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Sample records for clinical biomechanics university

  1. Clinical applications of biomechanics cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, A S

    1986-10-01

    Biomechanics cinematography is the analysis of movement of living organisms through the use of cameras, image projection systems, electronic digitizers, and computers. This article is a comparison of cinematographic systems and details practical uses of the modality in research and education. PMID:2946390

  2. The Undergraduate Biomechanics Experience at Iowa State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter R.

    This paper discusses the objectives of a program in biomechanics--the analysis of sports skills and movement--and the evolution of the biomechanics program at Iowa State University. The primary objective of such a course is to provide the student with the basic tools necessary for adequate analysis of human movement, with special emphasis upon…

  3. Weightbath hydrotraction treatment: application, biomechanics, and clinical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márta Kurutz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Márta Kurutz1, Tamás Bender21Department of Structural Mechanics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary; 2Department of Physical Medicine, Polyclinic and Hospital of the Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God, Budapest, Medical University of Szeged, HungaryBackground and purpose: Weightbath hydrotraction treatment (WHT is a simple noninvasive effective method of hydro- or balneotherapy to stretch the spine or lower limbs, applied successfully in hospitals and health resort sanitaria in Hungary for more than fifty years. This study aims to introduce WHT with its biomechanical and clinical effects. History, development, equipment, modes of application, biomechanics, spinal traction forces and elongations, indications and contraindications of WHT are precented.Subjects and methods: The calculation of traction forces acting along the spinal column during the treatment is described together with the mode of suspension and the position of extra weight loads applied. The biomechanics of the treatment are completed by in vivo measured elongations of lumbar segments using a special underwater ultrasound measuring method. The clinical effects, indications, and contraindications of the treatment are also presented.Results: In the underwater cervical suspension of a human body, approximately 25 N stretching load occurs in the cervical spine, and about 11 N occurs in the lumbar spine. By applying extra weights, the above tensile forces along the spinal column can be increased. Thus, the traction effect can be controlled by applying such loads during the treatment. Elongations of segments L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5–S1 were measured during the usual WHT of patients suspended cervically in water for 20 minutes, loaded by 20–20 N lead weights on the ankles. The mean initial elastic elongations of spinal segments were about 0.8 mm for patients aged under 40 years, 0.5 mm between 40–60 years, and 0.2 mm for patients over 60 years. The mean

  4. Using Clinical Gait Case Studies to Enhance Learning in Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Clinical case studies facilitate the development of clinical reasoning strategies through knowledge and integration of the basic sciences. Case studies have been shown to be more effective in developing problem-solving abilities than the traditional lecture format. To enhance the learning experiences of students in biomechanics, clinical case…

  5. Musculoskeletal demands on flamenco dancers: a clinical and biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejjani, F J; Halpern, N; Pio, A; Dominguez, R; Voloshin, A; Frankel, V H

    1988-04-01

    The flamenco dancer acts on the floor like a drummer. The percussive footwork and vibration patterns created during dancing impose unusual demands on the musculoskeletal system. This study investigated the clinical and biomechanical aspects of this task. Using the electrodynogram and skin-mounted accelerometers, foot pressures as well as hip and knee vibrations were recorded in 10 female dancers after a thorough clinical evaluation. A health questionnaire was also distributed to 29 dancers. Foot pressures and acceleration data reveal the percussive nature of the dance. Some clinical findings, like calluses, are related to pressure distribution. Urogenital disorders, as well as back and neck pain, may be related to the vibrations generated by the flamenco dance form. The hip joint seems to absorb most of the impacts. "Vibration-pressure" diagrams are suggested as a useful tool for evaluating a dancer's biomechanical behavior, as well as the effect of floors and footwear on this behavior. PMID:3366430

  6. Mystery of alar ligament rupture: Value of MRI in whiplash injuries - biomechanical, anatomical and clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Whiplash injury of the cervical spine is a frequent issue in medical expertise and causes enormous consequential costs for motor insurance companies. Some authors accuse posttraumatic changes of alar ligaments to be causative for consequential disturbances. Materials and methods: Review of recent studies on biomechanics, anatomical and clinical MR imaging. Results: Biomechanical experiments can not induce according injuries of alar ligaments. Although MRI provides excellent visualization of alar ligaments, the range of normal variants is high. (orig.)

  7. Biomechanics and clinical implications of complete edentulous state

    OpenAIRE

    Lalit Kumar, MDS

    2014-01-01

    The edentulous state represents a compromise in the integrity of the masticatory system. It is frequently accompanied by adverse functional and esthetic sequelae, which are varyingly perceived by the affected patient. Perceptions of the edentulous state may range from feelings of inconvenience to feelings of severe handicap because many regard total loss of teeth as equivalent to the loss of a body part. Consequently, the required treatment addresses a range of biomechanical problems that inv...

  8. Structural and biomechanical aspects of equine sacroiliac joint function and their relationship to clinical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, L M; Jeffcott, L B; Jasiewicz, J; McGowan, C M

    2008-06-01

    Pain originating from the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) in horses has long been associated with poor performance, yet specific diagnosis of sacroiliac dysfunction (SID) has been difficult to achieve. Clinical presentation of SID appears to fall into two categories. The first, presenting as pain and poor performance, is responsive to local analgesia of periarticular structures with poorly defined pathology. The second presents primarily as poor performance with bony pathological changes as a result of chronic instability. Diagnostic tests based on biomechanics as well as manual provocation for SIJ pain have formed the basis of tests currently used to diagnose SIJ dysfunction in humans. This review summarises the anatomy and biomechanics of the equine SIJ and current biomechanical, innervation and motor control concepts in human SID. The relationship between abnormal SIJ motion and altered neuromotor control with clinical disease of the equine SIJ are discussed. Future utilisation of these principles to develop new diagnostic and management tools for the equine SID is promising. PMID:17493851

  9. Clinical anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle in dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; McEwan, Islay M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2008-01-01

    The ankle is an important joint to understand in the context of dance because it is the connection between the leg and the foot that establishes lower extremity stability. Its function coordinates with the leg and foot and, thus, it is crucial to the dancer's ability to perform. Furthermore, the ankle is one of the most commonly injured body regions in dance. An understanding of ankle anatomy and biomechanics is not only important for healthcare providers working with dancers, but for dance scientists, dance instructors, and dancers themselves. The bony architecture, the soft tissue restraints, and the locomotive structures all integrate to allow the athletic artistry of dance. Yet, there is still much research to be carried out in order to more completely understand the ankle of the dancer. PMID:19618582

  10. Internal fixation on the lower cervical spine – biomechanics and clinical practice of procedures and implants

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Chr.; Arand, M.; Nothwang, J.

    2001-01-01

    The decision to opt for a particular internal fixation procedure of a traumatized unstable lower cervical spine should be based on analysis and implementation of scientific and clinical data on the biomechanics of the intact, the unstable and the implant-fixed spine. The following recommendations for surgical stabilization of the lower cervical spine seem, therefore, to be justified. Firstly, the surgical procedure should be to bring about decompression, realignment, and stability. Secondly, ...

  11. Traumatic Extensor Tendon Injuries to the Hand: Clinical Anatomy, Biomechanics, and Surgical Procedure Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colzani, Giulia; Tos, Pierluigi; Battiston, Bruno; Merolla, Giovanni; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Artiaco, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The extensor apparatus is a complex muscle-tendon system that requires integrity or optimal reconstruction to preserve hand function. Anatomical knowledge and the understanding of physiopathology of extensor tendons are essential for an accurate diagnosis of extensor tendon injuries (ETIs) of the hand and wrist, because these lesions are complex and commonly observed in clinical practice. A careful clinical history and assessment still remain the first step for the diagnosis, followed by US and MR to confirm the suspect of ETI or to investigate some doubtful conditions and rule out associate lesions. During last decades the evolution of surgical techniques and rehabilitative treatment protocol led to gradual improvement in clinical results of ETI treatment and surgical repair. Injury classification into anatomical zones and the evaluation of the characteristics of the lesions are considered key points to select the appropriate treatment for ETI. Both conservative and surgical management can be indicated in ETI, depending on the anatomical zone and on the characteristics of the injuries. As a general rule, an attempt of conservative treatment should be performed when the lesion is expected to have favorable result with nonoperative procedure. Many surgical techniques have been proposed over the time and with favorable results if the tendon injury is not underestimated and adequately treated. Despite recent research findings, a lack of evidence-based knowledge is still observed in surgical treatment and postoperative management of ETI. Further clinical and biomechanical investigations would be advisable to clarify this complex issue. PMID:27616821

  12. Clinical and biomechanical outcome of minimal invasive and open repair of the Achilles tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction With evolutions in surgical techniques, minimally invasive surgical (MIS repair with Achillon applicator has been introduced. However, there is still a lack of literature to investigate into the clinical merits of MIS over open surgery. This study aims to investigate the correlation between clinical outcome, gait analysis and biomechanical properties comparing both surgical methods. Materials and methods A single centre retrospective review on all the consecutive operated patients between January 2004 and December 2008 was performed. Twenty-six patients (19 male and 7 female; age 40.4 ± 9.2 years had experienced a complete Achilles tendon rupture with operative repair. Nineteen of the patients, 10 MIS versus 9 open repairs (13 men with a mean age of 40.54 ± 10.43 (range 23-62 yrs and 6 women with a mean age of 45.33 ± 7.71 (range 35-57 yrs were further invited to attend a thorough clinical assessment using Holz's scale and biomechanical evaluation at a mean of 25.3 months after operation. This study utilized the Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer to assess the isokinetic peak force of plantar-flexion and dorsiflexion of both ankles. The patients were also invited to return to our Gait Laboratory for analysis. The eight-infrared camera motion capture system (VICON, UK was utilized for the acquisition of kinematic variables. Their anthropometric data was measured according to the Davis and coworkers' standard. Results The mean operative time and length of hospital stay were shorter in the MIS group. The operative time was 54.55 ± 15.15 minutes versus 68.80 ± 18.23 minutes of the MIS group and Open group respectively (p = 0.045, whereas length of stay was 3.36 ± 1.21 days versus 6.40 ± 3.70 days respectively (p = 0.039. There is statistically significant decrease (p = 0.005 in incision length in MIS group than the open surgery group, 3.23 ± 1.10 cm versus 9.64 ± 2.55 cm respectively. Both groups attained similar Holz

  13. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling & Simulation to Enable Scientific Discovery and Clinical Care in Knee Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical function of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. The interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and for clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures, their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next generation knee models are noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  14. Lumbar spine endplate fractures: Biomechanical evaluation and clinical considerations through experimental induction of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, William H; Pintar, Frank A; Doan, Ninh B; Nguyen, Ha Son; Eckardt, Gerald; Baisden, Jamie L; Maiman, Dennis J; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S; Stemper, Brian D

    2016-06-01

    Lumbar endplate fractures were investigated in different experimental scenarios, however the biomechanical effect of segmental alignment was not outlined. The objectives of this study were to quantify effects of spinal orientation on lumbar spine injuries during single-cycle compressive loads and understand lumbar spine endplate injury tolerance. Twenty lumbar motion segments were compressed to failure. Two methods were used in the preparation of the lumbar motion segments. Group 1 (n = 7) preparation maintained pre-test sagittal lordosis, whereas Group 2 (n = 13) specimens had a free-rotational end condition for the cranial vertebra, allowing sagittal rotation of the cranial vertebra to create parallel endplates. Five Group 1 specimens experienced posterior vertebral body fracture prior to endplate fracture, whereas two sustained endplate fracture only. Group 2 specimens sustained isolated endplate fractures. Group 2 fractures occurred at approximately 41% of the axial force required for Group 1 fracture (p < 0.05). Imaging and specimen dissection indicate endplate injury consistently took place within the confines of the endplate boundaries, away from the vertebral periphery. These findings indicate that spinal alignment during compressive loading influences the resulting injury pattern. This investigation identified the specific mechanical conditions under which an endplate breach will take place. Development of endplate injuries has significant clinical implication as previous research identified internal disc disruption (IDD) and degenerative disc disease (DDD) as long-term consequences of the axial load-shift that occurs following a breach of the endplate. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1084-1091, 2016. PMID:26610067

  15. A universal self-charging system driven by random biomechanical energy for sustainable operation of mobile electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Simiao; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Fang; Zhou, Yu Sheng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-12-01

    Human biomechanical energy is characterized by fluctuating amplitudes and variable low frequency, and an effective utilization of such energy cannot be achieved by classical energy-harvesting technologies. Here we report a high-efficient self-charging power system for sustainable operation of mobile electronics exploiting exclusively human biomechanical energy, which consists of a high-output triboelectric nanogenerator, a power management circuit to convert the random a.c. energy to d.c. electricity at 60% efficiency, and an energy storage device. With palm tapping as the only energy source, this power unit provides a continuous d.c. electricity of 1.044 mW (7.34 W m-3) in a regulated and managed manner. This self-charging unit can be universally applied as a standard `infinite-lifetime' power source for continuously driving numerous conventional electronics, such as thermometers, electrocardiograph system, pedometers, wearable watches, scientific calculators and wireless radio-frequency communication system, which indicates the immediate and broad applications in personal sensor systems and internet of things.

  16. Universal protocol for alopecia areata clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesinkovska, Natasha A; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2013-12-01

    Within the area of alopecia areata research, there is an obvious need for well-designed clinical trials of therapeutic agents. The National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF) has created an initiative for the development of a unified protocol with guidelines for clinical studies. The NAAF universal protocol represents a joint effort of clinicians and investigators with experience in treating alopecia areata. This protocol will serve as a tremendous resource to facilitate future clinical studies. PMID:24326554

  17. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  18. The appropriate use of radiography in clinical practice: a report of two cases of biomechanical versus malignant spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Lawrence H

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To describe the evaluation, treatment, management and referral of two patients with back pain with an eventual malignant etiology, who were first thought to have a non-organic biomechanical disorder. Clinical features The study was a retrospective review of the clinical course of two patients seen by a chiropractor in a multi-disciplinary outpatient facility, who presented with what was thought to be non-organic biomechanical spine pain. Clinical examination by both medical and chiropractic physicians did not indicate the need for radiography in the early course of management of either patient. Upon subsequent re-evaluation, it was decided that certain clinical factors required investigation with advanced imaging. In one instance, the patient responded to conservative care of low back pain for nine weeks, after which she developed severe pain in the pelvis. In the second case, the patient presented with signs and symptoms consistent with uncomplicated musculoskeletal pain that failed to respond to a course of conservative care. He was referred for medical therapy which also failed to relieve his pain. In both patients, malignancy was eventually discovered with magnetic resonance imaging and both patients are now deceased, resulting in an inability to obtain informed consent for the publication of this manuscript. Conclusion In these two cases, the prudent use of diagnostic plain film radiography did not significantly alter the appropriate long-term management of patients with neuromusculoskeletal signs and symptoms. The judicious use of magnetic resonance imaging was an effective procedure when investigating recalcitrant neuromusculoskeletal pain in these two patients.

  19. Inertial measures of motion for clinical biomechanics: comparative assessment of accuracy under controlled conditions - changes in accuracy over time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lebel

    Full Text Available Interest in 3D inertial motion tracking devices (AHRS has been growing rapidly among the biomechanical community. Although the convenience of such tracking devices seems to open a whole new world of possibilities for evaluation in clinical biomechanics, its limitations haven't been extensively documented. The objectives of this study are: 1 to assess the change in absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of 3 commercially available AHRS over time; and 2 to identify different sources of errors affecting AHRS accuracy and to document how they may affect the measurements over time.This study used an instrumented Gimbal table on which AHRS modules were carefully attached and put through a series of velocity-controlled sustained motions including 2 minutes motion trials (2MT and 12 minutes multiple dynamic phases motion trials (12MDP. Absolute accuracy was assessed by comparison of the AHRS orientation measurements to those of an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was evaluated using the variation in relative orientation between modules during the trials.Both absolute and relative accuracy decreased over time during 2MT. 12MDP trials showed a significant decrease in accuracy over multiple phases, but accuracy could be enhanced significantly by resetting the reference point and/or compensating for initial Inertial frame estimation reference for each phase.The variation in AHRS accuracy observed between the different systems and with time can be attributed in part to the dynamic estimation error, but also and foremost, to the ability of AHRS units to locate the same Inertial frame.Mean accuracies obtained under the Gimbal table sustained conditions of motion suggest that AHRS are promising tools for clinical mobility assessment under constrained conditions of use. However, improvement in magnetic compensation and alignment between AHRS modules are desirable in order for AHRS to reach their full potential in capturing clinical outcomes.

  20. The sterno-clavicular joint: anatomy, biomechanic, clinical features and aspects of manual therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sterno-clavicular joint covers one remarkable importance in the complex of the shoulder girdle. This review investigates the anatomy, biomechanics, main affections and involvement of this joint in the pathological processes of the shoulder girdle in its complex. Moreover, it focuses on the opportunities offered from the conservative treatment, using in particular the manual therapy. Active and passive, as well as against isometric resistance movements, are discussed. In particular, the passive mobilization is demonstrated effective in the restoration of joint mobility. The sterno- clavicular joint is not structured in order to complete great work loads and has the tendency to become hypermotile or unstable, if subordinate to overload works, becoming painful. In this case, the techniques of passive mobilization and of modulation of the pain turn out effective.

  1. Biomechanical and clinical evaluation of a newly designed polycentric knee of transfemoral prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokogushi, Kazutoshi; Narita, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Eiichi; Chiba, Susumu; Nosaka, Toshiya; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2004-09-01

    We have designed a new polycentric knee adopting a hydraulic unit and an intelligent mechanism. The biomechanical parameters of this prototype, such as the stance duration, peak knee flexion angle in stance and swing, peak hip flexion angle, and peak hip extension moments were analyzed at three different cadences (88, 96, 104 steps/min) in three amputees, and then compared to those of polycentric hydraulic knees currently in use. The same parameters were also measured for 10 healthy volunteers and subsequently analyzed. In the prototype, almost all the values of the parameters showed no significant variety in individuals at the different cadences. The situation was the same with the healthy volunteers. However, the values of the parameter for the conventional knee varied significantly with the individual at the different cadences. The prototype may be of practical use, contributing to a stable walk even at different cadences. PMID:15558397

  2. Ocular biomechanics study: current state and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Petrov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the eye represents a challenge for biomechanical research due to its size, over the last two decades, much data on ocular biomechanics were accumulated. Scleral and lamina cribrosa biomechanics contribute to our understanding of myopia and open-angle glaucoma; iris and trabecular meshwork biomechanics to that of angle-closure glaucoma; vitreous biomechanics to that of retinal detachment and ocular drug delivery; corneal biomechanics to that of keratoconus; and lens capsule biomechanics to that of cataract. This paper offers a general overview of recent advances in corneal, scleral, crystalline lens, and lamina cribrosa biomechanics and summarizes the results of experimental and clinical studies. Ocular biomechanics abnormalities affect etiology of many eye diseases. Ocular biomechanics plays an important role in the development of novel diagnostic methods, therapeutic and surgical procedures. Corneal biomechanics impacts etiology and pathogenesis of keratoconus as well as tonometry accuracy and explains corneal refractive surgery effect. Scleral biomechanics is associated with IOP and progressive myopia. Accommodative apparatus (ciliary body and crystalline lens is an important anatomic physiological structure. Recent studies uncovered the causes of agerelated loss of accommodation as a result of lens involution. Optic nerve head abnormalities due to IOP fluctuations are the key factor of glaucomatous neuropathy. They are directly associated with ocular biomechanics as well.

  3. Hallux Valgus and the First Tarsometatarsal Joint: Clinical and Biomechanical Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.W.M. Faber (Frank)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes a series of cadaver, experimental, radiographic and clinical studies on the relation between a hallux valgus deformity and mobility of the first tarsometatarsal joint. Hypermobility of stiffnes of the joint was determined by Doppler imaging of vibrations and by radi

  4. Conformal piezoelectric systems for clinical and experimental characterization of soft tissue biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Shi, Yan; Joe, Pauline; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Balooch, Guive; Usgaonkar, Karan; Gur, Onur; Tran, Phat L.; Crosby, Jessi R.; Meyer, Marcin; Su, Yewang; Chad Webb, R.; Tedesco, Andrew S.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical assessment of soft biological tissues and organs has broad relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment of disease. Existing characterization methods are invasive, lack microscale spatial resolution, and are tailored only for specific regions of the body under quasi-static conditions. Here, we develop conformal and piezoelectric devices that enable in vivo measurements of soft tissue viscoelasticity in the near-surface regions of the epidermis. These systems achieve conformal contact with the underlying complex topography and texture of the targeted skin, as well as other organ surfaces, under both quasi-static and dynamic conditions. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the responses of piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs laminated on a variety of soft biological tissues and organ systems in animal models provide information on the operation of the devices. Studies on human subjects establish the clinical significance of these devices for rapid and non-invasive characterization of skin mechanical properties.

  5. Hallux Valgus and the First Tarsometatarsal Joint: Clinical and Biomechanical Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Frank

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes a series of cadaver, experimental, radiographic and clinical studies on the relation between a hallux valgus deformity and mobility of the first tarsometatarsal joint. Hypermobility of stiffnes of the joint was determined by Doppler imaging of vibrations and by radiographic stress measurement. With neither method a sharp distinction between hypermobility and non-hypermobility of the joint could be made. Comparison of the Hohmann surgical procedure with the La...

  6. Biomechanical assessment and clinical analysis of different intramedullary nailing systems for oblique fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alierta, J A; Pérez, M A; Seral, B; García-Aznar, J M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the fracture union or non-union for a specific patient that presented oblique fractures in tibia and fibula, using a mechanistic-based bone healing model. Normally, this kind of fractures can be treated through an intramedullary nail using two possible configurations that depends on the mechanical stabilisation: static and dynamic. Both cases are simulated under different fracture geometries in order to understand the effect of the mechanical stabilisation on the fracture healing outcome. The results of both simulations are in good agreement with previous clinical experience. From the results, it is demonstrated that the dynamization of the fracture improves healing in comparison with a static or rigid fixation of the fracture. This work shows the versatility and potential of a mechanistic-based bone healing model to predict the final outcome (union, non-union, delayed union) of realistic 3D fractures where even more than one bone is involved. PMID:26712100

  7. Biomechanics: basic and applied research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume presents the state of the art in biomechanics. The most recent achievements of biomechanical research in the fields of orthopaedics, dynamics of the musculoskeletal system, hard and soft tissues, rehabilitation, sports, cardiovascular problems and research methodology have been selected and edited by a distinguished panel of reviewers. The material is such that the volume will serve as a reference for many years for bioengineers, sports scientists, clinicians and clinical researchers in rehabilitation, orthopaedics and cardiovascular surgery

  8. Mathematical foundations of biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of biomechanics is the analysis of the structure and function of humans, animals, and plants by means of the methods of mechanics. Its foundations are in particular embedded in mathematics, physics, and informatics. Due to the inherent multidisciplinary character deriving from its aim, biomechanics has numerous connections and overlapping areas with biology, biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology, along with clinical medicine, so its range is enormously wide. This treatise is mainly meant to serve as an introduction and overview for readers and students who intend to acquire a basic understanding of the mathematical principles and mechanics that constitute the foundation of biomechanics; accordingly, its contents are limited to basic theoretical principles of general validity and long-range significance. Selected examples are included that are representative for the problems treated in biomechanics. Although ultimate mathematical generality is not in the foreground, an attempt is made to derive the theory from basic principles. A concise and systematic formulation is thereby intended with the aim that the reader is provided with a working knowledge. It is assumed that he or she is familiar with the principles of calculus, vector analysis, and linear algebra. PMID:21303323

  9. A review of biomechanics of the shoulder and biomechanical concepts of rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the basic knowledge about shoulder biomechanics, which is thought to be useful for surgeons. Some clinical reports have described that the excellent outcome after cuff repair without acromioplasty and a limited acromioplasty might be enough for subacromial decompression. It was biomechanically demonstrated that a 10-mm medial shift of the tendon repair site has a minimum effect on biomechanics. Many biomechanical studies reported that the transosseous equivalent repair was superior to other techniques, although the tendon may lose its inherent elasticity. We herein introduce our recent experiment data and latest information on biomechanics.

  10. Pedicle-Screw-Based Dynamic Systems and Degenerative Lumbar Diseases: Biomechanical and Clinical Experiences of Dynamic Fusion with Isobar TTL

    OpenAIRE

    Cédric Barrey; Gilles Perrin; Sabina Champain

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic systems in the lumbar spine are believed to reduce main fusion drawbacks such as pseudarthrosis, bone rarefaction, and mechanical failure. Compared to fusion achieved with rigid constructs, biomechanical studies underlined some advantages of dynamic instrumentation including increased load sharing between the instrumentation and interbody bone graft and stresses reduction at bone-to-screw interface. These advantages may result in increased fusion rates, limitation of bone rarefaction,...

  11. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  12. Predictors of Early Termination in a University Counseling Training Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampropoulos, Georgios K.; Schneider, Mercedes K.; Spengler, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the existence of counseling dropout research, there are limited predictive data for counseling in training clinics. Potential predictor variables were investigated in this archival study of 380 client files in a university counseling training clinic. Multinomial logistic regression, predictive discriminant analysis, and classification and…

  13. Brucellosis in Kosovo and Clinical Features of Brucellosis at University clinical center of Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Qehaja Buçaj; Edmond Puca; Sadie Namani; Muharem Bajrami; Valbon Krasniqi; Lindita Ajazaj Berisha; Xhevat Jakupi; Bahrie Halili; Dhimiter Kraja

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Brucellosis became a remarkable disease in Kosovo. But there is not a comprehensive epidemiological study about epidemiology and clinical course of this disease from Kosovo. The aim of our study is to present demographic and clinical data of patients with brucellosis at University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for the patients with brucellosis treated in our clinic during years 2011- 2012. The data about demography, history of the diseas...

  14. Managing University Clinical Partnership: Learning from International Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Stephen; Smith, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Dialogue between the leaders of academic clinical organisations in different countries has revealed that the core elements of the partnership between universities and health care systems are remarkably consistent across national boundaries. There is now an impetus to move beyond analysis of common challenges and towards strategies for success that…

  15. Biomechanics in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  16. Biomechanical Stability of Dental Implants in Augmented Maxillary Sites: Results of a Randomized Clinical Study with Four Different Biomaterials and PRF and a Biological View on Guided Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troedhan Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bone regenerates mainly by periosteal and endosteal humoral and cellular activity, which is given only little concern in surgical techniques and choice of bone grafts for guided bone regeneration. This study investigates on a clinical level the biomechanical stability of augmented sites in maxillary bone when a new class of moldable, self-hardening calcium-phosphate biomaterials (SHB is used with and without the addition of Platelet Rich Fibrin (aPRF in the Piezotome-enhanced subperiosteal tunnel-technique (PeSPTT. Material and Methods. 82 patients with horizontal atrophy of anterior maxillary crest were treated with PeSPTT and randomly assigned biphasic (60% HA/40% bTCP or monophasic (100% bTCP SHB without or with addition of aPRF. 109 implants were inserted into the augmented sites after 8.3 months and the insertion-torque-value (ITV measured as clinical expression of the (biomechanical stability of the augmented bone and compared to ITVs of a prior study in sinus lifting. Results. Significant better results of (biomechanical stability almost by two-fold, expressed by higher ITVs compared to native bone, were achieved with the used biomaterials and more constant results with the addition of aPRF. Conclusion. The use of SHB alone or combined with aPRF seems to be favourable to achieve a superior (biomechanical stable restored alveolar bone.

  17. Research Techniques in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Terry

    Biomechanics involves the biological human beings interacting with his/her mechanical environment. Biomechanics research is being done in connection with sport, physical education, and general motor behavior, and concerns mechanics independent of implements. Biomechanics research falls in the following two general categories: (1) that specific…

  18. Laser Metrology In Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    1983-12-01

    Modern treatment of sceletal disharmonies and malocclusions utilizes application of external forces. In order to effectively use these therapeutic forces, knowledge of three-dimensional displacements of bones with correlation to biological changes is required. In the past, this problem has been studied in a number of ways using, for example, strain gauges, brittle coatings, photoelasticity, as well as clinical observations and mathematical modeling. Becouse of their inherent limitations, these techniques did not always provide all the information necessary for development of meaningful relationships between the applied force system and the resulting biological remodeling. However, recent advances in the field of la-ser metrology allowed to overcome some of the dificulties found in the earlier methods and permitted development of new techniques for non-invasive measurements of bone motions in three-dimensional space. These laser techniques are particularly useful in biomechanics because they provide for rapid and accurate determination of displacements over the entire surface of the investigate object. In this paper, application of laser techniques for quantitative in-vivo and in-vitro measurements in biomechanics will be discussed and illustrated with representative examples.

  19. Clinical characteristics of sarcoidosis patients diagnosed in a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Özlem Abakay; Abdurrahman Abakay; Abdullah Çetin Tanrıkulu; Fatih Meteroğlu; Cengizhan Sezgi; Hadice Selimoğlu Şen; Ayşe Dallı; Mehmet Kabak

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The clinical characteristics and treatment resultsof patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis was investigatedin Dicle University Medical Faculty Hospital.Materials and methods: A total of 39 patients were includeddiagnosed with sarcoidosis between 01 January2008 and31 December 2011.Demographic data, laboratoryfindings, spirometric test data, diagnostic methodsand treatment regimens for the study were recorded form.According to pulmonary function test results of patients,61.5% were nor...

  20. Burnout Among the Clinical Dental Students in the Jordanian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Wala Majid; Al-Ali, Muna H.; Duaibis, Ramzi B.; Oweis, Tamara; Badran, Darwish H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The study aimed to evaluate the level of burnout among the clinical dental students in two Jordanian universities. Methods A total of 307 students from the two schools were surveyed using Maslach Burnout Inventory survey. Scores for the inventory’s subscales were calculated and the mean values for the students’ groups were computed separately. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were carried out and the results were compared at 95% confidence level. Results The results showed tha...

  1. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised. PMID:24218765

  2. Characteristics of demand and psychological treatments in a university clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Labrador

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to describe the most common characteristics of patients receiving psychological treatment and the treatments administered. We analyzed a sample of 856 patients at the University Psychology Clinic of the Complutense University of Madrid. Five diagnostic categories accounted for 78.4% of demand: anxiety disorders (31.9%, no diagnosis (15.4%, other problems requiring clinical attention (14.2%, mood disorders (9.5% and adaptive disorders (7.4%. A total of 17.7% presented a comorbid diagnosis and 49.3% had received treatment previously. The mean of assessment and treatment sessions was 3.5 and 12.7, respectively. The most commonly applied techniques included psychoeducation (95.1%, cognitive restructuring (74.8%, relaxation (74.4%, and control of internal dialogue (68.1%.Of the patients that had finished contact with the clinic, 68.3% were a therapeutic success. We discuss the generalization of the results and the implications for the profession and clinical practice.

  3. Transition questions in clinical practice - validity and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    2008-01-01

    Transition questions in CLINICAL practice - validity and reproducibility Lauridsen HH1, Manniche C3, Grunnet-Nilsson N1, Hartvigsen J1,2 1   Clinical Locomotion Science, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. e-mail: hlauridsen......@health.sdu.dk 2   Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Part of Clinical Locomotion Science, Odense, Denmark 3   Backcenter Funen, Part of Clinical Locomotion Science, Ringe, Denmark   Abstract  Understanding a change score is indispensable for interpretation of results from clinical studies...

  4. Biomechanics principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    Presents Current Principles and ApplicationsBiomedical engineering is considered to be the most expansive of all the engineering sciences. Its function involves the direct combination of core engineering sciences as well as knowledge of nonengineering disciplines such as biology and medicine. Drawing on material from the biomechanics section of The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition and utilizing the expert knowledge of respected published scientists in the application and research of biomechanics, Biomechanics: Principles and Practices discusses the latest principles and applicat

  5. Gingival Recessions and Biomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Morten Godtfredsen

    Gingival recessions and biomechanics “Tissue is the issue, but bone sets the tone.“ A tooth outside the cortical plate can result in loss of bone and development of a gingival recession. The presentation aims to show biomechanical considerations in relation to movement of teeth with gingival...... by moving the root back in the alveolus. The tooth movement is accompanied by bone gain and thus increase the success rate for soft tissue augmentation. The choice of biomechanical system influences the treatment outcome. If a standard straight wire appliance is used, a biomechanical dilemma can arise...

  6. Factors Related to Students' Learning of Biomechanics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, ChengTu; Smith, Jeremy D.; Bohne, Michael; Knudson, Duane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate and expand a previous study to identify the factors that affect students' learning of biomechanical concepts. Students were recruited from three universities (N = 149) located in the central and western regions of the United States. Data from 142 students completing the Biomechanics Concept Inventory…

  7. Comparing Pediatric Rotations at Two University of Queensland Clinical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julie; Kantrow, Charles M.; Coulthard, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The University of Queensland (UQ), Ochsner Clinical School (OCS) is a partnership between Ochsner Health System in New Orleans, LA, and UQ in Brisbane, Australia. OCS medical students are trained on both continents, receiving their didactic education in Australia and their clinical education in the United States. Methods: We review the OCS experience and compare the pediatric rotations at OCS and UQ. Results: Students in the pediatric rotations in Australia and in the United States receive their clinical instruction in the real-world learning environment of hospitals and clinics. In addition, lectures, online learning modules, case-based tutorials, and rigorous assessment at the end of the rotation help prepare medical students for future contact with pediatric patients. Sixty-nine third-year OCS students and 499 fourth-year UQ students completed the pediatric rotation in 2014. In 2015, 105 third-year OCS students and approximately 400 fourth-year UQ students completed the pediatric rotation. Conclusion: In a unique educational collaboration, OCS has used e-learning and face-to-face tutorials to produce a well-rounded curriculum that assimilates global healthcare and international medicine. This article demonstrates the feasibility of delivering a standardized curriculum across two continents using modern e-learning tools. PMID:27046407

  8. University psychiatry in Italy: organisation and integration of university clinics and the National Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Maria Furlan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the Italian psychiatric system, community-based care has become increasingly important and widespread since the national reform of 1978. This report aims to provide an overview of the involvement of university medical schools in this process, considering their responsibility for teaching and training specialist practitioners and professionals. METHODS: The study was carried out between early 2010 and February 2011. An 18-items, self-administered, questionnaire was designed to investigate the number of faculty members that are responsible both for running a clinical ward and for providing community-based healthcare. RESULTS: Nine out of 53 faculty members (17% manage a Mental Health Department, 9 (17% manage a University Department, and 2 (3.8% manage both types of department. Less than half of the teachers have full responsibility (hospital and community; however the percentage reaches 73.2% if we include the hospital wards open to the community emergencies. The remaining 26.8% have no responsibility for community psychiatry. Moreover there were undoubtedly still too many universities with specialisation schools that are without an appropriate network of facilities enabling them to offer complex psychiatric training. DISCUSSION: As expected, there were several types of healthcare management that were not uniformly distributed throughout Italy and there were also marked differences between mental health care provision in the North, Centre, and South of Italy. The university involvement in clinical responsibility was great, but at the management level there was a lack of equality in terms of clinical care, which risks being reflected also on the institutional functions of teaching and research.

  9. Carpal height and postoperative strength after proximal row carpectomy or four-corner arthrodesis: Clinical, anatomical and biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laronde, Pascale; Christiaens, Nicolas; Aumar, Aurélien; Chantelot, Christophe; Fontaine, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) and four-corner arthrodesis (4CA) are the two most commonly performed surgical procedures to treat wrist arthritis. Postoperative strength is one of the criteria for choosing between the two techniques. Some authors believe that strength is correlated with residual carpal height. The goal of this study was to determine if postoperative carpal height was predictive of postoperative strength. This study consisted of two parts: a clinical evaluation of grip strength after 4CA or PRC; anatomical and radiological measurements of carpal height before and after 4CA or PRC. Grip strength was better preserved after PRC (87.5%) than after 4CA (76.1%), when expressed relative to the opposite hand (P=0.053). There was a significant decrease in carpal height for the PRC group with a Youm's index of 0.37 versus 0.50 for the 4CA group (P<0.0001). Our clinical results and analysis of the literature indicate that 4CA is not superior to PRC when it comes to grip strength, whereas carpal height is significantly decreased after PRC. The decreased tendon excursion after PRC is balanced by an increase in joint stresses after 4CA. PMID:27117123

  10. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation. PMID:25801423

  11. The universal serial bus endoscope: design and initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Zendejas, Gregorio; Dobke, Marek K; Guerrerosantos, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Endoscopic forehead lift is a well-established procedure in aesthetic plastic surgery. Many agree that currently available video-endoscopic equipment is bulky, multipieced and sometimes cumbersome in the operating theater. A novel system, the Universal Serial Bus Endoscope (USBE) was designed to simplify and reduce the number of necessary equipment pieces in the endoscopic setup. The USBE is attached by a single cable to a Universal Serial Bus (USB) port of a laptop computer. A built-in miniaturized cold light source provides illumination. A built-in digital camera chip enables procedure recording. The real-time images and movies obtained with USBE are displayed on the computer's screen and recorded on the laptop's hard disk drive. In this study, 25 patients underwent endoscopic browlift using the USBE system to test its clinical usefulness, all with good results and without complications or need for revision. The USBE was found to be reliable and easier to use than current video-endoscope equipment. The operative time needed to complete the procedure by the authors was reduced approximately 50%. The design and main technical characteristics of the USBE are presented. PMID:15383889

  12. Expose Mechanical Engineering Students to Biomechanics Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui

    2011-01-01

    To adapt the focus of engineering education to emerging new industries and technologies nationwide and in the local area, a biomechanics module has been developed and incorporated into a mechanical engineering technical elective course to expose mechanical engineering students at ONU (Ohio Northern University) to the biomedical engineering topics.…

  13. Computational modeling in biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mofrad, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a glimpse of the diverse and important roles that modern computational technology is playing in various areas of biomechanics. It includes unique chapters on ab initio quantum mechanical, molecular dynamic and scale coupling methods..

  14. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  15. Biomechanical analysis of a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy bone fracture plate shows less stress shielding compared to a standard clinical metal plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Zahra S; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Bougherara, Habiba; Aziz, Mina S R; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-09-01

    Femur fracture at the tip of a total hip replacement (THR), commonly known as Vancouver B1 fracture, is mainly treated using rigid metallic bone plates which may result in "stress shielding" leading to bone resorption and implant loosening. To minimize stress shielding, a new carbon fiber (CF)/Flax/Epoxy composite plate has been developed and biomechanically compared to a standard clinical metal plate. For fatigue tests, experiments were done using six artificial femurs cyclically loaded through the femoral head in axial compression for four stages: Stage 1 (intact), stage 2 (after THR insertion), stage 3 (after plate fixation of a simulated Vancouver B1 femoral midshaft fracture gap), and stage 4 (after fracture gap healing). For fracture fixation, one group was fitted with the new CF/Flax/Epoxy plate (n = 3), whereas another group was repaired with a standard clinical metal plate (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN) (n = 3). In addition to axial stiffness measurements, infrared thermography technique was used to capture the femur and plate surface stresses during the testing. Moreover, finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to evaluate the composite plate's axial stiffness and surface stress field. Experimental results showed that the CF/Flax/Epoxy plated femur had comparable axial stiffness (fractured = 645 ± 67 N/mm; healed = 1731 ± 109 N/mm) to the metal-plated femur (fractured = 658 ± 69 N/mm; healed = 1751 ± 39 N/mm) (p = 1.00). However, the bone beneath the CF/Flax/Epoxy plate was the only area that had a significantly higher average surface stress (fractured = 2.10 ± 0.66 MPa; healed = 1.89 ± 0.39 MPa) compared to bone beneath the metal plate (fractured = 1.18 ± 0.93 MPa; healed = 0.71 ± 0.24 MPa) (p FEA bone surface stresses yielded peak of 13 MPa at distal epiphysis (stage 1), 16 MPa at distal epiphysis (stage 2), 85 MPa for composite and 129 MPa for metal

  16. Evaluation of clinical pharmacist recommendations in the geriatric ward of a Belgian university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Somers A; Robays H; De Paepe P; Van Maele G; Perehudoff K; Petrovic M

    2013-01-01

    Annemie Somers,1 Hugo Robays,1 Peter De Paepe,2 Georges Van Maele,3 Katrina Perehudoff,4 Mirko Petrovic41Department of Pharmacy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 3Department of Medical Statistics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 4Department of Geriatrics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, BelgiumObjective: To evaluate the type, acceptance rate, and clinical relevance of clinical pharmacist recom...

  17. Clinical characteristics of sarcoidosis patients diagnosed in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Abakay

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The clinical characteristics and treatment resultsof patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis was investigatedin Dicle University Medical Faculty Hospital.Materials and methods: A total of 39 patients were includeddiagnosed with sarcoidosis between 01 January2008 and31 December 2011.Demographic data, laboratoryfindings, spirometric test data, diagnostic methodsand treatment regimens for the study were recorded form.According to pulmonary function test results of patients,61.5% were normal pattern, 30.8% were restrictive patternand 7.7% were obstructive pattern.Results: Of the 39 patients 15.4% male, 84.6% werefemale. The mean age was 39.5±13.1 years for males,females 44.8±14.0 years. All patients of was 17.9%stage 1, 66.7% stage 2, 10.3% stage 3 and 5.1% stage4. 61.5% were symptomatic, 38.5% were asymptomatic.Methods of diagnosis of the patients examined, 25.6% ofpatients bronchoscopic biopsy procedures, 74.4% of patientssurgical biopsy procedures. Of the 56.4% patientshad received corticosteroid treatment, 5.1% patients hadreceived corticosteroid + methotrexate treatment, 38.5%were followed up without the pharmacological treatment.Pharmacological treatment in the group complete at thetime of the study 20.5% concluded the treatment of theperson. Patients who treatment ending 8.4 months hadused pharmacological treatment.Conclusions: Interstitial lung diseases which are prevalentamong patients with sarcoidosis diagnosed by examiningthe clinical features, differential diagnosis and treatmentmay be possible detection of potential problems. JClin Exp Invest 2012; 3 (3: 363-367Key words: Sarcoidosis diagnosis, treatment

  18. Understanding the biomechanical nature of musculoskeletal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karduna, Andrew R

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a general overview of the biomechanical principles associated with hand therapy. Specifically, it reviews the basic topics of material properties (including both theoretical principles and practical concepts), static analysis (including forces, moments, muscle forces, and Newton's laws), and ends with a clinical example involving analysis of the risk of damage to the A3 pulley. PMID:22507212

  19. Brucellosis in Kosovo and Clinical Features of Brucellosis at University clinical center of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Qehaja Buçaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brucellosis became a remarkable disease in Kosovo. But there is not a comprehensive epidemiological study about epidemiology and clinical course of this disease from Kosovo. The aim of our study is to present demographic and clinical data of patients with brucellosis at University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for the patients with brucellosis treated in our clinic during years 2011- 2012. The data about demography, history of the disease, clinical presentations, serological test, serum biochemistry and reatment were collected from hospital medical records. The diagnosis of brucellosis based on clinical and laboratory findings. Results: This descriptive study included 47 patients, who 33 of them (70.2% were males. The mean age was 37.9 ± 19.3 years. The route of transmission of the disease was known in 28 59.5% of them. Direct contact with livestock in 22 (46.8% and ingestion of dairy products in six cases (12.7% were reported as the transmission route. The majority of patients (27 patients, 57.4% were from rural area. The main presenting symptoms were atigue, fever and arthralgia. Osteoarticular manifestations were the common forms of localized disease. Regarding to the therapy, 45 (95.7% of patients were treated with streptomycin and doxycycline for the first three weeks. Conclusion: Human brucellosis is not a common in Kosovo but there is a potential risk. Osteoarticular symptoms were the most common presentation reasons. The most effective and preferred treatment regimen was Streptomycin plus Doxycycline for the first three weeks, and Doxycycline plus Rifampicin thereafter. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(4: 147-150

  20. Enterococcal urinary tract infections in a university hospital: clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Barros

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Although urinary tract infections (UTI represent the most common infection caused by enterococci, some aspects remain to be fully clarified. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics present in UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. in patients followed up at the Prof. Edgard Santos Teaching Hospital of the Federal University of Bahia. All patients consecutively examined between 1997 and 2005, who received a diagnosis of UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. were included in the study. UTI was defined as the presence of 10(5 colony-forming units per mL of urine. Standard microbiological techniques were used. During the study period, 6.2% of the urine cultures were positive for Enterococcus spp. The mean age of the patients was 48.9 years and 57% were male. At initial evaluation, 13% of the patients had complaints suggestive of UTI. Nineteen patients had a history consistent with obstructive uropathy and 26 with neurogenic bladder. At final evaluation, UTI was the diagnosis in 48 patients. In 36 patients (29%, the primary diagnosis was related to urogenital diseases, consisting of obstructive uropathy in 23 of these cases, while in 32 patients (25.8% primary diagnosis was related to neurologic diseases, frequently neurogenic bladder. UTI caused by Enterococcus spp. is not infrequent, is usually associated with few or no symptoms and occurs in sick patients who have anatomical or functional obstructive uropathy associated or not with urinary tract catheterization or instrumentation. The diagnosis of enterococcal UTI may indicate a urinary tract abnormality yet to be diagnosed.

  1. Model for a university-based clinical research development infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermahl, Tamara; LaPensee, Elizabeth; Williams, David; Clauw, Daniel; Parker, Robert A; Downey, Brad; Liu, Jing; Myles, James

    2015-01-01

    The Research Development Core (RDC) is housed within the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) at the University of Michigan (U-M). Established in 2006, RDC provides no-cost, in-person consultations to help U-M investigators strengthen their grant proposals. RDC offers investigators feedback and critique on all aspects of their study design, plus partnerships, funding mechanisms, and future directions. This article describes RDC's model and provides data describing the success of its services.RDC is composed of a multidisciplinary team of professionals in grant development. It comprises two senior faculty codirectors from the U-M Medical School, two senior biostatisticians, outside faculty content experts, and RDC administrative staff. Investigators contact RDC to request a consultation and submit advance grant materials for review by the RDC team. During the consultation, investigators explain their project and identify challenges. The RDC team and additional experts offer feedback that is captured in meeting notes and provided to investigators. RDC commitments beyond the meetings are implemented and carefully tracked. Investigators may also request grant editing, budgeting, or proposal submission assistance. Investigators using RDC have been awarded $44.5 million since 2011.The demand for RDC consultations doubled from 2010 to 2011 and reached a high of 131 consultations in 2012. Investigator feedback has been positive: 80% reported that RDC had a strong impact on their proposal, and over 90% indicated that they would recommend RDC to colleagues. MICHR is committed to providing investigators with RDC services to better ensure strong grant applications and successful research careers. PMID:25340362

  2. SERVICE IN BADMINTON: A BIOMECHANICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem Ahmed; Sartaj Khan; Manu Mishra; Touheed Akhter

    2015-01-01

    To find out the differences between forehand and backhand short services in badminton, the present study was designed to analyze the biomechanical variables and segmental angles - shuttle velocity, wrist angle, elbow angle and shoulder angle of six male badminton players. The data were recorded during “North-Zone Intervarsity Championship” held at Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. All subjects in the study were right handed badminton players. The mean age, body height ...

  3. Building clinical trial priorities at the University of Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condo, Jeanine; Kateera, Brenda; Mutimura, Eugene; Birungi, Francine; Ndagijimana, Albert; Jansen, Stefan; Kamwesiga, Julius; Forrest, Jamie I; Mills, Edward J; Binagwaho, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    After the genocide in Rwanda, the country's healthcare system collapsed. Remarkable gains have since been made by the state to provide greater clinical service capacity and expand health policies that are grounded on locally relevant evidence. This commentary explores the challenges faced by Rwanda in building an infrastructure for clinical trials. Through local examples, we discuss how a clinical trial infrastructure can be constructed by (1) building educational capacity; (2) encouraging the testing of relevant interventions using appropriate and cost-effective designs; and, (3) promoting ethical and regulatory standards. The future is bright for clinical research in Rwanda and with a renewed appetite for locally generated evidence it is necessary that we discuss the challenges and opportunities in drawing up a clinical trials agenda. PMID:25429819

  4. Experience with the Implementation of Clinical Pharmacy Services and Processes in a University Hospital in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Annemie; Claus, Barbara; Vandewoude, Koen; Petrovic, Mirko

    2016-03-01

    This article summarizes the experience with the development of clinical pharmacy services in the Ghent University Hospital in Belgium. Implementation of clinical pharmacy services in Belgian hospitals has not been evident because these activities were initially not structurally financed. The aim is to describe the strengths and weaknesses of the clinical pharmacy development process, and the milestones that enhanced the progress. Furthermore, the organisation of clinical pharmacy in the Ghent University Hospital is explained, including back- and front-office activities, seamless pharmaceutical care and medication safety improvement. Some working methods, procedures and tools are explained for different clinical pharmacy services. In particular, the clinical pharmacy projects for geriatric patients as well as the preparation of clinical pharmacy services for the accreditation process are explained. We also reflect on the organisation model and the future development of clinical pharmacy, taking into consideration facilitators and potential barriers. PMID:26922733

  5. Patient-Specific Models of Cardiac Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy CP

    2012-01-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-di...

  6. Clinical Engeneering Experience at the Hospital of the State University of Londrina

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Fernando Ferreyra Ramírez

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the four-year experience of implementation of Clinical Engineering services at the Hospital of the State University of Londrina (HURNP/UEL). It was performed by the Electrical Engineering Department (DEEL), through a project involving lecturers and students from the Electrical and Civil Engineering Courses of the same university. The main objectives were the formation of human resources in the Clinical Engineering area and a positive contribution to the healthcare service...

  7. Biomechanics of Rowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Kazunori; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    A new control model for the study of biomechanical simulation of human movement was investigated using rowing as an example. The objectives were to explore biological and mechanical alternatives to optimal control methods. The simulation methods included simple control mechanisms based on proportional and derivative (PD) control, consideration of a simple neural model, introduction of an inverse dynamics system for feedback, and computational adjustment of control parameters by using an evaluative criterion and optimization method. By using simulation, appropriate rowing motions were synthesized. The generated rowing motion was periodic, continuous, and adaptable so that the pattern was stable against the mechanical force and independent of the initial condition. We believe that the simulation model is not only practical as a computational research tool from a biomechanical-engineering viewpoint but also significant from the point of view of fundamental biological theories of movement.

  8. Third universal definition of myocardial infarction. Implications for clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, the conceptual meaning of the term myocardial infarction has not changed, although have developed new sensitive diagnostic methods. In this way the clinical diagnosis is based on patient symptoms, electrocardiogram's (ECG) changes and sensitive biochemical markers, as well as the information obtained from various imaging techniques

  9. Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Yaritza

    2016-01-01

    The Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) is equipped with anthropometric and biomechanical instrumentation and regularly performs population analysis based on analytical and modeling capabilities to test and verify if all eligible crew/passengers can be accommodated, and fitted with a protective suit that enables performance of reach and access tasks. The ABF's unique expertise can aid in identifying potential ergonomic and occupational biomechanical problems with recommended solutions to improve a suited passenger's safety, comfort, and injury protection. My involvement was in the following projects: The ABF is currently trying to define human performance capabilities in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit. Subjects are tested in an effort to further understand shoulder and elbow strength performance deficits when suited compared to unsuited. Another ongoing project is to develop a protocol to reliably characterize human health and performance metrics for individuals working inside various extravehicular activity (EVA) suits under realistic spaceflight conditions. This project will provide benchmarking data and protocols to be used in the making of future EVA suit configurations.

  10. Biomechanics of occlusion--implications for oral rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C

    2016-03-01

    The dental occlusion is an important aspect of clinical dentistry; there are diverse functional demands ranging from highly precise tooth contacts to large crushing forces. Further, there are dogmatic, passionate and often diverging views on the relationship between the dental occlusion and various diseases and disorders including temporomandibular disorders, non-carious cervical lesions and tooth movement. This study provides an overview of the biomechanics of the masticatory system in the context of the dental occlusion's role in function. It explores the adaptation and precision of dental occlusion, its role in bite force, jaw movement, masticatory performance and its influence on the oro-facial musculoskeletal system. Biomechanics helps us better understand the structure and function of biological systems and consequently an understanding of the forces on, and displacements of, the dental occlusion. Biomechanics provides insight into the relationships between the dentition, jaws, temporomandibular joints, and muscles. Direct measurements of tooth contacts and forces are difficult, and biomechanical models have been developed to better understand the relationship between the occlusion and function. Importantly, biomechanical research will provide knowledge to help correct clinical misperceptions and inform better patient care. The masticatory system demonstrates a remarkable ability to adapt to a changing biomechanical environment and changes to the dental occlusion or other components of the musculoskeletal system tend to be well tolerated. PMID:26371622

  11. Clinical Experience of Medical Students at University Sains Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Quah, Ban Seng; Malik, Alam Sher; Simpson, Hamish

    2000-01-01

    Experience of acute medical, surgical conditions, and clinical procedures of undergraduate students were assessed via a questionnaire survey during the final week of the 1993/1998 programme at the School of Medical Sciences, Univestiti Sains Malaysia. Individual performances were assessed by a scoring system. One hundred and twenty four students responded, (response rate 97%). More than 90% had seen myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, pneumonia, respiratory distress, gastroenteri...

  12. Diagnostic Assessment of Preparedness of Level One Sports Science Students for Biomechanics Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Sharon J.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the use of a diagnostic test to assess the preparedness of level one students for a sports biomechanics module. During their first week at university, a cohort of 108 students completed a diagnostic test at the end of their first lecture in sports biomechanics, with no prior notice. Upon…

  13. The Nonprofit Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh: Preparing Students for Transition to Professional Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    The Nonprofit Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh gives graduate students the opportunity to serve as management consultants to nonprofit organizations. This article describes the learning objectives, logistics, and outcomes of the Nonprofit Clinic. Bloom's 1956 taxonomy of learning objectives is employed to assess learning outcomes.

