CT-guided dose escalation radiotherapy is wel tolerated and can reduce local recurrence rates for patients with local y advanced NPC compared to conventional chemora-diotherapy.

  9. A quantitative non-invasive assessment of femoroacetabular impingement with CT-based dynamic simulation - Cadaveric validation study Clinical diagnostics and imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Röling (Maarten); M.I. Visser (Monique I); E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); P. Pilot (Peter); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); R.M. Bloem (Rolf)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is caused by an anatomic deviation of the acetabular rim or proximal femur, which causes chronic groin pain. Radiological identification of FAI can be challenging. Advances in imaging techniques with the use of computed tomography (CT) scan

  10. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  11. A MicroCT-Based Method for the Measurement of Pulmonary Compliance in Healthy and Bleomycin-Exposed Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Shofer, Scott; Badea, Cristian; Auerbach, Scott; Schwartz, David A.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2007-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (microCT) is being increasingly used to examine small animal models of pulmonary injury. We have developed a microCT technique suitable for the determination of pulmonary compliance in injured mice. Lung volumes in normal mice were radiographically determined at end-inspiration and end-expiration and pulmonary compliance was calculated at two timepoints 2 weeks apart, while a second group of mice were given bleomycin and imaged 3 weeks following drug administration. ...

  12. A brachytherapy treatment planning system based on dicom images and MCNP5 calculations optimized with artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exact dose calculation is an important part of brachytherapy Treatment Planning Systems (TPS). Currently used methods, such as analytic methods or tabulated data are inexact, as they are based on dose calculation in homogeneous water medium. Dose calculation systems such as CT based Monte Carlo simulation are the most exact, but they take too much time to reach the desirable accuracy. The aim of this research is to optimize the CT-based Monte Carlo dose calculation for dynamic Treatment Planning systems by using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) which is capable of calculating the dose distribution with the same accuracy as the CT based Monte Carlo simulation. 80000 Dose distributions -produced by the Best no.2301 seed source in different positions in the CT scan of the prostate- was calculated by the Monte Carlo Neutral particle (MCNP)5 code and this data was used to train the ANN. The ANN was tested for 26768 cases which were not used for the training step, with an average error of 0.8 percent compared to MCNP5 results. (author)

  13. Critical appraisal of the accuracy of Acuros-XB and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm compared to measurement and calculations with the compass system in the delivery of RapidArc clinical plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the two dose calculation engines available for RapidArc planning (both released for clinical use) is investigated in comparison to the COMPASS data. Two dose calculation algorithms (Acuros-XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA)) were used to calculate RA plans and compared to calculations with the Collapsed Cone Convolution algorithm (CC) from the COMPASS system (IBA Dosimetry). CC calculations, performed on patient data, are based on experimental fluence measurements with a 2D array of ion chambers mounted on the linac head. The study was conducted on clinical cases treated with RA. Five cases for each of the following groups were included: Brain, Head and Neck, Thorax, Pelvis and stereotactic body radiation therapy for hypo-fractionated treatments with small fields. COMPASS measurements were performed with the iMatrixx-2D array. RapidArc plans were optimized for delivery using 6MV photons from a Clinac-iX (Varian, Palo Alto, USA). Accuracy of the RA calculation was appraised by means of: 1) comparison of Dose Volume histograms (DVH) metrics; 2) analysis of differential dose distributions and determination of mean dose differences per organ; 3) 3D gamma analysis with distance-to-agreement and dose difference thresholds set to 3%/3 mm or 2%/2 mm for targets, organs at risks and for the volumes encompassed by the 50 and 10% isodoses. For almost all parameters, the better agreement was between Acuros-XB and COMPASS independently from the anatomical site and fractionation. The same result was obtained from the mean dose difference per organ with Acuros-CC average differences below 0.5% while for AAA-CC data, average deviations exceeded 0.5% and in the case of the pelvis 1%. Relevance of observed differences determined with the 3D gamma analysis resulted in a pass rate exceeding 99.5% for Acuros-CC and exceeding 97.5% for AAA-CC. This study demonstrated that i) a good agreement exists between COMPASS-CC calculations based on measured fluences with

  14. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Naichang, E-mail: yun@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  15. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for 90Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for 90Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of 99mTc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended

  16. Clinical evaluation of fast electron Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning systems validation with experimental measurements and EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Edimo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The present study is focused on the clinical validation of two electron Monte Carlo (eMC) based treatment planning systems (TPS), Oncentra MasterPlan TPS (OMTPS) and XiO eMC. We present a new approach on the commissioning process based on, (a) homogeneous water phantom validation, (b) heterogeneous phantom validation with film measurements and, (c) Full MC validation. As a first step, MC models of electron beams (4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV) from an Elekta SL25 medical linear accelerator were buil...

  17. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined

  18. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson Tedgren, A [Linkoping University, Linkoping, Linkoping (Sweden); Persson, M; Nilsson, J [Karolinska hospital, Stockholm, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined.

  19. Clinical validation of FDG-PET/CT in the radiation treatment planning for patients with oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the proportion of locoregional recurrences (LRRs) that could have been prevented if radiotherapy treatment planning for oesophageal cancer was based on PET/CT instead of CT. Materials and methods: Ninety oesophageal cancer patients, eligible for high dose (neo-adjuvant) (chemo)radiotherapy, were included. All patients underwent a planning FDG-PET/CT-scan. Radiotherapy target volumes (TVs) were delineated on CT and patients were treated according to the CT-based treatment plans. The PET images remained blinded. After treatment, TVs were adjusted based on PET/CT, when appropriate. Follow up included CT-thorax/abdomen every 6 months. If LRR was suspected, a PET/CT was conducted and the site of recurrence was compared to the original TVs. If the LRR was located outside the CT-based clinical TV (CTV) and inside the PET/CT-based CTV, we considered this LRR possibly preventable. Results: Based on PET/CT, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was larger in 23% and smaller in 27% of the cases. In 32 patients (36%), >5% of the PET/CT-based GTV would be missed if the treatment planning was based on CT. The median follow up was 29 months. LRRs were seen in 10 patients (11%). There were 3 in-field recurrences, 4 regional recurrences outside both CT-based and PET/CT-based CTV and 3 recurrences at the anastomosis without changes in TV by PET/CT; none of these recurrences were considered preventable by PET/CT. Conclusion: No LRR was found after CT-based radiotherapy that could have been prevented by PET/CT. The value of PET/CT for radiotherapy seems limited

  20. MEMS Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  1. SU-E-J-240: The Impact On Clinical Dose-Distributions When Using MR-Images Registered with Stereotactic CT-Images in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmakhlouf, H; Kraepelien, T; Forander, P [Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Wangerid, T [Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most Gamma knife treatments are based solely on MR-images. However, for fractionated treatments and to implement TPS dose calculations that require electron densities, CT image data is essential. The purpose of this work is to assess the dosimetric effects of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images in Gamma knife treatments. Methods: Twelve patients treated for vestibular schwannoma with Gamma Knife Perfexion (Elekta Instruments, Sweden) were selected for this study. The prescribed doses (12 Gy to periphery) were delivered based on the conventional approach of using stereotactic MR-images only. These plans were imported into stereotactic CT-images (by registering MR-images with stereotactic CT-images using the Leksell gamma plan registration software). The dose plans, for each patient, are identical in both cases except for potential rotations and translations resulting from the registration. The impact of the registrations was assessed by an algorithm written in Matlab. The algorithm compares the dose-distributions voxel-by-voxel between the two plans, calculates the full dose coverage of the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan, and calculates the minimum dose delivered to the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan. Results: The mean dose difference between the plans was 0.2 Gy to 0.4 Gy (max 4.5 Gy) whereas between 89% and 97% of the target (treated in the conventional approach) received the prescribed dose, by the CT-plan. The minimum dose to the target (treated in the conventional approach) given by the CT-based plan was between 7.9 Gy and 10.7 Gy (compared to 12 Gy in the conventional treatment). Conclusion: The impact of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images has successfully been compared to conventionally delivered dose plans showing significant differences between the two. Although CTimages have been implemented clinically; the effect of the

  2. Analyse of setup errors and margin for thoracic carcinoma radiotherapy with cone-beam CT-based image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the role of KV CBCT on the geometrical accuracy of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to evaluate the margin of targets and peripheral OAR for thoracic carcinoma. Methods: 34 patients with thoracic carcinoma were enrolled.Varian-IX lilac with OBI system was used to acquire CBCT scans before delivery in 3DCRT. The left-right (x), superior-inferior (y), anterior-posterior (z) setup errors of patients can be obtained from the tomography images automatically restructured by the system. Results: According to 279 CBCT scans the systemic ± random error on x, y, z directions were (-0.16 ± 3.25) mm, (-1.36 ± 5.43) mm, (-2.43 ± 2.14) mm and (2.41 ± 2.18) mm, (4.27 ± 3.60) mm, (2.71 ± 1.77) mm respectively if we do not consider the direction of setup errors. The margins of targets were calculated as 2.68 mm, 7.19 mm and 7.57 mm respectively. Conclusions: Setup errors are unavoidable in thoracic carcinoma irradiation. We suggest a PTV margin of 2.68 mm, 7.19 mm and 7.57 mm in the left-right, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions respectively in our department. (authors)

  3. Computer-assisted radiographic calculation of spinal curvature in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations: reliability and clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevar, Julien; Penderis, Jacques; Faller, Kiterie; Yeamans, Carmen; Stalin, Catherine; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: To investigate computer-assisted digital radiographic measurement of Cobb angles in dogs with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations, to determine its intra- and inter-observer reliability and its association with the presence of neurological deficits. Medical records were reviewed (2009-2013) to identify brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with radiographic studies of the thoracic vertebral column and with at least one vertebral malformation present. Twenty-eight dogs were included in the study. The end vertebrae were defined as the cranial end plate of the vertebra cranial to the malformed vertebra and the caudal end plate of the vertebra caudal to the malformed vertebra. Three observers performed the measurements twice. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to calculate the intra- and inter-observer reliabilities. The intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for all intra- and inter-observer measurements using this method. There was a significant difference in the kyphotic Cobb angle between dogs with and without associated neurological deficits. The majority of dogs with neurological deficits had a kyphotic Cobb angle higher than 35°. No significant difference in the scoliotic Cobb angle was observed. We concluded that the computer assisted digital radiographic measurement of the Cobb angle for kyphosis and scoliosis is a valid, reproducible and reliable method to quantify the degree of spinal curvature in brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations. PMID:25198374

  4. Computer-assisted radiographic calculation of spinal curvature in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations: reliability and clinical evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Guevar

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were: To investigate computer-assisted digital radiographic measurement of Cobb angles in dogs with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations, to determine its intra- and inter-observer reliability and its association with the presence of neurological deficits. Medical records were reviewed (2009-2013 to identify brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with radiographic studies of the thoracic vertebral column and with at least one vertebral malformation present. Twenty-eight dogs were included in the study. The end vertebrae were defined as the cranial end plate of the vertebra cranial to the malformed vertebra and the caudal end plate of the vertebra caudal to the malformed vertebra. Three observers performed the measurements twice. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to calculate the intra- and inter-observer reliabilities. The intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for all intra- and inter-observer measurements using this method. There was a significant difference in the kyphotic Cobb angle between dogs with and without associated neurological deficits. The majority of dogs with neurological deficits had a kyphotic Cobb angle higher than 35°. No significant difference in the scoliotic Cobb angle was observed. We concluded that the computer assisted digital radiographic measurement of the Cobb angle for kyphosis and scoliosis is a valid, reproducible and reliable method to quantify the degree of spinal curvature in brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations.

  5. Computer-Assisted Radiographic Calculation of Spinal Curvature in Brachycephalic “Screw-Tailed” Dog Breeds with Congenital Thoracic Vertebral Malformations: Reliability and Clinical Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevar, Julien; Penderis, Jacques; Faller, Kiterie; Yeamans, Carmen; Stalin, Catherine; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: To investigate computer-assisted digital radiographic measurement of Cobb angles in dogs with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations, to determine its intra- and inter-observer reliability and its association with the presence of neurological deficits. Medical records were reviewed (2009–2013) to identify brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with radiographic studies of the thoracic vertebral column and with at least one vertebral malformation present. Twenty-eight dogs were included in the study. The end vertebrae were defined as the cranial end plate of the vertebra cranial to the malformed vertebra and the caudal end plate of the vertebra caudal to the malformed vertebra. Three observers performed the measurements twice. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to calculate the intra- and inter-observer reliabilities. The intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for all intra- and inter-observer measurements using this method. There was a significant difference in the kyphotic Cobb angle between dogs with and without associated neurological deficits. The majority of dogs with neurological deficits had a kyphotic Cobb angle higher than 35°. No significant difference in the scoliotic Cobb angle was observed. We concluded that the computer assisted digital radiographic measurement of the Cobb angle for kyphosis and scoliosis is a valid, reproducible and reliable method to quantify the degree of spinal curvature in brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations. PMID:25198374

  6. Reliability Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kurt Erling

    1986-01-01

    probabilistic approaches have been introduced in some cases for the calculation of the reliability of structures or components. A new computer program has been developed based upon numerical integration in several variables. In systems reliability Monte Carlo simulation programs are used especially in analysis...... of very complex systems. In order to increase the applicability of the programs variance reduction techniques can be applied to speed up the calculation process. Variance reduction techniques have been studied and procedures for implementation of importance sampling are suggested....

  7. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15±9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256±80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of image quality and dose calculation accuracy on kV CBCT, MV CBCT, and MV CT images for urgent palliative radiotherapy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Mareike; Cremers, Florian; Sneed, Penny K; Braunstein, Steve; Fogh, Shannon E; Nakamura, Jean; Barani, Igor; Perez-Andujar, Angelica; Pouliot, Jean; Morin, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A clinical workflow was developed for urgent palliative radiotherapy treatments that integrates patient simulation, planning, quality assurance, and treatment in one 30-minute session. This has been successfully tested and implemented clinically on a linac with MV CBCT capabilities. To make this approach available to all clin-ics equipped with common imaging systems, dose calculation accuracy based on treatment sites was assessed for other imaging units. We evaluated the feasibility of palliative treatment planning using on-board imaging with respect to image qual-ity and technical challenges. The purpose was to test multiple systems using their commercial setup, disregarding any additional in-house development. kV CT, kV CBCT, MV CBCT, and MV CT images of water and anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired on five different imaging units (Philips MX8000 CT Scanner, and Varian TrueBeam, Elekta VersaHD, Siemens Artiste, and Accuray Tomotherapy linacs). Image quality (noise, contrast, uniformity, spatial resolution) was evalu-ated and compared across all machines. Using individual image value to density calibrations, dose calculation accuracies for simple treatment plans were assessed for the same phantom images. Finally, image artifacts on clinical patient images were evaluated and compared among the machines. Image contrast to visualize bony anatomy was sufficient on all machines. Despite a high noise level and low contrast, MV CT images provided the most accurate treatment plans relative to kV CT-based planning. Spatial resolution was poorest for MV CBCT, but did not limit the visualization of small anatomical structures. A comparison of treatment plans showed that monitor units calculated based on a prescription point were within 5% difference relative to kV CT-based plans for all machines and all studied treatment sites (brain, neck, and pelvis). Local dose differences > 5% were found near the phantom edges. The gamma index for 3%/3 mm criteria was ≥ 95% in most

  9. Micro-CT-based improvement of geometrical and mechanical controllability of selective laser melted Ti6Al4V porous structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Selective laser melting as a production tool for porous Ti6Al4V structures. → Significant mismatch between designed and as-produced properties. → Decreasing mismatch using a micro-CT-based protocol. → Mismatch of pore size decreased from 45% to 5%. → Increased morphological controllability increases mechanical controllability. - Abstract: Despite the fact that additive manufacturing (AM) techniques allow to manufacture complex porous parts with a controlled architecture, differences can occur between designed and as-produced morphological properties. Therefore this study aimed at optimizing the robustness and controllability of the production of porous Ti6Al4V structures using selective laser melting (SLM) by reducing the mismatch between designed and as-produced morphological and mechanical properties in two runs. In the first run, porous Ti6Al4V structures with different pore sizes were designed, manufactured by SLM, analyzed by microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) image analysis and compared to the original design. The comparison was based on the following morphological parameters: pore size, strut thickness, porosity, surface area and structure volume. Integration of the mismatch between designed and measured properties into a second run enabled a decrease of the mismatch. For example, for the average pore size the mismatch decreased from 45% to 5%. The demonstrated protocol is furthermore applicable to other 3D structures, properties and production techniques, powder metallurgy, titanium alloys, porous materials, mechanical characterization, tomography.

  10. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses

  11. SPEI Calculator

    OpenAIRE

    Beguería, Santiago; Vicente Serrano, Sergio M.

    2009-01-01

    [EN] *Objectives: The program calculates time series of the Standardised Precipitation-Evapotransporation Index (SPEI). *Technical Characteristics: The program is executed from the Windows console. From an input data file containing monthly time series of precipitation and mean temperature, plus the geographic coordinates of the observatory, the program computes the SPEI accumulated at the time interval specified by the user, and generates a new data file with the SPEI time serie...

  12. Burnout calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviewed is the effect of heat flux of different system parameters on critical density in order to give an initial view on the value of several parameters. A thorough analysis of different equations is carried out to calculate burnout is steam-water flows in uniformly heated tubes, annular, and rectangular channels and rod bundles. Effect of heat flux density distribution and flux twisting on burnout and storage determination according to burnout are commended

  13. Calculator calculus

    CERN Document Server

    McCarty, George

    1982-01-01

    How THIS BOOK DIFFERS This book is about the calculus. What distinguishes it, however, from other books is that it uses the pocket calculator to illustrate the theory. A computation that requires hours of labor when done by hand with tables is quite inappropriate as an example or exercise in a beginning calculus course. But that same computation can become a delicate illustration of the theory when the student does it in seconds on his calculator. t Furthermore, the student's own personal involvement and easy accomplishment give hi~ reassurance and en­ couragement. The machine is like a microscope, and its magnification is a hundred millionfold. We shall be interested in limits, and no stage of numerical approximation proves anything about the limit. However, the derivative of fex) = 67.SgX, for instance, acquires real meaning when a student first appreciates its values as numbers, as limits of 10 100 1000 t A quick example is 1.1 , 1.01 , 1.001 , •••• Another example is t = 0.1, 0.01, in the functio...

  14. Reliability calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk and reliability analysis is increasingly being used in evaluations of plant safety and plant reliability. The analysis can be performed either during the design process or during the operation time, with the purpose to improve the safety or the reliability. Due to plant complexity and safety and availability requirements, sophisticated tools, which are flexible and efficient, are needed. Such tools have been developed in the last 20 years and they have to be continuously refined to meet the growing requirements. Two different areas of application were analysed. In structural reliability probabilistic approaches have been introduced in some cases for the calculation of the reliability of structures or components. A new computer program has been developed based upon numerical integration in several variables. In systems reliability Monte Carlo simulation programs are used especially in analysis of very complex systems. In order to increase the applicability of the programs variance reduction techniques can be applied to speed up the calculation process. Variance reduction techniques have been studied and procedures for implementation of importance sampling are suggested. (author)

  15. Effects of CT-based attenuation correction of rat microSPECT images on relative myocardial perfusion and quantitative tracer uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Our goal in this work was to investigate the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on measurements of rat myocardial perfusion with 99mTc and 201Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods: Eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 99mTc-tetrofosmin and scanned in a small animal pinhole SPECT/CT scanner. Scans were repeated weekly over a period of 5 weeks. Eight additional rats were injected with 201Tl and also scanned following a similar protocol. The images were reconstructed with and without attenuation correction, and the relative perfusion was analyzed with the commercial cardiac analysis software. The absolute uptake of 99mTc in the heart was also quantified with and without attenuation correction. Results: For 99mTc imaging, relative segmental perfusion changed by up to +2.1%/−1.8% as a result of attenuation correction. Relative changes of +3.6%/−1.0% were observed for the 201Tl images. Interscan and inter-rat reproducibilities of relative segmental perfusion were 2.7% and 3.9%, respectively, for the uncorrected 99mTc scans, and 3.6% and 4.3%, respectively, for the 201Tl scans, and were not significantly affected by attenuation correction for either tracer. Attenuation correction also significantly increased the measured absolute uptake of tetrofosmin and significantly altered the relationship between the rat weight and tracer uptake. Conclusions: Our results show that attenuation correction has a small but statistically significant impact on the relative perfusion measurements in some segments of the heart and does not adversely affect reproducibility. Attenuation correction had a small but statistically significant impact on measured absolute tracer uptake

  16. Cone-Beam CT-Based Delineation of Stereotactic Lung Targets: The Influence of Image Modality and Target Size on Interobserver Variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It is generally agreed that the safe implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy requires image guidance. The aim of this work was to assess interobserver variability in the delineation of lung lesions on cone-beam CT (CBCT) images compared with CT-based contouring for adaptive stereotactic body radiotherapy. The influence of target size was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: Eight radiation oncologists delineated gross tumor volumes in 12 patient cases (non–small cell lung cancer I–II or solitary metastasis) on planning CTs and on CBCTs. Cases were divided into two groups with tumor diameters of less than (Group A) or more than 2 cm (Group B). Comparison of mean volumes delineated by all observers and range and coefficient of variation were reported for each case and image modality. Interobserver variability was assessed by means of standard error of measurement, conformity index (CI), and its generalized observer-independent approach. The variance between single observers on CT and CBCT images was measured via interobserver reliability coefficient. Results: Interobserver variability on CT images was 17% with 0.79 reliability, compared with 21% variability on CBCT and 0.76 reliability. On both image modalities, values of the intraobserver reliability coefficient (0.99 for CT and 0.97 for CBCT) indicated high reproducibility of results. In general, lower interobserver agreement was observed for small lesions (CIgenA = 0.62 ± 0.06 vs. CIgenB = 0.70 ± 0.03, p < 0.05). The analysis of single patient cases revealed that presence of spicules, diffuse infiltrations, proximity of the tumors to the vessels and thoracic wall, and respiration motion artifacts presented the main sources of the variability. Conclusion: Interobserver variability for Stage I–II non–small cell lung cancer and lung metastasis was slightly higher on CBCT compared with CT. Absence of significant differences in interobserver variability suggests that CBCT imaging provides

  17. Automatic computed tomography patient dose calculation using header metadata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes a method that calculates the patient dose values in computed tomography (CT) based on metadata contained in DICOM images in support of patient dose studies. The DICOM metadata is pre-processed to extract necessary calculation parameters. Vendor-specific DICOM header information is harmonized using vendor translation tables and unavailable DICOM tags can be completed with a graphical user interface. CT-Expo, an MS Excel application for calculating the radiation dose, is used to calculate the patient doses. All relevant data and calculation results are stored for further analysis in a relational database. Final results are compiled by utilizing data mining tools. This solution was successfully used for the 2009 CT dose study in Luxembourg. National diagnostic reference levels for standard examinations were calculated based on each of the countries' hospitals. The benefits using this new automatic system saved time as well as resources during the data acquisition and the evaluation when compared with earlier questionnaire-based surveys. (authors)

  18. Conformal CT-based bilateral neck irradiation (RT) for patients with head and neck cancer: potential gains in target coverage and noninvolved tissue sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Conformal CT-based RT techniques for patients requiring comprehensive, bilateral neck treatment were developed for parotid gland sparing. To assess these techniques, they were compared to standard RT regarding target coverage and noninvolved tissue sparing. In addition, dose distributions at locoregional recurrence sites were examined. Methods: 38 patients with stage III/IV oral, oropharyngeal, laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer had postoperative (27) or primary RT (11). Treatment planning included a CT scan in treatment position. Each target (the primary tumor/surgical bed, lymph node metastases and lymph node groups at risk), the parotid and submandibular glands and the oral cavity were outlined on the axial images. The planning aim was sparing the contralateral parotid gland while adequately treating the targets, including the contralateral jugulodigastric nodes. Initially, 23 patients were treated by a modification of the standard 3-field technique, with a moderate gantry angle selected utilizing beam's eye view (method A). Later, 15 patients were treated with static intensity modulation techniques: 5-6 non-coplanar fields, 2-4 segments in each field, using a multileaf collimator (method B). For comparison, standard 3-fields technique was retrospectively planned for each patient, covering the same CT-outlined targets, with CT-derived tissue compensators. Dose volume histograms (DVH's) for each target and non involved organ/tissue were generated for the actual treatment and for the standard plan. Before and periodically after radiation, saliva flow rates were measured from each major salivary gland. Results: Comparisons of method A treatment plans to standard plans demonstrated no differences in target coverage or noninvolved tissue sparing, apart for significant contralateral parotid sparing (mean parotid dose 34%±11% vs. 93%±7% of the prescribed tumor dose). Method B plans achieved similar sparing of the contralateral parotid, and in addition

  19. Realization of Micro-CT Based on a Lens-Coupled Detector and Calibration of Its Magnification%基于光耦探测器显微CT的实现及其放大倍数的标定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵耕砚; 胡晓东; 邹晶; 赵金涛; 陈津平

    2013-01-01

    X射线显微CT因其较高的成像分辨率,被应用于微小样品内部精细结构的检测。分辨率是显微CT最受关注的指标之一,而实现其测量功能则是当今CT研究领域的前沿方向。为了提高分辨率,设计实现了一种基于光耦探测器的显微CT系统,对经过几何放大的图像再进行光学放大。由于对其放大倍数的准确标定是实现其测量功能的重要前提,研究提出了基于标准栅格板和标准球的标定方法,对基于光耦探测器的显微CT的光学放大倍数和几何放大倍数分别进行了标定。这样即使在实际测试中射线源、样品和探测器的位置发生改变,亦可直接算出总放大倍数。标定过程还使用了最小二乘法以提高标定精度。二维X射线投影图像测量实验和三维重建结果测量实验显示,此种放大倍数标定方法是准确、有效的。%X-ray computerized microtomography ( micro-CT ) is used to test tiny structures due to its high image resolution. Image resolution is one of its most important characteristics,and actualizing its measuring function is the cutting edge of CT research. To enhance its resolution,a micro-CT based on a lens-coupled detector was designed and actualized, which magnified samples optically besides geometric magnification. Since calibrating its magnification accurately is a premise to realize measurement with it,a calibration method using a grid pattern and a standard ball was proposed, which calibrated the optical magnification and the geometrical magnification respectively. Even if positions of the X-ray source,the sample and the detector are changed in later measurements, the total magnification can also be calculated. To increase calibrating precision,least square method was involved. Measurement experiments on 2 D projection images and a 3 D reconstruction result show that the calibration method is precise and valid.

