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Sample records for clinical biochemistry laboratory

  1. Error tracking in a clinical biochemistry laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Ødum, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report our results for the systematic recording of all errors in a standard clinical laboratory over a 1-year period. METHODS: Recording was performed using a commercial database program. All individuals in the laboratory were allowed to report errors. The testing processes were cl...

  2. CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of the health status of animals through measurement of cellular, biochemical, and macromolecular constituents in blood, secretions, and excretions has been variously referred to as clinical chemistry, clinical biochemistry, or clinical pathology. he genesis of this dis...

  3. Clinical biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

  4. Biochemistry: from supermarket to laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    F. R. Freitas-Rego; Pereira, M.G.; S. O. Loureiro; M. T. de Santana; R. G. Garrido; F. de S.R.G Garrido

    2007-01-01

    After new campi as Instituto Multidisciplinar em Saúde (IMS/UFBA) startedworking, it was necessary to develop practical classes using domestic reagents atBiochemistry to Pharmacy (IMS078). Firstly, students visited a supermarket to readnutritional information at label and select possible products to be used in class. Moreover,chemical processes and fermentation were discussed as different foods and drinks wereanalysed. Some food were token to laboratories so that biomole cules qualitative ana...

  5. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H.L.; Larsen, B.; Ingwersen, P.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched...... Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained....... RESULTS: 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry...

  6. Clinical biochemistry and laboratory medicine in the post-genome era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last decades of the 20th century were a period of outstanding scientific achievements. The most significant discovery was the decoding of the human genome (Venter, J. et al., 2001; Dennis, C. et al., 2001; Baltimore, D., 2001). In this article the present view of the post genomic era is presented. The new analytical methods, such as micro arrays, bio chips, and nano technology, the discovery of SNPs, and the analysis of the proteome will lead to a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited and acquired diseases. Their use in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, and the future of technological innovations are discussed. In the post genomic era the greatest interest will be devoted to the application of these scientific achievements in the diagnosis, prevention and therapy of human diseases. The advances in human genetics that have occurred during the past 20 years have revolutionized our knowledge of the role played by inheritance in health and disease. It is clear that our DNA determines not only single gene disorders but also interacts with environments to predispose individuals to cancer, allergy, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, psychiatric disorders and even to some infectious diseases. The study of longevity and the demonstration of genes favouring a long lifespan suggest that such protective systems exist. The study of genetic polymorphisms has made clear that some alleles have beneficial effects. These discoveries will be of great help in our understanding of the interactions between genetics and environment. Gene array analysis has become the method of choice for identifying genes expressed at different levels in different samples. The mRNA expression profiles of normal and tumor tissues, treated and untreated cell cultures, and developmental stages of an organism can be compared quickly and easily with an appropriate array analysis system. A major task after a genome has been fully sequenced is to understand the functions

  7. Immobilized Lactase in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Matthew J.; Bering, C. Larry

    1998-10-01

    Immobilized enzymes have many practical applications. They may be used in clinical, industrial, and biotechnological laboratories and in many clinical diagnostic kits. For educational purposes, use of immobilized enzymes can easily be taught at the undergraduate or even secondary level. We have developed an immobilized enzyme experiment that combines many practical techniques used in the biochemistry laboratory and fits within a three-hour time frame. In this experiment, lactase from over-the-counter tablets for patients with lactose intolerance is immobilized in polyacrylamide, which is then milled into small beads and placed into a chromatography column. A lactose solution is added to the column and the eluant is assayed using the glucose oxidase assay, available as a kit. We have determined the optimal conditions to give the greatest turnover of lactose while allowing the immobilized enzymes to be active for long periods at room temperature.

  8. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry laboratory medicine practice guidelines for use of tumor markers in testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Duffy, Michael J; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the use of tumor markers in the clinic have been developed. METHODS: Published reports relevant to use of tumor markers for 5 cancer sites--testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast...... prostatic disease when total PSA is advanced disease. Fecal occult blood testing may be used for screening asymptomatic adults 50...... may be used for determining prognosis in lymph node-negative patients. CA15-3/BR27-29 or carcinoembryonic antigen may be used for therapy monitoring in advanced disease. CA125 is recommended (with transvaginal ultrasound) for early detection of ovarian cancer in women at high risk for this disease. CA...

  9. A Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Paul A.

    1999-08-01

    A project-oriented laboratory course has been designed to introduce students to the study of biochemistry as it is practiced. The course is designed to be a capstone experience for students enrolled in a variety of majors at the Rochester Institute of Technology, including those who enter our new B.S. Biochemistry program. The experiments in this course enable the students to explore the protein chemistry, enzymology, and molecular biology of a single enzyme, threonine dehydrogenase, in a series of integrated experiments. The laboratory incorporates both traditional methods (centrifugation, UV-vis spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and chromatography) and more recent developments in the field (polymerase chain reaction). Students use a small computer network to prepare for experiments (using simulation software developed at RIT), to evaluate data, to access sequence homology databases over the Internet, and to visualize and model proteins and nucleic acids. The change in the biochemistry teaching lab from a sequence of unrelated experiments to an integrated series of experiments is a model that can be readily adapted by other educators, who can change their courses to focus on a single enzyme with which they are most familiar.

  10. Application of Sigma Metrics for the Assessment of Quality Assurance in Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory in India: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Bhawna; Goswami, Binita; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Chawla, Ranjna; Mallika, Venkatesan

    2010-01-01

    Ensuring quality of laboratory services is the need of the hour in the field of health care. Keeping in mind the revolution ushered by six sigma concept in corporate world, health care sector may reap the benefits of the same. Six sigma provides a general methodology to describe performance on sigma scale. We aimed to gauge our laboratory performance by sigma metrics. Internal quality control (QC) data was analyzed retrospectively over a period of 6 months from July 2009 to December 2009. Lab...

  11. Immobilized alpha-Galactosidase in the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulimani, V. H.; Dhananjay, K.

    2007-01-01

    This laboratory experiment was designed to demonstrate the application of immobilized galactosidase in food industry to hydrolyze raffinose family oligosaccharides in soymilk. This laboratory experiment was conducted for postgraduate students of biochemistry and developed for graduate and undergraduate students of biochemistry, biotechnology,…

  12. Application of sigma metrics for the assessment of quality assurance in clinical biochemistry laboratory in India: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhawna; Goswami, Binita; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Chawla, Ranjna; Mallika, Venkatesan

    2011-04-01

    Ensuring quality of laboratory services is the need of the hour in the field of health care. Keeping in mind the revolution ushered by six sigma concept in corporate world, health care sector may reap the benefits of the same. Six sigma provides a general methodology to describe performance on sigma scale. We aimed to gauge our laboratory performance by sigma metrics. Internal quality control (QC) data was analyzed retrospectively over a period of 6 months from July 2009 to December 2009. Laboratory mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation were calculated for all the parameters. Sigma was calculated for both the levels of internal QC. Satisfactory sigma values (>6) were elicited for creatinine, triglycerides, SGOT, CPK-Total and Amylase. Blood urea performed poorly on the sigma scale with sigma six sigma standards for all the analytical processes. PMID:22468038

  13. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  14. An "in Silico" DNA Cloning Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces students to concepts in recombinant DNA technology while accommodating a major semester project in protein purification, structure, and function in a biochemistry laboratory for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students. It is also suitable for forensic science courses focused in DNA biology and advanced…

  15. Re-Attitude of Biochemistry Laboratory Course Contents in Medical, Dentistry and Para-Medical Faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durdi Qujeq

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Regarding to development of basic science and new methods in biochemistry in recent years, practical biochemistry contents should be optimized (1. Therefore, re-attitude biochemistry course contents in medical schools has paralleled worldwide trends a moved from current status is needed (2, 3. As reported by investi-gators many medical schools around the world have reformed their medical curriculum in recent years (2. Many authors are convinced that students learn more effectively if the knowledge and skills they acquire are inserted and contextualized in relevant real-life, problem based situations (3. Previous studies demonstrated that biochemistry course content is now incorporated into the clinical beneficial, therefore the evolution of students in many countries has occurred (4. In this respect, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate biochemistry laboratory course contents in medical, dentistry and Para-medicine faculties from view points of the students. This descriptive study was per-formed in years 2010-2013. Questionnaire contained items about appropriateness of biochemistry laboratory contents for students. The first section of questionnaire determines the effectiveness of bioche¬mistry laboratory contents and the factors influence on it. The second section indicates the application of biochemistry laboratory contents, and the third parts of questi¬onnaire demonstrate the laboratory time spent of biochemistry laboratory course contents. For this purpose three faculties were selected. First, Faculty of Medicine (50 medical students, second Faculty of Dentistry (50 dentistry students and third Faculty of Para-medicine (50 laboratory science students were selected. At least 50 students were selected from each faculty and they received a questionnaire. All students were randomly selected to receive a standard questionnaire designed to evaluate their opinions about biochemistry laboratory course contents. The students were asked

  16. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase Investigations for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Kathy; Sandwick, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (RpiA) has many features that make it attractive as a focal point of a semester-long, advanced biochemistry laboratory for undergraduate students. The protein can easily and inexpensively be isolated from spinach using traditional purification techniques. Characterization of RpiA enzyme activity can be…

  17. Raising Environmental Awareness through Applied Biochemistry Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman Ashraf, S.

    2013-01-01

    Our environment is under constant pressure and threat from various sources of pollution. Science students, in particular chemistry students, must not only be made aware of these issues, but also be taught that chemistry (and science) can provide solutions to such real-life issues. To this end, a newly developed biochemistry laboratory experiment…

  18. Differentiating Biochemistry Course Laboratories Based on Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Henry V.

    2011-01-01

    Content and emphases in undergraduate biochemistry courses can be readily tailored to accommodate the standards of the department in which they are housed, as well as the backgrounds of the students in the courses. A more challenging issue is how to construct laboratory experiences for a class with both chemistry majors, who usually have little or…

  19. Virtual Laboratories in Chemistry, Biochemistry, & Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael; Achiam, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Report (state-of-the-art review) from a research and development project on virtual laboratories supported by Markedmodningsfonden (tidl. "Fornyelsesfonden")(2012-2014). http://markedsmodningsfonden.dk/projekt/0/34/495....

  20. A biochemistry laboratory course designed to enhance students autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Laboratory sessions are responsible for promoting instrumentation skills desirable in biochemistry and biochemistry related careers. They are traditionally based on experimental protocols that lead to the expected results, and students usually have not autonomy to plan and execute their experiments. GOALS: This work aimed to enhance a traditional biochemistry lab course, applying pre-lab quizzes on protein biochemistry and lab techniques in order to have students better prepared to plan, execute and interpret experiments. This approach also aims to bring the laboratory sessions into an inquiry-based environment capable to improve students’ independent capabilities in 2 autonomy domains: learning and communication. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Online quizzes are delivered one week before each laboratory session, containing questions regarding the experimental techniques and theoretical basis related to them. Laboratory activities are presented in an inquiry-based approach where the first class of each activity is dedicated to plan experiments in order to answer the research questions presented by instructors. Activities are also organized in order to enhance students’ autonomy. The first activity is the simplest and more instructor-controlled and the last one is the most complex and less driven, transferring gradually to students the responsibility for their decisions in laboratory, supporting students’ autonomy. RESULTS: Online quizzes allowed instructors to identify students’ difficulties and to timely intervene. Scientific reports presented by students at the end of each activity showed that they performed better on less driven activities in which autonomy support were more complex than in the instructor controlled activities. CONCLUSIONS: Scientific reports analysis reveals students capabilities related to different scopes of autonomy, such as: discuss different strategies; find multiple solutions to solve problems; make their

  1. Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

    2015-01-01

    For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

  2. THE CYBERSPACE IN THE CONTINUED CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Martins

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The cybernetic spaces simulate the real world with interactive multimedia. This work  has been applied since January, 2007 on the curricular student’s apprenticeship at high school and graduation, in the site “bioq.educacao.biz/ULAB-HC-UFPE”. It has been developed to provide continuity to the technical-scientific learning of students and professionals, and also to improve their human social relations on the  labour  environment.  It’s comprises a virtual space, destined to communication and collective building of knowledge on the clinical biochemistry.   It’s about an interactive environment which allows the users registered as coordinator professor (professional  or the scientist student (trainee,  unlimited access to  posting contents (classes, texts, presentations, animations, consultations, non-synchronic discussions (on orkut, forums, e-mail and synchronic discussions (on chats, videoconferences. After a few live tutorials  about new  input in this environment, and the use of the new learning tool,  the collective building of knowledge on cyberspace begins. As a trainee’s program task, the scientist student would have to build a space of his own, under guidance and supervision of the coordinator teachers.  The cyberspace efficiency was evaluated from reports collected in February, 2008: the adherence to this  work was satisfactory, regarding this period, with 68 registered users, 870 accesses and 52 contents available on the several sections of the virtual laboratory. Our work is still being applied, and new adhesions are  happening everyday. We intend to amplify this cyber environment in order to make it a  permanent  continued education site on the health area.  From interest contracts and common knowledge,  the technological interfaces constitute an interaction, in which everyone is a potential author.  Keywords: Cyberspace, online biochemistry education, continued education.

  3. 78 FR 4170 - License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... COMMISSION License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO AGENCY... issuance of a license amendment to Materials License No. 24-13365-01 issued to Analytical Bio-Chemistry... Electronic Reading Room at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/adams.html . From this site, you can access the...

  4. A Curriculum Skills Matrix for Development and Assessment of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Benjamin; Rohlman, Christopher; Benore-Parsons, Marilee

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a skills matrix to be used for developing and assessing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula. We prepared the skills matrix for the Project Kaleidoscope Summer Institute workshop in Snowbird, Utah (July 2001) to help current and developing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology program…

  5. Known Structure, Unknown Function: An Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Cynthia; Price, Carol W.; Lee, Christopher T.; Dewald, Alison H.; Cline, Matthew A.; McAnany, Charles E.; Columbus, Linda; Mura, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry- and research-based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's…

  6. Students’ Blogs as a Tool for Learning Clinical Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cubas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available n the past decade, there has been an exponential growth of blogs on biomedical subjects with reliable contents. The potential use of this media as a learning tool has been recently tried in a medical residence at Harvard University, where students had to produce blogs as part of their duties. At Brasília University, a similar experience was tested with freshmen medical and nutrition students taking Basic Biochemistry (BB with the goal of producing blogs on clinical biochemistry (CB topics. In the last 4 teaching-semesters, students' acceptance (n=267 students regarding BB-blogs was evaluated through 6-point Likert questionnaires. 84% of them agreed that the preparation of their blogs was enjoyable and positive for their academic formation (they marked 4 to 6 in the questionnaire. 57% of students (those marking 5-6 believed that the elaboration of blogs boosted their interest for BB/CB. For 56% of students (those marking 5-6, the blogs motivated them to look for extra-class articles on CB. Only 13% of students (those marking 1-3 did not agree that these blogs are relevant learning tools. 38 out of 58 students’ BB-blogs scored 9.0 or above, only 3 scored below 7.9 (out of 10. These results suggest that student blogs have potential to be effective in stimulating CB learning.

  7. A Semester-Long Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Based on "Helicobacter pylori" Urease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnham, Kate R.; Dube, Danielle H.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the development of a 13 week project-oriented biochemistry laboratory designed to introduce students to foundational biochemical techniques and then enable students to perform original research projects once they have mastered these techniques. In particular, we describe a semester-long laboratory that focuses on a biomedically…

  8. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  9. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  10. Myoglobin Structure and Function: A Multiweek Biochemistry Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.; Kirk, Sarah R.; Meyer, Scott C.; Holman, Karen L. McFarlane

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure,…

  11. Forensic Analysis of Canine DNA Samples in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Tobin M.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Fekete, Brenda L.; Millard, Julie T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in canine genomics have allowed the development of highly distinguishing methods of analysis for both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify hypervariable regions of DNA from dog hair and saliva…

  12. Use of Solid Phase Extraction in the Biochemistry Laboratory to Separate Different Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurkey, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was used to demonstrate how various lipids and lipid classes could be separated in a biochemistry laboratory setting. Three different SPE methods were chosen on their ability to separate a lipid mixture, consisting of a combination of a either a fatty acid, a triacylglycerol, a mono- or diacylglycerol, phospholipid,…

  13. Integrating Bio-Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry into an Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate laboratories expose students to a wide variety of topics and techniques in a limited amount of time. This can be a challenge and lead to less exposure to concepts and activities in bio-inorganic chemistry and analytical chemistry that are closely-related to biochemistry. To address this, we incorporated a new iron determination by…

  14. An SDS-PAGE Examination of Protein Quaternary Structure and Disulfide Bonding for a Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Andrews, Carla S.; St. Antoine, Caroline C.; Jain, Swapan S.; Bevilacqua, Vicky L. H.

    2005-01-01

    Electrophoresis is a valuable tool for biochemists, yet this technique is often not included in biochemistry laboratory curricula owing to time constraints or lack of equipment. Protein structure is also a topic of interest in many disciplines, yet most undergraduate lab experiments focus only on primary structure. In this experiment, students use…

  15. Known Structure, Unknown Function: An Inquiry-based Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Cynthia; Lee, Christopher T; Dewald, Alison H; Cline, Matthew A; McAnany, Charles E; Columbus, Linda; Mura, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry- and research-based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's research expertise and confidence. We have developed a year-long undergraduate biochemistry laboratory curriculum wherein students determine, via experiment and computation, the function of a protein of known three-dimensional structure. The first half of the course is inquiry-based and modular in design; students learn general biochemical techniques while gaining preparation for research experiments in the second semester. Having learned standard biochemical methods in the first semester, students independently pursue their own (original) research projects in the second semester. This new curriculum has yielded an improvement in student performance and confidence as ...

  16. [beta]-Lactamases in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Paula; Prudencio, Cristina; Vieira, Monica; Ferraz, Ricardo; Fonte, Rosalia; Silva, Nuno; Coelho, Pedro; Fernandes, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    [beta]-lactamases are hydrolytic enzymes that inactivate the [beta]-lactam ring of antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins. The major diversity of studies carried out until now have mainly focused on the characterization of [beta]-lactamases recovered among clinical isolates of Gram-positive staphylococci and Gram-negative…

  17. Kinetics of Papain: An Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornely, Kathleen; Crespo, Eric; Earley, Michael; Kloter, Rachel; Levesque, Aime; Pickering, Mary

    1999-05-01

    Enzyme kinetics experiments are popular in the undergraduate laboratory. These experiments have pedagogic value because they reinforce the concepts of Michaelis-Menten kinetics covered in the lecture portion of the course and give students the experience of calculating kinetic constants from data they themselves have generated. In this experiment, we investigate the kinetics of the thiol protease papain. The source of the papain is commercially available papaya latex. A specific substrate, Na-benzoyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA), is used, which takes advantage of the fact that papain interacts with a phenylalanine residue two amino acids away from the peptide bond cleaved. Upon hydrolysis by papain, a bright yellow product is released, p-nitroaniline. This allows the reaction to be monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the rate of formation of the p-nitroaniline product as a function of the increase in absorbance of the solution at the lmax of p-nitroaniline (400 nm) over time at various substrate concentrations. These data are used to plot a Lineweaver-Burk plot from which the vmax and KM are obtained. If time permits, students carry out additional investigations in which e of p-nitroaniline is measured, the enzyme solution protein concentration is measured, the enzyme purity is evaluated by SDS-PAGE, and a pH-rate profile is constructed from experimental data.

  18. Consolidated Clinical Microbiology Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Sautter, Robert L.; Thomson, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    The manner in which medical care is reimbursed in the United States has resulted in significant consolidation in the U.S. health care system. One of the consequences of this has been the development of centralized clinical microbiology laboratories that provide services to patients receiving care in multiple off-site, often remote, locations. Microbiology specimens are unique among clinical specimens in that optimal analysis may require the maintenance of viable organisms. Centralized laborat...

  19. ASPECTS OF THE AMLODIPINE PLEIOTROPY IN BIOCHEMISTRY, PHARMACOLOGY AND CLINICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasma Vitolina, Aivars Krauze, Gunars Duburs and Astrida Velena*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Amlodipine is the third generation calcium antagonist, 1,4-dihydropyridine derivative with the prolonged duration of the antihypertensive action, especially blocking L-type Ca2+ ion channels. It promotes beneficial therapeutic effect by coronary and other blood vessel diseases and thus delays development of the atherosclerosis. It has several known trade names, the most mentioned is Norvasc. Amlodipine is well tolerated in the clinics, it could be used in combinations with other drugs – diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists, statins. Amlodipine at nanomolar concentrations binds to the voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels. It possesses optimal lipophylicity. Amlodipine also influences the NO-dependent metabolic processes, stimulates NO synthesis and prolongs NO action duration. Results of the studies of the amlodipine pharmacological and clinical properties are summarized in several reviews. The present review contains opinion from the scientific works of the last decades about the multisided or pleiotropic amlodipine mechanisms of action, it contains information about sometimes controversial clinical studies of the amlodipine vaso- and cardioprotective activity.

  20. Development of a competency based training programme to support multidisciplinary working in a combined biochemistry/haematology laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, R.; Longmire, W; Galloway, M.; Smellie, W

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a competency based training programme to support multidisciplinary working in a combined biochemistry and haematology laboratory. The training programme was developed to document that staff were trained in the full range of laboratory tests that they were expected to perform. This programme subsequently formed the basis for the annual performance review of all staff. All staff successfully completed the first phase of the programme. This allowed laboratory...

  1. Development of a Semester-Long, Inquiry-Based Laboratory Course in Upper-Level Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pushpalatha P. N.; Thompson, Martin; Hungwe, Kedmon

    2014-01-01

    A semester-long laboratory course was designed and implemented to familiarize students with modern biochemistry and molecular biology techniques. The designed format involved active student participation, evaluation of data, and critical thinking, and guided students to become independent researchers. The first part of the course focused on…

  2. HPLC of the Polypeptides in a Hydrolyzate of Egg-White Lysozyme. An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, W. S., III; Burns, L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple high-performance liquid chromatography experiment for undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. The experiment illustrates the separation of polypeptides by a step gradient elution using a single pump instrument with no gradient attachments. Discusses instrumentation, analysis, a sample preparation, and results. (CW)

  3. Re-Attitude of Biochemistry Laboratory Course Contents in Medical, Dentistry and Para-Medical Faculties

    OpenAIRE

    Durdi Qujeq; Iman Jahanian; Mohsen Tatar; Naghmeh Abbassi; Korosh Rasolpour

    2014-01-01

    Regarding to development of basic science and new methods in biochemistry in recent years, practical biochemistry contents should be optimized (1). Therefore, re-attitude biochemistry course contents in medical schools has paralleled worldwide trends a moved from current status is needed (2, 3). As reported by investi-gators many medical schools around the world have reformed their medical curriculum in recent years (2). Many authors are convinced that students learn more effectively if the k...

  4. The Relevance of Student Seminars on Clinically Related Subjects in a Biochemistry Course for Medical and Nutrition Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes-Lima, Marcelo; Muniz, Karinne C.; Coutinho, Iracema S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of a system of seminars on clinically related biochemistry topics for undergraduate students in medicine and nutrition at the University of Brasilia, Brazil. During the second semester of 1998 (1998-2), the teaching staff decided to establish new and stricter rules for the seminar method and to…

  5. Clinical laboratory studies in Barth Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Hilary J; Sandlers, Yana; McClellan, Rebecca; Kelley, Richard I

    2014-06-01

    Barth Syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder characterized principally by dilated cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia and caused by defects in tafazzin, an enzyme responsible for modifying the acyl chain moieties of cardiolipin. While several comprehensive clinical studies of Barth Syndrome have been published detailing cardiac and hematologic features, descriptions of its biochemical characteristics are limited. To gain a better understanding of the clinical biochemistry of this rare disease, we measured hematologic and biochemical values in a cohort of Barth Syndrome patients. We characterized multiple biochemical parameters, including plasma amino acids, plasma 3-methylglutaconic acid, cholesterol, cholesterol synthetic intermediates, and red blood cell membrane fatty acid profiles in 28 individuals with Barth Syndrome from ages 10 months to 30 years. We describe a unique biochemical profile for these patients, including decreased plasma arginine levels. We further studied the plasma amino acid profiles, cholesterol, cholesterol synthetic intermediates, and plasma 3-methylglutaconic acid levels in 8 female carriers and showed that they do not share any of the distinct, Barth Syndrome-specific biochemical laboratory abnormalities. Our studies augment and expand the biochemical profiles of individuals with Barth Syndrome, describe a unique biochemical profile for these patients, and provide insight into the possible underlying biochemical pathology in this disorder. PMID:24751896

  6. A Review of the Biochemistry, Metabolism and Clinical Benefits of Thiamin(e and Its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick Lonsdale

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiamin(e, also known as vitamin B1, is now known to play a fundamental role in energy metabolism. Its discovery followed from the original early research on the ‘anti-beriberi factor’ found in rice polishings. After its synthesis in 1936, it led to many years of research to find its action in treating beriberi, a lethal scourge known for thousands of years, particularly in cultures dependent on rice as a staple. This paper refers to the previously described symptomatology of beriberi, emphasizing that it differs from that in pure, experimentally induced thiamine deficiency in human subjects. Emphasis is placed on some of the more unusual manifestations of thiamine deficiency and its potential role in modern nutrition. Its biochemistry and pathophysiology are discussed and some of the less common conditions associated with thiamine deficiency are reviewed. An understanding of the role of thiamine in modern nutrition is crucial in the rapidly advancing knowledge applicable to Complementary Alternative Medicine. References are given that provide insight into the use of this vitamin in clinical conditions that are not usually associated with nutritional deficiency. The role of allithiamine and its synthetic derivatives is discussed. Thiamine plays a vital role in metabolism of glucose. Thus, emphasis is placed on the fact that ingestion of excessive simple carbohydrates automatically increases the need for this vitamin. This is referred to as high calorie malnutrition.

  7. Synthesis, Characterization, and Secondary Structure Determination of a Silk-Inspired, Self-Assembling Peptide: A Laboratory Exercise for Organic and Biochemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Tyler J.; Fry, Melany M.; Murphy, Amanda R.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory experiment gives upper-division organic or biochemistry undergraduate students a comprehensive look at the synthesis, chemical characterization, self-assembly, and secondary structure determination of small, N-acylated peptides inspired by the protein structure of silkworm silk. All experiments can be completed in one 4 h lab…

  8. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmohsen H Al-Elq

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow′s Doctors" [1] which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates. [2] The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review.

  9. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen H

    2007-05-01

    The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow's Doctors"(1) which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates.(2)The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs) in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review. PMID:23012147

  10. Analysis of a p53 Mutation Associated with Cancer Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cruz, Isabel; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of a p53 polymorphism associated with cancer susceptibility. First, students collected a drop of peripheral blood cells using a sterile sting and then used FTA cards to extract the genomic DNA. The p53 region is then PCR…

  11. A Static Method as an Alternative to Gel Chromatography: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burum, Alex D.; Splittgerber, Allan G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a static method as an alternative to gel chromatography, which may be used as an undergraduate laboratory experiment. In this method, a constant mass of Sephadex gel is swollen in a series of protein solutions. UV-vis spectrophotometry is used to find a partition coefficient, KD, that indicates the fraction of the interior…

  12. Green, Enzymatic Syntheses of Divanillin and Diapocynin for the Organic, Biochemistry, or Advanced General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Rachel T.; Giammanco, Chiara H.; Vosburg, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmentally benign chemistry is an increasingly important topic both in the classroom and the laboratory. In this experiment, students synthesize divanillin from vanillin or diapocynin from apocynin, using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in water. The dimerized products form rapidly at ambient temperature and are isolated by…

  13. Comparison of the microbial dynamics and biochemistry of laboratory sourdoughs prepared with grape, apple and yogurt

    OpenAIRE

    Gordún Quiles, Elena; Valle Mendoza, Luis Javier del; Ginovart Gisbert, Marta; Carbó Moliner, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    The microbiological culture-dependent characterization and physicochemical characteristics of laboratory sourdough prepared with grape (GS) were evaluated and compared with apple (AS) and yogurt (YS), which are the usual Spanish sourdough ingredients. Ripe GS took longer than AS and YS to reach the appropriate acidity and achieved lower values of lactic acid

  14. Comparison of the microbial dynamics and biochemistry of laboratory sourdoughs prepared with grape, apple and yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordún, Elena; del Valle, Luis J; Ginovart, Marta; Carbó, Rosa

    2015-09-01

    The microbiological culture-dependent characterization and physicochemical characteristics of laboratory sourdough prepared with grape (GS) were evaluated and compared with apple (AS) and yogurt (YS), which are the usual Spanish sourdough ingredients. Ripe GS took longer than AS and YS to reach the appropriate acidity and achieved lower values of lactic acid. In all sourdoughs, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increased during processing and were the dominant microorganisms (>1E+8 CFU/g). GS, as well as AS, had high diversity of LAB species. In ripe YS, Pediococcus pentosaceus was the only species identified; in GS and AS, several Lactobacilli were also found, Lb. plantarum, Lb. brevis, and Lb. sakei; in addition, in GS Weisella cibaria also appeared. Regarding the yeast population, non-Saccharomyces yeasts from GS and AS showed a very high specific population (>1E+7 CFU/g), but this was reduced in ripe sourdough (sourdoughs. Starting ingredients or raw material provided microbiological specificity to sourdoughs, and grape could be considered one of them. PMID:25008077

  15. Biochemistry and metabolism of lake trout: laboratory and field studies on the effects of contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passino, Dora R. May

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of ambient and higher concentrations of PCB's (Aroclor 1254) and DDE in food and water on fry of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Michigan, I measured several biochemical indicators of stress in exposed and unexposed (control) fry. No differences between treatments were observed in oxygen consumption rates or lactate concentrations of unexercised fry, but apparent differences in specific swimming speed and lactate response in fry that swam to exhaustion suggested that exposed fry had lower stamina. Observed differences between biochemical profiles of 1-day-old sac fry reared from eggs originating from lake trout collected off Saugatuck and those originating from eggs of brood stock at the Marquette (Michigan) hatchery may have been caused by organochlorine contamination or by genetic and dietary differences between the parental stocks. Activity of the enzyme allantoinase was measured in juvenile and adult lake trout as an indicator of sublethal effects of Great Lakes contaminants. The 50% inhibition of allantoinase in vitro occurred at 6.0 mg/L Cu++, 6.7 mg/L Cd++, 34 mg/L Hg++, and 52 mg/L Pb++. Allantoinase was not affected by in vitro exposure to PCB's up to 7 μg/g, or DDE or DDT up to 10 μg/g; however, in vivo exposure resulting in 2.6 μg/g PCB's in the whole fish activated allantoinase slightly (10% significance level). Allantoinase activity was negatively correlated with total length for fish from Lake Michigan but not for fish from Lake Superior or from laboratory stocks. Mercury, PCB's, and DDT, possibly acting in combination with each other and with additional contaminants, may be the cause of the negative correlation of allantoinase activity with size in Lake Michigan lake trout.