  14. Evaluation of radiological service of Dental Clinic, Uberlandia Federal University (MG-Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management related problems and the quality of dental radiographs of the Radiographic Service of the Dental Clinic, Uberlandia Federal University (MG-Brazil) are evaluated. The results are based on the examinations of 404 dental files from patients atending the Dental Clinic in 1983. Frequency distribution, mean and percentages were computed for the variables studied. (M.A.C.)

  15. Clinical improvisation and the universe of musical idioms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2001-01-01

    (please choose Danish language to see a German summary) The music therapy education at Aalborg University, Denmark, takes five years of full-time study to accomplish and contains many special disciplines. One of these is called intuitive music. It deals with improvisation training and with the......, which are focused upon one after another in practical exercises, and which can be used in analysing improvisations, are explained. Quotation aspects receive special attention and are seen as resulting from an inherent pluralism in the musical language. Through accepting this situation and through...... creation of open compositions as well, which allow for improvisation in the playing process. The author discusses the relativity of musical idioms and points to the endeavours in new and experimental music to again connect music to everyday life and make it accessible for everybody. Parameter concepts...

  16. A model for faculty practice teaching clinics developed at the Oregon Health Sciences University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hollaren, M T; Romm, C L; Cooney, T G; Bardana, E J; Walker, J; Martin, C

    1992-01-01

    In 1988 the Oregon Health Sciences University established its first faculty practice teaching clinic wherein physicians in training were incorporated into a faculty private practice clinic; this pilot project proved very successful and has been subsequently adopted as the model for essentially all outpatient clinics (both medical and surgery) in the university system. The model encourages efficiency, overhead control, and appropriate staffing; it also compensates faculty members for their additional time spent teaching. The authors conclude this model may help other academic training centers adapt to the changing demands of medical education. PMID:1729995

  17. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Mekonnen AB; Yesuf EA; Odegard PS; Wega SS

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods:...

  18. Clinical experience of medical students at university sains malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, B S; Malik, A S; Simpson, H

    2000-01-01

    Experience of acute medical, surgical conditions, and clinical procedures of undergraduate students were assessed via a questionnaire survey during the final week of the 1993/1998 programme at the School of Medical Sciences, Univestiti Sains Malaysia. Individual performances were assessed by a scoring system. One hundred and twenty four students responded, (response rate 97%). More than 90% had seen myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, pneumonia, respiratory distress, gastroenteritis, coma, and snake bite. Less than 33% had witnessed acute psychosis, diabetic ketoacidosis, acute hepatic failure, status epilepticus, near drowning, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute haemolysis or child abuse.Acute surgical/obstetrics cases, seen by >90% students, included fracture of long bones, head injury, acute abdominal pain, malpresentation and foetal distress. Less than 33% had observed epistaxis, sudden loss of vision, peritonitis or burns. Among operations only herniorrhaphy, Caesarian section, internal fixation of fracture and cataract extraction were seen by >80% students. The main deficits in clinical procedures are in rectal and vaginal examinations, urine collection and microscopic examinations. The performance of individual students, assessed by a scoring system, showed 15 students had unacceptably low scores (181.4/230, 70%) and 5 had superior scores (197.6/230, 80%). PMID:22844212

  19. [Universal ethical principles and their application in clinical drug trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonorazky, Sergio Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Since 1931, and especially since the Nuremberg Code of 1947, an increasing number of declarations, regulations, norms, guidelines, laws, resolutions, and rules intended to create conditions for better protection of subjects participating in research studies have been published, although some have meant setbacks in the human rights of vulnerable populations. As such, violations of the dignity of experimental subjects in clinical trials continue. What researchers investigate and how the research is done, the quality and transparency of the data, and the analysis and the publication of results (of both raw and processed data) respond to the financial interests of the pharmaceutical companies, coming into permanent tension with bioethical principles and the needs of society. The active participation of civil society is necessary to make it so that pharmaceutical research, results and applications subordinate economic benefits to the protection of human rights. PMID:25853830

  20. A survey of attitudes toward clinical research among physicians at Kyoto University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokode Masayuki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, only clinical research related to investigational new drug trials must be notified to regulatory bodies, and this lack of a uniform standard for clinical research has caused a number of difficulties. The objective of this study was to assess the willingness of physicians to participate in clinical research and to identify effective methods to promote and enhance clinical research. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey by administrating questionnaires to physicians in 31 departments in Kyoto University Hospital from October through November 2007. Results A total of 51.5% (310 of 602 of physicians completed the questionnaire. More than two-thirds of them reported currently participating in clinical research, and nearly all believed that clinical research is necessary for physicians. Less than 20% of respondents had specific training regarding clinical research, and most reported a need to acquire concepts and skills regarding clinical research, especially those related to statistics. "Paperwork was complicated and onerous" was the most frequently cited obstacle in conducting clinical research, followed by "few eligible patients" and "lack of time". Previous participation in and prospective participation in clinical research, previous writing a research protocol were positively associated with current participation in clinical research. Conclusions Physicians in university hospitals need more training regarding clinical research, particularly in biostatistics. They also require administrative assistance. Our findings indicate that the quality of clinical research could be improved if training in clinical research methodology and biostatistics were provided, and if greater assistance in the preparation of study documents requested by the institutional Independent Ethics Committee were available.

  1. Are biomechanical changes necessary for tumor progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Josef A.

    2014-03-01

    Already the Roman Celsus recognized rigid tissue as characteristic for solid tumors. Conversely, changes towards a weaker cytoskeleton have been described as a feature of cancer cells since the early days of tumor biology. It remains unclear if a carcinoma's rigid signature stems from more inflexible cells or is caused by the stroma. Despite that the importance of cell biomechanics for tumor progression becomes more and more evident the chicken-and-egg problem to what extent cancer cells already change their mechanical properties within the solid tumor in order to transgress its boundary or mechanical changes are induced by the microenvironment when the cell has left the tumor has been discussed highly controversial. Comprehensive clinical biomechanical measurements only exist from tumor tissue without the possibility to identify individual cells or from individual cancer cells from pleural effusions. Since the biomechanical properties of cells in carcinomas remain unknown measurements on individual cells that directly stem out of primary tumor samples are required, which we have conducted. We found in cervix and mammary carcinomas a distinctive increase of softer cells as well as contractile cells. A soft and contractile cell is like a strong elastic rope. The cell can generate a strong tensile tension to pull its self along and is soft against compression to avoid jamming.

  2. Expertise in Clinical Psychology. The Effects of University Training and Practical Experience on Expertise in Clinical Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Vollmer, Sabine; Spada, Hans; Caspar, Franz; Burri, Salome

    2013-01-01

    How do university training and subsequent practical experience affect expertise in clinical psychology? To answer this question we developed methods to assess psychological knowledge and the competence to diagnose, construct case conceptualizations, and plan psychotherapeutic treatment: a knowledge test and short case studies in a first study, and a complex, dynamically evolving case study in the second study. In our cross-sectional studies, psychology students, trainees in a certified postgr...

  3. Evaluation of clinical pharmacist recommendations in the geriatric ward of a Belgian university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somers A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Annemie Somers,1 Hugo Robays,1 Peter De Paepe,2 Georges Van Maele,3 Katrina Perehudoff,4 Mirko Petrovic41Department of Pharmacy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 3Department of Medical Statistics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 4Department of Geriatrics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, BelgiumObjective: To evaluate the type, acceptance rate, and clinical relevance of clinical pharmacist recommendations at the geriatric ward of the Ghent university hospital.Methods: The clinical pharmacist evaluated drug use during a weekly 2-hour visit for a period of 4 months and, if needed, made recommendations to the prescribing physician. The recommendations were classified according to type, acceptance by the physician, prescribed medication, and underlying drug-related problem. Appropriateness of prescribing was assessed using the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI before and after the recommendations were made. Two clinical pharmacologists and two clinical pharmacists independently and retrospectively evaluated the clinical relevance of the recommendations and rated their own acceptance of them.Results: The clinical pharmacist recommended 304 drug therapy changes for 100 patients taking a total of 1137 drugs. The most common underlying drug-related problems concerned incorrect dose, drug–drug interaction, and adverse drug reaction, which appeared most frequently for cardiovascular drugs, drugs for the central nervous system, and drugs for the gastrointestinal tract. The most common type of recommendation concerned adapting the dose, and stopping or changing a drug. In total, 59.7% of the recommendations were accepted by the treating physician. The acceptance rate by the evaluators ranged between 92.4% and 97.0%. The mean clinical relevance of the recommendations was assessed as possibly important (53.4%, possibly low relevance (38.1%, and possibly

  4. Biomechanic evaluation and clinical efficacy of RTS minimally invasive spine system%RTS自旋转撑开脊柱微创内固定系统的生物力学研究及临床疗效评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵泉来; 李逸峰; 俞宏星; 徐宏光; 沈祥; 王弘; 刘平; 王凌挺; 杨晓明; 陈学武; 张玙

    2015-01-01

    postoperative distraction, reset, loss of correc-tion. Objective:To assess the biomechanics and clinical efficacy of RTS minimally invasive spine system for thoracolumbar frac-ture. Methods:Mid-column thoracolumbar fracture was made in 5 fresh calves. Meanwhile, 52 patients with thoracolumbar frac-ture were enrolled in this study and divided into 2 groups:RTS group (n=27) and open surgery group (n=23). Surgical inci-sion, operation time, blood loss and deformity correction were recorded and compared between two groups. Results:There were no significant differences in the slip distances of extension experiment or torsion experiment between internal fixation group and control group. However, there were no significant differences in the slip distances of axial com-pression experiment or flexion experiment between these two groups. The maximum axial pull output of short screw (6.5 mm×30 mm) was 58.4%of long screw (6.5 mm×50 mm). There were significant differences in the incision size, operation duration, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative draining and postoperative VAS score between the RTS group and open surgery group (P the pain and recover the spinal function. With its minor surgical trauma, the RTS minimally invasive spine system can be used in clinic further.

  5. Psychology at Chinese universities and in Chinese society: with special reference to clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Guoan; Perrez, Meinrad; Han, Xiulan

    2011-01-01

    The following contribution gives a short introduction to Chinese psychology, history, psychological research and teaching institutions and student selection for universities. After a brief overview of the theoretical traditions and contemporary trends in general and experimental psychology it focuses in more detail on the recent developments in clinical and medical psychology. Research domains, academic training in clinical psychology and its applications in modern China are discussed with sp...

  6. Biomechanical conditions of walking

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y F; Luo, L P; Li, Z Y; Han, S Y; Lv, C S; Zhang, B

    2015-01-01

    The development of rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury does not usually include gait pattern design. This paper introduced a gait pattern design by using equations (conditions of walking). Following the requirements of reducing force to the injured side to avoid further injury, we developed a lower limb gait pattern to shorten the stride length so as to reduce walking speed, to delay the stance phase of the uninjured side and to reduce step length of the uninjured side. This gait pattern was then verified by the practice of a rehabilitation training of an Achilles tendon rupture patient, whose two-year rehabilitation training (with 24 tests) has proven that this pattern worked as intended. This indicates that rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury can rest on biomechanical conditions of walking based on experimental evidence.

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  8. VCT clinic HIV burden and its link with HIV care clinic at the University of Gondar hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemie Getahun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT is an important component of any HIV/AIDS control and prevention activities. VCT makes people aware of their HIV serostatus and enables early identification of those who need care. It is an important link to HIV care and support. The main aim of this study is to describe the HIV burden at VCT and define the relationship between the VCT Center and the HIV Chronic Care Clinic of the University of Gondar (UoG Hospital. Methods It is a record based descriptive study undertaken by using data collected by health professionals at the VCT center and the HIV chronic care clinic of the UoG Hospital. Patient data collected from 2005/06 to 2008/09 was investigated. Analysis was carried out using the SPSS version 16.0. Results A total of 19,168 people were tested for HIV and a prevalence of 25.4% was obtained. 4298 HIV positive people were referred to the HIV chronic care clinic but only 27% actually registered at the clinic. Chi-square analyses showed residence, age and time of VCT visit showed significant relations with hospital care attendance. Conclusion The overall HIV prevalence is high. The data obtained at the HIV care clinic regarding patients’ clinical conditions at acceptance were incomplete. Improvements are required on the link between VCT and HIV care and documentation of data.

  9. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  10. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekonnen AB

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods: The study was carried out in the internal medicine ward from March to April, 2011 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The study design was a prospective observational study where pharmaceutical care services provided by clinical pharmacists for inpatients were documented over a period of two months. Interventions like optimization of rational drug use and physician acceptance of these recommendations were documented. Clinical significance of interventions was evaluated by an independent team (1 internist, 1 clinical pharmacologist using a standardized method for categorizing drug related problems (DRPs. Results: A total of 149 drug related interventions conducted for 48 patients were documented; among which 133(89.3% were clinical pharmacists initiated interventions and 16(10.7% interventions were initiated by other health care professionals. The most frequent DRPs underlying interventions were unnecessary drug therapy, 36(24.2%; needs additional drug therapy, 34(22.8% and noncompliance, 29(19.5%. The most frequent intervention type was change of dosage/instruction for use, 23(15.4%. Acceptance rate by physicians was 68.4%. Among the interventions that were rated as clinically significant, 46(48.9% and 25(26.6% had major and moderate clinical importance respectively. Conclusion: Involving trained clinical pharmacists in the healthcare team leads to clinically relevant and well accepted optimization of medicine use in a resource limited settings. This

  11. Systems biomechanics of the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Maly, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    Systems Biomechanics of the Cell attempts to outline systems biomechanics of the cell as an emergent and promising discipline. The new field owes conceptually to cell mechanics, organism-level systems biomechanics, and biology of biochemical systems. Its distinct methodology is to elucidate the structure and behavior of the cell by analyzing the unintuitive collective effects of elementary physical forces that interact within the heritable cellular framework. The problematics amenable to this approach includes the variety of cellular activities that involve the form and movement of the cell body and boundary (nucleus, centrosome, microtubules, cortex, and membrane). Among the elementary system effects in the biomechanics of the cell, instability of symmetry, emergent irreversibility, and multiperiodic dissipative motion can be noted. Research results from recent journal articles are placed in this unifying framework. It is suggested that the emergent discipline has the potential to expand the spectrum of ques...

  12. Evaluation of preceptors and skills achievement by clinical pharmacy clerkship students during their clinical rotations at University of Gondar, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belachew SA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sewunet Admasu Belachew, Tadesse Melaku Abegaz, Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula, Henok Getachew, Yonas Getaya TeferaClinical Pharmacy Department, University of Gondar, Gondar, EthiopiaAim: To investigate the overall experiences of clinical pharmacy students during their clinicalattachments and to understand the breadth and depth of clinical skills provided by their preceptors.Methods: A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire containing 34 itemsto obtain feedback from the clerkship students from June to July 2015. Data analysis was performedto calculate mean, standard deviation, percentages, and multiple logistic regression usingStatistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software Version 22. Statistical significancewas set at P<0.01.Results: All 58 clerkship students actively participated in the study, yielding a response rateof 100%. While students ranked their clerkship experience as moderate, >15% remarked thatthey did not receive enough opportunities to hone their pharmaceutical care documentationskills. A relatively high percentage of students (32.8% strongly agreed that their preceptors hadprovided ample opportunity to discuss the patient problems at the bedside and encouraged themto express their opinions regarding patients’ drug therapeutic issues. This study also revealedthat students’ continuity in developing their therapeutic and disease process knowledge wassignificantly associated with the preceptor’s ability to provide adequate training and orientation(P =0.01, engagement in clinical pharmacy activities (P =0.01, regular review of students’ work(P =0.01, and instruction to students before entering clinical sites (P =0.00.Conclusion: The findings of this study reveal that a majority of the students were moderatelysatisfied with the clinical training program and preceptors need to demonstrate effective pharmaceutical care processes in their clinical sites.Keywords: pharmaceutical care, training

  13. Atraumatic extractions: a biomechanical rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Carl E; Perez, Helena M

    2008-08-01

    Biomechanical aspects of force have been applied to tooth extraction for centuries. However, the mechanical advantages available to extract the teeth were primarily applied to hold the crown of the tooth, rather than help extract it. An extraction device (Physics Forceps) has been developed to apply a biomechanical rationale to the extraction process of a tooth using a class 1 lever, creep, and shear components of force. PMID:18717405

  14. Structural and biomechanical basis of mitochondrial movement in eukaryotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu M; Kalyanasundaram A; Zhu J

    2013-01-01

    Min Wu,1 Aruna Kalyanasundaram,2 Jie Zhu1 1Laboratory of Biomechanics and Engineering, Institute of Biophysics, College of Science, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China; 2College of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Mitochondria serve as energy-producing organelles in eukaryotic cells. In addition to providing the energy supply for cells, the mitochondria are also involved in other processes, such as...

  15. Impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEHGHANI, MOHAMMADREZA; GHANAVATI, SHIRIN; SOLTANi, BEHROUZ; AGHAKHANI, NADER; HAGHPANAH, SEZANEH

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obtaining clinical competency in clinical education is one of the problems in nursing and use of the new methods of clinical training is very important. Clinical supervision is one of the methods used as a mechanism to promote knowledge and skill for promoting professional performance in nursing students. This study is carried out to determine the impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods In the present experimental study, 32 nursing students were enrolled in the study based on census and randomly assigned into two groups of experimental and control by block randomization. Clinical supervision was used in the experimental group and the control group received routine clinical trainings in the field. The students’ clinical skills were assessed using a researcher-made checklist, the validity of which was confirmed through content validity method by 13 faculty members and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 nursing students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (87%). Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 14. Results ‍There was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in clinical skills such as recognition and administration of medication, team participation,  patients and their relatives’ education, considering the safety,  infection prevention and  nursing process (p<0.005). Conclusion The study demonstrated that in clinical supervision process, students have a better communication and cooperation with their instructor and with each other and their confidence and understanding and the amount of learning in practical skills was enhanced more than routine clinical training. The implementation of this clinical training method for students of nursing and other fields of medical sciences is recommendable. PMID:27104203

  16. New Trends in Dental Biomechanics with Photonics Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Carvalho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Engineering techniques used to evaluate strain-stress fields, materials’ mechanical properties, and load transfer mechanisms, among others, are useful tools in the study of biomechanical applications. These engineering tools, as experimental and numerical ones, were imported to biomechanics, in particular in dental biomechanics, a few decades ago. Several experimental techniques have been used in dental biomechanics, like photoelasticity, ESPI (Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry, strain gages, and other kinds of transducers. However, these techniques have some limitations. For instance, photoelasticity and ESPI give the overall field pattern of the strain, showing the stress-strain concentration points. These methods cannot give an accurate measurement at all points. On the contrary, strain gages can be used to perform local measurements. However, as they use electrical resistances, their use is limited to perform in vivo measurements. Optical fiber sensors have already been used in dentistry, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, and in dental biomechanics studies. Lasers have also been used in clinical dentistry for a few decades. Other optical technologies, like optical coherence tomography (OCT, became suitable for dental practice and nowadays it is perhaps one that has had more development in dentristry, along with lasers.

  17. Biomechanical analysis of plate stabilization on cervical part of spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kiel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main aim of the work was determination of biomechanical analysis of cervical spine – stabilizer system made of stainless steel (Cr-Ni-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.Design/methodology/approach: To define biomechanical characteristic of the system the finite elements method (FEM was applied. Geometric model of part of spine C5-C7 and stabilizer were discretized by SOLID95 element. Appropriate boundary conditions imitating phenomena in real system with appropriate accuracy were established.Findings: The result of biomechanical analysis was calculation of displacements and stresses in the vertebras and the stabilizer in a function of the applied loading: 50-300 N for the stabilizer made of stainless steel (Cr-Ni-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.Research limitations/implications: The result of biomechanical analysis for plate stabilizer obtained by FEM can be use to determine a construction features of the stabilizer, and to select mechanical properties of metallic biomaterial and estimation of stabilization quality. The calculation of displacements for part C5-C7 show that the proposed type of stabilizer enables correct stabilization used to clinical apply.Practical implications: The results of biomechanical analysis showed correct mechanical properties used to made the plate stabilizer.Originality/value: The obtained numerical results should be verified in “in vitro” tests.

  18. Computational biomechanics for medicine imaging, modeling and computing

    CERN Document Server

    Doyle, Barry; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul; Miller, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements. This volume comprises eighteen of the newest approaches and applications of computational biomechanics, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, UK, Switzerland, Scotland, France and Russia. Some of the interesting topics discussed are: tailored computational models; traumatic brain injury; soft-tissue mechanics; medical image analysis; and clinically-relevant simulations. One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. We hope the research presented within this book series will contribute to overcoming this grand challenge.

  19. The attitudes of Australian radiography students towards the use of assistive transfer devices to reduce biomechanical stress in the clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The duties performed by radiographers, which includes transferring patients onto and off the examination table, can increase their risk of developing back and neck pain. This study used a survey to identify the assistive transfer devices Australian radiography undergraduate students are familiar with and have had practise using in the clinical setting. It also sought to determine whether students are being encouraged by other radiographers to use these devices during clinical training and if they would conform to practicing unsafe transfers if instructed to by senior staff. Results indicated that radiography students were familiar with the majority of the surveyed assistive devices such as the Patslide and X-ray cassette slider. Many of the students were unlikely to participate in unsafe work practices and were able to provide alternative methods of transferring patients. However, some of the respondents could be coerced into participating in unsafe patient transfers. Radiographers should therefore be vigilant in refraining from practicing unsafe transfer techniques as it could lead to students believing it is acceptable and emulating these practices in the work place

  20. The Anxiety Disorder Clinic for Children and Adolescents (TADCCA) at Aarhus University in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastum, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the two case studies in this issue of PCSP. The first is the single case of "Erik," a 12-year-old boy with cognitive difficulties and multiple anxiety disorders who was seen with his family in a cognitive behavioral therapy group program designed for...... psychologist and eight students. They were part of a training clinic, called The Anxiety Disorder Clinic for Children and Adolescents (TADCCA), in the Educational and Research Clinic of the Department of Psychology at Aarhus University in Aarhus, Denmark. This article describes the background and context of...... children with anxiety problems. The second case study is one of the total group of six families in which Erik was participating; as such it includes a summary of Erik's case in the context of the other five who participated. The group was conducted by a combination of a senior doctoral clinical...

  1. Judo Biomechanical Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Sacripanti, Attilio

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, for the first time, there is comprehensively tackling the problem of biomechanical optimization of a sport of situation such as judo. Starting from the optimization of more simple sports, optimization of this kind of complex sports is grounded on a general physics tool such as the analysis of variation. The objective function is divided for static and dynamic situation of Athletes couple, and it is proposed also a sort of dynamic programming problem Strategic Optimization. A dynamic programming problem is an optimization problem in which decisions have to be taken sequentially over several time periods linked in some fashion. A strategy for a dynamic programming problem is just a contingency plan, a plan that specifies what is to be done at each stage as a function of all that has transpired up to that point. It is possible to demonstrate, under some conditions, that a Markovian optimal strategy is an optimal strategy for the dynamic programming problem under examination. At last we try to appr...

  2. Inter-assessor reliability of practice based biomechanical assessment of the foot and ankle

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis Hannah L; Nester Christopher J; Jones Richard K; Williams Anita; Bowden Peter D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is no consensus on which protocols should be used to assess foot and lower limb biomechanics in clinical practice. The reliability of many assessments has been questioned by previous research. The aim of this investigation was to (i) identify (through consensus) what biomechanical examinations are used in clinical practice and (ii) evaluate the inter-assessor reliability of some of these examinations. Methods Part1: Using a modified Delphi technique 12 podiatrists de...

  3. Fracaso de la osteosíntesis mandibular. Consideraciones biomecánicas y tratamiento: A propósito de dos casos clínicos Mandibular osteosynthesis failure. Biomechanical and therapeutic considerations: Two clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Navarro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El fracaso de la osteosíntesis mandibular no es una situación frecuente. El objetivo de este artículo es determinar su etiología y esbozar su tratamiento. Material y métodos: Se presentan dos casos clínicos en los que se produjo un fracaso de la osteosíntesis y se indica su tratamiento. Discusión: Se analiza la etiología del fracaso y cómo, con la terapéutica adecuada, se consigue una regeneración ósea. Un conocimiento exacto de las características biomecánicas del sistema masticatorio, ayuda a abordar esta patología. Conclusión: Una fijación rígida con placas tipo "lock" junto a injerto esponjoso autólogo de cresta iliaca es la clave del éxito terapéutico.Introduction: Mandibular osteosynthesis failure is not common. The purpose of this article is to examine the etiology and treatment of mandibular osteosynthesis failure. Material and methods: Two clinical cases of mandibular osteosynthesis failure and its treatment are reported. Discussion: The etiology of osteosynthesis failure and bone regeneration with suitable treatment is analyzed Exact knowledge of the biomechanical characteristics of the masticatory system is useful in approaching this condition. Conclusion: Rigid fixation with locking plates and autologous grafts of iliac crest cancellous bone are the key to therapeutic success.

  4. Validation of the Rowland universal dementia assessment scale for multicultural screening in Danish memory clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T Rune; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Gottrup, Hanne; Lützhøft, Jan; Høgh, Peter; Waldemar, Gunhild

    Background/Aims: The Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS) is a brief cognitive screening test that was developed to detect dementia in multicultural populations. The RUDAS has not previously been validated in multicultural populations outside of Australia. The aim of this study was...... to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the RUDAS in a multicultural sample of patients referred to Danish memory clinics. Methods: Data were collected from 137 consecutive patients (34 with an immigrant background) in three Danish memory clinics. All patients were given the RUDAS as a supplement to...

  5. Prescription pattern of antihypertensive drugs in Family Practice Clinics at Jordan University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Drabah, Essam; Irshaid, Yacoub; Yasein, Nada; Zmeili, Suheil

    2013-01-01

    The present study represents the current prescribing trend for antihypertensive drugs in family medicine clinics at Jordan University Hospital in Jordan. The study sample involved 416 male and female hypertensive Jordanian patients. Our results demonstrate that 2 hypertensive patients were not receiving any antihypertensive therapy at the time of evaluation, 192 patients were on a single antihypertensive therapy, 157 patients were on two antihypertensive drugs, 52 patients were on triple anti...

  6. The Economic Value of The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Swenson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This analysis measures the regional economic value of The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (hereafter, UIHC). The assessment looks at UIHC operational expenditures using a properly specified regional input-output model that accurately reflects its major spending categories and its primary territory of economic influence. This analysis does not contain an estimate of the regional economic boost attributable to patients or the families of patients traveling to the Iowa City metropolitan...

  7. Vitiligo vulgaris and autoimmune diseases in Japan: A report from vitiligo clinic in Kyoto University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Tanioka, Miki; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Katoh, Mayumi; Takahashi, Kenzo; MIYACHI, YOSHIKI

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed the causes of “loss of skin color” in 144 patients, who visited Vitiligo Clinic of Kyoto University Hospital between April 2005 and August 2008. The numbers of patients with generalized and segmental Vitiligo vulgaris were 98 (68.1%) and 26 (18.1%), respectively. Small numbers of the patients suffered from Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, piebaldism, congenital albinism, Hypomelanosis of Ito, post-inflammatory hypopigmentation, white leaf-shaped macules associated with tuberous scler...

  8. Clinical outcome of protein-energy malnourished patients in a Brazilian university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquini, T.A.S.; H.D. Neder; Araújo-Junqueira, L.; De-Souza, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a treatable disease with high prevalence among hospitalized patients. It can cause significant increases in the duration of hospitalization and costs. PEM is especially important for health systems since malnourished patients present higher morbidity and mortality. The objective of the present study was to assess the evolution of nutritional status (NS) and the effect of malnutrition on clinical outcome of patients at a public university hospital of high c...

  9. Perceptions of Students and Clinical Instructors of Academic Learning Environments at Yazd University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Montazeri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this cross sectional study is to gain insight into the students and clinical instructors’ perception of learning environments at Yazd medical University in 2012. Various aspects of environment are compared between courses, gender and age. Students and instructors’ perspectives are reported. Methods: The sample consisted of 158 undergraduate students in their final year of graduation in the nursing, anesthesia, operating room, laboratory, radiology, midwifery courses and their 20 clinical instructors at Yazd University. Data were obtained using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM. Scores were compared across grouping variables identified via demographic information. Results: Scores were fairly high for both students and clinical instructors (M=110.0; SD=21.2 and M=93.1; SD=10.3 respectively, indicating an overall positive perception of learning environments between both groups. The perception of atmosphere subscale (PA received the highest mean grade by both groups. Total DREEM scores didn’t vary significantly between courses (p>0.05 but the results of ANOVA test showed significant differences only for perception of teaching and perception of atmosphere domains. There was not a significant association between females and males regarding total DREEM score (p>0.05. Conclusions: The more positive than negative perception held by the Yazd University health science students and instructors is hopefully indicative of a favorable teaching-learning environment. Overall; teachers’ attention to principles of educational design and setting a favorable environment to promote better learning is recommended.

  10. Medical Students’ Clinical Skills Do Not Match Their Teachers’ Expectations: Survey at Zagreb University School of Medicine, Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Sičaja, Mario; Romić, Dominik; Prka, Željko

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate self-assessed level of clinical skills of graduating medical students at Zagreb University School of Medicine and compare them with clinical skill levels expected by their teachers and those defined by a criterion standard. Method: The study included all medical students (n = 252) graduating from the Zagreb University School of Medicine in the 2004-2005 academic year and faculty members (n = 129) involved in teaching clinical skills. The participants completed anonymous qu...

  11. Implementation of a PACS for radiography training and clinical service in a university setting through a multinational effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fuk-hay; Law, Yuen Y.; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Hai L.; Chang, Tony; Matsuda, Koyo; Cao, Fei

    2001-08-01

    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has a Radiography Division under the Development of Optometry and Radiography. The Division trains both diagnostic and therapeutic radiographers with 60 students/year and offers a B.Sc. degree. In addition the Division together with the University Health Service operates a radiography clinic with radiology consultation from radiologists from other hospitals and clinics. This paper describers the implementation of a PACS in the Division for radiography training, and for clinical service.

  12. AN AUDIT OF PATTERN OF PATIENTS’ PRESENTATION AT THE PERIODONTICS CLINIC OF THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL, IBADAN

    OpenAIRE

    Olanrewaju, I.; Arowojolu, Opeodu, Modupeola O.; Gbadebo, S.O.; Ibiyemi, Titilola S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study is aimed at assessing the various reasons why patients present at the periodontics clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Materials and Methods: A six months retrospective review of patients treated in the periodontics clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan was conducted. Case file records were retrieved and information on patients’ bio-data, occupation and their various presenting complaint during their first consultation at the clinic were revie...

  13. The innovative viscoelastic CP ESP cervical disk prosthesis with six degrees of freedom: biomechanical concepts, development program and preliminary clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazennec, Jean-Yves; Aaron, Alain; Ricart, Olivier; Rakover, Jean Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The viscoelastic cervical disk prosthesis ESP is an innovative one-piece deformable but cohesive interbody spacer. It is an evolution of the LP ESP lumbar disk implanted since 2006. CP ESP provides six full degrees of freedom about the three axes including shock absorbtion. The prosthesis geometry allows limited rotation and translation with resistance to motion (elastic return property) aimed at avoiding overload of the posterior facets. The rotation center can vary freely during motion. The concept of the ESP prosthesis is fundamentally different from that of the devices currently used in the cervical spine. The originality of the concept of the ESP® prosthesis led to innovative and intense testing to validate the adhesion of the viscoelastic component of the disk on the titanium endplates and to assess the mechanical properties of the PCU cushion. The preliminary clinical and radiological results with 2-year follow-up are encouraging for pain, function and kinematic behavior (range of motion and evolution of the mean centers of rotation). In this series, we did not observe device-related specific complications, misalignment, instability or ossifications. Additional studies and longer patient follow-up are needed to assess long-term reliability of this innovative implant. PMID:26341803

  14. Kinesiology/Biomechanics: Perspectives and Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Anne E.

    1980-01-01

    Past and recent developments and future directions in kinesiology and biomechanics are reviewed. Similarities and differences between these two areas are clarified. The areas of kinesiology and biomechanics have distinct unique qualities and should be treated as separate disciplines. (CJ)

  15. Biomechanics of Degenerative Spinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Justin A.; Jakoi, Andre M.

    2016-01-01

    The spine has several important functions including load transmission, permission of limited motion, and protection of the spinal cord. The vertebrae form functional spinal units, which represent the smallest segment that has characteristics of the entire spinal column. Discs and paired facet joints within each functional unit form a three-joint complex between which loads are transmitted. Surrounding the spinal motion segment are ligaments, composed of elastin and collagen, and joint capsules which restrict motion to within normal limits. Ligaments have variable strengths and act via different lever arm lengths to contribute to spinal stability. As a consequence of the longer moment arm from the spinous process to the instantaneous axis of rotation, inherently weaker ligaments (interspinous and supraspinous) are able to provide resistance to excessive flexion. Degenerative processes of the spine are a normal result of aging and occur on a spectrum. During the second decade of life, the intervertebral disc demonstrates histologic evidence of nucleus pulposus degradation caused by reduced end plate blood supply. As disc height decreases, the functional unit is capable of an increased range of axial rotation which subjects the posterior facet capsules to greater mechanical loads. A concurrent change in load transmission across the end plates and translation of the instantaneous axis of rotation further increase the degenerative processes at adjacent structures. The behavior of the functional unit is impacted by these processes and is reflected by changes in the stress-strain relationship. Back pain and other clinical symptoms may occur as a result of the biomechanical alterations of degeneration. PMID:27114783

  16. Biomechanics of bird flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W

    2007-09-01

    Power output is a unifying theme for bird flight and considerable progress has been accomplished recently in measuring muscular, metabolic and aerodynamic power in birds. The primary flight muscles of birds, the pectoralis and supracoracoideus, are designed for work and power output, with large stress (force per unit cross-sectional area) and strain (relative length change) per contraction. U-shaped curves describe how mechanical power output varies with flight speed, but the specific shapes and characteristic speeds of these curves differ according to morphology and flight style. New measures of induced, profile and parasite power should help to update existing mathematical models of flight. In turn, these improved models may serve to test behavioral and ecological processes. Unlike terrestrial locomotion that is generally characterized by discrete gaits, changes in wing kinematics and aerodynamics across flight speeds are gradual. Take-off flight performance scales with body size, but fully revealing the mechanisms responsible for this pattern awaits new study. Intermittent flight appears to reduce the power cost for flight, as some species flap-glide at slow speeds and flap-bound at fast speeds. It is vital to test the metabolic costs of intermittent flight to understand why some birds use intermittent bounds during slow flight. Maneuvering and stability are critical for flying birds, and design for maneuvering may impinge upon other aspects of flight performance. The tail contributes to lift and drag; it is also integral to maneuvering and stability. Recent studies have revealed that maneuvers are typically initiated during downstroke and involve bilateral asymmetry of force production in the pectoralis. Future study of maneuvering and stability should measure inertial and aerodynamic forces. It is critical for continued progress into the biomechanics of bird flight that experimental designs are developed in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:17766290

  17. Problems of Sport Biomechanics and Robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Erdmann, Wlodzimierz S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents many common areas of interest of different specialists. There are problems described from sport, biomechanics, sport biomechanics, sport engineering, robotics, biomechanics and robotics, sport biomechanics and robotics. There are many approaches to sport from different sciences and engineering. Robotics is a relatively new area and has had moderate attention from sport specialists. The aim of this paper is to present several areas necessary to develop sport robots based on...

  18. The use of hirudin as universal anticoagulant in haematology, clinical chemistry and blood grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menssen, H D; Melber, K; Brandt, N; Thiel, E

    2001-12-01

    Undesirable interactions between anticoagulants and diagnostic test kit procedures so far have prevented the development of a single uniform blood sampling tube. Contrary to K2-EDTA, heparin and other anticoagulants, hirudin only minimally alters blood cells and dissolved blood constituents, thus qualifying as a universal anticoagulant for diagnostic purposes. Automated complete blood counts, automated analyses of clinical chemistry analytes and immunohaematology were performed from hirudinised and routinely processed blood obtained from healthy volunteers (n=35) and hospitalised patients (n=45). Hirudin (400 ATU/ml blood) sufficiently anticoagulated blood for diagnostic purposes. The measurements of automated complete blood counts obtained from K2-EDTA-anticoagulated and hirudinised blood correlated significantly as did the measurements of 24 clinical chemistry analytes from hirudinised plasma and serum. Regression analysis revealed that the results of complete blood counts and clinical chemistry tests were predictable from the respective measurements from hirudinised blood (p=0.001). Immunohaematological tests and cross-matching from hirudinised and native blood of the same donors gave identical results. Single clotting factors, but not global coagulation analytes, could be measured from hirudinised blood. Therefore, a universal hirudin-containing blood sampling tube could be designed for automated analysis of haematological, serological and clinical chemistry analytes. PMID:11798089

  19. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: The clinical laboratory information system (LABKA research database at Aarhus University, Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grann AF

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Anne Fia Grann, Rune Erichsen, Anders Gunnar Nielsen, Trine Frøslev, Reimar W ThomsenDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkAbstract: This paper provides an introduction to the clinical laboratory information system (LABKA research database in Northern and Central Denmark. The database contains millions of stored laboratory test results for patients living in the two Danish regions, encompassing 1.8 million residents, or one-third of the country's population. More than 1700 different types of blood test analyses are available. Therefore, the LABKA research database represents an incredible source for studies involving blood test analyses. By record linkage of different Danish registries with the LABKA research database, it is possible to examine a large number of biomarkers as predictors of disease risk and prognosis and as markers of disease severity, and to evaluate medical treatments regarding effectiveness and possible side effects. Large epidemiological studies using routinely stored blood test results for individual patients can be performed because it is possible to link the laboratory data to high-quality individual clinical patient data in Denmark.Keywords: biochemistry, laboratory procedures, diagnosis, therapeutic drug monitoring, epidemiological methods, registries

  20. Biomechanical analysis of transfemoral amputee’s sprint running and block start

    OpenAIRE

    Ojala, Emilia

    2012-01-01

    Ojala, Paula Emilia, 2012. Biomechanical analysis of transfemoral amputee’s sprint running and block start. Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Master’s Thesis in Biomechanics. 87 p. Although a large number of studies about human locomotion have been reported, little is known about how to run with a prosthesis limb. The purpose of the study was to examine the difference between the healthy and prosthesis leg and between different prostheses during the spri...

  1. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte;

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  2. Unified Approach to the Biomechanics of Dental Implantology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenoble, D. E.; Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    The human need for safe and effective dental implants is well-recognized. Although many implant designs have been tested and are in use today, a large number have resulted in clinical failure. These failures appear to be due to biomechanical effects, as well as biocompatibility and surgical factors. A unified approach is proposed using multidisciplinary systems technology, for the study of the biomechanical interactions between dental implants and host tissues. The approach progresses from biomechanical modeling and analysis, supported by experimental investigations, through implant design development, clinical verification, and education of the dental practitioner. The result of the biomechanical modeling, analysis, and experimental phases would be the development of scientific design criteria for implants. Implant designs meeting these criteria would be generated, fabricated, and tested in animals. After design acceptance, these implants would be tested in humans, using efficient and safe surgical and restorative procedures. Finally, educational media and instructional courses would be developed for training dental practitioners in the use of the resulting implants.

  3. Cutaneous Mycoses: Management and Education in Universities and Their Clinics in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In May 2015, information on the current status of mycological examinations in university clinics, and the education of students, and junior and senior residents in Japanese universities was gathered using a questionnaire, which was completed by 98 of the 117 (83.8%) professors or directors in charge of dermatology departments in Japan that were included in the survey.The questionnaire items were divided into three parts; namely, Part A, inspection methods used for diagnosis of cutaneous mycoses in each university clinic; Part B, need for a network and construction of a support system for medical care and education; and Part C, status of education of undergraduate students and residents. Some of these questions are based on a similar survey in 2007. In Part A, it was found that only 3% of university clinics performed fungal culture for all or most cases, indicating a drop from the previous study (9% in 2007). Meanwhile, responses indicating that fungal culture was almost or completely done away with accounted for about 36%. Based on type of mycoses, fungal culture for deep mycoses was performed in about 83% of the facilities. However, the percentage for superficial mycoses was very low, wherein only 39% of the facilities performed cultures even for tinea capitis. Trichophyton tonsurans infection was "often" or "sometimes" diagnosed in 22% of the facilities, with the other 78% reporting "no" or "almost no cases" of T. tonsurans infection diagnosed. In Part B, it was found that 96% of respondents (up from 89% in 2007) desired help from the university network, including aid in identifying fungal isolates, diagnosing rare fungal infections, and basic training in medical mycology of young doctors (senior residents in university hospitals). In Part C, it was found that education in direct KOH preparation for senior residents was satisfactory in about 80% of the facilities. However, about 45% of respondents reported that majority or all of the senior residents in their

  4. Integrative Structural Biomechanical Concepts of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonse T. Masi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is not fully explained by inflammatory processes. Clinical, epidemiological, genetic, and course of disease features indicate additional host-related risk processes and predispositions. Collectively, the pattern of predisposition to onset in adolescent and young adult ages, male preponderance, and widely varied severity of AS is unique among rheumatic diseases. However, this pattern could reflect biomechanical and structural differences between the sexes, naturally occurring musculoskeletal changes over life cycles, and a population polymorphism. During juvenile development, the body is more flexible and weaker than during adolescent maturation and young adulthood, when strengthening and stiffening considerably increase. During middle and later ages, the musculoskeletal system again weakens. The novel concept of an innate axial myofascial hypertonicity reflects basic mechanobiological principles in human function, tissue reactivity, and pathology. However, these processes have been little studied and require critical testing. The proposed physical mechanisms likely interact with recognized immunobiological pathways. The structural biomechanical processes and tissue reactions might possibly precede initiation of other AS-related pathways. Research in the combined structural mechanobiology and immunobiology processes promises to improve understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of AS than prevailing concepts. The combined processes might better explain characteristic enthesopathic and inflammatory processes in AS.

  5. Modeling the biomechanics of fetal movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Stefaan W; Loo, Jessica H W; Hayat, Tayyib T A; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rutherford, Mary A; Phillips, Andrew T M; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2016-08-01

    Fetal movements in the uterus are a natural part of development and are known to play an important role in normal musculoskeletal development. However, very little is known about the biomechanical stimuli that arise during movements in utero, despite these stimuli being crucial to normal bone and joint formation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to create a series of computational steps by which the forces generated during a kick in utero could be predicted from clinically observed fetal movements using novel cine-MRI data of three fetuses, aged 20-22 weeks. A custom tracking software was designed to characterize the movements of joints in utero, and average uterus deflection of [Formula: see text] mm due to kicking was calculated. These observed displacements provided boundary conditions for a finite element model of the uterine environment, predicting an average reaction force of [Formula: see text] N generated by a kick against the uterine wall. Finally, these data were applied as inputs for a musculoskeletal model of a fetal kick, resulting in predicted maximum forces in the muscles surrounding the hip joint of approximately 8 N, while higher maximum forces of approximately 21 N were predicted for the muscles surrounding the knee joint. This study provides a novel insight into the closed mechanical environment of the uterus, with an innovative method allowing elucidation of the biomechanical interaction of the developing fetus with its surroundings. PMID:26534772

  6. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Damian Pacheco Pinto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Viral conjunctivitis is a common, highly contagious disease that is often caused by an adenovirus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis by analyzing data from a prospective clinical study of 122 consecutively enrolled patients who were treated at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP after a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis between November 2011 and June 2012. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate all cases of clinically diagnosed infectious conjunctivitis and based on the laboratory findings, the prevalence of adenoviral infections was determined. The incidence of subepithelial corneal infiltrates was also investigated. RESULTS: Of the 122 patients with acute infectious conjunctivitis included, 72 had positive polymerase chain reaction results for adenoviruses and 17 patients developed subepithelial corneal infiltrates (13.93%. CONCLUSIONS: The polymerase chain reaction revealed that the prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis was 59% in all patients who presented with a clinical diagnosis of infectious conjunctivitis from November 2011 to June 2012. The prevalence of adenoviral conjunctivitis in the study population was similar to its prevalence in other regions of the world.

  7. Biomechanical evaluation of an expansive pedicle screw in calf vertebrae

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Wei; Wu, Zixiang

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to evaluate biomechanically a newly designed expansive pedicle screw (EPS) using fresh pedicles from calf lumber vertebrae in comparison with conventional pedicle screws, (CDH) CD Horizon, Universal Spine System pedicle screw (USS) and Tenor (Sofamor Denek). Pull-out and turning-back tests were performed on these pedicle screws to compare their holding strength. Additionally, revision tests were undertaken to evaluate the mechanical properties of EPS...

  8. Características biomecânicas, ergonômicas e clínicas da postura sentada: uma revisão Biomechanic, ergonomic, and clinical features of the sitting posture: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nise Ribeiro Marques

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A posição sentada é a mais adotada nos ambientes de trabalho, na escola e nas atividades de lazer. Porém, a manutenção prolongada dessa posição ocasiona a adoção de posturas inadequadas e sobrecarrega as estruturas do sistema musculoesquelético, o que pode acarretar dor e lesão na coluna lombar. A presente revisão teve como objetivo identificar os fatores biomecânicos, ergonômicos e clínicos envolvidos na sustentação da postura sentada. Para isso, foram consultadas as bases de dados ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, Pubmed e EBSCO Host, sendo selecionados 72 artigos publicados entre 1965 e 2010. Foi possível identificar que na posição sentada não existe uma postura ideal a ser sustentada, mas algumas posturas são mais recomendadas do que outras, tal como a postura sentada ereta e a postura lordótica. As cadeiras influenciam o padrão da posição sentada: conforme seu design, pode permitir maior variedade de posturas. Modificações na cadeira e a utilização de exercícios para o aumento da resistência muscular e da propriocepção, bem como a reeducação postural, são intervenções úteis para reduzir o impacto causado pela posição sentada prolongada no sistema musculoesquelético.The sitting posture is the most adopted in work environment, at school and in leisure activities. However, prolonged maintenance of this position causes the adoption of inadequate postures and overloads skeletal muscle structures, which may lead to spine pain and injuries. The purpose of the present review was to identify biomechanic, ergonomic, and clinical features involved in maintenance of the sitting position. The search in ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, Pubmed and EBSCOHost data bases led to selecting 72 articles published between 1965 and 2010. Results show that there is not an ideal posture to be kept, but some postures are more recommended than others, like the upright sitting and the lordotic postures. Chairs influence the

  9. Biomechanics of ossiculoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Daniel; PRENDERGAST, PATRICK JOHN

    2003-01-01

    PUBLISHED Many different designs of prostheses are available for middle ear surgery. Clinical comparisons of such prostheses are often difficult because of the large number of variables involved in the clinical outcome; including the skill of the surgeon or patient variability. In an attempt to compare the performance of four different middle ear implants (Kurz Bell-Tubingen, Kurz Aerial-Tubingen, Xomed no.0362, Xomed no. 0321), a finite element model of the middle ear befor...

  10. The etiology and symptoms of endodontic cases treated in a university clinic in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endodontic patients treated at a University Dental Clinic over a two year period were studied. A total of 281 patients seen in a beginning endodontic course were analyzed to determine (1) the etiology of the pulpal disease presenting and (2) the signs and symptoms of pulpal disease. Results indicated that caries was the most prevalent reason for endodontic treatment. Most cases (40.6%) were asymptomatic. Lower molars were the most commonly affected and there was no significant difference in endodontic treatment distribution between males and females in the patient population studied. (author)

  11. Present status of PACS at Kyoto University Hospital: image workstation for clinical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Kotaro; Komori, Masaru; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Okajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Ishu; Takahashi, Takashi; Konishi, Junji; Abe, Mituyuki; Gotoh, Yoshihiro; Sato, Kazuhiro

    1990-08-01

    The PAC system: KIDS (Kyoto University Hospital Image Database and Communication System) has been expanded to include several major digital imaging modalities such as X-ray CT, MRI, DSA and CR. The fiber optic high-speed local area network and the workstation with quick image handling are newly designed. The system (new KIDS) is intended to achieve a film-less environment in the department of radiology and to evaluate the feasibility of a hospital-wide PAC system. The present status of the system at the end of 1989 including a image workstation installed in a lecture hall for clinical education is described.

  12. Feasibility of HIV Universal Voluntary Counseling and Testing in a Thai General Practice Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Chunloy, Krongtip; Smith, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    An HIV transmission prevention program incorporating universal voluntary counseling and testing (UVCT) was conducted in a general practice (GP) clinic of a Thai hospital. Of the 494 participating patients, 356 (72%) accepted HIV-UVCT. Independent factors associated with HIV-UVCT acceptance included participating in the program after office hours (4-8 pm; P marriage (P = .01), and having primary school education or less (P = .02). The main reasons for declining HIV-UVCT were time constraint (38%) and perceiving self as no risk (35%). Among the 356 patients undergoing HIV-UVCT, having moderate to high HIV risk (P homosexual men. The findings suggest feasibility of HIV-UVCT in our GP clinic and factors to be considered for improving the program. PMID:24759448

  13. Clinical Homeopathic Study in the Homeopathic Ambulatory at UNIRIO University Hospital, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Alves dos Santos Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 1966, the Gaffrée and Guinle University Hospital – GGUH was incorporated into the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro – UNIRIO. Since then the Homeopathy clinic has had it's service there. Since the creation of medical residency in Homeopathy in 2004, there has been a significant increase of treatment in the number of patients and also a significant increase in the inter-relationship with other specialists and hospital services. A wide variety of patients have been treated at the GGUH on a daily basis. Many patients have been examined and treated with homeopathy alone, while others were also examined in other specialties, making homeopathic treatment an adjunct to classical therapy and vice versa. Given the expressive number of medical consultations (around 2500/year, this outstanding result in our clinical and academic practice has created the relevance and need for the verification of the epidemiological profile of these patients. Epidemiological studies are needed to clearly show the population included in this hospital, which is considered to be a reference in the Brazilian Health System (SUS. Aims: To demonstrate the epidemiological and clinical homeopathic profile in the ambulatory of homeopathy at the Gaffrée and Guinle University Hospital (GGUH of the Federal University of the Staate of Rio de Janeiro - UNIRIO, Brazil. Methodology: Cross-sectional study of 140 medical records randomly selected from the ambulatory of homeopathy at GGUH. The sample represents 50% of the monthly average of the clinical service from January to October 2009. The medical records incorrectly completed for the data analysis were excluded. Microsoft Office Excel 2007 used to data collection and analysis. Results and Discussion: A total of 100 records were selected for analysis (71.4%. Average age: 50 years old, 69% being between 41 and 80 years old. Gender: 79% women and 21% men

  14. Improving Access to Justice through Compulsory Student Work at University Law Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Holness

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an analysis is offered of compulsory so-called "live client" clinical legal education as part of the LLB as a means of improving access to justice for the indigent. This study first explores the factors which motivate which the establishment of a year’s compulsory community service during the LLB studies, and making clinical legal education compulsory. The motivation includes inducing law students and graduates to aid in the achievement of access to justice. The research then focuses on what the value of community service is in higher education generally. In the South African civil justice system many ordinary people cannot afford to use the courts because of the expense involved, or because they are ignorant of their rights. This is particularly the case in civil as opposed to criminal matters, as legal aid is more frequently focused on criminal than on civil matters in this country. This paper will consider the role which senior law students may play in rendering pro bono work as part of clinical legal education in their LLB studies. In this regard particular focus will be made on the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN, the only university offering law studies in greater Durban. As for pro bono work by students during their LLB, consideration could be given to making clinical legal education a compulsory part of such students' curricula. Possible compulsory community service for law graduates (ie post-LLB as envisaged in the proposed Legal Practice Bill falls beyond the ambit of this paper.

  15. Biomechanical model of otorhinoal ryngological organs and its clinical application%耳鼻咽喉器官结构与功能数值模拟的研究与临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏英锋; 孙秀珍

    2015-01-01

    Otorhinolaryngological organs, tiny sensory organs which locate deeply anatomically, contact with the external environment directly, which is closely related to the functional process and physiological process of the organs.Regarding clinical common diseases or stubborn disease as the break-through point, we extract and condense the scientific questions in the level of interdisciplinarity of science and engineering and clinical medicine, it is just like blaze another trail to ex-plore the mechanism of function implementation and the prediction and prevention of related diseases in the stimulation of outside environment through using research framework that fusion of computational biomechanics,modern informatics,com-puter technology and medical basic theory, clinical medical detection technology and establishing biological organs numeri-cal model.This paper discusses research status about ear, nose, pharynx, larynx organ biological numerical model from the two aspects of experimental study and numerical model study, and discussing the research achievements'application in the medical field,and also prospecting the research value of the current establishment of otorhinolaryngological organs biological numerical model.%耳鼻咽喉器官是人体直接接触外界环境的感觉性器官,具有解剖深在、细小之特点,其功能的实现和疾病发生与外界环境紧密相关。以临床常见或疑难疾患为切入点,从中提取和凝聚理工科与临床医学学科交叉界面的科学问题,采用计算生物力学、现代信息学和计算机技术与医学基础理论、临床医疗检测技术相融合的研究框架,建立生物器官数值模型,探索其在一定外界环境刺激下,功能实现的机理以及相关疾病的预测和防治具有另辟蹊径的意义。本文从实验研究和数值模型研究两个方面讨论了耳、鼻、咽、喉器官生物数值模型研究现状,并就其研究成果在医疗领域的应

  16. University-Pharmaceutical Industry Cooperation: Creation of a New Administrative Position to Broker the Placement of Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishler, John M.