  20. SU-C-BRD-02: A Team Focused Clinical Implementation and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis of HDR Skin Brachytherapy Using Valencia and Leipzig Surface Applicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: and Leipzig applicators (VLAs) are single-channel brachytherapy surface applicators used to treat skin lesions up to 2cm diameter. Source dwell times can be calculated and entered manually after clinical set-up or ultrasound. This procedure differs dramatically from CT-based planning; the novelty and unfamiliarity could lead to severe errors. To build layers of safety and ensure quality, a multidisciplinary team created a protocol and applied Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to the clinical procedure for HDR VLA skin treatments. Methods: team including physicists, physicians, nurses, therapists, residents, and administration developed a clinical procedure for VLA treatment. The procedure was evaluated using FMEA. Failure modes were identified and scored by severity, occurrence, and detection. The clinical procedure was revised to address high-scoring process nodes. Results: Several key components were added to the clinical procedure to minimize risk probability numbers (RPN): -Treatments are reviewed at weekly QA rounds, where physicians discuss diagnosis, prescription, applicator selection, and set-up. Peer review reduces the likelihood of an inappropriate treatment regime. -A template for HDR skin treatments was established in the clinical EMR system to standardize treatment instructions. This reduces the chances of miscommunication between the physician and planning physicist, and increases the detectability of an error during the physics second check. -A screen check was implemented during the second check to increase detectability of an error. -To reduce error probability, the treatment plan worksheet was designed to display plan parameters in a format visually similar to the treatment console display. This facilitates data entry and verification. -VLAs are color-coded and labeled to match the EMR prescriptions, which simplifies in-room selection and verification. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary planning and FMEA increased delectability and

  1. Preliminary experience on the implementation of computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 source in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalludin, Z.; Min, U. N.; Ishak, W. Z. Wan; Malik, R. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our preliminary work of the computed tomography (CT) image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) implementation on cervical cancer patients. We developed a protocol in which patients undergo two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations; a) prior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and b) prior to intra-cavitary brachytherapy for tumour identification and delineation during IGBT planning and dosimetry. For each fraction, patients were simulated using CT simulator and images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder and rectum were delineated on CT-based contouring for cervical cancer. Plans were optimised to achieve HR-CTV and IR-CTV dose (D90) of total EQD2 80Gy and 60Gy respectively, while limiting the minimum dose to the most irradiated 2cm3 volume (D2cc) of bladder and rectum to total EQD2 90Gy and 75Gy respectively. Data from seven insertions were analysed by comparing the volume-based with traditional point- based doses. Based on our data, there were differences between volume and point doses of HR- CTV, bladder and rectum organs. As the number of patients having the CT-based IGBT increases from day to day in our centre, it is expected that the treatment and dosimetry accuracy will be improved with the implementation.

  2. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  3. Long-term Results of Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced or Unfavorably Located Choroidal Melanoma: Usefulness of CT-based 2-Port Orthogonal Therapy for Reducing the Incidence of Neovascular Glaucoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi, E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Nomiya, Takuma; Kamada, Tadashi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Mizota, Atsushi [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Yoshitaka [Department of Ophthalmology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term results of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in patients with choroidal melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of CT-based 2-port irradiation in reducing the risk of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2012, a total of 116 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma received CT-based C-ion RT. Of these patients, 114 were followed up for more than 6 months and their data analyzed. The numbers of T3 and T2 patients (International Union Against Cancer [UICC], 5th edition) were 106 and 8, respectively. The total dose of C-ion RT varied from 60 to 85 GyE, with each dose given in 5 fractions. Since October 2005, 2-port therapy (51 patients) has been used in an attempt to reduce the risk of NVG. A dose-volume histogram analysis was also performed in 106 patients. Results: The median follow-up was 4.6 years (range, 0.5-10.6 years). The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and eye retention rates were 80.4% (95% confidence interval 89.0%-71.8%), 82.2% (90.6%-73.8%), 92.8% (98.5%-87.1%), 72.1% (81.9%-62.3%), and 92.8% (98.1%-87.5%), respectively. The overall 5-year NVG incidence rate was 35.9% (25.9%-45.9%) and that of 1-port group and 2-port group were 41.6% (29.3%-54.0%) and 13.9% (3.2%-24.6%) with statistically significant difference (P<.001). The dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the average irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body was significantly lower in the non-NVG group than in the NVG group at all dose levels, and significantly lower in the 2-port group than in the 1-port group at high dose levels. Conclusions: The long-term results of C-ion RT for choroidal melanoma are satisfactory. CT-based 2-port C-ion RT can be used to reduce the high-dose irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body and the resulting risk of NVG.

  4. Long-term Results of Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced or Unfavorably Located Choroidal Melanoma: Usefulness of CT-based 2-Port Orthogonal Therapy for Reducing the Incidence of Neovascular Glaucoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the long-term results of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) in patients with choroidal melanoma, and to assess the usefulness of CT-based 2-port irradiation in reducing the risk of neovascular glaucoma (NVG). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2012, a total of 116 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma received CT-based C-ion RT. Of these patients, 114 were followed up for more than 6 months and their data analyzed. The numbers of T3 and T2 patients (International Union Against Cancer [UICC], 5th edition) were 106 and 8, respectively. The total dose of C-ion RT varied from 60 to 85 GyE, with each dose given in 5 fractions. Since October 2005, 2-port therapy (51 patients) has been used in an attempt to reduce the risk of NVG. A dose-volume histogram analysis was also performed in 106 patients. Results: The median follow-up was 4.6 years (range, 0.5-10.6 years). The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and eye retention rates were 80.4% (95% confidence interval 89.0%-71.8%), 82.2% (90.6%-73.8%), 92.8% (98.5%-87.1%), 72.1% (81.9%-62.3%), and 92.8% (98.1%-87.5%), respectively. The overall 5-year NVG incidence rate was 35.9% (25.9%-45.9%) and that of 1-port group and 2-port group were 41.6% (29.3%-54.0%) and 13.9% (3.2%-24.6%) with statistically significant difference (P<.001). The dose-volume histogram analysis showed that the average irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body was significantly lower in the non-NVG group than in the NVG group at all dose levels, and significantly lower in the 2-port group than in the 1-port group at high dose levels. Conclusions: The long-term results of C-ion RT for choroidal melanoma are satisfactory. CT-based 2-port C-ion RT can be used to reduce the high-dose irradiated volume of the iris-ciliary body and the resulting risk of NVG

  5. Evaluation of a Monte Carlo calculation algorithm for clinical use extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT); Evaluacion de un algoritmo de calculo Monte Carlo de uso clinico para radioterapia esterotaxica extracraneal (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrila, J.; Minambres Moro, A.

    2013-07-01

    At present it is not common to find commercial planning systems that incorporate dose calculation algorithms to do based on Monte Carlo [1,2] photons This paper summarizes the process followed in the evaluation of a dose calculation algorithm for MC beams of 6 MV photons from an accelerator dedicated to radiosurgery (SRS), cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and extracranial (SBRT). (Author)

  6. SU-E-T-634: Analysis of Volume Based GYN HDR Brachytherapy Plans for Dose Calculation to Organs At Risk(OAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have analyzed the dose volume histogram of 140 CT based HDR brachytherapy plans and evaluated the dose received to OAR ; rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon based on recommendations from ICRU and Image guided brachytherapy working group for cervical cancer . Methods: Our treatment protocol consist of XRT to whole pelvis with 45 Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction followed by 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction by HDR brachytherapy in 2 weeks . The CT compatible tandem and ovoid applicators were used and stabilized with radio opaque packing material. The patient was stabilized using special re-locatable implant table and stirrups for reproducibility of the geometry during treatment. The CT scan images were taken at 3mm slice thickness and exported to the treatment planning computer. The OAR structures, bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon were outlined on the images along with the applicators. The prescription dose was targeted to A left and A right as defined in Manchester system and optimized on geometry . The dosimetry was compared on all plans using the parameter Ci.sec.cGy-1 . Using the Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) obtained from the plans the doses to rectum, sigmoid colon and bladder for ICRU defined points and 2cc volume were analyzed and reported. The following criteria were used for limiting the tolerance dose by volume (D2cc) were calculated. The rectum and sigmoid colon doses were limited to <75Gy. The bladder dose was limited to < 90Gy from both XRT and HDR brachytherapy. Results: The average total (XRT+HDRBT) BED values to prescription volume was 120 Gy. Dose 2cc to rectum was 70Gy +/− 17Gy, dose to 2cc bladder was 82+/−32 Gy. The average Ci.sec.cGy-1 calculated for the HDR plans was 6.99 +/− 0.5 Conclusion: The image based treatment planning enabled to evaluati volume based dose to critical structures for clinical interpretation

  7. SU-E-T-634: Analysis of Volume Based GYN HDR Brachytherapy Plans for Dose Calculation to Organs At Risk(OAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, M; Li, C; White, M; Davis, J [Joe Arrington Cancer Center, Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have analyzed the dose volume histogram of 140 CT based HDR brachytherapy plans and evaluated the dose received to OAR ; rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon based on recommendations from ICRU and Image guided brachytherapy working group for cervical cancer . Methods: Our treatment protocol consist of XRT to whole pelvis with 45 Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction followed by 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction by HDR brachytherapy in 2 weeks . The CT compatible tandem and ovoid applicators were used and stabilized with radio opaque packing material. The patient was stabilized using special re-locatable implant table and stirrups for reproducibility of the geometry during treatment. The CT scan images were taken at 3mm slice thickness and exported to the treatment planning computer. The OAR structures, bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon were outlined on the images along with the applicators. The prescription dose was targeted to A left and A right as defined in Manchester system and optimized on geometry . The dosimetry was compared on all plans using the parameter Ci.sec.cGy-1 . Using the Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) obtained from the plans the doses to rectum, sigmoid colon and bladder for ICRU defined points and 2cc volume were analyzed and reported. The following criteria were used for limiting the tolerance dose by volume (D2cc) were calculated. The rectum and sigmoid colon doses were limited to <75Gy. The bladder dose was limited to < 90Gy from both XRT and HDR brachytherapy. Results: The average total (XRT+HDRBT) BED values to prescription volume was 120 Gy. Dose 2cc to rectum was 70Gy +/− 17Gy, dose to 2cc bladder was 82+/−32 Gy. The average Ci.sec.cGy-1 calculated for the HDR plans was 6.99 +/− 0.5 Conclusion: The image based treatment planning enabled to evaluati volume based dose to critical structures for clinical interpretation.

  8. Impact of CT based attenuation correction on quantitative assessment of DaTSCAN (123I-Ioflupane) imaging in diagnosis of extrapyramidal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of visually and semi-quantitatively assessed DaTSCAN images is crucial for differential diagnostics of extrapyramidal diseases. Neuroimaging with the use of presynaptic tracers of the dopaminergic system provides evidence of nigrostriatal degeneration and may support the clinical diagnosis of Parkinsonism. During the last two years (2007-2008) we tried to elaborate the optimal methodology of SPECT/CT examination with the use of DaTSCAN (123I-Ioflupane), and we sought to evaluate the effect of the reconstruction and attenuation correction method on semi-quantitative measures of relative uptake in the striatum. In a present study, we retrospectively studied DaTSCAN scans of 44 consecutive patients with clinical indications of Parkinson's disease or uncertain Parkinsonian syndromes. The quality of DaTSCAN images reconstructed with the use of ordered-subset expectation maximization reconstruction technique (OSEM) with attenuation correction based on CT maps was found to be superior to that provided by the commonly applied filtered backprojection method (FBP) with Chang attenuation correction. OSEM reconstructed transverse slices were more legible for clinical interpretation because of increased contrast and improved delineation between striatum structures. Semiquantitative assessments of relative striatum uptake for OSEM reconstructed slices secured better intraperator reproducibility than that obtained by FBP method. (authors)

  9. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the…

  10. TU-A-12A-07: CT-Based Biomarkers to Characterize Lung Lesion: Effects of CT Dose, Slice Thickness and Reconstruction Algorithm Based Upon a Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiogenomics promises the ability to study cancer tumor genotype from the phenotype obtained through radiographic imaging. However, little attention has been paid to the sensitivity of image features, the image-based biomarkers, to imaging acquisition techniques. This study explores the impact of CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm on measuring image features using a thorax phantom. Methods: Twentyfour phantom lesions of known volume (1 and 2mm), shape (spherical, elliptical, lobular and spicular) and density (-630, -10 and +100 HU) were scanned on a GE VCT at four doses (25, 50, 100, and 200 mAs). For each scan, six image series were reconstructed at three slice thicknesses of 5, 2.5 and 1.25mm with continuous intervals, using the lung and standard reconstruction algorithms. The lesions were segmented with an in-house 3D algorithm. Fifty (50) image features representing lesion size, shape, edge, and density distribution/texture were computed. Regression method was employed to analyze the effect of CT dose, slice of thickness and reconstruction algorithm on these features adjusting 3 confounding factors (size, density and shape of phantom lesions). Results: The coefficients of CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm are presented in Table 1 in the supplementary material. No significant difference was found between the image features calculated on low dose CT scans (25mAs and 50mAs). About 50% texture features were found statistically different between low doses and high doses (100 and 200mAs). Significant differences were found for almost all features when calculated on 1.25mm, 2.5mm, and 5mm slice thickness images. Reconstruction algorithms significantly affected all density-based image features, but not morphological features. Conclusions: There is a great need to standardize the CT imaging protocols for radiogenomics study because CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm impact quantitative image features to

  11. Autistic Savant Calendar Calculators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Paul J.

    This study identified 10 savants with developmental disabilities and an exceptional ability to calculate calendar dates. These "calendar calculators" were asked to demonstrate their abilities, and their strategies were analyzed. The study found that the ability to calculate dates into the past or future varied widely among these calculators. Three…

  12. Small dense LDL particles - a predictor of coronary artery disease evaluated by invasive and CT-based techniques: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreasen Annette

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary angiography is the current standard method to evaluate coronary atherosclerosis in patients with suspected angina pectoris, but non-invasive CT scanning of the coronaries are increasingly used for the same purpose. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol and other lipid and lipoprotein variables are major risk factors for coronary artery disease. Small dense LDL particles may be of particular importance, but clinical studies evaluating their predictive value for coronary atherosclerosis are few. Methods We performed a study of 194 consecutive patients with chest pain, a priori considered of low to intermediate risk for significant coronary stenosis (>50% lumen obstruction who were referred for elective coronary angiography. Plasma lipids and lipoproteins were measured including the subtype pattern of LDL particles, and all patients were examined by coronary CT scanning before coronary angiography. Results The proportion of small dense LDL was a strong univariate predictor of significant coronary artery stenosis evaluated by both methods. After adjustment for age, gender, smoking, and waist circumference only results obtained by traditional coronary angiography remained statistically significant. Conclusion Small dense LDL particles may add to risk stratification of patients with suspected angina pectoris.

  13. Defining the target volume for post-operative radiotherapy after D2 dissection in gastric cancer by CT-based vessel-guided delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the recurrent nodal gross tumor volume (rnGTV) based on CT-guided vascular structure to refine the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation in postoperative radiotherapy for advanced gastric cancer following radical gastrectomy with D2 dissection. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed follow-up images from 91 patients with their first regional recurrence after D2 dissection in stage III gastric cancer with N3 disease. We defined rnGTV as recurrent nodes shown in follow-up CT images, in which one diagnostic radiologist with specialty of gastrointestinal tract investigated. We drew rnGTVs at the equivalent location based on the same vessels of reference comparing CT images to recurrence CT images. Results: We propose vessel-based locations of rnGTVs on CT images with axial and coronal views. We show different patterns of regional recurrence according to the location of primary gastric cancer using CT and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) images. Frequently recurred sites, overlapped by more than five rnGTVs, are depicted in a DRR image. Conclusions: This study suggests vessel-based delineations of rnGTVs on CT images depending on nodal recurrence sites from follow-up images after D2 lymphadenectomy. Our results could help reduce the inter-observer variation of CTV delineation after D2 dissection in gastric cancer

  14. Diagnostic Performance of F-18 FDG PET/CT in Patients with Cancer of Unknown Primary: Additional Benefit over CT-Based Conventional Work up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the era of well-developed site-specific treatment strategies in cancer, identification of occult primary is of paramount importance in CUP patients. Furthermore, exact determination of the extent of the disease may help in optimizing treatment planning. The aim of the present study was to investigate additional value of F-18 FDG PET/CT in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP as an appropriate imaging tool in early phase of initial standard work up.Materials and Methods: Sixty-two newly diagnosed CUP patients with inconclusive diagnostic CT scan of chest, abdomen and pelvis referring for F-18 FDG PET/CT were enrolled in this study. Standard of reference was defined as histopathology, other diagnostic procedures and a 3-month formal clinical follow up. The results of PET/CT were categorized as suggestion for primary site and additional metastasis and classified as true positive, false positive, false negative and true negative. The impact of additional metastasis revealed by F-18 FDG PET/CT on treatment planning and the time contribution of F-18 FDG PET/CT in diagnostic pathway was investigated.Results: Sixty-two patients with mean age of 62 (30 men, 32 women, PET/CT correctly identified primary origin in 32% with false positive rate of 14.8%. No primary lesion was detected after negative PET/CT according to standard of reference. Sensitivity, Specificity and accuracy were 100%, 78% and 85%, respectively. Additional metastatic site was found in 56% with 22% impact on treatment planning. Time contribution for PET/CT was 10% of total diagnostic pathway.Conclusion: Providing higher detection rate of primary origin with excellent diagnostic performance, shortening the diagnostic pathway and improving treatment planning, F-18 FDG PET/CT may play a major role in diagnostic work up of CUP patients and may be recommended as an alternative imaging tool in early phase of investigation.

  15. Modeling correlation indices between bladder and Foley′s catheter balloon dose with CT-based planning using limited CT slices in intracavitary brachytherapy for carcinoma of cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oinam Arun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To derive and validate an index to correlate the bladder dose with the catheter balloon dose using limited computed tomography (CT slices. Materials and Methods: Applicator geometry reconstructed from orthogonal radiographs were back-projected on CT images of the same patients for anatomy-based dosimetric evaluation. The correlation indices derived using power function of the catheter balloon dose and the bladder volume dose were validated in 31 patients with cervical cancer. Results: There was significant correlation between International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU-38 balloon reference dose (Dr and the dose received by 25% bladder volume (D 25 (P < 0.0001. Significant correlation was also found between the reference dose of mid-balloon point (D rm and the dose to D 25 (P < 0.0001. Average percentage difference [100 x (observed index - expected index / expected index] of observed value of I′ 25 (index for the dose to D25 bladder with respect to mid-balloon reference point from that of expected value was 0.52%, when the index was modeled with reference dose alone. Similarly the average percentage difference for I′10cc (index for the dose to 10 cc volume of bladder with respect to mid balloon point was 0.84%. When this index was modeled with absolute bladder volume and reference dose, standard deviation of the percentage difference between observed and expected index for D rm reduced by approximately 2% when compared to D r . Conclusion: For clinical applications, correlation index modeled with reference dose and volume predicts dose to absolute volume of bladder. Correlation index modeled with reference dose gives a good estimate of dose to relative bladder volume. From our study, we found D rm to be a better indicator of bladder dose than D r .

  16. CT-based three-dimensional kinematic comparison of dart-throwing motion between wrists with malunited distal radius and contralateral normal wrists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To compare motion of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate in wrists with a malunited distal radius and contralateral normal wrists during dart-throwing motion (DTM) by three-dimensional kinematic studies using computed tomography (CT) images. Materials and methods: CT was performed simultaneously on both wrists in six patients with a unilateral distal radius malunion at three stepwise positions simulating DTM. Using volume registration technique, the kinematic variables of helical axis motion of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate were calculated and compared between both wrists. The helical motion of the capitate was also evaluated in a scaphoid- and lunate-based coordinate system. Results: Among the average rotation and translation of the scaphoid, lunate, and capitate during DTM, only the average rotation of the capitate was significantly different between the uninjured (88.9°) and the injured (70°) wrist (p = 0.0075). Rotation of the capitate relative to the scaphoid (26.3° versus 37.8°, p = 0.029) or lunate (39.2° versus 59.3°, p = 0.028) was smaller in the malunited wrist. The centres of helical axis motion of the three carpal bones were located more dorsally and radially in the injured wrist. Conclusions: The present study showed that decreased DTM in wrists with a distal radius malunion resulted from decreased midcarpal motion. The present study of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate in wrists with distal radius malunion might be the first to present a 3D kinematic analysis of the effect of distal radius malunion on the carpal bones

  17. Evaluation of on-board kV cone beam CT (CBCT)-based dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Schreibmann, Eduard; Li, Tianfang; Wang, Chuang; Xing, Lei

    2007-02-01

    significant fluctuation was observed in the calibration over the period of 8 weeks. For the static phantom, the doses computed based on pCT and CBCT agreed to within 1%. A notable difference in CBCT- and pCT-based dose distributions was found for the motion phantom due to the motion artefacts which appeared in the CBCT images (the maximum discrepancy was found to be ~3.0% in the high dose region). The motion artefacts-induced dosimetric inaccuracy was also observed in the lung patient study. For the prostate cases, the mCBCT- and CBCT-based dose calculations yielded very close results (phantom data, it is concluded that the CBCT can be employed directly for dose calculation for a disease site such as the prostate, where there is little motion artefact. In the prostate case study, we also noted a large discrepancy between the original treatment plan and the CBCT (or mCBCT)-based calculation, suggesting the importance of inter-fractional organ movement and the need for adaptive therapy to compensate for the anatomical changes in the future. Part of this work was presented in 2006 Annual Meeting of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. Dual-energy CT based vascular iodine analysis improves sensitivity for peripheral pulmonary artery thrombus detection: An experimental study in canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chun Xiang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Zhang, Long Jiang, E-mail: kevinzhlj@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Han, Zong Hong; Zhou, Chang Sheng [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Krazinski, Aleksander W.; Silverman, Justin R. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of dual-energy CT (DECT) based vascular iodine analysis for the detection of acute peripheral pulmonary thrombus (PE) in a canine model with histopathological findings as the reference standard. Materials and methods: The study protocol was approved by our institutional animal committee. Thrombi (n = 12) or saline (n = 4) were intravenously injected via right femoral vein in sixteen dogs, respectively. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in DECT mode was performed and conventional CTPA images and DECT based vascular iodine studies using Lung Vessels application were reconstructed. Two radiologists visually evaluated the number and location of PEs using conventional CTPA and DECT series on a per-animal and a per-clot basis. Detailed histopathological examination of lung specimens and catheter angiography served as reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of DECT and CTPA were calculated on a segmental and subsegmental or more distal pulmonary artery basis. Weighted κ values were computed to evaluate inter-modality and inter-reader agreement. Results: Thirteen dogs were enrolled for final image analysis (experimental group = 9, control group = 4). Histopathological results revealed 237 emboli in 45 lung lobes in 9 experimental dogs, 11 emboli in segmental pulmonary arteries, 49 in subsegmental pulmonary arteries, 177 in fifth-order or more distal pulmonary arteries. Overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV for CTPA plus DECT were 93.1%, 76.9%, 87.8%, 89.4%, and 84.2% for the detection of pulmonary emboli. With CTPA versus DECT, sensitivities, specificities, accuracies, PPVs, and NPVs are all 100% for the detection of pulmonary emboli on a segmental pulmonary artery basis, 88.9%, 100%, 96.0%, 100%, and 94.1% for CTPA and 90.4%, 93.0%, 92.0%, 88.7%, and 94.1% for DECT on a subsegmental pulmonary artery basis; 23.8%, 96.4%, 50.4%, 93

  19. Dual-energy CT based vascular iodine analysis improves sensitivity for peripheral pulmonary artery thrombus detection: An experimental study in canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of dual-energy CT (DECT) based vascular iodine analysis for the detection of acute peripheral pulmonary thrombus (PE) in a canine model with histopathological findings as the reference standard. Materials and methods: The study protocol was approved by our institutional animal committee. Thrombi (n = 12) or saline (n = 4) were intravenously injected via right femoral vein in sixteen dogs, respectively. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in DECT mode was performed and conventional CTPA images and DECT based vascular iodine studies using Lung Vessels application were reconstructed. Two radiologists visually evaluated the number and location of PEs using conventional CTPA and DECT series on a per-animal and a per-clot basis. Detailed histopathological examination of lung specimens and catheter angiography served as reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of DECT and CTPA were calculated on a segmental and subsegmental or more distal pulmonary artery basis. Weighted κ values were computed to evaluate inter-modality and inter-reader agreement. Results: Thirteen dogs were enrolled for final image analysis (experimental group = 9, control group = 4). Histopathological results revealed 237 emboli in 45 lung lobes in 9 experimental dogs, 11 emboli in segmental pulmonary arteries, 49 in subsegmental pulmonary arteries, 177 in fifth-order or more distal pulmonary arteries. Overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV for CTPA plus DECT were 93.1%, 76.9%, 87.8%, 89.4%, and 84.2% for the detection of pulmonary emboli. With CTPA versus DECT, sensitivities, specificities, accuracies, PPVs, and NPVs are all 100% for the detection of pulmonary emboli on a segmental pulmonary artery basis, 88.9%, 100%, 96.0%, 100%, and 94.1% for CTPA and 90.4%, 93.0%, 92.0%, 88.7%, and 94.1% for DECT on a subsegmental pulmonary artery basis; 23.8%, 96.4%, 50.4%, 93

  20. Heterogeneous Calculation of ε

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heterogeneous method of calculating the fast fission factor given by Naudet has been applied to the Carlvik - Pershagen definition of ε. An exact calculation of the collision probabilities is included in the programme developed for the Ferranti - Mercury computer

  1. Personal Finance Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argo, Mark

    1982-01-01

    Contains explanations and examples of mathematical calculations for a secondary level course on personal finance. How to calculate total monetary cost of an item, monthly payments, different types of interest, annual percentage rates, and unit pricing is explained. (RM)

  2. Consolidated fuel shielding calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated fuel radiation dose rate and radiation shielding requirements are calculated using a validated ISOSHLD-II model. Comparisons are made to experimental measurements. ISOSHLD-11 calculations are documented

  3. Calculating Clearances for Manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, E. L.; Peticolas, J. D.; Ray, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    Set of algorithms rapidly calculates minimum safe clearances for remote manipulators. Such calculations are used in design of trajectories for manipulators to ensure they do not accidentally strike surrounding objects. Structural parts are considered as cylindrical shells having circular plane areas for ends. Clearance calculation method offers special benefits in industrial robotics, particularly in automated machining.