  16. 78 FR 6330 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... related to improvement in clinical laboratory quality and laboratory medicine practice and specific... laboratory services; revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the...

  17. Design and Development of Microcontroller-Based Clinical Chemistry Analyser for Measurement of Various Blood Biochemistry Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical chemistry analyser is a high-performance microcontroller-based photometric biochemical analyser to measure various blood biochemical parameters such as blood glucose, urea, protein, bilirubin, and so forth, and also to measure and observe enzyme growth occurred while performing the other biochemical tests such as ALT (alkaline amino transferase, amylase, AST (aspartate amino transferase, and so forth. These tests are of great significance in biochemistry and used for diagnostic purposes and classifying various disorders and diseases such as diabetes, liver malfunctioning, renal diseases, and so forth. An inexpensive clinical chemistry analyser developed by the authors is described in this paper. This is an open system in which any reagent kit available in the market can be used. The system is based on the principle of absorbance transmittance photometry. System design is based around 80C31 microcontroller with RAM, EPROM, and peripheral interface devices. The developed system incorporates light source, an optical module, interference filters of various wave lengths, peltier device for maintaining required temperature of the mixture in flow cell, peristaltic pump for sample aspiration, graphic LCD display for displaying blood parameters, patients test results and kinetic test graph, 40 columns mini thermal printer, and also 32-key keyboard for executing various functions. The lab tests conducted on the instrument include versatility of the analyzer, flexibility of the software, and treatment of sample. The prototype was tested and evaluated over 1000 blood samples successfully for seventeen blood parameters. Evaluation was carried out at Government Medical College and Hospital, the Department of Biochemistry. The test results were found to be comparable with other standard instruments.

  18. Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in Croatia: regulation of the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simundic, Ana-Maria; Topic, Elizabeta; Cvoriscec, Dubravka; Cepelak, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneity exists across Europe in the definition of the profession of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine and also in academic background of specialists in this discipline. This article provides an overview of the standards of education and training of laboratory professionals and quality regulations in Croatia. Clinical chemistry in Croatia is almost exclusively practiced by medical biochemists. Although term Medical biochemist often relates to medical doctors in other European countries, in Croatia medical biochemists are not medical doctors, but university degree professionals who are qualified scientifically. Practicing the medical biochemistry is regulated by The Health Care Law, The Law of the Medical Biochemistry Profession and The Law of the State and Private Health Insurance. According to the law, only medical biochemists are entitled to run and work in the medical biochemistry laboratory. University degree is earned after the 5 years of the studies. Register for medical biochemists is kept by the Croatian Chamber of Medical Biochemists. Licensing is mandatory, valid for 6 years and regulated by the government (Law on the Health Care, 1993). Vocational training for medical biochemists lasts 44 months and is regulated by the national regulatory document issued by the Ministry of Health. Accreditation is not mandatory and is provided by an independent, non-commercial national accreditation body. The profession has interdisciplinary character and a level of required competence and skills comparable to other European countries. PMID:22141201

  19. 76 FR 82299 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... following: activities of the Coordinating Council on the Clinical Laboratory Workforce; laboratory...), regarding the need for, and the nature of, revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories...

  20. Translating metabolic biochemistry into the clinic: an interview with Steve O’Rahilly

    OpenAIRE

    Weston, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Professor Steve O’Rahilly is one of the UK’s most renowned clinical researchers. He made his reputation by combining clinical practice with scientific and clinical studies focused on understanding the causes and consequences of obesity and insulin resistance. Here, he talks about his research philosophy, and his wider role as a spokesman for obesity research.

  1. Monitoring and root cause analysis of clinical biochemistry turn around time at an academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Kiran P; Trivedi, Amit P; Patel, Dharmik; Gami, Bhakti; Haridas, N

    2014-10-01

    Quality can be defined as the ability of a product or service to satisfy the needs and expectations of the customer. Laboratories are more focusing on technical and analytical quality for reliability and accuracy of test results. Patients and clinicians however are interested in rapid, reliable and efficient service from laboratory. Turn around time (TAT), the timeliness with which laboratory personnel deliver test results, is one of the most noticeable signs of laboratory service and is often used as a key performance indicator of laboratory performance. This study is aims to provide clue for laboratory TAT monitoring and root cause analysis. In a 2 year period a total of 75,499 specimens of outdoor patient department were monitor, of this a total of 4,142 specimens exceeded TAT. With consistent efforts to monitor, root cause analysis and corrective measures, we are able to decreased the specimens exceeding TAT from 7-8 to 3.7 %. Though it is difficult task to monitor TAT with the help of laboratory information system, real time documentation and authentic data retrievable, along with identification of causes for delays and its remedial measures, improve laboratory TAT and thus patient satisfaction. PMID:25298634

  2. Risk Management in the Clinical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests play an integral role in medical decision-making and as such must be reliable and accurate. Unfortunately, no laboratory tests or devices are foolproof and errors can occur at pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases of testing. Evaluating possible conditions that could lead to errors and outlining the necessary steps to detect and prevent errors before they cause patient harm is therefore an important part of laboratory testing. This can be achieved through the practice of risk management. EP23-A is a new guideline from the CLSI that introduces risk management principles to the clinical laboratory. This guideline borrows concepts from the manufacturing industry and encourages laboratories to develop risk management plans that address the specific risks inherent to each lab. Once the risks have been identified, the laboratory must implement control processes and continuously monitor and modify them to make certain that risk is maintained at a clinically acceptable level. This review summarizes the principles of risk management in the clinical laboratory and describes various quality control activities employed by the laboratory to achieve the goal of reporting valid, accurate and reliable test results. PMID:24982831

  3. Infections acquired in clinical laboratories in Utah.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, J.T.; Orlob, R B; Clayton, J L

    1985-01-01

    We reviewed laboratory-acquired infections occurring in Utah from 1978 through 1982. Written and telephone interviews of supervisors of 1,191 laboratorians revealed an estimated annual incidence of 3 laboratory-acquired infections per 1,000 employees. Infections, in order of frequency, included hepatitis B (clinical cases), shigellosis, pharyngitis, cellulitis, tuberculosis (skin test conversion), conjunctivitis, and non-A, non-B hepatitis. One-half of large laboratories (over 25 employees), ...

  4. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised. PMID:24218765

  5. Clinical laboratories: production industry or medical services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2015-06-01

    The current failure to evidence any link between laboratory tests, clinical decision-making and patient outcomes, and the scarcity of financial resources affecting healthcare systems worldwide, have put further pressure on the organization and delivery of laboratory services. Consolidation, merger, and laboratory downsizing have been driven by the need to deliver economies of scale and cut costs per test while boosting productivity. Distorted economics, based on payment models rewarding volume and efficiency rather than quality and clinical effectiveness, have underpinned the entrance of clinical laboratories into the production industry thus forcing them to relinquish their original mission of providing medical services. The sea change in laboratory medicine in recent years, with the introduction of ever newer and ever more complex tests, including 'omics', which impact on clinical decision-making, should encourage clinical laboratories to return to their original mission as long as payments models are changed. Rather than being considered solely in terms of costs, diagnostic testing must be seen in the context of an entire hospital stay or an overall payment for a care pathway: the testing process should be conceived as a part of the patient's entire journey. PMID:25405721

  6. Nutritional Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the effects that space flight has on humans nutritional biochemistry. Particular attention is devoted to the study of protein breakdown, inflammation, hypercatabolism, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, urine, folate and nutrient stability of certain vitamins, the fluid shift and renal stone risk, acidosis, iron/hematology, and the effects on bone of dietary protein, potassium. inflammation, and omega-3 fatty acids

  7. 75 FR 39028 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the impact on medical and laboratory practice of... laboratory information; and consideration of proposals from the CLIAC proficiency testing workgroup....

  8. 76 FR 5379 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... Clinical Laboratory Workforce; the National Institutes of Health Genetic Test Registry design and responses..., revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the impact on medical...

  9. Biochemistry engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This deals with biochemistry engineering with nine chapters. It explains bionics on development and prospect, basics of life science on classification and structure, enzyme and metabolism, fundamentals of chemical engineering on viscosity, shear rate, PFR, CSTR, mixing, dispersion, measurement and response, Enzyme kinetics, competitive inhibition, pH profile, temperature profile, stoichiometry and fermentation kinetics, bio-reactor on Enzyme-reactor and microorganism-reactor, measurement and processing on data acquisition and data processing, separation and purification, waste water treatment and economics of bionics process.

  10. Promoting clinical and laboratory interaction by harmonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario; Panteghini, Mauro

    2014-05-15

    The lack of interchangeable results in current practice among clinical laboratories has underpinned greater attention to standardization and harmonization projects. Although the focus was mainly on the standardization and harmonization of measurement procedures and their results, the scope of harmonization goes beyond method and analytical results: it includes all other aspects of laboratory testing, including terminology and units, report formats, reference limits and decision thresholds, as well as test profiles and criteria for the interpretation of results. In particular, as evidence collected in last decades demonstrates that pre-pre- and post-post-analytical steps are more vulnerable to errors, harmonization initiatives should be performed to improve procedures and processes at the laboratory-clinical interface. Managing upstream demand, down-stream interpretation of laboratory results, and subsequent appropriate action through close relationships between laboratorians and clinicians remains a crucial issue of the laboratory testing process. Therefore, initiatives to improve test demand management from one hand and to harmonize procedures to improve physicians' acknowledgment of laboratory data and their interpretation from the other hand are needed in order to assure quality and safety in the total testing process. PMID:24120352

  11. Alterations in body weight and biochemistry in patient treated with different psychotropic drugs in a clinic in Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeltekin Demirel,

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim Was to compare adult female patients receiving psychiatricdrugs with obese adult females who didn’t receive any drug treatmentwith respect to the alterations in body weight and biochemistry,and find out the contrubution of a team approach for the managementof these alterations.Methods A total of 102 female patients aged mean 40.9±12.4years who had been followed up and treated in the Psychiatry OutpatientClinics in Istanbul University for their psychiatric disordersand were complaining about increased body weight in thetreatment period were included. The controls were composed of261 females aged mean 39.8±13.0 years who had been referred byvarious departments to dietitians due to exogenous obesity but hadno endocrine-metabolic or psychiatric disorders or history of druguse. Initially, antropometric measurements and biochemical testswere performed for all patients.Results In the group receiving psychiatric treatment, the meanbody weight, BMI, waist and hip circumferences, body fat percentage(p<0.001; blood insulin, triglyceride, TSH, fibrinogenand homocysteine levels, and HOMA-IR were found to be higherthan those of the controls (p<0.05, whereas the total protein, albumin,zinc and folate levels were significantly lower (p<0.001.Conclusion The results of this study showed that patients whoneed psychopharmacotherapies were also more susceptible to severalmetabolic and cardiovascular disorders. Therefore, it wouldbe useful if psychiatric patients are treated with a multidisciplinaryteam approach consisting of an endocrinologist, psychiatrist and adietitian specialized in this area to prevent or delay the metabolicdisorders caused by psychiatric disorders and treatments.

  12. [Challenges for pathologists in clinical laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, F

    2001-06-01

    The number of pathologists in hospitals has been increasing and they are responsible for both surgical pathology and clinical laboratory medicine. In the future they will also play important roles in the modernized reform of the central laboratory as it establishes its own importance in improving the quality and safety of medical activities. As a pathologist, the author reports on challenges faced since assuming the present directorship of the department of laboratory medicine in 1995 including (a) establishing a decision-making system in collaboration with technologists, (b) improving expertise in the department through joining a variety of seminars, conferences and research activities, (c) publishing an annual department report, and (d) introducing both internal and external quality assessment. In the future, for young pathologists training in both pathology and laboratory medicine will be essential. PMID:11452548

  13. 76 FR 39879 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the impact on medical and laboratory practice of proposed revisions to the standards; and the modification of the standards...

  14. Standardizing clinical laboratory data for secondary use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Swapna; Demner-Fushman, Dina; McDonald, Clement J

    2012-08-01

    Clinical databases provide a rich source of data for answering clinical research questions. However, the variables recorded in clinical data systems are often identified by local, idiosyncratic, and sometimes redundant and/or ambiguous names (or codes) rather than unique, well-organized codes from standard code systems. This reality discourages research use of such databases, because researchers must invest considerable time in cleaning up the data before they can ask their first research question. Researchers at MIT developed MIMIC-II, a nearly complete collection of clinical data about intensive care patients. Because its data are drawn from existing clinical systems, it has many of the problems described above. In collaboration with the MIT researchers, we have begun a process of cleaning up the data and mapping the variable names and codes to LOINC codes. Our first step, which we describe here, was to map all of the laboratory test observations to LOINC codes. We were able to map 87% of the unique laboratory tests that cover 94% of the total number of laboratory tests results. Of the 13% of tests that we could not map, nearly 60% were due to test names whose real meaning could not be discerned and 29% represented tests that were not yet included in the LOINC table. These results suggest that LOINC codes cover most of laboratory tests used in critical care. We have delivered this work to the MIMIC-II researchers, who have included it in their standard MIMIC-II database release so that researchers who use this database in the future will not have to do this work. PMID:22561944

  15. 76 FR 9578 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... Additional Information: Nancy Anderson, Chief, Laboratory Practice Standards Branch, Division of Laboratory Science and Standards, Laboratory Science, Policy and Practice Program Office, Office of...

  16. 42 CFR 414.510 - Laboratory date of service for clinical laboratory and pathology specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratory date of service for clinical laboratory... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.510 Laboratory date of service for clinical laboratory and pathology specimens. The date of service for either...

  17. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: The clinical laboratory information system (LABKA research database at Aarhus University, Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grann AF

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Anne Fia Grann, Rune Erichsen, Anders Gunnar Nielsen, Trine Frøslev, Reimar W ThomsenDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkAbstract: This paper provides an introduction to the clinical laboratory information system (LABKA research database in Northern and Central Denmark. The database contains millions of stored laboratory test results for patients living in the two Danish regions, encompassing 1.8 million residents, or one-third of the country's population. More than 1700 different types of blood test analyses are available. Therefore, the LABKA research database represents an incredible source for studies involving blood test analyses. By record linkage of different Danish registries with the LABKA research database, it is possible to examine a large number of biomarkers as predictors of disease risk and prognosis and as markers of disease severity, and to evaluate medical treatments regarding effectiveness and possible side effects. Large epidemiological studies using routinely stored blood test results for individual patients can be performed because it is possible to link the laboratory data to high-quality individual clinical patient data in Denmark.Keywords: biochemistry, laboratory procedures, diagnosis, therapeutic drug monitoring, epidemiological methods, registries

  18. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Intestinal Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Li-Fan; Zhang, Yue-Qiu; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Fei, Gui-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide problem. Intestinal TB (ITB) constitutes a major public health problem in developing countries and has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and pathological features of ITB and to define the strategy for establishing the diagnosis. Methods: A retrospective study (from January 2000 to June 2015) was carried out in Peking Union Medical College Hospital and all hospitalized cases were diagnosed as ITB during the study period were included. The relevant clinical information, laboratory results, microbiological, and radiological investigations were recorded. Results: Of the 85 cases, 61 cases (71.8%) were ranged from 20 to 50 years. The ileocecal region was involved in about 83.5% (71/85) of patients. About 41.2% (35/85) of patients had co-existing extra ITB, especially active pulmonary TB. Abdominal pain (82.4%) was the most common presenting symptom followed by weight loss (72.9%) and fever (64.7%). Both T-cell spot of TB test (T-SPOT.TB) and purified protein derivatives (PPD) tests were performed in 26 patients: 20 (76.9%) positive T-SPOT.TB and 13 (50.0%) positive PPD were detected, with a statistical significant difference (P = 0.046). Twenty cases (23.5%) were histopathology and/or pathogen confirmed TB; 27 cases (31.8%) were diagnosed by clinical manifestation consistent with ITB and evidence of active extra ITB; 38 cases (44.7%) were diagnosed by good response to diagnostic anti-TB therapy. Conclusions: ITB is difficult to diagnose even with modern medical techniques due to its nonspecific clinical and laboratory features. At present, combination of clinical, endoscopic, radiological, and pathological features continues to be the key to the diagnosis of ITB. PMID:27231171

  19. Effect of dietary Ximenia caffra kernel meal on blood and liver metabolic substrate content and the general clinical biochemistry of Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivandi, E; Moyo, D; Dangarembizi, R; Erlwanger, K

    2016-06-01

    We investigated (at the University of the Witwatersrand: GPS coordinates 26°10' 52.96″S; 28°2' 33.61″E) the effects of substituting soya bean meal (SBM) with Ximenia caffra kernel meal (XCKM) as a dietary protein source on blood and liver metabolic substrates content, serum markers of liver and kidney function and the general clinical biochemistry of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Five diets with similar energy and protein content were formulated (D1-D5) where XCKM replaced SBM on a crude protein basis at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100%. Forty weanling male SD rats were randomly assigned to diets D1-D5, fed for 37 days and weighed twice weekly. The rats were then fasted overnight, and fasting blood glucose and triglyceride concentrations were determined from tail-vein-drawn blood. Immediately thereafter, the rats were euthanised and blood was collected via cardiac puncture. Serum was used to assay for markers of the general health profile. Livers were removed and weighed, and samples were used to determine lipid and glycogen content. Rats fed D4 (75% substitution level) had significantly lower (p  0.05) fasting blood glucose and cholesterol concentrations, liver glycogen and lipid content. Additionally, it had no effect (p > 0.05) on serum activity/concentration of surrogate markers of liver (alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity and urea, total bilirubin, globulin and albumin concentrations) and kidney (phosphorus, calcium and creatinine concentrations) function and the general clinical biochemistry of the rats. Defatted XCKM could substitute SBM in rat diets without compromising blood glucose and cholesterol homeostasis, liver and kidney function and the general clinical biochemistry of growing male Sprague Dawley rats. PMID:26344703

  20. Clinical and laboratory features of preleukemia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施均; 邵宗鸿; 陈桂彬; 李克; 刘鸿; 张益枝; 和虹; 赵明峰; 何广胜; 张泓; 储榆林; 郝玉书

    2002-01-01

    Objective To explore prospective diagnostic criteria for preleukemia.Methods A case control study was done comparing the discrepancies on clinical and laboratory features between patients with preleukemia and those with chronic aplastic anemia (CAA) or atypical paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglubinuria (a-PNH).Results There were eight variables of significance: (1) lymphocytoid micromegakaryocytes in the bone marrow; (2) immature granulocytes in the peripheral blood; (3) ≥2.0% myeloblasts in the bone marrow; (4) positive periodic acid schiff (PAS) stained nucleated erythrocytes; (5) myeloid differentiation index ≥1.8; (6) typical colonal karyotypic abnormalities; (7) negative sister chromatid differentiation; (8) cluster/colony ratio of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM)>4.0. The following criteria were assigned: A: to meet variable one and at least two of the other seven variables and B: to meet at least four of the eight variables. All of the patients with preleukemia met either A or B and none of the patients with CAA or a-PNH did. Conclusions Preleukemia is different from CAA or a-PNH. It has its own clinical and laboratory features, which may be useful for its prospective diagnosis.

  1. An inquiry-based biochemistry laboratory structure emphasizing competency in the scientific process: a guided approach with an electronic notebook format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Hall, Mona; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students through their laboratory work at a steady pace that encourages them to focus on quality observations, careful data collection and thought processes surrounding the chemistry involved. It motivates students to work in a collaborative manner with frequent opportunities for feedback, reflection, and modification of their ideas. Each laboratory activity has four stages to keep the students' efforts on track: pre-lab work, an in-lab discussion, in-lab work, and a post-lab assignment. Students are guided at each stage by an instructor created template that directs their learning while giving them the opportunity and flexibility to explore new information, ideas, and questions. These templates are easily transferred into an electronic journal (termed the E-notebook) and form the basic structural framework of the final lab reports the students submit electronically, via a learning management system. The guided-inquiry based approach presented here uses a single laboratory activity for undergraduate Introductory Biochemistry as an example. After implementation of this guided learning approach student surveys reported a higher level of course satisfaction and there was a statistically significant improvement in the quality of the student work. Therefore we firmly believe the described format to be highly effective in promoting student learning and engagement. PMID:24376181

  2. Cost analysis in a clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezmes, M F; Ochoa, C; Eiros, J M

    2002-08-01

    The use of models for business management and cost control in public hospitals has led to a need for microbiology laboratories to know the real cost of the different products they offer. For this reason, a catalogue of microbiological products was prepared, and the costs (direct and indirect) for each product were analysed, along with estimated profitability. All tests performed in the microbiology laboratory of the "Virgen de la Concha" Hospital in Zamora over a 2-year period (73192 tests) were studied. The microbiological product catalogue was designed using homogeneity criteria with respect to procedures used, workloads and costs. For each product, the direct personnel costs (estimated from workloads following the method of the College of American Pathologists, 1992 version), the indirect personnel costs, the direct and indirect material costs and the portion of costs corresponding to the remaining laboratory costs (capital and structural costs) were calculated. The average product cost was 16.05 euros. The average cost of a urine culture (considered, for purposes of this study, as a relative value unit) reached 13.59 euros, with a significant difference observed between positive and negative cultures (negative urine culture, 10.72 euros; positive culture, 29.65 euros). Significant heterogeneity exists, both in the costs of different products and especially in the cost per positive test. The application of a detailed methodology of cost analysis facilitates the calculation of the real cost of microbiological products. This information provides a basic tool for establishing clinical management strategies. PMID:12226688

  3. Effects of Various Dental Materials on Alkaline Phosphatase Extracted from Pulp: An Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lorin R.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that demonstrates the effects of various dental materials on a representative enzyme from the pulp is outlined. The experiment encourages students to consider the effects that various restorative materials and techniques might have on enzymes in the living pulp. (Author/MLW)

  4. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  5. Using an ePortfolio system as an electronic laboratory notebook in undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology practical classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jill; Kant, Sashi; Gysbers, Vanessa; Hancock, Dale; Denyer, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Despite many apparent advantages, including security, back-up, remote access, workflow, and data management, the use of electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) in the modern research laboratory is still developing. This presents a challenge to instructors who want to give undergraduate students an introduction to the kinds of data curation and notebook keeping skills that will inevitably be required as ELNs penetrate normal laboratory practice. An additional problem for the teacher is that ELNs do not generally have student-administrative functions and are prohibitively expensive. In this report, we describe the use and impact of an ePortfolio system as a surrogate ELN. Introduction of the system led to several pedagogic outcomes, namely: increased preparedness of students for class, encouragement of creativity and reflection with respect to experimental methods, greatly enhanced engagement between students and tutors, and it gave instructors the ability to scrutinize original data files and monitor student-tutor feedback cycles. However, implementation led to a disruption of tutor workloads and incurred new levels of accountability that threatened to undermine the initiative. Through course evaluations and other reflective processes, we reached an appreciation of how an ELN should be introduced into practical class teaching so that it not only becomes an appropriate aid for teaching the laboratory experience, but also becomes a life-long resource for students. PMID:24376052

  6. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Shirts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and "meaningful use." The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laboratory analytics meeting. The meeting featured short presentations on current trends in clinical laboratory analytics and several panel discussions on data science in laboratory medicine, laboratory data and its role in the larger healthcare system, integrating laboratory analytics, and data sharing for collaborative analytics. One main goal of meeting was to have an open forum of leaders that work with the "big data" clinical laboratories produce. This article summarizes the proceedings of the meeting and content discussed.

  7. Guidelines (1988) for training in clinical laboratory management

    OpenAIRE

    Cediel, N.; Fraser, C G; Deom, A.; Josefsson, L.; Worth, H. G. J.; Zinder, O.

    1989-01-01

    Trainees in laboratory medicine must develop skills in laboratory management. Guidelines are detailed for laboratory staff in training, directors responsible for staff development and professional bodies wishing to generate material appropriate to their needs. The syllabus delineates the knowledge base required and includes laboratory planning and organization, control of operations, methodology and instrumentation, data management and statistics, financial management, clinical use of tests, ...

  8. Liposomal drug delivery system from laboratory to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, N A; Pandya, S K; Kirodian, G B; Sanath, S

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of drug delivery systems is to deliver a drug effectively, specifically to the site of action and to achieve greater efficacy and minimise the toxic effects compared to conventional drugs. Amongst various carrier systems, liposomes have generated a great interest because of their versatility. Liposomes are vesicular concentric bilayered structures, which are biocompatible, biodegradable and nonimmumnogenic. They can control the delivery of drugs by targeting the drug to the site of action or by site avoidance drug delivery or by prolonged circulation of drugs. Amphotericin B (Amp B) remains the drug of choice in most systemic mycoses and also as a second line treatment for Kala azar. However, its toxic effects often limit its use. Although the liposome delivery system has been tried for several drugs, only a few have been used in patients due to the slow development of necessary large-scale pharmaceutical procedures. This paper reviews the development of the technique for liposomal Amphotericin B (L-Amp-LRC-1, Fungisome) drug delivery system in our laboratory in collaboration with the department of Biochemistry, Delhi University in India and proving the safety and efficacy of this preparation in clinical practice. It also attempts to compare the efficacy and benefits of our product for Indian patients with those of similar products and it includes facts from the publications that flowed from our work. As compared to conventional Amp B, Fungisome is infused over a much shorter period requiring a smaller volume and no premedication. It was found to be safe in patients who had developed serious unacceptable toxicity with conventional Amp B. In renal transplant patients, Fungisome did not produce any nephrotoxicity. Fungisome is effective in fungal infections resistant to fluconazole, conventional Amp B and in virgin and resistant cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The cost of any drug is of great significance, especially in India. We have therefore

  9. Liposomal drug delivery system from laboratory to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshirsagar N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of drug delivery systems is to deliver a drug effectively, specifically to the site of action and to achieve greater efficacy and minimise the toxic effects compared to conventional drugs. Amongst various carrier systems, liposomes have generated a great interest because of their versatility. Liposomes are vesicular concentric bilayered structures, which are biocompatible, biodegradable and nonimmumnogenic. They can control the delivery of drugs by targeting the drug to the site of action or by site avoidance drug delivery or by prolonged circulation of drugs. Amphotericin B (Amp B remains the drug of choice in most systemic mycoses and also as a second line treatment for Kala azar. However, its toxic effects often limit its use. Although the liposome delivery system has been tried for several drugs, only a few have been used in patients due to the slow development of necessary large-scale pharmaceutical procedures. This paper reviews the development of the technique for liposomal Amphotericin B (L-Amp-LRC-1, FungisomeTM drug delivery system in our laboratory in collaboration with the department of Biochemistry, Delhi University in India and proving the safety and efficacy of this preparation in clinical practice. It also attempts to compare the efficacy and benefits of our product for Indian patients with those of similar products and it includes facts from the publications that flowed from our work. As compared to conventional Amp B, Fungisome is infused over a much shorter period requiring a smaller volume and no premedication. It was found to be safe in patients who had developed serious unacceptable toxicity with conventional Amp B. In renal transplant patients, Fungisome did not produce any nephrotoxicity. Fungisome is effective in fungal infections resistant to fluconazole, conventional Amp B and in virgin and resistant cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The cost of any drug is of great significance, especially in India

  10. Competitive bidding for Medicare Part B clinical laboratory services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautter, John; Pope, Gregory C

    2014-06-01

    The traditional Medicare fee-for-service program may be able to purchase clinical laboratory test services at a lower cost through competitive bidding. Demonstrations of competitive bidding for clinical laboratory tests have been twice mandated or authorized by Congress but never implemented. This article provides a summary and review of the final design of the laboratory competitive bidding demonstration mandated by the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003. The design was analogous to a sealed bid (first price), clearing price auction. Design elements presented include covered laboratory tests and beneficiaries, laboratory bidding and payment status under the demonstration, composite bids, determining bidding winners and the demonstration fee schedule, and quality under the demonstration. Expanded use of competitive bidding in Medicare, including specifically for clinical laboratory tests, has been recommended in some proposals for Medicare reform. The presented design may be a useful point of departure if Medicare clinical laboratory competitive bidding is revived in the future. PMID:24366366

  11. Clinical and laboratory features of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Cárdenas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The clinical presentation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC differs between patients in developing countries (African and Chinese populations from those in industrialized countries. In industrialized countries, HCC co-exists with symptomatic cirrhosis in 80% of cases and clinical manifestations are usually related to those of the underlying disease. On the other hand, patients from developing countries have HCC and cirrhosis in approximately 40% of cases. Underlying cirrhosis in many cases is not advanced and does not produce any symptoms or associated symptoms are masked by those of the tumor (right upper quadrant pain, mass in the upper abdomen, weight loss and weakness. In a subset of patients, there are no clinical manifestations as HCC may occur in the context of hepatitis B infection without cirrhosis.

    Clinical Manifestations

    In Western countries, nearly 35% percent of patients with HCC are asymptomatic. Some of the most common clinical manifestations include: abdominal pain (53-58% of patients, especially in epigastrium or right upper quadrant, abdominal mass (30%, weight loss, malaise, anorexia, cachexia, jaundice or fever.

    Physical Exam

    Physical findings vary with the stage of disease. The patient may exhibit slight or moderate wasting when first seen. In patients with cirrhosis, typical stigmata of chronic liver disease may be present. In advanced stages of HCC the liver may be enlarged and there is significant tenderness. An arterial bruit may be heard over the liver

  12. Medical Service Clinical Laboratory Procedure--Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    Presented are laboratory studies focusing on blood cells and the complete scheme of blood coagulation. Formed is the basis for the following types of laboratory operations: (1) distinguishing the morphology of normal and abnormal blood cells; (2) measuring the concentrations or number of blood cells; (3) measuring concentration and detecting…

  13. Sigma metrics in clinical chemistry laboratory – A guide to quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha S. Adiga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Six sigma is a process of quality measurement and improvement program used in industries. Sigma methodology can be applied wherever an outcome of a process is to be measured. A poor outcome is counted as an error or defect. This is quantified as defects per million (DPM. Six sigma provides a more quantitative frame work for evaluating process performance with evidence for process improvement and describes how many sigma fit within the tolerance limits. Sigma metrics can be used effectively in laboratory services. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the quality of the analytical performance of clinical chemistry laboratory by calculating sigma metrics. Methodology: The study was conducted in the clinical biochemistry laboratory of Karwar Institute of Medical Sciences, Karwar. Sigma metrics of 15 parameters with automated chemistry analyzer, transasia XL 640 were analyzed. The analytes assessed were glucose, urea, creatinine, uric acid, total bilirubin (BT, direct bilirubin (BD, total protein, albumin, SGOT, SGPT, ALP, Total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and Calcium. Results: We have sigma values <3 for Urea, ALT, BD, BT, Ca, creatinine (L1 and urea, AST, BD (L2. Sigma lies between 3-6 for Glucose, AST, cholesterol, uric acid, total protein(L1 and ALT, cholesterol, BT, calcium, creatinine and glucose (L2.Sigma was more than 6 for Triglyceride, ALP, HDL, albumin (L1 and TG, uric acid, ALP, HDL, albumin, total protein(L2. Conclusion: Sigma metrics helps to assess analytical methodologies and augment laboratory performance. It acts as a guide for planning quality control strategy. It can be a self assessment tool regarding the functioning of clinical laboratory.