    1989-01-01

    A pilot program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City included creation of a part-time administrative position to enhance cooperative ventures between the university and the pharmaceutical industry through placement of clinical trials among academic units with interdisciplinary research programs in the health sciences. Sponsored funding levels…

  17. Integrating Massage, Chiropractic, and Acupuncture in University Clinics: A Guided Student Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrin Dashe, Alejandra A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported on the health benefits of applying an integrated complementary health care model. Purpose This paper presents the results of pilot research focusing on the observations massage therapy students made about complementary health care education and integration during massage, chiropractic, and acupuncture treatments at two university clinics. Setting: Observations took place at Northwestern Health Sciences University’s associated clinics that offered massage, chiropractic, and acupuncture. Research Design: Students directly observed how clinicians and interns educated their patients and integrated other forms of complementary health care into their practice. Participants: chiropractors, massage therapists, and acupuncturists, and their patients. All participants were English-speaking and 18–65 years old. Main Outcome Measures: Observations recorded by students in journals about education and integration during massage therapy, chiropractic, and acupuncture treatments were coded and counted. Results Qualitative observations showed that clinicians and interns educated patients to some degree, but the clinicians were less apt to integrate other modalities than the interns. Conclusions Observations support that professional integrity may limit clinicians in their ability to integrate multiple modalities of health care while treating patients. Since it is well established that integration of multiple health care modalities is beneficial to patient health, it is recommended that clinics assist their clinical staff in applying an integrative approach to their practice. PMID:22811755

  18. LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS. A REVIEW OF BIOMECHANICAL STUDIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴力扬; 徐印坎

    1998-01-01

    ObjectS. To investigate the biomechanical aspects of etiology, pathology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and surgical treatment of the lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods. A series of biomechanical methods, such as three-dimensional finite element models, threedimensional kinematic measurement, cadeveric evaluation, and imaging assessment was applied to correlate lumbar biomechanics and lumber spinal stenosls. Surgery of lumber spinal stenosis has been improved. Results.The stresses significantly concentrate on the posterolateral part of the annulus fibrcsms of disc, the posterior surface of vertebral body, the pedlcle, the interarticularis and the beet joints. This trend is intensified by disc degeneration and lumber backward extension. Posterior elcxnent resection has a definite effect upon the biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebrae. The improved operations proved satisfactory. Conclusion. Stress concentration in the lumber vertebrae is of importance to the etiology of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosls, and disc degeneratkm is the initial key of this process. Than these will be aggravatnd by backward extension. Functloval radiography and myelography are of assistance to the diagnosis of the lumhar spinal stenosls. For the surgcal treatment of the lumber spinal stenosis, destruction of the posterior element should be avoid as far as possible based upon the thorough decmnpression. Maintaining the lumbar spine in flexion by fusion after decorapression has been proved a useftd method. When developmental spinal stenoals is combined with disc herniation, discectoray through laminotomy is recommend for decompression.

  19. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  20. Revitalization of clinical skills training at the University of the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Jeggels

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Most educational institutions that offer health related qualifications make use of clinical skills laboratories. These spaces are generally used for the demonstration and assessment of clinical skills. The purpose of this paper is to share our experiences related to the revitalization of skills training by introducing the skills lab method at the School of Nursing (SoN, University of the Western Cape (UWC. To accommodate the contextual changes as a result of the restructuring of the higher education landscape in 2003, the clinical skills training programme at UWC had to be reviewed. With a dramatic increase in the student numbers and a reduction in hospital beds, the skills lab method provided students with an opportunity to develop clinical skills prior to their placement in real service settings. The design phase centred on adopting a skills training methodology that articulates with the case-based approach used by the SoN. Kolb’s, experiential learning cycle provided the theoretical underpinning for the methodology. The planning phase was spent on the development of resources. Eight staff members were trained by our international higher education collaborators who also facilitated the training of clinical supervisors and simulated patients. The physical space had to be redesigned to accommodate audio visual and information technology to support the phases of the skills lab method. The implementation of the skills lab method was phased in from the first-year level. An interactive seminar held after the first year of implementation provided feedback from all the role players and was mostly positive. The results of introducing the skills lab method include: a move by students towards self-directed clinical skills development, clinical supervisors adopting the role of facilitators of learning and experiential clinical learning being based on, amongst others, the students’ engagement with simulated patients. Finally, the recommendations relate

  1. Vitiligo vulgaris and autoimmune diseases in Japan: A report from vitiligo clinic in Kyoto University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Miki; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Katoh, Mayumi; Takahashi, Kenzo; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed the causes of "loss of skin color" in 144 patients, who visited Vitiligo Clinic of Kyoto University Hospital between April 2005 and August 2008. The numbers of patients with generalized and segmental Vitiligo vulgaris were 98 (68.1%) and 26 (18.1%), respectively. Small numbers of the patients suffered from Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, piebaldism, congenital albinism, Hypomelanosis of Ito, post-inflammatory hypopigmentation, white leaf-shaped macules associated with tuberous sclerosis and nevus hypopigmentosus. One forth of the patients with generalized vitiligo had complications, while no complications were found in the patients with segmental vitiligo. Among the complications, autoimmune diseases dominated 43% (10 of 23 cases). Autoimmune thyroid diseases explained for the most of the complicated autoimmune diseases and were associated with 7.4% of the patients with generalized vitiligo. Minor autoimmune complications include myasthenia gravis, Sjogren syndrome and autoimmune nephritis. Reflecting the condition that our clinic is located in a university hospital, vitiligo patients with end-stage non-melanoma cancers of internal organs accounted for 8.4% of the patients of generalized vitiligo. PMID:20046588

  2. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Haliti NR; Haliti FR; Koçani FK; Gashi AA; Mrasori SI; Hyseni VI; Bytyqi SI; Krasniqi LL; Murtezani AF; Krasniqi SL

    2015-01-01

    Naim R Haliti,1 Fehim R Haliti,2 Ferit K Koçani,3 Ali A Gashi,4 Shefqet I Mrasori,3 Valon I Hyseni,5 Samir I Bytyqi,5 Lumnije L Krasniqi,2 Ardiana F Murtezani,5 Shaip L Krasniqi5 1Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, 2Department of Children Dentistry, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 3Department of Oral Disease, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 4Department of Oral Surgery,...

  3. Using clinical decision support as a means of implementing a universal postpartum depression screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Holly; Nentin, Farida; Silverman, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    A major barrier to the diagnosis of postpartum depression (PPD) includes symptom detection. The lack of awareness and understanding of PPD among new mothers, the variability in clinical presentation, and the various diagnostic strategies can increase this further. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of adding clinical decision support (CDS) to the electronic health record (EHR) as a means of implementing a universal standardized PPD screening program within a large, at high risk, population. All women returning to the Mount Sinai Hospital OB/GYN Ambulatory Practice for postpartum care between 2010 and 2013 were presented with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in response to a CDS "hard stop" built into the EHR. Of the 2102 women who presented for postpartum care, 2092 women (99.5 %) were screened for PPD in response to a CDS hard stop module. Screens were missing on ten records (0.5 %) secondary to refusal, language barrier, or lack of clarity in the EHR. Technology is becoming increasingly important in addressing the challenges faced by health care providers. While the identification of PPD has become the recent focus of public health concerns secondary to the significant social burden, numerous barriers to screening still exist within the clinical setting. The utility of adding CDS in the form of a hard stop, requiring clinicians to enter a standardized PPD mood assessment score to the patient EHR, offers a sufficient way to address a primary barrier to PPD symptom identification at the practitioner level. PMID:26669601

  4. Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment for major depressive disorder in a university psychology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estupiñá Puig, Francisco José; Labrador Encinas, Francisco Javier

    2012-11-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is the most prevalent mental disorder in our environment, and one of the main causes of disability. While several empirically supported treatments (ESTs) for MDD exist, some doubts have been cast on the applicability--in time, components, and effectiveness--of these ESTs in routine clinical practice. A few attempts have been made to contrast the effectiveness of ESTs, but usually the precise components of the treatment developed are not considered in detail. The purpose of this study is to analyze the components of an EST-based treatment on a sample of 69 MDD cases from a University Psychology Clinic, and to benchmark them against the results of published efficacy studies on ESTs (behavioral activation, cognitive therapy, interpersonal therapy). Results show that treatments delivered at this clinical facility are similar in components, length, and effectiveness (in effect size, completers and improved ratio) to the benchmarked studies. Cognitive restructuring is the most frequent component of the delivered treatments. Therapy results show a 3.12 effect size, and a 55.1% improved ratio over initial sample, an 80% of completers. Results and limitations of the current study, especially those related to sample and center characteristics, are discussed. PMID:23156941

  5. A 3-Year Review of Cranial Nerve Palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Chinyere Nnenne Pedro-Egbe; Bassey Fiebai; Elizabeth Akon Awoyesuku

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the types, frequency and clinical information on common cranial nerve palsies seen at the Eye Clinic at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A chart review was performed of patients who presented with cranial nerve palsy at the Eye Clinic over a 3-year period (January 2009-December 2011). Data were collected on age, sex, type of cranial nerve palsy, a history of systemic disease such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension and cereb...

  6. Sport and Exercise Biomechanics (Bios Instant Notes)

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Grimshaw; Adrian Lees; Neil Fowler; Adrian Burden

    2007-01-01

    DESCRIPTION Instant Notes on Sport and Exercise Biomechanics provides a broad overview of the fundamental concepts in exercise and sport biomechanics. PURPOSE The book aims to provide instant notes on essential information about biomechanics, and is designed to help undergraduate students to grasp the corresponding subjects in physical effort rapidly and easily. AUDIENCE The book provides a useful resource for undergraduate and graduate students as a fundamental reference book. For the resear...

  7. Smart Materials in Structural Health Monitoring, Control and Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Soh, Chee-Kiong; Bhalla, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    "Smart Materials in Structural Health Monitoring, Control and Biomechanics" presents the latest developments in structural health monitoring, vibration control and biomechanics using smart materials. The book mainly focuses on piezoelectric, fibre optic and ionic polymer metal composite materials. It introduces concepts from the very basics and leads to advanced modelling (analytical/ numerical), practical aspects (including software/ hardware issues) and case studies spanning civil, mechanical and aerospace structures, including bridges, rocks and underground structures. This book is intended for practicing engineers, researchers from academic and R&D institutions and postgraduate students in the fields of smart materials and structures, structural health monitoring, vibration control and biomedical engineering. Professor Chee-Kiong Soh and Associate Professor Yaowen Yang both work at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Dr. Suresh Bhalla is an A...

  8. Standardized ultrasound evaluation of carotid stenosis for clinical trials: University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beach Kirk W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Serial monitoring of patients participating in clinical trials of carotid artery therapy requires noninvasive precision methods that are inexpensive, safe and widely available. Noninvasive ultrasonic duplex Doppler velocimetry provides a precision method that can be used for recruitment qualification, pre-treatment classification and post treatment surveillance for remodeling and restenosis. The University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center (UWURC provides a uniform examination protocol and interpretation of duplex Doppler velocity measurements. Methods Doppler waveforms from 6 locations along the common carotid and internal carotid artery path to the brain plus the external carotid and vertebral arteries on each side using a Doppler examination angle of 60 degrees are evaluated. The UWURC verifies all measurements against the images and waveforms for the database, which includes pre-procedure, post-procedure and annual follow-up examinations. Doppler angle alignment errors greater than 3 degrees and Doppler velocity measurement errors greater than 0.05 m/s are corrected. Results Angle adjusted Doppler velocity measurements produce higher values when higher Doppler examination angles are used. The definition of peak systolic velocity varies between examiners when spectral broadening due to turbulence is present. Examples of measurements are shown. Discussion Although ultrasonic duplex Doppler methods are widely used in carotid artery diagnosis, there is disagreement about how the examinations should be performed and how the results should be validated. In clinical trails, a centralized reading center can unify the methods. Because the goals of research examinations are different from those of clinical examinations, screening and diagnostic clinical examinations may require fewer velocity measurements.

  9. Universality

    OpenAIRE

    Marinchev, Emil

    2002-01-01

    This article is an attempt for a new vision of the basics of Physics, and of Relativity, in particular. A new generalized principle of inertia is proposed, as an universal principle, based on universality of the conservation laws, not depending on the metric geometry used. The second and the third principles of Newton's mechanics are interpreted as logical consequences. The generalization of the classical principle of relativity made by Einstein as the most basic postulate in the Relativity i...

  10. Clinical experience of BNCT for brain and skin tumors at Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research nuclear reactor of Kyoto University (KUR), which was established in 1963, has the power of 5 MW and has rendered services to scientists in various fields including biology and medicine. The first clinical application was carried out on a brain tumor patient by Professor Hatanaka in 1974. Eight Japanese, 2 German and one American patients were treated. The ages of patients were 9-66 years and all were male. Skin tumors were irradiated at KUR to measure 10B content in the tissues by Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube (NMNGT) attached to KUR, before BNCT. Except in a few cases, patients had recurrent tumours after previous treatment by chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgical treatments. The absorbed dose used in the previous radiotherapy before BNCT was a curative dose. The time intervals between previous radiotherapy and BNCT varied. The treated skin tumours included various grades of melanoma. Some cases appeared to be astrocytoma grade IV

  11. The Assessment of the Applications to University Hospital Urology Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Gucuk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Provision of health care services to persons where it is needed required for the production of quality service in the organization of health services. The purpose of this study, determine the reason for admission and factors affecting admission and evaluate the current status for the patients admitted to a tertiary health care center. Materials and methods: The study was planned descriptive. Participants were determined among the patients were admitted to urology clinic between December 2011-March 2012 for any reason on a voluntary basis. Fourteen item questionnaire was completed by the physician. The survey asked the age, educational status, initial complaint, elapsed time from the beginning of complaints, whether was the previous treatment from another institution, reasons for choosing a university hospital polyclinics for participants. Results: A total of 337 participants attended, and their gender were 23.7% female, 76.3% male. 61.7% participants had received earlier medical attention because of complaints, 38.3% of had not received previously medical attention in any health institution and had to apply directly to the tertiary health care center. Apply directly to the university hospital outpatient clinic was significantly higher in men (p:0.11(table 1. Direct applications are increasing significantly in participant has higher education level. Compared to complexity of required investigations for patients had received and had not received earlier medical attention were no significant differences (p:0.134. Conclusion: For more effective use of health resources and results-oriented, training must be relevant to users of health care services to increase health literacy as well as a number of legal arrangements. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(2.000: 165-168

  12. Clinical profile of hypertension at a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur C Onwuchekwa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Arthur C Onwuchekwa, Sunday ChinenyeDepartment of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, NigeriaBackground: Hypertension in Nigeria is a widespread problem of immense social and economic importance because of its high prevalence and the severity of its complications.Aim: To define the morbidity and mortality pattern of hypertension at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH.Method: Records of all patients admitted to the medical wards of the UPTH over a 5-year period with essential hypertension or any of its complications were retrieved from the ward and medical records and reviewed.Result: A total of 780 hypertensive patients were reviewed, constituting 28.2% of all ­medical admissions. Only 424 (15.2% had complete records and were analyzed. Record keeping was poor. There were 173 (41% males and 251 (59% females with a male to female ratio of 1:1.5. The ages ranged from 18 years to 100 years with a mean of 56.5 ± 16.2. Stroke was responsible for 169 (39.9% hypertensive complications. Heart failure occurred in 97 (22% cases while renal failure and encephalopathy accounted for 40 (9.4% and 7 (1.7% hypertensive complications respectively. There were 99 deaths out of which 51 (51.5% were due to stroke, 14 (14.12% were due to heart failure, and 12 (12.1% were due to renal failure.Conclusion: The contribution of systemic hypertension to the morbidity and mortality of adults at UPTH is quite significant.Keywords: clinical profile, hypertension, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital

  13. Satisfaction With Medication Therapy Management Services at a University Ambulatory Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shiyun; Martin, Michelle T; Pierce, Andrea L; Zueger, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    A survey was issued to patients enrolled in the Medication Therapy Management Clinic (MTMC) at University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences (June 2011-January 2012) in order to assess satisfaction with pharmacy services provided by pharmacists. A 23-item survey was offered to 65 patients in the MTMC program before or after clinic visits. Since there is a paucity of data indicating the level of satisfaction with MTM services provided by pharmacists, this survey may contribute to the process of building a greater collaboration between the pharmacist and patient. Sixty-two of 65 patients completed the survey; satisfaction with MTMC pharmacists was demonstrated to be significantly positively correlated with overall satisfaction with the MTMC. Patient satisfaction is not significantly different according to age, gender, ethnicity, or number of disease states. Satisfaction with the pillbox service is not significantly different between younger and older patients. It was also noted that patients taking a greater number of medications had higher levels of satisfaction. Most patients indicated that they were satisfied with the MTMC pharmacists and services; further study linking patient satisfaction with MTM services to improved patient outcomes may allow our MTMC to serve as a model for other pharmacist-managed MTMCs serving similar patient populations. PMID:25312261

  14. Protective factors in Chinese university students at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingyu; Wang, Lu; Yao, Yuhong; Chen, Fazhan; Su, Na; Zhao, Xudong; Zhan, Chenyu

    2016-05-30

    The role of protective factors in symptom formation and prognosis in schizophrenia has been shown in many studies, but research in the early phases of psychosis is limited, particularly among the nonclinical subjects. Protective factors associated with the severity of symptoms and clinical outcomes might be meaningful to the establishment of prevention systems and to the development of optimal psychosocial interventions prior to the onset of psychosis. The present study compares self-reported levels of self-esteem, social support and resilience of 32 university students at clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR) and 32 healthy controls in a longitudinal study design. Associations between protective factors with symptoms of psychosis were assessed in the CHR group. Individuals at CHR showed significantly lower self-esteem, social support and resilience compared to healthy controls. In the CHR group, lower social support and lower self-esteem were associated with more severe positive, negative and depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analyses revealed that self-esteem was the only significant determinant for negative, depressive symptoms and global functioning. In addition, we found that subjects who were fully recovered at a 6-month follow-up survey were greater resilient and showed lower depressive symptoms at baseline. The result implied that resilience intervention could be effective on early prevention of the onset of psychosis. Moreover, implications and limitations of this study will be discussed. PMID:27031594

  15. Prevalence of syphilis among antenatal clinic attendees in Karachi: Imperative to begin universal screening in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, SA; Kristensen, S; Memon, MA; Usman, G; Ghazi, A; John, R; Sathiakumar, N; Vermund, SH

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Sexually transmitted infections are thought by some to be rare in socially conservative Muslim countries. Little is known about prevalence of syphilis in Pakistani women from the general population. We determined syphilis prevalence in a multi-center cross-sectional study of low risk pregnant women in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods We administered a structured questionnaire and obtained a blood sample for syphilis serology (rapid plasma reagin test with Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay confirmation) from all women giving informed consent over six weeks in 2007. Results The prevalence of confirmed syphilis was less than one percent (0.9%; 95%CI: 0.4, 1.8) in a sample size of 800 women recruited from three urban sites (≈1% refusal rate). Women who lived in an area where male drug use is prevalent (Ibrahim Hyderi Hospital) had 1% (1.5%) higher prevalence rates than women from the other two sites 0.5%. Conclusions We documented higher-than-expected syphilis seroprevalence rates in a low risk population of antenatal clinic attendees in Pakistan. Bridge populations for syphilis may include drug users, who are usually married, and Hijras or their clients. Hijras are transgender and/or transvestite men who may provide sex for money to men. In accordance with our results, the national policy for syphilis control in Pakistan should be modified to include universal syphilis screening in antenatal clinics with subsequent partner notification. PMID:22356034

  16. Biomechanical Evaluation of 6.5-mm Cannulated Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Benjamin C; Litsky, Alan S; Pugh, Kevin J; Fowler, T Ty

    2016-01-01

    Although biomechanical and clinical evidence exists regarding smaller compression screws, biomechanical data regarding the larger headless screws are not currently available. Headed and headless 6.5-mm cannulated compression screws were examined, with analysis of interfragmentary compression, insertion torque, and resistance of the construct to a shear force. No significant differences were seen between the maximum insertion torque of the headless or headed screws. Maximum and steady-state compression forces were also not significantly different between groups. Countersinking the headless model 2 mm led to a 77.01% decrease in steady-state compression levels. Shear testing did not reveal any significant differences in peak load at ultimate failure, specimen stiffness, or final block displacement, although a trend to increased peak load and stiffness was seen with the headless specimens. PMID:27082882

  17. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint. PMID:26072625

  18. Clinical outcome of protein-energy malnourished patients in a Brazilian university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a treatable disease with high prevalence among hospitalized patients. It can cause significant increases in the duration of hospitalization and costs. PEM is especially important for health systems since malnourished patients present higher morbidity and mortality. The objective of the present study was to assess the evolution of nutritional status (NS) and the effect of malnutrition on clinical outcome of patients at a public university hospital of high complexity in Brazil. Patients hospitalized in internal medicine (n = 54), oncology (n = 43), and infectious diseases (n = 12) wards were included. NS was evaluated using subjective global assessment up to 48 h after admission, and thereafter at intervals of 4-6 days. On admission, patients (n = 109) were classified as well-nourished (n = 73), moderately malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (n = 28), and severely malnourished (n = 8). During hospitalization, malnutrition developed or worsened in 11 patients. Malnutrition was included in the clinical diagnosis of only 5/36 records (13.9% of the cases, P = 0.000). Nutritional therapy was administered to only 22/36 of the malnourished patients; however, unexpectedly, 6/73 well-nourished patients also received commercial enteral diets. Complications were diagnosed in 28/36 malnourished and 9/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.000). Death occurred in 12/36 malnourished and 3/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.001). A total of 24/36 malnourished patients were discharged regardless of NS. In summary, malnutrition remains a real problem, often unrecognized, unappreciated, and only sporadically treated, even though its effects can be detrimental to the clinical course and prognosis of patients. The amount of public and private funds unnecessarily dispersed because of hospital malnutrition is significant

  19. Clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients at the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetes Mellitus is emerging as a major health challenge with the incidence and prevalence of the disease on the increase. It also contributes to overall morbidity and mortality with complications like cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy and lower extremity amputation. There are few local studies on the clinical characteristics of the disease in our wet up and this study therefore set out to characterize the clinical profile of newly presenting diabetic patients in a health facility in Nigeria. It is a cross sectional, descriptive study carried out at the diabetes clinic of the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital between January 2007 and September 2008. Data obtained included age, sex, anthropometric indices, symptomatology, co-morbidities, complications and treatment of diabetes. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 10. A total of two hundred and seventy patients were studied (120 males, 150 females). About 89.2% were Type 2 DM patients and majority of the study subjects were overweight. Diabetic neuropathy was the commonest complication present in 38.8% of the subjects. Polyuria was the commonest symptom and hypertension the commonest comorbidity. Majority of the subjects were on oral hypolgycaemic agents for the management of their disease with the sulphonyureas and biguanides being the most common medication that was taken by them. A few of the patients were also taking herbal medication for treatment of their disease. Majority of the patients presenting in our facility have Type 2 diabetes, were hypertensive and overweight. Hypertension was the commonest co-morbidity and diabetic neuropathy the commonest complication. Adequate health education, subsidies on medications and proper funding of the health sector is necessary to stem the tide of the burden attributable to the disease. (author)

  20. Compliance with infection control practices in an university hospital dental clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutters, Nico T.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aim: Compliance with infection control practices is the key to quality care and excellence in dentistry. Infection control remains one of the most cost-beneficial interventions available. However, implementing control procedures requires full compliance of the whole dental team. The aim of our study was to measure the compliance in daily clinical practice.Methods: The compliance with infection control practices in dentistry by dental health care personnel (DHCP in a German university dental clinic was observed during clinical work. In addition, a survey was conducted to assess the individual knowledge about infection control procedures. Contamination of the workplace during invasive dental procedures was tested, as well.Results: A total of 58 invasive dental treatments implying close contacts between HCWs and patients were scrutinized. All HCWs (100% wore gloves during dental work, but in some cases (female dentists: 14.3%; dental assistants: 28.6% gloves were neither changed nor hands were disinfected between different activities or patient contacts (female dentists: 68.6%; male dentists: 60.9%; dental assistants: 93%. Only 31.4% of female and 39.1% of male dentists carried out adequate hygienic hand disinfection after removing gloves. Male dentists wore significantly more often (100% protective eyewear compared to 77.1% of female dentists (p<0.05. In addition, most of female dentists (62.9% and dental assistants (80.7% wore jewelry during dental procedures. Conclusion: Despite the knowledge of distinct hygiene procedures only a small percentage of dental staff performs hygiene practices according to recommended guidelines. Strict audit is clearly needed in the dental setting to ensure compliance with infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of pathogens. Our results provide insights for the development of a targeted education and training strategy to enhance compliance of dental staff especially of dental assistants with

  1. Clinical outcome of protein-energy malnourished patients in a Brazilian university hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquini, T.A.S. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Neder, H.D. [Instituto de Economia, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Araújo-Junqueira, L. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); De-Souza, D.A. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Clínica Médica e Curso de Nutrição, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2012-12-17

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a treatable disease with high prevalence among hospitalized patients. It can cause significant increases in the duration of hospitalization and costs. PEM is especially important for health systems since malnourished patients present higher morbidity and mortality. The objective of the present study was to assess the evolution of nutritional status (NS) and the effect of malnutrition on clinical outcome of patients at a public university hospital of high complexity in Brazil. Patients hospitalized in internal medicine (n = 54), oncology (n = 43), and infectious diseases (n = 12) wards were included. NS was evaluated using subjective global assessment up to 48 h after admission, and thereafter at intervals of 4-6 days. On admission, patients (n = 109) were classified as well-nourished (n = 73), moderately malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (n = 28), and severely malnourished (n = 8). During hospitalization, malnutrition developed or worsened in 11 patients. Malnutrition was included in the clinical diagnosis of only 5/36 records (13.9% of the cases, P = 0.000). Nutritional therapy was administered to only 22/36 of the malnourished patients; however, unexpectedly, 6/73 well-nourished patients also received commercial enteral diets. Complications were diagnosed in 28/36 malnourished and 9/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.000). Death occurred in 12/36 malnourished and 3/73 well-nourished patients (P = 0.001). A total of 24/36 malnourished patients were discharged regardless of NS. In summary, malnutrition remains a real problem, often unrecognized, unappreciated, and only sporadically treated, even though its effects can be detrimental to the clinical course and prognosis of patients. The amount of public and private funds unnecessarily dispersed because of hospital malnutrition is significant.

  2. Biomechanical properties of four dermal substitutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-an; NING Fang-gang; ZHAO Nan-ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Many kinds of cell-free dermal substitutes have been developed during the past several years, however,their biomechanical properties, including hysteresis,stress relaxation, creep, and non-linear stress-strain, are still unknown. In this study, we tested these biomechanical characteristics of four dermal substitutes,and compared them with those of fresh human skin (FHS).

  3. Applied Biomechanics in an Instructional Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics is the science of how people move better, meaning more skillfully and more safely. This article places more emphasis on skill rather than safety, though there are many parallels between them. It shares a few features of the author's paradigm of applied biomechanics and discusses an integrated approach toward a middle school football…

  4. Biomechanics finds practical applications in aerospace research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanghe, X.

    1984-10-01

    Biomechanics is a branch of science which studies the mechanical properties of biological parts using the basic principles of mechanics and engineering. Formulas and quantitative calculations are used to analyze and understand physiological phenomena. Problems caused by weightlessness, coronary heart disease, blood circulation, use of medication, and application of biomechanics in aviation rescue are discussed.

  5. Mechatronic support of present robotics and biomechanics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ehrenberger, Zdeněk; Kratochvíl, Ctirad; Janíček, P.

    Brno: VUT, 2003 - (Ehrenberger, Z.; Houfek, L.; Kratochvíl, C.), s. 1-2 ISBN 80-21423-12-9. [Mechanotronic, Robotics and biomechanics 2003. Hrotovice (CZ), 24.03.2003-27.03.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : mechatronics * robotics * biomechanics Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics

  6. Effectiveness of group cognitive–behavioral treatment for childhood anxiety disorders in community clinics: benchmarking against an efficacy trial at a university clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Hjalti; Arendt, Kristian Bech; Jørgensen, Lisbeth;

    Denmark (Arendt & Thastum, 2013). Objective: To evaluate the outcomes of evidence based, manualized group cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) for children and adolescent with anxiety disorders, when delivered in an outpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatry or in a community based School Counselling......Background: The efficacy of a group cognitive behavioural therapy program (Cool Kids) of childhood anxiety has been demonstrated in a university-clinic setting in Australia (Hudson et al., 2009) and findings from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) at a University-clinic supports its efficacy in...... Service in Denmark. Method: Psychologists and psychiatrists from three Child and Adolescent Psychiatry clinics and four community bases School Counselling Services are trained and supervised in a manualized group CBT treatment program (Cool Kids) for Childhood anxiety. Ninety-six children with anxiety...

  7. BIOMECHANIC EVALUATION OF CARPENTRY WORKERS IN THE DISTRITO FEDERAL, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Cesar Fiedler

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the biomechanical assessment of carpentry woodworkers, located in Brasília, DF. It was filmed the profile of each worker during the performance of his activities in the carpentry and the forces involved in the work were assessed. The image of each woodworker was congealed to accomplish the measurement of articulation angles. The data were submitted to the software of posture analysis “Winowas” (OWAS Method and to the biomechanic model of posture prognosis and static forces, developed by Michigan University. The OWAS method showed that, for all machines and carpentries assessed, the worst posture occurred when the worker lifted and placed the pieces of wood on the floor and during the feeding in the smoother. The tridimensional biomechanic model registered the worst posture in different phases of the work cycle. In the first one, there were problems in all articulations, except the hips, when placing the pieces on the floor from the smoother. In the second one, there were problems in all articulations, except the elbows and the L5-S1 column disc, by feeding the surface planer. The third one, the ankles were the most injured when feeding the smoother, the surface planer, the circular saw and the band saw. According to the results, the woodworkers should try to eliminate the constant work standing upright, use auxiliary machinery to handle pieces of wood, reduce the load during feeding the machines and improve postures.

  8. The study of relationship between reported temporomandibular symptoms and clinical dysfunction index among university students in Shiraz

    OpenAIRE

    Mahroo Vojdani; Farideh Bahrani; Parnian Ghadiri

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate the correlation between subjective data obtained from a questionnaire and clinical examination among students in Shiraz university of medical sciences. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional prospective study, the samples consisted of 200 subjects, with equal distribution between males and females. Subjects′ ages ranged from 18 to 30 years (24.07±2.93). A functional evaluation was performed using the Helkimo clinical dysfunction (Di)...

  9. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haliti NR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Naim R Haliti,1 Fehim R Haliti,2 Ferit K Koçani,3 Ali A Gashi,4 Shefqet I Mrasori,3 Valon I Hyseni,5 Samir I Bytyqi,5 Lumnije L Krasniqi,2 Ardiana F Murtezani,5 Shaip L Krasniqi5 1Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, 2Department of Children Dentistry, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 3Department of Oral Disease, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 4Department of Oral Surgery, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 5Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, Prishtina, Kosovo Background: Because Kosovo has no reliable information on antimicrobial and analgesic use in dental practice, the survey reported here evaluated the antibiotic and analgesic prescriptions in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo (UDCCK.Methods: The data of 2,442 registered patients for a 1-year period were screened and analyzed concerning antibiotic and analgesic use as per standards of rational prescription.Results: Dentistry doctors prescribed antibiotics significantly more often than analgesics. Antibiotics were prescribed in 8.11% of all cases, while only 1.35% of total prescriptions were for analgesics. The total consumption of antibiotic drugs in the UDCCK was 4.53 Defined Daily Doses [DDD]/1,000 inhabitants/day, compared with only 0.216 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day for analgesics. From a total number of 117 patients, 32 patients received combinations of two antibiotics.Conclusion: Pharmacotherapy analysis showed that the prescription rates of antibiotics and analgesics in the UDCCK are not rational in terms of the qualitative aspects of treatment. For the qualitative improvement of prescription of these drug groups, we recommend the implementation of treatment guidelines following rational standards. Keywords: antibiotic, analgesics

  10. Nurse awareness of clinical research: a survey in a Japanese University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Yanagawa, Hiroaki; Takai, Shigemi; Yoshimaru, Michiko; Miyamoto, Toshiko; Katashima, Rumi; Kida, Kikue

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical research plays an important role in establishing new treatments and improving the quality of medical practice. Since the introduction of the concept of clinical research coordinators (CRC) in Japan, investigators and CRC work as a clinical research team that coordinates with other professionals in clinical trials leading to drug approval (registration trials). Although clinical nurses collaborate with clinical research teams, extended clinical research teams that include c...

  11. Empirical Correlates of Low Scores on MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scales in a Sample of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeyeva, Tatyana V.; Tellegen, Auke; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the authors explored the meaning of low scores on the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical (RC) scales. Using responses of a sample of university students (N = 811), the authors examined whether low (T less than 39), within-normal-limits (T = 39-64), and high (T greater than 65) score levels on the RC scales are…

  12. A 3-year review of cranial nerve palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinyere Nnenne Pedro-Egbe

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first study in the literature on ocular cranial nerve palsies in Southern Nigeria. Third and sixth cranial nerve palsies were the most common cases to present to the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic. There was a statistically significant association to systemic disorders such as hypertension and DM and majority of cases with 6 th cranial nerve palsy.

  13. Infective endocarditis 1973-1984 at the Bergen University Hospital: clinical feature, treatment and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, E A; Solberg, C O; Kalager, T

    1988-01-01

    During the period 1973-1984, 72 patients with infective endocarditis (IE) were hospitalized in the medical department, Bergen University Hospital. The male/female ratio was 1.25/1, the mean age 55.3 years. 35 infections were caused by streptococci, 18 by staphylococci, 6 by other microorganisms and in 13 cases no causal organism was found. Only 13 patients had rheumatic heart disease. The overall mortality was 35%, and the mean age of the patients who died was 65 years. The case fatality rates for staphylococcal and streptococcal endocarditis were 61 and 24% respectively. In the period 1973-1978 the case fatality rate was 50% compared to 26% during 1979-1984. The proportion of patients with culture-negative endocarditis was reduced from 31 to 11% from the first to the second half of the study and the percentage of patients who received antibiotics before diagnosis decreased from 81 to 58%. Valve replacement was performed in 4 patients with staphylococcal and 15 with streptococcal infections. Seven cases (mean age 73.4 years) were diagnosed at necropsy; 3 with staphylococcal infections. With increased clinical awareness of IE, liberal use of blood cultures, better diagnostic tools and earlier surgical intervention, especially in staphylococcal infections, a further reduction in mortality should be possible. PMID:3406663

  14. Bariatric Surgery in University Clinic Center Tuzla - Results After 30 Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetasevic, Emir; Pasic, Fuad; Beslin, Miroslav Bekavac; Ilic, Miroslav; Ahmetasevic, Dzenita; Mesic, Mirza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Project of Bariatric surgery in University clinic center (UCC) Tuzla has been initiated in 2009 as an idea of professor Dešo Mešić and soon after that Bariatric surgical team led by doctor Fuad Pasic has been created. Material and methods: Practical team education was realized in Croatia in hospital „Sisters of Mercy” under supervision of professor Miroslav-Bekavac Beslin. First bariatric operations in UCC Tuzla has been done in 2011 and it was biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) Scopinaro. Results and discussion: So far there has been done 30 operations and among them there have been used almost all operative modalities - restrictive, malabsorptive and combined (laparoscopic gastric banding-LAPGB, Roux-y mini gastric bypass, open and laparoscopic gastric sleeve resection, and over mentioned Scopinaro’s BPD). Beginning results are very promising according to the fact that almost all operated patients after one year stopped using antihypertensive, antidiabetic and antidepressant therapy, that average year’s weight loss is 35-100 kilograms and total satisfactions of patients after surgeries is obvious. PMID:27147808

  15. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help

  16. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  17. Factors Enhancing Manpower Efficiency from the Viewpoint of Clinical and Non-clinical Faculty Members at Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Mehrabian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are various factors that affect manpower efficiency. Identification of the most important and influential factors on efficiency is quite essential. Analysis of factors affecting manpower efficiency from the viewpoint of clinical and non-clinical faculty members at Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2011.Methods: This descriptive, analytical, cross-sectional study was performed in October and November in 2011. The study sample consisted of 186 faculty members, including 128 clinical and 58 non-clinical. Instruments used to collect library data were questionnaire and field studies. Exploratory factor analysis with Varimax rotation was utilized to determine the factors influencing manpower efficiency as well as loading level of each of the variables. Results: Among clinical faculty members, 70.66% of changes in manpower efficiency, and among non-clinical faculty members, 79.57% of changes in manpower efficiency were explained by 9 and 8 factors, respectivelyConclusion: Staff empowerment and organizational culture were recognized as the most important factors enhancing manpower efficiency from the viewpoint of clinical and non-clinical faculty members, respectively.

  18. Biomechanical analysis of the camelid cervical intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean K. Stolworthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (LBP is a prevalent global problem, which is often correlated with degenerative disc disease. The development and use of good, relevant animal models of the spine may improve treatment options for this condition. While no animal model is capable of reproducing the exact biology, anatomy, and biomechanics of the human spine, the quality of a particular animal model increases with the number of shared characteristics that are relevant to the human condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the camelid (specifically, alpaca and llama cervical spine as a model of the human lumbar spine. Cervical spines were obtained from four alpacas and four llamas and individual segments were used for segmental flexibility/biomechanics and/or morphology/anatomy studies. Qualitative and quantitative data were compared for the alpaca and llama cervical spines, and human lumbar specimens in addition to other published large animal data. Results indicate that a camelid cervical intervertebral disc (IVD closely approximates the human lumbar disc with regard to size, spinal posture, and biomechanical flexibility. Specifically, compared with the human lumbar disc, the alpaca and llama cervical disc size are approximately 62%, 83%, and 75% with regard to area, depth, and width, respectively, and the disc flexibility is approximately 133%, 173%, and 254%, with regard to range of motion (ROM in axial-rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral-bending, respectively. These results, combined with the clinical report of disc degeneration in the llama lower cervical spine, suggest that the camelid cervical spine is potentially well suited for use as an animal model in biomechanical studies of the human lumbar spine.

  19. SERVICE IN BADMINTON: A BIOMECHANICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To find out the differences between forehand and backhand short services in badminton, the present study was designed to analyze the biomechanical variables and segmental angles - shuttle velocity, wrist angle, elbow angle and shoulder angle of six male badminton players. The data were recorded during “North-Zone Intervarsity Championship” held at Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. All subjects in the study were right handed badminton players. The mean age, body height and body weight were reported as 18.33 years (±1.71, 166.5cm (±3.30 and 57.17kg (±7.93 respectively. The movements were recorded by ‘Canon Legria HF S10 Comcorder’ operating at 60 Hz. The identified clips were analyzed with the help of ‘Silicon Coach Pro 7’ motion analysis software. The result revealed that there was significant difference found between forehand and backhand short service in respect to shoulder angle at 0.05 level of significance.

  20. A review of biomechanically informed breast image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipwell, John H.; Vavourakis, Vasileios; Han, Lianghao; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Eiben, Björn; Hawkes, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiology encompasses the full range of imaging modalities from routine imaging via x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound (both two- and three-dimensional), to more recent technologies such as digital breast tomosynthesis, and dedicated breast imaging systems for positron emission mammography and ultrasound tomography. In addition new and experimental modalities, such as Photoacoustics, Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Electrical Impedance Tomography etc, are emerging. The breast is a highly deformable structure however, and this greatly complicates visual comparison of imaging modalities for the purposes of breast screening, cancer diagnosis (including image guided biopsy), tumour staging, treatment monitoring, surgical planning and simulation of the effects of surgery and wound healing etc. Due primarily to the challenges posed by these gross, non-rigid deformations, development of automated methods which enable registration, and hence fusion, of information within and across breast imaging modalities, and between the images and the physical space of the breast during interventions, remains an active research field which has yet to translate suitable methods into clinical practice. This review describes current research in the field of breast biomechanical modelling and identifies relevant publications where the resulting models have been incorporated into breast image registration and simulation algorithms. Despite these developments there remain a number of issues that limit clinical application of biomechanical modelling. These include the accuracy of constitutive modelling, implementation of representative boundary conditions, failure to meet clinically acceptable levels of computational cost, challenges associated with automating patient-specific model generation (i.e. robust image segmentation and mesh generation) and the complexity of applying biomechanical modelling methods in routine clinical practice.

  1. Does clinical experience affect knowledge regarding hepatitis-B among male medical students at a private university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the knowledge of male medical students about Hepatitis-B in their preclinical and clinical years and to investigate the self reported vaccination status of these students. In the year of 2007, 187 male students of Isra University Hyderabad Sindh Pakistan were selected by convenient sampling and surveyed with a self reported questionnaire comprising of questions regarding knowledge about hepatitis B. Data gathered was analyzed by SPSS V. 16. Knowledge between preclinical and clinical students were compared by Pearson's coefficient chi square test, p value < 0.005 was considered significant. Out of 187 students interviewed, 73 (39%) and 114 (61%) were from preclinical and clinical years respectively. Significant difference was found in clinical and preclinical students regarding basic knowledge about hepatitis B. and mode of transmission of disease (P= 0.004) and (P=< 0.001) respectively. Significant difference was found in the knowledge of both preclinical and clinical male medical students. (JPMA 59:808; 2009). (author)

  2. Primary fixation of mini slings: a comparative biomechanical study in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Palma

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The mini sling concept for stress urinary incontinence is an anatomical approach that involves placing a midurethral low-tension tape anchored to the obturator internus muscles bilaterally. They overcome the blind passage of long needles and all the related complications. There are many different devices available and because these are outpatient procedures, primary fixation plays an important role in the outcome. The objective is to evaluate the primary fixation of the various devices of attachment of the commercially available mini-slings through biomechanical tests. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 45 Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups of 15 rats each. They underwent 5 subcutaneous implantation of different mini slings and one polipropilene mesh (control, as follows: TVT-Secur® (Gynecare, USA, Type 1 polypropylene mesh (control; Ophira Mini Sling System® (Promedon, Argentina, Tissue Fixation System® (TFS PTY, Australia, Zipper Sling® and "T device" (Prosurg, USA. The abdominal wall was removed on bloc at different times after implant for biomechanical evaluation, which consisted in application of unidirectional force to the extremity of the fixation system or mesh, until it was completely removed from the tissue using a tension meter (Nexygen 3.0 Universal Testing Machine - LLOYD Instruments. The force was measured in Newtons (N. RESULTS: There was significant difference in the resistance to extraction among the different fixation systems. At 7 days the Ophira Mini Sling System® presented the best fixation and "T dispositive" the worst. CONCLUSION: Ophira mini sling System® presented the best primary fixation at 7º, 14º and 30º days. The impact of this feature in the clinical setting needs to be verified.

  3. Biomechanical Remodeling of the Diabetic Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian;

    2010-01-01

    several years, several studies demonstrated that experimental diabetes induces GI morphological and biomechanical remodeling. Following the development of diabetes, the GI wall becomes thicker and the stiffness of the GI wall increases in a time-dependent manner. It is well known that mechanosensitive...... the biomechanical environment of the mechanosensitive nerve endings, therefore, the structure as well as the tension, stress and strain distribution in the GI wall is important for the sensory and motor function. Biomechanical remodeling of diabetic GI tract including alterations of residual strain and increase...

  4. Biomechanical performance of new cardiovascular needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, J G; Ferguson, R E; Rodeheaver, G T; Edlich, R F

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular needles are now being manufactured from new stainless steel alloys containing high concentrations of nickel, Surgalloy and Ethalloy. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical performance of a cardiovascular needle made of Surgalloy with a comparably sized needle made of Ethalloy. The parameters of biomechanical performance included sharpness, maintenance of sharpness, resistance to bending, and ductility. Because the biomechanical performance of these needles was remarkably similar, cardiovascular needles made of either the Surgalloy or Ethalloy alloys are recommended for cardiovascular surgery. PMID:11495105

  5. Tibiofemoral cartilage contact biomechanics in patients after reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Ali; Van de Velde, Samuel; Gill, Thomas J; Li, Guoan

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint in patients after reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A dual fluoroscopic and MR imaging technique was used to investigate the cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint during in vivo weight-bearing flexion of the knee in eight patients 6 months following clinically successful reconstruction of an acute isolated ACL rupture. The location of tibiofemoral cartilage contact, size of the contact area, cartilage thickness at the contact area, and magnitude of the cartilage contact deformation of the ACL-reconstructed knees were compared with those previously measured in intact (contralateral) knees and ACL-deficient knees of the same subjects. Contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral cartilage after ACL reconstruction were similar to those measured in intact knees. However, at lower flexion, the abnormal posterior and lateral shift of cartilage contact location to smaller regions of thinner tibial cartilage that has been described in ACL-deficient knees persisted in ACL-reconstructed knees, resulting in an increase of the magnitude of cartilage contact deformation at those flexion angles. Reconstruction of the ACL restored some of the in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint to normal. Clinically, recovering anterior knee stability might be insufficient to prevent post-operative cartilage degeneration due to lack of restoration of in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics. PMID:22528687

  6. Biomechanical Implications of Corrective Surgery for FAI: An Evidence-based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Joshua D; Safran, Marc R

    2015-12-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been identified as a potential cause of hip osteoarthritis. The goal of FAI surgery is to relieve pain, and hopefully delay or prevent osteoarthritis of the hip. Several studies have now demonstrated favorable clinical outcomes after arthroscopic and open surgical correction of symptomatic FAI. The concept is restoration of normal hip anatomy may result in improved biomechanical function and kinematics of the hip, which may prevent or delay the progression of osteoarthritis. Although many clinical studies demonstrate restoration of "normal" anatomy, there are few studies evaluating improvement of biomechanics and function. To date, only 5 studies have been published in the English literature that study biomechanics and/or kinematics of the hip both preoperatively and postoperatively. At this point in the understanding of FAI, critical analysis of the literature suggests that FAI surgery can improve several parameters of biomechanical hip function. However, the impact of these improved biomechanics on the natural history and progression of degenerative changes in patients that are treated for symptomatic FAI has not been demonstrated. PMID:26524550

  7. Visualisation to enhance biomechanical tuning of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) in stroke: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Carse Bruce; Bowers Roy J; Meadows Barry C; Rowe Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There are a number of gaps in the evidence base for the use of ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Three dimensional motion analysis offers an ideal method for objectively obtaining biomechanical gait data from stroke patients, however there are a number of major barriers to its use in routine clinical practice. One significant problem is the way in which the biomechanical data generated by these systems is presented. Through the careful design of bespoke biomechanica...

  8. Biomechanics of the press-fit phenomenon in dental implantology: an image-based finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Frisardi Gianni; Barone Sandro; Razionale Armando V; Paoli Alessandro; Frisardi Flavio; Tullio Antonio; Lumbau Aurea; Chessa Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A fundamental pre-requisite for the clinical success in dental implant surgery is the fast and stable implant osseointegration. The press-fit phenomenon occurring at implant insertion induces biomechanical effects in the bone tissues, which ensure implant primary stability. In the field of dental surgery, the understanding of the key factors governing the osseointegration process still remains of utmost importance. A thorough analysis of the biomechanics of dental implanto...

  9. State University of New York, University of Stoney Brook, University and Clinical Practice Management Plan Space Leasing Practices. Report 96-S-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This audit report assesses the propriety and economy of space leasing practices of the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SUNY-SB) for the period July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1996, specifically those related to a health center that includes five professional schools, a 536-bed teaching hospital, and a 350-bed veterans' home. Some of…

  10. Speckle photography in biomechanical testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Henryk T.; Podbielska, Halina

    1994-02-01

    The application of speckle photography in biomechanical testing of bones and surgical fixing devices is presented. Double-exposure speckle photography is used for measuring the in-plane deformation of broken lower leg bones supported with different fixing devices under axial loading. An osteosynthesis plate, an external fixator, and an intramedullar nail mounted on the tibia shaft are tested. The results for different loading conditions are analyzed and compared with those obtained by holographic interferometry. Further, the human hyoid bone is investigated by this method. The load is applied to the anterior surface of the body of the bone. All tested specimen show an asymmetric displacement, the greatest in a plane vertical to the load. An evaluation of fracture behavior can be done from the displacement pattern.

  11. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  12. Musculoskeletal Biomechanics in Cross-country Skiing

    OpenAIRE

    Holmberg, L. Joakim

    2012-01-01

    Why copy the best athletes? When you finally learn their technique, they may have already moved on. Using muscluloskeletal biomechanics you might be able to add the "know-why" so that you can lead, instead of being left in the swells. This dissertation presents the theoretical framework of musculoskeletal modeling using inverse dynamics with static optimization. It explores some of the possibilities and limitations of musculoskeletal biomechanics in cross-country skiing, especially double-pol...

  13. Athletic Training Students in the College/ University Setting and the Scope of Clinical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Weidner, Thomas G.; Noble, Gary L; Pipkin, Jennifer B

    2006-01-01

    Context: Athletic training education programs must provide the proper type and amount of clinical supervision in order for athletic training students to obtain appropriate clinical education and to meet Board of Certification examination requirements.

  14. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Symptoms and Associated Clinical Features among Australian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Dianna

    2007-01-01

    The current study addressed the frequency of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) symptoms among university students and investigated the predictors of dysmorphic concern. Six hundred and nineteen Australian university students completed measures assessing BDD, dysmorphic concern, self-esteem, depression, life satisfaction, self-oriented and socially…

  15. Tributes to Yuan-Cheng Fung on his 90th birthday biomechanics : from molecules to man

    CERN Document Server

    Chien, Shu; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2009-01-01

    This book is a tribute to Professor Yuan-Cheng Fung, the Father of Biomechanics and a pioneer in Bioengineering, in honor of his 90th Birthday. The book consists of articles contributed by his colleagues, students, friends and family. These articles illustrate Professor Fung's profound influence on outstanding leaders in bioengineering, especially biomechanics, and on the life and work of all people who have been in contact with him. The scientific topics covered range from fundamentals of science and engineering (e.g., residual stress, flow dynamics, and cellular signaling) to clinical disor

  16. Prevalence of dental trauma among children treated in the Pediatric Dentistry Clinic of the State University of Amazonas

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Melo Moutinho da Costa; Savana Maia; Gabriel Lucas de Cardoso da Cruz; Regina Maria Puppin Rontani

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Dental trauma is an acute energy transmission to the tooth and to the supporting structures that may result in fracture, tooth dislocation, breaking or crushing of supporting tissues. Objective: This retrospective study aimed to evaluate dental trauma prevalence among children treated in the Pediatric Dentistry Clinic of the State University of Amazonas (short UEA) from July 2005 to June 2009. Material and methods: The sample used in the analysis consisted of 171 children treat...

  17. Genetic Risk Assessment for Women with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Referral Patterns and Outcomes in a University Gynecologic Oncology Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Petzel, Sue v.; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Bensend, Tracy; Leininger, Anna; Argenta, Peter A.; Geller, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about genetic service utilization and ovarian cancer. We identified the frequency and outcome of genetic counseling referral, predictors of referral, and referral uptake for ovarian cancer patients. Using pathology reports, we identified all epithelial ovarian cancer patients seen in a university gynecologic oncology clinic (1/04–8/06). Electronic medical records (EMR) were used to document genetic service referral, time from diagnosis-to-referral, point-in-treatment at referr...

  18. Maternal and perinatal outcomes of induction of labor at term in the university clinics of Kinshasa, DR Congo

    OpenAIRE

    Barthélémy Tandu-Umba; Robert Laala Tshibangu; Andy Mbangama Muela

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This paper aims at assessing outcomes following induction of labor and characteristics likely to predict vaginal delivery. Study design: This is a descriptive retrospective cohort study including all women with singleton pregnancies who delivered at term in the university clinics of Kinshasa, DR Congo, from January 01, 2006 until December 31, 2010. Induction was initiated regardless of cervical status. Methods of induction included: oxytocin perfusion, vaginal Misoprostol, intrace...

  19. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENTS ADMITTED TO KARADENIZ TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL FACULTY CHILD OUTPATIENT CLINIC WITH SUICIDE ATTEMPT

    OpenAIRE

    evrim AKTEPE; sema KANDİL; göker, zeynep; Kadir SARP; Topbaş, Murat; Özkorumak, Evrim

    2006-01-01

    Assesment of sociodemographic and psychiatric characteristics of attempted suicide in children and adolescents. The aim of this study is to identify risk factors and sociodemographic, psychiatric characteristics of adolescents and children who attempted suicide. Suicide attempters (range 7-15 years, fifty-eight cases) who referred to Karadeniz Technical University, School of Medicine, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry outpatient clinic between January 2003 and January 2005 were an...

  20. Eye injuries caused by shotgun and air-rifles treated at the University eye clinic in Belgrade 2000-2009

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović Miloš B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Eye injuries caused by shotgun buckshot or air-rifle bullets are not common but are very severe, causing blindness of the injured eye. Objective. By comparison of different parameters, to determine which of these two types of injuries have more serious final effect on vision. Methods. A retrospective comparative analysis of patients with shotgun and air-rifle injuries, treated in the period 2000-2009 at the University Eye Clinic in Belgrade wa...

  1. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    FAYYAZI, Afshin; Leila KHEZRIAN; Zohreh KHERADMAND; DAMADI, Somayeh; Ali KHAJEH

    2013-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Fayyazi A, Kheizrian L, Kheradmand Z, Damadi S, Khajeh A. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1):29-33. ObjectiveDevelopmental impairment is a common problem in children health that occurs in approximately 5–10% of the childhood population. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic yield of subspecialists’ evaluation ...

  2. Clinical Features of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu

    OpenAIRE

    Ezeonwu, BU; Ibeneme, CA; Aneke, F; Oguonu, T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children world-wide with the highest incidence in the developing countries. The persistence and effect of this condition require a study of the features and characteristics of the disease especially, within any (each) locality in order to offer possible control solutions. Aim: To determine, the clinical and social characteristics associated with AGE among children seen in the University of Nigeria Teaching ...