  4. Methodology of assessment of the clinical and dosimetric impact of a change of dose calculation algorithm in radiotherapy; Methodologie d'evaluation de l'impact dosimetrique et clinique du changement d'algorithme de calcul de dose en radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaikh, A.; Giraud, J.Y.; Balosso, J. [Centre hospitalier universitaire de Grenoble, Grenoble (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the use of five dose calculation algorithms and the comparison of six treatment plans with identical configurations regarding patient, energy, and ballistics. Thirteen tumour locations have been compared (five in lungs, one in oesophagus, one in breast, three in ENT, two in brain, and one in prostate). The methodology is based on a dosimetric criterion (analysis related to the treatment dose, and to dose distribution) and on a statistic criterion. Short communication

  5. Clinical evaluation of X-ray voxel Monte Carlo versus pencil beam-based dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer under normal and deep inspiration breath hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, V; Borzì, G R; Strolin, S; Bruzzaniti, V; Soriani, A; D'Alessio, D; Ambesi, F; Di Grazia, A M; Strigari, L

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the differences between dose distributions calculated with the pencil beam (PB) and X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for patients with lung cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or HybridArc techniques. The 2 algorithms were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, under normal and deep inspiration breath hold, and in terms of the tumor control probability (TCP). The dependence of the differences in tumor volume and location was investigated. Dosimetric validation was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 (International Specialty Products, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Forty-five Computed Tomography (CT) data sets were used for this study; 40 Gy at 8 Gy/fraction was prescribed with 5 noncoplanar 6-MV IMRT beams or 3 to 4 dynamic conformal arcs with 3 to 5 IMRT beams distributed per arc. The plans were first calculated with PB and then recalculated with MC. The difference between the mean tumor doses was approximately 10% ± 4%; these differences were even larger under deep inspiration breath hold. Differences between the mean tumor dose correlated with tumor volume and path length of the beams. The TCP values changed from 99.87% ± 0.24% to 96.78% ± 4.81% for both PB- and MC-calculated plans (P = .009). When a fraction of hypoxic cells was considered, the mean TCP values changed from 76.01% ± 5.83% to 34.78% ± 18.06% for the differently calculated plans (P < .0001). When the plans were renormalized to the same mean dose at the tumor, the mean TCP for oxic cells was 99.05% ± 1.59% and for hypoxic cells was 60.20% ± 9.53%. This study confirms that the MC algorithm adequately accounts for inhomogeneities. The inclusion of the MC in the process of IMRT optimization could represent a further step in the complex problem of determining the optimal treatment plan. PMID:25223324

  6. How Do Calculators Calculate Trigonometric Functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Jeremy M.; Edwards, Bruce H.

    How does your calculator quickly produce values of trigonometric functions? You might be surprised to learn that it does not use series or polynomial approximations, but rather the so-called CORDIC method. This paper will focus on the geometry of the CORDIC method, as originally developed by Volder in 1959. This algorithm is a wonderful…

  7. 灌注造影显微CT三维重建研究骨痂微血管新生%MicroCT based angiography for studying neovascularization of long bone fracture repair in a rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪鹏; 宋祥胜; 周晓中; 顾军; 张戈; 佘昶; 秦岭; 董启榕

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore microcomputed tomography (MicroCT) based angiography for exhibiting the neovascularization/angiogenesis of a callus on a rat femoral fracture model.Methods After a closed fracture establishment,60 nale SD rats were randomized into2 groups (30 in each group)and killed at the time point of 1,2,3,4 and 8 weeks The callus in experimental group were scanned by MieroCT and 3-D vasculature images were reconstructed.Vessel size distribution,total vessel volume and volume fraction were quantified.The callus in control group were assessed by using immunohistochemisty for observing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor 2 ( VEGFR-2 ).Results MicroCT based angiography provided native 3-D vasculature images to iconicly reveal the states of neovascularization.And the total vessel volume and volume fraction peaked at 3 weeks ( P < 0.05 ):( 196.00 ± 20.33 ) mm3 and ( 6.70 ± 0.74 ) % respectively ; Immunohistochemistry of callus sections showed the expression of VEGF and VEGFR-2 occurred in the early stage of fracture healing and peaked at 2 weeks,the number of positive cells were ( 113.40 ± 9.17 ) and ( 51.80 ± 4.24 ) respectively ( P <0.05).Conclusion MicroCT based angiography atraumaticly provided high-resolution,quantitative,3-dimention,and objective data analysis.MicroCT based angiography is a robust methodology for evaluation of vascular networks in the callus of a small animal.%目的 探讨灌注造影显微CT(MicroCT)扫描三维重建在研究大鼠骨折愈合时骨痂微血管变化的可行性及意义.方法 60只雄性Sprague-Dawley( SD)大鼠,随机分为实验组及对照组(每组30只),制作标准的右侧股骨中段闭合骨折模型,术后1、2、3、4、8周处死大鼠.实验组大鼠行腹主动脉远端血管造影后,使用MicroCT断层扫描标本,并选取同一兴趣区测定血管体积、体积分数和血管平均直径.对照组骨痂通过免疫组织化学染色法测定血

  8. The clinical value of using anterior and posterior views in the calculation of geometric mean with a Tc-99m DMSA scan: is the evaluation of the geometric mean necessary in the paediatric patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geometric mean can be determined by using both the anterior and the posterior views in a Tc-99m DMSA renal scan. The aim of this study is to evaluate if there are significant differences in the quantification of the renal function percentage using only the posterior view and the geometric mean. 200 DMAS-scans (81 f, 119 m) aged to 57 year old were reviewed. The difference between the relative renal function obtained using the posterior view and that obtained using the geometric mean was calculated. For the purpose of evaluating the value of performing the geometric mean calculation in patients of different ages, patients were divided into four age groups (group I, 15 years). If counts were obtained from the posterior view only, significant change (5% difference) in relative renal function would be obtained in 2.2% (2 out of 91) of group I, in 1.4% (one out of 70) of group II patients, in 5.5% (one out of 18) of group III patients and in 14.3% (3 out of 21) of group IV patients. These data suggest that only the posterior view data sufficiently may represent relative renal function in pediatric groups (group I, II, III) in comparison to adult group (group IV). For normally located kidneys, it appears appropriate to use only the posterior view data rather than to use the geometric mean method, especially in pediatric age group

  9. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  10. Electrical installation calculations advanced

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    All the essential calculations required for advanced electrical installation workThe Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both apprentices and professional electrical installation engineers alike. The book provides a step-by-step guide to the successful application of electrical installation calculations required in day-to-day electrical engineering practiceA step-by-step guide to everyday calculations used on the job An essential aid to the City & Guilds certificates at Levels 2 and 3For apprentices and electrical installatio

  11. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase,...

  12. Electrical installation calculations basic

    CERN Document Server

    Kitcher, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    All the essential calculations required for basic electrical installation workThe Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both apprentices and professional electrical installation engineers alike. The book provides a step-by-step guide to the successful application of electrical installation calculations required in day-to-day electrical engineering practice. A step-by-step guide to everyday calculations used on the job An essential aid to the City & Guilds certificates at Levels 2 and 3Fo

  13. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation

  14. Sample size calculation in medical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Vahedi, Mohsen; Rahimzadeh, Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Optimum sample size is an essential component of any research. The main purpose of the sample size calculation is to determine the number of samples needed to detect significant changes in clinical parameters, treatment effects or associations after data gathering. It is not uncommon for studies to be underpowered and thereby fail to detect the existing treatment effects due to inadequate sample size. In this paper, we explain briefly the basic principles of sample size calculations in medica...

  15. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy by using Monte Carlo simulation%蒙特卡罗系统验证PBC和CCC算法精确度的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵艳群; 尹刚; 王先良; 王培; 祁国海; 吴大可; 肖明勇; 黎杰; 康盛伟

    2016-01-01

    .00,0.00,0.00,0.00,0.00),but the effect is not obvious in 3DCRT plans (P =0.18,0.08,0.62,0.08,0.97),similarly,the same effect was found in the differences between PBC and MC for IMRT plans,and the differences of dose volume are lager than that of CCC and MC.For the dose of ipsilateral lung,CCC algorithm overestimated dose for all lung,PBC algorithm overestimated V20(P=0.00,0.00),but underestimated V5(P=0.00,0.00),the difference of V10 have no statistical significant (P=0.47).Conclusions It is recommended that the treatment plan of lung cancer should be calculated by an advanced algorithm other than PBC.MC can calculate dose distribution of lung cancer accurately and can provide a very good tool for benchmarking the performance of other dose calculation algorithms.

  16. Mobile Scientific Calculator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdulrahim Hamdi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The mobile and wireless industry is entering an exciting time. Demand for mobile technology is growing at a tremendous rate. Corporations are deploying mobile applications that provide substantial business benefits, and consumers are readily adopting mobile data applications. We present scientific application for mobile phone in steps of software engineering project starting from data gathering, data analysis, designing, coding, packaging, testing and deploying, Mobile Scientific Calculator (MSC enable user to compute any mathematical operation by using this application in mobile phone without needing to use the calculator. Scientific calculator offers three keys the four mathematic operations, the four systems of digits and offering many of functions such as angles functions, power, factorial and other functions. Scientific calculator is suitable for many mobile phones which don t have scientific calculator in its applications, it provide simple design for dealing with its functions for all users. It operated on more than one mobile phone model.

  17. CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of the health status of animals through measurement of cellular, biochemical, and macromolecular constituents in blood, secretions, and excretions has been variously referred to as clinical chemistry, clinical biochemistry, or clinical pathology. he genesis of this dis...

  18. Collection of CASIM calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo calculations of hadronic cascades at Fermilab have usually been done using the code CASIM written by A. Van Ginneken. These calculations are often performed to determine the quantity of shielding required for radiation protection purposes. A number of examples of such calculations have been presented previously. Several years of practical experience have led the author to develop the collection of additional cases included in the present report. These results along with those given earlier will serve as a useful reference. No attempt was made here to consider all possibilities; rather, the purpose was to develop a useful set of examples. Exceptionally intricate cases should, of course, receive individualized attention as appropriate

  19. Large scale GW calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present GW calculations of molecules, ordered and disordered solids and interfaces, which employ an efficient contour deformation technique for frequency integration and do not require the explicit evaluation of virtual electronic states nor the inversion of dielectric matrices. We also present a parallel implementation of the algorithm, which takes advantage of separable expressions of both the single particle Green's function and the screened Coulomb interaction. The method can be used starting from density functional theory calculations performed with semilocal or hybrid functionals. The newly developed technique was applied to GW calculations of systems of unprecedented size, including water/semiconductor interfaces with thousands of electrons

  20. Radioactive cloud dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological dosage principles, as well as methods for calculating external and internal dose rates, following dispersion and deposition of radioactive materials in the atmosphere are described. Emphasis has been placed on analytical solutions that are appropriate for hand calculations. In addition, the methods for calculating dose rates from ingestion are discussed. A brief description of several computer programs are included for information on radionuclides. There has been no attempt to be comprehensive, and only a sampling of programs has been selected to illustrate the variety available

  1. Geogebra: Calculation of Centroid

    OpenAIRE

    Qamil Kllogjeri; Pellumb Kllogjeri

    2012-01-01

    Our paper is result of the research done in a special direction for solving problems of physics by using GeoGebra programme: calculation of centroid. Lots of simulations of physical phenomena from the class of Mechanics can be performed and computational problems can be solved with GeoGebra. GeoGebra offers many commands and one of them is the command “centroid” to calculate the coordinates of the centroid of a polygon but, we have created a new tool to calculate the coordinates of the centr...

  2. nuclear reactor design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work , the sensitivity of different reactor calculation methods, and the effect of different assumptions and/or approximation are evaluated . A new concept named error map is developed to determine the relative importance of different factors affecting the accuracy of calculations. To achieve this goal a generalized, multigroup, multi dimension code UAR-DEPLETION is developed to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron flux, effective multiplication factor and the spatial composition of a reactor core for a period of time and for specified reactor operating conditions. The code also investigates the fuel management strategies and policies for the entire fuel cycle to meet the constraints of material and operating limitations

  3. A Simple Calculator Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Lyle; McWilliam, James

    1983-01-01

    The problem of finding cube roots when limited to a calculator with only square root capability is discussed. An algorithm is demonstrated and explained which should always produce a good approximation within a few iterations. (MP)

  4. Calculativeness and trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Williamson’s characterisation of calculativeness as inimical to trust contradicts most sociological trust research. However, a similar argument is found within trust phenomenology. This paper re-investigates Williamson’s argument from the perspective of Løgstrup’s phenomenological theory of trust....... Contrary to Williamson, however, Løgstrup’s contention is that trust, not calculativeness, is the default attitude and only when suspicion is awoken does trust falter. The paper argues that while Williamson’s distinction between calculativeness and trust is supported by phenomenology, the analysis needs to...... take actual subjective experience into consideration. It points out that, first, Løgstrup places trust alongside calculativeness as a different mode of engaging in social interaction, rather conceiving of trust as a state or the outcome of a decision-making process. Secondly, the analysis must take...

  5. Handout on shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to avoid the difficulties of the radioprotection supervisors in the tasks related to shielding calculations, is presented in this paper the basic concepts of shielding theory. It also includes exercises and examples. (author)

  6. IRIS core criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional Monte Carlo computer code KENO-VI of CSAS26 sequence of SCALE-4.4 code system was applied for pin-by-pin calculations of the effective multiplication factor for the first cycle IRIS reactor core. The effective multiplication factors obtained by the above mentioned Monte Carlo calculations using 27-group ENDF/B-IV library and 238-group ENDF/B-V library have been compared with the effective multiplication factors achieved by HELIOS/NESTLE, CASMO/SIMULATE, and modified CORD-2 nodal calculations. The results of Monte Carlo calculations are found to be in good agreement with the results obtained by the nodal codes. The discrepancies in effective multiplication factor are typically within 1%. (author)

  7. Unit Cost Compendium Calculations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Unit Cost Compendium (UCC) Calculations raw data set was designed to provide for greater accuracy and consistency in the use of unit costs across the USEPA...

  8. Shielding calculations for SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo calculations of hadron and muon shielding for SSC are reviewed with emphasis on their application to radiation safety and environmental protection. Models and algorithms for simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic showers, and for production and transport of muons in the TeV regime are briefly discussed. Capabilities and limitations of these calculations are described and illustrated with a few examples. 12 refs., 3 figs

  9. Current interruption transients calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Peelo, David F

    2014-01-01

    Provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins, and the circuits involved, and how they can be calculated Current Interruption Transients Calculationis a comprehensive resource for the understanding, calculation and analysis of the transient recovery voltages (TRVs) and related re-ignition or re-striking transients associated with fault current interruption and the switching of inductive and capacitive load currents in circuits. This book provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins,

  10. Reactor lattice transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present lecture is a continuation of the lecture on Introduction to the Neutron Transport Phenomena. It comprises three aspects of lattice calculations. First the idea of a reactor lattice is introduced. Then the main definitions used in reactor lattice analysis are given, and finally two basic methods applied for solution of the transport equations are defined. Several remarks on secondary results from lattice transport calculations are added. (author)

  11. Electrical installation calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, AJ

    2006-01-01

    Designed to provide a step by step guide to successful application of the electrical installation calculations required in day to day electrical engineering practice, the Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both apprentices and professional electrical installation engineers alike.Now in its seventh edition, Volume 1 has been fully updated to meet the requirements of the 2330 Level 2 Certificate in Electrotechnical Technology from City & Guilds, and will also prove a vi

  12. Geometric unsharpness calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.J. [International Training and Education Group (INTEG), Oakville, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-15

    The majority of radiographers' geometric unsharpness calculations are normally performed with a mathematical formula. However, a majority of codes and standards refer to the use of a nomograph for this calculation. Upon first review, the use of a nomograph appears more complicated but with a few minutes of study and practice it can be just as effective. A review of this article should provide enlightenment. (author)

  13. Uncertainty calculations made easier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogenbirk, A.

    1994-07-01

    The results are presented of a neutron cross section sensitivity/uncertainty analysis performed in a complicated 2D model of the NET shielding blanket design inside the ITER torus design, surrounded by the cryostat/biological shield as planned for ITER. The calculations were performed with a code system developed at ECN Petten, with which sensitivity/uncertainty calculations become relatively simple. In order to check the deterministic neutron transport calculations (performed with DORT), calculations were also performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP. Care was taken to model the 2.0 cm wide gaps between two blanket segments, as the neutron flux behind the vacuum vessel is largely determined by neutrons streaming through these gaps. The resulting neutron flux spectra are in excellent agreement up to the end of the cryostat. It is noted, that at this position the attenuation of the neutron flux is about 1 l orders of magnitude. The uncertainty in the energy integrated flux at the beginning of the vacuum vessel and at the beginning of the cryostat was determined in the calculations. The uncertainty appears to be strongly dependent on the exact geometry: if the gaps are filled with stainless steel, the neutron spectrum changes strongly, which results in an uncertainty of 70% in the energy integrated flux at the beginning of the cryostat in the no-gap-geometry, compared to an uncertainty of only 5% in the gap-geometry. Therefore, it is essential to take into account the exact geometry in sensitivity/uncertainty calculations. Furthermore, this study shows that an improvement of the covariance data is urgently needed in order to obtain reliable estimates of the uncertainties in response parameters in neutron transport calculations. (orig./GL).

  14. Uncertainty calculations made easier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of a neutron cross section sensitivity/uncertainty analysis performed in a complicated 2D model of the NET shielding blanket design inside the ITER torus design, surrounded by the cryostat/biological shield as planned for ITER. The calculations were performed with a code system developed at ECN Petten, with which sensitivity/uncertainty calculations become relatively simple. In order to check the deterministic neutron transport calculations (performed with DORT), calculations were also performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP. Care was taken to model the 2.0 cm wide gaps between two blanket segments, as the neutron flux behind the vacuum vessel is largely determined by neutrons streaming through these gaps. The resulting neutron flux spectra are in excellent agreement up to the end of the cryostat. It is noted, that at this position the attenuation of the neutron flux is about 1 l orders of magnitude. The uncertainty in the energy integrated flux at the beginning of the vacuum vessel and at the beginning of the cryostat was determined in the calculations. The uncertainty appears to be strongly dependent on the exact geometry: if the gaps are filled with stainless steel, the neutron spectrum changes strongly, which results in an uncertainty of 70% in the energy integrated flux at the beginning of the cryostat in the no-gap-geometry, compared to an uncertainty of only 5% in the gap-geometry. Therefore, it is essential to take into account the exact geometry in sensitivity/uncertainty calculations. Furthermore, this study shows that an improvement of the covariance data is urgently needed in order to obtain reliable estimates of the uncertainties in response parameters in neutron transport calculations. (orig./GL)

  15. Clinical biophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbar, M.; Spangler, R.A.; Scott, P.

    1985-01-01

    Chapters are included on clinical decision making, principles of biomedical engineering, computers and their medical uses, clinical radiobiology, diagnostic x-ray radiology, clinical applications of ultrasonics, nuclear medicine, NMR imaging, diagnostic imaging, bioelectric techniques in diagnosis and therapy, biophysical aspects of the clinical laboratory, and biophysical aspects of modern surgery.

  16. Emerging clinical applications of computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguori C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlo Liguori,1 Giulia Frauenfelder,2 Carlo Massaroni,3 Paola Saccomandi,3 Francesco Giurazza,4 Francesca Pitocco,4 Riccardo Marano,5 Emiliano Schena,3 1Radiology Unit, AORN A Cardarelli, 2Radiology Unit, AOU Federico II, Naples, 3Measurement and Biomedical Instrumentation Unit, 4Radiology Unit, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, 5Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, A Gemelli University Hospital, Rome, Italy Abstract: X-ray computed tomography (CT has recently been experiencing remarkable growth as a result of technological advances and new clinical applications. This paper reviews the essential physics of X-ray CT and its major components. Also reviewed are recent promising applications of CT, ie, CT-guided procedures, CT-based thermometry, photon-counting technology, hybrid PET-CT, use of ultrafast-high pitch scanners, and potential use of dual-energy CT for material differentiations. These promising solutions and a better knowledge of their potentialities should allow CT to be used in a safe and effective manner in several clinical applications. Keywords: computed tomography, X-ray, thermometry, dual-energy, ultrafast scanner, guidance, photon-counting technology

  17. Dual-Energy CT-based Display of Bone Marrow Edema in Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures: Impact on Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiologists with Varying Levels of Experience in Correlation to MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, Moritz; Wichmann, Julian L; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Beeres, Martin; Kromen, Wolfgang; Albrecht, Moritz H; Lehnert, Thomas; Boettcher, Marie; Vogl, Thomas J; Bauer, Ralf W

    2016-08-01

    -23 to 2-10 patients). Considering the gain in true decisions with the virtual noncalcium technique on a patient level, between 12 (most experienced reader) and 17 (least experienced reader) MR examinations could have been avoided. Conclusion The DE CT-based virtual noncalcium technique may enable depiction of bone marrow edema in thoracolumbar vertebral compression fractures in patients with osteoporosis, with good accordance with MR imaging when images are read by experienced radiologists. Although less experienced readers improved their diagnostic performance to some degree, the experienced reader's diagnostic performance approached that with MR imaging. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:26928067

  18. Progress on theoretical calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation program NPPD-2 of neutron reaction data in the energy region from 10-11 to 20 MeV has been researched with extending the energy from 5 to 20 MeV. In this program, the cascade γ-de-excitations of the compound nucleus and residual nucleus are described by means of the Troubetzkoy's statistical model and the conservation relations of angular momentum and parity are are considered. This program may be used for the calculations of the natural element, with the number of isotopes less than 10. The program has been finished and the calculations for oxygen are being done in order to test the program. The reaction channels in n + 40Ca, which considered in NPPD-2, are presented

  19. Daylight calculations in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Anne; Roy, Nicolas; Hvass, Mette;

    The aim of the project was to obtain a better understanding of what daylight calculations show and also to gain knowledge of how the different daylight simulation programs perform compared with each other. Experience has shown that results for the same room, obtained from two daylight simulation...... programs can give different results. This can be due to restrictions in the program itself and/or be due to the skills of the persons setting up the models. This is crucial as daylight calculations are used to document that the demands and recommendations to daylight levels outlined by building authorities....... The aim of the project was to obtain a better understanding of what daylight calculations show and also to gain knowledge of how the different daylight simulation programs perform compared with each other. Furthermore the aim was to provide knowledge of how to build up the 3D models that were to be...

  20. Geogebra: Calculation of Centroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamil Kllogjeri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Our paper is result of the research done in a special direction for solving problems of physics by using GeoGebra programme: calculation of centroid. Lots of simulations of physical phenomena from the class of Mechanics can be performed and computational problems can be solved with GeoGebra. GeoGebra offers many commands and one of them is the command “centroid” to calculate the coordinates of the centroid of a polygon but, we have created a new tool to calculate the coordinates of the centroid of a plane region bounded by curves. Our work is part of the passionate work of many GeoGebra users which will result with a very rich fund of GeoGebra virtual tools, examples and experiences that will be worldwidely available for many teachers and practioners.

  1. Population dose calculation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An original method is suggested for calculating the population doses from gas and aerosol radioactive releases. The method is based on the assumption of uniform population and arable land distribution. The validity of this assumption has been proved for a rather large condition range. Though, some modified formulae are given to take into account the non-uniformity of population distribution, connected with large cities, on the one hand, and with woods, shores, regional borders, on the other hand. Employment of the suggested method results in an apriciable calculation accuracy rise for the long-living slowly precipitating radionuclides as compared with the existing methods

  2. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Kurki-Suonio, H

    2001-01-01

    I review standard big bang nucleosynthesis and some versions of nonstandard BBN. The abundances of the primordial isotopes D, He-3, and Li-7 produced in standard BBN can be calculated as a function of the baryon density with an accuracy of about 10%. For He-4 the accuracy is better than 1%. The calculated abundances agree fairly well with observations, but the baryon density of the universe cannot be determined with high precision. Possibilities for nonstandard BBN include inhomogeneous and antimatter BBN and nonzero neutrino chemical potentials.

  3. Electrical installation calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, AJ

    2006-01-01

    Designed to provide a step by step guide to successful application of the electrical installation calculations required in day to day electrical engineering practice, the Electrical Installation Calculations series has proved an invaluable reference for over forty years, for both Foundation and Modern Apprentices, and professional electrical installation engineers alike.Now in its sixth edition, Volume 2 has been fully updated to meet the requirements of the 2330 Level 3 Certificate in Electrotechnical Technology from City & Guilds, and will also prove a vital purchase for students of Level 3

  4. SUSY Calculation Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, Abdelhak

    2002-01-01

    I discuss the various available tools for the study of the properties of the new particles predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. Emphasis will be put on the codes for the determination of the sparticle and Higgs boson spectrum. Codes for the calculation of production cross sections, decay widths and branching ratios, Dark Matter relic density and detection rates, as well as codes for automatic analytical calculations and Monte-Carlo event generators for Supersymmetric processes will be briefly discussed.

  5. Three recent TDHF calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three applications of TDHF are discussed. First, vibrational spectra of a post grazing collision 40Ca nucleus is examined and found to contain many high energy components, qualitatively consistent with recent Orsay experiments. Second, the fusion cross section in energy and angular momentum are calculated for 16O + 24Mg to exhibit the parameters of the low l window for this system. A sensitivity of the fusion cross section to the effective two body potential is discussed. Last, a preliminary analysis of 86Kr + 139La at E/sub lab/ = 505 MeV calculated in the frozen approximation is displayed, compared to experiment and discussed

  6. Sample Size Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Noordzij, Marlies; Dekker, Friedo W.; Zoccali, Carmine; Jager, Kitty J.

    2011-01-01

    The sample size is the number of patients or other experimental units that need to be included in a study to answer the research question. Pre-study calculation of the sample size is important; if a sample size is too small, one will not be able to detect an effect, while a sample that is too large may be a waste of time and money. Methods to calculate the sample size are explained in statistical textbooks, but because there are many different formulas available, it can be difficult for inves...