  14. Clinical laboratory as an economic model for business performance analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Buljanović, Vikica; Patajac, Hrvoje; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a clinical laboratory as an economic model that may be used to improve business performance of laboratories by removing weaknesses, minimizing threats, and using external opportunities and internal strengths. Methods Impact of possible threats to and weaknesses of the Clinical Laboratory at Našice General County Hospital business performance and use of strengths and opportunities to improve operating profit we...

  15. [External quality assessment for clinical microbiology and good laboratory management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, K

    1998-02-01

    The Tokyo Metropolitan external quality assessment (EQA) program has revealed some serious problems in private independent microbiology laboratories in Tokyo since 1982. The poor performance in the EQA surveys closely related to poor laboratory managements, the type of training, experience of the medical technologists or technicians, and supervisory ability of the consultant physicians in independent laboratories. Social factors impede the reform of the quality assurance of clinical microbiology. Such factors include poor infrastructure of continuing education for small private laboratories, closure of the central clinical laboratories in the hospitals and outsourcing of laboratory tests due to restructuring in response to economic problems, and limited numbers of certified clinical pathologists of the Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (JSCP). Therefore, the Tokyo Metropolitan EQA Scheme is still confidential and its main role is educational. Good two way communication between participants and the organizers' clinical pathologists is essential, if the quality of laboratory tests is to be improved. The new JSCP edition of the postgraduate training requirement in clinical pathology includes "Laboratory Administration and Management". Good laboratory management(GLM) is an increasingly important component of good laboratory practice. The practice activities of clinical pathologists must include general management in addition to exercising there specialized knowledge in medicine and technology. Whereas leadership of a good clinical pathologist provides the direction of where a good laboratory is going, good management provides the steps of how to get there. And I believe quality system models from business and industry may provide us with strong guidance to build a quality system for the good laboratory that will endure into the next century. PMID:9528335

  16. Standardizing clinical laboratory data for secondary use

    OpenAIRE

    Abhyankar, Swapna; Demner-Fushman, Dina; McDonald, Clement J.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical databases provide a rich source of data for answering clinical research questions. However, the variables recorded in clinical data systems are often identified by local, idiosyncratic, and sometimes redundant and/or ambiguous names (or codes) rather than unique, well-organized codes from standard code systems. This reality discourages research use of such databases, because researchers must invest considerable time in cleaning up the data before they can ask their first research que...

  17. Preparation, Purification, and Secondary Structure Determination of Bacillus Circulans Xylanase. A Molecular Laboratory Incorporating Aspects of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Biophysical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Sal; Gentile, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    A project module designed for biochemistry or cellular and molecular biology student which involves determining the secondary structure of Bacillus circulans xylanase (BCX) by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy under conditions that compromise its stabilizing intramolecular forces is described. The lab model enhanced students knowledge of the…

  18. Laboratory automation in clinical bacteriology: what system to choose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxatto, A; Prod'hom, G; Faverjon, F; Rochais, Y; Greub, G

    2016-03-01

    Automation was introduced many years ago in several diagnostic disciplines such as chemistry, haematology and molecular biology. The first laboratory automation system for clinical bacteriology was released in 2006, and it rapidly proved its value by increasing productivity, allowing a continuous increase in sample volumes despite limited budgets and personnel shortages. Today, two major manufacturers, BD Kiestra and Copan, are commercializing partial or complete laboratory automation systems for bacteriology. The laboratory automation systems are rapidly evolving to provide improved hardware and software solutions to optimize laboratory efficiency. However, the complex parameters of the laboratory and automation systems must be considered to determine the best system for each given laboratory. We address several topics on laboratory automation that may help clinical bacteriologists to understand the particularities and operative modalities of the different systems. We present (a) a comparison of the engineering and technical features of the various elements composing the two different automated systems currently available, (b) the system workflows of partial and complete laboratory automation, which define the basis for laboratory reorganization required to optimize system efficiency, (c) the concept of digital imaging and telebacteriology, (d) the connectivity of laboratory automation to the laboratory information system, (e) the general advantages and disadvantages as well as the expected impacts provided by laboratory automation and (f) the laboratory data required to conduct a workflow assessment to determine the best configuration of an automated system for the laboratory activities and specificities. PMID:26806135

  19. U.S. Ebola Treatment Center Clinical Laboratory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelden, Katelyn C; Iwen, Peter C; Herstein, Jocelyn J; Biddinger, Paul D; Kraft, Colleen S; Saiman, Lisa; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L; Gibbs, Shawn G; Lowe, John J

    2016-04-01

    Fifty-five hospitals in the United States have been designated Ebola treatment centers (ETCs) by their state and local health authorities. Designated ETCs must have appropriate plans to manage a patient with confirmed Ebola virus disease (EVD) for the full duration of illness and must have these plans assessed through a CDC site visit conducted by an interdisciplinary team of subject matter experts. This study determined the clinical laboratory capabilities of these ETCs. ETCs were electronically surveyed on clinical laboratory characteristics. Survey responses were returned from 47 ETCs (85%). Forty-one (87%) of the ETCs planned to provide some laboratory support (e.g., point-of-care [POC] testing) within the room of the isolated patient. Forty-four (94%) ETCs indicated that their hospital would also provide clinical laboratory support for patient care. Twenty-two (50%) of these ETC clinical laboratories had biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) containment. Of all respondents, 34 (72%) were supported by their jurisdictional public health laboratory (PHL), all of which had available BSL-3 laboratories. Overall, 40 of 44 (91%) ETCs reported BSL-3 laboratory support via their clinical laboratory and/or PHL. This survey provided a snapshot of the laboratory support for designated U.S. ETCs. ETCs have approached high-level isolation critical care with laboratory support in close proximity to the patient room and by distributing laboratory support among laboratory resources. Experts might review safety considerations for these laboratory testing/diagnostic activities that are novel in the context of biocontainment care. PMID:26842705

  20. Reproduction, Physiology and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter focuses on the reproduction, physiology, and biochemistry of the root-knot nematodes. The extensive amount of information on the reproduction and cytogenetics of species of Meloidogyne contrasts with the limited information on physiology, biochemistry, and biochemical pathways. In commo...

  1. 42 CFR 493.2001 - Establishment and function of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Consultations § 493.2001 Establishment and function of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee. (a) HHS will establish a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee to.... (b) The Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee will be comprised of individuals...

  2. The Point-of-Care Laboratory in Clinical Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drancourt, Michel; Michel-Lepage, Audrey; Boyer, Sylvie; Raoult, Didier

    2016-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) laboratories that deliver rapid diagnoses of infectious diseases were invented to balance the centralization of core laboratories. POC laboratories operate 24 h a day and 7 days a week to provide diagnoses within 2 h, largely based on immunochromatography and real-time PCR tests. In our experience, these tests are conveniently combined into syndrome-based kits that facilitate sampling, including self-sampling and test operations, as POC laboratories can be operated by trained operators who are not necessarily biologists. POC laboratories are a way of easily providing clinical microbiology testing for populations distant from laboratories in developing and developed countries and on ships. Modern Internet connections enable support from core laboratories. The cost-effectiveness of POC laboratories has been established for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections in both developed and developing countries. PMID:27029593

  3. Quality in Online Courses: Technical Production Regarding Clinical Biochemistry Online Course Performed by Students in Advanced Learning in Scientific Education Discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Maia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available It is important to consider quality and efficacy concerning online courses. This study was accomplished with Master’s students in order to promote technical production regardingClinical Biochemistry online course. In web, www.bioq.educacao.biz, it was accessible strategic and organizational management training in distance learning course. Enrolled students(7, monitors (3 and the manager (1 have made use of thevirtual environment asa channel of communication as well as to construct the extension course (80 hours. Some strategies were discussed and planned for the purpose of a significant apprenticeship. In all, there were 173 standard contents available, which were 4 audiovisual presentations, 13 debating forums, 1 chat, 10 classes,77 scientific articles, 30 tests, 3 glossaries, 1 mini-library, 18 links, 3 texts and 13 folders. Although the managerwas not responsible for the construction ofthe contents, system reports have shown that the manager’s attendance and permanence online were three times superior to other users. It once more revealed that new Information and Communication Technologies(ICTs requires from the manager to plan an efficient pedagogical orientation.

  4. Clinical evaluation, biochemistry and genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of lactose intolerance in a population from northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Roberto Lins Ponte; Pedro Henrique Quintela Soares de Medeiros; Alexandre Havt; Joselany Afio Caetano; Cid, David A C; Mara de Moura Gondim Prata; Alberto Melo Soares; Richard L. Guerrant; Josyf Mychaleckyj; Aldo Ângelo Moreira Lima

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This work aimed to evaluate and correlate symptoms, biochemical blood test results and single nucleotide polymorphisms for lactose intolerance diagnosis. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, with a total of 119 patients, 54 of whom were lactose intolerant. Clinical evaluation and biochemical blood tests were conducted after lactose ingestion and blood samples were collected for genotyping evaluation. In particular, the single nucleotide polymo...

  5. Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated.

  6. Coryneform bacteria in infectious diseases: clinical and laboratory aspects.

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle, M B; Lipsky, B A

    1990-01-01

    Coryneform isolates from clinical specimens frequently cannot be identified by either reference laboratories or research laboratories. Many of these organisms are skin flora that belong to a large number of taxonomic groups, only 40% of which are in the genus Corynebacterium. This review provides an update on clinical presentations, microbiological features, and pathogenic mechanisms of infections with nondiphtheria Corynebacterium species and other pleomorphic gram-positive rods. The early l...

  7. Clinical and laboratory features of 48 feline hyperthyroidism cases in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Namba

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Feline hyperthyroidism (HT is a common endocrine disorder worldwide, but clinical and laboratory features might vary geographically. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate feline HT in Japan, and compare results to those of previous study for feline HT. We evaluated 48 feline HT cases clinical and laboratory features. Surprisingly, the youngest patient was 32 months of age (2 year 9 months. There was no significant difference among the study subjects in sex, but frequency of spayed/castrated cats was high (85.4%. Median age was 186 months (32-272 months. 91.3% (n=42 of subjects were over 10 years of age, and 8.7% (n=4 were under 10 years of age. Clinical symptoms included vomiting, 56.3% (n=27; diarrhea, 2.1% (n=1; hyperactivity, 12.5% (n=6; emaciation, 41.7% (n=20; polyuria and polydipsia, 22.9% (n=11; chronic weight loss, 60.4% (n=29; and palpated enlarged thyroid, 2.1% (n=1. Concurrent findings included chronic kidney disease, 20.8% (n=10; congestive heart failure, 20.8% (n=10; tachycardia (over 240 beats/min, 18.8% (n=9; gallop rhythm, 31.3% (n=15; neurological disorders such as hind-limb paralysis, 14.6% (n=7; cystitis, 8.7% (n=4; gingivitis, 4.2% (n=2; diabetes mellitus, 4.2% (n=2; and arterial thromboembolism, 6.3% (n=3. In addition, laboratory features (complete blood counts and biochemistry differed from those of previous reports in certain respects. Our results show that it might be important for practitioners to comprehend epidemiologic differences regarding feline HT worldwide.

  8. Mentoring for retention and advancement in the multigenerational clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudicina, R J

    2001-01-01

    Retention of recent graduates and other laboratory practitioners in the workplace will play a key role in addressing current and projected shortages of clinical laboratory scientists (CLS) and technicians (CLT). In addition, with overrepresentation of the aging Baby Boomer generation in laboratory supervisory and management positions, it is crucial not only to retain younger practitioners, but to prepare them for assuming these important functions in the future. Mentoring, a practice commonly employed in other professions, is widely considered to be useful in employee retention and career advancement. Mentoring has probably been used in the clinical laboratory profession, but has not been well documented. In the clinical laboratory environment, potential mentors are in the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations, and new practitioners who could benefit from mentoring are in Generation X. Generational differences among these groups may present challenges to the use of mentoring. This article will attempt to provide a better understanding of generational differences and show how mentoring can be applied in the setting of the clinical laboratory in order to increase retention and promote career advancement of younger practitioners. A panel of five laboratory managers provided examples of mentoring strategies. Definitions, benefits, and examples of mentoring are addressed in the accompanying article, "Passing the Torch: Mentoring the Next Generation of Laboratory Professionals". PMID:15633495

  9. Randomized trial interpreting sputum quality in a clinical laboratory.

    OpenAIRE

    Mizrachi, H H; Valenstein, P N

    1987-01-01

    The role for laboratory interpretation of microbiologic results remains controversial, and many laboratories leave the interpretation of culture results entirely to physicians. We examined the effects of furnishing a laboratory interpretation of sputum quality on physician decision making. Quality of sputum was determined on Gram-stained smears by using a modification of the criteria of Bartlett (R. C. Bartlett, Medical Microbiology: Quality, Cost, and Clinical Relevance, p. 24-31, 1974). A t...

  10. Washington Clinical Laboratory Initiative: a vision for collaboration and strategic planning for an integrated laboratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counts, J M

    2001-01-01

    This article addresses the importance of public health, hospital, and clinical laboratories in the role of patient care, disease prevention, and surveillance. It also focuses on the coordination and planning that needs to take place between these institutions in order to develop a more cost-effective and responsive laboratory delivery system. The Washington Clinical Laboratory Initiative is an innovative state initiative illustrating that coordinated and integrated strategic planning of public and private sector laboratories can be accomplished within a state. It also has increased interaction, collaboration, and communication between health practitioners, health plans, hospitals, laboratories, government agencies, and academicians. This accomplishment has enabled the establishment of public policy concerning laboratory reimbursement and development of standards of laboratory practice. PMID:11299913

  11. [ISO 15189 accreditation in clinical microbiology laboratory: general concepts and the status in our laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyar, Işin

    2009-10-01

    One important trend in the laboratory profession and quality management is the global convergence of laboratory operations. The goal of an accredited medical laboratory is to continue "offering useful laboratory service for diagnosis and treatment of the patients and also aid to the health of the nation". An accredited clinical laboratory is managed by a quality control system, it is competent technically and the laboratory service meets the needs of all its patients and physicians by taking the responsibility of all the medical tests and therapies. For this purpose, ISO 15189 international standard has been prepared by 2003. ISO 15189 standard is originated from the arrangement of ISO 17025 and ISO 9001:2000 standards. Many countries such as England, Germany, France, Canada and Australia have preferred ISO 15189 as their own laboratory accreditation programme, meeting all the requirements of their medical laboratories. The accreditation performance of a clinical microbiology laboratory is mainly based on five essential points; preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, quality control programmes (internal, external, interlaboratory) and audits (internal, external). In this review article, general concepts on ISO 15189 accreditation standards for the clinical microbiology laboratories have been summarized and the status of a private laboratory (Acibadem LabMed, Istanbul) in Turkey has been discussed. PMID:20084925

  12. Clinical evaluation, biochemistry and genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of lactose intolerance in a population from northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Lins Ponte

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This work aimed to evaluate and correlate symptoms, biochemical blood test results and single nucleotide polymorphisms for lactose intolerance diagnosis. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, with a total of 119 patients, 54 of whom were lactose intolerant. Clinical evaluation and biochemical blood tests were conducted after lactose ingestion and blood samples were collected for genotyping evaluation. In particular, the single nucleotide polymorphisms C>T-13910 and G>A-22018 were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism/polymerase chain reaction and validated by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: Lactose-intolerant patients presented with more symptoms of flatulence (81.4%, bloating (68.5%, borborygmus (59.3% and diarrhea (46.3% compared with non-lactose-intolerant patients (pT-13910 and G>A-22018 with lactose tolerance in this population and suggest clinical management for patients with lactose intolerance that considers single nucleotide polymorphism detection and a change in the biochemical blood test cutoff from <25 mg/dL to <15 mg/dL.

  13. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  14. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  15. Clinical laboratory technologist professional development in Camagüey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Caridad García González

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the results of research aimed at assessing the current conditions related to clinical laboratory technologist professional development. A descriptive cross study covering the period between November 2013 and January 2014 is presented. Several techniques for identifying and hierarchically arranging professional developmental related problems were used to study a sample at the Faculty of Health Technology of the Medical University “Carlos Juan Finlay”. The study involved heads of teaching departments and methodologists of health care technology specialties; moreover a survey and a content test were given graduate clinical laboratory technicians. The authors reached at the conclusion that clinical laboratory technologist professional development is limited and usually underestimate the necessities and interests of these graduates. Likewise, a lack of systematization and integration of the biomedical basic sciences contents and the laboratory diagnosis is noticeable.

  16. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment Teaching Model of Medical Laboratory Technology%医学检验技术专业生物化学与分子生物学实验教学改革探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁宁; 隋文; 李坤

    2014-01-01

    Biochemistry and molecular biology experiment is an importment course in medical laboratory technology profession which in cultivating students' practical and innovative ability has an important role. But current drawbacks of traditional medical education has seriously affected the course of biochemistry and molecular biology experiment. Through the experimental curriculum, assessment methods, opening up laboratory and other aspects of the reform ,building a student-centered interactive multi-level open experimental teaching model, and comprehensively improve the students' innovative ability.%生物化学与分子生物学是医学检验技术专业中的一门重要课程,对培养学生的实践能力和创新能力具有重要作用。当前传统医学教育存在的弊端严重影响了该课程的实验教学。本教研室通过对实验课程、考核方式、开放实验室等方面的改革,构建了以学生为中心的多层次开放互动式实验教学模式,全面提高了学生的创新实践能力。

  17. Wireless clinical alerts for physiologic, laboratory and medication data.

    OpenAIRE

    Shabot, M M; LoBue, M.; J. Chen

    2000-01-01

    A fully interfaced clinical information system (CIS) contains physiologic, laboratory, blood gas, medication and other data that can be used as the information base for a comprehensive alerting system. Coupled with an event driven rules engine, a CIS can generate clinical alerts which may both prevent medical errors and assist caregivers in responding to critical events in a timely way. The authors have developed a clinical alerting system which delivers alerts and reminders to clinicians in ...

  18. [What is the ideal attainment of clinical laboratory works?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, S

    1993-01-01

    This is the specified address delivered at the 20th meeting of the Chugoku-Shikoku District of the Japanese Society of Clinical Pathologists (JSCP). More than 40 years have elapsed since the incipient epoch of clinical pathology in this country, when physicians, surgeons and pathologists gathered, for the first time, to institute a scientific medical association (JSCP) for the purpose of elevating daily medical services to the modernized level through active use of clinical laboratory examination. Since then the laboratory examination has undergone a rapid progress and many new techniques have appeared. Excellent equipments and reagents are being supplied from the engineering and pharmaceutical companies. Thus, the clinical laboratories have assumed an out-look of a big factory equipped with a variety of automatic analysers and a large number of computers, and the figures of many laboratory staffs are peeped among them. In this situation there arose several problems urgently needed for control to hole the laboratory ideal in service to the medical doctors as well as to the patients. 1. Management of personnels (medical technologists and others) who are dissatisfied with daily robot-like works and discordant human relations. 2. Report sheets sent to the medical doctors are not employed adequately for the care of patients, because they are handed over in uncooked style without clinical laboratory interpretation and recommendation. Therefore, the laboratory medical doctors are ranked below the medical doctors on the wards and outpatient clinic. 3. Too many tests are ordered to the laboratory without adequate recognition of their usefulness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8355410

  19. Endogenous glucocorticoid analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in routine clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, James M; Keevil, Brian G

    2016-09-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a powerful analytical technique that offers exceptional selectivity and sensitivity. Used optimally, LC-MS/MS provides accurate and precise results for a wide range of analytes at concentrations that are difficult to quantitate with other methodologies. Its implementation into routine clinical biochemistry laboratories has revolutionised our ability to analyse small molecules such as glucocorticoids. Whereas immunoassays can suffer from matrix effects and cross-reactivity due to interactions with structural analogues, the selectivity offered by LC-MS/MS has largely overcome these limitations. As many clinical guidelines are now beginning to acknowledge the importance of the methodology used to provide results, the advantages associated with LC-MS/MS are gaining wider recognition. With their integral role in both the diagnosis and management of hypo- and hyperadrenal disorders, coupled with their widespread pharmacological use, the accurate measurement of glucocorticoids is fundamental to effective patient care. Here, we provide an up-to-date review of the LC-MS/MS techniques used to successfully measure endogenous glucocorticoids, particular reference is made to serum, urine and salivary cortisol. PMID:27208627

  20. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PROFILE OF DENGUE FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Fazal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Dengue is a major health problem in many parts of India and Gulbarga (North Karnataka was previously not a known endemic area f or dengue. Infection with dengue virus can cause a spectrum of three clinical syndromes , classic dengue fever (DF , dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS. The present study was undertaken to determine the disease profile of dengue virus infection in hospitalized patients. METHODS AND MATERIAL: One hundred patients admitted in Basaveshwar Teaching and General hospital with fever more than 38.5 degree Celsius and IgM dengue positive were selected. They were followed from the onset of fever to twelve days or till they are recovered according to WHO discharge criteria whichever is earlier. They underwent relevant investigations to identify specific organ dysfunction and categorize them into the spectrum of Dengue fever in accordance to W HO criteria . RESULTS: Out of 100 cases in this study 70 cases belongs to DF , 23 cases to DHF and 7 cases to DSS based on WHO criteria. All the cases had fever (100%. Other common symptoms noted were myalgia (61% , joint pain (54% , headache (66% , vomitin g (55% , pain abdomen (48% , rash (41% , hepatomegaly (20% , bleeding (21% and shock (8%. Hess test was positive in 24% patients. Low platelet count of less than 100 , 000/cu mm according to WHO criteria was present in 73% patients. Deranged liver functio n test and renal parameters were seen in 26 and 8 patients respectively . Mortality documented was 7 patients due to delayed presentation. The average duration of hospital stay was 4.65 days. CONCLUSION: Dengue fever was a more common manifestation than DHF or DSS. During aepidemic , dengue should be strongly considered on the differential diagnosis of any patient with fever. The treatment of dengue is mainly fluid management and supportive. Early recognition and management of alarm symptoms is the key to bet ter outcome

  1. 75 FR 12554 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory...-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for..., Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,...

  2. [Strategy Development for International Cooperation in the Clinical Laboratory Field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yoshiko; Osawa, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The strategy of international cooperation in the clinical laboratory field was analyzed to improve the quality of intervention by reviewing documents from international organizations and the Japanese government. Based on the world development agenda, the target of action for health has shifted from communicable diseases to non-communicable diseases (NCD). This emphasizes the importance of comprehensive clinical laboratories instead of disease-specific examinations in developing countries. To achieve this goal, the World Health Organization (WHO) has disseminated to the African and Asian regions the Laboratory Quality Management System (LQMS), which is based on the same principles of the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) 15189. To execute this strategy, international experts must have competence in project management, analyze information regarding the target country, and develop a strategy for management of the LQMS with an understanding of the technical aspects of laboratory work. However, there is no appropriate pre- and post-educational system of international health for Japanese international workers. Universities and academic organizations should cooperate with the government to establish a system of education for international workers. Objectives of this education system must include: (1) training for the organization and understanding of global health issues, (2) education of the principles regarding comprehensive management of clinical laboratories, and (3) understanding the LQMS which was employed based on WHO's initiative. Achievement of these objectives will help improve the quality of international cooperation in the clinical laboratory field. PMID:26897850

  3. A Streamlined Molecular Biology Module for Undergraduate Biochemistry Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Gregory W.; Chihade, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis and other molecular biology techniques, including plasmid manipulation and restriction analysis, are commonly used tools in the biochemistry research laboratory. In redesigning our biochemistry lab curricula, we sought to integrate these techniques into a term-long, project-based course. In the module presented here,…

  4. Autonomy and Privacy in Clinical Laboratory Science Policy and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibach, Elizabeth Kenimer

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advancements in diagnostic technologies coupled with growth in testing options and choices mandate the development of evidence-based testing algorithms linked to the care paths of the major chronic diseases and health challenges encountered most frequently. As care paths are evaluated, patient/consumers become partners in healthcare delivery. Clinical laboratory scientists find themselves firmly embedded in both quality improvement and clinical research with an urgent need to translate clinical laboratory information into knowledge required by practitioners and patient/consumers alike. To implement this patient-centered care approach in clinical laboratory science, practitioners must understand their roles in (1) protecting patient/consumer autonomy in the healthcare informed consent process and (2) assuring patient/consumer privacy and confidentiality while blending quality improvement study findings with protected health information. A literature review, describing the current ethical environment, supports a consultative role for clinical laboratory scientists in the clinical decision-making process and suggests guidance for policy and practice regarding the principle of autonomy and its associated operational characteristics: informed consent and privacy. PMID:26084151

  5. Appraising the performance of medical technologists in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorpade, J; Chen, M M

    1997-01-01

    Medical technologists and their coworkers serve as a critical link in the delivery of health care, yet their performance typically is appraised in a traditional way, causing stress for both managers and workers. Drawing on Total Quality Management concepts, this article proposes a framework for appraising performance in a clinical laboratory context and shows how it can be used to address the problems that managers face in providing constructive appraisals to laboratory personnel. PMID:10166906

  6. Survey of CF mutations in the clinical laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Myers Angela; Nersesian Rhea; Mirkovic Borka; Huber Klaus; Saiki Randall; Bauer Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Since it is impossible to sequence the complete CFTR gene routinely, clinical laboratories must rely on test systems that screen for a panel of the most frequent mutations causing disease in a high percentage of patients. Thus, in a cohort of 257 persons that were referred to our laboratory for analysis of CF gene mutations, reverse line probe assays for the most common CF mutations were performed. These techniques were evaluated as routine first-line analyses of the CFTR ...

  7. Biomedical mass spectrometry in today's and tomorrow's clinical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Belkum, Alex; Welker, Martin; Erhard, Marcel; Chatellier, Sonia

    2012-05-01

    Clinical microbiology is a conservative laboratory exercise where base technologies introduced in the 19th century remained essentially unaltered. High-tech mass spectrometry (MS) has changed that. Within a few years following its adaptation to microbiological diagnostics, MS has been introduced, embraced, and broadly accepted by clinical microbiology laboratories throughout the world as an innovative tool for definitive bacterial species identification. Herein, we review the current state of the art with respect to this exciting new technology and discuss potential future applications. PMID:22357505

  8. [The certification and accreditation of clinical diagnostic laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, M M; Abrashkina, N N; Dolgov, V V

    2014-06-01

    Two approaches are considered concerning evaluation of quality of functioning of clinical diagnostic laboratory--certification and accreditation. The comparison and juxtaposition of these two approaches is made. The practical importance and applicability of requirements of standards of GOSTK ISO 9001-2008 and GOSTR ISO 15189-2009 is demonstrated. The attention is paid to key issues of workability of system of quality management in laboratory and organization of its technical competence at required level. The standard basics of requirements of international and national quality standards are specified. The article can have crucial practical importance for laboratories which implement system of quality management and prepare for accreditation, pay proper attention to standardization of laboratory studies, strive for workability of system of quality management and determine future priorities in area of enhancement of laboratory services. PMID:25335405

  9. Rules for the certification of good practices in clinical laboratories. No regulation. 3-2009. Good Laboratory Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulation for Certification of Good Practices in clinical laboratories, hereinafter Regulation establishes the methodology and procedures for clinical laboratories to demonstrate their state of compliance with good practices, according to Regulation 3-2009, and that the CECMED can verify.

  10. Sweet syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Findings of 31 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Serap Güneş Bilgili; Ayşe Serap Karadağ; Ömer Çalka; İrfan Bayram

    2013-01-01

    Background and Design: Sweet syndrome is an inflammatory disease characterized by the abrupt onset of pain, red papules and plaques, fever, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and dermal neutrophilic infiltrate. There are not enough data about Sweet syndrome in Turkey. In this article, we studied clinical, laboratory, histopathological, and epidemiological characteristics of patients, who presented to our clinic, and compared the findings with the literature. Materials and Methods: All patients diagno...

  11. Clinical laboratory evaluation of the automicrobic system Enterobacteriaceae biochemical card.

    OpenAIRE

    J.R. Davis; Stager, C E; Wende, R D; Qadri, S M

    1981-01-01

    The AutoMicrobic System Enterobacteriaceae Biochemical Card (AMS-EBC; Vitek Systems, Inc.) was evaluated in two clinical microbiology laboratories. A total of 502 consecutive clinical isolates representing members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were tested in parallel with the AMS-EBC, API 20E, and Enterotube II systems. Discrepancies between systems were resolved with the conventional methods of Edwards and Ewing (P. R. Edwards and W. H. Ewing [ed.], Identification of Enterobacteriaceae, 1...

  12. Clinical laboratory in the biochemical evaluation of hypertension in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghagbon, E K; Okesina, A B; Oparinde, D P

    2007-03-01

    Hypertension is a worldwide problem. It is associated with severe complications that are worse in blacks! Effective management of hypertension requires that the pathophysiologic mechanism, underlining the condition be identified. The clinical laboratory can help in this regard by separating primary hypertension cases (high plasma rennin activity and low plasma rennin activity types) from those of secondary and mendelian types of hypertension. However most clinical laboratories in Nigeria do not provide some of the needed specialized tests-plasma renin activity level, urinary coritsol, plasma aldosterone and metanephrines, plasma natriuretic peptide and oral captopril tests, on routine bases. Importantly, clinicians in Nigeria should consider seriously, the role of the clinical laboratory in the management of hypertension, a condition that affects about 20% of the adult population. They should look beyond "basic or routine tests" in the management of patients with hypertension. Specific tests that will assist in the proper diagnoses of the type of hypertension in a patient should be carried out routinely on every case of hypertension. This will assist in justifying the addition of such investigations in laboratory tests repertoire, when laboratory budgets are prepared. PMID:17876918

  13. [Quality use of commercial laboratory for clinical testing services - considering laboratory's role].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    The number of commercial laboratories for clinical testing in Japan run privately has decreased to about 30 companies, and their business is getting tougher. Branch Lab. and FMS businesses have not expanded recently due to the new reimbursement system which adds an additional sample management fee, becoming effective in 2010. This presentation gives an outline of each role for hospital and commercial laboratories, and their pros & cons considering the current medical situation. Commercial laboratories have investigated how to utilize ICT systems for sharing test information between hospitals and our facilities. It would be very helpful to clarify issues for each hospital. We will develop and create new values for clinical laboratory testing services and forge mutually beneficial relationships with medical institutions. (Review). PMID:25823243

  14. A Computerized Clinical Support System and Psychological Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1978-01-01

    Advocating "holistic" medicine, this article details the benefits to be derived from using a computerized clinical support system in a psychological laboratory focusing on internal healing where the client/patient becomes a committed partner utilizing biofeedback equipment, gaming, and simulation to achieve self-understanding and self-control. (JC)

  15. Biological variation in 32 clinical laboratory routine tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈政君

    2012-01-01

    Objective To set quality goals of conventional biochemical tests through the research of biological variation of the 32 routine items in Chinese population to provide the basis for Chinese clinical and laboratory standards. Methods According to the experimental designs and computing methods

  16. 77 FR 41188 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control...