  3. MCNP6 model of the University of Washington clinical neutron therapy system (CNTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Gregory B.; Stewart, Robert D.; Sandison, George A.; Goorley, John T.; Argento, David C.; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    A MCNP6 dosimetry model is presented for the Clinical Neutron Therapy System (CNTS) at the University of Washington. In the CNTS, fast neutrons are generated by a 50.5 MeV proton beam incident on a 10.5 mm thick Be target. The production, scattering and absorption of neutrons, photons, and other particles are explicitly tracked throughout the key components of the CNTS, including the target, primary collimator, flattening filter, monitor unit ionization chamber, and multi-leaf collimator. Simulations of the open field tissue maximum ratio (TMR), percentage depth dose profiles, and lateral dose profiles in a 40 cm  ×  40 cm  ×  40 cm water phantom are in good agreement with ionization chamber measurements. For a nominal 10  ×  10 field, the measured and calculated TMR values for depths of 1.5 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, and 20 cm (compared to the dose at 1.7 cm) are within 0.22%, 2.23%, 4.30%, and 6.27%, respectively. For the three field sizes studied, 2.8 cm  ×  2.8 cm, 10.4 cm  ×  10.3 cm, and 28.8 cm  ×  28.8 cm, a gamma test comparing the measured and simulated percent depth dose curves have pass rates of 96.4%, 100.0%, and 78.6% (depth from 1.5 to 15 cm), respectively, using a 3% or 3 mm agreement criterion. At a representative depth of 10 cm, simulated lateral dose profiles have in-field (⩾10% of central axis dose) pass rates of 89.7% (2.8 cm  ×  2.8 cm), 89.6% (10.4 cm  ×  10.3 cm), and 100.0% (28.8 cm  ×  28.8 cm) using a 3% and 3 mm criterion. The MCNP6 model of the CNTS meets the minimum requirements for use as a quality assurance tool for treatment planning and provides useful insights and information to aid in the advancement of fast neutron therapy.

  4. MCNP6 model of the University of Washington clinical neutron therapy system (CNTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Gregory B; Stewart, Robert D; Sandison, George A; Goorley, John T; Argento, David C; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2016-01-21

    A MCNP6 dosimetry model is presented for the Clinical Neutron Therapy System (CNTS) at the University of Washington. In the CNTS, fast neutrons are generated by a 50.5 MeV proton beam incident on a 10.5 mm thick Be target. The production, scattering and absorption of neutrons, photons, and other particles are explicitly tracked throughout the key components of the CNTS, including the target, primary collimator, flattening filter, monitor unit ionization chamber, and multi-leaf collimator. Simulations of the open field tissue maximum ratio (TMR), percentage depth dose profiles, and lateral dose profiles in a 40 cm × 40 cm × 40 cm water phantom are in good agreement with ionization chamber measurements. For a nominal 10 × 10 field, the measured and calculated TMR values for depths of 1.5 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, and 20 cm (compared to the dose at 1.7 cm) are within 0.22%, 2.23%, 4.30%, and 6.27%, respectively. For the three field sizes studied, 2.8 cm × 2.8 cm, 10.4 cm × 10.3 cm, and 28.8 cm × 28.8 cm, a gamma test comparing the measured and simulated percent depth dose curves have pass rates of 96.4%, 100.0%, and 78.6% (depth from 1.5 to 15 cm), respectively, using a 3% or 3 mm agreement criterion. At a representative depth of 10 cm, simulated lateral dose profiles have in-field (⩾ 10% of central axis dose) pass rates of 89.7% (2.8 cm × 2.8 cm), 89.6% (10.4 cm × 10.3 cm), and 100.0% (28.8 cm × 28.8 cm) using a 3% and 3 mm criterion. The MCNP6 model of the CNTS meets the minimum requirements for use as a quality assurance tool for treatment planning and provides useful insights and information to aid in the advancement of fast neutron therapy. PMID:26738533

  5. Efeito da heparina sódica e da enoxaparina na consolidação de fratura da tíbia no rato: avaliação clínica e anatomopatológica e biomecânica Effect of heparin-sodium and enoxaparin on rats tibial fracture healing: clinical,anatomopathological, and biomechanical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Carlos Curcelli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado estudo experimental em ratos para avaliar o efeito do anticoagulante na consolidação óssea, conforme critérios clínicos, anatomopatológicos e biomecânicos. Manualmente, após perfuração do osso, foi produzida fratura aberta, na diáfise da tíbia direita, mantida sem imobilização, em 72 ratos machos da linhagem Wistar, com 60 dias de idade e peso médio de 242 gramas. Doze horas após a fratura, foi iniciado tratamento anticoagulante, mantido por 28 dias. Via subcutânea, um grupo recebeu heparina sódica na dose de 200UI/Kg de 12 em 12 horas, enquanto outro, recebeu enoxaparina na dose de 1mg/Kg de 12 em 12 horas, doses preconizadas para tratamento do tromboembolismo em humanos. O terceiro grupo, controle, recebeu água destilada. Durante o experimento, os animais foram avaliados clinicamente e após 28 dias, sacrificados. Nos animais dos três grupos, a evolução clínica foi semelhante. Mediante análise anatomopatológica efetuada por estudo descritivo e quantitativo, foi observada presença de fibrose, cartilagem e osso igualmente nos três grupos, sempre com predomínio de tecido ósseo. O estudo biomecânico, realizado por intermédio de ensaios de flexão, demonstrou coeficiente de rigidez e carga máxima semelhantes nos três grupos. Nenhuma diferença clínica, anatomopatológica e biomecânica foi encontrada, resultando todas as fraturas em consolidação de acordo com os critérios adotados, concluindo-se, portanto, que a heparina sódica e a enoxaparina nas doses, via e tempo de administração utilizados não interfiriram na consolidação da fratura da tíbia do rato.An experimental study in rats was accomplished to evaluate the effect of anticoagulant on fracture union, according to clinical, anatomopathological, and biomechanical approaches. Manually, after bone perforation, fracture was produced in the diaphysis of the right tibia, and maintained without immobilization in 72 male rats of Wistar lineage

  6. Quality of Ambulatory Education from the Viewpoint of the Clinical Medical Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Niroumand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ambulatory education is an integral part of medical education. The present study was carried out to evaluate the quality of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of clinical medical students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the study sample included medical externs externs and interns of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences that were selected through census sampling technique in the academic year 2012-2013. The instrument for data collection was a researcher-made questionnaire with acceptable validity and reliability. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS-16 software using descriptive statistics. Results: 65 (50% externs and 75 (65% interns participated in the study and 1588 questionnaires were completed via self-administered technique. The mean of the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was 22.6±5.2 and the mean for the clinics’ quality of physical environment was 19±5.13, indicating favorable and semi-favorable status, respectively. Qualitative evaluation of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of externs and interns showed a significant difference with more satisfaction from the part of the interns (p<0.001. Conclusion: The findings revealed that the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was favorable, but the physical condition of the clinics indicated a semi-favorable status.

  7. Impaired physical function, loss of muscle mass and assessment of biomechanical properties in critical ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum

    2012-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment. A...... potential to counteract loss of muscle mass. Despite the obvious clinical significance of muscle atrophy for the functional impairment observed in ICU survivors, no preventive therapies have been identified as yet. The overall aim of the present dissertation is to characterize aspects of physical function...... and biomechanical properties in ICU patients and to provide new insights into ICU-induced muscle wasting and the underlying biomechanical mechanisms responsible for the residual impairment of physical function in ICU survivors....

  8. Pilot biomechanical design of biomaterials for artificial nucleus prosthesis using 3D finite-element modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qijin Huang; Guoquan Liu; Yong Li; Jin Gao; Zhengqiu Gu; Yuanzheng Ma; Haibin Xue

    2004-01-01

    Pilot biomechanical design of biomaterials for artificial nucleus prosthesis was carried out based on the 3D finite-element method. Two 3D models of lumbar intervertebral disc respectively with a real human nucleus and with the nucleus removed were developed and validated using published experimental and clinical data. Then the models with a stainless steel nucleus prosthesis implanted and with polymer nucleus prostheses of various properties implanted were used for the 3D finite-element biomechanical analysis. All the above simulation and analysis were carried out for the L4/L5 disc under a human worst-daily compression load of 2000 N. The results show that the polymer materials with Young's modulus of elasticity E = 0.1-100 MPa and Poisson's ratio v=0.35-0.5 are suitable to produce artificial nucleus prosthesis in view of biomechanical consideration.

  9. Biomechanical Properties of Bone and Biomechanics of Age - Related Fractures - Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezzan Günaydın

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available From a biomechanical viewpoint, fractures are due to a structural failure of the bone. This failure occurs when the forces applied to the bone exceed its load – bearing capacity. The load – bearing capacity of a bone depends on the geometry (its size, shape and distribution of bone mass, and the material properties of a bone as well as the direction and magnitude of applied load. Bone fragility can be defined by biomechanical parameters such as strength, brittleness and work to failure. Strategies to reduce fracture risk must be based on a sound understanding of the cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms that underlie the increased risk of fractures while aging. In this review biomechanics of bone and the etiology of age – related fractures from a biomechanical viewpoint have been discussed in the view of current literature. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2007;13:44-8

  10. Systematic evaluation of observational methods assessing biomechanical exposures at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takala, Esa-Pekka; Irmeli, Pehkonen; Forsman, Mikael;

    2009-01-01

      Systematic evaluation of observational methods assessing biomechanical exposures at work   Esa-Pekka Takala 1, Irmeli Pehkonen 1, Mikael Forsman 2, Gert-Åke Hansson 3, Svend Erik Mathiassen 4, W. Patrick Neumann 5, Gisela Sjøgaard 6, Kaj Bo Veiersted 7, Rolf Westgaard 8, Jørgen Winkel 9   1...... University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, 9 University of Gothenburg and National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen   The aim of this project was to identify and systematically evaluate observational methods to assess workload on the musculoskeletal system. Searches......, and the Washington state method are checklist-type methods where each item or risk factor exceeding the criteria used in each method indicates consideration of actions at work place. In RULA weights are given to the observed items and a sum score is calculated to describe the risk. In ACGIH HAL the hand activity...

  11. [Hoarseness: biomechanisms and quantitative laryngoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysholdt, U

    2014-07-01

    Every phonosurgical procedure alters endolaryngeal anatomy; be it by removing tissue, or injection or implantation of autologous or foreign material. However, the effect that an altered airflow cross section and changed soft tissue elasticity will have on the voice cannot be predicted. With the aim of promoting rational indications for phonosurgery, the current article explains the biomechanisms of the normal and the disordered voice, including the complex interdependence of tissue viscoelasticity, glottal airstream and sound production. According to European Laryngological Society (ELS) recommendations, five - not entirely mutually independent - evaluation criteria form the basis of indication assessments: self-rating (by the patient), proxy rating (by the physician), technical signal analysis (computerized), aerodynamics (spirometry) and vibration analysis (stroboscopy). The ELS evaluation standards agreed upon in 2001 enable indications and - by virtue of pre- and postoperative comparisons - therapeutic successes to be assessed. The 10-year-old ELS protocol has been updated by a real-time method for visualizing vocal fold vibrations: the phonovibrogram (PVG) has replaced stroboscopy. Independently of the morphological anatomic details of the larynx, PVG visualizes the symmetry and regularity of vocal fold motion, thus allowing preoperative estimation of tissue elasticity. PMID:25056650

  12. Development of Clinical Pharmacy services at King Khalid University Hospital and its impact on the quality of healthcare provided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddique, Abdulaziz A

    2012-07-01

    Clinical Pharmacy is a unique service provided by the leading pharmacy departments in the United States. The concept of Clinical Pharmacy evolved after the significant increase in number of pharmaceuticals in the market and the increasing potential of drug interactions. However, the Clinical Pharmacist is not merely an individual who advises on drug interactions. There are a number of functions which include but are not limited to; the design of appropriate drug therapy, such as Pharmacokinetic assessment and evaluation to optimize drug therapy, drug information dissemination to the physicians and other healthcare providers and participation as a toxicology consultant in Poison management. At the King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) the first Clinical Pharmacy services program began in 1983. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of our Clinical Pharmacy program on the patients' care as well as its perception by the Medical staff that came from different parts of the world. Our Clinical Pharmacists were asked to record any suggestions or interventions in the form. The forms were all collected at the end of each day and entered into a database for analysis. Each intervention was analyzed in order to assess the merit of the action in terms of the therapeutic, financial and direct cost impact. The study showed a positive impact on the patients' care as well as on the economy of the drugs prescribed. Meanwhile, the service was very much appreciated by the Medical staff as well as other healthcare providers. PMID:23960800

  13. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5−/−), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0+/−; homozygous KO: AQP0−/−; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0+/− lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and together they help to confer

  14. SPORT AND EXERCISE BIOMECHANICS (BIOS INSTANT NOTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grimshaw

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION Instant Notes on Sport and Exercise Biomechanics provides a broad overview of the fundamental concepts in exercise and sport biomechanics. PURPOSE The book aims to provide instant notes on essential information about biomechanics, and is designed to help undergraduate students to grasp the corresponding subjects in physical effort rapidly and easily. AUDIENCE The book provides a useful resource for undergraduate and graduate students as a fundamental reference book. For the researcher and lecturer it would be a starting point to plan and prepare more detailed experimental designs or lecture and/or laboratory classes in the field of exercise and sport biomechanics. It would also be interest to anyone who wonders the concepts like momentum possessed, whole body angular momentum, opposite parallel forces, superman position, parabolic flight path, joint/normal reaction force, etc. FEATURES This textbook is divided into following sections from A to F: kinematics of motion, kinetics of linear motion, kinetics of angular motion, special topics, applications and measurement techniques, respectively. In sub-sections the kinematics of motion are reviewed in detail, outlining the physics of motion. Furthermore, the discussions of mechanical characteristics of motion, the mechanisms of injury, and the analysis of the sport technique provide a source of valuable information for both students and lecturers in appropriate fields. ASSESSMENT This book is an important reading for biomechanics students, teachers and even researchers as well as anyone interested in understanding motion.

  15. Achieving Educational Goals in Neurology Ward from the Viewpoint of Clinical Clerkship at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Razazian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In medical education, setting goals for clinical clerkship is the responsibility of educational groups. Taking the students' opinions into account, it is possible to study the efficacy of education in terms of learning and achieving educational goals. (1In periodontics and restorative departments of Shahed and Tehran University of Medical Sciences, it is reported that, achieving educational goals is not poss-ible (2. Also, some studies have reported the inadequacy of educational objectives in anesthesia clerkship from the viewpoint of medical students (3. In this descriptive-analytic study, 166 medical students of neurology wards at Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah during 2011- 2012 were selected via a survey to study the achievement rate of educational goals. We used a questionnaire to collect data. Reliability of the questionnaire (including content and face validity was obtained via consulting with ten faculty members of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences.The mean age of the participants was 21.34 (±1.43 years. 60.5% of them were females. 3.6% were freshmen and 49.9% were sophomores. 79.5% knew the goals before the start of clinical clerkship and 76.5% took part in the justification session in which their responsibility and method of evaluation were presented. 78.3% of them received the emergency protocol of Neurology. Overall, the participants ranked the goal achievement as high (41.6%, well (45.2% and medium (23.3%. There was no statistically significantly association between achieving educational goals and age and clinical clerkship period. However, there was a statis¬tically significantly association between the increase rate of achieving educational goals and introducing the objectives at the beginning of clinical clerkship period (p=0.011, justification session at the beginning of clinical clerkship (p=0.019 being familiar with emergency protocols of Neurology (p=0.04 and the season (winter in comparison with fall and spring in

  16. Biomechanical analysis of lumbosacral fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, D H; Cunningham, B W; Shono, Y; Myers, J J; McAfee, P C

    1992-08-01

    Flexion testing was performed until failure on 66 lumbosacral bovine spinal segments comparing ten different lumbosacral instrumentation techniques. Maximum flexion moment at failure, flexural stiffness, and maximum angulation of the lumbosacral joint at failure were determined as well as strain measurements across the anterior aspect of the lumbosacral intervertebral disc using an extensometer. The maximum moment at failure was significantly greater for the only two devices that extended fixation into the ilium anterior to the projected image of the middle osteoligamentous column: ISOLA Galveston and ISOLA iliac screws (F = 12.2, P less than 0.001). The maximum stiffness at failure reinforced these findings (F = 23.7, P less than 0.001). A second subset of stability showed the advantages of S2 pedicle fixation by increasing the flexural lever arm (Cotrel-Dubousset butterfly plate, and Cotrel-Dubousset Chopin block, P less than 0.05). This exhaustive in vitro biomechanical study introduces the concept of a pivot point at the lumbosacral joint at the intersection of the middle osteoligamentous column (sagittal plane) and the lumbosacral intervertebral disc (transverse plane). A spinal surgeon can increase the stability of lumbosacral instrumentation by extending fixation through the anterior sacral cortex (Steffee plate group with pedicle screws that medially converge in a triangular fashion). A means of enhancing this fixation was to achieve more inferior purchase by extending the fixation down to the S2 pedicle (Cotrel-Dubousset Chopin and Cotrel-Dubousset butterfly groups). However, the best fixation was achieved by obtaining purchase between the iliac cortices down into the superior acetabular bone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1523506

  17. 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference Proceedings (Abstracts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank W. Telewski; Lothar H. Koehler; Frank W. Ewers

    2003-07-20

    The 4th International Plant Biomechanics Conference facilitated an interdisciplinary exchange between scientists, engineers, and educators addressing the major questions encountered in the field of Plant Biomechanics. Subjects covered by the conference include: Evolution; Ecology; Mechanoreception; Cell Walls; Genetic Modification; Applied Biomechanics of Whole Plants, Plant Products, Fibers & Composites; Fluid Dynamics; Wood & Trees; Fracture Mechanics; Xylem Pressure & Water Transport; Modeling; and Introducing Plant Biomechanics in Secondary School Education.

  18. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J.; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-01-01

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal o...

  19. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, Roberto, E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guarnieri, Gianluigi, E-mail: gianluigiguarnieri@hotmail.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guglielmi, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.gugliemi@unifg.it [Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Muto, Mario, E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability.

  20. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability

  1. The Decline of Clinical Laboratory Science Programs in Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Janet Brown

    2000-01-01

    Enrollment in clinical laboratory science has declined over 50% since 1980. Reasons include lagging salaries, limited advancement opportunities, lack of doctoral-level faculty, and the expense of operating programs. Strategic organizational changes are needed to revive the field. (SK)

  2. Dermatophytosis Agents in Patients Who Attending to Dermatology Clinic of Fırat University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Nursel Dilek; Ahmet Yaşar Yücel; Aziz Ramazan Dilek; Yunus Saral; Zülal Aşcı Toraman

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the types of dermatophytes and dermatophytosis in Elazığ region to provide appropriate information for therapy planning and public health prevention.Methods: A total of 652 patients who attending to outpatient clinic between June 2007 – May 2008 with clinical signs of dermatophytosis were included in this study. All samples, including with negative results on direct microscopy were cultivated in Sabouraud dextrose agar (Oxoid), mycobiotic agar (Acumedia) ...

  3. Satisfaction of clinical nurses with the formation of a university tutorial program

    OpenAIRE

    Cervera Gasch, Águeda; González Chordá, Víctor; Mena Tudela, Desirée; Salas Medina, Pablo; Maciá Soler, Loreto; Orts Cortés, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Degree in nursing from the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) maintains the continuity of learning with an integrated learning methodology (theory, simulated practice and clinical practice). The objective of this methodology is to achieve consistency between the knowledge, abilities and skills acquired in the classroom, laboratory and clinic to ensure skills related. Reference Nurse is a key figure in this process, you receive accredited training on Educational Methods, assessment of competence, and E...

  4. Multiscale modeling in biomechanics and mechanobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Presenting a state-of-the-art overview of theoretical and computational models that link characteristic biomechanical phenomena, this book provides guidelines and examples for creating multiscale models in representative systems and organisms. It develops the reader's understanding of and intuition for multiscale phenomena in biomechanics and mechanobiology, and introduces a mathematical framework and computational techniques paramount to creating predictive multiscale models.   Biomechanics involves the study of the interactions of physical forces with biological systems at all scales – including molecular, cellular, tissue and organ scales. The emerging field of mechanobiology focuses on the way that cells produce and respond to mechanical forces – bridging the science of mechanics with the disciplines of genetics and molecular biology. Linking disparate spatial and temporal scales using computational techniques is emerging as a key concept in investigating some of the complex problems underlying these...

  5. Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Poul MF; Miller, Karol; Computational Biomechanics for Medicine : Deformation and Flow

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for mechanical engineers is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine. This book is an opportunity for computational biomechanics specialists to present and exchange opinions on the opportunities of applying their techniques to computer-integrated medicine. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine: Deformation and Flow collects the papers from the Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop held in Toronto in conjunction with the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention conference. The topics covered include: medical image analysis, image-guided surgery, surgical simulation, surgical intervention planning, disease prognosis and diagnostics, injury mechanism analysis, implant and prostheses design, and medical robotics.

  6. Universal Design for Learning and Its Application to Clinical Placements in Health Science Courses (Practice Brief)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan, Ann; Halligan, Phil; Quirke, Mary

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Ireland's Association for Higher Education, Access and Disability (AHEAD), in partnership with the School of Nursing University College Dublin (UCD), hosted a summer school for professionals working in the Health Sciences sector who have responsibility for including students with disabilities in the health professions, including clinical…

  7. University Counseling Center Use of Prolonged Exposure Therapy: In-Clinic Treatment for Students with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2015-01-01

    Students utilize university counseling center services to address distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since counseling centers services such as group work or general psychotherapy may not address specific PTSD-symptom reduction, centers often give community referrals in such cases. Evidence-based therapies (EBTs), including…

  8. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Healthy Children Who Applied to Erciyes University Pediatrics Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taşkın İ.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Helicobacter pylori (HP is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. The purpose of this study is to investigate the seroprevalence of HP infection in the pediatric population who applied to pediatrics outpatient clinic of Erciyes University and its relationship with different variables. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-one children (124 male, 97 female, age range: 8 months to 16 years were tested for anti-HP antibody Ig G. A questionnaire about the socioeconomic status and some living practices were completed by the familyResults: Of the 221 children, 129 (%58.4 were seropositive for HP. The seroprevalence of HP increased significantly with age and eating from the same plate. There was no correlation between HP seropositivity and other parameters.Conclusion: The rate of seropositivity of HP in children applied to Erciyes University is similar to other regions in Turkey.

  9. Influence of cavity design on the biomechanics of direct composite resin restorations in Class IV preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiping; Jiang, Zhe; Xiao, Ximei; Fu, Jing; Su, Qin

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cavity design on stress distribution and fracture resistance of direct composite resin restorations in Class IV preparations. A finite element analysis (FEA) model of the maxillary central incisor with a Class IV cavity was established. Five model variations were studied: (i) a 1-mm bevel (ii) a 2-mm bevel, (iii) a plain chamfer, (iv) a stair-step chamfer, and (v) butt joints (a control configuration). All FEA variations modeled a tooth restored with composite resin loaded under 100 N at an angle of 45° to the longitudinal axis. The interfacial von Mises stress was evaluated. The FEA was complemented with an in vitro assessment. Fracture resistance of direct composite resin restorations was tested with a universal testing machine and fracture patterns were observed. Finite element analysis showed that stress in chamfer and stair-step chamfer models was more homogenously distributed, while stress in bevel models was relatively concentrated at lingual regions. Fracture resistance of a 1-mm bevel preparation was lower than for the 2-mm bevel, plain chamfer, and stair-step chamfer preparations, but was higher than for butt joints. The stair-step chamfer group presented the most favorable failure pattern. Considering biomechanics and esthetics, the present study indicates that the stair-step chamfer and 2-mm bevel should be recommended for clinical restoration. PMID:22409223

  10. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu Kumari, S; Gupta, Neha; Shiels, Alan; FitzGerald, Paul G; Menon, Anil G; Mathias, Richard T; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5(-/-)), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0(+/-); homozygous KO: AQP0(-/-); all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0(+/-) lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and together they help to confer

  11. Analysis of Biomechanical Factors in Bend Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sprint running is the demonstration of comprehensive abilities of technology and tactics, under various conditions. However, whether it is just to allocate the tracks for short-distance athletes from different racetracks has been the hot topic. This study analyzes its forces, differences in different tracks and winding influences, in the aspects of sport biomechanics. The results indicate, many disadvantages exist in inner tracks, middle tracks are the best and outer ones are inferior to middle ones. Thus it provides references for training of short-distance items in biomechanics and psychology, etc.

  12. Treatment of the carcinoma of the vulva at the 1st University-Clinic of Gynaecology in Vienna (386 cases)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucera, H. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). Strahlenabteilung)

    1980-09-01

    In the department of radiotherapy of the 1st University-Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Vienna the electroresection and electrocoagulation is practiced with good success in the treatment of carcinoma of the vulva. Of 386 treated cases with vulvar carcinoma, 234 (60,6%) were alive after five years. After surgical treatment the inguinal lymphonodes were irradiated (6000 rad). In comparison with the international statistic of the Annual Report of the results of treatment in gynaecological cancer (1979) the results obtained in Vienna are much better than the international average.

  13. Treatment of the carcinoma of the vulva at the 1st University-Clinic of Gynaecology in Vienna (386 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the department of radiotherapy of the 1st University-Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Vienna the electroresection and electrocoagulation is practiced with good success in the treatment of carcinoma of the vulva. Of 386 treated cases with vulvar carcinoma, 234 (60,6%) were alive after five years. After surgical treatment the inguinal lymphonodes were irradiated (6000 rad). In comparison with the international statistic of the Annual Report of the results of treatment in gynaecological cancer (1979) the results obtained in Vienna are much better than the international average. (orig.)

  14. Bacteriemia during endodontic treatment in relation to the technique of biomechanical preparation: randomized clinical trial Bacteriemia durante o tratamento endodôntico em função da técnica de preparo biomecânico: ensaio clínico randomizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane Tenório Dourado

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the frequency of bacteriemia during endodontic treatment, with comparison between two techniques for biomechanical preparation of the root canal system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample comprised 50 patients aged 16 to 52 years, of both genders, which were divided into 2 groups with 25 patients each. Group I underwent biomechanical preparation by the step-back technique, and Group II was treated by the rotary technique with nickel-titanium instruments (K3. Patients were submitted to antisepsis of the oral cavity with chlorhexidine digluconate and three samples of blood were collected for blood culture: preoperatively, immediately after the biomechanical preparation and 10 minutes later. The significance level adopted was 5.0%, and analysis was performed by descriptive and inferential statistics by means of the Fisher's exact test, Fisher-Freeman-Halton test and Student's t test. Data were analyzed on the Statexact and SPSS softwares. RESULTS: All blood cultures achieved before and immediately after preparation were negative. On the other hand, with regard to the blood cultures collected 10 minutes after preparation, one (4% positive case was found for Group I. However, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.50. CONCLUSION: The frequency of bacteriemia was low and observed just for Group I.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste ensaio clínico randomizado foi avaliar a freqüência de bacteriemia durante o tratamento endodôntico comparando duas técnicas de preparo biomecânico do sistema de canais radiculares. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: A amostra constou de 50 pacientes, com idade variando entre 16 e 52 anos e de ambos os sexos, sendo dividida em 2 grupos de 25 pacientes. No Grupo I, realizou-se o preparo biomecânico através da técnica escalonada com recuo progressivo programado, e, no Grupo II, por meio técnica rotatória, empregando instrumentos de níquel-titânio (K3

  15. Clinical experiences of undergraduate dental students in pediatric dentistry at Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stewart, Christopher J

    2010-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the number and range of clinical procedures completed by undergraduate dental students in pediatric dentistry in Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Ireland, and to compare the number of procedures undertaken with the subsequent examination scores. The work comprised a retrospective audit of clinical logbooks for all of the undergraduate dental students in one cohort through their fourth and fifth clinical years between 2004 and 2006. Thirty-four quantitative logbooks were audited. Students had seen a total of 1,031 patients, and each student had completed a full course of dental treatment for an average of twenty-two children. Students completed means of 30.2 restorative procedures for children, fourteen in deciduous dentition (range six to twenty-eight), and seventeen in permanent dentition (range seven to twenty-eight). Continuity of education and care (measured through children having their treatment fully completed by the same student) was 72 percent. A moderate positive correlation between levels of clinical experience and exam score was identified. All students gained experience in management of child patients with students providing care for an average of thirty children and a minimum of nineteen.

  16. Biomechanical Analysis of Force Distribution in Human Finger Extensor Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx’s dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the “Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy” is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo.

  17. Clinical experience of therapy with cyclotron neutrons at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proper clinical evaluation of fast neutron teletherapy of human cancers will be difficult and time-consuming and will require extension over many years. Fast neutron teletherapy may not have significant advantage over modern conventional supervoltage/megavoltage radiation therapy. A negative answer will be acceptable only if based on sound evidence. If fast neutron teletherapy has an advantage over modern conventional radiation therapy, the advantage may be small and tumor- and site-specific. Detection of a small advantage will require study of a large number of patients and this will be possible only in carefully planned cooperative clinical trials. The study of a large number of patients over a long period will require installation of dedicated neutron generators in research-oriented medical centers. Cooperative clinical trials must be preceded by careful definition of target tumors, normal tissue tolerances, reasonable doses and advantageous patterns of application. Any improvement in local tumor control attributed to fast neutron teletherapy might be dissipated by a concurrent increase in treatment-related sequelae. Much related physics and radiobiology remains to be done and must be supported concurrent with the clinical programs

  18. Interdisciplinary Vertical Integration: The Future of Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The field of biomechanics has grown rapidly in the past 30 years in both size and complexity. As a result, the term might mean different things to different people. This article addresses the issues facing the field in the form of challenges biomechanists face in the future. Because the field is so diverse, strength within the different areas of…

  19. Biomechanics/risk management (Working Group 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Mariano; Naert, Ignace; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The remit of this workgroup was to update the existing knowledge base in biomechanical factors, navigation systems and medications that may affect the outcome of implant therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The literature was systematically searched and critically reviewed. Five manuscrip...

  20. The biomechanical interaction between horse and rider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cocq, de P.

    2012-01-01

    The forces exerted by a rider on a horse have a direct influence on the mechanical load experienced by the horse and consequently on its motion pattern. The aim of this thesis is to explore the biomechanical interaction between rider, saddle and horse in order to get insight in the loading of the ho

  1. The Value of Biomechanical Research in Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, D. A.

    Simple observation of dance movement, while very useful, can lead to misconceptions, about the physical realities of dance movement, that make learning difficult. This gap between reality and understanding can be reduced by the application of biomechanical techniques such as cinematography, electromyography, and force-plate analysis. Biomechanical…

  2. Heparin nanomodification improves biocompatibility and biomechanical stability of decellularized vascular scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Y; Hu T; Wu Z.; Tang H; Hu Y; Tan Q; Wu C

    2012-01-01

    Yunming Tao,1,2 Tiehui Hu,1 Zhongshi Wu,1 Hao Tang,1 Yerong Hu,1 Qi Tan,1 Chunlin Wu11Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha; 2Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Ji'an Central People’s Hospital, Ji'an, Jiangxi Province, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Biocompatibility and biomechanical stability are two of the main obstacles limiting the effectiveness of vascular sca...

  3. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria among Pregnant Women Attending An-tenatal Clinic at the University Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Acheampong, I.; N. Amidu; Bio, F.Y.; Quaye, L; Obirikorang, C.; Addo, K.

    2012-01-01

    The apparent decline in immunity of pregnant women appears to promote the growth of both com-mensal and non-commensal microorganisms. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women visiting the University hospital, Ku-masi. This prospective hospital-based study was carried out between April-June 2009. A total of 200 pregnant women were recruited for this study. The ages of the women ranged from 15 to 46 years. About 5-10mls of clean ca...

  4. Computer Models in Biomechanics From Nano to Macro

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    This book contains a collection of papers that were presented at the IUTAM Symposium on “Computer Models in Biomechanics: From Nano to Macro” held at Stanford University, California, USA, from August 29 to September 2, 2011. It contains state-of-the-art papers on: - Protein and Cell Mechanics: coarse-grained model for unfolded proteins, collagen-proteoglycan structural interactions in the cornea, simulations of cell behavior on substrates - Muscle Mechanics: modeling approaches for Ca2+–regulated smooth muscle contraction, smooth muscle modeling using continuum thermodynamical frameworks, cross-bridge model describing the mechanoenergetics of actomyosin interaction, multiscale skeletal muscle modeling - Cardiovascular Mechanics: multiscale modeling of arterial adaptations by incorporating molecular mechanisms, cardiovascular tissue damage, dissection properties of aortic aneurysms, intracranial aneurysms, electromechanics of the heart, hemodynamic alterations associated with arterial remodeling followin...

  5. Dermatophytosis Agents in Patients Who Attending to Dermatology Clinic of Fırat University Hospital

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    Nursel Dilek

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to investigate the types of dermatophytes and dermatophytosis in Elazığ region to provide appropriate information for therapy planning and public health prevention.Methods: A total of 652 patients who attending to outpatient clinic between June 2007 – May 2008 with clinical signs of dermatophytosis were included in this study. All samples, including with negative results on direct microscopy were cultivated in Sabouraud dextrose agar (Oxoid, mycobiotic agar (Acumedia and potato dextrose agar (Oxoid. Results: Dermatophytes were isolated in 142 (21.8% out of all samples. Of the isolates 70.4% were Trichophyton rubrum, 15.4% were Trichophyton mentagrophytes, 4.2% were , 4.2% were Microsporum canis, 2.8% were Epidermophyton floccosum, 2.11% were Trichophyton violaceum, 0.7% were Trichophyton tonsurans.Conclusion: Trichophyton rubrum was most frequently isolated dermatophytosis agent in Elazığ region.

  6. Promoting Mentalization in Clinical Psychology at Universities: A Linguistic Analysis of Student Accounts

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    Maria Francesca Freda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the structure of mentalization (Bateman & Fonagy, 2012 in a training context. The dual purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of practicum student training and whether the Linguistic Inquiry method (Pennebaker, 2000 could be used to evaluate the three dimensions of mentalization — relational, cognitive, and emotional. The training utilized the groups and their accounts as devices and mediators to conceptualize the relationship between self-mentalizing training, the academic context and the practicum experience. Accounts from 38 Italian students pursuing master degree in Clinical, Dynamic, and Community Psychology were analyzed by LIWC software. The Wilcoxon test showed a significant increase in mentalizing words during the middle and end of the term, as compared with the beginning. The results displayed a need to promote mentalization within academic settings and indicated the value of this competence for clinical psychology.

  7. Client perceptions of dietetic students and registered dietitians at a university-based nutrition clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, G W

    1990-03-01

    Client perceptions of students enrolled in a nutrition counseling practicum were compared with client perceptions of those students' clinical instructors, who were registered dietitians. One hundred forty-two clients who had either a student (no. = 81) or a dietitian (no. = 61) as primary counselor completed a postcard evaluation or a telephone interview. Students were rated significantly more positively (p less than .01) than their instructors for the item "I would recommend the clinic to others" and (p less than .05) for the items "The counselor helped me with my problem" and "I learned at the clinic what I did not know before." Seventy-two of the 89 clients interviewed by telephone replied to the question "Did students enhance or detract from services provided?" Sixty-one percent replied that students enhanced, but 25% replied that students detracted in some way, primarily because of concerns about having an additional observer during counseling sessions. In general, clients receiving nutrition counseling evaluated student dietitians very positively. PMID:2307818

  8. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-01

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (pmechanics exhibited significant relationships with age. Nonlinear flexibility curves described the functional response of the cervical spine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects. PMID:23415075

  9. Mini clinical evaluation exercise in undergraduate dermatovenereology education: an experience of University of Pamukkale, Medical Faculty

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    Şeniz Ergin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX is being widely used in medical education and is a reliable and valid method for the assessment of residents’ competency in medical interviewing, physical examination, humanistic qualities/professionalism, clinical judgment, counseling skills, organization, and efficiency. In order to enhance formative evaluation methods in our faculty, we planned to apply the method to students on dermatovenereology training. Materials and Methods: The Mini-CEX was performed by residents to 42 medical students. At first, 5 residents were evaluated by a faculty member with Mini-CEX and were informed about their application-oriented evaluator roles. The students were informed prior to conducting the assessment. Standard Mini-CEX form was used for the assessment. The participants were rated in 7 competencies and each was rated using a 9-point Likert scale. At the end of each encounter, students and evaluators rated their satisfaction with Mini-CEX using a 9-point Likert scale. Student’s t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for statistical analysis. Student feedback was evaluated with “grounded theory”. Results: A total of 50 assessments, 44 in outpatient and 6 in inpatient clinic, were performed. Satisfaction with the Mini-CEX was rated by the evaluators and the students as 7,16 and 7,98, respectively. There was no significant difference between the evaluators in terms of student satisfaction. Average time spent on observing the encounter and in giving feedback was 16.5 and 6.5 minutes, respectively. There was no significant difference between assessors in terms of time spent observing and giving feedback. Average scores of assessed clinical competencies were between 4,28 and 8,14. The highest scores were reported on humanistic qualities/ professionalism whereas the lowest were reported on clinical judgment skills. Discussion: According to our data, we believe that Mini-CEX may be used as an

  10. On the prospect of patient-specific biomechanics without patient-specific properties of tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karol; Lu, Jia

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents main theses of two keynote lectures delivered at Euromech Colloquium "Advanced experimental approaches and inverse problems in tissue biomechanics" held in Saint Etienne in June 2012. We are witnessing an advent of patient-specific biomechanics that will bring in the future personalized treatments to sufferers all over the world. It is the current task of biomechanists to devise methods for clinically-relevant patient-specific modeling. One of the obstacles standing before the biomechanics community is the difficulty in obtaining patient-specific properties of tissues to be used in biomechanical models. We postulate that focusing on reformulating computational mechanics problems in such a way that the results are weakly sensitive to the variation in mechanical properties of simulated continua is more likely to bear fruit in near future. We consider two types of problems: (i) displacement-zero traction problems whose solutions in displacements are weakly sensitive to mechanical properties of the considered continuum; and (ii) problems that are approximately statically determinate and therefore their solutions in stresses are also weakly sensitive to mechanical properties of constituents. We demonstrate that the kinematically loaded biomechanical models of the first type are applicable in the field of image-guided surgery where the current, intraoperative configuration of a soft organ is of critical importance. We show that sac-like membranes, which are prototypes of many thin-walled biological organs, are approximately statically determinate and therefore useful solutions for wall stress can be obtained without the knowledge of the wall's properties. We demonstrate the clinical applicability and effectiveness of the proposed methods using examples from modeling neurosurgery and intracranial aneurysms. PMID:23491073

  11. The knowledge and attitude about HIV/AIDS among Jordanian dental students: (Clinical versus pre clinical students at the University of Jordan

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    Shayyab Mohammad H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study aimed to address the suspected deficiency in the level of understanding of HIV/AIDS among clinical and pre clinical dental students at the University of Jordan. In this cross-sectional study, structured questionnaires were distributed to fifth year dental students (n = 121 and to third year dental students (n = 144 in the academic year 2008/2009. Findings Significantly higher percentage of fifth-year students compared to third-year students felt that the teaching they received on cross-infection precautions and barrier dentistry was adequate (P Significantly higher proportion of third-year students compared to fifth-year (39.2% vs. 26.3% thought that HIV patients should be referred to other centers or support groups for treatment (P = 0.04. Conclusions The level of knowledge of Jordanian dental students about HIV and AIDS was generally acceptable; there were inadequacies, however, in their understanding regarding some aspects of AIDS epidemic which demands that dental school curriculum needs some improvement.

  12. Dosimetric comparison of the linear accelerators at the University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Oncology in Skopje, Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiotherapy practice, for various practical reasons it is important to know whether two or more linear accelerators (linacs) are dosimetric matched and whether the patient’s treatment can be shifted from one linac to another without reducing the treatment quality. This work presents the data from the dosimetric comparison of the two Varian Clinacs 23EX and one Varian Clinac iX at the University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Oncology in Skopje. Both Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and Beam Profile (BP) curves were compared for the photon energies (6MV, 15MV) in use at the clinic. The comparison was performed using the IBA OmniPro Accept 7.4™ software. The results from the comparison of the PDD curves showed that in the clinically significant region the dose differences were smaller than 1%. The results from the comparison of the in line and cross line BP curves showed that in the flattened area the dose differences were smaller than 2.5%, while in the penumbra region they were usually between 2% and 8%, but sometimes up to 21%. This suggests that for treatments where the influence of the penumbra region is small, the three linacs may be considered to be dosimetric matched. For treatments where the influence of the penumbra region is greater, the patient can be switched to another machine only after recalculation of the treatment plan. (Author)

  13. Expandable intramedullary nail - experimental biomechanical evaluation

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    A. Kajzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents results of experimental analysis of femur and femur – expandable intramedullary nail system. The aim of the work was to determine displacement in three models. In addition, the torsion of the system aiming at determining the moments depending on the torsional angle of the bone was carried out.Design/methodology/approach: Three femurs were selected for studies. The analysis was carried out on the femur – expandable intramedullary nail system. The influence of the loads and displacements on the bone – nail system on the results of experimental analysis was analysed. In order to carry out calculations, three models were selected: model I – bone without fracture gap, model II and III – femur with expansion intramedullary nails – fracture gap was located 100 mm under greater trochanter. The studies were performed on femur models produced by Swedish company Sawbones. The intramedullary „Fixion IM” nails (Ti-6Al-4V alloy were implanted into the bone. Displacements of determinated models were being recorded from the sensors every 100 N from 10 N to 2000 N.Findings: The analyses showed the difference in displacements, depending on the selected models.Research limitations/implications: The limitations were connected with simplification of boundary conditions during analysis which were the result of the simplification of the models. While studying, muscles and ligaments supporting the bone in anatomic position were not taken into consideration. Instead, the system has been loaded with the axial force (compression.Practical implications: The obtained results can be useful in clinical practice. They can be applied in selection of stabilization methods or rehabilitation as well as in describing the biomechanical conditions connected with type of bone fracture obtained from medical imaging.Originality/value: . The work compares the values of displacement of characteristic points of femur (healthy – model I with the

  14. [Dynamics of hip joint biomechanics in patients with coxarthrosis at the time of hippotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nareklishvili, T M

    2008-02-01

    The problems of degenerative-dystrophic abnormalities stimulate the development of new skills and methods of treatment and rehabilitation of the diseases. The goal of the study was to determine the efficacy of hippotherapy in patients with coxarthrosis, according to functional and biomechanical parameters. Hippotherapy involves the utilization of horseback riding to stimulate the patient's normal reactions and locomotion; to improve the balance and coordination of movement, normalize muscle tension, and eliminate pathological reflexes. The advantage of the hippotherapy is in the specific posture, which is adopted by hip joint at the time of riding and in movement, which is accomplished by rider, at different paces of the horse. 10 female patients from 14 to 32 years old with coxarthrosis were under the observation. The rehabilitation of the patients was carried out by means of hippotherapy, which consisted of three months riding three times a week. To evaluate the efficacy of treatment, a new method of biomechanical registration of hip joint movement during hippotherapy on pacing horse was developed. The dynamics of biomechanical curves before and after the treatment, as well as the clinical and functional parameters of the patients allowed the authors to conclude: hippotherapy improves a hip joint functional state in patients with coxarthrosis; improves the muscle-tendineous component of hip joint movement. Hippotherapy may be considered as the pathogenetic method of treatment of coxarthrosis. Drawing the biomechanical curve of hip joint movement at the time of riding is the objective method of studying its function. PMID:18401052

  15. Planning, expectation, and image evaluation for PACS at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, E. A., Jr.; Smith, Wilbur L.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Owen, David A.; Hilsenrath, Peter

    1990-08-01

    Our strategy in studying PACS is to evaluate its clinical implementation working with equipment supplied by an established manufacturer. Fiscal and personnel resources required to design and integrate the hardware components and operational software to develop a functional PACS precluded a bottom up development approach at our institution. Imaging equipment vendors possess more abundant design development resources for this task and therefore can support a more rapid development of the initial components of PACS. For this reason we have chosen to serve as a beta test site to study the viability of the basic PACS components in a clinical setting. Our efforts primarily focus on: (1) image quality; (2) cost effectiveness; (3) PACS/HIS/RIS integration; (4) equipment and software reliability; and (5) overall system performance. The results of our studies are shared with the vendor for future PACS development and refi nement. To attain our investigational goals we have formed an interdisciplinary team of Radiologists, Perceptual Psychologist, Economist, Electrical and Industrial Engineers, Hospital Information System personnel and key departmental administrative staff. For several reasons Pediatric Radiology was targeted as the initial area for our PACS study: a small area representative of the overall operation,tight operational controls and willingness of physicians. We used a step-wise approach, the first step being the installation of PACS exclusively within the physical confines of Pediatric Radiology.

  16. Dental emergencies in a university pediatric dentistry clinic: a retrospective study

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    Ayah Qassem Shqair

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of children visit a dentist for the first time due to emergency situations. However, little is known regarding the prevalence, etiology, and treatment provided for children at emergency dental visits. This study aimed to evaluate the profile of children attending a dental school emergency clinic, the reasons for seeking dental care, and the treatment provided. Records of 270 patients who attended an emergency clinic during 2010 were analyzed, and 253 were selected. Demographic, diagnostic, and procedural information was collected. The mean child age was 7.8 years. For 208 children (82%, pain was the main reason for the emergency visit. Nearly 79% of the visits were due to caries, and the most frequently required treatment was endodontic intervention (31.22%. Of the decayed teeth, 61.70% were primary posterior teeth and 31.9% permanent posterior teeth. Pain caused by dental decay was the most frequent chief complaint. A large number of children were brought to the dentist with complaints that had started long before, for which over-the-counter medications had been used.

  17. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

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    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Shiels, Alan [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); FitzGerald, Paul G. [Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Menon, Anil G. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mathias, Richard T. [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States); Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan, E-mail: kulandaiappan.varadaraj@stonybrook.edu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5{sup −/−}), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0{sup +/−}; homozygous KO: AQP0{sup −/−}; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0{sup +/−} lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and

  18. Biomechanical failure of metacarpal fracture resorbable plate fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionelli, Gerald T; Korentager, Richard A

    2002-08-01

    Metacarpal fractures are a relatively common hand injury that may require operative intervention to ensure adequate reduction and stabilization. The use of permanent hardware, although acceptable, may lead to complications and an increased number of surgical procedures. The use of resorbable hardware such as poly-L-lactic acid and polyglycolic acid copolymer plates and screws may circumvent some of these complications. In vitro studies have demonstrated that the biomechanical characteristics of these resorbable plates may provide the rigid fixation necessary to allow for union of metacarpal fractures in vivo. However, limited clinical data are available regarding the success of their use in this application. The authors present what they believe is the first reported case of the failure of a poly-L-lactic acid and polyglycolic acid copolymer miniplate after use in the fixation of a metacarpal shaft fracture. PMID:12187350

  19. Biomechanical Effect of Chinese Immobilization Using Little Splint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mei; ZHAO Namula

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization using little splint is an original innovation of Chinese people for the fracture fixation, which is simple to use and clinically effective. It was found that Chinese immobilization using little splint can make the non-invasive, uncovering, and trouble free healing of bone fracture via harmonious unity of the structure stability and the force balance, of the motion stability and the stress adaptability, of the constant and discontinuous physiological stress. The biomechanical effect of Chinese immobilization using little splint, including entirety, dynamic, and functional fixity, is the root cause of its inheritance and the use up to now, and also is a direction of today's fracture fixation towards personalization, individuality and entirety.

  20. Denture-Related Biomechanical Factors for Fixed Partial Dentures Retained on Short Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, Bernhard; Hingsammer, Lukas; Haas, Robert; Mailath-Pokorny, Georg; Busenlechner, Dieter; Watzek, Georg; Fürhauser, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Prosthodontically driven biomechanical considerations are essential for longterm successful outcomes in dental implant therapy. Correct protocols seek to preclude potential consequences associated with functional and parafunctional occlusal overload such as screw loosening, component fracture, compromised marginal bone maintenance, and the integrity of the induced osseointegration response. Other concerns also need to be addressed, more especially when other implants are selected, for example: bridge insertion torque (BIT) in cases of immediate loading, cantilever length-anteroposterior spread ratio (CL-AP), overall crown-to-implant ratio (oCIR), total bone-to-implant surface area (tBICA), and the status of the opposing dentition. In spite of promising clinical results, evidence-based clinical protocols demand that such biomechanical limits still need to be determined. PMID:26218027

  1. Overview of two years of clinical experience of chest tomo-synthesis at Sahlgrenska university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since December 2006, ∼ 3800 clinical chest tomo-synthesis examinations have been performed at our department at Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital. A subset of the examinations has been included in studies of the detectability of pulmonary nodules, using computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard. Visibility studies, in which chest tomo-synthesis and CT have been compared side-by side, have been used to determine the depiction potential of chest tomo-synthesis. Comparisons with conventional chest radiography have been made. In the clinical setting, chest tomo-synthesis has mostly been used as an additional examination. The most frequent indication for chest tomo-synthesis has been suspicion of a nodule or tumour. In visibility studies, tomo-synthesis has depicted over 90% of the nodules seen on the CT scan. The corresponding figure for chest radiography has been <30%. In the detection studies, the lesion-level sensitivity has been ∼ 60% for tomo-synthesis and 20% for chest radiography. In one of the detection studies, an analysis of all false-positive nodules was performed. This analysis showed that all findings had morphological correlates on the CT examinations. The majority of the false-positive nodules were localised in the immediate sub-pleural region. In conclusion, chest tomo-synthesis is an improved chest radiography method, which can be used to optimise the use of CT resources, thereby reducing the radiation dose to the patient population. However, there are some limitations with chest tomo-synthesis. For example, patients undergoing tomo-synthesis have to be able to stand still and hold their breath firmly for 10 s. Also, chest tomo-synthesis has a limited depth resolution, which may explain why pathology in the sub-pleural region is more difficult to interpret and artefacts from medical devices may occur. (authors)

  2. Histopathological Study of Hysterectomy Operations in A University Clinic in Tehran From 2005 to 2009

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    Mahmoud Khaniki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We intended to determine causes and histological pattern of hysterectomies in an Iranianpopulation.Materials and methods: Archived reports of pathology department of a university hospital dated March2005 to March 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Age, chief complaint, type of operation includingabdominal, vaginal and subtotal hysterectomy, the indication of the operation and the pathology of thespecimen were retrieved from the records.Results: The average rate of hysterectomy was 219 per year. The average age of the patients was49.6±11.3. About 40% of cases aged 45-54 years. The main chief compliant was abnormal uterinebleeding (62.2%. The leading preoperative indication for hysterectomy operations were uterineleiomyoma (24.8% and then abnormal uterine bleeding and abdominal/pelvic mass. The most frequentpathologic findings were leiomyoma (22.0% and adenomyosis (12.1%. In 11.8% of hysterectomyspecimens no pathologic lesion was found.Conclusion: The hysterectomy is rather common in Iran with age dependent pattern of indications andcorresponding pathologies.

  3. Isolation, Identification, and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Dermatophytes from Clinical Samples at Sohag University Hospital in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Mona Fattouh Mohamed; El-din, Asmaa Nasr; El-Hamd, Mohammed Abu

    2016-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and explore the in-vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern of dermatophytes isolated from clinically suspected cases of dermatophytosis (tinea infections) attending the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic. Methods This study was conducted at Sohag University Hospital from December 2014 to December 2015. Clinical samples (e.g., skin scrapings and hair stumps) were collected under aseptic precautions. The identification of dermatophytes was performed through microscopic examination using 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) with 40% dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) mounts and culture on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and on Dermasel agar base media, both supplemented with chloramphenicol and cycloheximide. All dermatophytes isolates were subjected to antifungal susceptibility testing using the agar-based disk diffusion (ABDD) method against Clotrimazole, Miconazole, Fluconazole, and Griseofulvin. Data were analyzed via SPSS 16, using Chi square and a screening test (cross-tabulation method). Results A total of 110 patients of dermatophytosis were studied. The patients were clinically diagnosed and mycologically confirmed as having tinea capitis (49), tinea corporis (30), tinea pedis (16), tinea cruris (9), or tinea barbae (6). The dermatophytes isolates belonged to 4 species: Microsporum canis 58 (52.7%), Microsporum gypseum 23 (20.9%), Trichophyton mentagrophytes 18 (16.4%), and Microsporum audouinii 11 (10%). The most effective antifungal drugs tested were Clotrimazole, followed by Miconazole (95.5% and 84.5% of isolates were susceptible, respectively). Conclusion Every patient with a tinea infection should be properly studied for a mycological examination and should be treated accordingly. Dermasel agar is more useful as an identification medium in the isolation of dermatophytes. The ABDD method appears to be a simple, cost-effective, and promising method for the evaluation of antifungal susceptibility of dermatophytes. PMID

  4. The role of the Oregon State University Endophyte Service Laboratory in diagnosing clinical cases of endophyte toxicoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, A Morrie; Blythe, Linda L; Duringer, Jennifer M

    2014-07-30

    The Oregon State University Colleges of Veterinary Medicine and Agricultural Sciences instituted the Endophyte Service Laboratory to aid in diagnosing toxicity problems associated with cool-season grasses in livestock. The endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophalum) present in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) produces ergopeptine alkaloids, of which ergovaline is the molecule used to determine exposure and toxicity thresholds for the vasoconstrictive conditions "fescue foot" and "summer slump". Another vasoconstrictive syndrome, "ergotism," is caused by a parasitic fungus, Claviceps purpurea, and its primary toxin, ergotamine. "Ryegrass staggers" is a neurological condition that affects livestock consuming endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii)-infected perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) with high levels of lolitrem B. HPLC-fluorescent analytical methods for these mycotoxins are described and were used to determine threshold levels of toxicity for ergovaline and lolitrem B in cattle, sheep, horses, and camels. In addition, six clinical cases in cattle are presented to illustrate diagnosis of these three diseases. PMID:25017309

  5. Inter-assessor reliability of practice based biomechanical assessment of the foot and ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvis Hannah L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no consensus on which protocols should be used to assess foot and lower limb biomechanics in clinical practice. The reliability of many assessments has been questioned by previous research. The aim of this investigation was to (i identify (through consensus what biomechanical examinations are used in clinical practice and (ii evaluate the inter-assessor reliability of some of these examinations. Methods Part1: Using a modified Delphi technique 12 podiatrists derived consensus on the biomechanical examinations used in clinical practice. Part 2: Eleven podiatrists assessed 6 participants using a subset of the assessment protocol derived in Part 1. Examinations were compared between assessors. Results Clinicians choose to estimate rather than quantitatively measure foot position and motion. Poor inter-assessor reliability was recorded for all examinations. Intra-class correlation coefficient values (ICC for relaxed calcaneal stance position were less than 0.23 and were less than 0.14 for neutral calcaneal stance position. For the examination of ankle joint dorsiflexion, ICC values suggest moderate reliability (less than 0.61. The results of a random effects ANOVA highlight that participant (up to 5.7°, assessor (up to 5.8° and random (up to 5.7° error all contribute to the total error (up to 9.5° for relaxed calcaneal stance position, up to 10.7° for the examination of ankle joint dorsiflexion. Kappa Fleiss values for categorisation of first ray position and mobility were less than 0.05 and for limb length assessment less than 0.02, indicating slight agreement. Conclusion Static biomechanical assessment of the foot, leg and lower limb is an important protocol in clinical practice, but the key examinations used to make inferences about dynamic foot function and to determine orthotic prescription are unreliable.