  7. Dynamics Calculation of Spoke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Compared with ellipse cavity, the spoke cavity has many advantages, especially for the low and medium beam energy. It will be used in the superconductor accelerator popular in the future. Based on the spoke cavity, we design and calculate an accelerator

  8. Water vapor pressure calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J R; Brouillard, R G

    1985-06-01

    Accurate calculation of water vapor pressure for systems saturated with water vapor can be performed using the Goff-Gratch equation. A form of the equation that can be adapted for computer programming and for use in electronic databases is provided. PMID:4008425

  9. Languages for structural calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differences between human and computing languages are recalled. It is argued that they are to some extent structured in antagonistic ways. Languages in structural calculation, in the past, present, and future, are considered. The contribution of artificial intelligence is stressed

  10. Calendrical Calculation and Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Neil; Cowan, Richard; Samella, Katerina

    2000-01-01

    Studied the ability to name the days of the week for dates in the past and future (calendrical calculation) of 10 calendrical savants with Wechlser Adult Intelligence Scale scores from 50 to 97. Results suggest that although low intelligence does not prevent the development of this skill, the talent depends on general intelligence. (SLD)

  11. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  12. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator

    OpenAIRE

    Tina, KG; Bhadra, R.; Srinivasan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bo...

  13. Clinical reasoning as social deliberation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I will challenge the individualistic model of clinical reasoning. I will argue that sometimes clinical practice is rather machine-like, and information is called to mind and weighed, but the clinician is not just calculating how to use particular means to reach fixed ends. Often the...

  14. Advantages of mesh tallying in MCNPX for 3D dose calculations in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy deposition mesh tally option of MCNPX Monte Carlo code is very useful for 3-Dimentional (3D) dose calculations. In this study, the 3D dose calculation was done for CT-based Monte Carlo treatment planning in which the energy deposition mesh tally were superimposed on merged voxel model. The results were compared with those of obtained from the common energy deposition (*F8) tally method for all cells of non-merged voxel model. The results of these two tallies and their respective computational times are compared, and the advantages of the proposed method are discussed. For this purpose, a graphical user interface (GUI) application was developed for reading CT slice data of patient, creating voxelized model of patient, optionally merging adjacent cells with the same material to reduce the total number of cells, reading beam configuration from commercial treatment planning system transferred in DICOM-RT format, and showing the isodose distribution on the CT images. To compare the results of Monte Carlo calculated and TiGRT planning system (LinaTech LLC, USA), treatment head of the Siemens ONCOR Impression accelerator was also simulated and the phase-space data on the scoring plane just above the Y-jaws was created and used. The results for a real prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan showed that the proposed method was fivefold faster while the precision was almost the same. (author)

  15. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meetings, Conferences & Events Partnering & Donating to the NICHD Staff Directory ... Clinical Research Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Clinical research is research that directly involves a ...

  16. Assessment of the α-angle of femoral neck and morphological classification of the anterior femoral head-neck junction on CT-based images in normal Chinese adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the normal range of the femoral neck α-angle in normal Chinese adults and classify the morphology of the anterior femoral head-neck junction on CT-based images. Methods: Six hundred and fifty-two adult patients (Bilateral: 459 patients, unilateral: 193 patients) with the total of 1111 hips (552 left; 559 right, and 654 male, 457 female) without known diseases affecting the proximal femur or symptoms of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) underwent 64- slice CT scanning for medical purpose with the hip included in the scan range. The volume CT data was used for further analysis in this study. Oblique sagittal plane images paralleling to the axis of the femoral neck were reconstructed with the volume CT data, the image through the middle of the femoral neck was chosen to measure α-angle with AutoCAD2006 software. The morphology of the anterior femoral head-neck junction was classified. Analysis of variance and t-test were performed with SPSS 15.0. Results: The mean value of a-angle of all 1111 hips was 38.2°±5.3°. The normal range of α-angle in Chinese adults was 28° to 49°. The mean value of left and right α-angles were 38.0°±5.3° and 38.4°±5.3°,respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference between both sides (t=-1.231, P>0.05 ). Males have greater α- angles than females 39.2°±5.8 vs 36.8°±4.1°, with t=-8.180, P0.05). In all 1111 proximal femora, 168 were classified as concave type, accounting for 15.1%, with a mean a-angle of 31.2°±2.0°, 726 were smooth type, accounting for 65.4%, with a mean α-angle of 37.4°±2.4°, and 217 were flat type, accounting for 19.5%, with a mean a-angle of 46.4°±3.8°. The differences of the α-angles of the three groups reached statistical significance (F=1636.107, P<0.01). Conclusions: The morphology of anterior femoral head-neck junction can be classified into three types: concave type (type Ⅰ), smooth type (type Ⅱ) and fiat type (type Ⅲ). This

  17. Evaluation of the Accuracy of Smartphone Medical Calculation Apps

    OpenAIRE

    Bierbrier, Rachel; Lo, Vivian; Wu, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Background Mobile phones with operating systems and capable of running applications (smartphones) are increasingly being used in clinical settings. Medical calculating applications are popular mhealth apps for smartphones. These include, for example, apps that calculate the severity or likelihood of disease-based clinical scoring systems, such as determining the severity of liver disease, the likelihood of having a pulmonary embolism, and risk stratification in acute coronary syndrome. Howeve...

  18. Calculations in furnace technology

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Clive; Hopkins, DW; Owen, WS

    2013-01-01

    Calculations in Furnace Technology presents the theoretical and practical aspects of furnace technology. This book provides information pertinent to the development, application, and efficiency of furnace technology. Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the exothermic reactions that occur when carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur are burned to release the energy available in the fuel. This text then evaluates the efficiencies to measure the quantity of fuel used, of flue gases leaving the plant, of air entering, and the heat lost to the surroundings. Other chapters consi

  19. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the

  20. Linewidth calculations and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Strandberg, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    We are currently developing a new technique to further enhance the sensitivity of collinear laser spectroscopy in order to study the most exotic nuclides available at radioactive ion beam facilities, such as ISOLDE at CERN. The overall goal is to evaluate the feasibility of the new method. This report will focus on the determination of the expected linewidth (hence resolution) of this approach. Different effects which could lead to a broadening of the linewidth, e.g. the ions' energy spread and their trajectories inside the trap, are studied with theoretical calculations as well as simulations.

  1. Matlab numerical calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    MATLAB is a high-level language and environment for numerical computation, visualization, and programming. Using MATLAB, you can analyze data, develop algorithms, and create models and applications. The language, tools, and built-in math functions enable you to explore multiple approaches and reach a solution faster than with spreadsheets or traditional programming languages, such as C/C++ or Java. This book is designed for use as a scientific/business calculator so that you can get numerical solutions to problems involving a wide array of mathematics using MATLAB. Just look up the function y

  2. Core physics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, excerpts of the 'Core Design', 'Computational Chains' and 'Qualification of Computational Chains' lectures are presented. Nuclear reactor design basic concepts as power distribution and reactivity are defined and analyzed both from the theoretical and the computational point of view. Emphasis is put on the physical meaning and sensitivity of both 'observables' to design parameters. Computational aspects, mainly as regards the effects of the heterogeneity in space and energy in reactor calculations, are afforded too. Structure and qualification of computational code packages are discussed and a practical application to the FRAMATOME SCIENCE advanced computational chain is supplied. (author)

  3. Deep penetration calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several Monte Carlo techniques are compared in the transport of neutrons of different source energies through two different deep-penetration problems each with two parts. The first problem involves transmission through a 200-cm concrete slab. The second problem is a 900 bent pipe jacketed by concrete. In one case the pipe is void, and in the other it is filled with liquid sodium. Calculations are made with two different Los Alamos Monte Carlo codes: the continuous-energy code MCNP and the multigroup code MCMG

  4. Configuration space Faddeev calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detailed study of few-body systems provides one of the most effective means for studying nuclear physics at subnucleon distance scales. For few-body systems the model equations can be solved numerically with errors less than the experimental uncertainties. We have used such systems to investigate the size of relativistic effects, the role of meson-exchange currents, and the importance of quark degrees of freedom in the nucleus. Complete calculations for momentum-dependent potentials have been performed, and the properties of the three-body bound state for these potentials have been studied. Few-body calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron and pion have been carried out using a front-form formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics. The decomposition of the operators transforming convariantly under the Poincare group into kinematical and dynamical parts has been studies. New ways for constructing interactions between particles, as well as interactions which lead to the production of particles, have been constructed in the context of a relativistic quantum mechanics. To compute scattering amplitudes in a nonperturbative way, classes of operators have been generated out of which the phase operator may be constructed. Finally, we have worked out procedures for computing Clebsch-Gordan and Racah coefficients on a computer, as well as giving procedures for dealing with the multiplicity problem

  5. Weldon Spring dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to a request by the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) for assistance to the Department of the Army (DA) on the decommissioning of the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, the Health and Safety Research Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed limited dose assessment calculations for that site. Based upon radiological measurements from a number of soil samples analyzed by ORNL and from previously acquired radiological data for the Weldon Spring site, source terms were derived to calculate radiation doses for three specific site scenarios. These three hypothetical scenarios are: a wildlife refuge for hunting, fishing, and general outdoor recreation; a school with 40 hr per week occupancy by students and a custodian; and a truck farm producing fruits, vegetables, meat, and dairy products which may be consumed on site. Radiation doses are reported for each of these scenarios both for measured uranium daughter equilibrium ratios and for assumed secular equilibrium. Doses are lower for the nonequilibrium case

  6. Multilayer optical calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    When light hits a multilayer planar stack, it is reflected, refracted, and absorbed in a way that can be derived from the Fresnel equations. The analysis is treated in many textbooks, and implemented in many software programs, but certain aspects of it are difficult to find explicitly and consistently worked out in the literature. Here, we derive the formulas underlying the transfer-matrix method of calculating the optical properties of these stacks, including oblique-angle incidence, absorption-vs-position profiles, and ellipsometry parameters. We discuss and explain some strange consequences of the formulas in the situation where the incident and/or final (semi-infinite) medium are absorptive, such as calculating $T>1$ in the absence of gain. We also discuss some implementation details like complex-plane branch cuts. Finally, we derive modified formulas for including one or more "incoherent" layers, i.e. very thick layers in which interference can be neglected. This document was written in conjunction with ...

  7. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two

  8. Some calculations for TRISTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I took only few topics to investigate, some on which I had some personal interest, and others that I felt rather crucial for the design. In this document I report my calculations on these various subjects. Therefore this document represents my tangible contribution to TRISTAN design. I give in the following the list of the topics which are discussed in this document. 1. Increase of the vertical betatron emmitance by skew quadrupoles in the electron storage ring. 2. Bremsstrahlung. 3. Dipole correcting system for electron ring. 4. Wigglers at low energies 5. Steady state compensation of beam loading in the single beam mode in the electron storage ring. 6. Coupled bunch longitudinal instability for electron ring. 7. Ion production and trapping in the electron storage ring for TRISTAN. 8. Estimate of the longitudinal impedance for the TRISTAN electron storage ring. (author)

  9. Considerations on the calculation of volumes in two planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discrepancies in the calculation of the same volume between different planning systems impact on dose-volume histograms and therefore clinical assessment of dosimetry for patients. The transfer, by a local network, tomographic study (CT) and contours of critical organs of patients, between our two planning systems allows us to evaluate the calculation of identical volumes.

  10. Model calculations of nuclear data for biologically-important elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe calculations of neutron-induced reactions on carbon and oxygen for incident energies up to 70 MeV, the relevant clinical energy in radiation neutron therapy. Our calculations using the FKK-GNASH, GNASH, and ALICE codes are compared with experimental measurements, and their usefulness for modeling reactions on biologically-important elements is assessed

  11. How to Calculate Sample Size in Randomized Controlled Trial?

    OpenAIRE

    ZHONG, Baoliang

    2009-01-01

    To design clinical trials, efficiency, ethics, cost effectively, research duration and sample size calculations are the key things to remember. This review highlights the statistical issues to estimate the sample size requirement. It elaborates the theory, methods and steps for the sample size calculation in randomized controlled trials. It also emphasizes that researchers should consider the study design first and then choose appropriate sample size calculation method.

  12. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology. PMID:25991115

  13. The first clinical application of a "hands-on" robotic knee surgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakopec, M; Harris, S J; Rodriguez y Baena, F; Gomes, P; Cobb, J; Davies, B L

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a novel "hands-on" robotic system for total knee replacement (TKR) surgery is evaluated. An integrated robotic system for accurately machining the bone surfaces in TKR surgery is described. Details of the system, comprising an "active constraint" robot, called Acrobot, a "gross positioning" robot, and patient clamps, are provided. The intraoperative protocol and the preoperative, CT-based, planning system are also described. A number of anatomical registration and cutting trials, using plastic bones, are described, followed by results from two preliminary clinical trials, which demonstrate the accuracy achieved in the anatomical registration. Finally, the first clinical trial is described, in which the results of the anatomical registration and bone cutting are seen to be of high quality. The Acrobot system has been successfully used to accurately register and cut the knee bones in TKR surgery. This demonstrates the great potential of a "hands-on" robot for improving accuracy and increasing safety in surgery. PMID:11954064

  14. Clinical dosimetry using mosfets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of metal oxide-silicon field effect transistors (MOSFETs) as clinical dosimeters is demonstrated for a number of patients with targets at different clinical sites. Methods and Materials: Commercially available MOSFETs were characterized for energy response, angular dependency of response, and effect of accumulated dose on sensitivity and some inherent properties of MOSFETs. The doses determined both by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) and MOSFETs in clinical situation were evaluated and compared to expected doses determined by calculation. Results: It was observed that a standard calibration of 0.01 Gy/mV gave MOSFET determined doses which agreed with expected doses to within 5% at the 95% confidence limit for photon beams from 6 to 25 MV and electron beams from 5 to 14 MeV. An energy-dependent variation in response of up to 28% was observed between two orientations of a MOSFET. The MOSFET doses compared very well with the doses estimated by TLDs, and the patients tolerated MOSFETs very well. A standard deviation of 3.9% between expected dose and MOSFET determined dose was observed, while for TLDs the standard deviation was 5.1%. The advantages and disadvantages of using MOSFETs for clinical dosimetry are discussed in detail. Conclusion: It was concluded that MOSFETs can be used as clinical dosimeters and can be a good alternative to TLDs. However, they have limitations under certain clinical situations

  15. Self-Adaption Fusion Algorithm of PET/CT Based on Dual-Tree Complex Wavelet Transform%基于双树复小波变换的PET/CT自适应融合算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏兴瑜; 周涛; 陆惠玲; 王文文

    2015-01-01

    PET/CT医学图像融合对于图像分析及临床诊断具有重要的应用价值,通过融合PET/CT图像,可以丰富图像的信息量,提高信息准确度。针对PET/CT融合问题,提出了一个基于双树复小波的PET/CT自适应融合算法。对已配准的PET和CT图像进行双树复小波变换(dual-tree complex wavelet transform,DTCWT),得到低频分量和高频分量;根据低频图像集中了大部分源图像能量及决定了图像轮廓的特点,采用了自适应高斯隶属度函数的融合规则;在高频图像部分,考虑了图像相邻像素之间的相关性和模糊性问题,在第一层的高频分量上采用了高斯隶属度函数和3×3领域窗口相结合的融合规则,在第二层高频分量上采用了区域方差的融合规则。最后,为了验证算法的有效性和可行性,做了3个方面的实验,分别是该算法和其他像素级融合算法的比较实验,利用信息熵、均值、标准方差和互信息的融合效果评价实验,双树复小波变换中不同融合规则的比较实验。实验结果表明,该算法信息熵提高了7.23%,互信息提高了17.98%,说明该算法是一种有效的多模态医学影像融合方法。%PET/CT medical image fusion has very important application value for medical image analysis and diseases diagnosis. It is useful to improve the image content and accuracy by fusing PET/CT images. Aiming at PET/CT fusion problem, this paper proposes a self-adaption fusion algorithm of PET/CT based on dual-tree complex wavelet trans-form. Firstly, source PET and CT images after registration are decomposed low and high frequency sub-images using dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT). Secondly, according to the characteristics of low frequency sub-images concentrating the majority energy of the source image and determining the image contour, a fusion rule based on self-adaption Gaussian membership function is adopted in low

  16. Exoplanet Equilibrium Chemistry Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, J.; Bowman, M.; Blecic, J.

    2013-10-01

    Recently, Agundez et al. (2012, A&A 548, A73) used a chemical kinetics code to study a model HD 209458b (equilibrium temperature of 1450 K, assuming full redistribution and 0 albedo). They found that thermochemistry dominates most of the dayside, but that significant compositional gradients may exist across the dayside. We calculate equilibrium-chemistry molecular abundances for several model exoplanets, using NASA's open-source Chemical Equilibrium Abundances code (McBride and Gordon 1996). We vary the degree of radiation redistribution to the dark side, ranging from total redistribution to instantaneous reradiation. Atomically, both the solar abundance multiple and the carbon fraction vary. Planet substellar temperatures range from just above 1200 K, where photochemistry should no longer be important, to those of hot planets (3000 K). We present synthetic abundance images for the key spectroscopic molecules CO, CH4, and H2O for several hot-Jupiter model planets. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  17. Relative Hazard Calculation Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodology presented in this document was developed to provide a means of calculating the RH ratios to use in developing useful graphic illustrations. The RH equation, as presented in this methodology, is primarily a collection of key factors relevant to understanding the hazards and risks associated with projected risk management activities. The RH equation has the potential for much broader application than generating risk profiles. For example, it can be used to compare one risk management activity with another, instead of just comparing it to a fixed baseline as was done for the risk profiles. If the appropriate source term data are available, it could be used in its non-ratio form to estimate absolute values of the associated hazards. These estimated values of hazard could then be examined to help understand which risk management activities are addressing the higher hazard conditions at a site. Graphics could be generated from these absolute hazard values to compare high-hazard conditions. If the RH equation is used in this manner, care must be taken to specifically define and qualify the estimated absolute hazard values (e.g., identify which factors were considered and which ones tended to drive the hazard estimation)

  18. Parallel nearest neighbor calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trease, Harold

    We are just starting to parallelize the nearest neighbor portion of our free-Lagrange code. Our implementation of the nearest neighbor reconnection algorithm has not been parallelizable (i.e., we just flip one connection at a time). In this paper we consider what sort of nearest neighbor algorithms lend themselves to being parallelized. For example, the construction of the Voronoi mesh can be parallelized, but the construction of the Delaunay mesh (dual to the Voronoi mesh) cannot because of degenerate connections. We will show our most recent attempt to tessellate space with triangles or tetrahedrons with a new nearest neighbor construction algorithm called DAM (Dial-A-Mesh). This method has the characteristics of a parallel algorithm and produces a better tessellation of space than the Delaunay mesh. Parallel processing is becoming an everyday reality for us at Los Alamos. Our current production machines are Cray YMPs with 8 processors that can run independently or combined to work on one job. We are also exploring massive parallelism through the use of two 64K processor Connection Machines (CM2), where all the processors run in lock step mode. The effective application of 3-D computer models requires the use of parallel processing to achieve reasonable "turn around" times for our calculations.

  19. Configuration space Faddeev calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detailed study of few-body systems provides one of the most precise tools for studying the dynamics of nuclei. Our research program consists of a careful theoretical study of the nuclear few-body systems. During the past year we have completed several aspects of this program. We have continued our program of using the trinucleon system to investigate the validity of various realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials. Also, the effects of meson-exchange currents in nuclear systems have been studied. Initial calculations using the configuration-space Faddeev equations for nucleon-deuteron scattering have been completed. With modifications to treat relativistic systems, few-body methods can be applied to phenomena that are sensitive to the structure of the individual hadrons. We have completed a review of Relativistic Hamiltonian Dynamics in Nuclear and Particle Physics for Advances in Nuclear Physics. Although it is called a review, it is a large document that contains a significant amount of new research

  20. Calculation of uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important aspects in relation to the quality assurance in any analytical activity is the estimation of measurement uncertainty. There is general agreement that 'the expression of the result of a measurement is not complete without specifying its associated uncertainty'. An analytical process is the mechanism for obtaining methodological information (measurand) of a material system (population). This implies the need for the definition of the problem, the choice of methods for sampling and measurement and proper execution of these activities for obtaining information. The result of a measurement is only an approximation or estimate of the value of the measurand, which is complete only when accompanied by an estimate of the uncertainty of the analytical process. According to the 'Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology' measurement uncertainty' is the parameter associated with the result of a measurement that characterizes the dispersion of the values that could reasonably be attributed to the measurand (or magnitude). This parameter could be a standard deviation or a confidence interval. The uncertainty evaluation requires detailed look at all possible sources, but not disproportionately. We can make a good estimate of the uncertainty concentrating efforts on the largest contributions. The key steps of the process of determining the uncertainty in the measurements are: - the specification of the measurand; - identification of the sources of uncertainty - the quantification of individual components of uncertainty, - calculate the combined standard uncertainty; - report of uncertainty.

  1. Relativistic few body calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modern treatment of the nuclear few-body problem must take into account both the quark structure of baryons and mesons, which should be important at short range, and the relativistic exchange of mesons, which describes the long range, peripheral interactions. A way to model both of these aspects is described. The long range, peripheral interactions are calculated using the spectator model, a general approach in which the spectators to nucleon interactions are put on their mass-shell. Recent numerical results for a relativistic OBE model of the NN interaction, obtained by solving a relativistic equation with one-particle on mass-shell, will be presented and discussed. Two meson exchange models, one with only four mesons (π,σ,/rho/,ω) but with a 25% admixture of γ5 coupling for the pion, and a second with six mesons (π,σ,/rho/,ω,δ,/eta/) but pure γ5γ/sup μ/ pion coupling, are shown to give very good quantitative fits to the NN scattering phase shifts below 400 MeV, and also a good description of the /rvec p/ 40Ca elastic scattering observables. Applications of this model to electromagnetic interactions of the two body system, with emphasis on the determination of relativistic current operators consistent with the dynamics and the exact treatment of current conservation in the presence of phenomenological form factors, will be described. 18 refs., 8 figs

  2. Impact Cratering Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  3. The rating reliability calculator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon David J

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rating scales form an important means of gathering evaluation data. Since important decisions are often based on these evaluations, determining the reliability of rating data can be critical. Most commonly used methods of estimating reliability require a complete set of ratings i.e. every subject being rated must be rated by each judge. Over fifty years ago Ebel described an algorithm for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data. While his article has been widely cited over the years, software based on the algorithm is not readily available. This paper describes an easy-to-use Web-based utility for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data using Ebel's algorithm. Methods The program is available public use on our server and the source code is freely available under GNU General Public License. The utility is written in PHP, a common open source imbedded scripting language. The rating data can be entered in a convenient format on the user's personal computer that the program will upload to the server for calculating the reliability and other statistics describing the ratings. Results When the program is run it displays the reliability, number of subject rated, harmonic mean number of judges rating each subject, the mean and standard deviation of the averaged ratings per subject. The program also displays the mean, standard deviation and number of ratings for each subject rated. Additionally the program will estimate the reliability of an average of a number of ratings for each subject via the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula. Conclusion This simple web-based program provides a convenient means of estimating the reliability of rating data without the need to conduct special studies in order to provide complete rating data. I would welcome other researchers revising and enhancing the program.

  4. Surface retention capacity calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Vaclav; Dostal, Tomas

    2010-05-01

    Flood wave transformation in the floodplain is the phenomenon which is researched within interdisciplinary project NIVA - Water Retention in Floodplains and Possibilities of Retention Capacity Increase. The project focuses on broad range of floodplain ecosystem services and mitigation of flooding is one of them. Despite main influence on flood wave transformation is due to flow retardation, retention in surface depressions within floodplain has been analyzed to get better overview of whole transformation process. Detail digital relief model (DRM) has been used for given purposes to be able to analyze terrain depressions volumes. The model was developed with use of stereophotogrammetric evaluation of airborne images with high resolution of 10 cm. It was essential for purposes of presented analysis not to apply pit removal routines which are often used for generation of DRM for hydrological modelling purposes. First, the methodology of analysis was prepared and tested on artificial surface. This surface was created using random raster generation, filtration and resampling with final resolution of 1000 x 1000 units and height of maximum 10 units above datum. The methodology itself is based on analysis of areas inundated by water at different elevation levels. Volume is than calculated for each depression using extraction of terrain elevations under corresponding water level. The method was then applied on the area of Lužnice River floodplain section to assess retention capacity of real floodplain. The floodplain had to be cut into sections perpendicular to main river orientation for analyses as the method was tested for square shaped area without any significant inclination. Results obtained by mentioned analysis are presented in this paper. Acknowledgement Presented research was accomplished within national project NIVA - Water Retention in Floodplains and Possibilities of Retention Capacity Increase, nr. QH82078. The project is funded by Ministry of Agriculture of

  5. Clinical Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about the logic of problem solving and the production of scientific knowledge through the utilisation of clinical research perspective. Ramp-up effectiveness, productivity, efficiency and organizational excellence are topics that continue to engage research and will continue doing so...... for years to come. This paper seeks to provide insights into ramp-up management studies through providing an agenda for conducting collaborative clinical research and extend this area by proposing how clinical research could be designed and executed in the Ramp- up management setting....

  6. Paramedics’ Ability to Perform Drug Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eastwood, Kathyrn J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ability to perform drug calculations accurately is imperative to patient safety. Research into paramedics’ drug calculation abilities was first published in 2000 and for nurses’ abilities the research dates back to the late 1930s. Yet, there have been no studies investigating an undergraduate paramedic student’s ability to perform drug or basic mathematical calculations. The objective of this study was to review the literature and determine the ability of undergraduate and qualified paramedics to perform drug calculations.Methods: A search of the prehospital-related electronic databases was undertaken using the Ovid and EMBASE systems available through the Monash University Library. Databases searched included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, CINAHL, JSTOR, EMBASE and Google Scholar, from their beginning until the end of August 2009. We reviewed references from articles retrieved.Results: The electronic database search located 1,154 articles for review. Six additional articles were identified from reference lists of retrieved articles. Of these, 59 were considered relevant. After reviewing the 59 articles only three met the inclusion criteria. All articles noted some level of mathematical deficiencies amongst their subjects.Conclusions: This study identified only three articles. Results from these limited studies indicate a significant lack of mathematical proficiency amongst the paramedics sampled. A need exists to identify if undergraduate paramedic students are capable of performing the required drug calculations in a non-clinical setting.[WestJEM. 2009;10:240-243.