  17. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Clinical Laboratory Science/Biotechnology Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for clinical laboratory occupations programs. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing, the process used to develop the…

  18. 75 FR 1063 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control...

  19. 78 FR 44954 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control...

  20. Advances in data exchange for the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolin, R H

    1999-06-01

    The focus of the article is on the nuts and bolts of those standards relevant to the exchange of data between a clinical laboratory and an electronic health record. These include: Health Level 7 (HL7), Logical Observation Identifier Names and Codes (LOINC), Systematized Nomenclature of Human and Veterinary Medicine (SNOMED), and, most recently, the Extensible Markup Language (XML). PMID:10421962

  1. Hepatitis and other infections in clinical laboratory staff, 1979.

    OpenAIRE

    Grist, N R

    1981-01-01

    In 1979, British laboratories participating in the American of Clinical Pathologists' survey reported five cases of tuberculosis, four of chickenpox, four of salmonellosis or shigellosis, one malaria, and one hepatitis A infection. Microbiology workers were most affected, but at least six infections were not attributable to work. All cases recovered.

  2. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Canopy Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Charest, Martin; Sy, Mikailou

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set contains canopy biochemistry data collected in 1994 in the NSA at the YJP, OJR, OBS, UBS, and OA sites, including biochemistry lignin, nitrogen, cellulose, starch, and fiber concentrations. These data were collected to study the spatial and temporal changes in the canopy biochemistry of boreal forest cover types and how a high-resolution radiative transfer model in the mid-infrared could be applied in an effort to obtain better estimates of canopy biochemical properties using remote sensing. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. Information systems as a quality management tool in clinical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes information systems as a quality management tool in clinical laboratories. The quality of laboratory analyses is of fundamental importance for health professionals in aiding appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Information systems allow the automation of internal quality management processes, using standard sample tests, Levey-Jennings charts and Westgard multirule analysis. This simplifies evaluation and interpretation of quality tests and reduces the possibility of human error. This study proposes the development of an information system with appropriate functions and costs for the automation of internal quality control in small and medium-sized clinical laboratories. To this end, it evaluates the functions and usability of two commercial software products designed for this purpose, identifying the positive features of each, so that these can be taken into account during the development of the proposed system

  4. Information systems as a quality management tool in clinical laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Vanessa; Rosecler Bez el Boukhari, Marta

    2007-11-01

    This article describes information systems as a quality management tool in clinical laboratories. The quality of laboratory analyses is of fundamental importance for health professionals in aiding appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Information systems allow the automation of internal quality management processes, using standard sample tests, Levey-Jennings charts and Westgard multirule analysis. This simplifies evaluation and interpretation of quality tests and reduces the possibility of human error. This study proposes the development of an information system with appropriate functions and costs for the automation of internal quality control in small and medium-sized clinical laboratories. To this end, it evaluates the functions and usability of two commercial software products designed for this purpose, identifying the positive features of each, so that these can be taken into account during the development of the proposed system.

  5. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking. PMID:25892366

  6. Sweet syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Findings of 31 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Güneş Bilgili

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Sweet syndrome is an inflammatory disease characterized by the abrupt onset of pain, red papules and plaques, fever, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and dermal neutrophilic infiltrate. There are not enough data about Sweet syndrome in Turkey. In this article, we studied clinical, laboratory, histopathological, and epidemiological characteristics of patients, who presented to our clinic, and compared the findings with the literature. Materials and Methods: All patients diagnosed with Sweet syndrome in our clinic between 2005 and 2011 were included in the study. The epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory findings were retrospectively evaluated. Results: A total of 31 patients with Sweet’s syndrome - 24 female (77.4%, 7 male (22.6%; aged 23-82 years – included in the study. The average age of the patients was 48 years. Cutaneous lesions were most frequently localized in the upper extremity. Conjunctivitis was the common systemic manifestation, followed by fever, arthralgia, and myalgia. The most common trigger factor was infections of the upper respiratory tract. In histopathological evaluations of skin biopsies, dense neutrophil infiltration compatible with Sweet syndrome was detected in the dermis. Also, findings of vasculitis were determined in 3 patients. Discussion: The clinical and laboratory findings in our study are mostly similar to those reported in the literature. We found evidence of vasculitis in 10% of cases, therefore, we think the presence of vasculitis does not necessarily rule out the diagnosis of Sweet syndrome

  7. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-environment simulation, learners can obtain not only technical skills but also non-technical skills, such as leadership, team work, communication, situation awareness, decision-making, and awareness of personal limitations. SBME is also effective for integration of clinical medicine and basic medicine. In addition, technology-enhanced simulation training is associated with beneficial effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and patient-related outcomes. To perform SBME, effectively, not only simulators including high-fidelity mannequin-type simulators or virtual-reality simulators but also full-time faculties and instructors as professionals of SBME are essential in a clinical skills laboratory for SBME. Clinical skills laboratory is expected to become an integrated medical education center to achieve continuing professional development, integrated learning of basic and clinical medicine, and citizens' participation and cooperation in medical education. PMID:22449990

  8. Understanding the interface between clinical and laboratory staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankie van den Broek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interface between clinicians and laboratory staff is where the two meet and work together to provide quality care to their clients (patients. Effectiveness of the interface depends on the way the two groups of professionals relate to and communicate with each other. The number and type of tests requested and the use of the test results for clinical decision making can be influenced by the interface between clinicians and laboratory staff. A model to understand the factors and dynamics around the interface is lacking.Objectives: To propose a new conceptual model to gain insight and analyse factors that influence the laboratory–clinical staff interface.Methods: To develop the conceptual model, a literature study was performed, regulatory guidelines and standards for laboratories were analysed and discussions were held with experts on the topic.Result: A conceptual model and analytical framework provided good guidance in understanding and assessing the organisational and personal factors shaping the interface. The model was based on three elements: (1 the three phases of communication (pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical; (2 the organisational and personal factors of interaction; and (3 the socio-political, economic and cultural context in which clinicians and laboratory staff operate.Conclusion: Assessment of the interface between clinicians and laboratory workers can be performed in a systematic way. Applying this model will provide information to managers of health institutions and heads of laboratories and clinical departments about what happens when clinicians and laboratory staff interact, thus aiding them in designing strategies to improve this interface. Normal 0 21 false false false NL X-NONE X-NONE

  9. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  10. 42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory... SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. For a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test that is assigned a new...

  11. Education in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in various European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the complexity and heterogeneity of the educational systems, across Europe, aids in the identification of new initiatives in defining the core competences and skills necessary to practice the profession. Basic education of those who practice laboratory medicine, in European countries, may be in medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry or science. Their postgraduate education may last quite a variable time: from several months to several years, depending on the country. Some countries ha...

  12. 77 FR 64598 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... Hotel. A. Aging and Clinical Geriatrics........ November 28, 2012...... *VA Central Office....

  13. 78 FR 66992 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... City Hotel. Clinical Application of Genetics....... December 5, 2013 *VA Central Office....

  14. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme: A Research-Inspired Methods Optimization Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willbur, Jaime F.; Vail, Justin D.; Mitchell, Lindsey N.; Jakeman, David L.; Timmons, Shannon C.

    2016-01-01

    The development and implementation of research-inspired, discovery-based experiences into science laboratory curricula is a proven strategy for increasing student engagement and ownership of experiments. In the novel laboratory module described herein, students learn to express, purify, and characterize a carbohydrate-active enzyme using modern…

  15. Environmental Regulation of Plant Gene Expression: An Rt-qPCR Laboratory Project for an Upper-Level Undergraduate Biochemistry or Molecular Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickelberg, Garrett J.; Fisher, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the "FLOWERING LOCUS C" gene, a key regulator of floral timing in "Arabidopsis thaliana" plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate…

  16. Risk Management in Clinical Laboratory: from Theory to Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Eliza David Remona; Minodora Dobreanu

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests ensure approximately 70% of the medical decisions, so that the time until the release of the results and its accuracy are critical for the diagnosis and the efficiency of the treatment [1]. Risk management involves both the anticipation of what could happen erroneous and the assessment of errors’ frequency as well as the consequences or the severity of the effects caused by it, and finally to decide what can be done in order to reduce the risk to an acceptable clinic...

  17. Bringing the Excitement and Motivation of Research to Students; Using Inquiry and Research-Based Learning in a Year-Long Biochemistry Laboratory: Part I--Guided Inquiry--Purification and Characterization of a Fusion Protein--Histidine Tag, Malate Dehydrogenase, and Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Kristopher; Smith, Jennifer; Wallert, Mark A.; Provost, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    A successful laboratory experience provides the foundation for student success, creating active participation in the learning process. Here, we describe a new approach that emphasizes research, inquiry and problem solving in a year-long biochemistry experience. The first semester centers on the purification, characterization, and analysis of a…

  18. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-env...

  19. Study on the environmental perception in clinical laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Sérgio Marques Júnior; Walter Romero Ramos e Silva Júnior; Geraldo Barroso Cavalcanti Júnior; Dany Geraldo Kramer Cavalcanti e Silva; Anésio Mendes de Sousa; Aurean de Paula Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    This study objectified to investigate the environmental perception of the technician of clinical analyses laboratories, in the city of the Natal, state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, focusing the environmental aspects and impacts, the strategical importance of the environment management for the activity, as well as the knowledge of norms and applied ambient resolutions to the sector. A research was carried through type survey, exploratory and descriptive using a questionnaire, applied in 82 ...

  20. Clinical and laboratory profile of dengue in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul; Faizal, Baiju P.; Vijayakumar, Priya; Paul, George; Sharma, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world with a 30-fold increase in incidence in the last 50 years. Approximately, 50 million dengue infections occur annually. Aim: To study the various clinical and laboratory manifestations of dengue in the elderly and observe for any variations in IgM titer elevation with progression of age. Design: Retrospective observational study. Subjects and Methods: Medical charts of all patients admitted to the Divisi...

  1. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Christopher W.K.; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K.

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase...

  2. Clinical, laboratory and pathological findings in sub-acute monensin intoxication in goats

    OpenAIRE

    Deljou, Mahdi; Aslani, Mohammad Reza; Mohri, Mehrdad; Movassaghi, Ahmad Reza; Heidarpour, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Toxic effects of monensin, a polyether antibiotic mainly used as a coccidiostat, have been described in a wide range of animals. The present study was performed to investigate the toxic effects of monensin in goats. Seven adult goats were administered sodium monensin, 13.5 mg kg-1, daily for five consecutive days via gastric gavage. Monensin toxicity was evaluated by clinical signs, serum biochemistry and pathology. Monensin exposure caused diarrhea, tachycardia and reduction in ruminal movem...

  3. Clinical versus laboratory for estimating of dehydration severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Malaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute gastroenteritis is a common cause of dehydration and precise estimation of dehydration is a vital matter for clinical decisions. We try to find how much clinically diagnosed scales are compatible with laboratory tests measures. Materials and Methods : During 2 years 95 infants and children aged between 2 and 108 months entered to emergency room with acute gastroenteritis. They were categorized as mild, moderate and severe dehydration, their recorded laboratory tests include blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatinine, venous blood gases values were expressed by means ±95% of confidence interval and compared by mann-whitney test in each groups with SPSS 16, sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio measured for defined cut off values in severe dehydration group, P value less than 0.05 was significant. Result : Severe dehydration includes 3% of all hospitalization due to dehydration. Laboratory tests cannot differentiate mild to moderate dehydration definietly but this difference is significant between severe to mild and severe to moderate dehydration. Conclusion : R outine laboratory test are not generally helpful for dehydration severity estimation but they can be discriminate severe from mild or moderate dehydration exclusively. Creatinine higher than 0.9 mg/dl and Base deficit beyond-16 are specific (90% for severe dehydration estimation in infant and children.

  4. Speciation of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, P D; Myrick, B

    1982-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the API Staph System for the speciation of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Three hundred and seventy-one coagulase-negative clinical isolates were studied; 50% of these could be speciated using the code profiles of the API System. By reference to the Kloos and Schleifer schema, 93% of the isolates could be speciated. The distribution of the various staphylococcal species in clinical specimens was determined. It was concluded that the API Staph System would be a satisfactory method of speciation if the data base could be expanded. Such speciation may at times be helpful in interpreting the significance of coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates in the clinical laboratory. PMID:7173176

  5. Correlation between the limit values of laboratory and clinical mycotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanov Igor M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of feed for the presence of fungi and mycotoxins is a request necessary to meet in order to ensure a healthy and economical production in livestock. These tests are related to legal regulation which prescribes the maximum legislated content (MLC, both for the presence of mycotoxins and the total number of fungi in certain feeds. Health problems that can occur during the production of animals are sometimes caused by the presence of mycotoxins in the feed. Laboratory testing is a good practice to confirm a suspicion, and allows timely treatment of contaminated feed. Potential problems arise under circumstances when there is a clinical outcome of mycotoxicosis and animal and laboratory findings suggest that the obtained values are below the level that is within the MLC. For these reasons, the subject of our research was to investigate the occurrence of mycotoxins and mold in feed, as well as the clinical presentation for animals that were fed with the feed with allowed values of these agents according to the recommended levels. The aim of this paper was to highlight the problems associated with clinical correlation of sick animals and laboratory findings, and suggest their overcoming. In the period of one year, a total of 176 samples of feed (complete mixture for broilers, corn and soy products were examined for the presence of fungi, 106 samples were examined for the presence of mycotoxins and 26 flocks of broilers and turkeys were clinically observed. Standard methods were used for isolation of molds and the ELISA test was used for the detection of mycotoxins. Clinical and pathomorphological observation of the flocks was done to determine the natural indicators of production. Studies indicated a problem because clinical and pathomorphological findings in some cases were not correlated with laboratory findings of molds and mycotoxins in the feed, and in some cases it did not necessarily mean that the animals were healthy. Synergism and

  6. Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hashemzadeh

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Henoch-Schoenlein purpura (HSP is the most common vasculitis in children. It is characterized by purpura, arthritis, gasterointestinal involvment and glumerulonephritis. There is a male to female predominance. It is estimated that some infections such as BHGAS can predispose to HSP. Methods: In a retrospective study we evaluated clinical and laboratory findings in patients with HSP diagnosis admitted to Ghaem and Imam Raza hospitals in Mashad, Findings: It is known that skin, joint and gastrointestinal involvement is the most common presentation of disease. In our patients, kidney disorders were not detected. Hyperleukocytosis, positive CRP, elevated ESR and ASO titers were frequently observed laboratory signs in these patients Conclusion: In this study HSP had a good prognosis and we didn’t any kidney complication in our subjects.

  7. Laboratory and clinical profile of dengue: A study from Mumbai

    OpenAIRE

    D Turbadkar; A Ramchandran; Mathur, M; Gaikwad, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dengue an endemic disease in most subtropical and tropical regions of the world is causing severe epidemics in India. An alarming rise of dengue has also been seen in Mumbai, during the recent years. Aim and Objective: The study was conducted to know the prevalence of dengue infection, based on laboratory rapid screening tests for IgM and IgG antibodies and the confirmatory IgM ELISA test and to study the seasonal variation and the clinical profile in these cases. Material and Met...

  8. Epidemiological, clinical and sleep laboratory evaluations of insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, E. O.; Kales, A.; Kales, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have contributed to the understanding of the total scope of the insomnia problem, both in terms of the incidence of sleep difficulties, and the extent and frequency of hypnotic drug use. Clinical studies - at the Sleep Research and Treatment Center - have been used to evaluate the medical, psychological, pharmacological and situational factors contributing to insomnia, and to evaluate the psychotherapy and chemotherapy best suited to treatment of insomnia. The sleep laboratory studies were of two types: (1) the study of sleep induction, sleep maintenance, and sleep stages, and (2) the use of hypnotic drugs, emphasizing their effectiveness in inducing and maintaining sleep, and the duration of this effectiveness.

  9. All-ceramic systems: laboratory and clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, Petra C; Schultheis, Stefan; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A

    2011-04-01

    Several all-ceramic systems have been developed in dentistry to meet the increased expectations of patients and dentists for highly aesthetic, biocompatible, and long-lasting restorations. However, early bulk fractures or chippings have led the research community to investigate the mechanical performance of the all-ceramic systems. This overview explores the current knowledge of monolithic and bilayer dental all-ceramic systems, addressing composition and processing mechanisms, laboratory and clinical performance, and possible future trends for all-ceramic materials. PMID:21473997

  10. Thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The present studies have shown that GSH metabolism arose in the purple bacteria and cyanobacteria where it functions to protect against oxygen toxicity. Evidence was obtained indicating that GSH metabolism was incorporated into eucaryotes via the endosymbiosis giving rise to mitochrondria and chloroplasts. Aerobic bacteria lacking GSH utilize other thiols for apparently similar functions, the thiol being coenzyme A in Gram positive bacteria and chi-glutamylcysteine in the halobacteria. The thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes is thus seen to be much more highly diversified than that of eucaryotes and much remains to be learned about this subject.

  11. Biochemistry interview transcript 3

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  12. Biochemistry interview transcript 9

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  13. Biochemistry interview transcript 4

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  14. Biochemistry interview transcript 10

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  15. Biochemistry interview transcript 5

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  16. Biochemistry interview transcript 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  17. Biochemistry interview transcript 8

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  18. Biochemistry interview transcript 2

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  19. Biochemistry interview transcript 7

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  20. Biochemistry interview transcript 6

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    A series of personal interviews were carried out following on from the Project StORe questionnaire. Of the original 46 Biochemistry respondents, 11 indicated that they would be willing to be interviewed. Each potential interviewee was contacted during May 2006 and 10 interviews in total were conducted during June and July 2006. Of these, 5 were telephone interviews and 5 were conducted face-to-face. Each interview was with a single individual apart from the final face-to-face interview, which...

  1. Severe scorpion envenomation in Brazil. Clinical, laboratory and anatomopathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupo, P; Jurca, M; Azeedo-Marques, M M; Oliveira, J S; Hering, S E

    1994-01-01

    Scorpion stings in Brazil are important not only because of their incidence but also for their potential ability to induce severe, and often fatal, clinical situations, especially among children. In this report we present the clinical and laboratory data of 4 patients victims of scorpion stings by T. serrulatus, who developed heart failure and pulmonary edema, with 3 of them dying within 24 hours of the sting. Anatomopathologic study of these patients revealed diffuse areas of myocardiocytolysis in addition to pulmonary edema. The surviving child presented enzymatic, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic changes compatible with severe cardiac involvement, which were reversed within 5 days. These findings reinforce the need for continuous monitoring of patients with severe scorpion envenoming during the hours immediately following the sting. PMID:7997776

  2. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have a... testing; clinical consultant. 493.1453 Section 493.1453 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  3. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of women with uterine leiomiyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür ÖZKUL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare clinical and laboratory findings of women with or without uterine leiomyoma.Study group consisted of 82 women with uterine leiomyoma and the control group comprised 42 healthy women. Women’s age, gravity, parity, blood groups, pattern of menstrual cycles, complaints at presentation, fertility, ultrasonographical findings, surgical operations and thyroid function tests were evaluated.There were no significant differences in blood group distribution, gravity, parity and thyroid function test results between the patients and the control subjects (P>0.05. A significant difference was found in the complaints at presentation between two groups (P<0.001. Mentrual cycles irregularity was more frequently found in the patients compared with the controls (57.3% vs. 42.9%, respectively, P=0.009. Although no infertile woman was found in the control group, 8.5% of patients were found to have infertility. The sensitivity of ultrasonography was found to be 97.6%. Except for the existence of higher infertility rate and the menstrual cycles irregularities, no significant difference was found in the clinical and laboratory findings between women with or without uterine leiomyoma. Therefore, physical examination and imaging methods are remained as the most important diagnostic tools for uterine leiomyoma.

  4. 76 FR 38342 - Medicare Program; Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule: Signature on Requisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ...; Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule: Signature on Requisition AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services... physician or qualified non- physician practitioner on a requisition for clinical diagnostic laboratory tests paid under the Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule (CLFS). In addition, this proposed rule would...

  5. 42 CFR 405.515 - Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services billed by physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services... Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.515 Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services billed... limitation on reimbursement for markups on clinical laboratory services billed by physicians. If a...

  6. Towards quantitative biochemistry: research and reports in biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokholyan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nikolay V DokholyanDepartment of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USASince the mid twentieth century the field of biochemistry has evolved significantly (Figure 1. Advances made in the fields of structural, chemical, and systems biology, physics, and computation have shaped the new field of biochemistry such that the emphasis became the cellular-wide view of molecular life at the atomic scale. The principal paradigm in the field shifted from focusing on a single or a few biological molecules to focusing on their cellular- and intracellular-wide networks. This shift has resulted in more interdisciplinary approaches to biochemical research, which nowadays combines techniques and strategies from a broad range of fields. The evolution of the field of biochemistry resulted in closer connections to other fields, such as medicinal chemistry, physiology, and medicine. Biochemistry is also one of the central components of the emerging translational medicine paradigm.

  7. Concept mapping enhances learning of biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Surapaneni, Krishna M.; Tekian, Ara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Teaching basic science courses is challenging in undergraduate medical education because of the ubiquitous use of didactic lectures and reward for recall of factual information during examinations. The purpose of this study is to introduce concept maps with clinical cases (the innovative program) to improve learning of biochemistry course content. Methods: Participants were first year medical students (n=150) from Saveetha Medical College and Hospital (India); they were randomly d...

  8. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice L. Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To characterize the clinical, laboratory, and anthropometric profile of a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease type I managed at an outpatient referral clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional outpatient study based on a convenience sampling strategy. Data on diagnosis, management, anthropometric parameters, and follow-up were assessed. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were included (median age 10 years, range 1-25 years, all using uncooked cornstarch therapy. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (range, 1-132 months, and 19 patients underwent liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Overweight, short stature, hepatomegaly, and liver nodules were present in 16 of 21, four of 21, nine of 14, and three of 14 patients, respectively. A correlation was found between height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores (r = 0.561; p = 0.008. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients.

  9. Autoimmune thyroiditis goitrogenic. Aspects of clinical and laboratorial diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To asses the accuracy achieved by the A.C.A.T. and other clinical and laboratorial criterion in the diagnoses of T.A.I.B. we investigated twenty patients with goiter and antimicrossomal antibodies titres of 1/1.600 or more. Analysing the parameters useful in the diagnosis, we found a significant correlation between the antimicrossomal antibodies titres and the basal TSH concentration, an elevated basal TSH and an exaggerated response to TRH independent of the patient clinical status reflecting in the majority of the cases a state of subclinical hypotyroidism; an irregular appearance of the radioisotope thyroid scan and a positive response to a perchlorate discharge test. We conclude that from the parameters useful in the T.A.I.B. diagnosis, the A.C.A.T. detection mainly the antimicrossomal antibodies, is an excellent tool to detect patients with a clinical suspect of thyroid auto-immune disease and when we found high tires in a patient with goiter and an elevated basal TSH concentration we can suggest T.A.I.B. diagnosis. (author)

  10. Lean-Agile Adaptations in Clinical Laboratory Accredited ISO 15189

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vilaplana Pérez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It’s introduced Lean techniques in a Clinical Laboratory to improve the operability and the efficiency in continuous processes of analysis, failsafe systems, analysis of areas of value pursuit of zero defects and reduction of waste, and it promote continuous improvement in presented difficulties in adapting to the changing needs of the healthcare environment. Whereas it is necessary to incorporate certification and accreditation, note that the adaptability of the clinical laboratory to the changing needs of physicians in obtaining analytical information is reduced. The application of an agile methodology on analytical systems can provide a line of work that allows the incorporation of planning short work cycles on equips quickly with operational autonomy on the basis of demand and respecting the accreditation requirements and flexibility to ensure adequate performance as the intercomparison of results from the different units analytics, analytical quality and turnaround times. Between 2012 and 2014, a process of analysis and improvement was applied to circuits, a 5 s system, transportation of samples, inventory of reactive and samples, motion of personal and samples, reductions of waiting and delays, overproduction, over processing, and defects of results and reports. At last it seems necessary to apply the Agile methodology to adapt to the evolving necessities in time and the different origins of the samples. It’s have used modular systems where the modules of this study are programmed with immunoassay techniques and it has reduced the operative modules depending on the required activity, ensuring the goals of turnaround times, analytic quality, service, health care continuity, and keeping up with the ISO 15189 accreditation requirements. The results of applying the concept of Lean-Agile to a modular system allows us to reduce the associated costs to the seasonal variation of the health care demand and to adapt the system to the changes on

  11. Teaching human genetics in biochemistry by computer literature searching.

    OpenAIRE

    Proud, V. K.; Schmidt, F J; Johnson, E D; Mitchell, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    We describe a new user-intense-learning experience that incorporates the teaching of clinical and research applications of human genetics in biochemistry while training first-year medical students to develop skills in computer access to the literature. Human genetics was incorporated into the biochemistry curriculum by providing each student with experience in on-line literature searching in MEDLINE, using Grateful Med, in order to write an abstract about a specific inherited biochemical diso...

  12. Review of clinical and laboratory features of human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantur B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Brucella spp. continues to pose a human health risk globally despite strides in eradicating the disease from domestic animals. Brucellosis has been an emerging disease since the discovery of Brucella melitensis by Sir David Bruce in 1887. Although many countries have eradicated B. abortus from cattle, in some areas B. melitensis and B. suis have emerged as causes of this infection in cattle, leading to human infections. Currently B. melitensis remains the principal cause of human brucellosis worldwide including India. The recent isolation of distinct strains of Brucella from marine mammals as well as humans is an indicator of an emerging zoonotic disease. Brucellosis in endemic and non-endemic regions remains a diagnostic puzzle due to misleading non-specific manifestations and increasing unusual presentations. Fewer than 10% of human cases of brucellosis may be clinically recognized and treated or reported. Routine serological surveillance is not practiced even in Brucella - endemic countries and we suggest that this should be a part of laboratory testing coupled with a high index of clinical suspicion to improve the level of case detection. The screening of family members of index cases of acute brucellosis in an endemic area should be undertaken to pick up additional unrecognised cases. Rapid and reliable, sensitive and specific, easy to perform and automated detection systems for Brucella spp. are urgently needed to allow early diagnosis and adequate antibiotic therapy in time to decrease morbidity / mortality. The history of travel to endemic countries along with exposure to animals and exotic foods are usually critical to making the clinical diagnosis. Laboratory testing is indispensable for diagnosis. Therefore alertness of clinician and close collaboration with microbiologist are essential even in endemic areas to correctly diagnose and treat this protean human infection. Existing treatment options, largely based on

  13. Chapter IV: ultrafast biochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chergui, M. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Kjelstrup, S. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Meuwly, M. [Universitaet Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Schuler, B. [University of Zuerich (ETH), Zurich (Switzerland); Thor, J. van [Imperial College London (IC), London (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    The whole report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland takes a look at the scientific opportunities offered by the institute's SwissFEL X-ray Laser facility. In this sixth part, initial events and fluctuations in biochemical processes at the atomic scale are discussed. Sub-nanosecond processes are fundamental to biochemistry and will be accessible to the ultra-short pulses of the SwissFEL. Time and length scales of biochemical reactions are discussed, as is the photo-initiation of biochemical processes. Time-resolved measurement techniques are looked at. Fluorescence resonant energy transfer is discussed. As an example, the photo cycle of bacteriorhodopsin is examined. The dynamics of protein folding and catalytic action are also looked at. Mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics is discussed

  14. Laboratory and clinical profile of dengue: A study from Mumbai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Turbadkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue an endemic disease in most subtropical and tropical regions of the world is causing severe epidemics in India. An alarming rise of dengue has also been seen in Mumbai, during the recent years. Aim and Objective: The study was conducted to know the prevalence of dengue infection, based on laboratory rapid screening tests for IgM and IgG antibodies and the confirmatory IgM ELISA test and to study the seasonal variation and the clinical profile in these cases. Material and Method: A retrospective study of laboratory test results and clinical profile of suspected dengue cases was carried out in a tertiary care hospital over a period between January 2004 and November 2007. Result: Of the 3 677 samples processed by rapid test for antibodies against dengue (Denguchek, 503 (13.67% gave positive results. Fifty-six samples (26.41% were positive by IgM Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA test, of 212 rapid positive samples processed by ELISA test. Our study comprised of 315 adult and 188 pediatric cases. The common symptom of dengue was fever, icterus, myalgia, and headache. Thrombocytopenia (platelet counts <75 000/cmm was seen in 386 (76.74% cases. Seventy-seven cases (15.30% positive by rapid screening tests for dengue antibodies were also positive for IgM/IgG antibodies against Leptospira by Dridot test (Rapid test. Of these, 49 (63.64% were confirmed to be positive for dengue antibodies by the ELISA test. Conclusion: As dengue causes increased morbidity and mortality and requires prompt diagnosis and treatment for the proper management of these cases, the rapid screening test for IgM/IgG antibodies helps clinicians toward achieving this goal.

  15. Study on the environmental perception in clinical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Marques Júnior

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study objectified to investigate the environmental perception of the technician of clinical analyses laboratories, in the city of the Natal, state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, focusing the environmental aspects and impacts, the strategical importance of the environment management for the activity, as well as the knowledge of norms and applied ambient resolutions to the sector. A research was carried through type survey, exploratory and descriptive using a questionnaire, applied in 82 laboratories getting a return tax of 53.65%. The results of the descriptive analyses and statistical point with respect to environmental conscience of the interviewed, therefore the majority (75% described the activities of the sector as of great impact on the environment, however with little knowledge on ISO 14001 and practical of ambient protection in the sector of public health. It is concluded that a program of environmental qualification for the sector becomes necessary, in order to improve the knowledge of the professionals of the area and mitigation of risks.