  6. On the prospect of patient-specific biomechanics without patient-specific properties of tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Karol; Lu, Jia

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents main theses of two keynote lectures delivered at Euromech Colloquium “Advanced experimental approaches and inverse problems in tissue biomechanics” held in Saint Etienne in June 2012. We are witnessing an advent of patient-specific biomechanics that will bring in the future personalized treatments to sufferers all over the world. It is the current task of biomechanists to devise methods for clinically-relevant patient-specific modeling. One of the obstacles standing before...

  7. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria among Pregnant Women Attending An-tenatal Clinic at the University Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acheampong, I.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The apparent decline in immunity of pregnant women appears to promote the growth of both com-mensal and non-commensal microorganisms. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women visiting the University hospital, Ku-masi. This prospective hospital-based study was carried out between April-June 2009. A total of 200 pregnant women were recruited for this study. The ages of the women ranged from 15 to 46 years. About 5-10mls of clean catch urine was cultured on Cysteine Lactose Electrolyte Deficient (CLED agar aerobically at 37oC . Isolates were identified to the species level using standard proto-col. Antibiotic sensitivity test were carried out using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Of the 200 women examined, 19 had significant bacteriuria representing a prevalence of 9.5% in the study population. Pregnant women in their second trimester from the study had the highest prevalence of significant bacteriuria (52.6% with age ranges between 30-34 years having the highest prevalence (36.8%. Nulliparous women were 35 (17.5% with 3 (8.6% testing positive for bacteriuria and 165 (82.5% were multiparous with 16 (9.7% testing positive for bacteriuria. E. coli (36.8% was the common bacteria isolate from this study. From this study, asymptomatic bacteriuria is common among antenatal women in the population studied. It is therefore recommended that periodic test-ing of pregnant women is advocated and those found to be infected need to be treated to avoid complications.

  8. Antibiotic prescribing and resistance: knowledge level of medical students of clinical years of University Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mainul Haque, Nor Iza A Rahman, Zainal Zulkifli, Salwani Ismail Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia Abstract: The innovation of penicillin by Dr Alexander Fleming in 1928 and its use in clinical practice saved many lives, especially during the Second World War. Tuberculosis still carries a significant public health threat and has re-emerged over the past two decades, even in modern countries where tuberculosis was thought to be eliminated. The World Health Organization defines antimicrobial resistance as the resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial drug that was initially effective for treatment of infections caused by the microbe. Therefore, the findings of the current study will provide data to enable the design of a new educational program to better equip our students in confronting antimicrobial resistance. This study was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey, which was undertaken in the Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia. The study participants were students of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program (MBBS of Year III, IV, and V. A total of 142 out of 164 (86% medical students returned the questionnaire. Specifically, the year-wise breakdown of responses was 29% (41, 39% (55, and 32% (45 for Year III, IV, and V, respectively. Among the study respondents, 28% (40 were male, and the remaining 72% (102 were female. In all, 67% of the participants felt more confident in “making an accurate diagnosis of infection/sepsis.” The majority (88% of the study participants stated that they would like more training on antibiotic selection. This research has found that there is a gap between theoretical input and clinical practice; the students are demanding more educational intervention to face the threat of antimicrobial resistance. Keywords: antibiotic, prescribing, resistance, medical students, knowledge

  9. Análise clínica e biomecânica do efeito do diclofenaco sódico na consolidação da fratura da tíbia no rato Clinical and biomechanical analysis of the effect of diclofenac sodium in tibial fracture healing in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Swain Müller

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Os AINH (Antiinflamatórios não hormonais são agentes utilizados na prática clínica que interferem no processo inflamatório pela inibição da síntese de prostaglandinas e tromboxanos. Alguns trabalhos experimentais investigaram sua ação no processo de consolidação de fraturas, por meio de estudos clínicos e histológicos, sendo escassas as análises biomecânicas. Nesse estudo foram utilizados 20 ratos da linhagem Wistar, divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos iguais: grupo A (controle e grupo B (tratado com diclofenaco sódico. Em ambos os grupos foram realizadas fraturas abertas, após perfuração, na tíbia direita. A administração da droga foi via intramuscular, dose única diária, por 28 dias. Os animais foram pesados semanalmente. Após o sacrifício as tíbias foram dissecadas, pesadas e submetidas a ensaio biomecânico de flexão analisando-se carga máxima, deformação e coeficiente de rigidez. Observou-se que no grupo tratado com AINH não houve aumento do peso corpóreo a partir da segunda semana e as tíbias fraturadas foram mais pesadas. Neste grupo o calo ósseo suportou menor carga máxima, apresentando maior deformação e menor coeficiente de rigidez. Nos animais tratados, o osso não fraturado também se mostrou menos rígido. Concluiu-se, nas condições estudadas, que o DS alterou o processo de consolidação e o metabolismo ósseo, levando a retardo na maturação do calo e menor rigidez do osso intacto, respectivamente.The antinflammatories are agents utilized on clinical practice that interfere on inflammatory process by synthesis inhibition of prostaglandin and tromboxanes. Some experimental studies investigated their action on the fractures consolidation process, through clinical and histological studies, as the biomechanical analyses are scarce. In this study, 20 (twenty Wistar pedigree rats were used, aleatory divided into two groups: A group (control and B group (treated with diclofenac. In both

  10. Oral health knowledge among pre-clinical students of International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Oral health is an important issue in public health with a great impact on individuals’ general health status. A good access to oral healthcare services and a good knowledge of it play a key role in the oral disease prevention. A better health attitude and practice require a better knowledge. The aims of this study was to evaluate the oral health knowledge among the International students branch (Kish of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2011-12.   Materials and Methods: 159 pre-clinical students in medicine (54 students, dentistry (69 students and pharmacy (36 students participated in this research. A standard questionnaire was used as the main tool of research to evaluate the attitude and knowledge of students about the oral health. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test.   Results: According to the results, dental students had the best level of knowledge and pharmacy students had a better knowledge level compared to the medical students. The results also showed a significant relationship between students’ oral health knowledge and their field and duration of study and the place of their secondary school (P0.05.   Conclusion: The results showed that the students at the International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences had a relatively good knowledge of oral health. Students’ knowledge level can be improved by providing students with educational materials, organized workshops and seminars.

  11. Surgent University : The Establishment and Evaluation of a National Online Clinical Teaching Repository for Surgical Trainees and Students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to develop a new teaching strategy for medical students while creating a national online repository system (Surgent University). Then, the potential of this e-learning modality to facilitate learning of clinical surgery was evaluated. Methods. An online repository and Internet-based interface was designed and hosted on the medical education Web site, www.surgent.ie. Participation was by medical students across 3 Irish universities. Student use of the repository was quantitatively assessed over an 8-week period. They were then invited to complete an anonymous survey assessing the effectiveness of the online repository. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 15, with P < .05 considered significant. Results. Over the study period, the online repository received 6105 uploaded facts by 182 final-year medical students from 3 different universities. The repository Web pages were accessed 54 061 times with 4609 individual searches of the repository. Of the 60 participating students invited to provide survey-based feedback, there were 40 respondents, giving a 66.7% response rate. Of those surveyed, 70% (n = 28) rated the online repository as highly beneficial and 75% (n = 30) as highly relevant. Overall, 87.5% (n = 35) felt that it should be continued, and 70% (n = 28) felt that it should be expanded beyond surgery to include other hospital specialties. Those finding the program interface user-friendly were more likely to find it beneficial (P = .031) and relevant to their ongoing education (P = .002). Conclusions. A user-friendly interface allows for high levels of usage, whereas a "student-centered" structure ensures that the facts uploaded are beneficial and relevant to medical students\\' education.

  12. The Changing Patterns in Referral Rates of Geriatric Cats and Dogs to an University Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem ÜLGEN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving quality of care and nutrition of pet animals and advanced diagnosis and treatment by developing technologies, lead to an increase in survival rate. As the present authors were unaware of finding documented reports for several diseases, it was aimed to investigate the number and health status of geriatric cats and dogs which were brought to Internal Medicine clinics of our faculty’s training and research hospital within six years. Twenty-four cats and 10 dogs enrolled in the study were found to be healthy, whereas multiple health concerns were diagnosed in totally 1354 animals (n=403 for cats, n=951 for dogs. Increase in survival rate within 6 years was determined as 27.7% increase for cats and as 5.3% increase for dogs. The urinary system diseases for cats and cardiovascular system diseases for dogs were found to be the most frequent diagnosis. Geriatric animal rates varied between 4.2 and 12.3% for cats and 6.2 and 15.7% for dogs within years which were not expected as higher.

  13. MANAGEMENT OF NURSING ASSISTANCE: CASE STUDY IN A MEDICAL CLINIC IN A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Gonçalves Rodrigues

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It was aimed to show a case study about the management of nursing assistance. This paper is descriptive, a case study. As its source of study, the medical clinic in a school-hospital in Montes Claros, Minas Gerais was chosen. For the management, tools as Matrix SWOT, 5W2H and Protocol Forms of Risk Prevention were used in the management of caring in nursing. The tools and the results reached through the tools were contextualized in the light of literature, in which highlights the relevance of these tools. Through its use, it is possible to promote improvements in the given assistance to clients, once it shows opportunities, threats, strengths, weaknesses and the risk analysis in which the people involved in the care are exposed. In this way, it is needed that the tools are more and more utilized in the daily routine of the nursing work, and that this joins forces with the leadership and the management of care.

  14. Biomedical Imaging and Computational Modeling in Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Iacoviello, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    This book collects the state-of-art and new trends in image analysis and biomechanics. It covers a wide field of scientific and cultural topics, ranging from remodeling of bone tissue under the mechanical stimulus up to optimizing the performance of sports equipment, through the patient-specific modeling in orthopedics, microtomography and its application in oral and implant research, computational modeling in the field of hip prostheses, image based model development and analysis of the human knee joint, kinematics of the hip joint, micro-scale analysis of compositional and mechanical properties of dentin, automated techniques for cervical cell image analysis, and iomedical imaging and computational modeling in cardiovascular disease.   The book will be of interest to researchers, Ph.D students, and graduate students with multidisciplinary interests related to image analysis and understanding, medical imaging, biomechanics, simulation and modeling, experimental analysis.

  15. Biomechanical study of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the stiffness of lumbar spine after the injury caused by percutaneous diskectomy and evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy by biomechanical study. Methods: Four fresh lumbar specimens were used to analyse load-displacement curves in the intact lumbar spine and vertical disc-injured lumbar spine. The concepts of average flexibility coefficient (f) and standardized average flexibility coefficient (fs) were also introduced. Results: The load-displacement curves showed a good stabilization effect of the intact lumbar spine and disc-injured lumbar spine in flexion, extension, right and left bending. The decrease of anti-rotation also can be detected (P<0.05). Conclusion: In biomechanical study, percutaneous lumbar diskectomy is one of the efficiency methods to treat lumbar diac hernia

  16. Biomechanics and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Vercillo Fabio; Dede Ozgur; Wu Changfu; Woo Savio; Noorani Sabrina

    2006-01-01

    Abstract For years, bioengineers and orthopaedic surgeons have applied the principles of mechanics to gain valuable information about the complex function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The results of these investigations have provided scientific data for surgeons to improve methods of ACL reconstruction and postoperative rehabilitation. This review paper will present specific examples of how the field of biomechanics has impacted the evolution of ACL research. The anatomy and biome...

  17. Homogenization of biomechanical models for plant tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Piatnitski, Andrey; Ptashnyk, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper homogenization of a mathematical model for plant tissue biomechanics is presented. The microscopic model constitutes a strongly coupled system of reaction-diffusion-convection equations for chemical processes in plant cells, the equations of poroelasticity for elastic deformations of plant cell walls and middle lamella, and Stokes equations for fluid flow inside the cells. The chemical process in cells and the elastic properties of cell walls and middle lamella are coupled becau...

  18. BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF HUMAN FEMUR BONE

    OpenAIRE

    RAJI NARELIYA,; VEERENDRA KUMAR

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanics is the theory of how tissues, cells, muscles, bones, organs and the motion of them and how their form and function are regulated by basic mechanical properties. A finite element model of bones with accurate geometry and material properties retrieved from CT scan data are being widely used to make realistic investigations on the mechanical behavior of bone structures. The aim of this study is to create a model of real proximal human femur bone for evaluating the finite element ana...

  19. Numerical Simulation of Some Biomechanical Problems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedoma, Jiří; Klézl, Z.; Fousek, J.; Kestřánek, Zdeněk; Stehlík, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 61, 3-6 (2003), s. 283-295. ISSN 0378-4754. [MODELLING 2001. IMACS Conference on Mathematical Modelling and Computational Methods in Mechanics, Physics, Biomechanics and Geodynamics /2./. Pilsen, 19.06.2001-25.06.2001] Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : non-linear elasticity * contact problems * variational inequality * finite element method * wrist * spine * fracture Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.558, year: 2003

  20. Analysis of Biomechanical Factors in Bend Running

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Zhang; Xinping You; Feng Li

    2013-01-01

    Sprint running is the demonstration of comprehensive abilities of technology and tactics, under various conditions. However, whether it is just to allocate the tracks for short-distance athletes from different racetracks has been the hot topic. This study analyzes its forces, differences in different tracks and winding influences, in the aspects of sport biomechanics. The results indicate, many disadvantages exist in inner tracks, middle tracks are the best and outer ones are inferior to midd...

  1. [Modern biomechanical poroeslatic model of bone tissue. Part II--structure of pore space in cortical and trabecular bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala, Piotr; Uklejewski, Ryszard; Stryła, Wanda

    2002-01-01

    In modern bone biomechanics the bone tissue is treated as a porous elastically deformed solid filled with a viscous newtonian fluid (two-phase poroelastic model) [41]. Traditional one-phase biomechanical model of bone tissue is still valid and it can be considered as an approximate model in comparison with the more realistic two-phase model of bone tissue. Hierarchical biostructure of the pore space of cortical and trabecular bone is presented, including the compartments of bone pore space after Cowin [12, 13]. Examples of clinical amplications of the poroelastic model of bone tissue such as: osteoporosis, porous coated implants, bone electromagnetostimulation in rehabilitation are indicated. PMID:12418404

  2. Computational Biomechanics Theoretical Background and BiologicalBiomedical Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Masao; Nakamura, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Rapid developments have taken place in biological/biomedical measurement and imaging technologies as well as in computer analysis and information technologies. The increase in data obtained with such technologies invites the reader into a virtual world that represents realistic biological tissue or organ structures in digital form and allows for simulation and what is called “in silico medicine.” This volume is the third in a textbook series and covers both the basics of continuum mechanics of biosolids and biofluids and the theoretical core of computational methods for continuum mechanics analyses. Several biomechanics problems are provided for better understanding of computational modeling and analysis. Topics include the mechanics of solid and fluid bodies, fundamental characteristics of biosolids and biofluids, computational methods in biomechanics analysis/simulation, practical problems in orthopedic biomechanics, dental biomechanics, ophthalmic biomechanics, cardiovascular biomechanics, hemodynamics...

  3. The clinical utility of cardiopulmonary exercise testing: results of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajana Jalusic-Gluncic

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the main reasons for cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET referrals in our hospital over the last two years; to evaluate clinical usefulness of CPET. Methods: We included 207 patients between 17 and 76 years of age. For every patient, we measured electrocardigraphy (ECG, arterial blood gases, spirometry, maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV and diffusing capacity. CPET was then performed; using a treadmill, according to the modified Bruce protocol; then spirometry and diffusing capacity were repeated. Results: The most common reason for sending patients for CPET was dyspnea during exertion (85%, then preoperative assessment of lung cancer patients (11.6%, and preoperative assessment of heart transplant candidates (3.4%. After CPET in a dyspnea group, 33.5% had normal findings, 22.2% had pulmonary limitation, 31.8% had non pulmonary pathology, and 12.5% reached submaximal effort due to subjective problems (poor condition, feeling discomfort but no objective reasons to stop. From a lung cancer group, 25% were deemed unsuitable surgical candidates, and 14.29% of a heart transplant group was recommended immediate surgery, the remainder needed re-evaluation. Conclusion: Dyspnea of unknown cause is optimally investigated with CPET, allowing us to differentiate between the major causes of limitation (lung, heart, cardiovascular, muscular and, within each area, the specific causes of limitation. The most common diagnoses after CPET are pulmonary and cardiac diagnoses. CPET helps us to detect concurrent cardiovascular disease at respiratory impaired patients. CPET is the gold standard for evaluation of morbidity and mortality risk of lung cancer surgery and for selection of patients for heart transplant. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(4: 297-303

  4. Morphology and biomechanics of human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Polienko, Asel V.; Ivanov, Dmitry V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: A study of the biomechanical characteristics of the human heart ventricles was performed. 80 hearts were extracted during autopsy of 80 corpses of adults (40 women and 40 men) aged 31-70 years. The samples were investigated in compliance with the recommendations of the ethics committee. Methods: Tension and compression tests were performed with help of the uniaxial testing machine Instron 5944. Cardiometry was also performed. Results: In this work, techniques for human heart ventricle wall biomechanical properties estimation were developed. Regularities of age and gender variability in deformative and strength properties of the right and left ventricle walls were found. These properties were characterized by a smooth growth of myocardial tissue stiffness and resistivity at a relatively low strain against reduction in their strength and elasticity from 31-40 to 61-70 years. It was found that tissue of the left ventricle at 61-70 years had a lower stretchability and strength compared with tissues of the right ventricle and septum. These data expands understanding of the morphological organization of the heart ventricles, which is very important for the development of personalized medicine. Taking into account individual, age and gender differences of the heart ventricle tissue biomechanical characteristics allows to rationally choosing the type of patching materials during reconstructive operations on heart.

  5. Basic biomechanic principles of knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Ferrer, Gerald A; Debski, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Motion at the knee joint is a complex mechanical phenomenon. Stability is provided by a combination of static and dynamic structures that work in concert to prevent excessive movement or instability that is inherent in various knee injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer of the knee, providing both translational and rotatory constraint. Despite the high volume of research directed at native ACL function, pathogenesis and surgical reconstruction of this structure, a gold standard for objective quantification of injury and subsequent repair, has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that novel anatomic structures may play a significant role in knee stability. The use of biomechanical principles and testing techniques provides essential objective/quantitative information on the function of bone, ligaments, joint capsule, and other contributing soft tissues in response to various loading conditions. This review discusses the principles of biomechanics in relation to knee stability, with a focus on the objective quantification of knee stability, the individual contributions of specific knee structures to stability, and the most recent technological advances in the biomechanical evaluation of the knee joint. PMID:27007474

  6. Biomechanics aspects of technique of high jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adashevskiy V.M.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of work consists in the theoretical ground of optimum biomechanics descriptions in high jumps. A mathematical model is developed for determination of influence on the height of jump: speed and corner of flight of centre-of-mass during pushing away, positions of centre-of-mass body of sportsman in the phases of pushing away and transition through a slat, forces of resistance of air environment, influences of moment of inertia of body. The basic technical run-time errors of sportsman are selected exercises. To biomechanics descriptions, to the step-up effectiveness of high jumps belong: speed of flight of centre-of-mass sportsman (4.2-5.8 meters in a second, corner of flight of centre-of-mass body (50-58 degrees, height of flight of centre-of-mass body (0.85-1.15 meter. Directions of choice of necessary biomechanics descriptions which a sportsman can realize are shown. Offered recommendation on the increase of effectiveness of high jumps.

  7. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin FAYYAZI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveDevelopmental impairment is a common problem in children health that occurs in approximately 5–10% of the childhood population. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic yield of subspecialists’ evaluation of young children with developmental disability.Materials & MethodsAll children aged between 2 months and 5 years referred over a 15-month period to Hamadan University of Medical Sciences subspecialty services for initial evaluation of a suspected developmental Disability, were enrolled in the present study. Diagnostic yield was determined after the completion of clinical assessments and laboratory tests requested by the evaluating physician.ResultsA total of 198 children (129 boys and 69 girls were eligible for our study.108 children had global developmental delay and 90 children had isolated developmental delay. Approximately ¼ of all patients did not have any specific etiology for developmental disability. Cerebral palsy (CP was the most common clinical syndrome in all patients (41.4%. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (13.8%, brain dysgenesis (13%, genetic disorder (13%, and neurodegenerative diseases (11% were determined in more than one half of all children with global developmental disability. in our study, “developmental speech delay” was the common cause of isolated speech delay.ConclusionDetermination of an underlying etiology is an essential part of specialty evaluation of young children with developmental disability. The results of this study were similar closely to the results of other studies.

  8. Creating an integrated clinical enterprise at the University of Kentucky: the emergence of UK HealthCare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpf, Michael; Perman, Jay; Lofgren, Richard; Melgar, Sergio; Butler, Frank; Day, Zed; Clark, Murray; Claypool, Joseph O; Gilbert, Peter; Gombeski, William; Higdon, Courtney M

    2007-12-01

    If the medical system in the United States is to change, as has been recommended, academic medical centers must, in fact, lead this change process. To prepare for the future, the University of Kentucky decided to move aggressively toward developing an integrated clinical enterprise branded as UK HealthCare, where leadership of the various components of the academic medical center make strategic and financial decisions together to achieve common organizational goals. The authors discuss senior leadership's development of the vision for the enterprise and the governance structure that was established to engage board members and faculty of the institution. They examine the rigorous strategic, facilities, financial, and academic planning that ensued, and the early successes achieved. The authors introduce some of the lessons learned by the organization during the emergence of UK HealthCare and describe the corporate structure and senior management team that was established to support the quick and efficient implementation of the planning strategies. It was this corporate structure and senior management team which has proven to be an effective agent of change and a key to the successful development of a truly integrated clinical enterprise. PMID:18046120

  9. [Clinical and therapeutic aspects of pyelo-ureteral junction abnormalities at the University Hospital of Point G].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembely, Aly; Kassogué, Amadou; Berthé, Honoré; Ouattara, Zanafon

    2016-01-01

    This study is meant to analyze the clinical and therapeutic aspects of abnormalities ureteropelvic junction. Cross-sectional and descriptive study on 35 cases of abnormalities of the AUPJ collected the Urology Department of the University Hospital of Point G for a period of 4 years (January 2010 to December 2014). Data were collected on the survey forms, medical records and records of the block. The socio-demographic, clinical and therapeutic data were entered into Microsoft Word 2007 and Excel 2007 and analyzed on SPSS 18.0. Between January 2010 and December 2014, 35 cases of AUPJ were collected. The average age was 29.3 years. The back pain was the most frequent reason for consultation or 40%. 20% of patients were consulting for the first time 10 years symptomatic evolution. Kidney destruction was observed in 28.6%. The association Ultrasound + IVU has established the diagnosis in 37.1%. A urinary tract infection was found in 60%. The gallstone complication was present in 17.1% of patients. 51.4% of patients received open pyeloplasty by Anderson Kuss. The anomaly of the ureteropelvic junction in our study was marked by a consultation with delay formidable complications. The open surgery has been the gold standard with satisfactory results. The endopyéloplasty, the treatment of laparoscopic minimally invasive joint surgeries are not available to us but to encourage and incorporate in the therapeutic arsenal. PMID:27516821

  10. A qualitative evaluation of University of Cape Town medical students’ feedback of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazlie Beckett

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: All medical students at the University of Cape Town (UCT rotate through a Family Medicine clerkship during their final year. Students are based at community health centres (CHCs in the Western Cape Metropole, and at a rural site in Vredenburg. At the end of the four week clerkship, students do an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE. Aim: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the students’ feedback of the OSCE at the end of the 6th year Family Medicine rotation, and to make recommendations which can be used to improve the OSCE. Methods: This is a structured qualitative study. The study population included final year medical students rotating through the Family Medicine clerkship, over a period of seven months. Each student completed a structured questionnaire immediately after the OSCE. These evaluations were analysed using a “content analysis” method. Results: The majority of students were happy with the structure and content of the OSCE, as well as the fact that it was aligned to what was taught during the clinical rotation. However, the majority of students complained that the time allocated per station was inadequate. Conclusion: Objective ways should be utilized by the Division of Family Medicine to improve the time allocation and the current format of the OSCE.

  11. Carpal Ligament Anatomy and Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulos, Nicholas; Bozentka, David J

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the ligamentous anatomy of the wrist is critical for any physician attempting to treat carpal instability. The anatomy of the wrist is complex, not only because of the number of named structures and their geometry but also because of the inconsistencies in describing these ligaments. The complex anatomy of the wrist is described through a review of the carpal ligaments and their effect on normal carpal motion. Mastery of this topic facilitates the physician's understanding of the patterns of instability that are seen clinically. PMID:26205699

  12. An introduction to biomechanics solids and fluids, analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Humphrey, Jay D

    2004-01-01

    Designed to meet the needs of undergraduate students, Introduction to Biomechanics takes the fresh approach of combining the viewpoints of both a well-respected teacher and a successful student. With an eye toward practicality without loss of depth of instruction, this book seeks to explain the fundamental concepts of biomechanics. With the accompanying web site providing models, sample problems, review questions and more, Introduction to Biomechanics provides students with the full range of instructional material for this complex and dynamic field.

  13. Biomechanics of the elbow joint in tennis players.

    OpenAIRE

    Eygendaal, D.; Rahussen, F.T.; Diercks, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Elbow injuries constitute a sizeable percentage of tennis injuries. A basic understanding of biomechanics of tennis and analysis of forces, loads and motions of the elbow during tennis can will improve the understanding of the pathophysiology of these injuries. All different strokes in tennis have a different repetitive biomechanical nature which can result in tennis related injuries. In this article a biomechanically based evaluation of tennis strokes is presented. This overview includes all...

  14. Jet-Ricci Geometry of Time-Dependent Human Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancevic, Tijana T.

    2009-01-01

    We propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds derived from the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold. The corresponding Riemannian geometrical evolution follows the Ricci flow diffusion. In particular, we show that the exponential-like decay of total biomechanical energy (due to exh...

  15. THE STUDY ON BIOMECHANICAL RESPONSE OF DENTAL TISSUE IN CLINICAL CONDITION%正畸临床状态下的牙周组织力学响应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏志刚; 汤文成; 严斌; 杨宝宽

    2012-01-01

    该文通过非线性有限元法研究在口腔正畸临床状态下的牙周组织力学响应。通过逆向工程方法将CT扫描获得图像建立起牙颌的三维有限元模型,使用牙周膜非线性本构模型,获得了在相邻牙齿作用下的牙颌组织的力学响应。分析了不同情况下牙齿相互作用力对正畸过程中牙周组织响应的影响,研究对比了牙颌骨的变形对牙齿位移的影响,最后使用数字散斑实验对数值模拟的结果进行了分析和验证。结果表明:牙齿之间的相互作用使得实际作用到牙周组织上的力有较大的变化;分析牙周组织的应力响应应该考虑牙齿之间的相互作用力。%The mechanical response of periodontal ligament in a clinical condition was analyzed in this paper with a nonlinear finite element method. A three-dimensional finite element model was built through the reverse engineering method with the images gained from CT scanning, and the mechanical response of dental tissue in a clinical condition was obtained with a nonlinear constitutive model of periodontal ligament. The influence of the interaction force between teeth on the mechanical response of periodontal ligament was analyzed, also did the influence of deformation of alveolar bone under a load on tooth displacements. A digital speckle experiment was conducted at last to testify the simulation result. The result shows that: the real force acted on the dental tissue is greatly influenced by the interaction force between teeth, thusly it is important indeed to use the force which is load onto the dental tissue to evaluate the dental response.

  16. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitzmiller JP

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Joseph P Kitzmiller,1,4 Mitch A Phelps,2 Marjorie V Neidecker,3 Glen Apseloff41Center for Pharmacogenomics, Colleges of Medicine and of Engineering, The Ohio State University Medical Center, 2Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine, Pharmacoanalytic Shared Resources Laboratory, The Ohio State University, 3Colleges of Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, 4Department of Pharmacology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program – one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology – that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions.Keywords: clinical pharmacology education, clinical pharmacology fellowship

  17. Relationships between job organisational factors, biomechanical and psychosocial exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Stephen S; Kapellusch, Jay M; Merryweather, Andrew S; Thiese, Matthew S; Garg, Arun; Hegmann, Kurt T; Silverstein, Barbara A

    2016-02-01

    The relationships between work organisational, biomechanical and psychosocial factors were studied using cross-sectional data from a pooled dataset of 1834 participants. The work organisational factors included: job rotation, overtime work, having second jobs and work pace. Task and job level biomechanical variables were obtained through sub-task data collected in the field or analysed in the laboratory. Psychosocial variables were collected based on responses to 10 questions. The results showed that job rotations had significant effects on all biomechanical and most psychosocial measures. Those with job rotations generally had higher job biomechanical stressors, and lower job satisfaction. Overtime work was associated with higher job biomechanical stressors, and possibly self-reported physical exhaustion. Those having second jobs reported getting along with co-workers well. Work pace had significant influences on all biomechanical stressors, but its impact on job biomechanical stressors and psychosocial effects are complicated. Practitioner Summary: The findings are based on a large number of subjects collected by three research teams in diverse US workplaces. Job rotation practices used in many workplaces may not be effective in reducing job biomechanical stressors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Overtime work is also associated with higher biomechanical stressors. PMID:26102483

  18. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  19. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ho-Joong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to

  20. Descriptive study of the patients treated at the clinic “Integrated Dentistry for Patients with Special Needs” at Complutense University of Madrid (2003-2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Monteserín Matesanz, Marta; Esparza Gómez, G.; García Chías, Begoña; Gascó García, Carmen; Cerezo Lapiedra, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the patients treated at the clinic “Integrated Dentistry for Patients with Special Needs (Special Care Dentistry)” at Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), as well as to know the dental treatments performed in these patients and the modifications from the usual treatment protocol. The information obtained from the results could also be applied in order to assess the needs of dental students education about this type of pat...

  1. Attitude of Dental Prostheses Residents of Faculty of Dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences to Objective Structured Clinical Examination(OSCE)

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Hafezeqoran; Elnaz Moslehifard; Roodabeh Koodaryan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is one of the most authentic ways to evaluate clinical skills. The present study aimed at evaluating the attitude of dental prostheses residents of the faculty of dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences toward this kind of examination. Methods: In this cross sectional-descriptive study, two questionnaires were designed. One questionnaire dealt with nature of OSCE and the other dealt with the attitude of residents ab...

  2. Performance evaluation of Puritan® universal transport system (UniTranz-RT™) for preservation and transport of clinical viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasel, Trevor; Madhusudhan, Kunapuli T; Agans, Krystle; Dearen, Karen; Jones, Sara L; Sherwood, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The ability of a non-propagating microbial transport medium to maintain the viability of clinically relevant viruses was compared to a similar commercial medium to establish performance equivalence. Two dilutions of stock of test viruses, namely adenovirus (AdV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), echovirus Type 30 (EV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, influenza A, parainfluenza 3 (PIV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV), were spiked into Puritan® Medical Products Company Universal Transport System (UniTranz-RT™) and BD(TM) Universal Viral Transport System (UVT) and incubated at 4 °C and room temperature (RT) for up to 72 hr. Post incubation assessment of recovery of AdV, EV, HSV-2, PIV, and VZV from UniTranz-RT™ and UVT using shell vial assays followed by immunofluorescence staining demonstrated statistically significant differences between both transport media. In general, significantly higher recoveries of AdV, EV, and VZV were found from UniTranz-RT™ than UVT whereas HSV-2 and PIV were recovered better from UVT than UniTranz-RT™, under specific test conditions. The recovery of HSV-1, influenza A, PIV, and RSV showed no significant differences between transport media. Sulforhodamine B-based assay analysis of UniTranz-RT™ lots prior to and at expiration exhibited no cytotoxicity. The overall results of the study validate the full performance of UniTranz-RT™ as a viral transport medium and establish its effectiveness on par with the UVT. PMID:26243168

  3. Spinal biomechanics and functional anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoix, J M

    1999-04-01

    Knowledge of the normal functional behavior and mechanical properties of the vertebral column is important to understand the pathogenesis of back lesions, to identify the clinical manifestations of back pain, and to ensure a rational approach to physical therapy. The purpose of this article is to present a synthesis of in vivo and in vitro data obtained from different but complementary investigations. Presently, in vivo studies are limited; few gait-specific kinematic and electromyographic investigations are in process. Higher stresses to reach the maximal range of intervertebral motion can be applied on the spine on anatomical specimens than in living horses, and anatomical functional data can be obtained at the level of intervertebral structures. For each movement of flexion, extension, lateroflexion, and rotation, regional and intervertebral mobility is presented with an emphasis on craniocaudal variations and their anatomical causes. Because of the location of their ICR, the dorsoventral movements of a thoracolumbar intervertebral joint can be defined as a rotation around the center of the more caudal vertebral body. This information supports the new concept of intervertebral mobility in the horse and provides additional elements to facilitate understanding of the pathogenesis of back problems in the horse. PMID:10218240

  4. Antibiotic prescribing and resistance: knowledge level of medical students of clinical years of University Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mainul; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Zulkifli, Zainal; Ismail, Salwani

    2016-01-01

    The innovation of penicillin by Dr Alexander Fleming in 1928 and its use in clinical practice saved many lives, especially during the Second World War. Tuberculosis still carries a significant public health threat and has re-emerged over the past two decades, even in modern countries where tuberculosis was thought to be eliminated. The World Health Organization defines antimicrobial resistance as the resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial drug that was initially effective for treatment of infections caused by the microbe. Therefore, the findings of the current study will provide data to enable the design of a new educational program to better equip our students in confronting antimicrobial resistance. This study was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey, which was undertaken in the Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia. The study participants were students of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program (MBBS) of Year III, IV, and V. A total of 142 out of 164 (86%) medical students returned the questionnaire. Specifically, the year-wise breakdown of responses was 29% (41), 39% (55), and 32% (45) for Year III, IV, and V, respectively. Among the study respondents, 28% (40) were male, and the remaining 72% (102) were female. In all, 67% of the participants felt more confident in "making an accurate diagnosis of infection/sepsis." The majority (88%) of the study participants stated that they would like more training on antibiotic selection. This research has found that there is a gap between theoretical input and clinical practice; the students are demanding more educational intervention to face the threat of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27042083

  5. Comatose and noncomatose adult diabetic ketoacidosis patients at the University Teaching Hospital, Zambia: Clinical profiles, risk factors, and mortality outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwanja Kakusa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is one of the commonly encountered diabetes mellitus emergencies. Aim: This study aimed at describing the clinical profiles and hospitalization outcomes of DKA patients at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH in Lusaka, Zambia and to investigate the role of coma on mortality outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study of hospitalized DKA patients at UTH. The data collected included clinical presentation, precipitating factors, laboratory profiles, complications, and hospitalization outcomes. Primary outcome measured was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results: The median age was 40 years. Treatment noncompliance was the single highest identified risk factor for development of DKA, followed by new detection of diabetes, then infections. Comatose patients were significantly younger, had lower baseline blood pressure readings, and higher baseline respiratory rates compared to noncomatose patients. In addition, comatose patients had higher baseline admission random blood glucose readings. Their baseline sodium and chloride levels were also higher. The prevalences of hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia were also higher among comatose patients compared to noncomatose patients. Development of aspiration during admission with DKA, pneumonia at baseline, development of renal failure, and altered mental status were associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure was independently predictive of mortality. Conclusion: The mortality rate from DKA hospitalizations is high at UTH. Treatment noncompliance is the single highest identifiable precipitant of DKA. Aspiration, development of renal failure, altered sensorium, and pneumonia at baseline are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure during admission is predictive of mortality.

  6. An Outline of a Proposed Five- plus Three-Year Combined Undergraduate-Master's Degree for Clinical Medicine Majors at Nanjing Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing-Ya; Yu, Rong-Bin; Shen, Hong-Bing; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    To build an effective model to train excellent doctors, Nanjing Medical University has proposed a five- plus three-year combined undergraduate-master's clinical medicine degree program. The program integrates undergraduate education, the education of research students, and standardized doctor residency training into a single system, allowing…

  7. Trichomonas vaginalis infection in a low-risk women attended in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinic, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norhayati Moktar; Nor Liyana Ismail; Phoy Cheng Chun; Mohamad Asyrab Sapie; Nor Farahin Abdul Kahar; Yusof Suboh; Noraina Abdul Rahim; Nor Azlin Mohamed Ismail; Tengku Shahrul Anuar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the presence of trichomoniasis among women attending the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinic, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre. Methods: A total of 139 high vaginal swabs were taken from the subjects and sent to the laboratory in Amies gel transport media. The specimens were examined for the presence of Trichomonas vaginalis using wet mount, Giemsa staining and cultured in Diamond's medium. Sociodemographic characteristics and gynaecological complaints were obtained in private using structured questionnaire applied by one investigator. Results: The median age was 32 years, with an interquartile interval of 9.96. Most of the subjects were Malays (76.9%) and the remaining were Chinese (15.1%), Indians (2.2%) and other ethnic groups (5.8%). One hundred and thirty eight (99.3%) of the women were married and 98.6%had less than 6 children. More than half (75.5%) of the women's last child birth was less than 6 years ago. Forty seven percent of them were involved in supporting administrative work and 64.7% of the women gave a history of previous or current vaginal discharge. Conclusions: The present study reported zero incidence rate of trichomoniasis. The low incidence rate was postulated due to all women who participated in this study were categorized into a low-risk group.

  8. Prevalence of depression and its associated factors among elderly patients in outpatient clinic of Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, A; Azidah, A K; Asrenee, A R; Rosediani, M

    2009-06-01

    Depression among elderly primary care patients is a serious problem with significant morbidity and mortality. This is a cross sectional study to determine the prevalence of depression and its associated factors among the elderly patients attending the outpatient clinic, Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital. This study utilized Malay version Geriatric Depression Scale 14 (M-GDS 14) to screen for elderly depression among Malaysian population. It also looked into associated risk factors for elderly depression using sociodemographic, family dynamics, and medically related questionnaires. Out of 244 subjects, 34 or 13.9% were found to have depression. Three variables were found to be significantly associated with depression. Elderly patient with any illness that limits the patient's activity or mobility has more risk of developing depression (OR 2.68 CI 1.15 - 6.24). Elderly patients who were satisfied with their personal incomes (OR 0.29 CI 0.10 - 0.85), and who had children or son/daughter-in-law to take care of them when they are sick (OR 0.10 CI 0.01 - 0.83) have a lower chance of having depression. Screening the elderly for depression, would help in diagnosing the elderly depression better and offer them the treatment needed. PMID:20058573

  9. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliti, Naim R; Haliti, Fehim R; Koçani, Ferit K; Gashi, Ali A; Mrasori, Shefqet I; Hyseni, Valon I; Bytyqi, Samir I; Krasniqi, Lumnije L; Murtezani, Ardiana F; Krasniqi, Shaip L

    2015-01-01

    Background Because Kosovo has no reliable information on antimicrobial and analgesic use in dental practice, the survey reported here evaluated the antibiotic and analgesic prescriptions in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo (UDCCK). Methods The data of 2,442 registered patients for a 1-year period were screened and analyzed concerning antibiotic and analgesic use as per standards of rational prescription. Results Dentistry doctors prescribed antibiotics significantly more often than analgesics. Antibiotics were prescribed in 8.11% of all cases, while only 1.35% of total prescriptions were for analgesics. The total consumption of antibiotic drugs in the UDCCK was 4.53 Defined Daily Doses [DDD]/1,000 inhabitants/day, compared with only 0.216 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day for analgesics. From a total number of 117 patients, 32 patients received combinations of two antibiotics. Conclusion Pharmacotherapy analysis showed that the prescription rates of antibiotics and analgesics in the UDCCK are not rational in terms of the qualitative aspects of treatment. For the qualitative improvement of prescription of these drug groups, we recommend the implementation of treatment guidelines following rational standards. PMID:26491336

  10. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENTS ADMITTED TO KARADENIZ TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL FACULTY CHILD OUTPATIENT CLINIC WITH SUICIDE ATTEMPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim AKTEPE

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Assesment of sociodemographic and psychiatric characteristics of attempted suicide in children and adolescents. The aim of this study is to identify risk factors and sociodemographic, psychiatric characteristics of adolescents and children who attempted suicide. Suicide attempters (range 7-15 years, fifty-eight cases who referred to Karadeniz Technical University, School of Medicine, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry outpatient clinic between January 2003 and January 2005 were analyzed retrospectively, in terms of sex, age, living residence, number of suicide attempts, educational achievement and level, psychiatric examinations, method of suicide, precipitating events, psychiatric evaluations of parents, socioeconomic status in our study. The majority of subjects were girls (89.7%. The commonest age group involved was 15-16 years (46.6%. Girls, aged 15-16 years, from middle-low socioeconomic status with low achievement at school, living in urban area were found to be risky group for suicide attempt. From the view of low tolerance to problems, insufficient coping abilites in youth; acquirement of problem solving capacity and aiding in familiar problems solutions may be efficient in prevention and treatment of suicide. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(6.000: 444-454

  11. Biomechanics, Exercise Physiology, and the 75th Anniversary of RQES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Joseph; Haymes, Emily M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the biomechanics and exercise physiology studies published in the Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) over the past 75 years. Studies in biomechanics, a relatively new subdiscipline that evolved from kinesiology, first appeared in the journal about 40 years ago. Exercise physiology studies have…

  12. Biomechanics aspects of technique of high jump

    OpenAIRE

    Adashevskiy V.M.; Iermakov S.S.; Marchenko A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of work consists in the theoretical ground of optimum biomechanics descriptions in high jumps. A mathematical model is developed for determination of influence on the height of jump: speed and corner of flight of centre-of-mass during pushing away, positions of centre-of-mass body of sportsman in the phases of pushing away and transition through a slat, forces of resistance of air environment, influences of moment of inertia of body. The basic technical run-time errors of sportsma...

  13. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling

  14. Distributed Data Acquisition For Biomechanics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, J.; Geisler, M.; Prieto, T.; Weiss, R.

    1987-01-01

    Biomechanics research at the Medical College of Wisconsin is directed to the determination of the mechanisms of head and spine injury and the evaluation of surgical treatments for these injuries. This work involves mechanical testing of components of the spine (disks, vertebral bodies, and ligaments) as well as testing of composite spines and in situ evaluation of intact human cadavers (1,3). Other studies utilize experimental animals to measure neurologic and physiologic effects due to injury producing loads and accelerations (2). An integrated system has been developed to facilitate the acquisition and analysis of the diverse types of data from these experiments.

  15. Pathophysiology and Biomechanics of the Aging Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Sapkas, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Katonis, Pavlos

    2011-01-01

    Aging of the spine is characterized by two parallel but independent processes: the reduction of bone mineral density and the development of degenerative changes. The combination of degeneration and bone mass reduction contribute, to a different degree, to the development of a variety of lesions. This results in a number of painful and often debilitating disorders. The present review constitutes a synopsis of the pathophysiological processes that take place in the aging spine as well as of the consequences these changes have on the biomechanics of the spine. The authors hope to present a thorough yet brief overview of the process of aging of the human spine. PMID:21966338

  16. Jet Methods in Time-Dependent Lagrangian Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivancevic, Tijana T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds associated to the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold, called the configuration bundle. We start with an ordinary configuration manifold of human body motion, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF) for a particular movement. This is a Riemannian manifold with a material metric tensor given by the total mass-inertia matrix of the human body segments. This is the base manifold for standard autonomous biomechanics. To make its time-dependent generalization, we need to extend it with a real time axis. By this extension, using techniques from fibre bundles, we defined the biomechanical configuration bundle. On the biomechanical bundle we define vector-fields, differential forms and affine connections, as well as the associat...

  17. Biomechanical factors associated with the development of tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Tunen, Joyce A C; Dell'Isola, Andrea; Juhl, Carsten;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered biomechanics, increased joint loading and tissue damage, might be related in a vicious cycle within the development of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We have defined biomechanical factors as joint-related factors that interact with the forces, moments and kinematics in and around...... a synovial joint. Although a number of studies and systematic reviews have been performed to assess the association of various factors with the development of KOA, a comprehensive overview focusing on biomechanical factors that are associated with the development of KOA is not available. The aim...... of this review is (1) to identify biomechanical factors that are associated with (the development of) KOA and (2) to identify the impact of other relevant risk factors on this association. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Cohort, cross-sectional and case-control studies investigating the association of a biomechanical...

  18. Does student learning style affect performance on different formats of biomechanics examinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chengtu; Mache, Melissa; Knudson, Duane

    2012-03-01

    Students' learning style preferences have been widely adapted into teaching and learning environments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-reported and assessed learning style preferences (visual, auditory, reading/writing, kinesthetic: VARK) on performance in different types of multiple-choice examinations (T1: text only format and T2: visual format) given in an introductory biomechanics class. Students who enrolled in three biomechanics classes at a state university were recruited to participate in the study. Ninety students (47 males and 43 females) completed a learning style survey and two types of examinations. Results showed that approximately half of the students were assessed and self-reported as kinesthetic for their preferred learning style. There was no significant difference in test performance between students who preferred visual and reading/writing learning styles (self-reported and assessed). These students demonstrated similar learning and comprehension of biomechanical concepts regardless of whether the test material was presented in their preferred sensory mode or not. Interestingly, female students' perceptions of their learning style preference may have a positive effect on the test results when the test is presented in their preferred format. PMID:22518949

  19. Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie

    2014-01-01

    voluntary arm movement task and 2) selective activation tasks during sessions with and without on-line biofeedback, in a general population consisting of 16 SIS patients and 15 controls (No-SIS). Furthermore, 3) a systematic review was conducted of all available clinical scapular assessment methods and......Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics Larsen CM1, Juul-Kristensen B1,2 Holtermann A3, Lund H1,2, Søgaard K1 1University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, DK 2Institute of...... patient sample with SIS, and to assess the clinimetric properties of clinical assessment methods of scapular kinematics as important aspects for optimising effect measures of treatment in order to improve clinical guidelines in this area. METHODS: Scapular muscle activity was examined, 1) during a...

  20. Biomechanical Comparison of Spinal Fusion Methods Using Interspinous Process Compressor and Pedicle Screw Fixation System Based on Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jisoo; Kim, Sohee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biomechanical effects of a newly proposed Interspinous Process Compressor (IPC) and compare with pedicle screw fixation at surgical and adjacent levels of lumbar spine. Methods A three dimensional finite element model of intact lumbar spine was constructed and two spinal fusion models using pedicle screw fixation system and a new type of interspinous devices, IPC, were developed. The biomechanical effects such as range of motion (ROM) and facet contact force were analyzed at surgical level (L3/4) and adjacent levels (L2/3, L4/5). In addition, the stress in adjacent intervertebral discs (D2, D4) was investigated. Results The entire results show biomechanical parameters such as ROM, facet contact force, and stress in adjacent intervertebral discs were similar between PLIF and IPC models in all motions based on the assumption that the implants were perfectly fused with the spine. Conclusion The newly proposed fusion device, IPC, had similar fusion effect at surgical level, and biomechanical effects at adjacent levels were also similar with those of pedicle screw fixation system. However, for clinical applications, real fusion effect between spinous process and hooks, duration of fusion, and influence on spinous process need to be investigated through clinical study. PMID:26962413

  1. Biomechanical Analysis of Pedicle Screw Fixation for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Matthew; Shah, Kalpit N; Paller, David J; Thakur, Nikhil A; Koruprolu, Sarath; Palumbo, Mark A; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures remains controversial. Long-segment pedicle screw constructs may be stiffer and impart greater forces on adjacent segments compared with short-segment constructs, which may affect clinical performance and long-term out come. The purpose of this study was to biomechanically evaluate long-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation (LSPF) vs short-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation (SSPF) for unstable burst fractures. Six unembalmed human thoracolumbar spine specimens (T10-L4) were used. Following intact testing, a simulated L1 burst fracture was created and sequentially stabilized using 5.5-mm titanium polyaxial pedicle screws and rods for 4 different constructs: SSPF (1 level above and below), SSPF+L1 (pedicle screw at fractured level), LSPF (2 levels above and below), and LSPF+L1 (pedicle screw at fractured level). Each fixation construct was tested in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation; range of motion was also recorded. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to identify differences between treatment groups and functional noninstrumented spine. Short-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation did not achieve stability seen in an intact spine (P.1). Long-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation constructs were not associated with increased adjacent segment motion. Al though the sample size of 6 specimens was small, this study may help guide clinical decisions regarding burst fracture stabilization. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e514-e518.]. PMID:27135451

  2. A study on task-analysis of clinical pathologists as medical consultants in Nihon University Hospital--a Japanese perspective by comparison with current status in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, K; Yanai, M; Hosokawa, N; Iwasaki, Y; Hoshino, T; Arashima, Y; Hayashi, K; Murakami, J; Tsuchiya, T; Kawano, K

    2000-07-01

    To identify our role and the customers' satisfaction, the on-call consultation service records of the Department of Clinical Pathology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Itabashi Hospital (NUIH), were analyzed. Between 1995 and 1998, 1,789 consultation services were recorded, and approximately 40% were from physicians, and 50% were from medical technologists. During office hours, many physicians made contact with us at the office of clinical pathology, the clinical laboratory and other places in the hospital by various means. They asked us to interpret multidisciplinary laboratory data, and to provide the specific information that might affect clinical management. Medical technologists asked for clinical information of patients with extreme measured values and requested that we contact with physicians. In contrast, on weekends/holidays or after routine working hours, physicians sometimes requested non-automated laboratory tests such as peripheral blood smears/bone marrow smears or Gram stains. The major contents of our responses to medical technologists were concerned with blood banking and handling of instruments not to be operated in routine work. These results reconfirm that we are still required to have clinical competence for common laboratory procedures and to have the capability of interpretation of multidisciplinary laboratory data in the university hospital. Traditionally, most Japanese clinical pathologists have been focused their attention on bench work in research laboratories. However, the present study shows that the clinical pathologists need to bridge the real gap between laboratory technology and patient care. Our on-call service system can enhance the education of clinical pathologists, and improve not only laboratory quality assurance but also patient care. In addition, in response to a need for customer access to this service with a shortage of clinical pathologists, a more effective method would be to set up a proactive systemic approach in

  3. Inframammary Fold Reconstruction: A Biomechanical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Julia; Uener, Jens; Prescher, Andreas; Scaal, Martin; Puppe, Julian; Warm, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inframammary fold reconstruction has scarcely been evaluated in literature. No biomechanical analyses have been performed comparing different reconstructive methods. This evaluation compares the gold-standard suture reconstruction with an intrarib anchor system (Micro BioComposite SutureTak, Arthrex). Methods: Three analysis groups were compared including 8 Sawbone blocks, 22 embalmed cadaver, and 27 regular cadaver specimens (N = 57). Transient mechanical analysis was performed at 5 N/s using an Instron 5565 test frame. Results: Ultimate load favored the anchor system (compared with the gold-standard suture) by a factor of 9.8 (P group and a factor of 1.7 (P group. A similar statistically significant benefit was shown for stiffness and load at 2-mm displacement. Conclusions: This analysis showed an anchor system to be the biomechanically superior fixation method in terms of ultimate load, fixation stiffness, and displacement at failure when compared with the gold-standard suture method in inframammary fold reconstruction. Because of superior stability in every aspect, an anchor system may be considered for inframammary fold reconstruction. PMID:27257564

  4. Biomechanical analysis of jaw-closing movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolstra, J H; van Eijden, T M

    1995-09-01

    This study concerns the complex interaction between active muscle forces and passive guiding structures during jaw-closing movements. It is generally accepted that the ligaments of the joint play a major role in condylar guidance during these movements. While these ligaments permit a wide range of motions, it was assumed that they are not primarily involved in force transmission in the joints. Therefore, it was hypothesized that muscle forces and movement constraints caused by the articular surfaces imply a necessary and sufficient condition to generate ordinary jaw-closing movements. This hypothesis was tested by biomechanical analysis. A dynamic six-degrees-of-freedom mathematical model of the human masticatory system has been developed for qualitative analysis of the contributions of the different masticatory muscles to jaw-closing movements, it was found that the normally observed movement, which includes a swing-slide condylar movement along the articular eminence, can be generated by various separate pairs of masticatory muscles, among which the different parts of the masseter as well as the medial pterygoid muscle appeared to be the most suitable to complete this action. The results seem to be in contrast to the general opinion that a muscle with a forward-directed force component may not be suitable for generating jaw movements in which the condyle moves backward. The results can be explained, however, by biomechanical analysis which includes not only muscle and joint forces as used in standard textbooks of anatomy, but also the torques generated by these forces. PMID:7560417

  5. Integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Löberg, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna.Loberg@dentsply.com [Dentsply Implants, Box 14, SE-431 21 Mölndal (Sweden); Mattisson, Ingela [Dentsply Implants, Box 14, SE-431 21 Mölndal (Sweden); Ahlberg, Elisabet [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-01-30

    In an attempt to reduce the need for animal studies in dental implant applications, a new model has been developed which combines well-known surface characterization methods with theoretical biomechanical calculations. The model has been named integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC), and gives a comprehensive description of the surface topography and the ability of the surface to induce retention strength with bone. IBTSC comprises determination of 3D-surface roughness parameters by using 3D-scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and calculation of the ability of different surface topographies to induce retention strength in bone by using the local model. Inherent in this integrated approach is the use of a length scale analysis, which makes it possible to separate different size levels of surface features. The IBTSC concept is tested on surfaces with different level of hierarchy, induced by mechanical as well as chemical treatment. Sequential treatment with oxalic and hydrofluoric acid results in precipitated nano-sized features that increase the surface roughness and the surface slope on the sub-micro and nano levels. This surface shows the highest calculated shear strength using the local model. The validity, robustness and applicability of the IBTSC concept are demonstrated and discussed.