  7. Considering alternative calculations of weight suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumberg, Katherine; Anderson, Lisa M; Reilly, Erin E; Gorrell, Sasha; Anderson, Drew A; Earleywine, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    Weight suppression (WS)--the difference between an individual's highest adult weight and current weight-relates to eating pathology and weight gain; however, there are several methodological issues associated with its calculation. The current study presents four alternative methods of calculating WS and tests whether these methods differentially relate to maladaptive outcomes. Alternative methods of calculation included: (1) change in BMI units; (2) BMI category change; (3) percent change in weight; and (4) two different uses of regression residuals. A sample of undergraduate students (N=631) completed self-report measures of eating pathology, current and past weight, and teasing. Measures included the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire and the Perceptions of Teasing Scale. Results indicated that components of WS, current weight and highest weight, were strongly related in the present sample. The traditional method of calculating WS was related to eating pathology, binge eating and teasing for both males and females. However, WS indices orthogonal to the highest weight did not correlate with eating pathology and teasing in both males and females; for females, WS indices orthogonal to current weight were also unrelated to eating pathology. Findings suggest that the link between WS and eating pathology is mitigated after accounting for an individual's highest weight. Future research should continue to assess the reliability and clinical utility of this construct and consider using alternative WS calculations. PMID:26643591

  8. Paradigm shift in LUNG SBRT dose calculation associated with Heterogeneity correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of lung injury SBRT requires great dosimetric accuracy, the increasing clinical importance of dose calculation heterogeneities introducing algorithms that adequately model the transport of particles narrow beams in media of low density, as with Monte Carlo calculation. (Author)

  9. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue’s RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT. (paper)

  10. Calculation of multiphoton ionization processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T. N.; Poe, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    We propose an accurate and efficient procedure in the calculation of multiphoton ionization processes. In addition to the calculational advantage, this procedure also enables us to study the relative contributions of the resonant and nonresonant intermediate states.

  11. HEU benchmark calculations and LEU preliminary calculations for IRR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed neutronics calculations for the Soreq Research Reactor, IRR-1. The calculations were done for the purpose of upgrading and benchmarking our codes and methods. The codes used were mainly WIMS-D/4 for cell calculations and the three dimensional diffusion code CITATION for full core calculations. The experimental flux was obtained by gold wire activation methods and compared with our calculated flux profile. The IRR-1 is loaded with highly enriched uranium fuel assemblies, of the plate type. In the framework of preparation for conversion to low enrichment fuel, additional calculations were done assuming the presence of LEU fresh fuel. In these preliminary calculations we investigated the effect on the criticality and flux distributions of the increase of U-238 loading, and the corresponding uranium density.(author)

  12. A simple method for estimating the effective dose in dental CT. Conversion factors and calculation for a clinical low-dose protocol; Eine einfache Methode zur Abschaetzung der effektiven Dosis bei Dental-CT. Konversionsfaktoren und exemplarische Berechnung fuer ein klinisches Low-Dose-Protokoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homolka, P.; Kudler, H.; Nowotny, R. [Inst. fuer Biomedizinische Technik und Physik, Univ. Wien (Austria); Gahleitner, A. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteologie; Wien Univ. (Austria). Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde

    2001-06-01

    An easily appliable method to estimate effective dose including in its definition the high radio-sensitivity of the salivary glands from dental computed tomography is presented. Effective doses were calculated for a markedly dose reduced dental CT protocol as well as for standard settings. Data are compared with effective doses from the literature obtained with other modalities frequently used in dental care. Methods: Conversion factors based on the weighted Computed Tomography Dose Index were derived from published data to calculate effective dose values for various CT exposure settings. Results: Conversion factors determined can be used for clinically used kVp settings and prefiltrations. With reduced tube current an effective dose for a CT examination of the maxilla of 22 {mu}Sv can be achieved, which compares to values typically obtained with panoramic radiography (26 {mu}Sv). A CT scan of the mandible, respectively, gives 123 {mu}Sv comparable to a full mouth survey with intraoral films (150 {mu}Sv). Conclusion: For standard CT scan protocols of the mandible, effective doses exceed 600 {mu}Sv. Hence, low dose protocols for dental CT should be considered whenever feasable, especially for paediatric patients. If hard tissue diagnoses is performed, the potential of dose reduction is significant despite the higher image noise levels as readability is still adequate. (orig.) [German] Eine Methode, die eine einfache Bestimmung der effektiven Dosis bei Dental-CT unter Beruecksichtigung der Strahlensensitivitaet der Gl. parotis und der Gl. submandibularis - sowohl bei Standard- als auch bei dosisreduzierten Protokollen - ermoeglicht, wird beschrieben. Weiters wird die effektive Dosis eines klinisch verwendeten Low-Dose-Protokolles abgeschaetzt und mit den haeufigsten dentalradiologischen Untersuchungsverfahren verglichen. Methoden: Aus publizierten effektiven Dosen fuer Maxilla und Mandibula Scans wurden Konversionsfaktoren ermittelt, mit deren Hilfe fuer abweichende

  13. Mediastinal Hodgkin lymphomas in computertomography: exact CT-based volume assessment and approximations with simple geometric models; Mediastinale Hodgkin-Lymphone in der Computertomographie. Vergleich von exakter CT-gestuetzter Volumetrie und Volumenabschaetzung mit Hilfe einfacher geometrischer Modelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battmann, A. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlendiagnostik; Dieckmann, K.; Resch, A.; Poetter, R. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria). Universitaetsklinik Strahlentherapie und Strahlenbiologie; Battmann, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Pathologie

    2001-03-01

    Background: The importance of the size of the primary tumor in lymphomas and its size after treatment is still uncertain. Assuming a prognostic relevance, an assessment of tumor volume before and after induction of chemotherapy has been performed in the pediatric Hodgkin's disease study (HD-90). Since an exact CT-scan-based volumetric tumor assessment is time-consuming and in some centers not possible, the tumor volume is often estimated based on simple geometric approximations. Aim of this study was the development of an easy to apply and nearly exact model of volume estimation compared to CT-scan-based tumor volume measurements. Material and Methods: thirty computed tomographies (CT) of mediastinal Hodgkin lymphomas of children aged 5 to 16 years have been examined. The CT scans were digitalized using a CCD camera combined with a frame grabber. Applying the Global Lab image software, the true tumor volume was determined excluding local organs, which did not belong to the lymphoma. Subsequently, volumes were assessed using simple geometric models (block, ellipsoid, octaeder) by using the maximum diameters of the tumor. The differences between the volume of the geometric models and the true volume, based on the CT scan evaluation, were compared. Results: the maximum diameters of a tumor can be used to calculate its volume based on simple geometric models. The model 'block' overestimates the volume by 89 to 268%. The model 'ellipsoid' overestimates the volume on average by 29%. The model 'octaeder' underestimates the volume on average by 18%. A division of the block volume by 2.3 approximated the geometric closest to the true volume: the average volume was overestimated by 2% in tumors with a volume larger than 20 ml. No model was sufficient to approximate tumors with a volume of less than 20 ml. Conclusions: for the estimation of tumor volumes in mediastinal Hodgkin lumphomas exceeding 20 ml, the formula 'block /2.3&apos

  14. A comparison of carbon calculators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International attention to carbon dioxide emissions is turning to an individual's contribution, or 'carbon footprint.' Calculators that estimate an individual's CO2 emissions have become more prevalent on the internet. Even with similar inputs, however, these calculators can generate varying results, often by as much as several metric tons per annum per individual activity. This paper examines the similarities and differences among ten US-based calculators. Overall, the calculators lack consistency, especially for estimates of CO2 emissions from household electricity consumption. In addition, most calculators lack information about their methods and estimates, which impedes comparison and validation. Although carbon calculators can promote public awareness of carbon emissions from individual behavior, this paper reveals the need for improved consistency and transparency in the calculators

  15. IOL Power Calculation after Corneal Refractive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena De Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the different formulas that try to overcome the problem of calculating the intraocular lens (IOL power in patients that underwent corneal refractive surgery (CRS. Methods. A Pubmed literature search review of all published articles, on keyword associated with IOL power calculation and corneal refractive surgery, as well as the reference lists of retrieved articles, was performed. Results. A total of 33 peer reviewed articles dealing with methods that try to overcome the problem of calculating the IOL power in patients that underwent CRS were found. According to the information needed to try to overcome this problem, the methods were divided in two main categories: 18 methods were based on the knowledge of the patient clinical history and 15 methods that do not require such knowledge. The first group was further divided into five subgroups based on the parameters needed to make such calculation. Conclusion. In the light of our findings, to avoid postoperative nasty surprises, we suggest using only those methods that have shown good results in a large number of patients, possibly by averaging the results obtained with these methods.

  16. Clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is about clinical cases and the contribution of the PET - CT Fag application in the diagnosis and treatment of different types of cancer. The cases presented were: neck diseases, epidermoid carcinoma, liver damage and metastasize, lymphoma, thrombosis, colonic cancer and lung disease

  17. Invert Effective Thermal Conductivity Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivities of a repository-emplaced invert steel set and surrounding ballast material. The scope of this calculation analyzes a ballast-material thermal conductivity range of 0.10 to 0.70 W/m · K, a transverse beam spacing range of 0.75 to 1.50 meters, and beam compositions of A 516 carbon steel and plain carbon steel. Results from this calculation are intended to support calculations that identify waste package and repository thermal characteristics for Site Recommendation (SR). This calculation was developed by Waste Package Department (WPD) under Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 1, ICN 0, Calculations

  18. Global nuclear-structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revival of interest in nuclear ground-state octupole deformations that occurred in the 1980's was stimulated by observations in 1980 of particularly large deviations between calculated and experimental masses in the Ra region, in a global calculation of nuclear ground-state masses. By minimizing the total potential energy with respect to octupole shape degrees of freedom in addition to ε2 and ε4 used originally, a vastly improved agreement between calculated and experimental masses was obtained. To study the global behavior and interrelationships between other nuclear properties, we calculate nuclear ground-state masses, spins, pairing gaps and Β-decay and half-lives and compare the results to experimental qualities. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the microscopic contributions calculated in a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential

  19. Measurement and calculation of evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    Plesničar, Leja

    2015-01-01

    The thesis presents three selected methods of measurement and calculation of the evapotranspiration on research plot at Hajdrihova 28 in Ljubljana. First method is measurement by evaporation pan type A and the other two methods are empirical equations for potential evapotranspiration calculation: FAO Penman-Monteith equation and Thornthwait equation. The results obtained for all three methods are compared with each other. Calculated results according to the FAO Penman-Monteith equation wer...

  20. Calculation of Spectra of Solids:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    The Gilat-Raubenheimer method simplified to tetrahedron division is used to calculate the real and imaginary part of the dynamical response function for electrons. A frequency expansion for the real part is discussed. The Lindhard function is calculated as a test for numerical accuracy....... The conduction electron susceptibility is calculated for Gd, Tb and Dy using the RAPW energy bands by Keeton and Louks....

  1. CAVEAT calculations of shock interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAVEAT is a computer code for calculating the time-varying fluid dynamics of several adjacent materials in two or three space dimensions. Using an extended Godunov technique and adaptive meshing, the code allows for large slippage at material interfaces. To exhibit the capability for calculating strong distortions we have performed a variety of calculations describing the interaction of shocks with rigid wedges, cylinders, and spheres and deformable cylindrical, spherical, and conical shells in two space dimensions. Comparison of the results with experimental data and analytical solutions demonstrates the considerable accuracy that can be expected from calculations with this code

  2. Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Analysis of Clinical Performance Measures in the Management of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The specific aim was to determine national patterns of radiation therapy (RT) practice in patients treated for stage IB-IV (nonmetastatic) gastric cancer (GC). Methods and Materials: A national process survey of randomly selected US RT facilities was conducted which retrospectively assessed demographics, staging, geographic region, practice setting, and treatment by using on-site record review of eligible GC cases treated from 2005 to 2007. Three clinical performance measures (CPMs), (1) use of computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning; (2) use of dose volume histograms (DVHs) to evaluate RT dose to the kidneys and liver; and (3) completion of RT within the prescribed time frame; and emerging quality indicators, (i) use of intensity modulated RT (IMRT); (ii) use of image-guided tools (IGRT) other than CT for RT target delineation; and (iii) use of preoperative RT, were assessed. Results: CPMs were computed for 250 eligible patients at 45 institutions (median age, 62 years; 66% male; 60% Caucasian). Using 2000 American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria, 13% of patients were stage I, 29% were stage II, 32% were stage IIIA, 10% were stage IIIB, and 12% were stage IV. Most patients (43%) were treated at academic centers, 32% were treated at large nonacademic centers, and 25% were treated at small to medium sized facilities. Almost all patients (99.5%) underwent CT-based planning, and 75% had DVHs to evaluate normal tissue doses to the kidneys and liver. Seventy percent of patients completed RT within the prescribed time frame. IMRT and IGRT were used in 22% and 17% of patients, respectively. IGRT techniques included positron emission tomography (n=20), magnetic resonance imaging (n=1), respiratory gating and 4-dimensional CT (n=22), and on-board imaging (n=10). Nineteen percent of patients received preoperative RT. Conclusions: This analysis of radiation practice patterns for treating nonmetastatic GC indicates widespread adoption of CT-based

  3. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    members voted we calculated the median score among the nine members of the working group who completed the score. The document includes 25 recommendations regarding randomization, blocking and stratification, blinding, enhancing accuracy of patient-reported outcomes (PRO), selecting a study population and......The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct, and...... reporting of clinical trials for knee OA we initially drafted recommendations through an iterative process. Members of the working group included representatives from industry and academia. After the working group members reviewed a final draft, they scored the appropriateness for recommendations. After the...

  4. Clinical biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

  5. Calculations of effective atomic number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliman, Z. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Omladinska 14, Rijeka (Croatia); Orlic, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Omladinska 14, Rijeka (Croatia)], E-mail: norlic@ffri.hr; Jelovica, I. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Omladinska 14, Rijeka (Croatia)

    2007-09-21

    We present and discuss effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) obtained by different methods of calculations. There is no unique relation between the computed values. This observation led us to the conclusion that any Z{sub eff} is valid only for given process. We illustrate calculations for different subshells of atom Z=72 and for M3 subshell of several other atoms.

  6. Calculation of two Belyi pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Dremov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate two Belyi pairs using the properties of Mulase-Penkava differential. Details are provided including accurate construction of coordinates, variables and equations. The calculation is a part of the work which results in a catalogue arXiv:0710.2658

  7. CELSS scenario analysis: Breakeven calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    A model of the relative mass requirements of food production components in a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) based on regenerative concepts is described. Included are a discussion of model scope, structure, and example calculations. Computer programs for cultivar and breakeven calculations are also included.

  8. Shielding calculational system for plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer calculational system has been developed and assembled specifically for calculating dose rates in AEC plutonium fabrication facilities. The system consists of two computer codes and all nuclear data necessary for calculation of neutron and gamma dose rates from plutonium. The codes include the multigroup version of the Battelle Monte Carlo code for solution of general neutron and gamma shielding problems and the PUSHLD code for solution of shielding problems where low energy gamma and x-rays are important. The nuclear data consists of built in neutron and gamma yields and spectra for various plutonium compounds, an automatic calculation of age effects and all cross-sections commonly used. Experimental correlations have been performed to verify portions of the calculational system. (23 tables, 7 figs, 16 refs) (U.S.)

  9. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post

  10. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  11. Practical astronomy with your calculator

    CERN Document Server

    Duffett-Smith, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Practical Astronomy with your Calculator, first published in 1979, has enjoyed immense success. The author's clear and easy to follow routines enable you to solve a variety of practical and recreational problems in astronomy using a scientific calculator. Mathematical complexity is kept firmly in the background, leaving just the elements necessary for swiftly making calculations. The major topics are: time, coordinate systems, the Sun, the planetary system, binary stars, the Moon, and eclipses. In the third edition there are entirely new sections on generalised coordinate transformations, nutr

  12. Calculation of thermal diffuse scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Nicklow, R. M.; Katano, S.; Ishii, Y.; Child, H. R.; Smith, H. G.; Fernandez-Baca, J. A.

    We have developed a computer program to calculate the thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) intensity distribution for single-crystal specimens in a diffractometer with no energy analysis. We assumed that the phonon frequencies are approximated by those of elastic waves and that the elastic constants, density and lattice parameters of the system under study are known. The results of the calculations were compared to experimental data obtain for single crystals of Si, diamond and NiAl at the wide-angle neutron diffractometer (WAND) at the HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Excellent agreement was found between the calculations and the experimental observations.

  13. Calculation of thermal diffuse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors developed a computer program to calculate the thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) intensity distribution for single crystal specimens in a diffractometer with no energy analysis. They assumed that the phonon frequencies are approximated by those of elastic waves and that the elastic constants, density and lattice parameters of the system under study are known. The results of the calculations were compared to experimental data obtained for single crystals of Si, diamond and NiAl at the Wide Angle neutron Diffractometer at the HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Excellent agreement was found between the calculations and the experimental observations

  14. Clinical arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arndt, R.; Horns, J.W.; Gold, R.H.; Blaschke, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the method and interpretation of arthrography of the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, and temporomandibular joints. The emphasis is on orthopaedic disorders, usually of traumatic origin, which is in keeping with the application of arthrography in clinical practice. Other conditions, such as inflammatory and degenerative diseases, congenital disorders and, in the case of the hip, arthrography of reconstructive joint surgery, are included. Each chapter is devoted to one joint and provides a comprehensive discussion on the method of arthrography, including single and double contrast techniques where applicable, normal radiographic anatomy, and finally, the interpretation of the normal and the abnormal arthrogram.

  15. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy

  16. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  17. Relativistic calculations of atomic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Fricke, Burkhard

    1984-01-01

    A review of relativistic atomic structure calculations is given with a emphasis on the Multiconfigurational-Dirac-Fock method. Its problems and deficiencies are discussed together with the contributions which go beyond the Dirac-Fock procedure.

  18. Calculations of turbulent separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of incompressible turbulent separated flows is carried out by using two-equation turbulence models of the K-epsilon type. On the basis of realizability analysis, a new formulation of the eddy-viscosity is proposed which ensures the positiveness of turbulent normal stresses - a realizability condition that most existing two-equation turbulence models are unable to satisfy. The present model is applied to calculate two backward-facing step flows. Calculations with the standard K-epsilon model and a recently developed RNG-based K-epsilon model are also made for comparison. The calculations are performed with a finite-volume method. A second-order accurate differencing scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure the numerical accuracy of solutions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for both mean and turbulent quantities. The comparison shows that the present model performs quite well for separated flows.

  19. Calculation method of Tesla coil

    OpenAIRE

    Коломієць, Роман Олександрович

    2015-01-01

    Tesla coil, despite the simplicity of its design may be called one of the least studied electronic devices. The article is an attempt to bring in various experimental results of general theoretical framework, which is the basis of exact calculation method of Tesla coils. Such calculation should be the starting point to create devices based on it. In order to develop such methods were considered the general principles of designing Tesla coil, reviewed the most famous mathematical models of its...

  20. Hydraulic calculation of pressure pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhalev, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present time there is only one classic method for hydraulic calculation of pressure pipes. In it fluid flow velocity and pipeline diameter are considered as given values.The paper proposes a procedure for physical modeling and hydraulic calculation of pressure pipes, based on the theory of similarity. Methods for obtaining similarity criteria from combinations of similarity numbers were discussed. Similarity numbers and criteria and criteria equations were defined.

  1. Multifragmentation calculated with relativistic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A saturating hamiltonian is presented in a relativistically covariant formalism. The interaction is described by scalar and vector mesons, with coupling strengths adjusted to the nuclear matter. No explicit density dependence is assumed. The hamiltonian is applied in a QMD calculation to determine the fragment distribution in O + Br collision at different energies (50 - 200 MeV/u) to test the applicability of the model at low energies. The results are compared with experiment and with previous non-relativistic calculations. (orig.)

  2. The calculation of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation guidelines of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Druckbehaelter (task group for pressure vessels) have been revised with the following objective: conversion to international standards (SI), adaption to the latest state of guidelines for production and testing, revision of the contents of individual regulations. Another target of the cooperating interest groups of producers, operators, and supervisory bodies was a harmonization of the approaches for calculation with other German guidelines, in particular the Technische Regeln fuer Dampfkessel (technical regulations for steam boilers). (orig./RW)

  3. Clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of the Advancing practice series which is aimed at exploring practice issues in more depth, considering topics that are frequently encountered and facilitating the development of new insights. Elaine Uppal focuses on the importance of all midwives developing guideline writing skills to ensure that local, national and international midwifery/maternity guidelines are up to date, relevant and reflect midwifery knowledge alongside 'gold' standard evidence. The article aims to consider the development, use and critical appraisal of clinical guidelines. It will define and explain guidelines; discuss their development and dissemination; and consider issues relating to their use in practice. Techniques to critique and develop guidelines using the AGREE tool will be outlined in the form of practice challenges to be undertaken by the individual or in a group. PMID:26975126

  4. An electronic application for rapidly calculating Charlson comorbidity score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Ashesh B

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncertainty regarding comorbid illness, and ability to tolerate aggressive therapy has led to minimal enrollment of elderly cancer patients into clinical trials and often substandard treatment. Increasingly, comorbid illness scales have proven useful in identifying subgroups of elderly patients who are more likely to tolerate and benefit from aggressive therapy. Unfortunately, the use of such scales has yet to be widely integrated into either clinical practice or clinical trials research. Methods This article reviews evidence for the validity of the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI in oncology and provides a Microsoft Excel (MS Excel Macro for the rapid and accurate calculation of CCI score. The interaction of comorbidity and malignant disease and the validation of the Charlson Index in oncology are discussed. Results The CCI score is based on one year mortality data from internal medicine patients admitted to an inpatient setting and is the most widely used comorbidity index in oncology. An MS Excel Macro file was constructed for calculating the CCI score using Microsoft Visual Basic. The Macro is provided for download and dissemination. The CCI has been widely used and validated throughout the oncology literature and has demonstrated utility for most major cancers. The MS Excel CCI Macro provides a rapid method for calculating CCI score with or without age adjustments. The calculator removes difficulty in score calculation as a limitation for integration of the CCI into clinical research. The simple nature of the MS Excel CCI Macro and the CCI itself makes it ideal for integration into emerging electronic medical records systems. Conclusions The increasing elderly population and concurrent increase in oncologic disease has made understanding the interaction between age and comorbid illness on life expectancy increasingly important. The MS Excel CCI Macro provides a means of increasing the use of the CCI scale in clinical

  5. 4D-CT-based plan target volume (PTV)definition compared with conventional PTV definition using general margin in radiotherapy for lung cancer%肺癌放疗中四维CT技术与传统方法勾画靶区计划比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠潇; 李明辉; 周宗玫; 张可; 韩伟; 符贵山; 曹莹; 王绿化

    2014-01-01

    process compared with conventional PTV definition using general margin in radiotherapy of lung cancer.Methods A set of 4D-CT images and multiphase helical CT scans were obtained in 10 patients with lung cancer.The radiotherapeutic plans based on PTV determined by 4D-CT and in addition of general margin were performed,respectively.The 3D motion of the centroid of GTV and the 3D spatial motion vectors were calculated.The differences of the two kinds of PTVs,mean lung dose (MLD),V5,V10,V15,V20 of total lung,mean heart dose (MHD),V30 and V40 of heart,D99 and D95 were compared,and the correlation between them and the 3D spatial motion vector was analyzed.Results The PTV4D in eight patients were smaller than PTV with a mean reduction of (13.0 ± 8.0) % (P =0.018).In other two patients,whose respiration motion was great,PTV4D was larger than PTVconv.The mean 3D spatial motion vector of GTV centroid was (0.78 ± 0.72) cm.By using 4D-CT,the mean reduction of MLD was (8.6 ±9.9) % (P =0.037) o V5,V10,V15,V20 of total lung were decreased averagely by (7.2 ± 10.5) %,(5.5±8.9)%,(6.5 ±8.4)% and (5.7 ±7.4)%,respectively (P<0.05 for all).There was a significant positive correlation between PTV4D/PTV and the 3D spatial motion vector of the GTV centroid (P =0.008).A significant inverse correlation was found between D994D/D99 and the 3D spatial motion vector of the GTV centroid (P =0.002).Dg94D/D99,(MLD-MLD4D)/MLD total lung (V5conv-V54D)/V5,total lung (V10-V104D)/V10,(MHD-MHD4D)/MHD heart (V30-V304D)/V30 were inversely correlated with PTV4D/PTVconv (P < 0.05 for all).Conclusions 4D-CT can be used to evaluate the respiration motion of lung tumor accurately.The 4D-CT-based PTV definition and radiotherapeutic planing can reduce the volume of PTV in patients with small respiration motion,increase the intra-target dose,and decrease the dose of normal tissue sequentially.For patients with large respiration motion,especially those more than 1.5-2 cm,this method can avoid

  6. Clinical Implementation of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Thoracic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Heng; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing; Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Amy [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Sahoo, Narayan; Poenisch, Falk [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wu, Richard; Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) can improve dose conformality and better spare normal tissue over passive scattering techniques, but range uncertainties complicate its use, particularly for moving targets. We report our early experience with IMPT for thoracic malignancies in terms of motion analysis and management, plan optimization and robustness, and quality assurance. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four consecutive patients with lung/mediastinal cancers received IMPT to a median 66 Gy(relative biological equivalence [RBE]). All patients were able to undergo definitive radiation therapy. IMPT was used when the treating physician judged that IMPT conferred a dosimetric advantage; all patients had minimal tumor motion (<5 mm) and underwent individualized tumor-motion dose-uncertainty analysis and 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic (CT)-based treatment simulation and motion analysis. Plan robustness was optimized by using a worst-case scenario method. All patients had 4D CT repeated simulation during treatment. Results: IMPT produced lower mean lung dose (MLD), lung V{sub 5} and V{sub 20}, heart V{sub 40}, and esophageal V{sub 60} than did IMRT (P<.05) and lower MLD, lung V{sub 20}, and esophageal V{sub 60} than did passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) (P<.05). D{sub 5} to the gross tumor volume and clinical target volume was higher with IMPT than with intensity modulated radiation therapy or PSPT (P<.05). All cases were analyzed for beam-angle-specific motion, water-equivalent thickness, and robustness. Beam angles were chosen to minimize the effect of respiratory motion and avoid previously treated regions, and the maximum deviation from the nominal dose-volume histogram values was kept at <5% for the target dose and met the normal tissue constraints under a worst-case scenario. Patient-specific quality assurance measurements showed that a median 99% (range, 95% to 100%) of the pixels met the 3% dose/3 mm distance criteria for the

  7. Methods of core neutronic calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core neutronic calculations lead to the determination of geometry, composition, controls systems and to the core exploitation limits in agreement with the expected performances, with safety rules, technological choices and fuel management methods. Neutronic calculations object are described with physics justifications of hypothesis and approximations. A description and a definition of reactivity and power distribution are also given. A panorama of calculation methods used in the conception of fast breeder and pressure water reactors, are described with numerical aspects and general interest considerations related to the field of these methods and to the industrial options chosen. A complete industrial uses panorama of methods derived from the classical or generalized perturbation theory is followed by the qualification and the definition of the validity field of numerical codes.(A.B.). 88 refs., 6 figs

  8. Insertion device calculations with mathematica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States); Lidia, S. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The design of accelerator insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators has usually been aided by numerical modeling on digital computers, using code in high level languages like Fortran. In the present era, there are higher level programming environments like IDL{reg_sign}, MatLab{reg_sign}, and Mathematica{reg_sign} in which these calculations may be performed by writing much less code, and in which standard mathematical techniques are very easily used. The authors present a suite of standard insertion device modeling routines in Mathematica to illustrate the new techniques. These routines include a simple way to generate magnetic fields using blocks of CSEM materials, trajectory solutions from the Lorentz force equations for given magnetic fields, Bessel function calculations of radiation for wigglers and undulators and general radiation calculations for undulators.