  16. Concept mapping enhances learning of biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna M. Surapaneni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teaching basic science courses is challenging in undergraduate medical education because of the ubiquitous use of didactic lectures and reward for recall of factual information during examinations. The purpose of this study is to introduce concept maps with clinical cases (the innovative program to improve learning of biochemistry course content. Methods: Participants were first year medical students (n=150 from Saveetha Medical College and Hospital (India; they were randomly divided into two groups of 75, one group attending the traditional program, the other the innovative program. Student performance was measured using three written knowledge tests (each with a maximum score of 20. The students also evaluated the relevance of the learning process using a 12-item questionnaire. Results: Students in the innovative program using concept mapping outperformed those in the traditional didactic program (means of 7.13–8.28 vs. 12.33–13.93, p<0.001. The students gave high positive ratings for the innovative course (93–100% agreement. Conclusion: The new concept-mapping program resulted in higher academic performance compared to the traditional course and was perceived favorably by the students. They especially valued the use of concept mapping as learning tools to foster the relevance of biochemistry to clinical practice, and to enhance their reasoning and learning skills, as well as their deeper understanding for biochemistry.

  17. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Akın

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to evaluate clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with Kawasaki disease (KD in Konya region of Turkey. Methods: The hospital records of patients who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of KD in the Pediatrics Clinics of Konya Training and Research Hospital between May 2010 and June 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Seven cases were found to have the diagnosis of KD, two of whom were incomplete KD. Oropharynx changes were the most common (100% feature in our patients. Five (71% patients had bulbar conjunctivitis. Three (43% patients had erythema at the site of BCG inoculation. Adenopathy was present in all of our patients with the classical form. A desquamation was observed in one case at the seventh day of fever. No cardiac manifestation was seen. Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and thrombocytosis were present in all patients. All of the patients were received intravenous immunoglobulin in the first ten days of the fever. Conclusion: KD should be considered as a possible diagnosis in any child presenting with prolonged fever. BCG reaction can be attributed as a diagnostic criterion for incomplete form of the disease especially in countries where BCG vaccination is routinely performed. Early treatment is essential to prevent cardiovascular complications.

  18. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of dengue fever in travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Khokhlova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of clinical and laboratory symptoms in 35 adult patients with denger fever, Novosibirsk residents, which travelled in endemic countries, mostly Tailand. The classic form of the disease was determined in all cases. The moderate form was in 71,5% patients, the severe form was in the rest ones. The diagnosis of dengue was verified by detection of specific immunoglobulin M and in some cases immunoglobulin G and also virus dengue NS1 antigen by immunochromatography. The dominant clinical symptoms in observed patients were fever for 3–8 days (100%, mostly high one (71,4%, asthenia (97,1%, anorexia (100%, myalgia or/and arthralgia (77,1%, exantema (60%, hepatomegaly (62,8%. The gematologic indicators were represented with thrombocytopenia in 91,4% patients (from 167 to 20×109/l и leucopenia in 85,7% patients (from 3,9 to 1,1×109/l. The cytolitic syndrom was revealed in 80% patients with predominance of aspartate aminotransferase activity in early period of the disease. 

  19. Baseline morbidity in 2,990 adult African volunteers recruited to characterize laboratory reference intervals for future HIV vaccine clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Stevens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An understanding of the health of potential volunteers in Africa is essential for the safe and efficient conduct of clinical trials, particularly for trials of preventive technologies such as vaccines that enroll healthy individuals. Clinical safety laboratory values used for screening, enrolment and follow-up of African clinical trial volunteers have largely been based on values derived from industrialized countries in Europe and North America. This report describes baseline morbidity during recruitment for a multi-center, African laboratory reference intervals study. METHODS: Asymptomatic persons, aged 18-60 years, were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study at seven sites (Kigali, Rwanda; Masaka and Entebbe, Uganda; Kangemi, Kenyatta National Hospital and Kilifi, Kenya; and Lusaka, Zambia. Gender equivalency was by design. Individuals who were acutely ill, pregnant, menstruating, or had significant clinical findings were not enrolled. Each volunteer provided blood for hematology, immunology, and biochemistry parameters and urine for urinalysis. Enrolled volunteers were excluded if found to be positive for HIV, syphilis or Hepatitis B and C. Laboratory assays were conducted under Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Of the 2990 volunteers who were screened, 2387 (80% were enrolled, and 2107 (71% were included in the analysis (52% men, 48% women. Major reasons for screening out volunteers included abnormal findings on physical examination (228/603, 38%, significant medical history (76, 13% and inability to complete the informed consent process (73, 13%. Once enrolled, principle reasons for exclusion from analysis included detection of Hepatitis B surface antigen (106/280, 38% and antibodies against Hepatitis C (95, 34%. This is the first large scale, multi-site study conducted to the standards of GCLP to describe African laboratory reference intervals applicable to potential volunteers in

  20. Survey of CF mutations in the clinical laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Angela

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since it is impossible to sequence the complete CFTR gene routinely, clinical laboratories must rely on test systems that screen for a panel of the most frequent mutations causing disease in a high percentage of patients. Thus, in a cohort of 257 persons that were referred to our laboratory for analysis of CF gene mutations, reverse line probe assays for the most common CF mutations were performed. These techniques were evaluated as routine first-line analyses of the CFTR gene status. Methods DNA from whole blood specimens was extracted and subjected to PCR amplification of 9 exons and 6 introns of the CFTR gene. The resulting amplicons were hybridised to probes for CF mutations and polymorphisms, immobilised on membranes supplied by Roche Molecular Systems, Inc. and Innogenetics, Inc.. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing of suspicious fragments indicating mutations were done with CF exon and intron specific primers. Results Of the 257 persons tested over the last three years (referrals based on 1 clinical symptoms typical for/indicative of CF, 2 indication for in vitro fertilisation, and 3 gene status determination because of anticipated parenthood and partners or relatives affected by CF, the reverse line blots detected heterozygote or homozygote mutations in the CFTR gene in 68 persons (26%. Eighty-three percent of those affected were heterozygous (47 persons or homozygous (10 persons for the ΔF508 allele. The only other CF-alleles that we found with these tests were the G542X allele (3 persons, the G551D allele (3 persons, the 3849+10kb C-T allele (2 persons the R117H allele (2 persons and the 621+1G-T allele (1 person. Of the fifteen IVS8-5T-polymorphisms detected in intron 8, seven (47% were found in males referred to us from IVF clinics. These seven 5T-alleles were all coupled with a heterozygous ΔF508 allele, they make up 35% of the males with fertility problems (20 men referred to us. Conclusions

  1. Insect Biochemistry Goes to School .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo R. Cunha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many arthropods feed on vertebrate blood and eventually transmit diseases to the human being. Ordinary citizens are continuously exposed to vectors of major diseases and thus prone to contamination. In the present study we have evaluated a new approach regarding the basic biochemistry mechanism that regulates thebiology of Triatominaes, well known as vectors of Chagas Disease. We have used a comic book "Carlos Chagas: 100 years of the discovery of a hero", produced by researchers at our laboratory. The main concepts presented include: neurochemistry of insect olfaction, hemostasis, blood digestion, redox balance to mention some. The material was applied between 60 pupils of theseventh year of elementary school. The work is divided into two phases: an assessment of the concepts that thestudents bring their experiences into the classroom by producing conceptual maps followed by the intervention with the comic and production ofnew conceptual maps under the influence of activity with the material. Analysis of 18conceptual maps obtained from 06 different groups at three different points revealedthat the average score 07 at the beginning of theevaluation went to an average of 45 at the end of the study. This result suggests that a change in the approach of content can give encouragement to students to better develop the theme of contributing to a proper process of conceptual change.

  2. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... laboratory must have a clinical consultant who meets the qualification requirements of § 493.1417 of this... complexity testing; clinical consultant. 493.1415 Section 493.1415 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  3. 78 FR 59704 - Medicare, Medicaid, and CLIA Programs; Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... requirements of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) for a period of 6 years. DATES... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare, Medicaid, and CLIA Programs; Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 Exemption of Laboratories Licensed by the State of...

  4. Discussion on bilingual teaching of Biochemistry in six-year-clinical medicine and English majors%六年制临床医学与英语专业生物化学双语教学探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟静; 孙凌云; 张媛英; 伊淑莹

    2012-01-01

    In order to deepen the medical education reform, improve teaching quality of Biochemistry, we started bilingual teaching in 2003 in 6-year clinical medicine and English speciality, from syllabus design, material selection and preparation, teaching method reform and other aspects of attempt. Through nearly 10 years of trials and efforts, we have made bilingual teaching mode according to the characteristics of students' specialty and professional basis. Sampling survey reveals that the level of students' satisfaction towards bilingual teaching of Biochemistry is 29%, that of general satisfaction is 56%, and of dissatisfaction is 15%. In the evaluation organized by the university for teaching effect, our performance has been increasing year by year.%为了深化医学教育改革,进一步提高生物化学教学质量,我们教学团队从2003年开始在6年制临床医学与英语专业试行双语教学,从教学大纲制定、教材选择与编写、教学方法改革等多方面进行了尝试.通过近10年的尝试和努力,我们根据学生专业特点和专业基础形成了该专业学生的双语教学模式.抽样问卷调查显示学生对生物化学双语教学满意者达29%,基本满意达56%,不满意者为15%.而且在学校组织的教学效果评价中,成绩逐年提高.

  5. Biochemical Neuroscience Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This biochemistry lab is set up for protein analysis using Western blot, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, immunohistochemistry, and bead-based immunoassays. The...

  6. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  7. Biochemistry Teaching in the Undergraduate Medical Course at Universidade Federalde Viçosa

    OpenAIRE

    L. Moreira Lima; R. Siqueira-Batista; L.A. Santana; Gomes, A. P.; A. M. Pilon; Oliveira, M.G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background:The current competencies and abilities required for the training of medical professionals, recommended by the National Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Medicine (DCN) have initiated discussions about the teaching of biochemistry in medical schools. Objective: This study aimed to describe the rationale of education in the Clinical Laboratory Applieddisciplines – (LAC) I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII – which will be taught from first to eighth period of medical school at U...

  8. 77 FR 26069 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following three panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science.... Clinical Research Program will meet on June 7-8, 2012, at *VA Central Office and not at Sheraton...

  9. 76 FR 24974 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following four panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science... clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one hour at...

  10. 75 FR 57833 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... Plaza Clinical Research Program December 3, 2010 *VA Central Office Mental Hlth & Behav Sci-A December...

  11. 78 FR 22622 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... June 7, 2013 U.S. Access Board. Aging and Clinical Geriatrics........ June 10, 2013 VA Central...

  12. 77 FR 20489 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services.... Neurobiology-A June 1, 2012..... Sheraton Suites--Old Town Alexandria. Clinical Application of June 1,...

  13. 76 FR 79273 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the public...

  14. 75 FR 23847 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and ] Development Services Scientific Merit.... Clinical Research Program June 9, 2010 *VA Central Office. Oncology June 10-11, 2010....... L'Enfant...

  15. 77 FR 23810 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services.... Neurobiology-A June 1, 2012........ Sheraton Suites--Old Town Alexandria. Clinical Application of June 1,...

  16. 76 FR 19188 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit.... Clinical Research Program June 13, 2011 VA Central Office.* Gastroenterology June 13, 2011 L'Enfant...

  17. 76 FR 1212 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to...

  18. Establishing a stem cell culture laboratory for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elíseo Joji Sekiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem/progenitor cells are found in different human tissues. An in vitro cell culture is needed for their isolation or for their expansion when they are not available in a sufficient quantity to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The level of complexity of these new technologies requires adequate facilities, qualified personnel with experience in cell culture techniques, assessment of quality and clear protocols for cell production. The rules for the implementation of cell therapy centers involve national and international standards of good manufacturing practices. However, such standards are not uniform, reflecting the diversity of technical and scientific development. Here standards from the United States, the European Union and Brazil are analyzed. Moreover, practical solutions encountered for the implementation of a cell therapy center appropriate for the preparation and supply of cultured cells for clinical studies are described. Development stages involved the planning and preparation of the project, the construction of the facility, standardization of laboratory procedures and development of systems to prevent cross contamination. Combining the theoretical knowledge of research centers involved in the study of cells with the practical experience of blood therapy services that manage structures for cell transplantation is presented as the best potential for synergy to meet the demands to implement cell therapy centers.

  19. Clinical, demographic, and laboratory characteristics of children with nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas, David J; Becton, Lauren J; Tutman, Jeffrey; Lindsay, Laura A; Wahlquist, Amy H

    2016-06-01

    While the incidence of pediatric kidney stones appears to be increasing, little is known about the demographic, clinical, laboratory, imaging, and management variables in this patient population. We sought to describe various characteristics of our stone-forming pediatric population. To that end, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of pediatric patients with nephrolithiasis confirmed by imaging. Data were collected on multiple variables from each patient and analyzed for trends. For body mass index (BMI) controls, data from the general pediatrics population similar to our nephrolithiasis population were used. Data on 155 pediatric nephrolithiasis patients were analyzed. Of the 54 calculi available for analysis, 98 % were calcium based. Low urine volume, elevated supersaturation of calcium phosphate, elevated supersaturation of calcium oxalate, and hypercalciuria were the most commonly identified abnormalities on analysis of 24-h urine collections. Our stone-forming population did not have a higher BMI than our general pediatrics population, making it unlikely that obesity is a risk factor for nephrolithiasis in children. More girls presented with their first stone during adolescence, suggesting a role for reproductive hormones contributing to stone risk, while boys tended to present more commonly at a younger age, though this did not reach statistical significance. These intriguing findings warrant further investigation. PMID:26467033

  20. A biochemistry discipline designed for the nutrition course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A.G. Bianco

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is widely considered an essential background in a Nutrition Course framework. At theFaculdade de Saude Publica, USP, it is a direct requirement to eight disciplines of the syllabus and anindirect requirement to another nine disciplines. Nevertheless, a previous interview study involvingNutrition students and Nutritionists revealed a contradictory image of Biochemistry. Although stu-dents and Nutritionists admitted the important role played by Biochemistry, most of the respondentsdeclared that they could not foresee any application of Biochemical contents in their professional life.Aiming to change this situation, a deep intervention in the Biochemistry discipline was carried on.The discipline was planned in such a way that all the contents to be taught was directly derived fromsubjects or situations matching the interests of nutrition students. Instead of a classical lecture basedcourse, collaborative learning was the methodological choice, taking advantage of practical activitiesinvolving educational software and laboratory work as well. The course was carried on in 180 hoursand a variety of strategies were employed, especially small group discussion and problem solving. Thestudents were given a booklet containing all the exercises and problems, which acted as course guide.At the end of the course, an evaluation survey was carried out. It is noticeable that, according tostudents answers: 100% agreed that Biochemistry was intimately linked to Nutrition; 83% appreciatedthe didactical methodologies employed; 89% would like to continue studying Biochemistry in a furtherdiscipline; 96% declared that the discipline has raised their interest in Biochemistry. In respect tothe assessment of the students, these results are in accordance with the opinion of teachers and TAsengaged in restructuring Biochemistry courses.

  1. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Christopher W K; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K

    2004-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Treatment has been empirical; initial potent antibiotic cover, followed by simultaneous ribavirin and corticosteroids, with or without pulse high-dose methylprednisolone, have been used. The postulated disease progression comprises (1) active viral infection, (2) hyperactive immune response, and (3) recovery or pulmonary destruction and death. We investigated serum LD isoenzymes and blood lymphocyte subsets of SARS patients, and found LD1 activity as the best biochemical prognostic indicator for death, while CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer cell counts were promising predictors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Plasma cytokine and chemokine profiles showed markedly elevated Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma, inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-12, neutrophil chemokine IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Th1 chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) for at least two weeks after disease onset, but there was no significant elevation of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Corticosteroid reduced IL-8, MCP-1 and IP-10 concentrations from 5-8 days after treatment. Measurement of biochemical markers of bone metabolism demonstrated significant but transient increase in bone resorption from Day 28-44 after onset of fever, when pulse steroid was most frequently given. With tapering down of steroid

  2. Valores bioquímicos sanguíneos en hembras brahman bajo condiciones de pastoreo Clinical biochemistry values in serum from grazing brahman cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor Alonso Villa

    1999-12-01

    g/L; globulines 40±10 g/L; urea 3.31±1.43 mmol/L; AST 158±34 U/L; Ca 2.50±0.21 mmol/L, and Mg 1.40±0.44 mmol/L. The increasing of beta-hydroxybutyrates and globulines, and a high activity of AST were the most frequent alterations. The serum biochemistry values for grazing B. indicus cattle are similar to the described values for B. taurus.

  3. Implementation of a companion diagnostic in the clinical laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mancini, Irene; Pinzani, Pamela; Simi, Lisa;

    2015-01-01

    on restrictions of the method used. In relation to these aspects herein we report an opinion paper of the Working Group Personalized Laboratory Medicine jointly constituted by the European Federation of Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) and by the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT) using...

  4. 78 FR 28292 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... location changes have been made for the following panel meetings of the of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit...

  5. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  6. Restructuring clinical laboratories in Ontario--a '90s revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, D; Treloar, M

    1996-01-01

    The results of the first-ever province-wide survey of laboratory restructuring initiatives in Ontario, Canada are presented. These initiatives coincide with the historically largest financial cuts to the publicly funded health-care delivery system in Ontario, Canada's most populous province. The laboratory system includes both public hospital and commercial sectors. A survey was mailed to every laboratory director in the province, with a 73% response rate from the hospital sector. The results show that most hospital laboratories are restructuring, the bed count of the hospital is not a determinant of change, and downsizing and multiskilling of staff are the most frequent strategies. Many hospital laboratories were also considering regional alliances or contracting out part or all of their services. Also, the survey showed that the majority of laboratories in community hospitals did not have Laboratory Information Systems, in contract to the situation in teaching facilities. Most hospitals employed some form of utilization management, with the most popular being education of their users. Many respondents viewed the effect of these changes on staff morale with disquiet and expressed anxiety about the potential adverse effects on quality. In many ways, these findings mirror those reported in the United States. PMID:10159526

  7. Introducing a Method for Achieving Standardization and Harmonization in Clinical and Research Laboratory Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastmardi, M. (MSc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Proficiency testing schemes as a part of quality system in clinical and research laboratory centers provides the opportunity to evaluate the quality of test results. In this paper, we try to introduce the proficiency testing schemes as a useful method for achieving standardization and homogenization of test results in clinical and research laboratory centers. Keywords: Proficiency Testing Schemes; Quality Improvement; Laboratory Centers

  8. Laboratory approach for diagnosis of toluene-based inhalant abuse in a clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raka Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The steady increase of inhalant abuse is a great challenge for analytical toxicologists. This review describes an overview of inhalant abuse including the extent of the problem, types of products abused, modes of administration, pharmacology and effects of inhalants, the role of laboratory, interpretation of laboratory results and clinical considerations. Regular laboratory screening for inhalant abuse as well as other substance abuse and health risk behaviors must be a part of standard clinical care.

  9. Implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines within the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL)

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, Christopher A.; Sanchez, Ana M.; Garcia, Ambrosia; Thomas N Denny; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    The EQAPOL contract was awarded to Duke University to develop and manage global proficiency testing programs for flow cytometry-, ELISpot-, and Luminex bead-based assays (cytokine analytes), as well as create a genetically diverse panel of HIV-1 viral cultures to be made available to National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers. As a part of this contract, EQAPOL was required to operate under Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) that are traditionally used for laboratories conducting ...

  10. CLSI-derived hematology and biochemistry reference intervals for healthy adults in eastern and southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Karita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical laboratory reference intervals have not been established in many African countries, and non-local intervals are commonly used in clinical trials to screen and monitor adverse events (AEs among African participants. Using laboratory reference intervals derived from other populations excludes potential trial volunteers in Africa and makes AE assessment challenging. The objective of this study was to establish clinical laboratory reference intervals for 25 hematology, immunology and biochemistry values among healthy African adults typical of those who might join a clinical trial. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Equal proportions of men and women were invited to participate in a cross sectional study at seven clinical centers (Kigali, Rwanda; Masaka and Entebbe, Uganda; two in Nairobi and one in Kilifi, Kenya; and Lusaka, Zambia. All laboratories used hematology, immunology and biochemistry analyzers validated by an independent clinical laboratory. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines were followed to create study consensus intervals. For comparison, AE grading criteria published by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Division of AIDS (DAIDS and other U.S. reference intervals were used. 2,990 potential volunteers were screened, and 2,105 (1,083 men and 1,022 women were included in the analysis. While some significant gender and regional differences were observed, creating consensus African study intervals from the complete data was possible for 18 of the 25 analytes. Compared to reference intervals from the U.S., we found lower hematocrit and hemoglobin levels, particularly among women, lower white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and lower amylase. Both genders had elevated eosinophil counts, immunoglobulin G, total and direct bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine phosphokinase, the latter being more pronounced among women. When graded against U.S. -derived DAIDS AE grading criteria

  11. The National Market for Medicare Clinical Laboratory Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Current Medicare payment policy for outpatient laboratory services is outdated. Future reforms, such as competitive bidding, should consider the characteristics of...

  12. THE PRESENCE OF BIOCHEMISTRY EXPERIMENTS IN TEXTBOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E.S. Rocha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Being present in high school in chemistry and biology disciplines, biochemistry is to explain the chemical and biological reactions in cells. His concepts are seen as abstract and difficult to understand and can be contextualized through experimentation. Experimentation is used in the classroom to allow students to view the applicability of the contents through observation, creating hypotheses, discussion and conclusions. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of experimentation in biochemistry content  in high school books. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this way, it was analyzed the presence of experimental activities in the textbooks approved by the National Textbook Plan 2015 "Biology 1", authored by César da Silva Junior, Sezar Sasson and Nelson Caldini Junior, and in the book " Chemistry - Volume 3 "by Martha Reis. RESULTS: At the end of the unit where the biochemical concepts are covered in the book "Biology 1" is presented an interdisciplinary project called "Enzymes - chemical tools of life" that proposes four experiments on catalase, pH and contact surface enzyme-substrate. They are easy activities to be implemented with affordable materials. Already at the Chemistry book, when addressing the biochemistry there is only one proposal for experimental activity called "Glycolic Extract of milk proteins". In this case, we need materials like food processor and enameled pots, which can hinder your performance in virtual classes, however, the experiment is easy to perform. Both books contain questions after the experimental proposals enhancing the questioning of the activities and understanding the contents addressed. CONCLUSIONS: The present experimental activities in the textbooks are mostly easy to apply and is not required sophisticated equipment of Sciences laboratories. It also allows the contextualization of theory and practice enhancing the process of teaching and learning with the proposals made.

  13. Contributions of Analytical Chemistry to the Clinical Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogerboe, Kristen J.

    1988-01-01

    Highlights several analytical techniques that are being used in state-of-the-art clinical labs. Illustrates how other advances in instrumentation may contribute to clinical chemistry in the future. Topics include: biosensors, polarization spectroscopy, chemiluminescence, fluorescence, photothermal deflection, and chromatography in clinical…

  14. Implications of the introduction of laboratory demand management at primary care clinics in South Africa on laboratory expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnostic health laboratory services are regarded as an integral part of the national health infrastructure across all countries. Clinical laboratory tests contribute substantially to health system goals of increasing quality of care and improving patient outcomes.Objectives: This study aimed to analyse current laboratory expenditures at the primary healthcare (PHC level in South Africa as processed by the National Health Laboratory Service and to determine the potential cost savings of introducing laboratory demand management.Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of laboratory expenditures for the 2013/2014 financial year across 11 pilot National Health Insurance health districts was conducted. Laboratory expenditure tariff codes were cross-tabulated to the PHC essential laboratory tests list (ELL to determine inappropriate testing. Data were analysed using a Microsoft Access database and Excel software.Results: Approximately R35 million South African Rand (10% of the estimated R339 million in expenditures was for tests that were not listed within the ELL. Approximately 47% of expenditure was for laboratory tests that were indicated in the algorithmic management of patients on antiretroviral treatment. The other main cost drivers for non-ELL testing included full blood count and urea, as well as electrolyte profiles usually requested to support management of patients on antiretroviral treatment.Conclusions: Considerable annual savings of up to 10% in laboratory expenditure are possible at the PHC level by implementing laboratory demand management. In addition, to achieve these savings, a standardised PHC laboratory request form and some form of electronic gatekeeping system that must be supported by an educational component should be implemented.

  15. Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 4th edition of Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry Edited by Eldor Paul continues in the vein of the 3rd edition by providing an excellent, broad-reaching introduction to soil biology. The new edition improves on the previous by providing extensive supplementary materials, links to outs...

  16. Commentary: Biochemistry Re-Natured

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    In his last commentary on "Biochemistry Denatured," this author dealt with his perception that college students today have spent too little of their childhood years playing outside in nature and as a consequence have not learned basic things about the world from personal experience. This "nature-deficit disorder" removes many opportunities for…

  17. Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology investigates the organization, compartmentalization, and biochemistry of eukaryotic cells and the pathology associated...

  18. Zirconia abutments and restorations: from laboratory to clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, M; Vichi, A; Zarone, F

    2015-03-01

    In last years the use of zirconia in dentistry has become very popular. Unfortunately, the clinical indications for a dental use of zirconia are not completely clear yet, neither are their limitations. The objective of this review was to evaluate the basic science knowledge on zirconia and to discuss some aspects of the clinical behavior of zirconia-based restorations. In particular, one of the goals was highlighting the possible correlation between in vitro and in vivo studies. The definition of concepts like success, survival and failure was still debated and the correlation between in vitro results and predictability of clinical behavior was investigated. PMID:25576437

  19. Does breast feeding influence liver biochemistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marianne Hørby; Ott, Peter; Juul, Anders;

    2003-01-01

    It is assumed that early feeding can affect liver biochemistry because breast-fed infants have a higher risk of hyperbilirubinemia than formula-fed infants. The authors sought to determine how feeding mode affected liver biochemistry in healthy term infants.......It is assumed that early feeding can affect liver biochemistry because breast-fed infants have a higher risk of hyperbilirubinemia than formula-fed infants. The authors sought to determine how feeding mode affected liver biochemistry in healthy term infants....

  20. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anet Papazovska Cherepnalkovski

    2015-12-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

  1. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level. PMID:25187892

  2. Postmortem biochemistry: Current applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsey, S L; Flanagan, R J

    2016-07-01

    The results of biochemical analyses in specimens obtained postmortem may aid death investigation when diabetic and alcoholic ketoacidosis is suspected, when death may have been the result of drowning, anaphylaxis, or involved a prolonged stress response such as hypothermia, and in the diagnosis of disease processes such as inflammation, early myocardial infarction, or sepsis. There is often cross-over with different disciplines, in particular with clinical and forensic toxicology, since some endogenous substances such as sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and insulin can be used as poisons. The interpretation of results is often complicated because of the likelihood of postmortem change in analyte concentration or activity, and proper interpretation must take into account all the available evidence. The unpredictability of postmortem changes means that use of biochemical measurements in time of death estimation has little value. The use of vitreous humour is beneficial for many analytes as the eye is in a physically protected environment, this medium may be less affected by autolysis or microbial metabolism than blood, and the assays can be performed with due precaution using standard clinical chemistry analysers. However, interpretation of results may not be straightforward because (i) defined reference ranges in life are often lacking, (ii) there is a dearth of knowledge regarding, for example, the speed of equilibration of many analytes between blood, vitreous humour, and other fluids that may be sampled, and (iii) the effects of post-mortem change are difficult to quantify because of the lack of control data. A major limitation is that postmortem vitreous glucose measurements are of no help in diagnosing antemortem hypoglycaemia. PMID:27131037

  3. Professional behaviors, sense of belonging, and professional socialization of early career clinical laboratory scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Janna Marie

    Professional socialization is a process that individuals experience as members of a profession and consists of the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences that influence and shape their professional identity. The process of professional socialization has not been studied in the clinical laboratory science profession. Clinical laboratory science is an allied health profession that is faced by a workforce shortage that has been caused by a decrease in new graduates, decreased retention of qualified professionals, and increased retirements. Other allied health professions such as nursing, athletic training, and pharmacy have studied professional socialization as a way to identify factors that may influence the retention of early career professionals. This mixed method study, which quantitatively used Hall's Professionalism Scale (1968) in addition to qualitative focus group interviews, sought to identify the professional attitudes and behaviors, sense of belonging, and professional socialization of early career clinical laboratory scientists. Early career clinical laboratory scientists were divided into two groups based upon the amount of work experience they had; new clinical laboratory science graduates have had less than one year of work experience and novice clinical laboratory scientists had between one and three years of work experience. This study found that early career clinical laboratory scientists have established professional identities and view themselves as members of the clinical laboratory science field within four proposed stages of professional socialization consisting of pre-arrival, encounter, adaptation, and commitment. New CLS graduates and novice clinical laboratory scientists were found to be at different stages of the professional stage process. New CLS graduates, who had less than one year of work experience, were found to be in the encounter stage. Novice clinical laboratory scientists, with one to three years of work experience, were found to

  4. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bacteria, viruses. protozoa and fungi was positive in 425 (49.76%) cases. From this number the test on bacteria was positive in 248 (58.62%) cases, on viruses it was positive in 165 (39.0%), on protozoa in 9 (2.12%) cases and on fungi only one case. Rotavirus was the most frequent one in viral test, it was isolated in 142 (86.06%) cases, adenoviruses were found in 9 (5.45%) cases and noroviruses in only one case. The same feces sample that contained rotavirus and adenoviruses were isolated in five cases, whereas rotavirus with bacteria was isolated in the same feces sample in five cases. The biggest number of cases 62 (43.66%) were of the age 6-12 months, whereas the smallest number 10 (7.04%) cases were of the age 37-60 months. There were 76 (53.52%) of cases of male gender, from rural areas there were 81 (57.04%) cases and there were 58 (40.80%) cases during the summer period. Among the clinical symptoms the most prominent were diarrhea, vomiting, high temperature, whereas the different degree of dehydration were present in all cases (the most common one was moderate dehydration). The most frequent one was isonatremic dehydration in 91 (64.08%) cases, less frequent one was hypernatremic dehydration in 14 (9.85%) cases. The majority of cases (97.89%) had lower blood pH values, whereas 67 (47.17%) cases had pH values that varied from 7.16 -7.20 (curve peak), normal values were registered in only 3 (2.11%) cases. Urea values were increased in 45 (31.07%) cases (the maximum value

  5. The Decline of Clinical Laboratory Science Programs in Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Janet Brown

    2000-01-01

    Enrollment in clinical laboratory science has declined over 50% since 1980. Reasons include lagging salaries, limited advancement opportunities, lack of doctoral-level faculty, and the expense of operating programs. Strategic organizational changes are needed to revive the field. (SK)

  6. Exploratory analyses of the association of MRI with clinical, laboratory and radiographic findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, Paul; van der Heijde, Désirée; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2011-01-01

    Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  7. The clinical autoimmunologist and the laboratory autoimmunologist: the two sides of the coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzoli, Renato; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this review is to analyze the causes of the increasing interest of laboratory medicine in the definition and characterization of a new sub-discipline, laboratory autoimmunology, concerning the development and the clinical use of tests for measuring circulating autoantibodies and the study of autoimmune serological reactions. The laboratory autoimmunologist's task includes knowledge of the range of technical solutions available to identify the different types of autoantibodies and provide laboratory consult for improving utilization of laboratory results. Along with the figure of the laboratory autoimmunologist, the position of clinical autoimmunologist not only has been proposed but has already found its first concrete applications. This is a specialist with a wide knowledge of those symptoms and diagnostic procedures necessary to identify autoimmune diseases, and who is familiar with the range of therapies available to treat various diseases. Cooperation between the two autoimmunology specialists will lead to a more up-to-date and efficient management of autoimmune patients. PMID:22349615

  8. Role of the clinical microbiology laboratory in nosocomial infections and infection control

    OpenAIRE

    Sönmez, Dr. Emine; Özerol, Dr. İbrahim Halil; Şahin, Dr. Kazım

    1996-01-01

    The prevention and control of hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections is a team effort requiring the cooperation of the hospital epidemiologist, infection control practitioner, and members of the clinical microbiology laboratory. The clinical microbiology laboratory clearly plays a key role in the diagnosis of nosocomial infections and is consulted frequently to assist in the epidemiologic investigation of nosocomial infection problems. In addition to performing routine isolation and identi...