  6. Biomechanical Energy Harvester Design For Active Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akın Oğuz Kaptı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the factors restricting the functions of active prostheses is limited charge times and weights of the batteries. Therefore, some biomechanical energy harvesting studies are conducted for reducing the dependence on batteries and developing the systems that produce energy by utilizing one's own actions during daily living activities. In this study, as a new approach to meet energy needs of active-controlled lower limb prostheses, the design of a biomechanical energy harvester that produces electrical energy from the movements of the knee joint during gait were carried out. This harvester is composed of the generator, planetary gear system and one-way clutch that transmit just the knee extension. Low weight, low additional metabolic power consumption requirement and high electrical power generation are targeted in design process. The total reduction ratio of the transmission is 104, and the knee joint reaction torque applied by the system is 6 Nm. Average electrical powers that can be obtained are 17 W and 5,8 W for the swing extension phase and the entire cycle, respectively. These values seem to be sufficient for charging the battery units of many prostheses and similar medical systems, and portable electronic devices such as mobile phones, navigation devices and laptops.

  7. Are biomechanical changes necessary for tumor progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Josef A.; Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias; Nnetu, David K.; Pawlizak, Steve; Wetzel, Franziska; Zink, Mareike

    2011-03-01

    With an increasing knowledge in tumor biology an overwhelming complexity becomes obvious which roots in the diversity of tumors and their heterogeneous molecular composition. Nevertheless in all solid tumors malignant neoplasia, i.e. uncontrolled growth, invasion of adjacent tissues, and metastasis, occurs. Physics sheds some new light on cancer by approaching this problem from a functional, materials perspective. Recent results indicate that all three pathomechanisms require changes in the active and passive cellular biomechanics. Malignant transformation causes cell softening for small deformations which correlates with an increased rate of proliferation and faster cell migration. The tumor cell's ability to strain harden permits tumor growth against a rigid tissue environment. A highly mechanosensitive, enhanced cell contractility is a prerequisite that tumor cells can cross its tumor boundaries and that this cells can migrate through the extracellular matrix. Insights into the biomechanical changes during tumor progression may lead to selective treatments by altering cell mechanics. Such drugs would not cure by killing cancer cells, but slow down tumor progression with only mild side effects and thus may be an option for older and frail patients.

  8. Integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löberg, Johanna; Mattisson, Ingela; Ahlberg, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce the need for animal studies in dental implant applications, a new model has been developed which combines well-known surface characterization methods with theoretical biomechanical calculations. The model has been named integrated biomechanical and topographical surface characterization (IBTSC), and gives a comprehensive description of the surface topography and the ability of the surface to induce retention strength with bone. IBTSC comprises determination of 3D-surface roughness parameters by using 3D-scanning electron microscopy (3D-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and calculation of the ability of different surface topographies to induce retention strength in bone by using the local model. Inherent in this integrated approach is the use of a length scale analysis, which makes it possible to separate different size levels of surface features. The IBTSC concept is tested on surfaces with different level of hierarchy, induced by mechanical as well as chemical treatment. Sequential treatment with oxalic and hydrofluoric acid results in precipitated nano-sized features that increase the surface roughness and the surface slope on the sub-micro and nano levels. This surface shows the highest calculated shear strength using the local model. The validity, robustness and applicability of the IBTSC concept are demonstrated and discussed.

  9. The corneoscleral shell of the eye: potentials of assessing biomechanical parameters in normal and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Iomdina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews modern methods of evaluating the biomechanical properties of the corneoscleral shell of the eye that can be used both in the studies of the pathogenesis of various ophthalmic pathologies and in clinical practice. The biomechanical parameters of the cornea and the sclera have been shown to be diagnostically significant in assessing the risk of complications and the effectiveness of keratorefractive interventions, in the diagnosis and the prognosis of keratoconus, progressive myopia, or glaucoma. In clinical practice, a special device, Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA, has been used on a large scale. The analyzer is used to assess two parameters that characterize viscoelastic properties of the cornea — corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF. Reduced levels of CH and CRF have been noted after eximer laser surgery, especially that administered to patients who demonstrate a regression in the refraction effect or suffer from keratoconus. This fact justifies the use of these biomechanical parameters as additional diagnostic criteria in the evaluation of the state of the cornea. At the same time, ORA data are shown to reflect the biomechanical response to the impact of the air pulse not only from the cornea alone but also from the whole corneoscleral capsule. This is probably the cause of reduced CH in children with progressive myopia and a weakened supportive function of the sclera, as well as such reduction in glaucomatous adult patients. It is hypothesized that a low CH value is a result of remodeling of the connective tissue matrix of the corneoscleral shell of the eye and can be an independent factor testifying to a risk of glaucoma progression. Reduced CH in primary open-angle glaucoma occurs in parallel with the development of pathological structural changes of the optic disc, and deterioration of visual fields, which is an evidence of a specific character and sensitivity of this parameter. The

  10. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin FAYYAZI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Fayyazi A, Kheizrian L, Kheradmand Z, Damadi S, Khajeh A. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1:29-33. ObjectiveDevelopmental impairment is a common problem in children health that occurs in approximately 5–10% of the childhood population. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic yield of subspecialists’ evaluation of young children with developmental disability.Materials & MethodsAll children aged between 2 months and 5 years referred over a 15-month period to Hamadan University of Medical Sciences subspecialty services for initial evaluation of a suspected developmental Disability, were enrolled in the present study. Diagnostic yield was determined after the completion of clinical assessments and laboratory tests requested by the evaluating physician.ResultsA total of 198 children (129 boys and 69 girls were eligible for our study.108 children had global developmental delay and 90 children had isolated developmental delay. Approximately ¼ of all patients did not have any specific etiology for developmental disability. Cerebral palsy (CP was the most common clinical syndrome in all patients (41.4%. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (13.8%, brain dysgenesis (13%, genetic disorder (13%, and  neurodegenerative  diseases  (11%  were  determined  in  more  than one half of all children with global developmental disability. in our study, “developmental speech delay” was the common cause of isolated speech delay.ConclusionDetermination of an underlying etiology is an essential part of specialty evaluation of young children with developmental disability. The results of this study were similar closely to the results of other studies. ReferencesBernard LM. Current Management in Child Neurology. 3rd ed. London: BC Decker Inc; 2005. pp. 3-8 and 246-50.Cleary M A

  11. Sociodemographic Characteristics and Diagnoses of Individuals Referred to a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic of a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevcan Karakoç Demirkaya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate the sociodemographic characteristics, complaints, and diagnoses of individuals who were admitted to a child and adolescent psychiatry outpatient clinic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical charts of the patients who were admitted to the child and adolescent psychiatry unit of Adnan Menderes University between February 1st and July 31st, 2014 were retrospectively studied. RESULTS: The rate of girls and boys from a total of 832 cases who were referred to the child and adolescent psychiatry outpatient clinic in the six month period was 41.8% and 58.2%, respectively. The mean age of the girls and boys was 10.8±4.9 and 8.5±4.7 years, respectively. The most common age range was between 12 and 18 years. The proportion of patients who lived with both parents was 81.1%; however, the proportion of individuals brought in by institutional caregivers was 0.8%. The proportion of consanguineous marriages was 13.7%. The education level of mothers and fathers was mostly a primary school degree (47% and 45.6%, respectively. A positive psychiatric history was present in 13.7% of the mothers and 7.6% of the fathers. Reasons for child psychiatric assessments were as follows: 21.9% for disability report, 13.8% for forensic evaluation, 11.2% for consultation, and 52.9% for general psychiatric evaluation. Referral complaints were irritability/anger (15.7%, attention deficit/hyperactivity (14.8%, delay in speech (10.5%, fear/anxiety (5.9%, and poor school performance (5.7%. The diagnoses were as follows: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD (20.6%, other disruptive behaviors (12.4%, and anxiety disorder (10.2%. CONCLUSION: We revealed that the most common referring complaint was irritability/anger and that the most common diagnosis was ADHD in our patient group, which was similar to previous studies. Our results showed that a low parental educational level and a positive history for parental psychopathology were

  12. The biomechanics of upper extremity kinematic and kinetic modeling: applications to rehabilitation engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavens, Brooke A; Harris, Gerald F

    2008-01-01

    Human motion analysis has evolved from the lower extremity to the upper extremity. Rehabilitation engineering is reliant upon three-dimensional biome-chanical models for a thorough understanding of upper body motions and forces in order to improve treatment methods, rehabilitation strategies and to prevent injury. Due to the complex nature of upper body movements, a standard biomechanical model does not exist. This paper reviews several kinematic and kinetic rehabilitation engineering models from the literature. These models may capture a single joint; multijoints such as the shoulder, elbow and wrist; or a combination of joints and an ambulatory aid, which serves as the extension of the upper arm. With advances in software and hardware, new models continuously arise due to the clinical questions at hand. When designing a biomechanical upper extremity model, several key components must be determined. These include deciding on the anatomic segments of the model, the number of markers and placement on bony landmarks, the definition of joint coordinate systems, and the description of the joint motions. It is critical to apply the proper model to further our understanding of pathologic populations. PMID:19740069

  13. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian

    2015-12-01

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach. PMID:26631334

  14. Perceived Clinical Competence among Undergraduate Nursing Students in the University of Gondar and Bahir Dar University, Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Institution Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhanu Boru Bifftu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To produce competent, confident, critical thinker with the ability to lead, to question, and to be questioned is needed in nursing education. This study aimed to assess perceived clinical competence among nursing students. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in two nursing schools in Ethiopia. Data were collected using pretested, semistructured questionnaire. Clinical competence was measured by Short Nursing Competence Questionnaires. Binary logistic regression model was fitted to identify associated factors. An adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence interval was computed. Results. Overall, 48.7 % of the participants perceived themselves as clinically competent. Social support [moderate (AOR = 5.87, CI: 1.346, 9.586, high (AOR = 6.27, CI: 1.741, 7.608], type of institution [(AOR = 3.20, CI: 1.331, 7.694], year of study [(AOR = 1.89 (4.760, 18.510], attending theoretical classes [(AOR = 0.83 CI: 0.017, 0.412], and clinical environment [poor (AOR = 5.65, CI: 1.837, 13.453, fair (AOR = 7.31, CI: 2.790, 15.356, good (AOR = 9.31, CI: 3.260, 19.967] were associated with clinical competence. Conclusion. More than half of the study participants perceived themselves as incompetent. Social support, type of institution, year of study, attending theory classes, and clinical environment were associated with perceived clinical competence. Authors suggested that nursing students attend their theoretical class and utilize the available resource.

  15. Biomechanics principle of elbow joint for transhumeral prostheses: comparison of normal hand, body-powered, myoelectric & air splint prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Abd Razak, Nasrul Anuar; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Ali, Sadeeq

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding of kinematics force applied at the elbow is important in many fields, including biomechanics, biomedical engineering and rehabilitation. This paper provides a comparison of a mathematical model of elbow joint using three different types of prosthetics for transhumeral user, and characterizes the forces required to overcome the passive mechanical of the prosthetics at the residual limb. Methods The study modeled the elbow as a universal joint with intersecting axes of ...

  16. Biomechanical Evaluation of Knee Kinematics after ACL Reconstructions in Anatomic SB and DB - Technique with Additional Medial Meniscus Suture

    OpenAIRE

    Lorbach, Olaf; Herbort, Mirco; Engelhardt, Martin; Kieb, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Biomechanical evaluation of knee laxity after single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction with additional medial meniscus suture. Methods: Kinematics of the intact knee were determined in 12 human cadaver specimens in response to a 134-N anterior tibial load (aTT) and a combined rotatory load of 10 Nm valgus and 4 Nm internal tibial rotation using a robotic/universal force moment sensor testing system. Subsequently, the ACL was resected following the creation of a bucket-handle t...

  17. Biomechanical risk factors of non-contact ACL injuries:A stochastic biomechanical modeling study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Feng; Lin; Hui; Liu; Michael; T.Gros; Paul; Weinhold; William; E.Garrett; Bing; Yu

    2012-01-01

    <正>Background:Significant efforts have been made to identify modifiable risk factors of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) injuries in male and female athletes.However,current literature on the risk factors for ACL injury are purely descriptive.An understanding of biomechanical relationship between risk and risk factors of the non-contact ACL injury is necessary to develop effective prevention programs. Purpose:To compare lower extremity kinematics and kinetics between trials with and without non-contact ACL injuries and to determine if any difference exists between male and female trials with non-contact ACL injuries regarding the lower extremity motion patterns. Methods:In this computer simulation study,a stochastic biomechanical model was used to estimate the ACL loading at the time of peak posterior ground reaction force(GRF) during landing of the stop-jump task.Monte Carlo simulations were performed to simulate the ACL injuries with repeated random samples of independent variables.The distributions of independent variables were determined from in vivo laboratory data of 40 male and 40 female recreational athletes. Results:In the simulated injured trials,both male and female athletes had significantly smaller knee flexion angles,greater normalized peak posterior and vertical GRF.greater knee valgus moment,greater patella tendon force,greater quadriceps force,greater knee extension moment. and greater proximal tibia anterior shear force in comparison to the simulated uninjured trials.No significant difference was found between genders in any of the selected biomechanical variables in the trials with simulated non-contact ACL injuries. Conclusion:Small knee flexion angle,large posterior GRF.and large knee valgus moment are risk factors of non-contact ACL injury determined by a stochastic biomechanical model with a cause-and-effect relationship.

  18. Uterine fibroids and urinary disorders: An analysis using the medical imaging of 72 cases in Kinshasa University Clinics from 1998 to 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross sectional study of 672 cases with clinical analysis and medical imaging whose average age is 44,5 years. This analysis looked at 672 cases of women's diagnosed with fibroids 1 january 1998 to 1 january 2003 in the department of obstetrics gynecology in the oncology and radiology of the university clinics in Kinshasa. All cases with diagnosis, using the clinical and medical imaging (ultrasound and hysterosalpingography and or intravenous urography) had fibroids were reviewed to identify the consequences of these on the urinary tract. The most frequent clinical signs were menorrhagia (22%), the menometrorrhagia (21,1%) and pelvic heaviness (20%). Radiological signs seen on intravenous urography were compressing the bladder dome (34,7%), bilateral ureteral diversion (15,2%) with hydronephrosis upstream (15,2%)

  19. Carpal tunnel release: do we understand the biomechanical consequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Nathan T; Harris, Andrew; Skjong, Christian; Akelman, Edward

    2014-11-01

    Carpal tunnel release is a very common procedure performed in the United States. While the procedure is often curative, some patients experience postoperative scar sensitivity, pillar pain, grip weakness, or recurrent median nerve symptoms. Release of the carpal tunnel has an effect on carpal anatomy and biomechanics, including increases in carpal arch width and carpal tunnel volume and changes in muscle and tendon mechanics. Our understanding of how these biomechanical changes contribute to postoperative symptoms is still evolving. We review the relevant morphometric and biomechanical changes that occur following release of the transverse carpal ligament. PMID:25364635

  20. Biomechanical ToolKit: Open-source framework to visualize and process biomechanical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Arnaud; Armand, Stéphane

    2014-04-01

    C3D file format is widely used in the biomechanical field by companies and laboratories to store motion capture systems data. However, few software packages can visualize and modify the integrality of the data in the C3D file. Our objective was to develop an open-source and multi-platform framework to read, write, modify and visualize data from any motion analysis systems using standard (C3D) and proprietary file formats (used by many companies producing motion capture systems). The Biomechanical ToolKit (BTK) was developed to provide cost-effective and efficient tools for the biomechanical community to easily deal with motion analysis data. A large panel of operations is available to read, modify and process data through C++ API, bindings for high-level languages (Matlab, Octave, and Python), and standalone application (Mokka). All these tools are open-source and cross-platform and run on all major operating systems (Windows, Linux, MacOS X). PMID:24548899

  1. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  2. Biomechanical Analysis of T2 Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, John K.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Everett, Meghan; Newby, Nathaniel; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Guilliams, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Crewmembers regularly perform treadmill exercise on the ISS. With the implementation of T2 on ISS, there is now the capacity to obtain ground reaction force (GRF) data GRF data combined with video motion data allows biomechanical analyses to occur that generate joint torque estimates from exercise conditions. Knowledge of how speed and load influence joint torque will provide quantitative information on which exercise prescriptions can be based. The objective is to determine the joint kinematics, ground reaction forces, and joint kinetics associated with treadmill exercise on the ISS. This study will: 1) Determine if specific exercise speed and harness load combinations are superior to others in exercise benefit; and 2) Aid in the design of exercise prescriptions that will be most beneficial in maintaining crewmember health.

  3. The biomechanics of vertical hopping: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Mario; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive vertical hopping is a simple and relatively controlled task useful for studying basic neuromuscular properties and tissue mechanics. However, several biomechanical and physiological factors are involved. This article provides an overview of muscle and tendon properties and how these interact during vertical hopping. Muscle properties discussed are force-velocity and force-length relationships, electromechanical delay, muscle fiber type, stretch induced contraction amplification, and muscle spindle afferent feedback. Tendon properties include storage and reuse of elastic energy, tendon stiffness, afferent information from Golgi tendon organs, and failure points. These muscle and tendon properties interact to generate vertical hopping force and power. In addition to these basic properties, there are other more complicated factors to consider when analyzing vertical hopping such as balance and coordination. A wealth of information can be gathered by studying vertical hopping. Caution should be taken, however, to prevent inappropriate conclusions being drawn about hop performance due to oversimplification. PMID:24067123

  4. Development of a biomechanical energy harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donelan J Maxwell

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomechanical energy harvesting–generating electricity from people during daily activities–is a promising alternative to batteries for powering increasingly sophisticated portable devices. We recently developed a wearable knee-mounted energy harvesting device that generated electricity during human walking. In this methods-focused paper, we explain the physiological principles that guided our design process and present a detailed description of our device design with an emphasis on new analyses. Methods Effectively harvesting energy from walking requires a small lightweight device that efficiently converts intermittent, bi-directional, low speed and high torque mechanical power to electricity, and selectively engages power generation to assist muscles in performing negative mechanical work. To achieve this, our device used a one-way clutch to transmit only knee extension motions, a spur gear transmission to amplify the angular speed, a brushless DC rotary magnetic generator to convert the mechanical power into electrical power, a control system to determine when to open and close the power generation circuit based on measurements of knee angle, and a customized orthopaedic knee brace to distribute the device reaction torque over a large leg surface area. Results The device selectively engaged power generation towards the end of swing extension, assisting knee flexor muscles by producing substantial flexion torque (6.4 Nm, and efficiently converted the input mechanical power into electricity (54.6%. Consequently, six subjects walking at 1.5 m/s generated 4.8 ± 0.8 W of electrical power with only a 5.0 ± 21 W increase in metabolic cost. Conclusion Biomechanical energy harvesting is capable of generating substantial amounts of electrical power from walking with little additional user effort making future versions of this technology particularly promising for charging portable medical devices.

  5. Laryngeal biomechanics of the singing voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufman, J A; Radomski, T A; Joharji, G M; Russell, G B; Pillsbury, D C

    1996-12-01

    By transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy, patients with functional voice often demonstrate abnormal laryngeal biomechanics, commonly supraglottic contraction. Appropriately, such conditions are sometimes termed muscle tension dysphonias. Singers working at the limits of their voice may also transiently demonstrate comparable tension patterns. However, the biomechanics of normal singing, particularly for different singing styles, have not been previously well characterized. We used transnasal fiberoptic laryngoscopy to study 100 healthy singers to assess patterns of laryngeal tension during normal singing and to determine whether factors such as sex, occupation, and style of singing influence laryngeal muscle tension. Thirty-nine male and 61 female singers were studied; 48 were professional singers, and 52 were amateurs. Examinations of study subjects performing standardized and nonstandardized singing tasks were recorded on a laser disk and subsequently analyzed in a frame-by-frame fashion by a blinded otolaryngologist. Each vocal task was graded for muscle tension by previously established criteria, and objective muscle tension scores were computed. The muscle tension score was expressed as a percentage of frames for each task with one of the laryngeal muscle tension patterns shown. The lowest muscle tension scores were seen in female professional singers, and the highest muscle tension scores were seen in amateur female singers. Male singers (professional and amateur) had intermediate muscle tension scores. Classical singers had lower muscle tension scores than nonclassical singers, with the lowest muscle tension scores being seen in those singing choral music (41%), art song (47%), and opera (57%), and the highest being seen in those singing jazz/pop (65%), musical theater (74%), bluegrass/country and western (86%), and rock/gospel (94%). Analyzed also were the influences of vocal nodules, prior vocal training, number of performance and practice hours per week

  6. Biomechanical research in dance: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnow, Donna; Wilmerding, M Virginia; Stecyk, Shane; Wyon, Matthew; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2011-03-01

    The authors reviewed the literature, published from 1970 through December 2009, on biomechanical research in dance. To identify articles, the authors used search engines, including PubMed and Web of Science, five previous review articles, the Dance Medicine and Science Bibliography, and reference lists of theses, dissertations, and articles being reviewed. Any dance research articles (English language) involving the use of electromyography, forceplates, motion analysis using photography, cinematography or videography, and/or physics analysis were included. A total of 89 papers, theses/dissertations, and abstracts were identified and reviewed, grouped by the movement concept or specialized movements being studied: alignment (n = 8), plié (8), relevé (8), passé (3), degagé (3), développé (7), rond de jambe (3), grand battement (4), arm movements (1), forward stepping (3), turns (6), elevation work (28), falls (1), and dance-specific motor strategies (6). Several recurring themes emerged from these studies: that elite dancers demonstrate different and superior motor strategies than novices or nondancers; that dancers perform differently when using a barre as opposed to without a barre, both in terms of muscle activation patterns and weight shift strategies; that while skilled dancers tend to be more consistent across multiple trials of a task, considerable variability is seen among participants, even when matched for background, years of training, body type, and other variables; and that dance teachers recommend methods of achieving movement skills that are inconsistent with optimal biomechanical function, as well as inconsistent with strategies employed by elite dancers. Measurement tools and the efficacy of study methodologies are also discussed. PMID:21442132

  7. Factors influencing the choice of antidepressants: A study of antidepressant prescribing practice at University psychiatric clinic in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nađa P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antidepressants are a widely used class of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate different aspects of antidepressant prescribing practice at University Psychiatric Clinic in Belgrade. Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out by retrospective analysis of the patient's medical charts. The study included all patients with antidepressant prescribed at discharge during 2009 (n = 296. The evaluation was focused on patient- related factors (socio-demographic and illness related, psychiatrist-related factors (sex and duration of working experience and drug related factors (type of antidepressant, dose, polypharmacy and reimbursement by national health insurance. Results. Antidepressants were prescribed for unipolar depression (F32-34, ICD X either without comorbidity (46.2% or with comorbidity (24.7%, mostly as a monotherapy (91% had one antidepressant, to the patients who were 65% female, aged 50.1 ± 8.9, most of them with 12 years of education (52.6%, married (69.3% and employed (55.9%. The majority of patients had a history of two hospitalizations (Med 2; 25th-75th perc. 1-4 during nine years (Med 9; 25th-75th perc. 2-15 after the first episode of depression. Among them, 19% were found to be suicidal in a lifetime. The single most prescribed antidepressant was sertraline (20.4%, followed by fluoxetine (13.3% and maprotiline (11.7%. Utilization of antidepressants was positively correlated with the rate of reimbursement (p < 0.01. The most prescribed antidepressant group was selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI (47.8%, followed by tricyclic antidepresants (TCA (25.3% and new antidepressants - venlafaxine, tianeptine, mirtazapine, bupropion, trazodone (15.1%. Most of the drugs were prescribed in doses which are at the lower end of the recommended dose-range. Regarding severity of the actual depressive episode, TCA were prescribed for severe depression with psychotic features, while SSRI were choice for

  8. [Biomechanics of whiplash injuries of the cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G

    1989-07-01

    1. The whiplash injury of the cervical spine is a typical, but not very often observed injury of occupants of automotive vehicles involved in moderate collisions. 2. There still exist great uncertainties in the elaboration of expertises concerning the minor whiplash injury, so that the great part of the disturbances cannot be objectivated under a clinical point of view. And on the other hand, serious whiplash injuries often are superposed or veiled by secondary injuries. 3. Thus, the aim of the present paper was to point out injury mechanisms, to give a rough scaling of the whiplash severity under biomechanical aspects and finally to set these injury mechanisms in correlation to the following criteria of accident: a) vehicle velocity change (energy equivalent speed--EES); b) deformation of vehicles on the impact-exposed structure; c) loading of occupants by acceleration or deceleration. 4. The tolerance limit of the cervical spine generally decreases to a lower limit, if the cervical spine is changed in a pathological way, e.g. by preexisting diseases. 5. It is evident and important, that the difficult work of giving an expert's opinion on this field must be performed in an interdisciplinary collaboration of engineers for collision-analysis and physicians experienced in accident-traumatology. PMID:2669311

  9. Soft Tissue Biomechanical Modeling for Computer Assisted Surgery

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

      This volume focuses on the biomechanical modeling of biological tissues in the context of Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS). More specifically, deformable soft tissues are addressed since they are the subject of the most recent developments in this field. The pioneering works on this CAS topic date from the 1980's, with applications in orthopaedics and biomechanical models of bones. More recently, however, biomechanical models of soft tissues have been proposed since most of the human body is made of soft organs that can be deformed by the surgical gesture. Such models are much more complicated to handle since the tissues can be subject to large deformations (non-linear geometrical framework) as well as complex stress/strain relationships (non-linear mechanical framework). Part 1 of the volume presents biomechanical models that have been developed in a CAS context and used during surgery. This is particularly new since most of the soft tissues models already proposed concern Computer Assisted Planning, with ...

  10. Hip protectors: recommendations for biomechanical testing-an international consensus statement (part I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinovitch, S.N.; Evans, S.L.; Minns, J.;

    2009-01-01

    Hip protectors represent a promising strategy for preventing fall-related hip fractures. However, clinical trials have yielded conflicting results due, in part, to lack of agreement on techniques for measuring and optimizing the biomechanical performance of hip protectors as a prerequisite to...... performance of hip protectors. The primary outcome of testing should be the percent reduction (compared with the unpadded condition) in peak value of the axial compressive force applied to the femoral neck during a simulated fall on the greater trochanter. To provide reasonable results, the test system should...

  11. Distension of the renal pelvis in kidney stone patients: sensory and biomechanical responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katja Venborg; Liao, Donghua; Osther, Susanne Sloth;

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of symptoms in urolithiasis is poorly understood. Traditionally increased endoluminal pressure is considered the main mechanism causing pain in the upper urinary tract but clinical data are sparse. The aim of the present study was to develop a new model related to mechanosensation...... was a relation between pressure and pain score, the non-homogenous spatial strain distribution suggests that the 3D biomechanical properties of the renal pelvis are not reflected by simple estimates of tension based on pressure and volume....

  12. Sensory and biomechanical responses to distension of the renal pelvis in kidney stone patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katja Venborg; Liao, Donghua; Osther, Susanne Sloth;

    The pathogenesis of symptoms in urolithiasis is poorly understood. Traditionally increased endoluminal pressure is considered the main mechanism causing pain in the upper urinary tract but clinical data are sparse. The aim of the present study was to develop a new model related to mechanosensation...... was a relation between pressure and pain score, the non-homogenous spatial strain distribution suggests that the 3D biomechanical properties of the renal pelvis are not reflected by simple estimates of tension based on pressure and volume....

  13. The search for performance related factors in biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The identification of performance related factors (PRFs) is a major goal in sports biomechanics. However, PRFs identified across studies are inconsistent and this might be explained by the limitations of discrete point analysis, which is commonly used. New data analysis techniques involving continuous waveform analysis (e.g. functional principal component analysis, fPCA) have been suggested, but their use in biomechanics is not widespread, and they also have limitations. Anot...

  14. Carpal Tunnel Release: Do We Understand the Biomechanical Consequences?

    OpenAIRE

    Morrell, Nathan T.; Harris, Andrew; Skjong, Christian; Akelman, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel release is a very common procedure performed in the United States. While the procedure is often curative, some patients experience postoperative scar sensitivity, pillar pain, grip weakness, or recurrent median nerve symptoms. Release of the carpal tunnel has an effect on carpal anatomy and biomechanics, including increases in carpal arch width and carpal tunnel volume and changes in muscle and tendon mechanics. Our understanding of how these biomechanical changes contribute to ...

  15. BIOMECHANICAL PRINCIPLES PHYSICAL REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    OpenAIRE

    S. D. Korshunov; K. V. Davletyarova; L. V. Kapilevich

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We studied the basic biomechanical principles of physical rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy.Materials and methods. Methods of Motion Tracking and electromyography investigated the biomechanical characteristics of gait in children with cerebral palsy. It is shown that the main differences between dynamic stereotype walk pediatric patients is to delay moving forward center of gravity and the disorganization of the lower limb movements (especially knee) in the vertical plane. P...

  16. Biomechanics and Cycling BIOMECÁNICA Y CICLISMO

    OpenAIRE

    M. Gutierrez

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this essay is giving a general overview about sport cycling from a biomechanical perspective. Although it is necessary to say that the extraordinary dimension of the huge scientific production related to the topic makes difficult to deal this area in just one essay. Due to the variety of contents included into cycling biomechanics, contents in this essay have been restricted into three units: the first, focusing the study of forces opposed to displacement, and specially to the anal...

  17. Single Cell Biomechanical Phenotyping using Microfluidics and Nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Babahosseini, Hesam

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied with alterations in the cell biomechanical phenotype, including changes in cell structure, morphology, and responses to microenvironmental stress. These alterations result in an increased deformability of transformed cells and reduced resistance to mechanical stimuli, enabling motility and invasion. Therefore, single cell biomechanical properties could be served as a powerful label-free biomarker for effective characterization and early detection of single ca...

  18. Biomechanics and control of vocalization in a non-songbird

    OpenAIRE

    Elemans, Coen P.H; Zaccarelli, Riccardo; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2007-01-01

    The neuromuscular control of vocalization in birds requires complicated and precisely coordinated motor control of the vocal organ (i.e. the syrinx), the respiratory system and upper vocal tract. The biomechanics of the syrinx is very complex and not well understood. In this paper, we aim to unravel the contribution of different control parameters in the coo of the ring dove (Streptopelia risoria) at the syrinx level. We designed and implemented a quantitative biomechanical syrinx model that ...

  19. Jet Methods in Time-Dependent Lagrangian Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancevic, Tijana T.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds associated to the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold, called the configuration bundle. We start with an ordinary configuration manifold of human body motion, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF) for ...

  20. State of Clinical Education at Tehran University of Medical Sciences from the Viewpoint of Students of Nursing & Midwifery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Baraz Pardenjani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Clinical education is considered as the heart of medicine and health care due to the importance of training expert manpower. To achieve this goal, education quality should be promoted, this requiring its continuous evaluation. In this regard, application of appropriate educational strategies by competent clinical trainers or instructors leads to an improvement in the clinical education outcomes. This study was carried out to assess the learning method of clinical skills and its barriers from the viewpoint of students of midwifery. Materials & Methods : This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 140 employed BS midwives in Yazd Province who had a 6-month working experience using a questionnaire including demographic information and items on the common clinical skills grading, skills learning methods, and barriers to clinical learning. Having collected the questionnaires, the data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The findings of the study revealed that the rate of clinical skills was at a good level for most of the subjects (56.5%, at an intermediate level for 30.7 %, and at a low level for 12.8% of the subjects. The correlation coefficients were statistically significant between subjects' level of clinical skills and age, department, and clinical experience. In studying the learning methods of clinical skills, 46.6% of learning was attributed to trainers, while 69.3% of the learning barriers were attributed to lack of sufficient cases during education, and 68.6% were attributed to insufficient practical training. Conclusion : Although the graduates had an acceptable level of clinical skills, the need for improving clinical education and administering continuous education programs for controlling and warranting care quality was markedly obvious. As the subjects reported, learning was attributed to trainers, while learning barriers were attributed to lack of sufficient cases during training, and insufficient practical

  1. Biomechanics of Artificial Disc Replacements Adjacent to a 2-Level Fusion in 4-Level Hybrid Constructs: An In Vitro Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Zhenhua; Fogel, Guy R.; Wei, Na; Gu, Hongsheng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The ideal procedure for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases remains controversial. Recent studies on hybrid surgery combining anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) for 2-level and 3-level constructs have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to estimate the biomechanics of 3 kinds of 4-level hybrid constructs, which are more likely to be used clinically compared to 4-level arthrodesis. Mate...

  2. In vitro biomechanical study of pedicle screw pull-out strength based on different screw path preparation techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Moldavsky; Kanaan Salloum; Brandon Bucklen; Saif Khalil; Jwalant S Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor screw-to-bone fixation is a clinical problem that can lead to screw loosening. Under-tapping (UT) the pedicle screw has been evaluated biomechanically in the past. The objective of the study was to determine if pedicle preparation with a sequential tapping technique will alter the screw-to-bone fixation strength using a stress relaxation testing loading protocol. Materials and Methods: Three thoracolumbar calf spines were instrumented with pedicle screws that were either p...

  3. Construction and Biomechanical Properties of PolyAxial Self-Locking Anatomical Plate Based on the Geometry of Distal Tibia

    OpenAIRE

    Weiguo Liang; Weixiong Ye; Dongping Ye; Ziqiang Zhou; Zhiguang Chen; Aiguo Li; Zong-Han Xie; Lihai Zhang; Jiake Xu

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide scientific and empirical evidence for the clinical application of the polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate, 80 human tibias from healthy adults were scanned by spiral CT and their three-dimensional images were reconstructed using the surface shaded display (SSD) method. Firstly, based on the geometric data of distal tibia, a polyaxial self-locking anatomical plate for distal tibia was designed and constructed. Biomechanical tests were then performed by applying axial lo...

  4. Fibrin Sealant: A Review of the History, Biomechanics, and Current Applications for Prosthetic Fixation in Hernia Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jefferson Tyler; Webb, David L; Stoikes, Nathaniel F N; Voeller, Guy R

    2015-11-01

    The role of surgical adhesives in hernia repair has continued to evolve. The purpose of this chapter is to review the role of fibrin sealant and its application in general surgery for mesh fixation, specifically the history, biomechanics, and clinical utilization. The utilization of fibrin sealant for repair of groin hernias, both open and laparoscopic, ventral hernias, and hiatal hernias will be discussed. PMID:26696538

  5. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPORTS BIOMECHANICS: NEW DAWN OR FALSE HOPE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bartlett

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews developments in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI in sports biomechanics over the last decade. It outlines possible uses of Expert Systems as diagnostic tools for evaluating faults in sports movements ('techniques' and presents some example knowledge rules for such an expert system. It then compares the analysis of sports techniques, in which Expert Systems have found little place to date, with gait analysis, in which they are routinely used. Consideration is then given to the use of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs in sports biomechanics, focusing on Kohonen self-organizing maps, which have been the most widely used in technique analysis, and multi-layer networks, which have been far more widely used in biomechanics in general. Examples of the use of ANNs in sports biomechanics are presented for javelin and discus throwing, shot putting and football kicking. I also present an example of the use of Evolutionary Computation in movement optimization in the soccer throw in, which predicted an optimal technique close to that in the coaching literature. After briefly overviewing the use of AI in both sports science and biomechanics in general, the article concludes with some speculations about future uses of AI in sports biomechanics.

  6. Brain injury biomechanics in closed-head impact : Studies on injury epidemiology, tolerance criteria, biomechanics and traffic injury prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Viano, David

    1997-01-01

    Permanent disability from traumatic brain injury is a devastating consequence of traffic crashes. Injury prevention is a fruitful approach to reduce the incidence and severity of disabling brain injury. However, the development of effective prevention techniques requires better knowledge on the mechanisms and biomechanics of brain injury in closed-head impact. The overall aim of this study is focused on brain injury mechanisms, biomechanics, and tolerances in closed-head ...

  7. Biomechanical metrics of aesthetic perception in dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Shaw; Shippen, James

    2015-12-01

    The brain may be tuned to evaluate aesthetic perception through perceptual chunking when we observe the grace of the dancer. We modelled biomechanical metrics to explain biological determinants of aesthetic perception in dance. Eighteen expert (EXP) and intermediate (INT) dancers performed développé arabesque in three conditions: (1) slow tempo, (2) slow tempo with relevé, and (3) fast tempo. To compare biomechanical metrics of kinematic data, we calculated intra-excursion variability, principal component analysis (PCA), and dimensionless jerk for the gesture limb. Observers, all trained dancers, viewed motion capture stick figures of the trials and ranked each for aesthetic (1) proficiency and (2) movement smoothness. Statistical analyses included group by condition repeated-measures ANOVA for metric data; Mann-Whitney U rank and Friedman's rank tests for nonparametric rank data; Spearman's rho correlations to compare aesthetic rankings and metrics; and linear regression to examine which metric best quantified observers' aesthetic rankings, p < 0.05. The goodness of fit of the proposed models was determined using Akaike information criteria. Aesthetic proficiency and smoothness rankings of the dance movements revealed differences between groups and condition, p < 0.0001. EXP dancers were rated more aesthetically proficient than INT dancers. The slow and fast conditions were judged more aesthetically proficient than slow with relevé (p < 0.0001). Of the metrics, PCA best captured the differences due to group and condition. PCA also provided the most parsimonious model to explain aesthetic proficiency and smoothness rankings. By permitting organization of large data sets into simpler groupings, PCA may mirror the phenomenon of chunking in which the brain combines sensory motor elements into integrated units of behaviour. In this representation, the chunk of information which is remembered, and to which the observer reacts, is the elemental mode shape of

  8. Evaluation of the physical work load and biomechanical of workers at manual and semi-mechanized mowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Martins de Oliveir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate of the physical work load and biomechanical of workers at manual and semi-mechanized mowing activities for the planting the forests. The physical work load was evaluated in a survery of the workers cardiac frequency in different stages of the work using a Polar Oy monitor. To the biomechanic evaluation the workers were filmed in the execution of the work, defined the typical postures adopted and the date analyzed in program 3DSSPP (3D Static Strength Prediction Program developed for University of Michigan, USA. The results showed that the activity of manual mowing required greater physical effort, with cardiac frequency above the maximum limit recommended of 40% and the activity was classified as heavy. In this method of working the various joints of the workers showed injurie risks. The hip joint articulation was the most affected, with capable percentage varying between 88 and 92%.

  9. Survey of socio-economic profile of p seen at the dental clinic of University das Cruzes and of the treatment to w were submitted to: endodontic clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Renata Giazzi NASSRI

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:In order to minimize the population oral health problemsis essential the consistent collection of information about the socio-economic situation and oral condition, raising the knowledge base thatwill lead the action, research and planning for better care. Objective:This article aimed to evaluate the socio-economic profile of patients seen at the endodontic clinic of UMC and its correlation with endodontic diseases.Material and methods: It was proposed a questionnaire to collect data through medical records of patients seen at the Endodontic Clinic of UMC.The study analyzed medical records of 70 patients,most of them female adult with age ranging from 22 to 69 years.Results:Most of the people attending the clinic of UMC has low-income, and it has been found that the most frequent cause of the endodontic problems is dental caries, followed by trauma.The largest number of diagnoses pointed to pulpal necrosis as a cause of endodontic involvement.Conclusion: It was concluded that the socio-economic profile of patients attending the clinic is of classes D and C (according to IBGE,and the leading cause of demand for endodontic treatment is pain.

  10. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-02-18

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26925379

  11. Avaliação biomecânica das fraturas intra-articulares do calcâneo e sua correlação clínica radiográfica Biomechanical evaluation of intra articular calcaneal fracture and clinical radiographic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Emilio Kuschnaroff Contreras

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve o objetivo de oferecer uma avaliação clínica, radiográfica e biomecânica de pacientes com fratura intraarticular de calcâneo, submetidos à redução aberta e fixação interna. A amostra consistiu em 22 pacientes, 20 do sexo masculino e dois do sexo feminino, com idade média de 40,95 (± 11,63 anos. Os autores realizaram avaliações radiográficas do ângulo de Böhler e Gissane, no pré e no pós-operatório, além de utilizarem a tomografia computadorizada para avaliação da classificação de Sanders. A avaliação da Distribuição da Pressão Plantar foi realizada pelo sistema F-scan. Os resultados clínicos encontrados foram satisfatórios apresentando, pontuação média de 75,5 no critério da AOFAS.. A redução cirúrgica resultou em uma melhora dos ângulos de Böhler e Gissane. O estudo mostrou diferenças estatisticamente significantes entre o antepé o retropé fraturados no que tange sobre a área de contato, pressão e força de reação do solo. Os valores encontrados para estes parâmetros foram maiores no retropé que no antepé fraturados. A trajetória de Pressão (COP foi menor no pé fraturado que no pé normal. Encontrou-se correlação entre o Ângulo de Gissane após a redução e o Segundo Pico de Força, indicando que quanto melhor a redução deste ângulo , melhor a impulsão. Também encontrou-se a correlação entre a pontuação AOFAS e o Primeiro Pico de Força, mostrando que quanto melhor o resultado clínico melhor o apoio do retropé.The present study had an objective to perfom a clinical, radiographic and biomechanical evaluation in patients with calcaneal fractures submitted to open reduction with internal fixation. The sample consisted of 22 patients - 20 male and 2 female with an average age of 40,95 (±11,63 years old. The authors have done radiographic evaluation of the pre and post operatory of Böchler and Gissane angles; furthermore, they used a CT scanning for Sander

  12. Comparative biomechanics: life's physical world (second edition)

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Why do you switch from walking to running at a specific speed? Why do tall trees rarely blow over in high winds? And why does a spore ejected into air at seventy miles per hour travel only a fraction of an inch? Comparative Biomechanics is the first and only textbook that takes a comprehensive look at the mechanical aspects of life--covering animals and plants, structure and movement, and solids and fluids. An ideal entry point into the ways living creatures interact with their immediate physical world, this revised and updated edition examines how the forms and activities of animals and plants reflect the materials available to nature, considers rules for fluid flow and structural design, and explores how organisms contend with environmental forces. Drawing on physics and mechanical engineering, Steven Vogel looks at how animals swim and fly, modes of terrestrial locomotion, organism responses to winds and water currents, circulatory and suspension-feeding systems, and the relationship between size and mech...

  13. Functional anatomy and biomechanics of the carpus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wrist is an exceedingly complex structure composed of several joints and a dedicated ligamentous system. Its functional principles allow a wide range of carpal motion and make the wrist remarkably resistant to external stress forces: The proximal carpal row serves as an intercalated link interposed between the static elements of both the forearm and the distal carpal row. Like a flexible placeholder, the proximal row synchronously adapts to the spatial and temporal requirements of the wrist. There are synergistic movement patterns including simultaneous flexion of the proximal row as the wrist is deviated radially and simultaneous extension during ulnar deviation. Together with pronosupination of the radioulnar joints, the combined radial/ulnar inclination and flexion/extension enable spherical, out-of-plane movements of the hand. Carpal function is best explained by the ''model of a ring under tension.'' This review addresses the anatomy and the biomechanics of the wrist and illustrates systematic image analysis by using carpal lines and angles as well as indices of carpal height. (orig.)

  14. The biomechanics of throwing: simplified and cogent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alexander E; Kontaxis, Andreas; O'Brien, Stephen J; Bedi, Asheesh

    2014-06-01

    The majority of shoulder injuries occur due to repetitive overhead movements, with baseball pitching being the most common mechanism for overuse injury. Before studying the treatment of these shoulder injuries, it is paramount that the health professional have an understanding of the etiology of and the underlying mechanisms for shoulder pathology. The act of overhead throwing is an eloquent full-body motion that requires tremendous coordination from the time of force generation to follow-through. The shoulder complex is a crucial component of the upper body kinetic chain as it transmits force created in the lower body to the arm and hand to produce velocity and accuracy with ball release. The focus of this article is on the biomechanics of the throwing motion, with emphasis on the kinematics of the shoulder. The established phases of the throwing motion will be reviewed in a stepwise manner and the contributions of osseous and soft-tissue structures to the successful completion of each phase will be discussed. PMID:24787720

  15. Psychological Center as a Foundation for the Practical Training of Clinical psychologists at the Saint-Petersburg State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A Burina

    2016-05-01

    In overall, the Psychological Center with its long-term experience of preparation and practical skills training for the students of the Clinical Psychology specialty, has proven its necessity, relevance, and effectiveness.

  16. Antoni Christian Bryk (1820-1881) - professor of forensic medicine at Jagiellonian University (1852-1860), and director of the surgical clinic of Jagiellonian University in Cracow (1860-1881).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajączkowski, Tadeusz

    2014-01-01

    scientific discipline. In the 19th century two milestones revolutionised surgery: the development of narcosis, which enabled painless surgery, and the introduction of antisepsis and asepsis. The author presents the beginnings of academic surgery in Cracow. Its pioneer surgeons are presented. Extensive research was undertaken to collect the literature and documents in Polish, Austrian and German archives and libraries in order to prepare this study. Biographical details of the director of the Surgical Clinic, Prof. Antoni Bryk, are provided. He was the first person in Poland to introduce antisepsis and galvanocautery as routine procedures in the Cracow Clinic. The introduction of antisepsis contributed to a reduction in infection during surgery, and a reduction in postoperative mortality in Cracow Surgical Clinic. In this way Professor Bryk became the first Polish surgeon to apply Lister's antiseptic method in the treatment of wounds. Thus enlarged, the scope of surgery for intracranial, bone and other procedures became routine. Surgery is the oldest discipline in medicine. Poland's first university chair of surgery was established in the 18th century. Surgery, which until then had been the domain of barbers and bath house attendants, became a clinical, PMID:25518102

  17. Outcomes from the first mouth cancer awareness and clinical check-up day in the Dublin Dental University Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacCarthy, Denise

    2012-04-01

    To increase public awareness about mouth cancer, the Dublin Dental University Hospital (DDUH) hosted an awareness day and free mouth check-up in September 2010. The messages of information, self-examination and risk management, and the importance of early detection, were available to all attendees. The role of general dental and medical practitioners in examination of the mouth was stressed.

  18. Measurement properties of exsisting clinical assessment methods evaluating scapular positioning and function. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Juul-Kristensen, B; Lund, H;

    2014-01-01

    MEASUREMENT PROPERTIES OF EXISTING CLINICAL ASSESSMENT METHODS EVALUATING SCAPULAR POSITIONING AND FUNCTION. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW1,2Camilla Marie Larsen, 1,3Birgit Juul-Kristensen, 1,3Hans Lund, 1Karen Søgaard1Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark2...... of the available clinical scapular assessment methods and critically appraise the methodological quality of the involved studies. METHODS A systematic, computer-assisted literature search using Medline, CINAHL, SportDiscus and EMBASE was performed from inception to October 2013. Reference lists in...... groups: Static positioning assessment (n=19), Semi-dynamic (n=13), and Dynamic functional assessment (n=22). Fifteen studies were excluded for evaluation due to no/few clinimetric results, leaving 35 studies for evaluation. Graded according to the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health...

  19. An online guided ACT intervention for enhancing the psychological wellbeing of university students: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Panajiota; Lappalainen, Päivi; Muotka, Joona; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2016-03-01

    Stress, anxiety and depression are relatively common problems among university students. This study examined whether an online psychological intervention aiming at enhancing the wellbeing of university students could be an effective and practical alternative for meeting the needs of a university population. University students (N = 68; 85% female; 19-32 years old) were randomly assigned to either a guided seven-week online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (iACT) intervention or a waiting list control condition (WLC). A between-groups pre-post (iACT vs WLC) design with 12-month follow-up for the iACT participants was conducted. The intervention participants were offered two face-to-face meetings, completed online exercises during a five-week period, and received personal weekly written feedback via the website from their randomly assigned, trained student coaches. Waitlist participants were offered the intervention program soon after the post measurements. Results in this small efficacy trial showed that the iACT participants had significantly higher gains in wellbeing (between group, d = 0.46), life satisfaction (d = 0.65), and mindfulness skills (d = 0.49). In addition, iACT participants' self-reported stress (d = 0.54) and symptoms of depression (d = 0.69) were significantly reduced compared to the participants in the control group. These benefits were maintained over a 12-month follow-up period (within iACT group, d = 0.65-0.69, for primary measures). The results suggest that an online-based, coach-guided ACT program with blended face-to-face and online sessions could be an effective and well-accepted alternative for enhancing the wellbeing of university students. PMID:26848517

  20. Computational biomechanics of bone's responses to dental prostheses - osseointegration, remodeling and resorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical and experimental studies showed that human bone has the ability to remodel itself to better adapt to its biomechanical environment by changing both its material properties and geometry. As a consequence of the rapid development and extensive applications of major dental restorations such as implantation and fixed partial denture (FPD), the effect of bone remodeling on the success of a dental restorative surgery is becoming critical for prosthetic design and pre-surgical assessment. This paper aims to provide a computational biomechanics framework to address dental bone's responses as a result of dental restoration. It explored three important issues of resorption, apposition and osseointegration in terms of remodeling simulation. The published remodeling data in long bones were regulated to drive the computational remodeling prediction for the dental bones by correlating the results to clinical data. It is anticipated that the study will provide a more predictive model of dental bone response and help develop a new design methodology for patient-specific dental prosthetic restoration.

  1. Dynamic ultra high speed Scheimpflug imaging for assessing corneal biomechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ambrósio Jr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe a novel technique for clinical characterization of corneal biomechanics using non-invasive dynamic imaging. METHODS: Corneal deformation response during non contact tonometry (NCT is monitored by ultra-high-speed (UHS photography. The Oculus Corvis ST (Scheimpflug Technology; Wetzlar, Germany has a UHS Scheimpflug camera, taking over 4,300 frames per second and of a single 8mm horizontal slit, for monitoring corneal deformation response to NCT. The metered collimated air pulse or puff has a symmetrical configuration and fixed maximal internal pump pressure of 25 kPa. The bidirectional movement of the cornea in response to the air puff is monitored. RESULTS: Measurement time is 30ms, with 140 frames acquired. Advanced algorithms for edge detection of the front and back corneal contours are applied for every frame. IOP is calculated based on the first applanation moment. Deformation amplitude (DA is determined as the highest displacement of the apex in the highest concavity (HC moment. Applanation length (AL and corneal velocity (CVel are recorded during ingoing and outgoing phases. CONCLUSION: Corneal deformation can be monitored during non contact tonometry. The parameters generated provide clinical in vivo characterization of corneal biomechanical properties in two dimensions, which is relevant for different applications in Ophthalmology.

  2. Tumor growth prediction with reaction-diffusion and hyperelastic biomechanical model by physiological data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ken C L; Summers, Ronald M; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-10-01

    The goal of tumor growth prediction is to model the tumor growth process, which can be achieved by physiological modeling and model personalization from clinical measurements. Although image-driven frameworks have been proposed with promising results, several issues such as infinitesimal strain assumptions, complicated personalization procedures, and the lack of functional information, may limit their prediction accuracy. In view of these issues, we propose a framework for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor growth prediction, which comprises a FEM-based tumor growth model with coupled reaction-diffusion equation and nonlinear biomechanics. Physiological data fusion of structural and functional images is used to improve the subject-specificity of model personalization, and a derivative-free global optimization algorithm is adopted to facilitate the complicated model and accommodate flexible choices of objective functions. With this flexibility, we propose an objective function accounting for both the tumor volume difference and the root-mean-squared error of intracellular volume fractions. Experiments were performed on synthetic and clinical data to verify the parameter estimation capability and the prediction performance. Comparisons of using different biomechanical models and objective functions were also performed. From the experimental results of eight patient data sets, the average recall, precision, Dice coefficient, and relative volume difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes were 84.5 ± 6.9%, 85.8 ± 8.2%, 84.6 ± 1.7%, and 14.2 ± 8.4%, respectively. PMID:25962846

  3. A biomechanical comparison of four different fixation methods for midshaft clavicle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Yang, Yang; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Weiguo; Ma, Jianxiong; Zhu, Shaowen; Ma, Baoyi; Xing, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Clavicle fractures may occur in all age groups, and 70%-80% of clavicle fractures occur in the midshaft. Many methods for treating midshaft clavicular fractures have been reported and remain controversial. To provide some guidance for clinical treatment, 30 artificial polymethyl methacrylate models of the clavicle were sewn obliquely at the midshaft to simulate the most common type of clavicular fractures, and the fracture models were divided into five groups randomly and were fixed as follows: the reconstruction plates were placed at the superior position of the fracture model (R-S group), the reconstruction plates were placed at the anteroinferior position of the fracture model (R-AI group), the locking plates were placed at the superior position (L-S group), the locking plates were placed at the anteroinferior position (L-AI group); and the control models were unfixed (control group). The strain gauges were attached to the bone surface near the fracture fragments, and then, the biomechanical properties of the specimens were measured using the compression test, torsion test and three-point bending test. The results showed that plate fixation can provide a stable construct to help with fracture healing and is the preferred method in the treatment of clavicle fractures. The locking plate provides the best biomechanical stability when placed at the anteroinferior position, and this surgical method can reduce the operation time and postoperative complications; thus, it would be a better choice in clinical practice. PMID:26586526

  4. Computational biomechanics of bone's responses to dental prostheses - osseointegration, remodeling and resorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Rungsiyakull, Chaiy; Field, Clarice; Lin, Daniel; Zhang, Leo; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Clinical and experimental studies showed that human bone has the ability to remodel itself to better adapt to its biomechanical environment by changing both its material properties and geometry. As a consequence of the rapid development and extensive applications of major dental restorations such as implantation and fixed partial denture (FPD), the effect of bone remodeling on the success of a dental restorative surgery is becoming critical for prosthetic design and pre-surgical assessment. This paper aims to provide a computational biomechanics framework to address dental bone's responses as a result of dental restoration. It explored three important issues of resorption, apposition and osseointegration in terms of remodeling simulation. The published remodeling data in long bones were regulated to drive the computational remodeling prediction for the dental bones by correlating the results to clinical data. It is anticipated that the study will provide a more predictive model of dental bone response and help develop a new design methodology for patient-specific dental prosthetic restoration.