  9. PHEBUS-FPTO Benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes a set of pre-test predictions made for the first Phebus-FP test, FPT-O. There were many different calculations, performed by various organizations and they represent the first attempt to calculate the whole experimental sequence, from bundle to containment. Quantitative agreement between the various calculations was not good but the particular models in the code responsible for disagreements were mostly identified. A consensus view was formed as to how the test would proceed. It was found that a successful execution of the test will require a different operating procedure than had been assumed here. Critical areas which require close attention are the need to devize a strategy for the power and flow in the bundle that takes account of uncertainties in the modelling and the shroud conductivity and the necessity to develop a reliable method to achieve the desired thermalhydraulic conditions in the containment

  10. Parameters calculation of shielding experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation transport methodology comparing the calculated reactions and dose rates for neutrons and gama-rays, with experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in the YAYOI reactor is evaluated. The ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system, for cross sections generation collapsed by the ANISN code were used. The transport calculations were made using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the boundary iron shield source spectrum to the reactions and dose rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The neutron and gamma ray distributions calculated on the iron shield presented reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. An experimental arrangement using the IEA-R1 reactor to determine a shielding benchmark is proposed. (Author)

  11. Canister Transfer Facility Criticality Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Monroe-Rammsy

    2000-10-13

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the criticality risk in the surface facility for design basis events (DBE) involving Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) standardized canisters (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System [CRWMS] Management and Operating Contractor [M&O] 2000a). Since some of the canisters will be stored in the surface facility before they are loaded in the waste package (WP), this calculation supports the demonstration of concept viability related to the Surface Facility environment. The scope of this calculation is limited to the consideration of three DOE SNF fuels, specifically Enrico Fermi SNF, Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA) SNF, and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF.

  12. Ab Initio Calculations of Oxosulfatovanadates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøberg, Torben; Johansen, Helge

    1996-01-01

    Restricted Hartree-Fock and multi-configurational self-consistent-field calculations together with secondorder perturbation theory have been used to study the geometry, the electron density, and the electronicspectrum of (VO2SO4)-. A bidentate sulphate attachment to vanadium was found to be stable...... with anO-V-O angle of 72.5 degrees . The calculated spectrum shows bands in reasonable agreement with anexperimental spectrum which has been attributed to (VO2SO4)-. The geometry and the electron density fortwo binuclear vanadium complexes proposed as intermediates in the vanadium catalyzed SO2...

  13. Data Acquisition and Flux Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O; Heinesch, B;

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation.......In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation....

  14. Design basis accident calculation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudden failures of the primary circuit is the design basis accident of pressurized water reactors, being liable to affect the other two barriers separating the fission products from the environment. The calculation of the thermohydraulic behavior of the core and primary circuit is at present based, for the CEA, on the RELAP 4 code. However a second-generation code, POSEIDON, is being developed by the CEA, EDF and FRAMATOME to obtain a better description of the physical phenomena and a better estimate of safety margins. Other difficult problems arise in connection with the calculation of structural stresses and the behavior of the vessel during decompression

  15. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  16. Molecular calculations with B functions

    CERN Document Server

    Steinborn, E O; Ema, I; López, R; Ramírez, G

    1998-01-01

    A program for molecular calculations with B functions is reported and its performance is analyzed. All the one- and two-center integrals, and the three-center nuclear attraction integrals are computed by direct procedures, using previously developed algorithms. The three- and four-center electron repulsion integrals are computed by means of Gaussian expansions of the B functions. A new procedure for obtaining these expansions is also reported. Some results on full molecular calculations are included to show the capabilities of the program and the quality of the B functions to represent the electronic functions in molecules.

  17. Economic aspects of clinical decision making: applications of clinical decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, V S

    1988-03-01

    Clinical decision analysis as a basic tool for decision making is described, and potential applications of decision analysis in six areas of clinical practice are identified. Clinical decision analysis is a systematic method of describing clinical problems in a quantitative fashion, identifying possible courses of action, assessing the probability and value of outcomes, and then making a calculation to select the ultimate course of action. Clinical decision analysis provides a structure for clinical decision problems, helps clarify medical controversies, and encourages decision makers to speak a common language. Applications of clinical decision analysis in the areas of diagnostic testing, patient management, product and program selection, research and education, patient preferences, and health-care-policy evaluation are described. Decision analysis offers health professionals a tool for making quantifiable, cost-effective clinical decisions, especially in terms of clinical outcomes. PMID:3285672

  18. Automatic segmentation of lung parenchyma from thoracic CT based on image resampling%基于重采样的胸部CT图像肺实质自动分割

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司广磊; 齐守良; 岳勇; Han J.W.van Triest; 康雁

    2012-01-01

    Automatic lung parenchyma segmentation is one of the most important steps in the computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of the lung. To increase segmentation speed, an algorithm based on resampling of the image data is proposed and implemented. Methods The algorithm firstly resamples and extracts a small part (1/8 ) of the original CT images data. Several steps are implemented to get preliminary segmentation with the resampled data, which include simple threshold segmentation, body region elimination, trachea extraction, removal of interior cavities, left-right lung separation and lung nodule filling. The final results are obtained after projecting the preliminary segmentation to the original dataset and morphology smoothing. The proposed algorithm is applied to 20 patients' data (2556 slices) , and the results are compared to the manual segmentations. Results The algorithm can get accurate results with an average area overlapped ratio 99. 02% to the manual segmentation by the radiologist, and works well for the abnormal cases (right-left connected, with nodules and uncompleted views) . Through resampling, the time consumption of the algorithm is shortened significantly, typically by 50%, and the processing for one slice image is less than 0. 25 s. Conclusions The proposed automatic lung parenchyma segmentation algorithm with excellent robustness and high speed, can get accurate result and satisfy the requirements of current clinical applications.%目的 胸部CT图像的肺实质自动分割是肺部疾病计算机辅助检测的重要基础.为提高分割速度,本文提出并实现了一种基于重采样的分割算法.方法 首先对数据重采样,提取部分(1/8)体数据.再基于重采样体数据,通过阈值分割、胸腔提取、气管剔除、血管填充、左右肺分离和肺壁结节填充等步骤,得到初步分割结果.然后将该结果还原到完整数据体上,形态学平滑后即完成最终分割.最后将算法应用于20

  19. Feasibility study of small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Ze-Jing; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of small animal imaging using a clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose (FDG) was evaluated. Two protocols in PET/CT system, single-mouse high-resolution mode (SHR) and multi-mouse high throughput mode (MHT) protocol were employed to investigate the ability of the scanner and also explored the performance differences between microPET and clinical PET/CT. In this study, we have found that even the clinical PET/CT scanner could not compete with the microPET scanner, especially in spatial resolution; the high-resolution CT image could advance the anatomical information to sub-millimeter level. Besides, CT-based attenuation correction can improve the image uniformity characteristics and quantification accuracy, and the large bore of a human whole-body scanner broadens the possibility of high throughput studies. Considering all the benefits, clinical PET/CT imaging might be a potential alternative for small animal study.

  20. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm2 applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield

  1. ITER Port Interspace Pressure Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL; Van Hove, Walter A [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) is equipped with 54 access ports. Each of these ports has an opening in the bioshield that communicates with a dedicated port cell. During Tokamak operation, the bioshield opening must be closed with a concrete plug to shield the radiation coming from the plasma. This port plug separates the port cell into a Port Interspace (between VV closure lid and Port Plug) on the inner side and the Port Cell on the outer side. This paper presents calculations of pressures and temperatures in the ITER (Ref. 1) Port Interspace after a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a pipe of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) with high temperature water. It is assumed that this DEGB occurs during the worst possible conditions, which are during water baking operation, with water at a temperature of 523 K (250 C) and at a pressure of 4.4 MPa. These conditions are more severe than during normal Tokamak operation, with the water at 398 K (125 C) and 2 MPa. Two computer codes are employed in these calculations: RELAP5-3D Version 4.2.1 (Ref. 2) to calculate the blowdown releases from the pipe break, and MELCOR, Version 1.8.6 (Ref. 3) to calculate the pressures and temperatures in the Port Interspace. A sensitivity study has been performed to optimize some flow areas.

  2. On calculation of photoneutron yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple analytical expression has been obtained for the photon track lengths in the region of nuclei giant resonance by summing the cross-sections of the bremsstrahlung from thin layers. The photoneutron yields from thick Cu and Pb targets calculated for verifying this expression are in a good agreement with the experimental results obtained by other authors

  3. Dead reckoning calculating without instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Doerfler, Ronald W

    1993-01-01

    No author has gone as far as Doerfler in covering methods of mental calculation beyond simple arithmetic. Even if you have no interest in competing with computers you'll learn a great deal about number theory and the art of efficient computer programming. -Martin Gardner

  4. Sparsifying preconditioner for soliton calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Ying, Lexing

    2016-06-01

    We develop a robust and efficient method for soliton calculations for nonlinear Schrödinger equations. The method is based on the recently developed sparsifying preconditioner combined with Newton's iterative method. The performance of the method is demonstrated by numerical examples of gap solitons in the context of nonlinear optics.

  5. Relativistic multiple scattering Xα calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one component relativistic theory has recently been developed and tested on isolated atoms and on molecules through the molecular scattered-wave formalism of Johnson, while its application to energy-band calculations (through a relativistic augmented-plane-wave program) has also been considered

  6. CALCULATION OF MAGNETIC OIL CLARIFIER

    OpenAIRE

    Puzik, S. O.; National Aviation University; Shevchuk, V. S.; National Aviation University; Baranivskiy, Y. O.; National Aviation University; Mykhailenko, O. O.; National Aviation University

    2013-01-01

    Technology of oil cleaning from iron-containing impurities that shows the feasibility of magnetic cleaners applying was investigated. Comparative analysis of the types of magnetic clarifier was carried out. Procedure of calculating the dimension type of oil clarifier, which makes it possible to obtain high purity grade oil, was offered.

  7. Sparsifying preconditioner for soliton calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    We develop a robust and efficient method for soliton calculations for nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equations. The method is based on the recently developed sparsifying preconditioner combined with Newton's iterative method. The performance of the method is demonstrated by numerical examples of gap solitons in the context of nonlinear optics.

  8. Sous le signe du calcul

    OpenAIRE

    Giavitto, Jean-Louis; Reichenmann, François

    2012-01-01

    Alan Turing a non seulement défini l'objet d'étude de l'informatique, le calcul, mais aussi révolutionné notre rapport aux machines. Il a fondé l'informatique comme un domaine scientifique autonome et a ouvert le chemin vers un nouveau continent à explorer et à habiter.

  9. Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This "Professional Growth & Support Spending Calculator" helps school systems quantify all current spending aimed at improving teaching effectiveness. Part I provides worksheets to analyze total investment. Part II provides a system for evaluating investments based on purpose, target group, and delivery. In this Spending Calculator…

  10. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  11. High-risk clinical target volume delineation in CT-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy - Impact of information from FIGO stage with or without systematic inclusion of 3D documentation of clinical gynecological examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegazy, Neamat [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Medical Univ. of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt); Poetter Rickard; Kirisits, Christian [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel; Federico, Mario; Sturdza, Alina; Nesvacil, Nicole [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)], e-mail: nicole.nesvacil@meduniwien.ac.at

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to improve computed tomography (CT)-based high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) delineation protocols for cervix cancer patients, in settings without any access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time of brachytherapy. Therefore the value of a systematic integration of comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) documentation of repetitive gynecological examination for CT-based HR CTV delineation protocols, in addition to information from FIGO staging, was investigated. In addition to a comparison between reference MRI contours and two different CT-based contouring methods (using complementary information from FIGO staging with or without additional 3D clinical drawings), the use of standardized uterine heights was also investigated. Material and methods: Thirty-five cervix cancer patients with CT- and MR-images and 3D clinical drawings at time of diagnosis and brachytherapy were included. HR CTV{sub stage} was based on CT information and FIGO stage. HR CTV{sub stage} {sub +3Dclin} was contoured on CT using FIGO stage and 3D clinical drawing. Standardized HR CTV heights were: 1/1, 2/3 and 1/2 of uterine height. MRI-based HR CTV was delineated independently. Resulting widths, thicknesses, heights, and volumes of HR CTV{sub stage}, HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} and MRI-based HR CTV contours were compared. Results: The overall normalized volume ratios (mean{+-}SD of CT/MRI{sub ref} volume) of HR CTV{sub stage} and HR{sub stage+3Dclin} were 2.6 ({+-}0.6) and 2.1 ({+-}0.4) for 1/1 and 2.3 ({+-}0.5) and 1.8 ({+-}0.4), for 2/3, and 1.9 ({+-}0.5) and 1.5 ({+-}0.3), for 1/2 of uterine height. The mean normalized widths were 1.5{+-}0.2 and 1.2{+-}0.2 for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin}, respectively (p < 0.05). The mean normalized heights for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} were both 1.7{+-}0.4 for 1/1 (p < 0.05.), 1.3{+-}0.3 for 2/3 (p < 0.05) and 1.1{+-}0.3 for 1/2 of uterine height. Conclusion: CT-based HR

  12. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging

  13. Verification of Calculated Skin Doses in Postmastectomy Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To verify the accuracy of calculated skin doses in helical tomotherapy for postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: In vivo thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the skin dose at multiple points in each of 14 patients throughout the course of treatment on a TomoTherapy Hi.Art II system, for a total of 420 TLD measurements. Five patients were evaluated near the location of the mastectomy scar, whereas 9 patients were evaluated throughout the treatment volume. The measured dose at each location was compared with calculations from the treatment planning system. Results: The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for the scar measurements was -1.8% ± 0.2% (standard deviation [SD], 4.3%; range, -11.1% to 10.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for measurements throughout the treatment volume was -3.0% ± 0.4% (SD, 4.7%; range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for all measurements was -2.1% ± 0.2% (standard deviation, 4.5%: range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference between measured and calculated TLD doses was statistically significant at two standard deviations of the mean, but was not clinically significant (i.e., was <5%). However, 23% of the measured TLD doses differed from the calculated TLD doses by more than 5%. Conclusions: The mean of the measured TLD doses agreed with TomoTherapy calculated TLD doses within our clinical criterion of 5%.

  14. Calculation of potassium critical temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the algorithm of the functional prediction which is based on the selforganization of nonlinear algebraic models. The calculation procedure includes the module for the recognition of the dependence type hitch allows to restrict the number of choice of the prediction functions at the each step of the model building. The characteristic property of this algorithm is bootstrap method application as the external criteria of the selforganization. The calculation module is built using APL*PLUS and the user-friendly interface is implemented using Clipper 5.01 under Windows control. When using the algorithm and the programs, the critical point of potassium has been predicted on the base of the solubility curves of liquid and steam. 9 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  15. Algorithm project weight calculation aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Г. В. Абрамова

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the process of a complex technical object design on the example of the aircraft, using information technology such as CAD/CAM/CAE-systems, presents the basic models of aircraft which are developed in the process of designing and reflect the different aspects of its structure and function. The idea of control parametric model at complex technical object design is entered, which is a set of initial data for the development of design stations and enables the optimal complex technical object control at all stages of design using modern computer technology. The paper discloses a process of weight design, which is associated with all stages of development aircraft and its production. Usage of a scheduling algorithm that allows to organize weight calculations are carried out at various stages of planning and weighing options to optimize the use of available database of formulas and methods of calculation

  16. CONTRIBUTION FOR MINING ATMOSPHERE CALCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franica Trojanović

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Humid air is an unavoidable feature of mining atmosphere, which plays a significant role in defining the climate conditions as well as permitted circumstances for normal mining work. Saturated humid air prevents heat conduction from the human body by means of evaporation. Consequently, it is of primary interest in the mining practice to establish the relative air humidity either by means of direct or indirect methods. Percentage of water in the surrounding air may be determined in various procedures including tables, diagrams or particular calculations, where each technique has its specific advantages and disadvantages. Classical calculation is done according to Sprung's formula, in which case partial steam pressure should also be taken from the steam table. The new method without the use of diagram or tables, established on the functional relation of pressure and temperature on saturated line, is presented here for the first time (the paper is published in Croatian.

  17. Consolidated fuel decay heat calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1994-06-24

    The radiological decay heat generated from all irradiated fuel presently in K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins was calculated in support of consolidated fuel storage. There are four sources of heat inflow into the fuel storage basins: (1) radiological decay heat from irradiated fuel; (2) mechanical heat from operating machinery (e.g., pumps); (3) heat flow from surroundings (mainly the ground through the concrete walls into the basin water if it is maintained below ambient); and (4) exothermic chemical reactions of uranium oxidation (although at basin temperatures this reaction rate is slow). This report details the radiological decay heat from irradiated fuel source in the K basins. Decay heat calculations using ORIGEN2 (Wittekind 1994 and Schmittroth 1993) for irradiated fuel presently (April 1994) in KE and KW Basins gave results for January 31 of each year.

  18. Calculation of Hilbert Borcherds Products

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    In Brunier and Bundschuh, “On Borcherds Products Associated with Lattices of Prime Discriminant.” Ramanujan Journal 7 (2003), 49–61, the authors use Borcherds lifts to obtain Hilbert modular forms. Another approach is to calculate Hilbert modular forms using the Jacquet--Langlands correspondence, which was implemented by Lassina Dembele in "Magma". In Mayer, "Rings of Hilbert Modular Forms for the Fields $\\Q(\\sqrt{13})$ and $\\Q(\\sqrt{17})$,'' To appear, 2009, we use Brunier and...

  19. Numerical calculation of Casimir forces

    OpenAIRE

    Kilen, Isak Ragnvald

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis a set of regularized boundary integral equation are introduced that can be used to calculate the Casimir force induced by a two dimensional scalar field. The boundary integral method is compared to the functional integral method and mode summation where possible. Comparisons are done for the case of two parallel plates, two concentric circles and two adjacent circles. The results indicate that the boundary integral method correctly predicts the geometry dependence of the C...

  20. Calculations of the Wigner angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new methods to determine Wigner's angle in special relativity are presented. The first one consists in calculating the angle between the compositions u-bar x ν-bar and ν-bar x u-bar of the two non-collinear velocities u-bar and ν-bar. In another method we introduce a generalization in the complex plane of Einstein's addition law of parallel velocities. (author)

  1. Archimedes' calculations of square roots

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, E B

    2011-01-01

    We reconsider Archimedes' evaluations of several square roots in 'Measurement of a Circle'. We show that several methods proposed over the last century or so for his evaluations fail one or more criteria of plausibility. We also provide internal evidence that he probably used an interpolation technique. The conclusions are relevant to the precise calculations by which he obtained upper and lower bounds on pi.

  2. Parallel plasma fluid turbulence calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of plasma turbulence and transport is a complex problem of critical importance for fusion-relevant plasmas. To this day, the fluid treatment of plasma dynamics is the best approach to realistic physics at the high resolution required for certain experimentally relevant calculations. Core and edge turbulence in a magnetic fusion device have been modeled using state-of-the-art, nonlinear, three-dimensional, initial-value fluid and gyrofluid codes. Parallel implementation of these models on diverse platforms--vector parallel (National Energy Research Supercomputer Center's CRAY Y-MP C90), massively parallel (Intel Paragon XP/S 35), and serial parallel (clusters of high-performance workstations using the Parallel Virtual Machine protocol)--offers a variety of paths to high resolution and significant improvements in real-time efficiency, each with its own advantages. The largest and most efficient calculations have been performed at the 200 Mword memory limit on the C90 in dedicated mode, where an overlap of 12 to 13 out of a maximum of 16 processors has been achieved with a gyrofluid model of core fluctuations. The richness of the physics captured by these calculations is commensurate with the increased resolution and efficiency and is limited only by the ingenuity brought to the analysis of the massive amounts of data generated

  3. Decay heat calculations for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of release of energy (decay heat) over an extended period of time after termination of neutron induced fission is necessary for determining the heat removal requirements when the reactor is shutdown, and for fuel storage and transport facilities as well as for accident studies. The method of decay heat estimation relies on the measurements over practical time intervals as well as on calculation for predictions over very long time intervals. Neutron cross-sections, fission yields and decay data together with operational history are the basic inputs to such. A code used to calculate decay heat would require to generate isotopic inventory that would be present at the shutdown based on operational history of the reactor and follow up the decay over an extended period of time. Aspects of decay heat estimation based on standards like ANS 5.1 and by fuel cycle analysis codes shall be discussed. A Fuel Cycle Analysis Code, ADWITA (Activation, Decay, Waste Incineration and Transmutation Analysis) which can generate inventory based on irradiation history and calculate radioactivity and decay heat for extended period of cooling, has been written. The method and data involved in Fuel Cycle Analysis Code ADWITA and some results obtained shall also be presented. (author)

  4. Calculation of groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time is one indicator of the isolation capability of the geologic system surrounding a repository. Two distinct modeling approaches exist for prediction of groundwater flow paths and travel times from the repository location to the designated accessible environment boundary. These two approaches are: (1) the deterministic approach which calculates a single value prediction of groundwater travel time based on average values for input parameters and (2) the stochastic approach which yields a distribution of possible groundwater travel times as a function of the nature and magnitude of uncertainties in the model inputs. The purposes of this report are to (1) document the theoretical (i.e., mathematical) basis used to calculate groundwater pathlines and travel times in a basalt system, (2) outline limitations and ranges of applicability of the deterministic modeling approach, and (3) explain the motivation for the use of the stochastic modeling approach currently being used to predict groundwater pathlines and travel times for the Hanford Site. Example calculations of groundwater travel times are presented to highlight and compare the differences between the deterministic and stochastic modeling approaches. 28 refs

  5. [IOL calculation for high ametropia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigis, W

    2008-11-01

    Long and short eyes are connected with high ametropia and constitute special problems for biometry and IOL calculations. Ultrasound measurements on these eyes, which often have altered geometries, are frequently more difficult than in normal eyes. This holds especially for long eyes, which significantly benefit from optical biometry. Measurement errors, IOL manufacturing tolerances and uncertainties regarding the effective lens position affect short eyes much more than normal eyes. The selection of a suitable IOL formula is of special importance for the refractive outcome. For short eyes, Holladay-2, HofferQ and Haigis are recommended, for long eyes Holladay-1, Holladay-2 and Haigis. In each case, optimized IOL constants must be used. If minus lenses for extremely long eyes are calculated with the same constants as plus lenses, a hyperopic refractive error is created, which can be avoided by a separate set of constants for minus lenses. For extremely short eyes the commonly used approximation of thinner lenses fails necessitating a thick lens calculation or raytracing. PMID:18998145

  6. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  7. Comparison between calculation methods of dose rates in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In treatments with radiations for gynecologic tumors is necessary to evaluate the quality of the results obtained by different calculation methods for the dose rates on the points of clinical interest (A, rectal, vesicle). The present work compares the results obtained by two methods. The Manual Calibration Method (MCM) tri dimensional (Vianello E., et.al. 1998), using orthogonal radiographs for each patient in treatment, and the Theraplan/T P-11 planning system (Thratonics International Limited 1990) this last one verified experimentally (Vianello et.al. 1996). The results show that MCM can be used in the physical-clinical practice with a percentile difference comparable at the computerized programs. (Author)

  8. Coregistration of Prechemotherapy PET-CT for Planning Pediatric Hodgkin's Disease Radiotherapy Significantly Diminishes Interobserver Variability of Clinical Target Volume Definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) definitions when using registered 18F-labeled deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET-CT) versus side-by-side image sets in pediatric Hodgkin's disease (HD). Methods and Materials: Prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scans performed in the treatment position were acquired from 20 children (median age, 14 years old) with HD (stages 2A to 4B) and registered with postchemotherapy planning CT scans. The patients had a median age of 14 years and stages of disease ranging between 2A and 4B. Image sets were coregistered using a semiautomatic coregistration system. The biological target volume was defined on all the coregistered images as a guide to defining the initial site of involvement and to avoid false-positive or negative results. Five radiation oncologists independently defined the CTV for all 20 patients: once using separate FDG-PET-CT images as a guide (not registered) to define CTVa and once using the registered FDG-PET-CT data to define CTVb. The total volumes were compared, as well as their coefficients of variation (COV). To assess the interobserver variability, the percentages of intersection between contours drawn by all observers for each patient were calculated for CTVa and for CTVb. Results: The registration of a prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan caused a change in the CTV for all patients. Comparing CTVa with CTVb showed that the mean CTVb increased in 14 patients (range, 0.61%-101.96%) and decreased in 6 patients (range, 2.97%-37.26%). The COV for CTVb significantly decreased for each patient; the mean COVs for CTVa and CTVb were 45% (21%-65%) and 32% (13%-57%), respectively (p = 0.0004). The percentage of intersection among all CTVbs for the five observers increased significantly by 89.77% (1.99%-256.41%) compared to that of CTVa (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: High observer variability can occur during CT-based definition of CTVs for children diagnosed with HD. Registration

  9. Classification of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: CT correlation to the clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To propose a new computed tomography (CT)-based classification system for non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which predicts patients' discharge clinical outcome and helps to prioritize appropriate patient management. Methods and materials: A 5-year, retrospective, two-centre study was carried out involving 1486 patients presenting with SAH. One hundred and ninety patients with non-aneurysmal SAH were included in the study. Initial cranial CT findings at admission were correlated with the patients' discharge outcomes measured using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). A CT-based classification system (type 1-4) was devised based on the topography of the initial haemorrhage pattern. Results: Seventy-five percent of the patients had type 1 haemorrhage and all these patients had a good clinical outcome with a discharge MRS of ≤1. Eight percent of the patients presented with type 2 haemorrhage, 62% of which were discharged with MRS of ≤1 and 12% of patients had MRS 3 or 4. Type 3 haemorrhage was found in 10%, of which 16% had good clinical outcome, but 53% had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4) and 5% were discharged with severe disability (MRS 5). Six percent of patients presented with type 4 haemorrhage of which 42% of the patients had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4), 42% had severe disability and one-sixth of the patients died. Highly significant differences were found between type 1(1a and 1b) and type 2 (p = 0.003); type 2 and type 3 (p = 0.002); type 3 and type 4 (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Haemorrhages of the type 1 category are usually benign and do not warrant an extensive battery of clinical and radiological investigations. Type 2 haemorrhages have a varying prognosis and need to be investigated and managed along similar lines as that of an aneurysmal haemorrhage with emphasis towards radiological investigation. Type 3 and type 4 haemorrhages need to be extensively investigated to find an underlying cause.