  9. A Map for Clinical Laboratories Management Indicators in the Intelligent Dashboard

    OpenAIRE

    Azadmanjir, Zahra; Torabi, Mashallah; Safdari, Reza; Bayat, Maryam; Golmahi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: management challenges of clinical laboratories are more complicated for educational hospital clinical laboratories. Managers can use tools of business intelligence (BI), such as information dashboards that provide the possibility of intelligent decision-making and problem solving about increasing income, reducing spending, utilization management and even improving quality. Critical phase of dashboard design is setting indicators and modeling causal relations between them. The pa...

  10. LC-MS/MS in the Clinical Laboratory – Where to From Here?

    OpenAIRE

    Grebe, Stefan KG; Singh, Ravinder J

    2011-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has seen enormous growth in clinical laboratories during the last 10–15 years. It offers analytical specificity superior to that of immunoassays or conventional high performance/pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) for low molecular weight analytes and has higher throughput than gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Drug/Toxicology and Biochemical Genetics/Newborn Screening laboratories were at the vanguard of clinical LC-MS/M...

  11. Evaluation of clinical and laboratory predictors of fatality in patients with Hantavirus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kostakoglu, Uğur; Yılmaz, Gürdal; Volkan, Serkan; Sökel, Sevinc Kant; Kaya, Selcuk; Köksal, Iftihar

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the clinical and laboratory predictors of fatality among patients with Hantavirus infection. Material and methods: A retrospective study was conducted on the patients with Hantavirus infection between April 2009 and October 2011 at the Black Sea and the Mediterranean regions in Turkey. Demographic, clinical and laboratory findings of fatal cases and non-fatal cases at the admission were compared. Results: Twenty-two patients with confirmed Hantavirus infection...

  12. Evaluation of clinical and laboratory predictors of fatality in patients with Hantavirus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Uğur Kostakoğlu; Gürdal Yılmaz; Serkan Volkan; Sevinç Kant Sökel1; Selçuk Kaya; İftihar Köksal

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the clinical and laboratory predictors of fatality among patients with Hantavirus infection.Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted on the patients with Hantavirus infection between April 2009and October 2011 at the Black Sea and the Mediterranean regions in Turkey. Demographic, clinical and laboratory findings offatal cases and non-fatal cases at the admission were compared.Results: Twenty-two patients with confirmed Hantavirus infection were evalu...

  13. Quality management systems for your in vitro fertilization clinic's laboratory: Why bother?

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Jan I; Banker, Manish R; Late Peter Sjoblom

    2013-01-01

    Several countries have in recent years introduced prescribed requirements for treatment and monitoring of outcomes, as well as a licensing or accreditation requirement for in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics and their laboratories. It is commonplace for Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) laboratories to be required to have a quality control system. However, more effective Total Quality Management systems are now being implemented by an increasing number of ART clinics. In India, it is no...

  14. Clinical and laboratory update on the DEL variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuchnoi, Pornlada; Thongbus, Jairak; Srisarin, Apapan; Kerdpin, Usanee; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    Serological assays for the RhD blood group are based on detection of the RhD antigen on human red blood cells using a specific anti-D antibody. The weak expression of the RhD antigen in the DEL variant hinders the sensitivity of conventional serological assays. Evidence of anti-D immunization in patients with D-negativity who have received DEL-variant blood units has been reported in various populations. This observation has prompted the need for genetic epidemiological and clinical data on the DEL variant in the development of DEL molecular diagnostic testing. This review highlights the molecular features of the DEL variant, the clinical consequences of DEL-blood transfusion, and current approaches for detection of the DEL-variant for donor screening and transfusion. PMID:25316658

  15. Experimental Psychopathology: From laboratory studies to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Philippot

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, David Barlow (2004, a pioneer in the field of anxiety disorders, has proposed that psychologists should abandon the concept of psychotherapy and rather use the one of “psychological treatment”. The provoking idea behind this proposal is that the concept of psychotherapy, relying on the notion of “therapeutic school” should be discarded by professional psychologists because it relies too much on conceptions based on pre-scientific models. Barlow (2004 insists that, today, psychology as an empirical science has gathered sufficient knowledge and know-how to found clinical practice. It is no longer necessary to rely on pre-scientific theories. Further, Barlow’s perspective opens clinical practice to the entire field of psychology, i.e. to the advances accomplished by research on emotion, cognition, learning, development, etc.

  16. Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Iranian Children with Cyclic Neutropenia

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic neutropenia is a rare immunodeficiency syndrome, characterized by regular periodic oscillations in the circulating neutrophil count from normal to neutropenic levels through 3 weeks period, and lasting for 3-6 days. In order to determine the clinical features of cyclic neutropenia, this study was performed. Seven patients with cyclic neutropenia (3 males and 4 females), who experienced neutropenic periods every 3 weeks (5 with severe and 2 with moderate neutropenia), were investigated ...

  17. Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Patients with Breath Holding Spells

    OpenAIRE

    Özlem Özdemir; Serpil Çalışkan Can; Evren Semizel; Mehmet S. Okan

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics; physical findings, cardiological, hematological and neurological problems; treatment approaches; and the prognosis of children with breath holding spells.Materials and Method: Seventhy patients were included in this study. All patients were evaluated with detailed history and physical examination. Complete blood count, serum iron and iron binding capacity were studied; cardiological (telecardiography, electro...

  18. Gender Performance Differences in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenberger, Matthew M.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the historical performance of students at Michigan State University in a two-part biochemistry series Biochem I (n = 5,900) and Biochem II (n = 5,214) for students enrolled from 1997 to 2009. Multiple linear regressions predicted 54.9-87.5% of the variance in student from Biochem I grade and 53.8-76.1% of the variance in…

  19. Clinical and laboratory investigation of experimentaly infected broilers with CIAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapetanov Miloš C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken infectious anemia (CIA is widespread viral disease in countries with the intensive poultry industry. In susceptible birds CIAV causes anemia subcutaneous and intramuscular hemorrhages, lymphoid tissue atrophy immunosuppression, cachexia and increased mortality. Protection of progeny relies not only on age resistance but also on maternally delivered antibodies (Mabs so possessing the information on level and persistence of Mabs is of great significance. In our study experimental infection with CIAV was performed on one and seven days old broiler chickens from naturally infected parent flock during the rearing period. In infected birds, clinical signs hematological findings and humoral immune response were examined. After euthanasia, we looked for specific pathomorphological and histopathological changes that indicate the presence of CIAV infection. In all one and seven days old chickens maternally derived antibodies were established. No clinical signs of CIA were observed, hematological findings showed no deviation from referent values, and there were no specific pathomorphological and histopathological changes at postmortem examination. According to previous knowledge, only serological negative flock if infected in time of laying represent risk for vertical transmission to progeny where typical disease with mortality will appear. The absence of Mabs in one day old chickens is critical point in break of disease. Typical clinical picture in day old chickens rises only when vertical transmission occurs.

  20. Comprehensive evaluation and validation of targeted next-generation sequencing performance in two clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Pedro; Dang, Jennifer; Kim, James Wansoo; Lee, Sharon; Yoon, Jun-Hee; Kim, Thomas; Sailey, Charles J; Jablons, David M; Kim, Il-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has led to breakthroughs for genetic and genomic analyses and personalized medicine approaches for many diseases. More and more clinical laboratories are using NGS as a genetic screening tool for providing mutation information that is used to select the best treatment regimens for cancer patients. However, several obstacles prevent the routine implementation of NGS technology into the clinical molecular diagnosis setting: the sophisticated sample preparation process, high cost, time-consuming data analyses, as well as the reproducibility and accuracy of interpretation. To systematically evaluate the performance and quality of targeted NGS cancer panel analyses in clinical laboratories, we performed three different tests: i) laboratory-to-laboratory accuracy test, ii) intra-laboratory precision validation, and iii) limit of detection test, using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissue specimens, cell lines and mutation positive DNA. A laboratory-to-laboratory accuracy test performed using 51 samples showed 100% sensitivity and 99.97% specificity. For the intra-laboratory precision test, 100% reproducibility was observed. For the limit of detection test, KRAS mutations from samples diluted from 70 to 2% of mutant allele frequencies were detected correctly. We believe that the present study demonstrated the feasibility of clinical implementation of a targeted NGS cancer panel analysis for personalized medicine. PMID:27121194

  1. Laboratory-based surveillance in the molecular era : the TYPENED model, a joint data-sharing platform for clinical and public health laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesters, H G; Rossen, J W; van der Avoort, H; Baas, D; Benschop, K; Claas, E C; Kroneman, A; van Maarseveen, N; Pas, S; van Pelt, W; Rahamat-Langendoen, J C; Schuurman, R; Vennema, H; Verhoef, L; Wolthers, K; Koopmans, M

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory-based surveillance, one of the pillars of monitoring infectious disease trends, relies on data produced in clinical and/or public health laboratories. Currently, diagnostic laboratories worldwide submit strains or samples to a relatively small number of reference laboratories for characte

  2. Improvement of interpretation in cystic fibrosis clinical laboratory reports: longitudinal analysis of external quality assessment data

    OpenAIRE

    Berwouts, Sarah; Girodon, Emmanuelle; Schwarz, Martin; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Morris, Michael A.; Dequeker, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Participation in external quality assessment (EQA) is a key element of quality assurance in medical laboratories. In genetics EQA, both genotyping and interpretation are assessed. We aimed to analyse changes in the completeness of interpretation in clinical laboratory reports of the European cystic fibrosis EQA scheme and to investigate the effect of the number of previous participations, laboratory accreditation/certification status, setting and test volume. We distributed similar versions o...

  3. Laboratory approach for diagnosis of toluene-based inhalant abuse in a clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Raka Jain; Arpita Verma

    2016-01-01

    The steady increase of inhalant abuse is a great challenge for analytical toxicologists. This review describes an overview of inhalant abuse including the extent of the problem, types of products abused, modes of administration, pharmacology and effects of inhalants, the role of laboratory, interpretation of laboratory results and clinical considerations. Regular laboratory screening for inhalant abuse as well as other substance abuse and health risk behaviors must be a part of standard clini...

  4. 10 CFR 31.11 - General license for use of byproduct material for certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... in vitro clinical or laboratory testing. 31.11 Section 31.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing. (a) A general license is hereby issued to any physician, veterinarian in the practice of veterinary medicine, clinical laboratory or hospital to receive,...

  5. 77 FR 31620 - Medicare Program; Public Meeting in Calendar Year 2012 for New Clinical Laboratory Tests Payment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... Year 2012 for New Clinical Laboratory Tests Payment Determinations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... for Medicare payment under the clinical laboratory fee schedule (CLFS) for calendar year (CY) 2013... determinations for new clinical diagnostic laboratory tests under Part B of title XVIII of the Social...

  6. 42 CFR 414.506 - Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.506 Section 414.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR... FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.506 Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory...

  7. 10 CFR 32.71 - Manufacture and distribution of byproduct material for certain in vitro clinical or laboratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing under general license. 32.71 Section 32.71 Energy NUCLEAR... certain in vitro clinical or laboratory testing under general license. An application for a specific... hospitals and only for in vitro clinical or laboratory tests not involving internal or...

  8. 76 FR 10600 - Medicare Program; Public Meeting in Calendar Year 2011 for New Clinical Laboratory Tests Payment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... Year 2011 for New Clinical Laboratory Tests Payment Determinations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes for clinical laboratory tests in calendar year (CY) 2012. The meeting... that will be included in Medicare's Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule for CY 2012, which will...

  9. 78 FR 31560 - Medicare Program; Public Meeting in Calendar Year 2013 for New Clinical Laboratory Test Payment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... Year 2013 for New Clinical Laboratory Test Payment Determinations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... clinical laboratory fee schedule (CLFS) for calendar year (CY) 2014. DATES: Meeting Date: The public... clinical diagnostic laboratory tests under Part B of title XVIII of the Social Security Act (the Act)...

  10. Sesame seed allergy: Clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlollahi MR.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant-origin foods are among the most important sources of food allergic reactions. An increase in the incidence of sesame seed allergy among children and adults has been reported in recent years. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the prevalence, importance and clinical manifestations of sesame allergy among Iranian patients.Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 250 patients with suspected IgE-mediated food allergies completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick tests with sesame extract as well as cross-reacting foods (walnut, soya and peanut. Total IgE and sesame-specific IgE levels were measured. Patients with positive skin test reactions and/or IgE specific for sesame without clinical symptoms were considered sensitive to sesame. The patients who also had clinical symptoms with sesame consumption were diagnosed as allergic to sesame.Results: Of the 250 patients enrolled in this study, 129 were male and 121 female, with a mean age of 11.7 years. The most common food allergens were cow's milk, egg, curry, tomato and sesame. Sesame sensitivity was found in 35 patients (14.1%. Only five patients (2% had sesame allergy. Sesame-sensitive patients had a significantly higher frequency of positive prick test to cross-reacting foods when compared to non-sensitized patients (p=0.00. The type of symptom was independent of gender and age of the patients, but urticaria and dermatitis-eczema were significantly more frequent in sensitized patients (p=0.008.Conclusions: This is the first study addressing the prevalence of sesame seed allergy in Iranian population. We found sesame to be a common and important cause of food allergy. The panel of foods recommended for use in diagnostic allergy tests should be adjusted.

  11. Uterine transplantation research: laboratory protocols for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-García, C; Johannesson, L; Enskog, A; Tzakis, A; Olausson, M; Brännström, M

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the state-of the-art methods that are used in clinical organ transplantation today, as well as the major findings of recent experimental uterus transplantation (UTx) research regarding organ donation/retrieval, ischemic preservation, surgical techniques for anastomosis, immunosuppression and pregnancy. Absolute uterine factor infertility lacks treatment despite the major developments in infertility treatment and assisted reproduction. Concerning uterine factor infertile patients, genetic motherhood is only possible through gestational surrogacy. The latter can pose medical, ethical and legal concerns such as lack of control of life habits during surrogate pregnancy, economic motives for women to become surrogate mothers, medical/psychological pregnancy-related risks of the surrogate mother and uncertainties regarding the mother definition. Thus, surrogacy is non-approved in large parts of the world. Recent advances in the field of solid organ transplantation and experimental UTx provide a favourable and safe background in a scenario in which a human clinical UTx trial can take place. Protocols based on animal research over the last decade are described with a view to providing a scientifically guided approach to human UTx as an experimental procedure in the future. PMID:21900333

  12. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  13. A training session in a clinical simulation laboratory for the acquisition of clinical skills by newly recruited medical interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Akinobu; Shimura, Toshiro; Kim, Chol; Ishikawa, Gen; Haraguchi, Shuji; Ohno, Tadaaki; Hayashi, Hiroki; Nakano, Hiroshi; Nitta, Takashi; Takaoka, Masako

    2010-08-01

    In organized orientation programs for newly recruited medical interns of the Nippon Medical School Hospital, the working committee of the clinical simulation laboratory introduced a laboratory training session that was designed to improve the clinical skills of the medical interns. The session consisted of 6 training courses, comprising internal examination, tracheal intubation, auscultation of heart sounds, bandaging and the collection of samples of venous and arterial blood. Medical interns rotated to a new course every 30 minutes and did practical trainings in each of the 6 skills. A total of 36 newly recruited medical interns participated in the training session. The majority of medical interns took part in the practical training actively and positively. The session was efficiently carried out from the standpoints of human resources and the teaching hours involved. A post training questionnaire survey, completed by the medical interns, revealed that many of them valued the sessions for comprehensibility of the instructions, the descriptions in the manual and the content of the training; however, only 21% thought that they had successfully acquired the clinical skills. Medical interns must continually engage in self-training to steadily acquire basic clinical skills. The convenience of a clinical simulation laboratory, together with the reinforcement of the education of clinical skills during internship, is necessary to strengthen the educational benefits of the training session. PMID:20818139

  14. The Frequency of the Accidental Contamination with Laboratory Samples in Yazd Clinical Laboratories’ personnel in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari, AA. (PhD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: laboratory personnel have always accidental exposure to clinical samples, which can cause the transmission of infection. This threat can be prevented and controlled by education for the use of safety instruments. The purpose was to determine the frequency of accidental exposure to laboratory samples among Yazd laboratory personnel in 2011. Material and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 of Yazd clinical laboratory personnel. The data was collected, using a valid and reliable questioner, via interview and analyzed by means of SPSS software. Results: Eighty-six percent of the subjects reported an experience of accidental exposure to clinical samples, such as blood, serum and urine. The causes were carelessness (41% and work overload (29%. Needle- stick was the most prevalent injury (52% particularly in sampler workers (51% and in their hands (69%. There wasn’t significant relationship between accidental exposure to laboratory samples and the variables such as private and governmental laboratories (p=0.517, kind of employment (p=0.411, record of services (p=0.439 and academic degree (p=0.454. The subjects aged 20-29 (p=0.034 and worked in sampling unit had the highest accidental exposure. Conclusion: based on the results, inexperience of the personnel especially in sampling room, overload at work and ignorance of applying safety instruments are known as the most important reasons for accidental exposure to clinical samples. Keywords: Contamination; accidental Exposure; Infectious agents; laboratory; personnel

  15. A Two-Week Guided Inquiry Protein Separation and Detection Experiment for Undergraduate Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, James P.; Nolta, Kathleen V.

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for teaching protein separation and detection in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course is described. This experiment, performed in two, 4 h laboratory periods, incorporates guided inquiry principles to introduce students to the concepts behind and difficulties of protein purification. After using size-exclusion…

  16. Excellence in clinical laboratories: the standard ISO 15189:2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scipioni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available I laboratori clinici operano in stretto contatto con i pazienti e collaborano direttamente alla loro cura, in modo corresponsabile con i medici e i reparti ospedalieri. L’importanza della loro attività per la salute pubblica rende obbligatoria l’esplicitazione di alcuni punti finora spesso considerati ovvii. Ai pazienti dev’essere infatti garantito che: - i metodi di analisi utilizzati siano stati preliminarmente valutati, per confermare la loro rispondenza agli obiettivi dell’analisi stessa, verificati, per controllarne l’effettiva efficacia e, se necessario, validati per garantire che siano appropriati allo scopo; - il personale che esegue le analisi sia stato adeguatamente formato e quindi tecnicamente competente; - il laboratorio assicuri un’adeguata consulenza allo staff clinico che richiede le analisi, allo scopo di ottenere una sinergia tra il laboratorio e il clinico che ha in cura il paziente, sia nella fase di prelievo di materiale biologico, sia nella fase di interpretazione dei risultati. Tutto ciò è necessario per dimostrare ai pazienti

  17. Clinical and laboratory peculiarities of acute myocardial infarction after chronic tonsillitis

    OpenAIRE

    Shvarts Y.G.; Dzhukaeva Kh.R.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The definition of the relationship of clinical and laboratory features of acute myocardial infarction depending on the suffering of chronic tonsillitis. Materials and methods. The study included 54 patients with acute myocardial infarction suffering for 1-2 days. The collection of the anamnesis, assessment of clinical factors, inspection of the palatine tonsils, clinical and biochemical blood tests have been done. Markers of myocardial necrosis, an electrocardiogram with calculation of a...

  18. Comparison of clinical and laboratory characteristics of viral hepatitis A and E in Montenegro

    OpenAIRE

    Terzić Dragica; Mijović Gordana; Dupanović Brankica; Drašković Nenad; Švirtlih Neda

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis E has many similarities in with hepatitis A concerning clinical picture, route of transmission and nonexistence of chronicity. Comparison of clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with hepatitis A and E to estimate characteristics of these diseases. Material and methods Total of 54 patients divided into two groups was investigated: 27 had hepatitis A, others had hepatitis E. Detailed history past, clinical examination, liver function tests and ultrasonography of...

  19. Interpretative commenting: a tool for improving the laboratory-clinical interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2009-06-01

    The clinical interpretation of laboratory results is an integral part of laboratory services. However, while many clinical laboratories provide comments of some form or other in their reports, this provision varies from one country to another, and between laboratories in a single country. Over the last decade, the focus on medical errors and patient safety has spread worldwide, involving all medical disciplines, including laboratory medicine. While available evidence demonstrates that in recent decades an impressive reduction has been achieved in the rates of analytical errors in clinical laboratories, the pre- and post-analytic phases of the testing cycle are still error prone and, even more dramatic, affected by errors that could translate into harm and adverse events for patients. Interest in post-analytic errors, in particular, has increased the identification of problems not only before and during the reporting of laboratory results, but also in the physician's reactions to the transmission of data, their interpretation, and the appropriate action to take for the patient. Therefore, greater efforts should be made to facilitate the review, interpretation and utilization of test results. The continuation and expansion of interpretative commenting, part of a broad strategy to improve the transmission and communication of laboratory results, appear to be favored by several factors, including the introduction of new and complex tests, clinical and regulatory guidelines, data on clinicians' satisfaction and the impact of interpretative comments on patient outcomes. The appropriate training and education of laboratory professionals is a fundamental component in assuring quality and safety of interpretative comments. Moreover, quality assurance programs and an appropriate clinical audit are required to evaluate and improve upon this activity. PMID:19298798

  20. Clinical microbiology: Should microbiology be a clinical or a laboratory speciality?

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Clinical microbiology is a specific combination of knowledge, attitude and practice aimed at direct clinical involvement in infectious disease management using the core principles of medical microbiology and clinical medicine. In this article certain areas in microbiology, where a more proactive approach could make a significant difference in clinical outcome has been delineated. The article reiterates the role of a medical microbiologist in a hospital setting. The practices described are the...

  1. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more...... than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous...

  2. Clinical and laboratory findings associated with severe scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Seong-Hyung

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrub typhus is a mite-borne bacterial infection of humans caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi that causes a generalized vasculitis that may involve the tissues of any organ system. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated to severe complications from scrub typhus. Methods We conducted this prospective, case-control study on scrub typhus patients who presented to the Department of Internal Medicine at Chosun University Hospital between September, 2004 and December, 2006. Cases were 89 scrub typhus patients with severe complications and controls were 119 scrub typhus patients without severe complications. Results There were significant differences in the absence of eschar, white blood cell (WBC counts, hemoglobin, albumin, serum creatinine, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP, and active partial thromboplastin time (aPTT between the two groups. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that only the following four factors were significantly associated with the severe complications of scrub typhus: (1 age ≥ 60 years (odd ratio [OR] = 3.13, P = 0.002, confidence interval [CI] = 1.53-6.41, (2 the absence of eschar (OR = 6.62, P = 0.03, CI = 1.22-35.8, (3 WBC counts > 10, 000/mm3 (OR = 3.6, P = 0.001, CI = 1.65-7.89, and (4 albumin ≤ 3.0 g/dL (OR = 5.01, P = 0.004, CI = 1.69-14.86. Conclusions Our results suggest that clinicians should be aware of the potential for complications, when scrub typhus patients are older (≥ 60 years, presents without eschar, or laboratory findings such as WBC counts > 10, 000/mm3, and serum albumin level ≤ 3.0 g/dL. Close observation and intensive care for scrub typhus patients with the potential for complications may prevent serious complications with subsequent reduction in its mortality rate.

  3. Neurobrucellosis: Clinical and laboratory findings in 22 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoolinejad M

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a multisystem disease with diverse clinical presentations and involvement of the nervous system is considered to 5 to be 10% in adult patients and 1% in children. The presentations of neurobrucellosis includes meningoencephalitis, subarachnoid haemorrhage, myelitis, radiculoneuritis, intracerebral and epidural abscess, psychosis and vascular syndrome. Twenty-two patients with neurobrucellosis are described. Ten patients had meningoencephalitis, seven patients had meningitis, three patients had polyradiculopathy and one patient presented with spinal epidural abscess and one patient had brain abscess. Results of an agglutination test for Brucella in serum were positive for all patients (>1:160; eight of 15 patients had positive agglutination test in CSF. Five patients had positive blood cultures, 3 patients had positive bone marrow cultures and 2 of 15 patients had positive CSF cultures. All of cultures were Brucella Mellitensis. Antimicrobial treatment included concurrent administration of Doxycycline, Rifampin and Trimethoprim-Sulfametoxazole. Four patients received Dexamethason concurrently. In conclusion, nervous system involvement is a serious manifestation of brucellosis. As brucellosis is an endemic disease in Iran we suggest that brucellosis be investigated with neurological symptoms and signs.

  4. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course. PMID:27001769

  5. Clinical and laboratory features of human herpesvirus 6 chromosomal integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D A

    2016-04-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) comprises two separate viruses, HHV-6A and HHV-6B, although this distinction is not commonly made. HHV-6B is ubiquitous in the population with primary infection usually occurring in early childhood, and often resulting in febrile illness. HHV-6B is also recognized as a pathogen in the immunocompromised host, particularly in transplant recipients. HHV-6A is less well characterized and may have a more restricted prevalence. Both viruses are unique among the human herpesviruses in that the entire viral genome can be found integrated into the telomeric regions of host cell chromosomes. Approximately 1% of persons have inherited integrated viral sequences through the germline, and these individuals characteristically have very high viral loads in blood and other sample types. Emerging evidence suggests that HHV-6A and HHV-6B chromosomal integration may not just be an uncommon biological observation, but more likely a characteristic of the replication properties of these viruses. The integrated viral genome appears capable of excision from the chromosomal site and potentially allows viral replication. The clinical consequences of inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6 have yet to be fully appreciated. PMID:26802216

  6. Exploring a Laboratory Model of Pharmacogenetics as Applied to Clinical Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Smith, PharmD Candidate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate a pilot of a laboratory model for relating pharmacogenetics to clinical decision making. Case Study: This pilot was undertaken and evaluated to help determine if a pharmacogenetics laboratory should be included in the core Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. The placement of the laboratory exercise in the curriculum was determined by identifying the point in the curriculum where the students had been introduced to the chemistry of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA as well as instructed on the chemistry of genetic variation. The laboratory included cytochrome P450 2C19 genotyping relative to the *2 variant. Twenty-four students served as the pilot group. Students provided buccal swabs as the source of DNA. Students stabilized the samples and were then provided instructions related to sample preparation, polymerase chain reaction, and gel electrophoresis. The results were reported as images of gels. Students used a reference gel image to compare their results to. Students then applied a dosing algorithm to make a “clinical decision” relative to clopidogrel use. Students were offered a post laboratory survey regarding attitudes toward the laboratory. Twenty-four students completed the laboratory with genotyping results being provided for 22 students (91.7%. Sixteen students were wild-type (*1/*1, while six students were heterozygous (*1/*2. Twenty-three students (96% completed the post laboratory survey. All 23 agreed (6, 26.1% or strongly agreed (17, 73.9% that the laboratory “had relevance and value in the pharmacy curriculum”. Conclusion: The post pilot study survey exploring a laboratory model for pharmacogenetics related to clinical decision making indicated that such a laboratory would be viewed positively by students. This model may be adopted by colleges to expand pharmacogenetics education.

  7. Biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contributions of the group consist of six reports. The first is concerned with recent developments in the isolation and characterization of subcellular components of mammalian cells: the inhibition by imipramine of digitonin-induced lysis of mitochondrial membranes; age-dependent changes in mitochondrial sedimentability; peroxisomal enzymes; and collaborative studies on near-uv effects on bacterial respiration, radiation effects on mouse heart mitochondria, and toxicity and distribution of liposome-encapsulated drugs. Plant physiology is the theme of the next two reports. The first describes progress in a NASA-supported program on the involvement of organelles, especially dictyosomes, in the georesponse of roots, and the second covers work principally supported by ERDA on the interaction of light and gravity on differential growth of corn roots. Progress in liposome encapsulation of drugs is presented in three contributions. The first deals with studies on the toxicity, distribution, therapeutic action, and mechanism of encapsulated cancer chemotherapeutic agents; the second with morphologic studies, based principally on electron microscopy; and the third with alteration of liposomal surface properties by varying the lipid composition, in order to modify tissue distribution

  8. Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Iranian Children with Cyclic Neutropenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Rezaei

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic neutropenia is a rare immunodeficiency syndrome, characterized by regular periodic oscillations in the circulating neutrophil count from normal to neutropenic levels through 3 weeks period, and lasting for 3-6 days. In order to determine the clinical features of cyclic neutropenia, this study was performed. Seven patients with cyclic neutropenia (3 males and 4 females, who experienced neutropenic periods every 3 weeks (5 with severe and 2 with moderate neutropenia, were investigated in this study. They had been referred to Iranian Primary Immunodeficiency Registry during 23 years (1980-2003. The range of patients' ages was from 7 to 13 years (median 11 years. The median age at the onset of the disease was 12 months (1 month- 2 years and the median age of diagnosis was 2 (1.5-5 years, with a median diagnosis delay of 1 year (2 months- 5 years. Neutropenia was associated with leukopenia (3 patients, anemia (3 patients, and thrombocytopenia (1 patient. Patients were asymptomatic in healthy phase, but during the episode of neutropenia suffered from aphthous ulcers, abscesses and overwhelming infections. The most commonly occurred manifestations were: otitis media (6 cases, oral ulcers (5 cases, abscesses (4 cases, pneumonia (3 cases, diarrhea (3 cases, oral candidiasis (3 cases, cutaneous infections (2 cases, and periodontitis (2 cases. One of these patients subsequently died because of recurrent infections. Unusual, persistent or severe infections should be the initiating factors to search for an immune deficiency syndrome such as cyclic neutropenia, because a delay in diagnosis may result in chronic infection, irretrievable end-organ damage or even death of the patient.