  5. Image-assisted non-invasive and dynamic biomechanical analysis of human joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhit, Abdullah A.; Pickering, Mark R.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Ward, Tom; Smith, Paul N.

    2013-07-01

    Kinematic analysis provides a strong link between musculoskeletal injuries, chronic joint conditions, treatment planning/monitoring and prosthesis design/outcome. However, fast and accurate 3D kinematic analysis still remains a challenge in order to translate this procedure into clinical scenarios. 3D computed tomography (CT) to 2D single-plane fluoroscopy registration is a promising non-invasive technology for biomechanical examination of human joints. Although this technique has proven to be very precise in terms of in-plane translation and rotation measurements, out-of-plane motion estimations have been a difficulty so far. Therefore, to enable this technology into clinical translation, precise and fast estimation of both in-plane and out-of-plane movements is crucial, which is the aim of this paper. Here, a fast and accurate 3D/2D registration technique is proposed to evaluate biomechanical/kinematic analysis. The proposed algorithm utilizes a new multi-modal similarity measure called ‘sum of conditional variances’, a coarse-to-fine Laplacian of Gaussian filtering approach for robust gradient-descent optimization and a novel technique for the analytic calculation of the required gradients for out-of-plane rotations. Computer simulations and in vitro experiments showed that the new approach was robust in terms of the capture range, required significantly less iterations to converge and achieved good registration and kinematic accuracy when compared to existing techniques and to the ‘gold-standard’ Roentgen stereo analysis.

  6. Biomechanical and physical properties of human amniotic membrane after gamma irradiation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At MINT Tissue Bank, amniotic membranes are procured routinely from placenta of screened healthy mothers. They are processed, dried, packed and sterilised using gamma irradiation at minimum dose of 17 kGy. The sterilised membranes are delivered to several hospitals and clinics, locally and even abroad. The membranes are effectively used on patients with first and second degree bums, superficial wounds and scalds. At present the membrane is given 2 years expiry date if stored in dark and cool place. A study was carried to validate this expiry period under the quality system by determining any changes in biomechanical properties of amnion after irradiation and at various storage times. Random samples of amnion, stored at room temperature in dark were picked up for physical tests including tensile strength and elongation using Instron Universal Testing Instrument (Model 43 1 0) at MINT. After 4 months storage, irradiated freeze-dried amnion (79.79+20.27 kg/cm sup 2) had significantly lower tensile strength compared to air-dried amnion (304.97+66.92 kg/cm sup 2) at P<0.05. As for elongation, there was no significant different between air-dried and freeze dried. Further studies on the stability of air-dried amnion over storage time showed that there was no significant reduction in tensile strength (432.37 +208.1 1 kg/cm sup 2) and elongation (I 1.68+1.63%) for radiation sterilised amnion up to 12 months storage. Combination of radiation and storage at room temperature also did not alter the stability of the products stored up to 20 months when compared to newly processed amnion. We could not find any changes in physical appearance such as colour for amnion which have been kept for almost 5 years. Therefore the expiry date of 2 years (24 months) given to our amnion is acceptable. At present, MINT Tissue Bank only process air-dried amnion since the cost of processing of amniotic membranes can be reduced by 40% compared to freeze drying. Water content for both drying

  7. Relationship Between Oral Health Related Quality of Life and Dental Condition in Patients Referring to Yazd Dental University and Yazd Khatamolanbia Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    farzane Vaziri; Ahmad Haerian; Mohammad Ali Morowati Sharifabadi; Elaheh Amirian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral health related quality of life - United Kingdom (OHQoL-UK) questionnaire is one of the instrument which measure both positive and negative aspect of Oral Health related Quality of Life (OHQoL) at the same time. The aim of this study is to evaluate OHQoL with remaining teeth and other variable using OHQoL-UK questionnaire. Method and Material: This cross-sectional study was done on 150 patients referring to Yazd dental university and Khatamolanbia clinic; They were random...

  8. A selection of biomechanical research problems: From modeling to experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Cyrus Omid

    The research undertakings within this manuscript illustrate the importance of biomechanics in today's science. Without doubt, biomechanics can be utilized to obtain a better understanding of many unsolved mysteries involved in the field of medicine. Moreover, biomechanics can be used to develop better prosthetic or surgical devices as well. Chapter 2 represents a medical problem, which has not been solved for more than a century. With the use of fundamental principles of biomechanics', a better insight of this problem and its possible causes were obtained. Chapter 3 investigates the mechanical interaction between the human teeth and some processed food products during mastication, which is a routine but crucial daily activity of a human being. Chapter 4 looks at a problem within the field of surgery. In this chapter the stability and reliability of two different Suturing-Techniques are explored. Chapters 5 and 6 represent new patent designs as a result of the investigations made in Chapter 4. Chapter 7 studies the impact and load transfer patterns during the collision between a child's head and the ground. All of the above mentioned chapters show the significance of biomechanics in solving a range of different medical problems that involve physical and or mechanical characters.

  9. Sarcomas of the head and neck in clinical material from Clinic of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Oncological Surgery of Medical University of Lodz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcomas are the malignant neoplasms originating from mesenchymal tissue. They can arise from connective, vascular, muscular and other tissues. The most frequent localization is on the trunk and limbs, but in maxillofacial region they occur rarely and have worse survival prognosis. Initially they arise asymptotically and painlessly. Radiological findings are also untypical. The best results of treatment are obtained by the combined therapy. Applying not only surgery but also chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with sarcomas enabled longer 5-years survival from 20% to almost 70%. We want to present 4 patients treated in the Department of Cranio - Maxillofacial Surgery of the Medical University in Lodz during the recent years. There were 2 patients with chondrosarcomas, 1 with osteosarcomas and 1 with leyomiosarcoma. (authors)

  10. The Current Testing Protocols for Biomechanical Evaluation of Lumbar Spinal Implants in Laboratory Setting: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina A. Gonzalez-Blohm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro biomechanical investigations have become a routinely employed technique to explore new lumbar instrumentation. One of the most important advantages of such investigations is the low risk present when compared to clinical trials. However, the best use of any experimental data can be made when standard testing protocols are adopted by investigators, thus allowing comparisons among studies. Experimental variables, such as the length of the specimen, operative level, type of loading (e.g., dynamic versus quasistatic, magnitude, and rate of load applied, are among the most common variables controlled during spinal biomechanical testing. Although important efforts have been made to standardize these protocols, high variability can be found in the current literature. The aim of this investigation was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify the current trends in the protocols reported for the evaluation of new lumbar spinal implants under laboratory setting.

  11. Evaluation of Gram Negative Bacterial Contamination in Dental Unit Water Supplies in a University Clinic in Tabriz, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Pouralibaba, Firoz; Balaei, Esrafil; Kashefimehr, Atabak

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Bacterial contamination of dental unit water supplies (DUWS) has attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to the emergence of serious infectionsin susceptible dental patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of gram-negative bacterial contamination in DUWS at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences Faculty of Dentistry. Materials and methods This descriptive study was carried out on 51 active dental units in different departments. Con-tamina...

  12. Do cells contribute to tendon and ligament biomechanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen.Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay.The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain.The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in soft tissue repair. Further research

  13. Do Cells Contribute to Tendon and Ligament Biomechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Niels; Huster, Daniel; Fritsch, Sebastian; Hädrich, Carsten; Koch, Holger; Schmidt, Peter; Sichting, Freddy; Wagner, Martin Franz-Xaver; Boldt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen. Material and Methods Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay. Results The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain. Discussion The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in

  14. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008-2012

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    Agon Y Mekaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008-2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Patients were analyzed in many aspects such as age, gender, etiological factors, clinical features, localization, diagnoses, methods of surgical interventions, recurrences and mortality of patients. Results: From 137 patients with CSDH, 106 (77.3% were males and 31 (22.7% females. Average age of patients was 62.85 years. Analyzed according to the decades, the highest number of causes with CSDH was between 70 and 79 years (46%. The head trauma has been responsible for CSDH in 88 patients (64.3%, while the main symptom was headache (92 patients or 67.1%. One burr-hole trepanation with closed drainage system has been used in majority of cases (in 101 patients or 73.7%. The recurrence of CSDH was 6.5%, whereas mortality 2.9%. Conclusion: CSDH is more common in elderly patients. The male-female ratio is 3.4:1. Like other authors we also think that treatment with one burr-hole and drainage is a method of choice, because of its simplicity and safety.

  15. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekaj, Agon Y.; Morina, Arsim A.; Mekaj, Ymer H.; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Miftari, Ermira I.; Duci, Shkelzen B.; Hamza, Astrit R.; Gashi, Musli M.; Xhelaj, Mentor R.; Kelmendi, Fatos M.; Morina, Qamile Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008–2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Patients were analyzed in many aspects such as age, gender, etiological factors, clinical features, localization, diagnoses, methods of surgical interventions, recurrences and mortality of patients. Results: From 137 patients with CSDH, 106 (77.3%) were males and 31 (22.7%) females. Average age of patients was 62.85 years. Analyzed according to the decades, the highest number of causes with CSDH was between 70 and 79 years (46%). The head trauma has been responsible for CSDH in 88 patients (64.3%), while the main symptom was headache (92 patients or 67.1%). One burr-hole trepanation with closed drainage system has been used in majority of cases (in 101 patients or 73.7%). The recurrence of CSDH was 6.5%, whereas mortality 2.9%. Conclusion: CSDH is more common in elderly patients. The male-female ratio is 3.4:1. Like other authors we also think that treatment with one burr-hole and drainage is a method of choice, because of its simplicity and safety. PMID:25883478

  16. The Correlation between Critical Thinking Disposition and Academic Achievement of Preclinical and Clinical Medical Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Sepahi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Critical thinking skill is an essential factor for success in today’s rapidly developing world. The present study was carried out to compare the association between critical thinking disposition and academic achievement in preclinical and clinical medical students. Methods: This study was descriptive-correlational in which the sample included 259 medical students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences selected through stratified random sampling. The standard critical thinking disposition inventory (with validity of 0.8 and the students’ report card grades as criterion for academic achievement was used to collect the data. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software using descriptive statistics, t-test, and Kolmogrov-Smirnov and correlation coefficient tests. Results: The mean of critical thinking disposition in the preclinical stage was 209.08±26.24 indicating a significant correlation with academic achievement (p=0.003, r=-2.64. In the clinical stage, however, the mean of critical thinking disposition was 214.07±28.15 which showed no significant correlation with academic achievement. Moreover, the mean of critical thinking disposition and its components in preclinical and clinical stages revealed not significant correlation and merely curiosity component showed a significant correlation (p=0.04. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed no correlation between critical thinking disposition and academic achievement in the clinical stage; however, this correlation was negatively significant in the preclinical stage.

  17. Clinical Commentary by Barbara Segal, a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist Working in University College London Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This moving clinical account describes the psychotherapeutic work of a child psychotherapist undertaken in a hospital room with 13-year-old Maya, after the sudden onset of a terrifying and serious illness, Guillain-Barre syndrome, leaving her with paralysis and extreme weakness. The first session takes place almost three weeks after Maya's…

  18. Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging System with Chirp-Coded Excitation for Assessing Biomechanical Properties of Elasticity Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Chun Chun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The biomechanical properties of soft tissues vary with pathological phenomenon. Ultrasound elasticity imaging is a noninvasive method used to analyze the local biomechanical properties of soft tissues in clinical diagnosis. However, the echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR is diminished because of the attenuation of ultrasonic energy by soft tissues. Therefore, to improve the quality of elastography, the eSNR and depth of ultrasound penetration must be increased using chirp-coded excitation. Moreover, the low axial resolution of ultrasound images generated by a chirp-coded pulse must be increased using an appropriate compression filter. The main aim of this study is to develop an ultrasound elasticity imaging system with chirp-coded excitation using a Tukey window for assessing the biomechanical properties of soft tissues. In this study, we propose an ultrasound elasticity imaging system equipped with a 7.5-MHz single-element transducer and polymethylpentene compression plate to measure strains in soft tissues. Soft tissue strains were analyzed using cross correlation (CC and absolution difference (AD algorithms. The optimal parameters of CC and AD algorithms used for the ultrasound elasticity imaging system with chirp-coded excitation were determined by measuring the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe of a homogeneous phantom. Moreover, chirp-coded excitation and short pulse excitation were used to measure the elasticity properties of the phantom. The elastographic qualities of the tissue-mimicking phantom were assessed in terms of Young’s modulus and elastographic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRe. The results show that the developed ultrasound elasticity imaging system with chirp-coded excitation modulated by a Tukey window can acquire accurate, high-quality elastography images.

  19. Biomechanical Effect of an Interlaminar Device on Ranges of Motion, Intradiscal Pressure, and Centers of Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Guizzardi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The IntraSPINE is a new interlaminar device that has been proposed with the aim to decompress the spinal canal without reducing the extension motion. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of L4-L5 spinal units implanted with this interlaminar device, in terms of ranges of motion, intradiscal pressure, and centers of rotation. Material and Methods. Six human lumbar spines were harvested within 10 days after death. A specific spine testing device was used to apply moments up to 10 Nm in flexion-extension, lateral bending (left-right flexion and left-right axial rotation (torsion, with measurement of vertebral 3D motion and of intervertebral disc pressure. Protocol was repeated for each specimen in 5 configurations: intact specimen; after L4-L5 bilateral medial hemifacetectomy and both yellow ligament resection; after implantation of the interlaminar device at the L4-L5 level; after removal of the L4-L5 supraspinous ligament, resection of the posterior third of the disc and addition of an artificial ligament; after device and artificial ligament removal. Results. The implant reduced increases in segmental flexion seen following injury particularly when applied with the artificial ligament. Intradiscal pressure reduced following application of the implant without reducing extension range. A small posterior shift of the Mean Centers of Rotation (MCR was noticed after instrumentation. Torsion and lateral bending range was unaffected by the interlaminar device. Conclusion. This biomechanical study yields a better understanding of this interlaminar implant effect. A large clinical trial with follow-up would be required to evaluate and confirm in vivo the observed in vitro biomechanical behavior of the device.

  20. Biomechanical approaches to understanding the potentially injurious demands of gymnastic-style impact landings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gittoes Marianne JR

    2012-01-01

    effectiveness of gymnastics injury counter measures has been advocated over the past decade, a lack of information based on randomised controlled studies or actual evaluation of counter measures in the field setting has been highlighted. The subsequent integration of insight into biomechanical risk factors of landing with clinical practice interventions has been recently advocated.

  1. Fatigue behavior of Ilizarov frame versus tibial interlocking nail in a comminuted tibial fracture model: a biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahel Philip F

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment options for comminuted tibial shaft fractures include plating, intramedullary nailing, and external fixation. No biomechanical comparison between an interlocking tibia nail with external fixation by an Ilizarov frame has been reported to date. In the present study, we compared the fatigue behaviour of Ilizarov frames to interlocking intramedullary nails in a comminuted tibial fracture model under a combined loading of axial compression, bending and torsion. Our goal was to determine the biomechanical characteristics, stability and durability for each device over a clinically relevant three month testing period. The study hypothesis was that differences in the mechanical properties may account for differing clinical results and provide information applicable to clinical decision making for comminuted tibia shaft fractures. Methods In this biomechanical study, 12 composite tibial bone models with a comminuted fracture and a 25 mm diaphyseal gap were investigated. Of these, six models were stabilized with a 180-mm four-ring Ilizarov frame, and six models were minimally reamed and stabilized with a 10 mm statically locked Russell-Taylor Delta™ tibial nail. After measuring the pre-fatigue axial compression bending and torsion stiffness, each model was loaded under a sinusoidal cyclic combined loading of axial compression (2.8/28 lbf; 12.46/124.6 N and torque (1.7/17 lbf-in; 0.19/1.92 Nm at a frequency of 3 Hz. The test was performed until failure (implant breakage or ≥ 5° angulations and/or 2 cm shortening occurred or until 252,000 cycles were completed, which corresponds to approximately three months testing period. Results In all 12 models, both the Ilizarov frame and the interlocking tibia nail were able to maintain fracture stability of the tibial defect and to complete the full 252,000 cycles during the entire study period of three months. A significantly higher stiffness to axial compression and torsion was

  2. Biomechanics of Kuzushi-Tsukuri and Interaction in Competition

    CERN Document Server

    Sacripanti, Attilio

    2010-01-01

    In this paper it is performed the comparative biomechanical analysis of the Kuzushi (Unbalance) -Tsukuri (the entry and proper fitting of Tori's body into the position taken just before throwing) phases of Judo Throwing techniques. The whole effective movement is without separation, as already stated by old Japanese biomechanical studies (1972 -1978), only one skilled connected action, but the biomechanical analysis is able to separate the whole in didactic steps called Action Invariants. The first important finding singled out is the existence of two classes of Action Invariants the first the General one' connected to the whole body motion is specific of shortening distance in the Kuzushi Tsukuri Phase. The second one, the Specific Action Invariants is connected to the superior and inferior kinetic chains motion and right positioning connected both to Kuzushi and Tsukuri phases. Some interesting findings derive from this analysis: among throwing techniques, couple techniques could be independent from Kuzushi...

  3. Computational biomechanics for medicine new approaches and new applications

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologiesand advancements. Thisvolumecomprises twelve of the newest approaches and applications of computational biomechanics, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, France, Spain and Switzerland. Some of the interesting topics discussed are:real-time simulations; growth and remodelling of soft tissues; inverse and meshless solutions; medical image analysis; and patient-specific solid mechanics simulations. One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. We hope the research presented within this book series will contribute to overcoming this grand challenge.

  4. Biomechanics of Wheat/Barley Straw and Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher T. Wright; Peter A. Pryfogle; Nathan A. Stevens; Eric D. Steffler; J. Richard Hess; Thomas H. Ulrich

    2005-03-01

    The lack of understanding of the mechanical characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks is a limiting factor in economically collecting and processing crop residues, primarily wheat and barley stems and corn stover. Several testing methods, including compression, tension, and bend have been investigated to increase our understanding of the biomechanical behavior of cellulosic feedstocks. Biomechanical data from these tests can provide required input to numerical models and help advance harvesting, handling, and processing techniques. In addition, integrating the models with the complete data set from this study can identify potential tools for manipulating the biomechanical properties of plant varieties in such a manner as to optimize their physical characteristics to produce higher value biomass and more energy efficient harvesting practices.

  5. The increasing importance of the biomechanics of impact trauma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Murray Mackay

    2007-08-01

    The evolution of experimental biomechanics and crash injury research is summarized briefly to show that they both play a major role in mitigating traffic deaths and injuries. Historically, the subject has been based largely in western countries and thus focused on vehicle occupants, whereas some 80% of traffic casualties in the world are outside the vehicle as pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists. The subject is close to the regulatory process which controls vehicle design and is thus heavily influenced by government and industry, yet it is now in an expanding period because of new techniques to replicate the human frame’s response to impact forces. New knowledge is likely to emerge from addressing population variations and combining real world accident investigations with experimental biomechanics. The application of impact biomechanics to the vulnerable road users is of particular importance.

  6. The biomechanical and structural properties of CS2 fimbriae

    CERN Document Server

    Mortezaei, Narges; Zakrisson, Johan; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide, and infection of children in underdeveloped countries often leads to high mortality rates. Isolated ETEC express a plethora of colonization factors (fimbriae/pili), of which CFA/I and CFA/II that are assembled via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP), are amongst the most common. Fimbriae are filamentous structures, whose shafts are primarily composed of helically arranged single pilin-protein subunits, with a unique biomechanical capability allowing them to unwind and rewind. A sustained ETEC infection, under adverse conditions of dynamic shear forces, is primarily attributed to this biomechanical feature of ETEC fimbriae. Recent understandings about the role of fimbriae as virulence factors are pointing to an evolutionary adaptation of their structural and biomechanical features. In this work, we investigated the biophysical properties of CS2 fimbriae from the CFA/II group. Homology modelling its major structural subunit CotA ...

  7. Biomechanical analysis technique choreographic movements (for example, "grand battman jete"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batieieva N.P.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : biomechanical analysis of the execution of choreographic movement "grand battman jete". Material : the study involved students (n = 7 of the department of classical choreography faculty of choreography. Results : biomechanical analysis of choreographic movement "grand battman jete" (classic exercise, obtained kinematic characteristics (path, velocity, acceleration, force of the center of mass (CM bio parts of the body artist (foot, shin, thigh. Built bio kinematic model (phase. The energy characteristics - mechanical work and kinetic energy units legs when performing choreographic movement "grand battman jete". Conclusions : It was found that the ability of an athlete and coach-choreographer analyze the biomechanics of movement has a positive effect on the improvement of choreographic training of qualified athletes in gymnastics (sport, art, figure skating and dance sports.

  8. Biomechanical Profile of Danish Elite and Sub-elite Soccer Goalkeepers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Thomassen, Martin; Zacho, Morten

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define a biomechanical profile of the soccer goalkeeper. We tested whether the skill level of 6 goalkeepers correlated with a number of biomechanical tests. The skill level of each goalkeeper was defined as the league he played in. The biomechanical tests were...

  9. The study of relationship between reported temporomandibular symptoms and clinical dysfunction index among university students in Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahroo Vojdani

    2012-01-01

    With respect to gender, women (80% were more affected than men (62%. A significant relationship was found between gender and the occurrence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD (P<0.05. The correlation coefficient (r between the reported symptoms (Ai and recorded signs (Di was 0.53. There were positive correlation coefficient between Di and Ai. They were statistically significant (P<0.001. Conclusions: A high prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMD among students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences was seen, which was greater in women. Despite suffering from TMD, students were not aware of their disorders.

  10. The modern biomechanics technology in practice of preparedness athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmetov R.F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized information about directions of application of biomechanics technologies in modern sport is resulted. Some aspects of the use of biomechanics ergogenical tools of the moved delayed action in the system of preparation of athletes-jumpers are considered. Presents the possibility of using training complex «easy leading» for perfection of structure of motive actions of sportsmen, specialized in high jumps. The introduction of a vast arsenal of technical tools in practice the training process open new prospects associated with increased efficiency in the preparation of athletes.

  11. Forward lunge knee biomechanics before and after partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Nielsen, Jonas Høberg; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    partial meniscectomy (APM) on knee joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in knee joint biomechanics during a forward lunge in patients with a suspected degenerative meniscal tear from before to three months after APM. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (35-55years old......) with a suspected degenerative medial meniscal tear participated in this study. Three dimensional knee biomechanics were assessed on the injured and contralateral leg before and three months after APM. The visual analogue scale was used to assess knee pain and the Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score was used...

  12. Advances in compression nails - principles and biomechanical photoelastic evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittelmeier, W.; Hauschild, M.; Bader, R.; Steinhauser, E. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik fuer Orthopaedie und Sportorthopaedie

    2001-12-01

    The nail-osteosynthesis is an established concept for shaft-fractures of long bones. The compression-nail ICN enables a favourable primary-stability and also a former full weight-bearing over a precompression of the nail-bone-system. The indications of the compression-nail include beside more diaphyseal cross fractures and short oblique fractures non-unions and correction-osteotomies. Newer modular nail-types like the tandem compression nail (TCN) can improve the biomechanical prerequisites of the compression nail principle. Key-words: internal fixation - interlocking-nail - modular - compression - biomechanics - non-union (orig.)

  13. The combined plastic surgery/physical medicine and rehabilitation amputee clinic at the University of Western Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Neinstein, Ryan; Death, A Barry; Siang Gan, Bing

    2008-01-01

    Since the autumn of 2001, a multidisciplinary plastic surgery (PS) and physical medicine and rehabilitation (PMR) outpatient amputee clinic has been in place at St Joseph’s Health Centre/Parkwood Hospital in London, Ontario. To date, more than 140 new patients have been seen in combined consultations. The present paper reviews the demographics, interventions and outcomes of the patients seen between 2001 and 2005. The majority of primary PMR patients had problems that prevented optimal use of...

  14. A Biomechanical Approach to Assessing Hip Fracture Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellman, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Bone loss in microgravity is well documented, but it is difficult to quantify how declines in bone mineral density (BMD) contribute to an astronaut's overall risk of fracture upon return. This study uses a biomechanical approach to assessing hip fracture risk, or Factor of Risk (Phi), which is defined as the ratio of applied load to bone strength. All long-duration NASA astronauts from Expeditions 1-18 were included in this study (n=25), while crewmembers who flew twice (n=2) were treated as separate subjects. Bone strength was estimated based on an empirical relationship between areal BMD at the hip, as measured by DXA, and failure load, as determined by mechanical testing of cadaver femora. Fall load during a sideways fall was calculated from a previously developed biomechanical model, which takes into account body weight, height, gender, and soft tissue thickness overlying the lateral aspect of the hip that serves to attenuate the impact force. While no statistical analyses have been performed yet, preliminary results show that males in this population have a higher FOR than females, with a post- flight Phi of 0.87 and 0.36, respectively. FOR increases 5.1% from preflight to postflight, while only one subject crossed the fracture "threshold" of Phi = 1, for a total of 2 subjects with a postflight Phi > 1. These results suggest that men may be at greater risk for hip fracture due largely in part to their relatively thin soft tissue padding as compared to women, since soft tissue thickness has the highest correlation (R(exp 2)= .53) with FOR of all subject-specific parameters. Future work will investigate changes in FOR during recovery to see if baseline risk levels are restored upon return to 1-g activity. While dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most commonly used clinical measure of bone health, it fails to provide compartment-specific information that is useful in assessing changes to bone quality as a result of microgravity exposure. Peripheral

  15. Hand kinematics: Application in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Rath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological conditions of the hand consequent to injuries, paralysis, disease, arthritis and congenital difference results in loss or limitation of function, deformities, stiffness, inadequate power and poor position for pinch. The pathogenesis of deformities is influenced by bio-mechanical principles of joints and muscle function. The crippling impact of secondary changes due to edema, soft tissue contractures, muscle shortening and functional adaptations also have a mechanical basis. For clinicians and hand therapists, it is necessary to understand these fundamental principles of biomechanics to plan treatment modalities. Interpretation of mechanics of hand deformities in rheumatoid arthritis and paralysis will enable the treating team to identify the appropriate interventions of splinting, therapy and surgical procedures. Basic knowledge of the principles of hand clinical bio-mechanics will help the beginner to sail through the multitude of tendon transfers described in the text books of hand surgery and find the best solution for a particular clinical presentation. Similarly, knowledge of bio-mechanics will provide solutions to an experienced surgeon to plan treatment protocols for complex situations. The article presents a concise summary of the basic principles of hand bio-mechanics for common hand conditions seen in clinical practice. Understanding and applying these principles will help clinicians in planning and devising treatment options for common and complex hand conditions.

  16. A Matrix Mentoring Model That Effectively Supports Clinical and Translational Scientists and Increases Inclusion in Biomedical Research: Lessons From the University of Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byington, Carrie L; Keenan, Heather; Phillips, John D; Childs, Rebecca; Wachs, Erin; Berzins, Mary Anne; Clark, Kim; Torres, Maria K; Abramson, Jan; Lee, Vivian; Clark, Edward B

    2016-04-01

    Physician-scientists and scientists in all the health professions are vital members of the U.S. biomedical workforce, but their numbers at academic health centers are declining. Mentorship has been identified as a key component in retention of faculty members at academic health centers. Effective mentoring may promote the retention of clinician-scientists in the biomedical workforce. The authors describe a holistic institutional mentoring program to support junior faculty members engaged in clinical and translational science at the University of Utah. The clinical and translational scholars (CATS) program leverages the resources of the institution, including the Center for Clinical and Translational Science, to augment departmental resources to support junior faculty investigators and uses a multilevel mentoring matrix that includes self, senior, scientific, peer, and staff mentorship. Begun in the Department of Pediatrics, the program was expanded in 2013 to include all departments in the school of medicine and the health sciences. During the two-year program, scholars learn management essentials and have leadership training designed to develop principal investigators. Of the 86 program participants since fiscal year 2008, 92% have received extramural awards, 99% remain in academic medicine, and 95% remain at the University of Utah. The CATS program has also been associated with increased inclusion of women and underrepresented minorities in the institutional research enterprise. The CATS program manifests institutional collaboration and coordination of resources, which have benefited faculty members and the institution. The model can be applied to other academic health centers to support and sustain the biomedical workforce. PMID:26650676

  17. Biomechanical exploration on dynamic modes of lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, M; Smyth, G

    1992-03-01

    Whatever the lifting method used, dynamic factors appear to have an effect on the safe realization of movement, and NIOSH guidelines recommend smooth lifting with no sudden acceleration effects. On the other hand, inertial forces may play an important role in the process of transfer of momentum to the load. The direction by which these inertial forces may affect the loadings on body structures and processes of energy transfers cannot be determined a priori. A biomechanical experiment was performed to examine if there were differences in the execution processes between a slow-continuous lift and an accelerated-continuous lift, and also between accelerated lifts either executed continuously or interrupted with a pause. The lifts were executed from a height of 15 cm to a height of 185 cm above the head and with two different loads (6.4 and 11.6 kg). Five experienced workers in manual materials handling were used as subjects. Films and force platforms recordings supplied the data; dynamic segmental analyses were performed to calculate net muscular moments at each joint; a planar single-muscle equivalent was used to estimate compression loadings at L5/S1; total mechanical work, joint work distribution, and energy transfers were determined from a kinetic approach based on the integration of joint power as a function of time. Analyses of variance with repeated measures were applied to the three treatments. The results showed that joint muscular moments, spinal loadings, mechanical work, and muscular utilization ratios were generally increased by the presence of acceleration without inducing benefits of improved energy transfers; therefore slower lifts with reduced acceleration may be safer when handling moderately heavy loads. The maximum values of kinematic and kinetic factors were generally not affected by the pause, but the occurrence of jerks in the movement (acceleration, ground forces, and muscular moments) suggests that the pause may not be indicated when

  18. Wrist joint moments of walker-assisted gait:a study of biomechanics and instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    While walkers are commonly prescribed to improve patient stability and ambulatory ability,quantitativestudy of the biomechanical and functional requirements for effective walker use is limited.To investigate the changesin wrist joint moments that occur with the use of a standard walker,a strain gauge-based walker instrumentation system was developed for the measurement of wrist joint moments.This walker dynamometer was integrated with an upper extremity biomechanical model.Preliminary system data were collected for twelve healthy,right-handed young adultsfollowing informed consent.Bilateral upper extremity kinematic data were acquired with a six-camera motion analysis system.Internal joint moments at the wrist were determined in the three clinical planes using the inverse dynamics method.Results showed that during a walker-assisted gait there were several typical demands of wrist abductor,adductor,flexor and external rotator.An interesting " bare phase " of wrist joint moments was also found in phaseangle[-30°,30°] of gait cycle.Complete description of wrist joint moments during walker-assisted gait may provide insight into walker use parameters and rehabilitative strategies.

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of a corporectomy in porcine lumbar specimens using flexible polymer belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Fernández, J. A.; Hernández-Gómez, L. H.; Ruiz-Muñoz, E.; González-Rebattú, A.; Rodríguez-Cañizo, R. G.; Urriolagoitia-Calderón, G.; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, G.; Hernández-Moreno, H.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of a biomechanical evaluation in lumbar porcine specimens (L2-L4), instrumented with flexible polymer belts, under fatigue and tensile loading. The clinical effect called facetary arthrosis is evaluated. An experimental analysis was carried on 3 lumbar porcine specimens. In two of them, polyamide belts are fixed on the interspinous ligament from L2 to L4. Specimens are taken from pigs which are 6 month old. For the present work, the stiffness reduction of the spine and the biomechanical behaviour of the belts in conjunction with the interspinous ligament are evaluated. The purpose is to determine the failure conditions for the elements of the specimen (vertebral disk, supra and intraspinous ligament and vertebral body). Under static loading, which is the base line case, the elements of the specimen failed as a typical healthy structure. While in the fatigue combined with static loading, the element failed in different order. Additionally, the stiffness changed in accordance with the fatigue loading conditions. Because of the simplicity of this alternative technique, a high level of the structural integrity is preserved, as no holes are made on the spinous process in order to insert the fixation screws. Furthermore, there is a cost reduction.

  20. Biomechanical evaluation of a corporectomy in porcine lumbar specimens using flexible polymer belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the experimental results of a biomechanical evaluation in lumbar porcine specimens (L2-L4), instrumented with flexible polymer belts, under fatigue and tensile loading. The clinical effect called facetary arthrosis is evaluated. An experimental analysis was carried on 3 lumbar porcine specimens. In two of them, polyamide belts are fixed on the interspinous ligament from L2 to L4. Specimens are taken from pigs which are 6 month old. For the present work, the stiffness reduction of the spine and the biomechanical behaviour of the belts in conjunction with the interspinous ligament are evaluated. The purpose is to determine the failure conditions for the elements of the specimen (vertebral disk, supra and intraspinous ligament and vertebral body). Under static loading, which is the base line case, the elements of the specimen failed as a typical healthy structure. While in the fatigue combined with static loading, the element failed in different order. Additionally, the stiffness changed in accordance with the fatigue loading conditions. Because of the simplicity of this alternative technique, a high level of the structural integrity is preserved, as no holes are made on the spinous process in order to insert the fixation screws. Furthermore, there is a cost reduction.

  1. Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 in Oman: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Outcome of Patients Admitted to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujahid Al-Busaidi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oman experienced the H1N1 pandemic in 2009 that initially started in Mexico and the United States. We present the epidemiology, clinical features, and outcome of cases admitted to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients admitted with confirmed influenza A H1N1 infection from August to December 2009. The study included adults and pediatric patients. We looked at the clinical and laboratory factors associated with increased length of hospital stay. Results: There were 68 patients admitted with influenza A H1N1 infection, and their median age was 23 years. The most common symptoms were fever (100% and cough (79.4%. The most common reason for admission was the severity of illness (69.1%. Lymphopenia was the most common hematological abnormality (41.8%. All patients received treatment with oseltamivir. One patient died secondary to multi-organ failure. On multivariate analysis, severity of illness, use of steroids, anemia, lymphopenia, and abnormal alanine amino transferase levels were associated with increased length of stay. Conclusions: The H1N1 pandemic in Oman followed the international trends in terms of clinical presentation and laboratory values for patients admitted to the hospital.

  2. Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 in Oman: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Outcome of Patients Admitted to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Busaidi, Mujahid; Al Maamari, Khuloud; Al’Adawi, Badriya; Alawi, Fatma Ba; Al-Wahaibi, Adil; Belkhair, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Oman experienced the H1N1 pandemic in 2009 that initially started in Mexico and the United States. We present the epidemiology, clinical features, and outcome of cases admitted to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients admitted with confirmed influenza A H1N1 infection from August to December 2009. The study included adults and pediatric patients. We looked at the clinical and laboratory factors associated with increased length of hospital stay. Results There were 68 patients admitted with influenza A H1N1 infection, and their median age was 23 years. The most common symptoms were fever (100%) and cough (79.4%). The most common reason for admission was the severity of illness (69.1%). Lymphopenia was the most common hematological abnormality (41.8%). All patients received treatment with oseltamivir. One patient died secondary to multi-organ failure. On multivariate analysis, severity of illness, use of steroids, anemia, lymphopenia, and abnormal alanine amino transferase levels were associated with increased length of stay. Conclusions The H1N1 pandemic in Oman followed the international trends in terms of clinical presentation and laboratory values for patients admitted to the hospital. PMID:27403242

  3. An alternative path to improving university Earth science teaching and developing the geoscience workforce: Postdoctoral research faculty involvement in clinical teacher preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirakparvar, N. A.; Sessa, J.; Ustunisik, G. K.; Nadeau, P. A.; Flores, K. E.; Ebel, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2020 relative to 2009, there will be 28% more Earth Science jobs paying ≥ $75,000/year1 in the U.S.A. These jobs will require advanced degrees, but compared to all arts and science advanced degrees, the number of physical science M.S. and Ph.D. awarded per year decreased from 2.5% in 1980 to 1.5% in 20092. This decline is reflected on a smaller scale and at a younger age: in the New York City school system only 36% of all 8th graders have basic proficiency in science 3. These figures indicate that the lack achievement in science starts at a young age and then extends into higher education. Research has shown that students in grades 7 - 12 4,5 and in university level courses 6 both respond positively to high quality science teaching. However, much attention is focused on improving science teaching in grades 7- 12, whereas at many universities lower level science courses are taught by junior research and contingent faculty who typically lack formal training, and sometimes interest, in effective teaching. The danger here is that students might enter university intending to pursue geoscience degrees, but then encounter ineffective instructors, causing them to lose interest in geoscience and thus pursue other disciplines. The crux of the matter becomes how to improve the quality of university-level geoscience teaching, without losing sight of the major benchmark of success for research faculty - scholarly publications reporting innovative research results. In most cases, it would not be feasible to sidetrack the research goals of early career scientists by placing them into a formal teacher preparation program. But what happens when postdoctoral research scientists take an active role in clinical teacher preparation as part of their research appointments? The American Museum of Natural History's Masters of Arts in Teaching (AMNH-MAT) urban residency pilot program utilizes a unique approach to grade 7 - 12 Earth Science teacher

  4. Bone plate composed of a ternary nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fiber composite: biomechanical properties and biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bo Qiao,1 Jidong Li,2 Qingmao Zhu,1 Shuquan Guo,1 Xiaotong Qi,1 Weichao Li,1 Jun Wu,1 Yang Liu,3 Dianming Jiang1 1Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 2Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 3Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: An ideal bone plate for internal fixation of bone fractures should have good biomechanical properties and biocompatibility. In this study, we prepared a new nondegradable bone plate composed of a ternary nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fiber (n-HA/PA66/GF composite. A breakage area on the n-HA/PA66/GF plate surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Its mechanical properties were investigated using bone-plate constructs and biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The results confirmed that adhesion between the n-HA/PA66 matrix and the glass fibers was strong, with only a few fibers pulled out at the site of breakage. Fractures fixed by the n-HA/PA66/GF plate showed lower stiffness and had satisfactory strength compared with rigid fixation using a titanium plate. Moreover, the results with regard to mesenchymal stem cell morphology, MTT assay, Alizarin Red S staining, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin showed that the n-HA/PA66/GF composite was suitable for attachment and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells, and did not have a negative influence on matrix mineralization or osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. These observations indicate that the n-HA/PA66/GF plate has good biomechanical properties and biocompatibility, and may be considered a new option for internal fixation in orthopedic surgery. Keywords: nano

  5. Improving Adult ART Clinic Patient Waiting Time by Implementing an Appointment System at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmamaw Atnafu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Long waiting time has been among the major factors that affect patient satisfaction and health service delivery. The aim of this study was to determine the median waiting time at the Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART Clinic before and after introduction of an intervention of the systematic appointment system. Methods. Patient waiting time was measured before and after the introduction of an intervention; target population of the study was all adult HIV patients/clients who have visited the outpatient ART Clinic in the study period. 173 patients were included before and after the intervention. Systematic patient appointment system and health education to patients on appointment system were provided as an intervention. The study period was from October 2011 to the end of January 2012. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 17.0. Independent sample t-test at 95% confidence interval and 5% significance level was used to determine the significance of median waiting time difference between pre- and postintervention periods. Results and Conclusion. The total median waiting time was reduced from 274.8 minutes (IQR 180.6 minutes and 453.6 minutes before intervention to 165 minutes (IQR 120 minutes and 377.4 minutes after intervention (40% decrease, p=0.02. Overall, the study showed that the introduction of the new appointment system significantly reduces patient waiting time.

  6. Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility Spring 2016 Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Abhishektha

    2016-01-01

    The Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) at Johnson Space Center supports the Space Human Factors Engineering portfolio of the Human Research Program. ABF provides capability to verify the accommodation and comfort of crewmembers through anthropometry and biomechanics analyses. Anthropometric measurements are derived from three-dimensional (3D) whole body scan images. The scans are currently taken by a Human Solutions Vitus 3D Laser Scanning System. ABF has purchased a 3dMD photogrammetry scanner system to speed up the process of collecting 3D scans. The photogrammetry scanner system features a faster data collection time, as well as fewer holes in the scans. This internship was mainly focused on developing calibration, measurement, data acquisition, and analysis processes for the new system. In addition, I also participated in a project to validate the use of a pressure mat sensor on the shoulder during in-suit testing. My duties for the scanner validation project started with identifying and documenting a calibration process. The calibration process proved vital to using the system as the quality of the scans was directly related to the success of the calibration. In addition, the calibration process suggested by the system vendor required the user to hold a large calibration board at precise locations. To aid in this, I built a calibration stand which held a calibration board at constant positions throughout numerous calibration process. The calibration process was tested extensively until proven acceptable. The standardized process reduced calibration time from over 10 minutes to just below three minutes. As a result, the calibration process could be completed painlessly and precisely, and scan quality was constant between sessions. After standardizing the calibration process, I proceeded to modify the locations of the cameras in order to capture the full volume of a person. The scanning system needed to capture a full T-pose of a person in one scan

  7. Fundamental biomechanics of the spine-What we have learned in the past 25 years and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxland, Thomas R

    2016-04-11

    Since the publication of the 2nd edition of White and Panjabi׳s textbook, Clinical Biomechanics of the Spine in 1990, there has been considerable research on the biomechanics of the spine. The focus of this manuscript will be to review what we have learned in regards to the fundamentals of spine biomechanics. Topics addressed include the whole spine, the functional spinal unit, and the individual components of the spine (e.g. vertebra, intervertebral disc, spinal ligaments). In these broad categories, our understanding in 1990 is reviewed and the important knowledge or understanding gained through the subsequent 25 years of research is highlighted. Areas where our knowledge is lacking helps to identify promising topics for future research. In this manuscript, as in the White and Panjabi textbook, the emphasis is on experimental research using human material, either in vivo or in vitro. The insights gained from mathematical models and animal experimentation are included where other data are not available. This review is intended to celebrate the substantial gains that have been made in the field over these past 25 years and also to identify future research directions. PMID:26706717

  8. Radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical effects of recombinant canine somatotropin in an unstable ostectomy gap model of bone healing in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the effect of recombinant canine somatotropin (STH) on radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing using an unstable ostectomy gap model. Study Design: After an ostectomy of the midshaft radius, bone healing was evaluated over an 8-week period in control dogs (n = 4) and dogs receiving recombinant canine STH (n = 4). Animals Or Sample Population: Eight sexually intact female Beagle dogs, 4 to 5 years old. Methods: Bone healing was evaluated by qualitative and quantitative evaluation of serial radiographs every 2 weeks. Terminal dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and three-point bending biomechanical testing were also performed. Results: Dogs receiving STH had more advanced radiographic healing of ostectomy sites. Bone area, bone mineral content, and bone density were two to five times greater at the ostectomy sites of treated dogs. Ultimate load at failure and stiffness were three and five times greater in dogs receiving STH. Conclusions: Using the ostectomy gap model, recombinant canine STH enhanced the radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing in dogs. Clinical Relevance: Dogs at risk for delayed healing of fractures may benefit from treatment with recombinant canine STH

  9. 肱骨三维模型的构建及其生物力学意义%Construction of humeral three-dimensional model and its biomechanical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏佳灿; 张春才; 禹宝庆; 薛召军; 吴建国; 丁祖泉

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various therapies can be used to treat humeral fracture,but serious complications like bone disunion, etc. Are often left over. New biomechanical analytical methods are tried to be applied to provide new approaches for the functional prognosis in humeral fracture and bone disunion.OBJECTIVE: To construct humeral three-dimension model to explore its correlated biomechanical significance.DESIGN: To construct humeral three-dimension finite element model. SETTING: Department of orthopedics of a military medical university-affiliated hospital and institute for biological science and bioengineering of a university.PARTICIPANTS: The study was conducted in Shanghai Changhai Hospital and the Laboratory of Biological Science of Shanghai Tongji University. One piece of typical adult wet humerus sample was selected.INTERVENTIONS: Cross section image of each humeral layer was obtained from the selected wet humerus sample by CT scanning, and humeral three-dimensional model was constructed by large finite element analytic software ANSYS5.6.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Biomechanical features of the constructed humeral three-dimension mode; ② Differences from clinical reality and key similarities.RESULTS: The constructed humeral three-dimensional model vividly reflected the true humeral anatomic morphology and biomechanical behavior. Its precision was judged by the comparison with CT image.CONCLUSION: The construction of humeral three-dimension finite element model provides a precise model for the researches of normal humeral mechanical behavior and the basic mechanics of internal fixation after fracture.%背景:肱骨骨折治疗方法多样,但是也常常遗留严重的并发症如骨不连等,尝试采用新的生物力学分析手段,以期为肱骨骨折、骨不连的功能预后提供新思路.目的:构建肱骨三维模型,并探讨其相关的生物力学意义.设计:构建肱骨三维有限元模型.单位:一所军医大学的附属医院骨科和一所

  10. Quantitative modelling of the biomechanics of the avian syrinx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elemans, Coen P. H.; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Hoffmann, Marc R.;

    2003-01-01

    We review current quantitative models of the biomechanics of bird sound production. A quantitative model of the vocal apparatus was proposed by Fletcher (1988). He represented the syrinx (i.e. the portions of the trachea and bronchi with labia and membranes) as a single membrane. This membrane acts...

  11. Biomechanics Curriculum: Its Content and Relevance to Movement Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    While the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) has outlined a number of learning outcomes for undergraduate biomechanics, there are a number of factors that can influence the curriculum in such courses. These factors create a situation that indeed can influence students and their attitude towards these classes.…

  12. Focusing on the Hard parts: A Biomechanics Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerut, Jonathan; Orbe, Kristina; Flynn, Daniel; Habdas, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    As part of a biomechanics course aimed at both upper-division Biology and Physics majors, this laboratory exercise introduces students to the ingenious ways in which organisms vary the composition and form of support and defensive structures such as bone and shell to maximize their strength while minimizing the energetic cost needed to produce…

  13. Corneal biomechanical changes following toric soft contact lens wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Radaie-Moghadam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: CH and CRF decreased significantly one month after fitting toric soft contact lenses while CCT and K mean did not change significantly. Corneal biomechanical parameters may alter with toric soft contact lens use and such changes may have implications with long-term use such lenses.

  14. Biomechanics of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Health and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is functionally subjected to dimensional changes. Hence, biomechanical properties such as the stress-strain relationships are of particularly importance. These properties vary along the normal GI tract and remodel in response to growth, aging and disease. The biome...

  15. How to Assess the Biomechanical Risk Levels in Beekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, G; Rossi, F; Baracco, A

    2016-01-01

    Beekeepers are at particular risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders, but many of the studies lack detailed exposure assessment. To evaluate the biomechanical overload exposure in a specific farming activity, a multitasking model has been developed through the characterization of 37 basic operational tasks typical of the beekeeping activity. The Occupational Repetitive Actions (OCRA) Checklist and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Lifting Index methodologies have been applied to these elementary tasks to evaluate the exposure, and the resulting risk indices have been time-weighted averaged. Finally, an easy access, computer-assisted toolkit has been developed to help the beekeepers in the biomechanical risk assessment process. The risk of biomechanical overload for the upper limbs ranges from acceptable (maintenance and recovery of woody material and honey packaging with dosing machine tasks) to high (distribution of the top supers) risk level. The risk for back injury is always borderline in women and increases with exposure time, whereas it ranges from acceptable to borderline in men. The definition of the biomechanical risk levels allows for planning of corrective actions aimed at preventing and reducing the risk of musculoskeletal disorders through engineering, administrative, and behavioral interventions. The methodology can be used for risk assessment in other mainly manual agricultural activities. PMID:26765780

  16. Computational modelling of biomechanical behaviour of skeletal elements and implants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jíra, J.; Jiroušek, Ondřej; Jírová, Jitka

    Anaheim Calgary Zurich : ACTA Press, 2004 - (Hamza, M.), s. 170 ISBN 0-88986-448-9. [Biomechanics /2./. Honolulu (US), 23.08.2004-25.08.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2071913 Keywords : FE model of pelvis * skull and long bone * CT scan Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics

  17. A review of probabilistic analysis in orthopaedic biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Laz, P.J.; Browne, M.

    2010-01-01

    Probabilistic analysis methods are being increasingly applied in the orthopaedics and biomechanics literature to account for uncertainty and variability in subject geometries, properties of various structures, kinematics and joint loading, as well as uncertainty in implant alignment. As a complement to experiments, finite element modelling, and statistical analysis, probabilistic analysis provides a method of characterizing the potential impact of variability in parameters on performa...

  18. The Biomechanical Implications of Obesity in K-12 Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeyer, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Few biomechanical studies have examined obese individuals as primary subjects. However, some mechanical differences have been identified between overweight or obese individuals and nonoverweight movers. It is not clear how obesity affects the onset of osteoarthritis, for example, but it is evident that obesity does place significant limitations on…

  19. Pathobiology of obesity and osteoarthritis: integrating biomechanics and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita I. Issa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant risk factor for developing osteoarthritis in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing joints. Although the pathogenesis of obesity-associated osteoarthritis is not completely understood, recent studies indicate that pro-inflammatory metabolic factors contribute to an increase in osteoarthritis risk. Adipose tissue, and in particular infrapatellar fat, is a local source of pro-inflammatory mediators that are increased with obesity and have been shown to increase cartilage degradation in cell and tissue culture models. One adipokine in particular, leptin, may be a critical mediator of obesity-associated osteoarthritis via synergistic actions with other inflammatory cytokines. Biomechanical factors may also increase the risk of osteoarthritis by activating cellular inflammation and promoting oxidative stress. However, some types of biomechanical stimulation, such as physiologic cyclic loading, inhibit inflammation and protect against cartilage degradation. A high percentage of obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis are sedentary, suggesting that a lack of physical activity may increase the susceptibility to inflammation. A more comprehensive approach to understanding how obesity alters daily biomechanical exposures within joint tissues may provide new insight into the protective and damaging effects of biomechanical factors on inflammation in osteoarthritis.

  20. A highly versatile autonomous underwater vehicle with biomechanical propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, D.G.; Bergers, M.M.C.; Henrion, S.; Hulzenga, J.I.J.; Jutte, R.W.; Pas, W.M.G.; Van Schravendijk, M.; Vercruyssen, T.G.A.; Wilken, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    An autonomous underwater vehicle with a biomechanical propulsion system is a possible answer to the demand for small, silent sensor platforms in many fields. The design of Galatea, a bio-mimetic AUV, involves four aspects: hydrodynamic shape, the propulsion, the motion control systems and payload. T

  1. Biomechanics of the elbow joint in tennis players.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eygendaal, D.; Rahussen, F.T.; Diercks, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Elbow injuries constitute a sizeable percentage of tennis injuries. A basic understanding of biomechanics of tennis and analysis of forces, loads and motions of the elbow during tennis can will improve the understanding of the pathophysiology of these injuries. All different strokes in tennis have a

  2. Quality of life of People living with HIV and AIDS attending the Antiretroviral Clinic, University College Hospital, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluyemisi F. Folasire

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of life (QOL is an important component in the evaluation of the well-being of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA, especially with the appreciable rise in longevity of PLWHA. Moreover, limited studies have been conducted in Nigeria on how PLWHA perceive their life with the World Health Organisation Quality of Life Brief Scale (WHOQOL-Bref instrument. Objective: This study assessed the QOL of PLWHA attending the antiretroviral (ARV clinics, UCH Ibadan, Nigeria.Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to September 2008 that involved 150 randomly selected HIV-positive patients who were regular attendees at the antiretroviral clinic, UCH Ibadan. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect information on sociodemographic data, satisfaction with perceived social support, medical records, and QOL was assessed with WHOQOL-Bref.Results: The mean age of the respondents was 38.1 ± 9.0 years and the male : female ratio was 1:2. The mean CD4 count was higher in female patients than in male patients, 407 cells/mm3 : 329 cells/mm3 (p = 0.005. The mean QOL scores on the scale of (0–100 in three domains were similar: psychological health, 71.60 ± 18.40; physical health, 71.60 ± 13.90; and the environmental domain, 70.10 ± 12.00; with the lowest score in the social domain, 68.89 ± 16.70. Asymptomatic HIV-positive patients had significantly better mean QOL scores than symptomatic patients in the physical (74.04 ± 16.85 versus 64.47 ± 20.94, p = 0.005 and psychological domains (76.09 ± 12.93 versus 69.74 ± 15.79, p = 0.015. There was no significant difference in the mean QOL scores of men compared to those of women, in all domains assessed.Conclusion: High QOL scores in the physical, psychological and environmental domains may be reflective of the effectiveness of some of the interventions PLWHA are exposed to at the ARV clinic, UCH Ibadan (on-going psychotherapy, free antiretroviral drugs

  3. Changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics with a heat-mouldable semi-custom foot orthotic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferber Reed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Semi-custom foot orthoses (SCO are thought to be a cost-effective alternative to custom-made devices. However, previous biomechanical research involving either custom or SCO has only focused on rearfoot biomechanics. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine changes in multi-segment foot biomechanics during shod walking with and without an SCO. We chose to investigate an SCO device that incorporates a heat-moulding process, to further understand if the moulding process would significantly alter rearfoot, midfoot, or shank kinematics as compared to a no-orthotic condition. We hypothesized the SCO, whether moulded or non-moulded, would reduce peak rearfoot eversion, tibial internal rotation, arch deformation, and plantar fascia strain as compared to the no-orthoses condition. Methods Twenty participants had retroreflective markers placed on the right limb to represent forefoot, midfoot, rearfoot and shank segments. 3D kinematics were recorded using an 8-camera motion capture system while participants walked on a treadmill. Results Plantar fascia strain was reduced by 34% when participants walked in either the moulded or non-moulded SCO condition compared to no-orthoses. However, there were no significant differences in peak rearfoot eversion, tibial internal rotation, or medial longitudinal arch angles between any conditions. Conclusions A semi-custom moulded orthotic does not control rearfoot, shank, or arch deformation but does, however, reduce plantar fascia strain compared to walking without an orthoses. Heat-moulding the orthotic device does not have a measurable effect on any biomechanical variables compared to the non-moulded condition. These data may, in part, help explain the clinical efficacy of orthotic devices.