  10. Classification of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: CT correlation to the clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, S., E-mail: sanjeevnayak@hotmail.co [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary, Princes Road, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST4 7LN (United Kingdom); Kunz, A.B.; Kieslinger, K. [University Clinic of Neurology, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg (Austria); Ladurner, G.; Killer, M. [University Clinic of Neurology, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg (Austria); Neuroscience Institute, Christian Doppler Clinic, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg (Austria)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: To propose a new computed tomography (CT)-based classification system for non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which predicts patients' discharge clinical outcome and helps to prioritize appropriate patient management. Methods and materials: A 5-year, retrospective, two-centre study was carried out involving 1486 patients presenting with SAH. One hundred and ninety patients with non-aneurysmal SAH were included in the study. Initial cranial CT findings at admission were correlated with the patients' discharge outcomes measured using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). A CT-based classification system (type 1-4) was devised based on the topography of the initial haemorrhage pattern. Results: Seventy-five percent of the patients had type 1 haemorrhage and all these patients had a good clinical outcome with a discharge MRS of {<=}1. Eight percent of the patients presented with type 2 haemorrhage, 62% of which were discharged with MRS of {<=}1 and 12% of patients had MRS 3 or 4. Type 3 haemorrhage was found in 10%, of which 16% had good clinical outcome, but 53% had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4) and 5% were discharged with severe disability (MRS 5). Six percent of patients presented with type 4 haemorrhage of which 42% of the patients had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4), 42% had severe disability and one-sixth of the patients died. Highly significant differences were found between type 1(1a and 1b) and type 2 (p = 0.003); type 2 and type 3 (p = 0.002); type 3 and type 4 (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Haemorrhages of the type 1 category are usually benign and do not warrant an extensive battery of clinical and radiological investigations. Type 2 haemorrhages have a varying prognosis and need to be investigated and managed along similar lines as that of an aneurysmal haemorrhage with emphasis towards radiological investigation. Type 3 and type 4 haemorrhages need to be extensively investigated to find an underlying cause.

  11. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-09-10

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the

  12. Calculation of gas turbine characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaev, B. I.; Murashko, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    The reasons and regularities of vapor flow and turbine parameter variation depending on the total pressure drop rate π* and rotor rotation frequency n are studied, as exemplified by a two-stage compressor turbine of a power-generating gas turbine installation. The turbine characteristic is calculated in a wide range of mode parameters using the method in which analytical dependences provide high accuracy for the calculated flow output angle and different types of gas dynamic losses are determined with account of the influence of blade row geometry, blade surface roughness, angles, compressibility, Reynolds number, and flow turbulence. The method provides satisfactory agreement of results of calculation and turbine testing. In the design mode, the operation conditions for the blade rows are favorable, the flow output velocities are close to the optimal ones, the angles of incidence are small, and the flow "choking" modes (with respect to consumption) in the rows are absent. High performance and a nearly axial flow behind the turbine are obtained. Reduction of the rotor rotation frequency and variation of the pressure drop change the flow parameters, the parameters of the stages and the turbine, as well as the form of the characteristic. In particular, for decreased n, nonmonotonic variation of the second stage reactivity with increasing π* is observed. It is demonstrated that the turbine characteristic is mainly determined by the influence of the angles of incidence and the velocity at the output of the rows on the losses and the flow output angle. The account of the growing flow output angle due to the positive angle of incidence for decreased rotation frequencies results in a considerable change of the characteristic: poorer performance, redistribution of the pressure drop at the stages, and change of reactivities, growth of the turbine capacity, and change of the angle and flow velocity behind the turbine.

  13. Calculation of Thermal Scattering Kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long-standing programme at General Atomic has been the development of physical models to describe the scattering of slow neutrons from the various moderators and the numerical methods necessary for the computation of thermal neutron cross-sections and scattering kernels. This paper contains a review of the recent developments and improvements in the scattering descriptions and subsequent kernels for the moderators Be, C, H2O, D2O, CH2, H2 and D2. In particular for the moderators Be and C accurate phonon spectra, obtained by the root sampling technique, are presented along with comparisons to demonstrate how well the scattering models can predict the results of cross-section and spectral measurements. While the treatment of H2O is essentially that of Nelkin, curves of calculated and experimental neutron spectra are shown, which demonstrate that the inclusion of anisotropic effects for the molecular vibrations improve the agreement between theory and experiment. Following Butler's description of neutron scattering by D2O, a scattering kernel has been obtained which predicts quite accurately integral quantities such as neutron spectra and angular as well as total scattering cross-sections. An interesting result of the curves shown is that the inter- and intramolecular interference effects tend to cancel so that an incoherent approximation is quite adequate to calculate neutron spectra in D2O for the case of infinite media or weakly space-dependent problems. By utilizing the treatment by Lin and Koenig of the vibrational modes of infinite CH2 chains, a scattering kernel has been obtained which results in very good agreement between the predicted and experimental total cross-section and neutron spectra. Curves are presented to demonstrate this agreement between theory and experiment. Neutron spectra have been calculated for liquid hydrogen at boiling using a very accurate scattering description. These spectra are shown in the paper to be very sensitive both to

  14. Calculational Tool for Skin Contamination Dose Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R L

    2002-01-01

    Spreadsheet calculational tool was developed to automate the calculations preformed for dose assessment of skin contamination. This document reports on the design and testing of the spreadsheet calculational tool.

  15. Calculation of sound propagation in fibrous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    Calculations of attenuation and velocity of audible sound waves in glass wools are presented. The calculations use only the diameters of fibres and the mass density of glass wools as parameters. The calculations are compared with measurements....

  16. Atomic physics: computer calculations and theoretical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Drukarev, E. G.

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated, how the theoretical analysis preceding the numerical calculations helps to calculate the energy of the ground state of helium atom, and enables to avoid qualitative errors in the calculations of the characteristics of the double photoionization.

  17. The Dental Trauma Internet Calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg;

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Prediction tools are increasingly used to inform patients about the future dental health outcome. Advanced statistical methods are required to arrive at unbiased predictions based on follow-up studies. Material and Methods The Internet risk calculator at the Dental Trauma Guide...... provides prognoses for teeth with traumatic injuries based on the Copenhagen trauma database: http://www.dentaltraumaguide.org The database includes 2191 traumatized permanent teeth from 1282 patients that were treated at the dental trauma unit at the University Hospital in Copenhagen (Denmark...

  18. Three-dimensional cavity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existence of a code that solves for the resonant electromagnetic modes of oscillation in arbitrarily-shaped three-dimensional cavities opens new possibilities in rf-structure analysis and research. The URMEL-3D code, the product of a multi-year collaboration between DESY, KFA-Juelich, and Los Alamos, has been used in some exploratory studies to determine the feasibility of using a 3-D code to calculate the properties of several practical rf structures. The results are reported here for three cases: the jungle gym, two coupled cavities, and a waveguide-cavity coupling problem

  19. Optimization calculations at TR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The main objective of the optimization calculations at TR-2 is to increase the radioisotope production (Tc-99m, I-131). Irradiation time and location were optimized separately. A second objective of this study is to obtain similar activities in the irradiated samples irrespective of the irradiation positions. This study also includes the maximization of the discharge burnup levels of the HEU elements in a mixed HEU-LEU core, so both safe and economical usage of the reactor is attained. Five group structure is used for the burnup dependent cross-section libraries that are generated by EPRI-CELL code. The RABANL integral transport option of MC2-2 code was used to accurately account for the resonance self-shielding of U-238. Transport corrected effective cross sections were used for the control rod regions. The data for Mo, Tc and Te isotopes were not available in this library, so new data were generated using GGC-4 and ANISN codes. In order to have a better understanding of the neutronic interactions, especially in the epithermal energy range, 9 group structure for the cross-section libraries of all the isotopes in the core have been generated with the fore mentioned codes. 2D diffusion-depletion code GEREBUS is used for the reactivity and burnup calculations. The 9 group calculations gave higher activity values then 5 group results, but the relative variations between different core positions remained the same, as could be expected. Many new core designs and various irradiation positions have been investigated for the above mentioned purposes. The reactor core was designed as compact as possible, in order to have higher fluxes for the irradiation samples. New graphite and Be reflectors have been added to the periphery of the core to enhance the reactivity and the discharge burnup levels. The water boxes which are used for the irradiation purposes have been moved from periphery to the inside of the reactor core. These modifications have yielded higher

  20. Calculation of transonic aileron buzz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, J. L.; Bailey, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    An implicit finite-difference computer code that uses a two-layer algebraic eddy viscosity model and exact geometric specification of the airfoil has been used to simulate transonic aileron buzz. The calculated results, which were performed on both the Illiac IV parallel computer processor and the Control Data 7600 computer, are in essential agreement with the original expository wind-tunnel data taken in the Ames 16-Foot Wind Tunnel just after World War II. These results and a description of the pertinent numerical techniques are included.

  1. Rate calculation with colored noise

    CERN Document Server

    Bartsch, Thomas; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-01-01

    The usual identification of reactive trajectories for the calculation of reaction rates requires very time-consuming simulations, particularly if the environment presents memory effects. In this paper, we develop a new method that permits the identification of reactive trajectories in a system under the action of a stochastic colored driving. This method is based on the perturbative computation of the invariant structures that act as separatrices for reactivity. Furthermore, using this perturbative scheme, we have obtained a formally exact expression for the reaction rate in multidimensional systems coupled to colored noisy environments.

  2. Digital calculations of engine cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Starkman, E S; Taylor, C Fayette

    1964-01-01

    Digital Calculations of Engine Cycles is a collection of seven papers which were presented before technical meetings of the Society of Automotive Engineers during 1962 and 1963. The papers cover the spectrum of the subject of engine cycle events, ranging from an examination of composition and properties of the working fluid to simulation of the pressure-time events in the combustion chamber. The volume has been organized to present the material in a logical sequence. The first two chapters are concerned with the equilibrium states of the working fluid. These include the concentrations of var

  3. Electronics reliability calculation and design

    CERN Document Server

    Dummer, Geoffrey W A; Hiller, N

    1966-01-01

    Electronics Reliability-Calculation and Design provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of reliability. The increasing complexity of electronic equipment has made problems in designing and manufacturing a reliable product more and more difficult. Specific techniques have been developed that enable designers to integrate reliability into their products, and reliability has become a science in its own right. The book begins with a discussion of basic mathematical and statistical concepts, including arithmetic mean, frequency distribution, median and mode, scatter or dispersion of mea

  4. Perturbation calculations with Wilson loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present perturbative calculations with the Wilson loop (WL). The dimensional regularization method is used with a special attention concerning to the problem of divergences in the WL expansion in second and fourth orders, in three and four dimensions. We show that the residue in the pole, in 4d, of the fourth order graphs contribution sum is important for the charge renormalization. We compute up to second order the exact expression of the WL, in three-dimensional gauge theories with topological mass as well as its assimptotic behaviour for small and large distances. the author

  5. The "intelligence" of calendrical calculators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R L; Nettelbeck, T

    1994-09-01

    Strategies of 4 men (WAIS-R range 65 to 76) when making calendar calculations were investigated. Each subject completed a battery of standardized psychological tests. Results suggested that subjects were aware of rules and regularities associated with the calendar, including knowledge of the 14 different calendar templates, one of which describes any calendar year. Their strategies were rigidly applied and could not be modified easily, even when doing so would have facilitated performance. The involvement of practice, memory, anchor dates, eidetic imagery, and mathematical algorithms were discussed. We concluded that these savants relied heavily on memory, with little manipulation of cognitive input, as opposed to transforming stimuli. PMID:7803035

  6. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, FMIPA Institut Teknologi Bandung, Physics Buildings, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  7. Writing clinical scenarios for clinical science questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Phil Em; Mucklow, John C

    2016-04-01

    Written knowledge assessments for physicians in training typically involve multiple-choice questions that use a clinical scenario in a single-best-answer format. The Royal College of Physicians Part 1 MRCP(UK) examination includes basic sciences themes that are challenging to assess through a clinical scenario. A realistic clinical setting based on everyday clinical practice and integral to the question is the clearest demonstration that the knowledge being assessed is clinically relevant. However, without special attention to detail, the scenario in a clinical science question can appear redundant or artificial. Reading unnecessary material frustrates candidates and threatens the reputation of the assessment. In this paper we discuss why a clinical scenario is important for basic science questions and offer advice on setting realistic and plausible clinical scenarios for such questions. PMID:27037383

  8. FDG-PET/CT based response-adapted treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Vriens, Dennis; Arens, Anne I J;

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) provides robust and reproducible data for early metabolic response assessment in various malignancies. This led to the initiation of several prospective multicenter trials in malignant lymphoma and adenocarc...

  9. CT based radiography simulations for both industrial and medical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the important issues in the simulation work is proper representation of the simulated objects. The geometrical shapes of the simulated objects may range from very simple to very complicated geometries. In addition, a lot of objects come with heterogeneous material properties that need to be included into simulations. These two issues play important roles in both industrial and medical radiography simulations. CT (computed tomography) became widely available to the radiography community in the recent years. Since this technology provides two-dimensional images, CT images can be used to build models toward using in simulation work. In this work, we developed a CT image based algorithm to account for object shape complexities and heterogeneities. The resulting algorithm and absorbed energy doses in a human body part and ideal detector images obtained through the algorithm will be presented

  10. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy;

    2011-01-01

    radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology...

  11. Calculation of sound propagation in fibrous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    Calculations of attenuation and velocity of audible sound waves in glass wools are presented. The calculations use only the diameters of fibres and the mass density of glass wools as parameters. The calculations are compared with measurements.......Calculations of attenuation and velocity of audible sound waves in glass wools are presented. The calculations use only the diameters of fibres and the mass density of glass wools as parameters. The calculations are compared with measurements....

  12. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  13. Light Pipe Energy Savings Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Erin; Behringer, Ernest R.

    2009-04-01

    Dependence on fossil fuels is unsustainable and therefore a shift to renewable energy sources such as sunlight is required. Light pipes provide a way to utilize sunlight for interior lighting, and can reduce the need for fossil fuel-generated electrical energy. Because consumers considering light pipe installation may be more strongly motivated by cost considerations than by sustainability arguments, an easy means to examine the corresponding costs and benefits is needed to facilitate informed decision-making. The purpose of this American Physical Society Physics and Society Fellowship project is to create a Web-based calculator to allow users to quantify the possible cost savings for their specific light pipe application. Initial calculations show that the illumination provided by light pipes can replace electric light use during the day, and in many cases can supply greater illumination levels than those typically given by electric lighting. While the installation cost of a light pipe is significantly greater than the avoided cost of electricity over the lifetime of the light pipe at current prices, savings may be realized if electricity prices increase.

  14. Quantification of Proton Dose Calculation Accuracy in the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, Clemens, E-mail: Grassberger.Clemens@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Center for Proton Radiotherapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Daartz, Juliane; Dowdell, Stephen; Ruggieri, Thomas; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the accuracy of a clinical proton treatment planning system (TPS) as well as Monte Carlo (MC)–based dose calculation through measurements and to assess the clinical impact in a cohort of patients with tumors located in the lung. Methods and Materials: A lung phantom and ion chamber array were used to measure the dose to a plane through a tumor embedded in the lung, and to determine the distal fall-off of the proton beam. Results were compared with TPS and MC calculations. Dose distributions in 19 patients (54 fields total) were simulated using MC and compared to the TPS algorithm. Results: MC increased dose calculation accuracy in lung tissue compared with the TPS and reproduced dose measurements in the target to within ±2%. The average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target was 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients showed a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. For large tumors, MC also predicted consistently higher V5 and V10 to the normal lung, because of a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target could show large deviations, although this effect was highly patient specific. Range measurements showed that MC can reduce range uncertainty by a factor of ∼2: the average (maximum) difference to the measured range was 3.9 mm (7.5 mm) for MC and 7 mm (17 mm) for the TPS in lung tissue. Conclusion: Integration of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. In addition, the ability to confidently reduce range margins would benefit all patients by potentially lowering toxicity.

  15. Calculation of cranial nerve complication probability for acoustic neuroma radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Estimations of complications from stereotactic radiosurgery usually rely simply on dose-volume or dose-diameter isoeffect curves. Due to the sparse clinical data available, these curves have typically not considered the target location in the brain, target histology, or treatment plan conformality as parameters in the calculation. In this study, a predictive model was generated to estimate the probability of cranial neuropathies as a result of acoustic schwannoma radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: The dose-volume histogram reduction scheme was used to calculate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) from brainstem dose-volume histograms. The model's fitting parameters were optimized to provide the best fit to the observed complication data for acoustic neuroma patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the University of Florida. The calculation was then applied to the remainder of the patients in the database. Results: The best fit to our clinical data was obtained using n = 0.04, m = 0.15, and no. alphano. /no. betano. = 2.1 Gy-1. Although the fitting parameter m is relatively consistent with ranges found in the literature, both the volume parameter, n, and no. alphano. /no. betano. are much smaller than the values quoted in the literature. The fit to our clinical data indicates that brainstem, or possibly a specific portion of the brainstem, is more radiosensitive than the parameters in the literature indicate, and that there is very little volume effect; in other words, irradiation of a small fraction of the brainstem yields NTCPs that are nearly as high as those calculated for entire volume irradiation. These new fitting parameters are specific to acoustic neuroma radiosurgery, and the small volume effect that we observe may be an artifact of the fixed relationship of acoustic tumors to specific regions of the brainstem. Applying the model to our patient database, we calculate an average NTCP of 7.2% for patients who had no cranial

  16. SR 97 - Radionuclide transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Maria [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindstroem, Fredrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    An essential component of a safety assessment is to calculate radionuclide release and dose consequences for different scenarios and cases. The SKB tools for such a quantitative assessment are used to calculate the maximum releases and doses for the hypothetical repository sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg for the initial canister defect scenario and also for the glacial melting case for Aberg. The reasonable cases, i.e. all parameters take reasonable values, results in maximum biosphere doses of 5x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Aberg, 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Beberg and 1x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg for peat area. These doses lie significantly below 0.15 mSv/yr. (A dose of 0.15 mSv/yr for unit probability corresponds to the risk limit of 10{sup -5} per year for the most exposed individuals recommended in regulations.) The conclusion that the maximum risk would lie well below 10{sup -5} per year is also demonstrated by results from the probabilistic calculations, which directly assess the resulting risk by combining dose and probability estimates. The analyses indicate that the risk is 2x10{sup -5} Sv/yr for Aberg, 8x10{sup -7} Sv/yr for Beberg and 3x10{sup -8} Sv/yr for Ceberg. The analysis shows that the most important parameters in the near field are the number of defective canisters and the instant release fraction. The influence from varying one parameter never changes the doses as much as an order of magnitude. In the far field the most important uncertainties affecting release and retention are associated with permeability and connectivity of the fractures in the rock. These properties affect several parameters. Highly permeable and well connected fractures imply high groundwater fluxes and short groundwater travel times. Sparsely connected or highly variable fracture properties implies low flow wetted surface along migration paths. It should, however, be remembered that the far-field parameters have little importance if the near-field parameters take their reasonable

  17. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits Terms ... with Your Doctor Taking Medicines The information in this topic was provided by the National Library of ...

  18. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits Terms to Know Finding a Clinical ... researchers may gather information about experimental treatments, their risks, and how well they work compare existing therapies ...

  19. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Home > Health topics A-Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks ... centers across the country. The National Institutes of Health funds much of this basic research. Screening Trials ...

  20. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is a research study that involves human subjects. The purpose of ...

  1. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is a research study that involves human subjects. The purpose ...

  2. FLAG-SGH Sedov calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schofield, Sam [LLNL; Shashkov, Mikhail J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-25

    We did not run with a 'cylindrically painted region'. However, we did compute two general variants of the original problem. Refinement studies where a single zone at each level of refinement contains the entire internal energy at t=0 or A 'finite' energy source which has the same physical dimensions as that for the 91 x 46 mesh, but consisting of increasing numbers of zones with refinement. Nominal mesh resolution: 91 x 46. Other mesh resolutions: 181 x 92 and 361 x 184. Note, not identical to the original specification. To maintain symmetry for the 'fixed' energy source, the mesh resolution was adjusted slightly. FLAG Lagrange or full (Eulerian) ALE was used with various options for each simulation. Observation - for either Lagrange or ALE, point or 'fixed' source, calculations converge on density and pressure with mesh resolution, but not energy, (not vorticity either).

  3. Langage C++ et calcul scientifique

    OpenAIRE

    Saramito, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    La simulation numérique est devenue essentielle dans de nombreux domaines tels que la mécanique des fluides et des solides, la météo, l'évolution du climat, la biologie ou les semi-conducteurs. Elle permet de comprendre, de prévoir, d'accéder là où les instruments de mesures s'arrêtent. Ce livre présente des méthodes performantes du calcul scientifique : matrices creuses, résolution efficace des grands systèmes linéaires, ainsi que de nombreuses applications à la résolution par éléments fini...

  4. Exploring Clinical Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte

    Clinical overview is explored at four emergency departments (EDs) during the introduction of a new IT system to support hereof. Important aspects of clinical overview are described for the clinical practice and for the further development of the IT system.......Clinical overview is explored at four emergency departments (EDs) during the introduction of a new IT system to support hereof. Important aspects of clinical overview are described for the clinical practice and for the further development of the IT system....

  5. Future requirements. Clinical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.

    2002-01-01

    Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics......Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics...

  6. On Calculation of Amplitudes in Quantum Electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Karplyuk, Kostyantyn; Zhmudsky, Oleksandr

    2012-01-01

    A new method of calculation of amplitudes of different processes in quantum electrodynamics is proposed. The method does not use the Feynman technique of trace of product of matrices calculation. The method strongly simplifies calculation of cross sections for different processes. The effectiveness of the method is shown on the cross-section calculation of Coulomb scattering, Compton scattering and electron-positron annihilation.

  7. Numerical identification of bacteria with a hand-held calculator as an alternative to code books.

    OpenAIRE

    Schindler, J; Schindler, Z

    1982-01-01

    The Hewlett-Packard HP 41C hand-held calculator can be used for the numerical identification of bacteria. The dimensions of the identification matrix are limited to about 30 by 22; however, many groups of clinically important bacteria can be numerically identified by this method. Hand-held calculators can be used as an alternative to code books. At present, these calculators and additional tests can help solve identification problems in profiles not contained in code books.

  8. Comparison of the clinical accuracy of cervical (C2-C7) pedicle screw insertion assisted by fluoroscopy, computed tomography-based navigation, and intraoperative three-dimensional C-arm navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-jun; TIAN Wei; LIU Bo; LI Qin; HU Lin; LI Zhi-yu; YUAN Qiang; L(U) Yan-wei; SUN Yu-zhen

    2010-01-01

    -fluoroscopy and CT-based navigation systems in future clinical applications.

  9. Children and Clinical Studies: Why Clinical Studies Are Important

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites ...

  10. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health Information > Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical Trials in Vision Research Listen Clinical studies depend on ... vision research in the United States. Basics of Clinical Trials What is a clinical trial? Clinical trials are ...

  11. Calculating system reliability with SRFYDO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzinski, Jerome [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson - Cook, Christine M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klamann, Richard M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    SRFYDO is a process for estimating reliability of complex systems. Using information from all applicable sources, including full-system (flight) data, component test data, and expert (engineering) judgment, SRFYDO produces reliability estimates and predictions. It is appropriate for series systems with possibly several versions of the system which share some common components. It models reliability as a function of age and up to 2 other lifecycle (usage) covariates. Initial output from its Exploratory Data Analysis mode consists of plots and numerical summaries so that the user can check data entry and model assumptions, and help determine a final form for the system model. The System Reliability mode runs a complete reliability calculation using Bayesian methodology. This mode produces results that estimate reliability at the component, sub-system, and system level. The results include estimates of uncertainty, and can predict reliability at some not-too-distant time in the future. This paper presents an overview of the underlying statistical model for the analysis, discusses model assumptions, and demonstrates usage of SRFYDO.

  12. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2014-03-31

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  13. Benchmark calculations for EGS5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few years, EGS4 has undergone an extensive upgrade to EGS5, in particularly in the areas of low-energy electron physics, low-energy photon physics, PEGS cross section generation, and the coding from Mortran to Fortran programming. Benchmark calculations have been made to assure the accuracy, reliability and high quality of the EGS5 code system. This study reports three benchmark examples that show the successful upgrade from EGS4 to EGS5 based on the excellent agreements among EGS4, EGS5 and measurements. The first benchmark example is the 1969 Crannell Experiment to measure the three-dimensional distribution of energy deposition for 1-GeV electrons shower in water and aluminum tanks. The second example is the 1995 Compton-scattered spectra measurements for 20-40 keV, linearly polarized photon by Namito et. al., in KEK, which was a main part of the low-energy photon expansion work for both EGS4 and EGS5. The third example is the 1986 heterogeneity benchmark experiment by Shortt et. al., who used a monoenergetic 20-MeV electron beam to hit the front face of a water tank containing both air and aluminum cylinders and measured spatial depth dose distribution using a small solid-state detector. (author)

  14. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Weimin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  15. Selfconsistent calculations for hyperdeformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molique, H.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.; Luo, W.D. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France)

    1996-12-31

    Properties of the hyperdeformed nuclei in the A {approximately} 170 mass range are re-examined using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with the SOP parametrization. A comparison with the previous predictions that were based on a non-selfconsistent approach is made. The existence of the {open_quotes}hyper-deformed shell closures{close_quotes} at the proton and neutron numbers Z=70 and N=100 and their very weak dependence on the rotational frequency is suggested; the corresponding single-particle energy gaps are predicted to play a role similar to that of the Z=66 and N=86 gaps in the super-deformed nuclei of the A {approximately} 150 mass range. Selfconsistent calculations suggest also that the A {approximately} 170 hyperdeformed structures have neglegible mass asymmetry in their shapes. Very importantly for the experimental studies, both the fission barriers and the {open_quotes}inner{close_quotes} barriers (that separate the hyperdeformed structures from those with smaller deformations) are predicted to be relatively high, up to the factor of {approximately}2 higher than the corresponding ones in the {sup 152}Dy superdeformed nucleus used as a reference.