  9. Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Patients with Breath Holding Spells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Özdemir

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics; physical findings, cardiological, hematological and neurological problems; treatment approaches; and the prognosis of children with breath holding spells.Materials and Method: Seventhy patients were included in this study. All patients were evaluated with detailed history and physical examination. Complete blood count, serum iron and iron binding capacity were studied; cardiological (telecardiography, electrocardiography, if necessary echocardiography and event recorder and neurological investigations (electroencephalography were done during the admission. Patients with iron deficiency anemia and iron deficiency were treated with ferrous sulphate orally. In patients with normal hematological values, no medication was used. After a two-month treatment period patients underwent control hematological evaluation. Frequency of the spells, age of disappearance of spells (defined as 6 months without spells, disappearance ratios between the three groups were compared. Results: The percentage of cyanotic, palloric and mixt type of breath holding spells of 70 patients included in the study were 67.1, 14.3 and 18.6, respectively. It was determined that psychogenic factors played a role in 77.1% of our patients. There were iron deficiency anemia in 39 (55.7%, iron deficiency in 12 (17.2% and normal hematological parameters in 19 (27.1% of 70 patients. The QTc values were normal in all of them. EEG’s were normal in 56 (80%, dysrhythmic in 11 (15.7% and pathologic in (4.3%. There was a positive family history of breath holding spells in 44.3% of those with breath holding spells. Conclusion: We determined that there was a correlation between the iron levels and the frequency of spells. The lower the iron levels the higher the frequency of spells. There was a dramatic decrease of 92% in spells with low doses of iron supplementation especially in the anemic group. (Journal of

  10. PNH revisited: Clinical profile, laboratory diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, nocturnal hemoglobinuria and thrombophila. This acquired disease caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins on the hematopoietic cells is uncommon in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year were collected. Clinical data (age, gender, various presenting symptoms, treatment information and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results of relevant diagnostic tests were documented i.e., urine analysis, Ham′s test, sucrose lysis test and sephacryl gel card test (GCT for CD55 and CD59. Results: A total of 5 patients were diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year. Presenting symptoms were hemolytic anemia (n=4 and bone marrow failure (n=1. A GCT detected CD59 deficiency in all erythrocytes in 4 patients and CD55 deficiency in 2 patients. A weak positive PNH test for CD59 was seen in 1 patient and a weak positive PNH test for CD55 was seen in 3 patients. All patients were negative by sucrose lysis test. Ham′s test was positive in two cases. Patients were treated with prednisolone and/or androgen and 1 patient with aplastic anemia was also given antithymocyte globulin. A total of 4 patients responded with a partial recovery of hematopoiesis and 1 patient showed no recovery. None of the patients received a bone marrow transplant. Conclusion: The study highlights the diagnostic methods and treatment protocols undertaken to evaluate the PNH clone in a developing country where advanced methods like flowcytometry immunophenotyping (FCMI and bone marrow transplants are not routinely available.

  11. Diabetic neuropathy: a clinical, laboratory and electrodiagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halar, E M; Graf, R J; Halter, J B; Brozovich, F V; Soine, T L

    1982-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and hyperglycemia and to assess the extent of NCV changes in adult-onset diabetic patients before and after diabetic treatment. Twenty-five diabetic males (mean age = 50.9 years) were tested twice prior to beginning diabetic treatment. Eighteen of these 25 were also tested at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after initiation of therapy. Both groups were compared to 23 age-matched controls. Each test session consisted of NCV and clinical sensory and blood chemistry testing. The findings revealed that, before treatment average NCVs of the median, peroneal sural, and tibial nerves and H-reflex latency results were all significantly impaired in diabetic subjects (p less than 0.025). No difference was found between right and left NCVs of the same nerve (p less than 0.05) and NCVs in the lower as well as the upper extremities were significantly reduced (p less than 0.05). Thus, it appears that the neuropathy in these patients was symmetrical and diffuse. Peroneal and median motor nerves showed the greatest amount of NCV slowing when compared to normal values. Furthermore, median, peroneal, and tibial motor NCVs and H-reflex latencies correlated significantly with the degree of hyperglycemia in diabetic subjects before treatment. After initiation of diabetic treatment, median motor NCVs after 1, 3, 6 and 12 months showed significantly improvement when compared to baseline NCV values (all p less than 0.05). Also, the improvement in median NCVs after 3 and 13 months and peroneal NCV after 3 months directly correlated to decreased fasting plasma glucose levels (p less than 0.05). PMID:7092528

  12. Clinical and Laboratory Investigation of Oral Allergy Syndrome to Grape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Falak

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is occasionally observed following consumption  of raw fruits  in  allergic adults. Since this  phenomenon  was  commonly  reported  in  Khorasan province of Iran; we intended to check if common  diagnostic tests could be applied for differential diagnosis of OAS to grapes.IgE reactivity of 84 patients with OAS to grape and 34 patients with OAS to other fruits were analyzed by in vivo and in vitro methods, and the results were compared with those of controls. The patients underwent skin prick test (SPT with common allergic pollen extracts as well as grape extract. The specific IgE  level to grape proteins was determined by an indirect ELISA. The correlation of SPT results with ELISA and western blotting patterns was checked by statistical methods.The results showed a significant correlation of grape SPT diameters with grape specific IgE levels. Furthermore,  a significant association of grape SPT results with IgE immunoreactivity of a 10 kDa  grape protein,  probably lipid transfer protein  (LTP was prominent. Immunoreactivity of other proteins was linked with mild clinical symptoms.The study showed a significant correlation of grape SPT results with grape total extract, as well as its 10 kDa component’s IgE reactivity. The results suggested that OAS to grape should not be considered as a main criterion in diagnosis of grape allergy and a combination of grape SPT results with evaluation of IgE reactivity to grape 10 kDa allergen should be considered to achieve a more reliable grape allergy diagnosis.

  13. Insect Biochemistry Goes to School .

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo R. Cunha; Cecília Cudischevitch; Willy Jablonka; Alan de Brito; Mário A. Silva-Neto

    2011-01-01

    Many arthropods feed on vertebrate blood and eventually transmit diseases to the human being. Ordinary citizens are continuously exposed to vectors of major diseases and thus prone to contamination. In the present study we have evaluated a new approach regarding the basic biochemistry mechanism that regulates thebiology of Triatominaes, well known as vectors of Chagas Disease. We have used a comic book "Carlos Chagas: 100 years of the discovery of a hero", produced by researchers at our labor...

  14. Quality of Control of Clinical-Biochemical Laboratories – Serbian Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Peric

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last 20 years in medical laboratories, numerous activities regarding quality and accreditation system were taken. Approach to this problem in European countries is different, so the task of the Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 to help the efforts to harmonize this issue. External quality control in clinical-chemical laboratories imposed the need for the implementation of quality management system. »Good laboratory practice« and its principles were adopted by nominated bodies, both international and national. In the beginning, the standard ISO 9001 was applied for certification and for accreditation EN 45001 and ISO Guide 25, which are prepared for testing and calibration laboratories. Standard ISO 17025 is the successor of the previous documents and for now it is a reference for mentioned laboratories. Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 made an amendment of the requirements for medical laboratories, which this standard describes. Standard draft ISO 15189 was adopted on February 2003 as a final version with requirements for medical laboratories.

  15. University of Tennessee Comparative Animal Research Laboratory accident in 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 4 February 1971, a 32-year-old research technologist performing seed irradiated experiments at the University of Tennessee Comparative Animal Research Laboratory was exposed to a Cobalt 60 source of 7700 curies for 40 seconds. Details of the accident, dose estimates from dosimetry studies, and acute biological clinical findings are discussed. Follow-up clinical data on the hematopoietic system, biochemistry, fingers, and blood counts are discussed

  16. Instrumentation of Microscale Techniques for Biochemistry Teaching at FES Zaragoza, UNAM

    OpenAIRE

    Araceli García-del Valle; María Teresa Corona-Ortega; Margarita Cruz-Millán; Antonia Guillermina Rojas-Fernández; Miguel Aguilar-Santelises; Leonor Aguila-Santelises

    2015-01-01

    Biochemistry teaching requires many laboratory sessions where theoretical knowledge may be put on test. At the same time, there is always some risk due to exposure to toxic materials, dangerous chemicals storage and waste disposal. Compliance with new regulations to prevent environmental contamination may also constitute a real hindrance for biochemistry teaching as experimental science. Therefore, we have designed microscale techniques, in order to reduce costs as well as the negative impact...

  17. Clinical, laboratory and pathological findings in sub-acute monensin intoxication in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deljou, Mahdi; Aslani, Mohammad Reza; Mohri, Mehrdad; Movassaghi, Ahmad Reza; Heidarpour, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Toxic effects of monensin, a polyether antibiotic mainly used as a coccidiostat, have been described in a wide range of animals. The present study was performed to investigate the toxic effects of monensin in goats. Seven adult goats were administered sodium monensin, 13.5 mg kg(-1), daily for five consecutive days via gastric gavage. Monensin toxicity was evaluated by clinical signs, serum biochemistry and pathology. Monensin exposure caused diarrhea, tachycardia and reduction in ruminal movements and body temperature. Significant increase of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase were observed in monensin exposed goats. Reduction of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and elevation of serum malondialdehyde and troponin I were inconsistent. In necropsy, there were effusions in body cavities, vacuolar degeneration and coagulative necrosis in cardiac and skeletal muscles and renal tubular necrosis. These findings suggested that monensin intoxication in goats leads to cardiac, skeletal and renal damage and a wide range of biochemical abnormalities. Oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of monensin poisoning. PMID:25568713

  18. Psychosocial and individual characteristics and musculoskeletal complaints among clinical laboratory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Farideh; Kasaeian, Amir; Noroozi, Pirasteh; Vatani, Javad; Taiebi, Seiyed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are an important health problem among healthcare workers, including clinical laboratory ones. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of MSDs and individual and psychosocial risk factors among clinical laboratory workers. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 156 workers of 30 clinical laboratories in 3 towns of Iran. The Nordic questionnaire with individual and psychosocial risk factors was used to collect data. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed. The prevalence of reported MSDs among the study population was 72.4% in the past 12 months. The most prevalent MSDs were pain in the lower back and neck; 42.7% and 33.3%, respectively. Significant relations were found between MSDs and age, gender, heavy work at home and job control (p workers were high and associated with age, gender, heavy work at home and job control. More research into measuring these factors and workplace physical demands is suggested. PMID:24934430

  19. Computer-Aided Generation of Result Text for Clinical Laboratory Texts

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzmak, Peter M.; Miller, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Efficient processing of non-numeric textual data is a frequent requirement with medical computer applications such as clinical laboratory result reporting. In such instances, it is often desirable that the computer control the generation of the text to ensure that the intended meaning is conveyed. This paper describes a technique for interactively selecting predefined text segments to form complex textual reports for laboratory tests. The approach, which uses algorithms based on augmented tra...

  20. Evaluation of four gentamicin and tobramycin assay procedures for clinical laboratories.

    OpenAIRE

    Witebsky, F G; Sliva, C A; Selepak, S T; Ruddel, M E; MacLowry, J D; Johnson, E E; Elin, R J

    1983-01-01

    Accuracy, precision, and clinical laboratory utility of the TDX (Abbott Laboratories), Auto-ICS (Beckman Instruments, Inc.), COBAS-Bio (Roche Analytical Instruments, Inc.) with reagent kits (Syva), and EMIT (Syva) for gentamicin and tobramycin serum assay were assessed. TDX, COBAS-Bio, and EMIT analytical systems showed a proportional bias of less than 10% for recovery studies and a coefficient of variation less than 5% for within-run precision. The results of the recovery studies with the Au...

  1. Practical aspects of the use of FMEA tool in clinical laboratory risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Elizabete Mendes; Pérsio de Almeida Rezende Ebner; Paschoalina Romano; Maurílio Pacheco Neto; Alexandre Sant’anna; Nairo Massakazu Sumita

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This paper presents the failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) tool in a clinical laboratory through the introduction of new technology for blood gas and serum ionized calcium in multi-parameter analyzers such as Point of Care Testing (POCT). OBJECTIVE: To present FMEA as a tool for risk managing and improvement with the introduction of new technologies in a public laboratory. METHODS: The change of multiparameter gas analyzer type POCT was defined and described as a process....

  2. [Assessment of the quality of laboratory diagnosis of intestinal parasitic diseases by the laboratories participating in the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhov, V N; Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Iu; Serdiuk, A P

    2014-01-01

    In 2010-2013, the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents ofparasitic diseases in the feces has been assessed by the specialists of the laboratories of the therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions (TPIs) and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, which are participants of the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing. Thirty-two specimens containing 16 species of human helminths and 4 species of enteric protozoa in different combinations were examined. The findings suggest that the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents of parasitic diseases is low in the laboratories of health care facilities and that the specialists of the laboratories of TPIs and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, do not not possess the knowledge and skills necessary to make a laboratory diagnosis of helminths and enteric protozoa. The average detection rates of helminths and protozoa were at a level of 64 and 36%, respectively. The correct results showed that the proportion of helminths and protozoa were 94.5 and 5.5%, respectively. According to the biological and epidemiological classification of helminths, there were higher detection rates for contact group parasites (Enterobius vermicularis and Hymenolepis nana) and geohelminths (Ascaris, Trichuris trichiura, and others). Biohelminths (Opisthorchis, tapeworms, and others) Were detectable slightly worse. PMID:25812407

  3. Postprandial biochemistry changes in penguins (Spheniscus demersus) including hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, Carolyn; Stremme, Donald W; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2010-06-01

    In a clinical setting, it is important to differentiate abnormal values that may be a normal change resulting from feeding and those that may be disease related. Such postprandial changes have been identified in mammalian and avian species. In the current study, pre- and postvalues for several routine biochemical analytes from penguins (Spheniscus demersus) were examined. Significant increases were found in uric acid, triglycerides, and bile acids (P abnormal biochemistry values in penguins. PMID:20597226

  4. Instrumentation of Microscale Techniques for Biochemistry Teaching at FES Zaragoza, UNAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli García-del Valle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry teaching requires many laboratory sessions where theoretical knowledge may be put on test. At the same time, there is always some risk due to exposure to toxic materials, dangerous chemicals storage and waste disposal. Compliance with new regulations to prevent environmental contamination may also constitute a real hindrance for biochemistry teaching as experimental science. Therefore, we have designed microscale techniques, in order to reduce costs as well as the negative impact of laboratory practical sessions due to risk and environmental contamination. To develop microscale techniques does not only mean to reduce equipment size and amount of the reagents that are required for the usual experiments. Microscale techniques serve particularly well as a motivating approach to experimental biochemistry teaching that produces highly motivated students at the same time that requires minor costs, decreases working time, laboratory space, reagents volume and diminishes the generation of dangerous waste. We have demonstrated all these positive effects in biochemistry teaching and prompted the formal implementation of microscale techniques into the formal activities from the Cell and Tissue Biochemistry Laboratory I (BCT-I from the Chemistry, Pharmacy and Biology (QFB curricula at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM. First, we reviewed the BCT-I manual, choosing all the laboratory practices that might be microscaled. Then, we elaborated and validated all necessary protocols to analyse linearity, accuracy and reproducibility of the determinations, demonstrating that microscale techniques allow truthful results, comparable to full scale techniques.

  5. 42 CFR 414.509 - Reconsideration of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.509 Section 414.509 Public Health CENTERS FOR... FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.509 Reconsideration of basis for and amount of payment for a new clinical diagnostic...

  6. The Relative Frequency, Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Adult Glomerulonephritidies in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Afsoon Emami Naini; A Amini Harandi; S Ossareh; A. Ghods; Bastani, B; Taheri, S

    2006-01-01

    Background: Renal diseases information is population-based and has great geographic variability. Due to the lack of national renal data registry system, there is no information on the prevalence rate, and clinical and laboratory features of various glomerulonephritidies (GNs) in Iran. Methods: In a retrospective cross sectional study, we analyzed 462 adult renal biopsies in Hashemi Nejad hospital, Tehran, Iran. We determined the prevalence rate and the frequency of different clinical and...

  7. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Automation in the 21st Century - Amat Victoria curam (Victory loves careful preparation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, David A; Overcash, David R; Reyes, Jaime

    2014-08-01

    The era of automation arrived with the introduction of the AutoAnalyzer using continuous flow analysis and the Robot Chemist that automated the traditional manual analytical steps. Successive generations of stand-alone analysers increased analytical speed, offered the ability to test high volumes of patient specimens, and provided large assay menus. A dichotomy developed, with a group of analysers devoted to performing routine clinical chemistry tests and another group dedicated to performing immunoassays using a variety of methodologies. Development of integrated systems greatly improved the analytical phase of clinical laboratory testing and further automation was developed for pre-analytical procedures, such as sample identification, sorting, and centrifugation, and post-analytical procedures, such as specimen storage and archiving. All phases of testing were ultimately combined in total laboratory automation (TLA) through which all modules involved are physically linked by some kind of track system, moving samples through the process from beginning-to-end. A newer and very powerful, analytical methodology is liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS has been automated but a future automation challenge will be to incorporate LC-MS/MS into TLA configurations. Another important facet of automation is informatics, including middleware, which interfaces the analyser software to a laboratory information systems (LIS) and/or hospital information systems (HIS). This software includes control of the overall operation of a TLA configuration and combines analytical results with patient demographic information to provide additional clinically useful information. This review describes automation relevant to clinical chemistry, but it must be recognised that automation applies to other specialties in the laboratory, e.g. haematology, urinalysis, microbiology. It is a given that automation will continue to evolve in the clinical laboratory

  8. Medical biochemistry in Macedonia: a profession for physicians and natural scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traikovska, S; Dzhekova-Stojkova, S

    2001-06-01

    Medical biochemistry or clinical chemistry in its roots is an interdisciplinary science between natural sciences and medicine. The largest part of medical biochemistry is natural science (chemistry, biochemistry, biology, physics, mathematics), which is very well integrated in deduction of medical problems. Medical biochemistry throughout the world, including Macedonia, should be a professional field open to both physicians and natural scientists, according to its historical development, theoretical characteristics and applied practice. Physicians and natural scientists follow the same route in clinical chemistry during the postgraduate training of specialization in medical biochemistry/clinical chemistry. However, in Macedonia the specialization in medical biochemistry/clinical chemistry is today regulated by law only for physicians and pharmacists. The study of clinical chemistry in Europe has shown its interdisciplinary character. In most European countries different professions, such as physicians, chemists/biochemists, pharmacists, biologists and others could specialize in clinical chemistry. The question for the next generation of specialists in Macedonia is whether to accept the present conditions or to attempt to change the law to include chemists/biochemists and biologists as well. The latter used to be a practice in Macedonia 20 years ago, and still is in many European countries. Such change in law would also result in changes in the postgraduate educational program in medical biochemistry in Macedonia. The new postgraduate program has to follow the European Syllabus, recommended by EC4. To obtain sufficient knowledge in clinical chemistry, the duration of vocational training (undergraduate and postgraduate) for all trainees (physicians, pharmaceutics, chemists/biochemists and biologists) should be 8 years. PMID:11506455

  9. Instructional Software for Biochemistry Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marson Guilherme Andrade

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the world has witnessed a revolution in the expansion and access to knowledge, whi-ch has dramatically changed the relationship between labor and production. According to UNESCO(United Nations Educational, Scientical and Cultural Organization and ILO (International LaborOrganization, in the of information it is fundamental that Higher Education Institutes educate pro-fessionals capable to update their knowledge in the course of professional life. The so-called life-longlearning s pointed out as a request for creating and maintaining jobs, and for supporting the develop-ment of nations as well. In such context, Biochemistry is a eld of knowledge which has outstandinglyexpanded its boundaries. Preparing the next generation of biochemists for the age of informationrequires the development of cognitive skills as an essential educational goal concerning graduationcourses, which have been historically limited to the exposition of contents. The achievement of suchobjective depends on many factors, including the development of suitable instructional materials thatcan improve the teaching and learning experience. This conference deals with the development ofinstructional software at the crossroad of Educational research, Informatics and Biochemistry. Theinvestigative approach leading to the development and improvement of instructional software for Bi-ochemical education will be discussed on the basis of the following issues: i motivating questionsto software development - teaching and learning problems; ii development of digital content: speci-c content, interface and interactivity; iii evaluation of the software s instructional eciency; ivexamples of softwares which have been conceived according to the discussed methodology.

  10. Symposium 19: The contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP towards Biochemistry teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayardo Baptista Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available K-Education(Portuguese Chair: V. Trindade Bayardo Torres; Clovis Wannmacher; Denise MacedoThe contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP towards Biochemistry teaching.O ensino de Bioquímica nos últimos 20 anosBayardo B. TorresDepartamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, USP. São Paulo, Brazil.Among the contributions of the Department of Biochemistry/USP one must recall:1. Winter school for graduate studentsThis course, now at the ninth edition, is intended for students in the final stage of their Masters or PhD in Biochemistry or related areas from any institution of higher education.Modern and important techniques are offered as possible support to help the student’s projects.2. Summer courses for undergraduate studentsThe Department offers every year, since 1999, complementary courses for undergraduate students to extend their knowledge in biochemical subjects not ordinarily treated in introductory courses. Some examples:Plant Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Diseases, Biochemistry of Mind, Biochemistry of Ageing, Cancer Biochemistry, Nutrition and Sports, Biochemistry of Beauty, Biochemistry of the Envenomation Response, etc.3. Summer courses for high school teachers. Some examples:Biochemistry of Nutrition, DNA – Techniques and Applications, Biochemistry in the kitchen.4. Software developmentMany software for biochemistry teaching/learning were developed and are freely available at the Biblioteca Digital de Ciências [http://www.bdc.ib.unicamp.br/bdc/index.php]. Some examples:Oxygen consumption by mitochondria, Muscle contraction, Electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation, Free radicals, Enzyme kinetics, cAMP signalization, Interactive study of protein structure, Leptin, Insulin and Obesity.5. A Biochemistry textbook. 

  11. Clinical and Laboratory Data in a Sample of Greek Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ververi, Athina; Vargiami, Efthymia; Papadopoulou, Vassiliki; Tryfonas, Dimitrios; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe clinical and laboratory data, as well as comorbid disorders in Greek children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Data were retrospectively collected for 222 children aged 1.5-9 years. The mean age at diagnosis was 43.7 [plus or minus] 17.6 months. Significantly earlier diagnoses were noted in children…

  12. 76 FR 66367 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meetings The Department of Veterans Affairs gives notice under the Public Law 92-463...

  13. Clinical characteristics and laboratory findings in Danish children hospitalized with primary Epstein-Barr virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Sofie Kathrine; Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Vestergaard, Hanne;

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: All immunocompetent children hospitalized at Hvidovre University Hospital, Copenhagen between 2002 and 2013, who presented with clinical features that prompted a laboratory test for EBV, and who tested positive by presence of EBV-specific antibodies, heterophile antibodies or a positive EBV PCR...

  14. Introduction of New Clinical Clerks to Nursing Procedures and the Ward Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunin, Calvin M.; DeGrott, Jane

    1975-01-01

    The quality of patient care suffers because of the intellectual separatism that exists among medical, nursing, and other professions. Description of an attempt to introduce knowledge of selected nursing and laboratory skills to third-quarter clinical clerks. (Author/PG)

  15. Clinical and laboratory features of antihistamine-resistant chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Eli; Mishal, Joseph; Zeldin, Yuri; Schlesinger, Menachem

    2011-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic (spontaneous) urticaria (CIU) is sometimes resistant to the conventional and high doses of antihistamines (AHs). This study compares the clinical and laboratory characteristics of AH responsive and AH-resistant CIU subjects. Clinical and laboratory data were retrospectively collected from 385 CIU patients. Urticaria activity score (UAS), concomitant angioedema, dermatographism, positive autologous serum skin (ASST), and laboratory data were collected. The control group consisted of 44 sex- and age-matched healthy individuals. Two hundred forty-five CIU patients controlled with AH medications were included in the CIU group. Forty-six patients failed to show clinical improvement during 8 weeks of treatment with fourfold AH doses and were included in the resistant CIU (R-CIU) group. The R-CIU group was characterized with a higher incidence (58.7%) of angioedema than the CIU group (28.5%; p CIU versus 12.2% in CIU; p = 0.014), more positive ASST (73.9% in R-CIU versus 45.4% in CIU; p CIU versus 3.32 ± 1.25 in CIU; CIU was characterized with more severe basopenia (0.04 ± 0.07 cell/mm(3) versus 0.16 ± 0.13 cell/mm(3); p CIU is a clinically more severe disease with laboratory features of low-grade inflammation and platelet activation. PMID:22221441

  16. 77 FR 14805 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the... Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health...

  17. An Effective Model for a Comprehensive Performance Measurement of Clinical and Research Laboratory Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazinoory S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bachground and objectives: Improvement of the effectiveness of services isone of the most important strategies in many clinical and research laboratorycenters. The increased client satisfaction (researchers or patients, resourcedevelopment innovation, efficacy, continuity of services and income are alsothe important strategies of these centers. For achieving these strategies, wecombined the qualitative and the quantitative approaches to evaluate theeffective model based on frameworks of the Balance Scorecard (BSC and theLaboratory Quality Management Systems (LQMS.Material and Methods: This paper describes the basic steps required fordesigning and developing of a model for performance measurement inlaboratory centers. For model validation, the relationship between the criteria,the strategies and the strategic objectives was evaluated using both the AHPmethod and the evaluation by the experts.Results: Implementation of the above mentioned model, conducted in one ofthe largest Laboratory centers, has resulted in a remarkable enhancement inthe efficiency (22%, profit (33%, level of quality of service (27% and inthe clients’ satisfaction (4%.Conclusion: This research model is a valuable tool for effective evaluationand continuous improvement of the clinical and research laboratory centers.Applying this model leads to increased resource productivity as well as theclients and community satisfaction from the laboratories services.Key words: Laboratory Centers, Performance Management, BalanceScorecard (BSC, Laboratory Quality Management Systems (LQMS

  18. Searching for Alien Life Having Unearthly Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry

    2003-01-01

    The search for alien life in the solar system should include exploring unearth-like environments for life having an unearthly biochemistry. We expect alien life to conform to the same basic chemical and ecological constraints as terrestrial life, since inorganic chemistry and the laws of ecosystems appear to be universal. Astrobiologists usually assume alien life will use familiar terrestrial biochemistry and therefore hope to find alien life by searching near water or by supplying hydrocarbons. The assumption that alien life is likely to be based on carbon and water is traditional and plausible. It justifies high priority for missions to search for alien life on Mars and Europa, but it unduly restricts the search for alien life. Terrestrial carbon-water biochemistry is not possible on most of the bodies of our solar system, but all alien life is not necessarily based on terrestrial biochemistry. If alien life has a separate origin from Earth life, and if can survive in an environment extremely different from Earth's, then alien life may have unearthly biochemistry. There may be other solvents than water that support alien life and other elements than carbon that form complex life enabling chain molecules. Rather than making the exploration-restricting assumption that all life requires carbon, water, and terrestrial biochemistry, we should make the exploration-friendly assumption that indigenous, environmentally adapted, alien life forms might flourish using unearthly biochemistry in many places in the solar system. Alien life might be found wherever there is free energy and a physical/chemical system capable of using that energy to build living structures. Alien life may be discovered by the detection of some general non-equilibrium chemistry rather than of terrestrial biochemistry. We should explore all the potential abodes of life in the solar system, including those where life based on terrestrial biochemistry can not exist.

  19. Clinical and Laboratory evaluation of measleslike rash in children and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewien Klaus Eberhard

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical and laboratory evaluation of 11 children and young adults with measleslike rash was done during the measles outbreak in the Greater São Paulo Metropolitan area at the end of 1996 and spread over the country during 1997. Measles was laboratory confirmed in 07 patients by specific IgM detection in acute serum specimens using an IgM-capture EIA, by specific IgG seroconversion in serum pairs, and by reverse transcription PCR and virus isolation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Clinical presentations were not always classic; one of the 07 cases had received measles vaccine and corresponded to modified clinical case of measles. The 4 remaining cases were negative for measles and were diagnosed as exanthem subitum (2 cases, scarlet fever and Kawasaki disease. The present study reinforces the view that clinical features alone are not sufficient for establishing an accurate diagnosis in the post-vaccine era, and a surveillance system based on sensitive laboratory results is needed so that it can confirm IgM-negative measles cases.

  20. HLA genotyping in the clinical laboratory: comparison of next-generation sequencing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profaizer, T; Lázár-Molnár, E; Close, D W; Delgado, J C; Kumánovics, A

    2016-07-01

    Implementation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical lab brings new challenges to the laboratories performing this testing. With the advent of commercially available HLA-NGS typing kits, labs must make numerous decisions concerning capital equipment and address labor considerations. Therefore, careful and unbiased evaluation of available methods is imperative. In this report, we compared our in-house developed HLA NGS typing with two commercially available kits from Illumina and Omixon using 10 International Histocompatibility Working Group (IHWG) and 36 clinical samples. Although all three methods employ long range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and have been developed on the Illumina MiSeq platform, the methodologies for library preparation show significant variations. There was 100% typing concordance between all three methods at the first field when a HLA type could be assigned. Overall, HLA typing by NGS using in-house or commercially available methods is now feasible in clinical laboratories. However, technical variables such as hands-on time and indexing strategies are sufficiently different among these approaches to impact the workflow of the clinical laboratory. PMID:27524804

  1. Current practices and challenges in the standardization and harmonization of clinical laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, Hubert W; Myers, Gary L; Miller, W Greg

    2016-09-01

    Effective patient care, clinical research, and public health efforts require comparability of laboratory results independent of time, place, and measurement procedure. Comparability is achieved by establishing metrological traceability, which ensures that measurement procedures measure the same quantity and that the calibration of measurement procedures is traceable to a common reference system consisting of reference methods and materials. Whereas standardization ensures traceability to the International System of Units, harmonization ensures traceability to a reference system agreed on by convention. This article provides an overview of standardization and harmonization with an emphasis on commutability as an important variable that affects testing accuracy. Commutability of reference materials is required to ensure that traceability is established appropriately and that laboratory results are comparable. The use of noncommutable reference materials leads to inaccurate results. Whereas procedures and protocols for standardizing measurements are established and have been successfully applied in efforts such as the Hormones Standardization Program of the CDC, harmonization activities require new, more complex procedures and approaches. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, together with its domestic and international partners, formed the International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results to coordinate harmonization efforts. Reference systems, as well as procedures and protocols to establish traceability of clinical laboratory tests, have been established and continue to be developed by national and international groups and organizations. Serum tests of thyroid function, including those for the thyroid hormones thyroxine and triiodothyronine, are among the clinical procedures for which standardization efforts are well under way. Approaches to the harmonization of measurement procedures for serum concentrations of thyroid

  2. Assessment of noise levels in clinical and laboratory areas of dental teaching institution, Ahmedabad

    OpenAIRE

    Parkar, Sujal M; Sagar H Parekh; Lopa M Shah; Abhishek S Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To measure and assess the noise levels produced by different dental equipments. Materials and Methods: Measurement of the noise level was performed in preclinics, clinics, and dental laboratory of different departments of Ahmedabad Dental College and Hospital. The noise levels were determined using a Mini sound meter (CEM USA), which was placed at the dentist′s and laboratory technician′s ear level and at a distance of 1 m from a main noise source. The level of noise was measured in deci...