  4. Computational biomechanics and experimental validation of vessel deformation based on 4D-CT imaging of the porcine aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazer, Dilana; Finol, Ender A.; Kostrzewa, Michael; Kopaigorenko, Maria; Richter, Götz-M.; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2009-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease results from pathological biomechanical conditions and fatigue of the vessel wall. Image-based computational modeling provides a physical and realistic insight into the patient-specific biomechanics and enables accurate predictive simulations of development, growth and failure of cardiovascular disease. An experimental validation is necessary for the evaluation and the clinical implementation of such computational models. In the present study, we have implemented dynamic Computed-Tomography (4D-CT) imaging and catheter-based in vivo measured pressures to numerically simulate and experimentally evaluate the biomechanics of the porcine aorta. The computations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and simulate the arterial wall response to the transient pressure-based boundary condition. They are evaluated by comparing the numerically predicted wall deformation and that calculated from the acquired 4D-CT data. The dynamic motion of the vessel is quantified by means of the hydraulic diameter, analyzing sequences at 5% increments over the cardiac cycle. Our results show that accurate biomechanical modeling is possible using FEM-based simulations. The RMS error of the computed hydraulic diameter at five cross-sections of the aorta was 0.188, 0.252, 0.280, 0.237 and 0.204 mm, which is equivalent to 1.7%, 2.3%, 2.7%, 2.3% and 2.0%, respectively, when expressed as a function of the time-averaged hydraulic diameter measured from the CT images. The present investigation is a first attempt to simulate and validate vessel deformation based on realistic morphological data and boundary conditions. An experimentally validated system would help in evaluating individual therapies and optimal treatment strategies in the field of minimally invasive endovascular surgery.

  5. A comparison of the biomechanical effects of valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard K; Nester, Christopher J; Richards, Jim D; Kim, Winston Y; Johnson, David S; Jari, Sanjiv; Laxton, Philip; Tyson, Sarah F

    2013-03-01

    Increases in the external knee adduction moment (EKAM) have been associated with increased mechanical load at the knee and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles are common approaches to reducing this loading; however no study has directly compared the biomechanical and clinical effects of these two treatments in patients with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. A cross-over randomised design was used where each intervention was worn by 28 patients for a two week period. Pre- and post-intervention gait kinematic/kinetic data and clinical outcomes were collected to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical effects on the knee joint. The valgus knee brace and the lateral wedged insole significantly increased walking speed, reduced the early stance EKAM by 7% and 12%, and the knee adduction angular impulse by 8.6 and 16.1% respectively. The lateral wedged insole significantly reduced the early stance EKAM compared to the valgus knee brace (p=0.001). The valgus knee brace significantly reduced the knee varus angle compared to the baseline and lateral wedged insole. Improvements in pain and function subscales were comparable for the valgus knee brace and lateral wedged insole. There were no significant differences between the two treatments in any of the clinical outcomes; however the lateral wedged insoles demonstrated greater levels of acceptance by patients. This is the first study to biomechanically compare these two treatments, and demonstrates that given the potential role of knee loading in osteoarthritis progression, that both treatments reduce this but lateral wedge insoles appear to have a greater effect. PMID:22920242

  6. Energetics, Biomechanics, and Performance in Masters' Swimmers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria I; Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário J; Neiva, Henrique P; Marinho, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Ferreira, MI, Barbosa, TM, Costa, MJ, Neiva, HP, and Marinho, DA. Energetics, biomechanics, and performance in masters' swimmers: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2069-2081, 2016-This study aimed to summarize evidence on masters' swimmers energetics, biomechanics, and performance gathered in selected studies. An expanded search was conducted on 6 databases, conference proceedings, and department files. Fifteen studies were selected for further analysis. A qualitative evaluation of the studies based on the Quality Index (QI) was performed by 2 independent reviewers. The studies were thereafter classified into 3 domains according to the reported data: performance (10 studies), energetics (4 studies), and biomechanics (6 studies). The selected 15 articles included in this review presented low QI scores (mean score, 10.47 points). The biomechanics domain obtained higher QI (11.5 points), followed by energetics and performance (10.6 and 9.9 points, respectively). Stroke frequency (SF) and stroke length (SL) were both influenced by aging, although SF is more affected than SL. Propelling efficiency (ηp) decreased with age. Swimming performance declined with age. The performance declines with age having male swimmers deliver better performances than female counterparts, although this difference tends to be narrow in long-distance events. One single longitudinal study is found in the literature reporting the changes in performance over time. The remaining studies are cross-sectional designs focusing on the energetics and biomechanics. Overall, biomechanics parameters, such as SF, SL, and ηp, tend to decrease with age. This review shows the lack of a solid body of knowledge (reflected in the amount and quality of the articles published) on the changes in biomechanics, energetics, and performance of master swimmers over time. The training programs for this age-group should aim to preserve the energetics as much as possible and, concurrently, improve the

  7. Interdisciplinary approach to clinical placements within Charles Sturt University School of Nursing Midwifery and Indigenous Health. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Maree Biles

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The clinical placement environment can be challenging for many students, and for students enrolled in the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Indigenous Health (SNMIH subject NRS194, Indigenous Cultures, Health and Nursing, being placed in an Aboriginal facility can be daunting and increase anxiety within a cohort.  A pilot project within the SNMIH for NRS194 sought to engage the local Aboriginal Health Service through Aboriginal staff and utilising the skills, knowledge and expertise of the Aboriginal Health workers as a conduit to the community.  The cross cultural engagement within the SNMIH and the community has meant the cohorts of discipline-specific programs are being exposed to a breadth and depth of diversity within the Australian Health context, with a specific focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their communities.  This Practice Report discusses the core elements of this first year placement initiative and the outcomes from the academic lens.

  8. Prevalence of potentially reversible dementias in a dementia outpatient clinic of a tertiary university-affiliated hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takada Leonel Tadao

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of investigating the etiology for dementia lies in the possibility of treating potentially reversible dementias. The aims of this retrospective study are to determine the prevalence of potentially reversible dementias among 454 outpatients seen at the Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology Unit, Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University School of Medicine - Brazil, between the years of 1991 and 2001, and observe their evolution in follow-up. Among the initial 454 patients, 275 fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for dementia. Alzheimer's disease was the most frequent diagnosis (164 cases; 59.6%. Twenty-two cases (8.0% of potentially reversible dementia were observed, the most frequent diagnoses being neurosyphilis (nine cases and hydrocephalus (six cases. Full recovery was observed in two patients and partial recovery in 10 patients. Two cases were not treated and eight cases were lost on follow-up. The prevalence found in the present study falls within the range reported in previous studies (0-30%.

  9. Considerations for clinics and practitioners treating foreign patients with assisted reproductive technology: lessons from experiences at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sutter, Petra

    2011-11-01

    Cross-border reproductive care (CBRC) is not a new concept, having been around since the beginning of assisted reproductive technology. Countries having taken the lead in developing new technologies have seen an influx of patients from other countries, because of legal limitations or the unavailability of good-quality care in their home country. This paper describes the experience of the Ghent University Hospital fertility centre with Dutch and French patients and tries to set out standards of care for CBRC patients. Dutch patients usually have longer histories, more complex pathology and are better informed, more outspoken and more financially secure. Thus, the care for these patients is challenging. The standards of care should be the same for local patients and CBRC patients; however, the nature of the complexity of the problems they come with will necessitate more time investment. Experience shows that many patients who have no access to treatment in their own country obtain reasonably good results. Some of them, however, are beyond possible help and these patients need a high standard of psychological care. All should be done to avoid that cross-border patients compromise the local care system. Special arrangements should be taken to manage possible complications following treatment. PMID:21945265

  10. Primary cicatricial alopecias: a review of histopathologic findings in 38 patients from a clinical University Hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuella Rosyane Duarte Moure

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scarring alopecias are classified into primary and secondary types according to the initial site of inflammation. In primary scarring alopecias, the hair follicle is the main target of destruction; the term secondary cicatricial alopecia implies that follicular destruction is not the primary pathologic event. AIMS: To review the histopathologic diagnoses of cases of cicatricial alopecia in order to classify them according to the North American Hair Research Society. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with biopsy specimens diagnosed as cicatricial alopecia seen from 2000 to 2005 at the Dermatologic Department of Hospital das Clinicas, São Paulo University Medical School had hematoxylin and eosin, Periodic acid-Schiff and Weigert stained slides reevaluated and sub-typed into different primary cicatricial alopecias. RESULTS: Thirty-eight cases of primary cicatricial alopecias were reclassified as: chronic cutaneous lupus (17, lichen planus pilaris (4, pseudopelade of Brocq (12, folliculitis decalvans (3, dissecting folliculitis (1, and non-specific scarring alopecia (1. In our cases, the methods employed allowed an accurate diagnosis in 12 of 13 cases (92.3% previously classified as non-specific cicatricial alopecias. CONCLUSIONS: Even in the late, pauci or non-inflammatory phases, an approach with systematic evaluation of a constellation of criteria in routine hematoxylin and eosin stain, Periodic acid-Schiff and Weigert stain allowed for a more accurate diagnosis of cicatricial alopecias.

  11. Measurement properties of existing clinical assessment methods evaluating scapular positioning and function. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Juul-Kristensen, B; Lund, H;

    2014-01-01

    Measurement properties of existing clinical assessment methods evaluating scapular positioning and function. A systematic review Larsen CM1, Juul-Kristensen B1,2 Lund H1,2, Søgaard K1 1University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics 2Institute of Occupational....... Methods A systematic, computer-assisted literature search using Medline, CINAHL, SportDiscus and EMBASE was performed from inception to October 2013. Reference lists in articles were also screened for publications. The overall method used in this review can be divided into four steps: 1) Compile an...... evaluation due to no/few clinimetric results, leaving 35 studies for evaluation. Graded according to the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN checklist), the methodological quality in the reliability and validity domains was ‘fair’ (57%) to ‘poor’ (43%), with...

  12. Measurement properties of existing clinical assessment methods evaluating scapular positioning and function. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Lund, Hans;

    ABSTRACT OARSI Measurement properties of existing clinical assessment methods evaluating scapular positioning and function. A systematic review Larsen CM1, Juul-Kristensen B1,2 Lund H1,2, Søgaard K11University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics2Institute of...... studies.MethodsA systematic, computer-assisted literature search using Medline, CINAHL, SportDiscus and EMBASE was performed from inception to October 2013. Reference lists in articles were also screened for publications. The overall method used in this review can be divided into four steps: 1) Compile an...... evaluation due to no/few clinimetric results, leaving 35 studies for evaluation. Graded according to the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN checklist), the methodological quality in the reliability and validity domains was ‘fair’ (57%) to ‘poor’ (43%), with...

  13. Potential and limits of mammography (Statistical and casuistic investigation of clinically positive, mammographically negative cases among the patients of Goettingen Radiological University Hospital)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the radiological clinic of the Goettingen university, 23 945 patients were mammographed from 1971 to 1977. For 612 patients with existing clinical findings, a negative radiological finding was established; as for the 202 patients who are dealt with in this paper, in 192 of these cases a histological or cytological clarification was carried out; 10 other cases were observed over a longer period. The average age of the patients examined was 39.7 years. The maximum frequency with regard to the age lies in the 5th life decade with 26.2%. Corresponding to the Goettingen model, the patients examined were assigned to 4 main groups in accordance to their parenchymal structure. In relation to the mamma structure, the clinical finding in 53.9% is hardening and in 46.1% nodes. As for the nodes, most have the size of cherry or plum (21.3%), this is followed by those with the size of beans (13,8%) and lenses (10.9%). A coherence between age and size of the clinical finding cannot be manifested definitely. In nearly half of the cases, the histological or cytological examination revealed a masthopathy (48.9%). In 10.4% a fibroadenoma was found and in 2.1% a carcinoma. In the remaining 32,8% the finding referred to lipomas, mastitis, atypical cells or negative cytological results. Related to the age, mastopathy is dominant in women between 20 and 60 years of age. In women below 20 years, fibroadenomas are dominant, in women in their 7th decade other benign diagnoses which in the 8th decade are of the same frequency as carcinomas. With increasing age, the number of fibroadenomas decreases. (orig./MG)

  14. Effects of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK on corneal biomechanical measurements with the Corvis ST tonometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frings A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Frings,1,* Stephan J Linke,1,2,* Eva L Bauer,1 Vasyl Druchkiv,1 Toam Katz,1,2 Johannes Steinberg1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE, Hamburg, Germany; 2Care Vision Refractive Center, Hamburg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: This study was initiated to evaluate biomechanical changes using the Corvis ST tonometer (CST on the cornea after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK. Setting: University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, and Care Vision Refractive Centers, Germany. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Methods: This retrospective study included 37 eyes of 37 refractive patients. All CST measurements were performed 1 day before surgery and at the 1-month follow-up examination. The LASIK procedure included mechanical flap preparation using a Moria SBKmicrokeratome and an Allegretto excimer laser platform. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed for mean first applanation length, mean first and second deflection lengths, mean first and second deflection amplitudes, radius of curvature, and peak distance. Significant positive correlations were found between the change (∆ of radius of curvature and manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE, ablation depth, and ∆intraocular pressure as well as between AD and ∆HC-time. Each diopter of myopic correction in MRSE resulted in an increase in ∆radius of curvature of 0.2 mm. Conclusion: Several CST parameters were statistically significantly altered by LASIK, thereby indicating that flap creation, ablation, or both, significantly change the ability of the cornea to absorb or dissipate energy. Keywords: LASIK, corneal biomechanics, refractive surgery, Corvis ST

  15. The use of Amniotic membrane in the treatment of Burns in Children a clinical trial at the university Teaching Hospital, Lusaka

    CERN Document Server

    Katebe, K R

    1995-01-01

    This is a clinical trial which was carried out at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka from the 1st of July to the 31st December, 1994. It involved treatment of burns in forty children using gamma irradiated amniotic membrane produced at the hospital. The results showed that it is feasible to produce Gamma irradiated biological dressings from amniotic membrane at this hospital. The amniotic membrane was easy to apply on burns and the treatment was acceptable to the majority of parents with burnt children. The use of amniotic membrane was non inflammatory to the wounds in all forty patients (100%), reduced wound infection in thirty three patients (82.5%), increased the rate of wound healing in thirty nine patients (97.5%), and resulted in good quality wound healing in thirty one patients (77.5%). Therefore, the treatment offers a good alternative in the treatment of burns in children at the hospital

  16. The use of Amniotic membrane in the treatment of Burns in Children: a clinical trial at the university Teaching Hospital, Lusaka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a clinical trial which was carried out at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka from the 1st of July to the 31st December, 1994. It involved treatment of burns in forty children using gamma irradiated amniotic membrane produced at the hospital. The results showed that it is feasible to produce Gamma irradiated biological dressings from amniotic membrane at this hospital. The amniotic membrane was easy to apply on burns and the treatment was acceptable to the majority of parents with burnt children. The use of amniotic membrane was non inflammatory to the wounds in all forty patients (100%), reduced wound infection in thirty three patients (82.5%), increased the rate of wound healing in thirty nine patients (97.5%), and resulted in good quality wound healing in thirty one patients (77.5%). Therefore, the treatment offers a good alternative in the treatment of burns in children at the hospital

  17. Experience With A Small Scale All Digital CT And MRI Clinical Service Unit: Present Status Of Kyoto University Hospital Image Database And Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, K.; Komori, M.; Nakano, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Kyoto University Hospital is currently developing a prototype PAC system named KIDS (Kyoto univ. hosp. Image Database and communication System). The present goal of the system is to achieve the totally digital CT and MRI unit in the radiological department. Because KIDS is designed as a first step of a long-range plan towards a hospital wide system, it includes all of the basic functions required in realizing the PAC system, such as communication networks, a long term archiving unit, a laser film printer and image workstations. The system concept, architecture and current status are described in this paper. Our early experience and evaluations with the system in a clinical environment are also mentioned.

  18. The results of the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia at the Medical Clinic of the University of Tuebingen 1969-1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of treatment of 111 patients with myeloid leukemia at the Medical Clinic of the University of Tuebingen from the years 1969 to 1971 were evaluated under a testing, which occurred at the same time, of the therapeutically differential importance of the spleen size before the beginning of therapy and of the influence of various factors on the treatment success of spleen irradiation. The median survival time of the 111 patients after diagnosis was 43 months. The primary busulfan therapy increased survival time in comparison to the therapy with spleen irradiation, but not statistically significantly. With more greatly enlarged spleens there was no recognizable advantage in either form of treatment. For a better evaluation of the therapy success stricter remission criteria appeared to be required. (orig.)

  19. Visualisation to enhance biomechanical tuning of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs in stroke: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carse Bruce

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of gaps in the evidence base for the use of ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Three dimensional motion analysis offers an ideal method for objectively obtaining biomechanical gait data from stroke patients, however there are a number of major barriers to its use in routine clinical practice. One significant problem is the way in which the biomechanical data generated by these systems is presented. Through the careful design of bespoke biomechanical visualisation software it may be possible to present such data in novel ways to improve clinical decision making, track progress and increase patient understanding in the context of ankle-foot orthosis tuning. Methods A single-blind randomised controlled trial will be used to compare the use of biomechanical visualisation software in ankle-foot orthosis tuning against standard care (tuning using observation alone. Participants (n = 70 will have experienced a recent hemiplegia (1-12 months and will be identified by their care team as being suitable candidates for a rigid ankle-foot orthosis. The primary outcome measure will be walking velocity. Secondary outcome measures include; lower limb joint kinematics (thigh and shank global orientations & kinetics (knee and hip flexion/extension moments, ground reaction force FZ2 peak magnitude, step length, symmetry ratio based on step length, Modified Ashworth Scale, Modified Rivermead Mobility Index and EuroQol (EQ-5D. Additional qualitative measures will also be taken from participants (patients and clinicians at the beginning and end of their participation in the study. The main aim of the study is to determine whether or not the visualisation of biomechanical data can be used to improve the outcomes of tuning ankle-foot orthoses for stroke patients. Discussion In addition to answering the primary research question the broad range of measures that will be taken during this study are likely to contribute to a

  20. The present state of the diabetic clinic in the first department of internal medicine of Niigata University Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Osamu; Oyama, Yasuro; Suzuki, Katsunori [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1998-10-01

    The treatment of diabetic complications in Niigata University were reported. Of all patients, 23.6% were treated by diabetic therapy alone, 37.8% were administered with SU drug and, in addition, about 50% were treated by a glucosidase inhibitor ({alpha}GI) or troglitazone. Insulin was used in 26.2% of the patients. Patients with NIDDM in whom the onset of simple retinopathy could be specified, were divided into 2 groups; Group S, with simple retinopathy without progression and Group P, with progression to preproliferative or proliferative retinopathy. Between the 2 groups, there were significant differences in the period of suffering from simple retinopathy, HbA1c and TC b. The association of the retinopathy with the short period would mean that HbA1c and TC were poorly controlled in these patients. In attention to silent myocardial ischemia and significance of cerebral blood flow scintigraphy, there was no significant difference regarding the presence or absence of angina pain or incidence of abnormal findings of scintigraphy or coronary angiography. It was difficult to predict the presence of silent myocardial ischemia from the presence or absence of diabetic neuropathy. Cerebral blood flow scintigraphy was performed in 37 diabetic patients, 25 patients were allocated to a group having uneven distribution of RI which never detected normally and an ununiform drop of peripheral blood flow (Micro group) and 12 cases without these findings to another group (Non-micro group). In the Micro group, HbA1c was significantly higher and the incidence of diabetic nephropathy was also higher. {alpha}GI was used to improve postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with NIDDM. It was more effective when being used concomitantly with a SU agent although the effect tended to decrease relatively in the cases of long term use. Improvement was observed in 90% of the patients which showed BMI of 24.2 or above. (K.H.)

  1. The present state of the diabetic clinic in the first department of internal medicine of Niigata University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of diabetic complications in Niigata University were reported. Of all patients, 23.6% were treated by diabetic therapy alone, 37.8% were administered with SU drug and, in addition, about 50% were treated by a glucosidase inhibitor (αGI) or troglitazone. Insulin was used in 26.2% of the patients. Patients with NIDDM in whom the onset of simple retinopathy could be specified, were divided into 2 groups; Group S, with simple retinopathy without progression and Group P, with progression to preproliferative or proliferative retinopathy. Between the 2 groups, there were significant differences in the period of suffering from simple retinopathy, HbA1c and TC b. The association of the retinopathy with the short period would mean that HbA1c and TC were poorly controlled in these patients. In attention to silent myocardial ischemia and significance of cerebral blood flow scintigraphy, there was no significant difference regarding the presence or absence of angina pain or incidence of abnormal findings of scintigraphy or coronary angiography. It was difficult to predict the presence of silent myocardial ischemia from the presence or absence of diabetic neuropathy. Cerebral blood flow scintigraphy was performed in 37 diabetic patients, 25 patients were allocated to a group having uneven distribution of RI which never detected normally and an ununiform drop of peripheral blood flow (Micro group) and 12 cases without these findings to another group (Non-micro group). In the Micro group, HbA1c was significantly higher and the incidence of diabetic nephropathy was also higher. αGI was used to improve postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with NIDDM. It was more effective when being used concomitantly with a SU agent although the effect tended to decrease relatively in the cases of long term use. Improvement was observed in 90% of the patients which showed BMI of 24.2 or above. (K.H.)

  2. Intravenous thrombolytic treatment experiences in patients with acute ischemic stroke at the University of Kocatepe, Neurology Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Oruç

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to discuss the results of the intravenous thrombolytic treatment (IV-tPA to acute ischemic stroke patients, in the light of the literature. METHODS: We performed our study with forty acute ischemic stroke patients who were receiving the IV-tPA in the intensive care unit of our neurology clinic between 2011 and 2015.. The demographic, clinical and radiological data were collected retrospectively. The intracranial hemorrhage detected within 3 months after discharge and neurological status at the end of the 3rd month were evaluated by using modified Rankin scale (MRS and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores. The symptom-to-needle time, Alberta stroke programe early computed tomography score (ASPECT and initial and follow-up scores of NIHSS were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were female, twenty-five were male, and the mean age was 66.45±10.56. The initial mean NIHSS score was 13±4.33, whereas it was 4,10±3,37at 3rd month. The initial mean ASPECT score was 8.23±1.20. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was detected in 1 patient and asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was detected in 6. The mean symptom-to-needle time was 139,0±48,1 minutes. The neurological disability of 13 patients ( %32.5 were fully recovered at the end of the 3rd month, while 7 patients were died. (% 17,5 The initial NIHSS and ASPECT scores were significantly different between group of patients with a MRS score between 0-2 and between 3-6 (p=0.03 and p=0.006; respectively, while the symptom-to-needle time was not different (p=0.79. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The results of the current study are in accordance with previous studies in the literature. These results have shown that the IV-tPA treatment is efficient and safe treatment modality in acute ischemic stroke, and reduces disability at the end of the 3rd month.

  3. The evolution of articular cartilage imaging and its impact on clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past four decades, articular cartilage imaging has developed rapidly. Imaging now plays a critical role not only in clinical practice and therapeutic decisions but also in the basic research probing our understanding of cartilage physiology and biomechanics. (orig.)

  4. Treatment of ankle fracture and biomechanics of talus%踝部骨折治疗效果与距骨生物力学的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁庆威; 范广宇; 吕刚

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The anatomical structure of ankle joint is not complicated, but its biomechanics is very important. The talus has participated in consisting of three joints and played very important role in supporting the functions of ankle. Therefore, it is very important to stabilize the position of talus in order to restore the anatomical structure of ankle.OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between treatment of ankle fracture and the biomechanics of the talus.DESIGN: A non-randomized case controlled study was conducted.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: There were 95 patients with fracture of ankle joints during January 1985 to October 2000 from the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University. Three specimens of amputating legs due to malignant tumor were collected.INTERVENTIONS: The biomechanics of talus in ankle fracture was observed by amputated leg specimens and the clinical manifestation and Xray examinations were analyzed in the 95 fracture patients after treatment.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Forces acting on different fracture types,relationship between therapeutic effects and biomechanics of talus.RESULTS: Sixty-five cases were followed up. There were 41 cases with very good therapeutic effects, 12 cases with good effects, 7 cases with fair effects and 5 cases with poor effects. Biomechanics results: the neck was compressed 0.48 cm when both ankles were broken. The lateral malleolar facet got more pressure than medial malleolar facet when vertical pressure acted in external facet fracture. When fracture happened in the lower 1/3 of fibula, the pressure acted on lateral malleolar facet was less than that on medial malleolar facet when in inversion position.CONCLUSION: It should pay more attention to the anatomical relations of talus in ankle cavity and the gap of lower tibiofibular joint no matter external fixation or internal fixation of manual reposition to ankle fracture was used. It is a very important treatment standard to restore the biomechanical

  5. A cross-sectional study of anxiety and marital quality among women with breast cancer at a university clinic in western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zaben, Faten N.; Sehlo, Mohammad G.; Koenig, Harold G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine relationship between the quality of marital relationship and anxiety among women with breast cancer (BC) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: This cross-sectional study recruited a consecutive series of 49 married women with BC seen in the Al-Amoudi Breast Cancer Center of Excellence at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, KSA in early 2013. Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Spouse Perception Scale, and Quality of Marriage Index forms, and answered questions on demographic and cancer characteristics. Results: Anxiety symptoms indicating “possible” anxiety disorder were present in 10.4% and “probable” anxiety disorder in 14.6% (25% total). No significant relationship was found between the quality of marital relationship and anxiety symptoms (B=-0.04, standard error=0.05, t=-0.81, p=0.42). Anxiety was primarily driven by low education, poor socioeconomic status, and young age. Conclusion: Anxiety symptoms are prevalent among married women with BC seen in a university-based clinic in the KSA. Further research is needed to determine whether a diagnosis of BC adversely affects marital relationship, and whether this is the cause for anxiety in these women. PMID:26446326

  6. [Nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi isolated in Le Dantec University hospital of Dakar in 2014: Epidemiological, clinical and mycological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diongue, K; Diallo, M A; Badiane, A S; Seck, M C; Ndiaye, M; Ndoye, N W; Ndiaye, Y D; Dieye, B; Déme, A; Ndiaye, I M; Ndir, O; Ndiaye, D

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the incidence of superficial fungal infections involving nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi increased considerably. The objective of this work was to analyze the epidemiological, clinical and mycological fungal infections due to nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi diagnosed in the laboratory of parasitology-mycology of Le Dantec hospital in Dakar. With a retrospective study of the various cases of nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi isolated in the laboratory of parasitology-mycology during the period of November 2013 to December 2014, we collected 22 cases of infections in 11 men and 11 women; age ranging from 17 to 75 years with a mean of 45.3 years (sex ratio=1): eight cases of intertrigo, seven cases of onychomycosis, four cases of palmoplantar keratoderma (KPP), a case of onychomycosis associated with interdigital intertrigo, a case of infectious myositis and one case of African histoplasmosis. We have isolated and identified a total of 22 nondermatophytic and noncandidal fungi: ten Fusarium, five Trichosporon, two Chrysosporium, two Geotrichum, one Rhodotorula, one Neoscytalidium dimidiatum and one Histoplasma capsulatum var. duboisii. So we are seeing the emergence of nondermatophytic and noncandidal increasingly isolated from superficial and local lesions. These fungi, generally contaminants or commensal, cause a problem regarding their direct involvement in pathological processes in which they are isolated. So we should respect the recommendations proposed for their involvement in pathological processes and, by a collaboration between clinician and biologist, demonstrate their real involvement through effective, targeted treatment. PMID:26138533

  7. A quasi-universal medium to break the aerobic/anaerobic bacterial culture dichotomy in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dione, N; Khelaifia, S; La Scola, B; Lagier, J C; Raoult, D

    2016-01-01

    In the mid-19th century, the dichotomy between aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was introduced. Nevertheless, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacterial species such as Ruminococcus gnavus and Fusobacterium necrophorum, in a culture medium containing antioxidants, was recently demonstrated. We tested aerobically the culture of 623 bacterial strains from 276 bacterial species including 82 strictly anaerobic, 154 facultative anaerobic, 31 aerobic and nine microaerophilic bacterial species as well as ten fungi. The basic culture medium was based on Schaedler agar supplemented with 1 g/L ascorbic acid and 0.1 g/L glutathione (R-medium). We successively optimized this media, adding 0.4 g/L uric acid, using separate autoclaving of the component, or adding haemin 0.1 g/L or α-ketoglutarate 2 g/L. In the basic medium, 237 bacterial species and ten fungal species grew but with no growth of 36 bacterial species, including 22 strict anaerobes. Adding uric acid allowed the growth of 14 further species including eight strict anaerobes, while separate autoclaving allowed the growth of all tested bacterial strains. To extend its potential use for fastidious bacteria, we added haemin for Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Eikenella corrodens and α-ketoglutarate for Legionella pneumophila. This medium allowed the growth of all tested strains with the exception of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Testing primoculture and more fastidious species will constitute the main work to be done, but R-medium coupled with a rapid identification method (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) will facilitate the anaerobic culture in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:26577141

  8. Teaching Translational Research to Medical Students: The New York University School of Medicine's Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation Dual-Degree Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Jennifer; Pillinger, Michael; Plottel, Claudia S; Galeano, Claudia; Maddalo, Scott; Hochman, Judith S; Cronstein, Bruce N; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2015-12-01

    To develop the next generation of translational investigators, New York University School of Medicine (NYUSOM) and the NYU-NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NYU-HHC CTSI) developed the Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation dual-degree (MD/MSCI) program. This 5-year program dedicates 1 year to coursework and biomedical research, followed by a medical school/research overlap year, to prepare students for academic research careers. This paper details the MD/MSCI program's curriculum and approach to mentorship, describes the research/professional interests of students, and reports student productivity. In the first 4 years of the program (2010-2014) 20 students were matriculated; 7 (35%) were women, and 12 (60%) research projects were in surgical specialties. To date, 14 students have applied to residency, and half pursued surgical residency programs. Our students have produced 68 accepted abstracts, 15 abstracts in submission, 38 accepted papers, and 24 papers in submission. Despite the time-limited nature of this program, additional training in research design and implementation has promoted a high level of productivity. We conclude that dual-degree training in medicine and translational research is feasible for medical students and allows for meaningful participation in valuable projects. Follow-up is warranted to evaluate the academic trajectory of these students. PMID:26365704

  9. Putting Research Findings into Clinical Practice; Feasibility of integrated evidence-based care pathways in otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Bhargava

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A perception exists that clinicians in Oman are reluctant to adopt evidence-based practice (EBP. This pilot study was undertaken to study the feasibility of using EBP pathways at the point of care in otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery. The ultimate aim was to facilitate EBP with the probability of developing a new system for implementing research findings/translational research at the clinical point of care. Methods: A cross-sectional prospective questionnaire pilot survey of clinicians at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH, Oman, a tertiary care medical centre, was undertaken. Respondents included 135 physicians and surgeons with between 3 months and 25 years of clinical experience and included personnel ranging from interns to senior consultants, in areas ranging from primary care to specialist care. Results: Of those polled, 90% (95% confidence interval (CI 85–95% either strongly agreed or agreed that evidence-based practice protocols (EBPP could help in decision making. A total of 87.4% of participants (95% CI 81.8–93% either strongly agreed or agreed that EBPPs can improve clinical outcomes; 91.8% of participants (95% CI 87.2–96.4% would use and apply EBPP in day-to-day care if they were available at the point of care and embedded in the hospital information system. Conclusions: The perception that clinicians at SQUH are reluctant to adopt EBP is incorrect. The introduction of EBP pathways is very feasible at the primary care level. Institutional support for embedding EBP in hospital information systems is needed as well as further outcome research to assess the improvement in quality of care.

  10. Composition of The Knee Index, a novel three-dimensional biomechanical index for knee joint load, in subjects with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Andriacchi, Tom; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg;

    Background Knee joint load is an important factor associated with progression of knee osteoarthritis. To provide an overall understanding of knee joint loading, the Knee Index (KI) has been developed to include moments from all three planes (frontal, sagittal and transversal). However, before KI is...... used in clinical trials a biomechanical analysis identifying the respective contributions of the knee moments derived from the three planes is needed. Aim The purpose of this study was therefor to investigate how the frontal, sagittal and transversal moments contribute to KI, a novel biomechanical...... index of joint load for the knee, in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. Methods The contribution of frontal, sagittal and transversal plane knee moments to KI was investigated in 24 subjects (13 women, age: 58 ± 7.6 years, BMI: 27.1 ± 3.0) with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee...

  11. Framework and Bio-Mechanical Model for a Per-Operative Image-Guided Neuronavigator Including 'Brain-Shift' Compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Bucki, M; Bucki, Marek; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology to adress the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as "brainshift". This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on preoperative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intraoperative image-guided system, we propose a biomechanical model of the brain which can take into account interactively such deformations as well as surgical procedures that modify the brain structure, like tumour or tissue resection.

  12. Biomechanical Evaluation of Plate Versus Lag Screw Only Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaghi, Amirhossein; Doan, Josh; Bastrom, Tracey; Pennock, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional fixation of unstable Orthopaedic Trauma Association type B/C ankle fractures consists of a lag screw and a lateral or posterolateral neutralization plate. Several studies have demonstrated the clinical success of lag screw only fixation; however, to date no biomechanical comparison of the different constructs has been performed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biomechanical strength of these different constructs. Osteotomies were created in 40 Sawbones(®) distal fibulas and reduced using 1 bicortical 3.5-mm stainless steel lag screw, 2 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, 3 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, or a single 3.5-mm lag screw coupled with a stainless steel neutralization plate with 3 proximal cortical and 3 distal cancellous screws. The constructs were tested to determine the stiffness in lateral bending and rotation and failure torque. No significant differences in lateral bending or rotational stiffness were detected between the osteotomies fixed with 3 lag screws and a plate. Constructs fixed with 1 lag screw were weaker for both lateral bending and rotational stiffness. Osteotomies fixed with 2 lag screws were weaker in lateral bending only. No significant differences were found in the failure torque. Compared with lag screw only fixation, plate fixation requires larger incisions and increased costs and is more likely to require follow-up surgery. Despite the published clinical success of treating simple Orthopaedic Trauma Association B/C fractures with lag screw only fixation, many surgeons still have concerns about stability. For noncomminuted, long oblique distal fibula fractures, lag screw only fixation techniques offer construct stiffness similar to that of traditional plate and lag screw fixation. PMID:25990534

  13. Automatized Patient-Specific Methodology for Numerical Determination of Biomechanical Corneal Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Gracia, M Á; Zurita, J; Piñero, D P; Calvo, B; Rodríguez-Matas, J F

    2016-05-01

    This work presents a novel methodology for building a three-dimensional patient-specific eyeball model suitable for performing a fully automatic finite element (FE) analysis of the corneal biomechanics. The reconstruction algorithm fits and smooths the patient's corneal surfaces obtained in clinic with corneal topographers and creates an FE mesh for the simulation. The patient's corneal elevation and pachymetry data is kept where available, to account for all corneal geometric features (central corneal thickness-CCT and curvature). Subsequently, an iterative free-stress algorithm including a fiber's pull-back is applied to incorporate the pre-stress field to the model. A convergence analysis of the mesh and a sensitivity analysis of the parameters involved in the numerical response is also addressed to determine the most influential features of the FE model. As a final step, the methodology is applied on the simulation of a general non-commercial non-contact tonometry diagnostic test over a large set of 130 patients-53 healthy, 63 keratoconic (KTC) and 14 post-LASIK surgery eyes. Results show the influence of the CCT, intraocular pressure (IOP) and fibers (87%) on the numerical corneal displacement [Formula: see text] the good agreement of the [Formula: see text] with clinical results, and the importance of considering the corneal pre-stress in the FE analysis. The potential and flexibility of the methodology can help improve understanding of the eye biomechanics, to help to plan surgeries, or to interpret the results of new diagnosis tools (i.e., non-contact tonometers). PMID:26307330

  14. Biomechanical comparison of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and bilateral laminotomy for spinal stenosis syndrome – an experimental study in porcine model

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Lih-Huei; Chen Weng-Pin; Hsieh Pang-Hsing; Tai Ching-Lung; Chen Wen-Jer; Lai Po-Liang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The association of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and laminotomy has been clinically studied, but the corresponding in vitro biomechanical studies have not been reported. We investigated the hypothesis that the integrity of the posterior complex (spinous process-interspinous ligament-spinous process) plays an important role on the postoperative spinal stability in decompressive surgery. Methods Eight porcine lumbar spine specimens were studied. Each specimen ...

  15. Biomechanical Modeling of the Human Heart - Modeling of the Ventricles, the Atria and the Pericardium and the Inverse Problem of Cardiac Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A biomechanical simulation framework has been developed which allows to simulate the contraction of the whole human heart. Further, an inverse solving algorithm has been developed, which works in an opposite manner and allows to reconstruct the active tension distribution from provided data of the motion of the heart surfaces, which can for example be extracted from medical imaging data. This allows for a personalization of the model based on clinical data.

  16. The Biomechanical Testing for the Assessment of Bone Quality in an Experimental Model of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksztulska-Kolanek, Ewa; Znorko, Beata; Michałowska, Małgorzata; Pawlak, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Mineral metabolism disturbances are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and have been classified as a new clinical entity, also known as CKD-mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD). A decrease in the bone strength, whose clinical manifestation is a tendency for fracture, has been recognized as an important component of CKD-MBD. Because of ethical issues, measurements of the bone strength in the human body are usually limited to noninvasive techniques, such as radiography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and the assays of bone turnover biomarkers. However, it has been postulated recently that the evidence concerning bone strength based solely on the determination of the bone quantity may be insufficient and that bone quality should also be examined. In this regard, an animal model of CKD can represent an experimental tool to test the effectiveness of new therapeutic strategies. Despite the many available methods that are used to diagnose metabolic bone disorders and predict fracture risk especially in small rodents with CKD, it turns out that the most appropriate are biomechanical tests, which can provide information about the structural and material properties of bone. The present review summarizes and discusses the principles for carrying out selected biomechanical tests (3-point bending test and compression test) and their application in clinical practice. PMID:26680019

  17. 3D printed guides for controlled alignment in biomechanics tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Matthias A; Willemot, Laurent; Van Onsem, Stefaan; Stevens, Cyriëlle; Arnout, Nele; Victor, Jan

    2016-02-01

    The bone-machine interface is a vital first step for biomechanical testing. It remains challenging to restore the original alignment of the specimen with respect to the test setup. To overcome this issue, we developed a methodology based on virtual planning and 3D printing. In this paper, the methodology is outlined and a proof of concept is presented based on a series of cadaveric tests performed on our knee simulator. The tests described in this paper reached an accuracy within 3-4° and 3-4mm with respect to the virtual planning. It is however the authors' belief that the method has the potential to achieve an accuracy within one degree and one millimeter. Therefore, this approach can aid in reducing the imprecisions in biomechanical tests (e.g. knee simulator tests for evaluating knee kinematics) and improve the consistency of the bone-machine interface. PMID:26810696

  18. Valgus torque in youth baseball pitchers: A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabick, Michelle B; Torry, Michael R; Lawton, Richard L; Hawkins, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical and anthropometric factors contributing to elbow valgus torque during pitching. Video data of 14 youth pitchers throwing fastballs were used to calculate shoulder and elbow kinematics and kinetics. Peak elbow valgus torque averaged 18 Nm and occurred just before maximal shoulder external rotation. The magnitude of valgus torque was most closely correlated with the thrower's weight. When subject weight and height were controlled for, maximum shoulder abduction torque and maximum shoulder internal rotation torque were most strongly associated with elbow valgus torque, accounting for 85% of its variance (P <.001). When only kinematic variables were considered, maximum shoulder external rotation accounted for 33% of the variance in valgus torque. Given that the biomechanical variables correlated with peak valgus torque are not easily modifiable, limiting the number of innings pitched is likely the best way to reduce elbow injury in youth pitchers. PMID:15111908

  19. Biomechanical bases of rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davlet'yarova, K. V.; Korshunov, S. D.; Kapilevich, L. V.

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis and the study results of children's with cerebral palsy (CP) muscles bioelectrical activity while walking on a flat surface are represented. Increased flexion in the hip and shoulder joints and extension in the elbow joint in children with cerebral palsy were observed, with the movement of the lower limbs had less smooth character in comparison with the control group. Herewith, the oscillation amplitude was significantly increased, and the frequency in the m. gastrocnemius and m. lateralis was decreased. It was shown, that the dynamic stereotype of walking in children with cerebral palsy was characterized by excessive involvement of m. gastrocnemius and m.latissimus dorsi in locomotion. Thus, resulting biomechanical and bioelectrical parameters of walking should be considered in the rehabilitation programs development.

  20. Hand Posture Prediction using Neural Networks within a Biomechanical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta C. Mora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs in the framework of a biomechanical hand model for grasping. ANNs enhance the model capabilities as they substitute estimated data for the experimental inputs required by the grasping algorithm used. These inputs are the tentative grasping posture and the most open posture during grasping. As a consequence, more realistic grasping postures are predicted by the grasping algorithm, along with the contact information required by\tthe dynamic biomechanical model (contact points and normals. Several neural network architectures are tested and compared in terms of prediction errors, leading to encouraging results. The performance of the overall proposal is also shown through simulation, where a grasping experiment is replicated and compared to the real grasping data collected by a data glove device.

  1. Scapholunate Interosseous Ligament Anatomy and Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Prashant V; Day, Charles S

    2015-08-01

    Injury to the scapholunate interosseous ligament is one of the most common causes of carpal instability and can impart considerable compromise to the patient's hand function. However, the management of scapholunate ligament injuries remains a dynamic concept, especially with regard to the multitude of options and techniques that exist for its surgical treatment. We present a thorough review of scapholunate anatomy and morphology, and the role of the scapholunate articulations in the kinetics and pathomechanics of wrist instability. We also review the current literature on the biomechanical properties of the scapholunate ligament and its subcomponents. A sound understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the scapholunate ligament can clarify its instability and may better orient current reconstructive procedures or pioneer better future techniques. PMID:26143029

  2. The biomechanics of kicking in soccer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, A; Asai, T; Andersen, T B; Nunome, H; Sterzing, T

    2010-06-01

    Kicking is the defining action of soccer, so it is appropriate to review the scientific work that provides a basis of our understanding of this skill. The focus of this review is biomechanical in nature and builds on and extends previous reviews and overviews. While much is known about the biomechanics of the kicking leg, there are several other aspects of the kick that have been the subject of recent exploration. Researchers have widened their interest to consider the kick beginning from the way a player approaches the ball to the end of ball flight, the point that determines the success of the kick. This interest has encapsulated characteristics of overall technique and the influences of the upper body, support leg and pelvis on the kicking action, foot-ball impact and the influences of footwear and soccer balls, ball launch characteristics and corresponding flight of the ball. This review evaluates these and attempts to provide direction for future research. PMID:20509089

  3. Meshless methods in biomechanics bone tissue remodelling analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Belinha, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the complete formulation of a new advanced discretization meshless technique: the Natural Neighbour Radial Point Interpolation Method (NNRPIM). In addition, two of the most popular meshless methods, the EFGM and the RPIM, are fully presented. Being a truly meshless method, the major advantages of the NNRPIM over the FEM, and other meshless methods, are the remeshing flexibility and the higher accuracy of the obtained variable field. Using the natural neighbour concept, the NNRPIM permits to determine organically the influence-domain, resembling the cellulae natural behaviour. This innovation permits the analysis of convex boundaries and extremely irregular meshes, which is an advantage in the biomechanical analysis, with no extra computational effort associated.   This volume shows how to extend the NNRPIM to the bone tissue remodelling analysis, expecting to contribute with new numerical tools and strategies in order to permit a more efficient numerical biomechanical analysis.

  4. Biomechanical tactics of chiral growth in emergent aquatic macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zi-Long; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Li, Bing-Wei; Nie, Ben-Dian; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2015-07-01

    Through natural selection, many plant organs have evolved optimal morphologies at different length scales. However, the biomechanical strategies for different plant species to optimize their organ structures remain unclear. Here, we investigate several species of aquatic macrophytes living in the same natural environment but adopting distinctly different twisting chiral morphologies. To reveal the principle of chiral growth in these plants, we performed systematic observations and measurements of morphologies, multiscale structures, and mechanical properties of their slender emergent stalks or leaves. Theoretical modeling of pre-twisted beams in bending and buckling indicates that the different growth tactics of the plants can be strongly correlated with their biomechanical functions. It is shown that the twisting chirality of aquatic macrophytes can significantly improve their survivability against failure under both internal and external loads. The theoretical predictions for different chiral configurations are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Derivation, simulation and validation of poroelastic models in dental biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Favino, Marco; Krause, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Poroelasticity and mechanics of growth are playing an increasingly relevant role in biomechanics. This work is a self- contained and holistic presentation of the modeling and simulation of non-linear poroelasticity with and without growth inhomogeneities. Balance laws of poroelasticity are derived in Cartesian coordinates. These allow to write the governing equations in a form that is general but also readily implementable. Closure relations are formally derived from the study of dissipati...

  6. Biomechanical simulation of thorax deformation using finite element approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guangzhi; Chen, Xian; Ohgi, Junji; Miura, Toshiro; Nakamoto, Akira; Matsumura, Chikanori; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background The biomechanical simulation of the human respiratory system is expected to be a useful tool for the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory diseases. Because the deformation of the thorax significantly influences airflow in the lungs, we focused on simulating the thorax deformation by introducing contraction of the intercostal muscles and diaphragm, which are the main muscles responsible for the thorax deformation during breathing. Methods We constructed a finite element model of t...

  7. Biomechanical analysis of the camelid cervical intervertebral disc

    OpenAIRE

    Dean K. Stolworthy; R. Amy Fullwood; Tyler M. Merrell; Bridgewater, Laura C.; Anton E. Bowden

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent global problem, which is often correlated with degenerative disc disease. The development and use of good, relevant animal models of the spine may improve treatment options for this condition. While no animal model is capable of reproducing the exact biology, anatomy, and biomechanics of the human spine, the quality of a particular animal model increases with the number of shared characteristics that are relevant to the human condition. The purpose o...

  8. A Microfluidic Platform for Profiling Biomechanical Properties of Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xuanhao; Weinlandt, William D; Patel, Harsh; WU, Mingming; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to resist mechanical forces is necessary for the survival and division of bacteria and has traditionally been probed using specialized, low-throughput techniques such as atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic technique to profile the stiffness of individual bacteria and populations of bacteria. The approach is similar to micropipette aspiration used to characterize the biomechanical performance of eukaryotic cells. However, the small size ...

  9. Application of optimal control to a biomechanics model

    OpenAIRE

    Krasovskii, A.

    2015-01-01

    A model of sport biomechanics describing short-distance running (sprinting) is developed by applying methods of optimal control. In the considered model, the motion of a sportsman is described by a second-order ordinary differential equation. Two interconnected optimal control problems are formulated and solved: the minimum energy and time-optimal control problems. Based on the comparison with real data, it is shown that the proposed approach to sprint modeling provides realistic results.

  10. Biomechanical considerations on tooth-implant supported fixed partial dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Michalakis, Konstantinos X.; Calvani, Pasquale; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the connection of teeth to implants, in order to restore partial edentulism. The main problem arising from this connection is tooth intrusion, which can occur in up to 7.3% of the cases. The justification of this complication is being attempted through the perspective of biomechanics of the involved anatomical structures, that is, the periodontal ligament and the bone, as well as that of the teeth- and implant-supported fixed partial dentures.

  11. Multiscale computer modeling in biomechanics and biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book reviews the state-of-the-art in multiscale computer modeling, in terms of both accomplishments and challenges. The information in the book is particularly useful for biomedical engineers, medical physicists and researchers in systems biology, mathematical biology, micro-biomechanics and biomaterials who are interested in how to bridge between traditional biomedical engineering work at the organ and tissue scales, and the newer arenas of cellular and molecular bioengineering.

  12. Corneal Structure and Biomechanics in Collagen Vascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Colaço, Maria Luisa; Franco, Mónica; Pinto, Rita; Maia Sêco, José

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate corneal biomechanics and structure in asymptomatic individuals with Collagen Vascular Diseases (CVD), and compare with an age- -matched control group. Methods: In this prospective study 23 patients with the diagnosis of CVD (46 eyes) and 17 healthy age and gender-matched controls (34 eyes) underwent Ocular Response Analyzer and Specular Microscopy measurements. CH and CRF were recorded for each eye using the ORA, pachymetry and endothelial ce...

  13. Biomechanical models to simulate consequences of maxillofacial surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Payan, Yohan; Chabanas, Matthieu; Pelorson, Xavier; Vilain, Coriandre; Levy, Patrick; Luboz, Vincent; Perrier, Pascal

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the biomechanical finite element models that have been developed in the framework of the computer-assisted maxillofacial surgery. After a brief overview of the continuous elastic modelling method, two models are introduced and their use for computer-assisted applications discussed. The first model deals with orthognathic surgery and aims at predicting the facial consequences of maxillary and mandibular osteotomies. For this, a generic three-dimensional model of the face is...

  14. On seed physiology, biomechanics and plant phenology in Eragrostis tef

    OpenAIRE

    Delden, van, J.

    2011-01-01

    • Key words: Teff (Eragrostis tef (Zuccagni) Trotter), germination, temperature, model, leaf appearance, phyllochron, development rate, lodging, biomechanics, safety factor, flowering, heading, day length, photoperiod. • Background Teff (Eragrostis tef (Zuccagni) Trotter) is a C4 annual grass species (Poaceae) originating from Ethiopia. Teff cultivation in the Netherlands is thought to be economically feasible because teff grains and flour do not contain gluten and are rich in iron....

  15. Absorbable scaphoid screw development: a comparative study on biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yongqing

    2016-01-01

    Yi Wang, Muguo Song, Yongqing Xu, Xiaoqing He, YueLiang Zhu Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kunming General Hospital, Chengdu Military Command, People’s Liberation Army, Kunming, Yunnan, People’s Republic of China Background: The scaphoid is critical for maintaining the stability and movement of the wrist joints. This study aimed to develop a new internal fixator absorbable scaphoid screw (ASS) for fixation of the scaphoid waist after fracture and to test the biomechan...

  16. Absorbable scaphoid screw development: a comparative study on biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Y; Song MG; Xu YQ; He XQ; Zhu YL

    2016-01-01

    Yi Wang, Muguo Song, Yongqing Xu, Xiaoqing He, YueLiang Zhu Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kunming General Hospital, Chengdu Military Command, People’s Liberation Army, Kunming, Yunnan, People’s Republic of China Background: The scaphoid is critical for maintaining the stability and movement of the wrist joints. This study aimed to develop a new internal fixator absorbable scaphoid screw (ASS) for fixation of the scaphoid waist after fracture and to test the biomechanical cha...

  17. Absorbable scaphoid screw development: a comparative study on biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Song, Muguo; Xu, Yongqing; He, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Yueliang

    2016-01-01

    Background The scaphoid is critical for maintaining the stability and movement of the wrist joints. This study aimed to develop a new internal fixator absorbable scaphoid screw (ASS) for fixation of the scaphoid waist after fracture and to test the biomechanical characteristics of ASS. Materials and methods An ASS was prepared using polylactic acids and designed based on scaphoid measurements and anatomic features. Twenty fractured scaphoid waist specimens were randomly divided into experimen...

  18. Biomechanical Evaluation of Capsulotomy and Capsular Repair in the Hip

    OpenAIRE

    Wuerz, Thomas H.; Song, Sang Hoon; Grzybowski, Jeffrey S.; Greenberg, Mitchell; Espinoza, Alejandro; Nho, Shane Jay

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The use of hip arthroscopy has increased over recent years to treat various forms of hip pathologies including femoroacetabular impingement. While a capsulotomy facilitates adequate visualization and access for diagnostic and interventional purposes, the current literature remains divided over the use of routine capsular closure to address the iatrogenic instability that may be induced by an excessive or unclosed capsulotomy. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to determin...

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of fixation degree of fragments by periosteal osteosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barabash Yu.A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of indications for surgery and plate osteosynthesis of long bones points to increased number of complications caused by instability of fragments, that can be associated in their turn with constructive features or iatrogenic factors. Insufficient rigidity of fragment fixation is due to incorrect technical treatment and wrong choice of fixator. Biomechanical parameters of periosteal fixation rigidity have been experimentally proved, depending on fixator lever

  20. Biomechanics of DNA structures visualized by 4D electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, Ulrich J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique for in situ visualization of the biomechanics of DNA structural networks using 4D electron microscopy. Vibrational oscillations of the DNA structure are excited mechanically through a short burst of substrate vibrations triggered by a laser pulse. Subsequently, the motion is probed with electron pulses to observe the impulse response of the specimen in space and time. From the frequency and amplitude of the observed oscillations, we determine the normal modes and eig...