  16. Good clinical practice in clinical interventional studies

    OpenAIRE

    Pieterse, Herman; Diamant, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Good clinical practice (GCP) guidelines should always be implemented and obeyed in clinical interventional studies. In this mini-review, we will address several burning questions relating to GCP in a concise ‘frequently asked questions’ format.While compliance to current rules and regulations is our mission, we also wish to play devil’s advocate attempting to translate the rules into sizeable chunks using a high dose of common sense.Keywords: clinical interventional studies; quality; safety; ...

  17. Clinical application of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of treatments and clinical experiments with neutrons (from a medical d+T neutron generator with an output of 1012 neutrons per second) are reported and discussed. Data on RBE values are presented after single doses and multiple fractions of neutrons and 60Co-gamma rays on pulmonary metastases. The results of pilot studies on head and neck tumours, brain tumours and pelvic tumours are discussed. The accuracy of the calculated dose is tested with some in-vivo experiments during neutron irradiation of the pelvis. Estimations of RBE values for tumour control, skin damage and intestinal damage after fractionated neutron therapy are dealt with and the results obtained in treatment of sarcomas are discussed. The preliminary results are given of some clinical trials in Amsterdam. Also some data from other centres are reviewed. From these data some remarks about the future of neutron therapy are made. (Auth.)

  18. Clinical application of percutaneous nephrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value and safety of percutaneous nephrostomy(PCN) in patients with obstruction of renal uremia. Methods: X-ray or CT-guided PCN by using Seldinger's technique was performed in 65 patients (85 kidneys), among of them, 40 patients had hydronephtosis because of invading or oppression of tumors, and 25 patients with calcul would undergo pcrcutaneous nephrostolithotomy (PCNL). Results: The success rate of puncture was 95% at first attempt and 100% after regulate of puncture needle. The improvement of renal function was marked in the patients with hydronephrosis after drainage and PCNL was finished successfully in the patients with calcul, No severe complications occurred. Conclusion: PCN is a safe and effective procedure for patients with obstructive uropathy and has important role in improving of renal functiong and building access for PCNL. (authors)

  19. Paradigm shift in LUNG SBRT dose calculation associated with Heterogeneity correction; Cambio de paradigma en SBRT pulmonar asociada al calculo de dosis con correccion de heterogeneidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Pinto Monedero, M.; Marti Asensjo, J.; Alonso Iracheta, L.

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of lung injury SBRT requires great dosimetric accuracy, the increasing clinical importance of dose calculation heterogeneities introducing algorithms that adequately model the transport of particles narrow beams in media of low density, as with Monte Carlo calculation. (Author)

  20. Clinical Trial Results: A Clinical Trial Bazaar!

    OpenAIRE

    Fojo, Antonio Tito; Bates, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    The Oncologist’s Clinical Trial Results section welcomes both positive and negative results in an effort to share information, speed discovery, and inform the field. Clinical Trial Results submissions have shown how succinctly the salient features of a submission can be presented, with more in-depth information to be found online.

  1. Calculation Methods for Wallenius’ Noncentral Hypergeometric Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Agner

    2008-01-01

    conditional distribution of independent binomial variates given their sum. No reliable calculation method for Wallenius' noncentral hypergeometric distribution has hitherto been described in the literature. Several new methods for calculating probabilities from Wallenius' noncentral hypergeometric...

  2. 76 FR 71431 - Civil Penalty Calculation Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Civil Penalty Calculation Methodology AGENCY: Federal... its civil penalty methodology. Part of this evaluation includes a forthcoming explanation of the Uniform Fine Assessment (UFA) algorithm, which FMCSA currently uses for calculation of civil...

  3. Dynamics Calculation of Travel Wave Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    During the dynamics calculating of the travel tube, we must obtain the field map in the tube. The field map can be affected by not only the beam loading, but also the attenuation coefficient. The calculation of the attenuation coefficient

  4. A New Approach for Calculating Vacuum Susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗红石; 平加伦; 顾建中

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Dyson-Schwinger approach, we propose a new method for calculating vacuum susceptibilities. As an example, the vector vacuum susceptibility is calculated. A comparison with the results of the previous approaches is presented.

  5. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Quality MediPhys LLC, Denville, New Jersey 07834 (United States); New York Eye Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89169 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Physics, Elekta Inc., Norcross, Georgia 30092 (United States); Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose/EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within {approx}2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off

  6. Carbon cycle modeling calculations for the IPCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We carried out essentially all the carbon cycle modeling calculations that were required by the IPCC Working Group 1. Specifically, IPCC required two types of calculations, namely, ''inverse calculations'' (input was CO2 concentrations and the output was CO2 emissions), and the ''forward calculations'' (input was CO2 emissions and output was CO2 concentrations). In particular, we have derived carbon dioxide concentrations and/or emissions for several scenarios using our coupled climate-carbon cycle modelling system

  7. Lattice Dynamics Calculation in MGB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Present report, We have introduced a new theoretical results for MgB2 by using home design programme Lattice Dynamics. we have calculated partial and total density of states (PDOS, TDOS), infrared and Raman spectrums and specific heat capacity. Dispersion curves in different symmetry points are calculated and found that there is agreement with other calculations. Also we have tried to investigate the Boron Isotope effect on the calculated properties

  8. CORRECTED CALCULATION OF HORIZONTAL GATING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Zayatz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the course of fulfillment of work the specified calculations of horizontal gating systems for various parts produced in dispensable molds were carried out. The results of work showed that the weight removal value in gating systems fluctuates in big intervals and the specified calculation of horizontal gating systems enables to calculate precisely their weight that allows to calculate quantity of metal in metal charge.

  9. Final disposal room structural response calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finite element calculations have been performed to determine the structural response of waste-filled disposal rooms at the WIPP for a period of 10,000 years after emplacement of the waste. The calculations were performed to generate the porosity surface data for the final set of compliance calculations. The most recent reference data for the stratigraphy, waste characterization, gas generation potential, and nonlinear material response have been brought together for this final set of calculations

  10. Thermohydraulic calculation of WWER-type NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technique of thermohydraulic calculation of the WWER-type NPP in unsteady processes is described. Effective algorithm for solving hydrodynamics equations without regard for acoustic effects permitting to use enough large time integration step is given. Calculation of two-dimensional temperature fields in fuel element is considered. Method for calculating a pressurizer, steam generators and pumps is described as well

  11. Quantum Transport Calculations Using Periodic Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-01-01

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal ground state calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  12. 47 CFR 1.1623 - Probability calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Probability calculation. 1.1623 Section 1.1623 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Random Selection Procedures for Mass Media Services General Procedures § 1.1623 Probability calculation. (a) All calculations shall...

  13. 10 CFR 766.102 - Calculation methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calculation methodology. 766.102 Section 766.102 Energy... ASSESSMENT OF DOMESTIC UTILITIES Procedures for Special Assessment § 766.102 Calculation methodology. (a) Calculation of Domestic Utilities' Annual Assessment Ratio to the Fund. Domestic utilities shall be...

  14. 7 CFR 760.1106 - Payment calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment calculation. 760.1106 Section 760.1106 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... Payment calculation. (a) Preliminary, unadjusted LCP payments are calculated for a producer by...

  15. 7 CFR 1416.104 - Payment calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment calculation. 1416.104 Section 1416.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... PROGRAMS Livestock Compensation Program § 1416.104 Payment calculation. (a) LCP payments are calculated...

  16. 7 CFR 1416.504 - Payment calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment calculation. 1416.504 Section 1416.504 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... PROGRAMS Tropical Fruit Disaster Program § 1416.504 Payment calculation. (a) Payments are calculated...

  17. Three-dimensional rf structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described. 13 refs., 14 figs

  18. 40 CFR 89.207 - Credit calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Credit calculation. 89.207 Section 89... Trading Provisions § 89.207 Credit calculation. (a) Requirements for calculating NO X credits from Tier 1 engines rated at or above 37 kW. (1) For each participating engine family, emission credits (positive...

  19. Nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD REZA HEIDARI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of optimal clinical nursing education in professional skills development is undeniable. In clinical education, nursing students are often faced with problems. Recognizing nursing students’ perception on clinical education is the first step to remove the barriers of this challenge. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education. 150 nursing students were selected randomly from nursing and midwifery schools (Tehran. Data collection instrument was a researcher made questionnaire consisting of five domains: objective and curricula, instructor, feedback to student in clinical field, clinical environment, supervision and evaluation. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for each item, using SPSS, ver. 14. Chi-square test was used to compare the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education based on age, sex and the work experience. The significance level was considered 0.05. Results: Mean age of the students was 21.58±26.97 students (66% were male. 44 students (30.1% had work experience (3.58±6.48 month. Male and female students had different perceptions in domains of clinical education (p<0.05. Nursing student had different perceptions as to objectives and curricula (p=0.039, how to deal with students in the clinical environment (p=0.032, supervision, and evaluation (p<0.001 with respect to their work experience duration. The most positive responses were in clinical instructor (81.5% and the most negative ones were the clinical environment (33.66%, respectively. Conclusion: Providing an optimal clinical environment and improving the supervision and evaluation of student practice should prioritized in schools of nursing and midwifery.

  20. Children and Clinical Studies: Why Clinical Studies Are Important

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often had to ...

  1. Likelihood ratios: Clinical application in day-to-day practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh Rajul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we provide an introduction to the use of likelihood ratios in clinical ophthalmology. Likelihood ratios permit the best use of clinical test results to establish diagnoses for the individual patient. Examples and step-by-step calculations demonstrate the estimation of pretest probability, pretest odds, and calculation of posttest odds and posttest probability using likelihood ratios. The benefits and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  2. Application of the peregrine Monte Carlo dose calculation system to stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: This work describes the capability to perform Monte Carlo dose calculations for stereotactic radiosurgery within the framework of the PEREGRINE dose calculation system. A future study will use this capability to assess the clinical benefits to this technique of higher accuracy in dose calculation. Materials and Methods: PEREGRINE is a first-principles 3D Monte Carlo dose calculation system for clinical radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP) systems. By taking advantage of recent advances in low-cost computer commodity hardware, modern symmetric multiprocessor architectures and state-of-the-art Monte Carlo transport algorithms, PEREGRINE performs high-resolution (1 mm), high accuracy, Monte Carlo RTP calculations in times that are reasonable for clinical use (< 30 minutes.) The PEREGRINE source model provides a compact, accurate representation of the radiation source and the effects of beam modifiers. Our experience in implementing blocks, wedges, and static MLC ports in PEREGRINE as beam modifiers provides physics models that accurately reproduce the transmitted and scattered fluence at the patient surface. Adapting PEREGRINE to calculate stereotactic radiosurgery dose distributions requires extending the PEREGRINE source model to include stereotactic apertures and treatment arcs. The physics models used for other modifiers will accurately determine stereotactic aperture effects. We only need to provide a new geometry module to describe the physical properties of the apertures. Treatment arcs are easily implemented as a probability distribution in beam direction as a function of delivered dose. Results: A comparison of results from PEREGRINE calculations and experimental measurements made at the University of Wisconsin/Madison is presented. The distribution of direct, transmitted and scattered radiation and the resulting contributions to dose from stereotactic apertures are shown. The accuracy and calculational efficiency of the physics

  3. A slide rule for calculating the power of an intraocular lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G J; Pomerantzeff, O; Miao, T Y

    1983-01-01

    We have designed a slide rule to calculate the emmetropizing and iseikonizing power of an intraocular lens (IOL). Like the dial biometer currently used for these calculations, the slide rule is inexpensive, easy to use, simple, and a compact pocket size. It can, however, also be used to calculate postoperative refractive error, corneal power when various keratometers are used, and conversion of refractive correction at the spectacle frame to that at the cornea, or vice versa. All the calculated data are within the accuracy suitable for clinical work. PMID:6630016

  4. Two-dimensional sensitivity calculation code: SENSETWO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A SENSETWO code for the calculation of cross section sensitivities with a two-dimensional model has been developed, on the basis of first order perturbation theory. It uses forward neutron and/or gamma-ray fluxes and adjoint fluxes obtained by two-dimensional discrete ordinates code TWOTRAN-II. The data and informations of cross sections, geometry, nuclide density, response functions, etc. are transmitted to SENSETWO by the dump magnetic tape made in TWOTRAN calculations. The required input for SENSETWO calculations is thus very simple. The SENSETWO yields as printed output the cross section sensitivities for each coarse mesh zone and for each energy group, as well as the plotted output of sensitivity profiles specified by the input. A special feature of the code is that it also calculates the reaction rate with the response function used as the adjoint source in TWOTRAN adjoint calculation and the calculated forward flux from the TWOTRAN forward calculation. (author)

  5. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is a research study ... lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, keeping mentally active, or eating nutritious foods, can ...

  6. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  7. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  8. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial is to find out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will ... disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based on their phase. The ...

  9. HISTIOCYTOSIS X: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Ponomareva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Two clinical cases of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis X have been analyzed demonstrating lung and other inner organ pathology, common clinical and X-ray features but different life prognosis.

  10. HISTIOCYTOSIS X: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    E. Y. Ponomareva; A. P. Rebrov; E. E. Archangelskaja; A. A. Roshchina; R. N. Steshenko; A. S. Bukia; N. V. Dvornikova; N. N. Moskaleva

    2014-01-01

    Two clinical cases of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis X have been analyzed demonstrating lung and other inner organ pathology, common clinical and X-ray features but different life prognosis.

  11. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  12. Research Areas: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  13. Fertility Clinic Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir 2013 ART Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report [PDF - 1MB] Bookmarks and thumbnails are ...

  14. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... was provided by the National Library of Medicine Topic last reviewed: December 2013 For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is ...

  15. Evolution of Clinical Enzymology

    OpenAIRE

    Büttner, J

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of clinical enzymology is discussed in relation to the history of general enzymology and clinical chemistry. The discussion is limited to the period from 1835 (definition of catalysis by Berzelius) to 1935 (description of the optical test by Warburg). In conclusion, a general account is given of the introduction of the concept of quantitative enzyme activity determination into clinical medicine.

  16. Clinical Process Intelligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup Pedersen, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Ideally, clinical guidelines are created from evidence based medicine. Translating the narrative semi-structured article for-mat of the clinical guidelines into a computable language makes it possible to utilize this information in IT-supported clinical reasoning, and thereby bring the relevant...

  17. Clinical document architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Kai

    2003-01-01

    The Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), a standard developed by the Health Level Seven organisation (HL7), is an ANSI approved document architecture for exchange of clinical information using XML. A CDA document is comprised of a header with associated vocabularies and a body containing the structural clinical information. PMID:15061557

  18. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... topic was provided by the National Library of Medicine Topic last reviewed: December 2013 For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is a research study ...

  19. Spina Bifida Clinic Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 798,163.html Back to top Missouri Children’s Mercy Hospital & Clinics Spinal Defects Clinic (pediatric only-will ... 234-3790 or (816) 234 3005 www.childrens-mercy.org/ Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center Myelomeningocele Clinic ( ...

  20. Challenges and approaches in modern biometry and IOL calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigis, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of new intraocular lenses (IOLs), industry marketing to the public and patient expectations has warranted increased accuracy of IOL power calculations. Toric IOLs, multifocal IOLs, aspheric IOLs, phakic lenses, accommodative lenses, cases of refractive lens exchange and eyes that have undergone previous refractive surgery all require improved clinical measurements and IOL prediction formulas. Hence, measurement techniques and IOL calculation formulas are essential factors that affect the refractive outcome. Measurement with ultrasound has been the historic standard for measurement of ocular parameters for IOL calculation. However the introduction of optical biometry using partial coherence interferometry (PCI) has steadily established itself as the new standard. Additionally, modern optical instruments such as Scheimpflug cameras and optical coherence tomographers are being used to determine corneal power that was normally the purview of manual keratometry and topography. A number of methods are available to determine the IOL power including the empirical, analytical, numerical or combined methods. Ray tracing techniques or paraxial approximation by matrix methods or classical analytical 'IOL formulas' are actively used in for the prediction of IOL power. There is no universal formula for all cases - phakic and pseudophakic cases require different approaches, as do short eyes, long eyes, astigmatic eyes or post-refractive surgery eyes. Invariably, IOLs are characterized by different methods and lens constants, which require individual optimization. This review describes the current methods for biometry and IOL calculation. PMID:23960962

  1. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis. PMID

  2. Proprioceptive deficits after ACL injury: are they clinically relevant?

    OpenAIRE

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Lephart, Scott M.; Engebretsen, Lars; Ageberg, Eva; Engelhardt, Martin; Arnold, Markus P; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Egbert; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish the clinical relevance of proprioceptive deficits reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Material and methods A literature search was done in electronic databases from January 1990 to June 2009. Inclusion criteria for studies were ACL deficient (ACL-D) and ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) articles written in English, Dutch or German and calculation of correlation(s) between proprioception tests and clinical outcome measures. Clinical outcome measures were mus...

  3. Comparison of estimates and calculations of risk of coronary heart disease by doctors and nurses using different calculation tools in general practice: cross sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McManus, R.J.; Mant, J.; Meulendijks, C.F.M.; Salter, R.A.; Pattison, H.M.; Roalfe, A.K.; Hobbs, F.D.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of using different risk calculation tools on how general practitioners and practice nurses evaluate the risk of coronary heart disease with clinical data routinely available in patients' records. DESIGN: Subjective estimates of the risk of coronary heart disease and r

  4. Microscopic Calculations of 240Pu Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2007-09-11

    Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations have been performed with the Gogny finite-range effective interaction for {sup 240}Pu out to scission, using a new code developed at LLNL. A first set of calculations was performed with constrained quadrupole moment along the path of most probable fission, assuming axial symmetry but allowing for the spontaneous breaking of reflection symmetry of the nucleus. At a quadrupole moment of 345 b, the nucleus was found to spontaneously scission into two fragments. A second set of calculations, with all nuclear moments up to hexadecapole constrained, was performed to approach the scission configuration in a controlled manner. Calculated energies, moments, and representative plots of the total nuclear density are shown. The present calculations serve as a proof-of-principle, a blueprint, and starting-point solutions for a planned series of more comprehensive calculations to map out a large set of scission configurations, and the associated fission-fragment properties.

  5. Argosy 4 - A programme for lattice calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a detailed description of the methods of calculation used in the Argosy 4 computer programme, and of the input requirements and printed results produced by the programme. An outline of the physics of the Argosy method is given. Section 2 describes the lattice calculation, including the burn up calculation, section 3 describes the control rod calculation and section 4 the reflector calculation. In these sections the detailed equations solved by the programme are given. In section 5 input requirements are given, and in section 6 the printed output obtained from an Argosy calculation is described. In section 7 are noted the principal differences between Argosy 4 and earlier versions of the Argosy programme

  6. Methodology of shielding calculation for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology of calculation that coupling a serie of computer codes in a net that make the possibility to calculate the radiation, neutron and gamma transport, is described, for deep penetration problems, typical of nuclear reactor shielding. This net of calculation begining with the generation of constant multigroups, for neutrons and gamma, by the AMPX system, coupled to ENDF/B-IV data library, the transport calculation of these radiations by ANISN, DOT 3.5 and Morse computer codes, up to the calculation of absorbed doses and/or equivalents buy SPACETRAN code. As examples of the calculation method, results from benchmark n0 6 of Shielding Benchmark Problems - ORNL - RSIC - 25, namely Neutron and Secondary Gamma Ray fluence transmitted through a Slab of Borated Polyethylene, are presented. (Author)

  7. GPU-based calculations in digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal, R.; Acebal, P.; Blaya, S.; Carretero, L.; Fimia, A.; Serrano, F.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we are going to apply GPU (Graphical Processing Units) with CUDA environment for scientific calculations, concretely high cost computations on the field of digital holography. For this, we have studied three typical problems in digital holography such as Fourier transforms, Fresnel reconstruction of the hologram and the calculation of vectorial diffraction integral. In all cases the runtime at different image size and the corresponding accuracy were compared to the obtained by traditional calculation systems. The programs have been carried out on a computer with a graphic card of last generation, Nvidia GTX 680, which is optimized for integer calculations. As a result a large reduction of runtime has been obtained which allows a significant improvement. Concretely, 15 fold shorter times for Fresnel approximation calculations and 600 times for the vectorial diffraction integral. These initial results, open the possibility for applying such kind of calculations in real time digital holography.

  8. Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements

    OpenAIRE

    X. H. Zhong; Li, L.; Ning, P. Z.

    2004-01-01

    The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

  9. Reactor calculation benchmark PCA blind test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Further improvement in calculational procedures or a combination of calculations and measurements is necessary to attain 10 to 15% (1 sigma) accuracy for neutron exposure parameters (flux greater than 0.1 MeV, flux greater than 1.0 MeV, and dpa). The calculational modeling of power reactors should be benchmarked in an actual LWR plant to provide final uncertainty estimates for end-of-life predictions and limitations for plant operations. 26 references, 14 figures, 6 tables

  10. Comparison of methods for calculating water erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Svobodová, Pavlína

    2011-01-01

    Bachelor thesis presents a comparison of methods for calculating water erosion. The aim is to summarize available evidence concerning the problems of water erosion. There are presented some methods how to calculate average annual erosion of soils, and selected models for calculating the erosion immediately. There are also listed possible erosion control measures through which we can at least slow the effects of erosion, rather than stop completely.

  11. Handbook for the calculation of reactor protections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note constitutes the first edition of a Handbook for the calculation of reactor protections. This handbook makes it possible to calculate simply the different neutron and gamma fluxes and consequently, to fix the minimum quantities of materials necessary under general safety conditions both for the personnel and for the installations. It contains a certain amount of nuclear data, calculation methods, and constants corresponding to the present state of our knowledge. (authors)

  12. First principles phonon calculations in materials science

    OpenAIRE

    Togo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Phonon plays essential roles in dynamical behaviors and thermal properties, which are central topics in fundamental issues of materials science. The importance of first principles phonon calculations cannot be overly emphasized. Phonopy is an open source code for such calculations launched by the present authors, which has been world-widely used. Here we demonstrate phonon properties with fundamental equations and show examples how the phonon calculations are applied in materials science.

  13. Dynamic calculations of pressurized water reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model is briefly described for the calculation of oscillations in the WWER-440 reactor internals. The model was developed for improved safety of the type of reactors. It allows calculating vibrations resistance of reactor components, mainly during accidents, such as loss of coolant accidents. Some results are given of the calculation of forces acting in the rupture of the reactor inlet and outlet pipes. (Z.M.)

  14. How to Calculate Sample Size and Why

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeehyoung; Seo, Bong Soo

    2013-01-01

    Why Calculating the sample size is essential to reduce the cost of a study and to prove the hypothesis effectively. How Referring to pilot studies and previous research studies, we can choose a proper hypothesis and simplify the studies by using a website or Microsoft Excel sheet that contains formulas for calculating sample size in the beginning stage of the study. More There are numerous formulas for calculating the sample size for complicated statistics and studies, but most studies can us...

  15. Benchmark calculations on simple reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of some calculation methods is described. Tests of these and other methods on benchmark problems are reported. The following items are treated: 1) Criticality of spheres and slabs for monoenergetic neutrons with Carlviks method. 2) High precision S sub (n) calculations on critical slabs. 3) Comparison of angular quadrature methods in S sub (n) calculations. 4) Tests of a standard ANISN program. 5) Presence of complex time eigenvalues in a fundamental problem. (Author)

  16. Large scale calculations for hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The talk reviews some recent Monte Carlo calculations for Quantum Chromodynamics, performed on Euclidean lattices of rather large extent. Purpose of the calculations is to provide accurate determinations of quantities, such as interquark potentials or mass eigenvalues, which are relevant for hadronic spectroscopy. Results obtained in quenched QCD on 163 x 32 lattices are illustrated, and a discussion of computational resources and techniques required for the calculations is presented. 18 refs.,3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Calculation of plasma characteristics of the sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Abbas Bari; Zhong Jia-Yong; Chen Miu; Zhao Jing; Zhang Jie

    2006-01-01

    The ionization level and free electron density of most abundant elements (C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, S, and Fe) in the sun are calculated from the centre of the sun to the surface of the photosphere. The model and computations are made under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The Saha equation has been used to calculate the ionization level of elements and the electron density. Temperature values for calculations along the solar radius are taken from referebces.

  18. Evaluating Energy Sector Investments: Calculating Volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson de Oliveira Pamplona

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A major task in assessing risks of investment projects is defining the approach to calculating the project’s volatility. Looking at assorted estimation techniques, this paper calculates their volatilities. The techniques originate from authors in the area and involve project-specific variables of uncertainty. These techniques are applied to a case of electricity distribution through real options. Results are then compared. The difference between the calculated volatilities was low, leaving, in the case of the project evaluated here, the decision unchanged. The paper’s contribution consists of providing a detailed presentation of calculating volatility by the methods cited and by comparing the results obtained by its application.

  19. Pile Load Capacity – Calculation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrana Bogumił

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is a review of the current problems of the foundation pile capacity calculations. The article considers the main principles of pile capacity calculations presented in Eurocode 7 and other methods with adequate explanations. Two main methods are presented: α – method used to calculate the short-term load capacity of piles in cohesive soils and β – method used to calculate the long-term load capacity of piles in both cohesive and cohesionless soils. Moreover, methods based on cone CPTu result are presented as well as the pile capacity problem based on static tests.

  20. Surface Tension Calculation of Undercooled Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the Butler equation and extrapolated thermodynamic data of undercooled alloys from those of liquid stable alloys, a method for surface tension calculation of undercooled alloys is proposed. The surface tensions of liquid stable and undercooled Ni-Cu (xNi=0.42) and Ni-Fe (xNi=0.3 and 0.7) alloys are calculated using STCBE (Surface Tension Calculation based on Butler Equation) program. The agreement between calculated values and experimental data is good enough, and the temperature dependence of the surface tension can be reasonable down to 150-200 K under the liquid temperature of the alloys.