  3. Autoverification in a core clinical chemistry laboratory at an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Krasowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoverification is a process of using computer-based rules to verify clinical laboratory test results without manual intervention. To date, there is little published data on the use of autoverification over the course of years in a clinical laboratory. We describe the evolution and application of autoverification in an academic medical center clinical chemistry core laboratory. Subjects and Methods: At the institution of the study, autoverification developed from rudimentary rules in the laboratory information system (LIS to extensive and sophisticated rules mostly in middleware software. Rules incorporated decisions based on instrument error flags, interference indices, analytical measurement ranges (AMRs, delta checks, dilution protocols, results suggestive of compromised or contaminated specimens, and ′absurd′ (physiologically improbable values. Results: The autoverification rate for tests performed in the core clinical chemistry laboratory has increased over the course of 13 years from 40% to the current overall rate of 99.5%. A high percentage of critical values now autoverify. The highest rates of autoverification occurred with the most frequently ordered tests such as the basic metabolic panel (sodium, potassium, chloride, carbon dioxide, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, calcium, glucose; 99.6%, albumin (99.8%, and alanine aminotransferase (99.7%. The lowest rates of autoverification occurred with some therapeutic drug levels (gentamicin, lithium, and methotrexate and with serum free light chains (kappa/lambda, mostly due to need for offline dilution and manual filing of results. Rules also caught very rare occurrences such as plasma albumin exceeding total protein (usually indicative of an error such as short sample or bubble that evaded detection and marked discrepancy between total bilirubin and the spectrophotometric icteric index (usually due to interference of the bilirubin assay by immunoglobulin (Ig M monoclonal

  4. Useful Demonstrations for a Medial Biochemistry Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragatz, Barth H.; Modrak, Gina

    1986-01-01

    Describes six demonstrations used in a medical biochemistry course. These demonstrations focus on: (1) platelet aggregometry; (2) ion-transporting antibiotics; (3) glycosylated hemoglobin; (4) molecular models; (5) serum preparation; and (6) bioluminescence. (JN)

  5. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more...

  6. Impact of sonography in gouty arthritis: Comparison with conventional radiography, clinical examination, and laboratory findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the typical sonographic features of gray-scale and Power Doppler of acute and chronic gouty arthritis in conjunction with radiographic, clinical, and laboratory findings. Materials and methods: All hand, finger, and toe joints of 19 patients with acute and chronic gout were examined with gray-scale and Power Doppler sonography. The number and size of bone changes detected with sonography was compared to radiographic findings. Vascularization of the synovial tissue was scored on Power Doppler (grades 0-3), and was compared with clinical appearance, including swelling, tenderness, and redness (grades 0-3). Results: In acute gout, mild to moderate echogenic periarticular nodules with sonotransmission and hypervascularization of the edematous surrounding soft tissue were found. In chronic gout, tophaceous nodules completely blocked transmission of US wave, leading to strong reflexion and dorsal shadowing in a minority of cases. No significant difference in the detection of large bone changes (>2 mm) was found between sonography and radiography. However, gray-scale sonography was significantly more sensitive in the detection of small bone changes (p < 0.001). Power Doppler scores were statistically significantly higher than clinical examination scores (p < 0.001). Discussion: Sonography is superior to radiographs in evaluating small bone changes. The inflammatory process in joints can be better detected with Power Doppler sonography than with clinical examination. Typical sonographic appearance of acute and in particular of chronic gout might provide clues on gouty arthritis that adds to the information available from conventional radiography, clinical, and laboratory findings

  7. Impact of sonography in gouty arthritis: Comparison with conventional radiography, clinical examination, and laboratory findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: claudia.schueller-weidekamm@meduniwien.ac.at; Schueller, Gerd [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Aringer, Martin [Department of Rheumatology, Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-06-15

    Objective: To explore the typical sonographic features of gray-scale and Power Doppler of acute and chronic gouty arthritis in conjunction with radiographic, clinical, and laboratory findings. Materials and methods: All hand, finger, and toe joints of 19 patients with acute and chronic gout were examined with gray-scale and Power Doppler sonography. The number and size of bone changes detected with sonography was compared to radiographic findings. Vascularization of the synovial tissue was scored on Power Doppler (grades 0-3), and was compared with clinical appearance, including swelling, tenderness, and redness (grades 0-3). Results: In acute gout, mild to moderate echogenic periarticular nodules with sonotransmission and hypervascularization of the edematous surrounding soft tissue were found. In chronic gout, tophaceous nodules completely blocked transmission of US wave, leading to strong reflexion and dorsal shadowing in a minority of cases. No significant difference in the detection of large bone changes (>2 mm) was found between sonography and radiography. However, gray-scale sonography was significantly more sensitive in the detection of small bone changes (p < 0.001). Power Doppler scores were statistically significantly higher than clinical examination scores (p < 0.001). Discussion: Sonography is superior to radiographs in evaluating small bone changes. The inflammatory process in joints can be better detected with Power Doppler sonography than with clinical examination. Typical sonographic appearance of acute and in particular of chronic gout might provide clues on gouty arthritis that adds to the information available from conventional radiography, clinical, and laboratory findings.

  8. Benign childhood acute myositis: clinical and laboratory findings of 15 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Saltık, Sema; Sürücü, Murat; Özdemir, Öner

    2012-01-01

    Aim: In this study; clinical and laboratory findings of 15 cases with benign childhood acute myositis are presented to look over pathognomonic findings of the disease Material and Method: Fifteen typical cases with benign childhood acute myositis referred to our Pediatric Neurology Clinic because of inability to walk from 15th of January to 15th of March 2011 were enrolled into this study Eighty percent of cases were male and their mean age was 6 3 years Guillian Barre rsquo;s syndrome was th...

  9. Benign childhood acute myositis: clinical and laboratory findings of 15 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Saltık, Sema; Sürücü, Murat; Özdemir, Öner

    2011-01-01

    Aim: In this study; clinical and laboratory findings of 15 cases with benign childhood acute myositis are presented to look over pathognomonic findings of the disease Material and Method: Fifteen typical cases with benign childhood acute myositis referred to our Pediatric Neurology Clinic because of inability to walk from 15th of January to 15th of March 2011 were enrolled into this study Eighty percent of cases were male and their mean age was 6 3 years Guillian Barre rsquo;s syndrome was th...

  10. Clinical and Laboratory Steps for Fabricating a Complete-Arch Fixed Prosthesis Using CAD/CAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthi, Senthil; Proussaefs, Periklis; Lozada, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of a full-arch maxillary prosthesis has been associated with several prosthetic complications and difficulties. Even though it has been reported that phonetics, esthetics, and proper lip support are difficult to achieve, there is a scarcity in the literature regarding the clinical and laboratory procedures necessary to minimize these complications. This article provides clinical and laboratory steps that may enable the clinician to achieve more predictable restorative results when using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) to fabricate a full-arch maxillary implant-supported prosthesis. The technique presented here describes the use of an implant-retained diagnostic wax-up that is subsequently duplicated to an interim polymethylmethacrylate prosthesis using CAD/CAM before fabricating the definitive restoration. PMID:26133136

  11. MODULAR ANALYTICS: A New Approach to Automation in the Clinical Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Golaz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available MODULAR ANALYTICS (Roche Diagnostics (MODULAR ANALYTICS, Elecsys and Cobas Integra are trademarks of a member of the Roche Group represents a new approach to automation for the clinical chemistry laboratory. It consists of a control unit, a core unit with a bidirectional multitrack rack transportation system, and three distinct kinds of analytical modules: an ISE module, a P800 module (44 photometric tests, throughput of up to 800 tests/h, and a D2400 module (16 photometric tests, throughput up to 2400 tests/h. MODULAR ANALYTICS allows customised configurations for various laboratory workloads. The performance and practicability of MODULAR ANALYTICS were evaluated in an international multicentre study at 16 sites. Studies included precision, accuracy, analytical range, carry-over, and workflow assessment. More than 700 000 results were obtained during the course of the study. Median between-day CVs were typically less than 3% for clinical chemistries and less than 6% for homogeneous immunoassays. Median recoveries for nearly all standardised reference materials were within 5% of assigned values. Method comparisons versus current existing routine instrumentation were clinically acceptable in all cases. During the workflow studies, the work from three to four single workstations was transferred to MODULAR ANALYTICS, which offered over 100 possible methods, with reduction in sample splitting, handling errors, and turnaround time. Typical sample processing time on MODULAR ANALYTICS was less than 30 minutes, an improvement from the current laboratory systems. By combining multiple analytic units in flexible ways, MODULAR ANALYTICS met diverse laboratory needs and offered improvement in workflow over current laboratory situations. It increased overall efficiency while maintaining (or improving quality.

  12. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: Code of Conduct, Version 2--2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 10 years, more than 2000 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). A Code of Conduct was adopted in 2003 and a revised and updated version, taking account particularly of the guidelines of the Conseil Européen des Professions Libérales (CEPLIS) of which EFCC is a member, is presented in this article. The revised version was approved by the EC4 Register Commission and by the EFCC Executive Board in Paris on 6 November, 2008.

  13. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2010-07-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous Guides to the Register have been published, one in 1997 and another in 2003. The third version of the Guide is presented in this article and is based on the experience gained and development of the profession since the last revision. Registration is valid for 5 years and the procedure and criteria for re-registration are presented as an Appendix at the end of the article.

  14. THE USE OF MULTIPLE TOOLS FOR TEACHING MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Sé

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The pros and cons of Problem Based Learning (PBL have been extensivelydiscussed in the literature. We describe PBL-like strategies used at UnB (some ofthem since 1999 that may be useful elsewhere to improve undergraduatebiochemistry teaching with clinical applications. The main activities are: (i aseminar/poster system, (ii a true-or-false applied biochemistry exam (prepared bypeer tutors, (iii a 9-hour-exam on metabolism (based in actual papers, (iv anAdvanced Biochemistry course (directed to peer tutors, (v pizza-and-pasta (formetabolism teaching and free radicals (real science for students experiments,(vi the BioBio blog (http://www.biobio-unb.blogspot.com, (vii student lectures onhealth issues directed to the community, and (viii the BioBio Show. The mainobjective of these activities is providing students with a more practical andentertaining approach to biochemistry using philosophic PBL principles such asthe application of basic knowledge to real situations (diseases, experiments andscientific discoveries. We also emphasize (a the importance of peer-tutor activityfor optimized learning of students and peer tutors, (b the relevance of a closerinteraction between students and professors, and (c the necessity to initiatestudents precociously in actual basic/medical science and contact with the public.Most activities have been evaluated by the students through written questionnairesand informal conversations, for several semesters, indicating good acceptanceand approval of these methods.

  15. From professional monopoly to corporate oligopoly:the clinical laboratory industry in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R M

    1977-02-01

    Until the mid-1960s the nonhospital clinical laboratory industry was dominated by pathologists. The ethics of medical professionalism protected the pathologists' market from price competition and from any serious threat from new entrants into the market. Immune from the competitive pressures of the marketplace, pathologists exerted monopoly control in local markets. That power was eroded by laboratories operated by technologists and bioanalysts and was finally overcome by the entry of large corporations into the industry. The market power of the largest corporate laboratories is now growing to a point where competition may again be thwarted. The professional ethics of pathologists allowed high prices, but there was little push toward higher volume. The commercial ethics of the corporate entrants brought lower prices but resulted in strong pressure for greater test quantities. In either case, the power wielded by the dominant producer would seem to go against the consumer's interests. PMID:839868

  16. ClinLabGeneticist: a tool for clinical management of genetic variants from whole exome sequencing in clinical genetic laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinlian; Liao, Jun; Zhang, Jinglan; Cheng, Wei-Yi; Hakenberg, Jörg; Ma, Meng; Webb, Bryn D; Ramasamudram-Chakravarthi, Rajasekar; Karger, Lisa; Mehta, Lakshmi; Kornreich, Ruth; Diaz, George A; Li, Shuyu; Edelmann, Lisa; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Routine clinical application of whole exome sequencing remains challenging due to difficulties in variant interpretation, large dataset management, and workflow integration. We describe a tool named ClinLabGeneticist to implement a workflow in clinical laboratories for management of variant assessment in genetic testing and disease diagnosis. We established an extensive variant annotation data source for the identification of pathogenic variants. A dashboard was deployed to aid a multi-step, hierarchical review process leading to final clinical decisions on genetic variant assessment. In addition, a central database was built to archive all of the genetic testing data, notes, and comments throughout the review process, variant validation data by Sanger sequencing as well as the final clinical reports for future reference. The entire workflow including data entry, distribution of work assignments, variant evaluation and review, selection of variants for validation, report generation, and communications between various personnel is integrated into a single data management platform. Three case studies are presented to illustrate the utility of ClinLabGeneticist. ClinLabGeneticist is freely available to academia at http://rongchenlab.org/software/clinlabgeneticist . PMID:26338694

  17. Comparison of four types of diet using clinical, laboratory and psychological studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lockie, Andrew H.; Carlson, Eleanor; Kipps, Michael; Thomson, James

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-seven people of different dietary habits—vegans, ovolactovegetarians, whole-food omnivores and average omnivores—were studied using nine-day weighed food intakes, clinical and laboratory assessments, standard psychology questionnaires, measurements of urinary cortisol and catecholamine levels and questionnaires on life-style and health factors. The vegan diet most clearly approximated current thinking on diet, as expressed in the NACNE Report, but was deficient in vitamin D, riboflavin...

  18. New applications of Antrad Medical's thawing technology : Applications within the clinical and laboratory segment

    OpenAIRE

    Truvé, Malin; Kilegran, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Antrad Medical has developed an ultra-fast blood plasma thawing device named UFT100. The method is based on thawing with an oscillating electrical field and unlike water baths it is a dry method. Fast and homogeneous thawing is achieved. This project investigates new possible applications where this thawing technology could be used within the clinical and laboratory segment. The aim was to identify existing thawing and heating methods for a substance that can be improved and potentially repla...

  19. The Usefulness of Clinical-Practice-Based Laboratory Data in Facilitating the Diagnosis of Dengue Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Jien-Wei Liu; Ing-Kit Lee; Lin Wang; Rong-Fu Chen; Kuender D. Yang

    2013-01-01

    Alertness to dengue and making a timely diagnosis is extremely important in the treatment of dengue and containment of dengue epidemics. We evaluated the complementary role of clinical-practice-based laboratory data in facilitating suspicion/diagnosis of dengue. One hundred overall dengue (57 dengue fever [DF] and 43 dengue hemorrhagic fever [DHF]) cases and another 100 nondengue cases (78 viral infections other than dengue, 6 bacterial sepsis, and 16 miscellaneous diseases) were analyzed. We...

  20. Current research on cigarette toxicity: critical appraisal in view of clinical laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Prajwal Gyawali; Victor Maduabuchi Oguoma

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been implicated as a potential risk factor for development and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), including ischemic heart disease. Although, several methods are in existence to measuring cigarette toxicity, evidence regarding adoption of a gold standard technique is still imprecise. In this study, we reviewed articles describing methods of measuring cigarette toxicity in relation to clinical laboratory practice....

  1. Use of the Bruker MALDI Biotyper for Identification of Molds in the Clinical Mycology Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Schulthess, Bettina; Ledermann, Raphael; Mouttet, Forouhar; Zbinden, Andrea; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Böttger, Erik C.; Hombach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is increasingly used for the identification of bacteria and fungi in the diagnostic laboratory. We evaluated the mold database of Bruker Daltonik (Bremen, Germany), the Filamentous Fungi Library 1.0. First, we studied 83 phenotypically and molecularly well-characterized, nondermatophyte, nondematiaceous molds from a clinical strain collection. Using the manufacturer-recommended interpretation criteria,...

  2. Prediction of Dengue Disease Severity among Pediatric Thai Patients Using Early Clinical Laboratory Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    James A Potts; Gibbons, Robert V.; Rothman, Alan L.; Anon Srikiatkhachorn; Thomas, Stephen J.; Pra-On Supradish; Lemon, Stephenie C.; Libraty, Daniel H.; Sharone Green; Siripen Kalayanarooj

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue virus is endemic in tropical and sub-tropical resource-poor countries. Dengue illness can range from a nonspecific febrile illness to a severe disease, Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS), in which patients develop circulatory failure. Earlier diagnosis of severe dengue illnesses would have a substantial impact on the allocation of health resources in endemic countries. Methods and Findings We compared clinical laboratory findings collected within 72 hours of fever onset from a pros...

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis Laboratory Strains versus Recent Clinical Isolates: Implications for Routine Microbicide Testing ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, M. C.; Stamm, W. E.; Lampe, M. L.

    2009-01-01

    A topical microbicide that women can use to prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is essential, and many microbicide candidates are being tested for activity against human immunodeficiency virus and other STDs, including Chlamydia trachomatis. Screening assays for assessing the activity of microbicides against C. trachomatis are typically done with laboratory-adapted strains, but it is possible that recent clinical isolates may have different susceptibilities to microbicides, as has be...

  4. Evaluation of the Etiological, Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sebahattin Vurucu; Oktay Sari; Mustafa Gulgun; Bulent Unay; Ridvan Akin; Okan Ozcan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: In this study we aimed to discuss the etiological risk factors, clinical and laboratory findings of the patients with cerebral palsy (CP) according to the literature of knowledges. METHOD: The data including sex, age, social status of families, method of delivery, type of CP, risk factors, comorbidities, brain imaging and electroencephalograpy findings were retrospectively recorded from the patients’ files. RESULTS: A total of 180 patients were included in this study. Of the patient...

  5. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  6. Laboratory challenges in the scaling up of HIV, TB, and malaria programs: The interaction of health and laboratory systems, clinical research, and service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Deborah; de Souza, Mark; Nkengasong, John N

    2009-06-01

    Strengthening national health laboratory systems in resource-poor countries is critical to meeting the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Despite strong commitment from the international community to fight major infectious diseases, weak laboratory infrastructure remains a huge rate-limiting step. Some major challenges facing laboratory systems in resource-poor settings include dilapidated infrastructure; lack of human capacity, laboratory policies, and strategic plans; and limited synergies between clinical and research laboratories. Together, these factors compromise the quality of test results and impact patient management. With increased funding, the target of laboratory strengthening efforts in resource-poor countries should be the integrating of laboratory services across major diseases to leverage resources with respect to physical infrastructure; types of assays; supply chain management of reagents and equipment; and maintenance of equipment. PMID:19461092

  7. Physician satisfaction with hospital clinical laboratory services in Aden Governorate, Yemen, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adulkader, N Mujahed; Triana, B E Garcia

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the level of physicians' satisfaction with hospital clinical laboratory services and related factors in Aden Governorate, we carried out this cross-sectional study during September 2008-September 2009. Satisfaction with laboratory services of 3 public and 3 private hospitals was assessed. The overall physician satisfaction was 3.30 out of 5.00. The highest mean score (3.40) was observed for phlebotomy services, while the lowest mean score (1.95) was for esoteric test turnaround time. The most important laboratory service category forthe physicians was quality and reliability of the results (54.4%). An association was observed between physician satisfaction and institution type in 11 categories, with lower satisfaction for public compared to private institutions for all services. No statistically significant association was observed between physician satisfaction and experience in the field. Lower satisfaction was observed among those with more than 20 years experience. Our findings may help to improve the quality of clinical laboratory services. PMID:24975185

  8. Report of Six Cases of Chediak-Higashi Syndrome with Regard to Clinical and Laboratory Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhasan Farhoudi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Chediak - Higashi Syndrome (CHS is a rare, primary Immunodeficiency disorder with an autosomal recessive (AR inheritance and characterized by re¬current infection, partial occulocutaneous albinism and an accelerated phase.In this report we describe clinical and laboratory findings from 6 CHS pa¬tients.Clinical and laboratory information of six patients who were referred to our center during the last 20 years (from 1983 - 2003 were reviewed.Onset age of disease was between 3 months to 10 years. All patients had history of consanguineous parents and two patients were siblings. All patients had oculocutaneous albinism, nystagmus, recurrent infections which included upper and lower respiratory tract (U&LRT infections, stomatitis, thrush, and skin ab¬scesses and hepatitis. In laboratory findings, all patients had neutropenia and normal immunoglobulins and normal CD3, CD4, CD8and CD 19 lymphocyte by flowcytometry and three of the four patients had chemotatic defect. Five patients certainly had giant granule in bone marrow neutrophil and in one patient it was equiovocal. Three patients had an accelerated phase, and for one patient bone marrow transplantation was done that was tolerated well and had been well after 7 years.We emphasize the need for early diagnosis on basis of characteristic facies and diagnostic laboratory examinations and early bone marrow transplantation (BMT in patients.

  9. Microbial contamination of removable prosthodontic appliances from laboratories and impact of clinical storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D W; Chamary, N; Lewis, M A O; Milward, P J; McAndrew, R

    2011-08-01

    Decontamination of dental instruments has recently been the subject of considerable debate. However, little information is available on the potential bacterial colonisation of dental appliances returning from dental laboratories and their need for decontamination. This study investigated the extent and nature of microbial contamination of removable prosthodontic appliances produced at different dental laboratories and stored in two clinical teaching units (CTU 1 and CTU 2) of a dental hospital and school. Forty consecutive dental prosthodontic appliances that were being stored under varying conditions in the two clinical teaching units were selected for study; the appliances having been produced 'in-house' (hospital laboratory) or 'out-of-house' (external commercial laboratory). Two appliances, that were known to have undergone decontamination before storage, were used as controls. Swabs were taken according to a standard protocol and transferred to the microbiological laboratory with bacterial growth expressed as colony forming units (cfu) per cm(2). Microbial sampling yielded growth from 23 (58%) of the 40 appliances studied (CTU 1, n = 22; CTU 2, n = 18), with 38% of these having a high level of contamination (>42,000 cfu/cm(2)). The predominant bacteria isolated were Bacillus spp. (57%), pseudomonads (22%) and staphylococci (13%). Fungi of the genus Candida were detected in 38% of the samples. There was no significant difference in contamination of the appliances in relation to either their place of production or the CTU (p >0.05). However, the level of contamination was significantly higher (p = 0.035) for those appliances stored in plastic bag with fluid (n = 16) compared to those stored on models (n = 19). No growth was recovered from the two appliances that had undergone decontamination before storage. The research showed that appliances received from laboratories are often contaminated and therefore there is a need for routine disinfection of such items

  10. Virtual Biochemistry – pH effect on enzyme activity

    OpenAIRE

    D.N. Heidrich; R.V. Antônio; M.S.R.B. Figueiredo; J.K. Sugai; J.A.P. Angotti

    2011-01-01

    Protocols of laboratory experiments, followed by teacher's explanation, not always clearly translate to the student the dynamics to beadopted for the implementation of the proposed practice. One of these cases is related to the study of the effect of pH on enzyme activity. For better help the understanding of the technical procedure, a hypermedia was built based on a protocol adopted at the Department of Biochemistry, UFSC. The hypermedia shows how theeffect of variations in pH can be observe...

  11. Simple clinical and laboratory predictors of Chikungunya versus dengue infections in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon J Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue and chikungunya are co-circulating vector-borne diseases with substantial overlap in clinical presentations. It is important to differentiate between them during first presentation as their management, especially for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, is different. This study compares their clinical presentation in Singapore adults to derive predictors to assist doctors in diagnostic decision-making. METHODS: We compared 117 patients with chikungunya infection diagnosed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR with 917 dengue RT-PCR-positive adult patients (including 55 with DHF. We compared dengue fever (DF, DHF, and chikungunya infections by evaluating clinical characteristics of dengue and chikungunya; developing classification tools via multivariate logistic regression models and classification trees of disease etiology using clinical and laboratory factors; and assessing the time course of several clinical variables. FINDINGS: At first presentation to hospital, significantly more chikungunya patients had myalgia or arthralgia, and fewer had a sore throat, cough (for DF, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia or tachycardia than DF or DHF patients. From the decision trees, platelets <118 × 10(9/L was the only distinguishing feature for DF versus chikungunya with an overall correct classification of 89%. For DHF versus chikungunya using platelets <100 × 10(9/L and the presence of bleeding, the overall correct classification was 98%. The time course analysis supported platelet count as the key distinguishing variable. INTERPRETATION: There is substantial overlap in clinical presentation between dengue and chikungunya infections, but simple clinical and laboratory variables can predict these infections at presentation for appropriate management.

  12. Clinical and Laboratory Presentation of Hairy Cell Leukemia (Hcl and Rate of Response to Cladribine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Forat Yazdi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HCL is a rare malignant condition that is curable if diagnosed early. HCL can present with reduced blood cells and splenomegaly which maybe misdiagnosed with other conditions. The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency of early clinical and laboratory findings as well as the response rate of patients to the standard treatment regimen of Cladribine. Methods: The study was an uncontrolled clinical trial including 25 HCL patients referring to Oncology Clinics of Shahid Sadoughi (Yazd - Iran and Shahid Beheshti (Tehran - Iran between 1999 and 2005. Data was gathered by a pre–designed questionnaire. 21 out of 25 patients were treated with Cladribine and the clinical and laboratory response was assessed. Results: Of the 25 patients studied, 20 patients (80% were male and 5 patients (20% were female. Most of the patients at diagnosis were 55–67 years old and the most common presenting symptom was fatigue and lassitude secondary to anemia. Two patients were asymptomatic and were diagnosed incidentally. Splenomegaly was the main clinical finding which was present in about 80% of the males and all of the females. Accordingly, hairy cells in the peripheral blood smear, leukopenia and anemia were the most common laboratory findings. In contrast to previous results, pancytopenia was found in only 60% of the patients. Response rate was 90% (19 out of 21 of which 61.9% (13 patients and 28.5% (6 patients had complete remission (CR and partial remission (PR, respectively. Conclusion: According to the results, it can be concluded that HCL should be considered as a possible diagnosis in the context of fatigue, splenomegaly and reduced blood cell count. The results of the present study were similar to other similar international studies.

  13. Are tutor-students capable of writing good biochemistry exams?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sé Alexandre B.

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In a previous article we described the relevance of student seminars for the learning process of appliedbiochemistry for medical and nutrition students (Hermes-Lima et al., Biochem. Mol.Biol.Educ. 30:30-34,2002. First semester students of a basic biochemistry course (BioBio are divided in 10 groupsof 5 members, and each group is assigned to a specic topic (diabetes, cholesterol, etc under thesupervision of a tutor-student. The tutors have already coursed BioBio and are currently undertakingan advanced biochemistry course. In order to evaluate the learning of applied biochemistry for BioBiostudents a true or false exam (TFE is performed. This exam is made of 50 questions (5 on eachtopic elaborated by the tutors under the supervision of the teacher. The TFE corresponds to 10percent of the grade of BioBio and focus on clinical and/or applied biochemistry situations. At theend of the exam, BioBio students were asked to share their opinions about TFEs (n = 401, from2001/1 to 2003/2. When asked to give a 0-to-4 score regarding (a the diculty level of the test,(b the technical quality and (c if the exam makes an appropriate evaluation of applied biochemistryknowledge, the scores were 2.9, 3.4 and 2.9, respectively. BioBio students were also asked if they ndvalid to be evaluated by a tutor-made exam and if they would like to participate in the making ofTFEs; 96 and 58 percent answered yes, respectively.In another survey, we interviewed former BioBio students from the 2nd to the 7th semesters (n=95about TFEs (since 1999-1 regarding technical aspects, which included (1 clarity of questions, (2 levelof diculty, (3 clinical application and (4 thinking (as opposed to memorizing abilities demanded;the 0-to-4 scores were 3.1, 2.9, 2.6, and 2.5, respectively. Other four questions were on the validityof tutors writing TFEs and their capacity to perform such a task; the average score was 3.2. Oursurveys show the students good acceptance of the seminar system

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliitis in early seronegative spondylarthropathy. Abnormalities correlated to clinical and laboratory findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puhakka, K B; Jurik, A G; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new MRI scoring system of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) in early spondylarthropathy (SpA) with clinical and laboratory parameters. METHODS: Forty-one patients (24 males, 17 females) with a median age of 26 yr and a median duration of inflammatory low back pain of 19 months...... were included. They all fulfilled the ESSG-criteria for SpA. The patients were examined by MRI of the SIJs using a new scoring system. Clinical examinations, biochemical tests, functional score (BASFI), and pain score (BASDAI) were also performed. RESULTS: 95% of the patients had inflammation and....../or destructive bone changes of the SIJs at MRI. No correlation was found between MRI pathology and clinical findings. MRI demonstrated significantly greater severity of both inflammation and destruction of the SIJs in HLA B27 positive patients than in the HLA B27 negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with...

  15. Quality control of the translation of the laboratory research into clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the biological basis of new treatment strategies that are being introduced into the clinic in the form of controlled clinical trials. There is an increasing awareness of the need for quality assurance in the design, execution and analysis of these trials. However there is little awareness of the need to critically assess the biological basis of the trial design, to ensure that no other biological principles have been contravened in the attempt to optimise just one of the many parameters that determine the differential in sensitivity between tumours and normal tissues. Some examples are given of the changes that have recently occurred in the laboratory interpretation of both the mechanism of action and the therapeutic gain of several novel approaches. If these are not considered, the carefully controlled clinical trials may be wasted, because of being based on an incomplete consideration of all the interconnected biological factors. (author)

  16. Evaluation of Clinical and Laboratory Data in Patients with Recurrent Infections and Suspected Immunodeficiency

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    Hamid Ahanchian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequent infections is among the most frequent clinical dilemmas for primary care physicians. Immunodeficiency disorders are a heterogeneous group of illnesses that predispose patients to the recurrent infections, autoimmunity and malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory data collected for the final diagnosis of patients referred with recurrent infections and suspected immunodeficiency to a local immunodeficiency clinic.   Methods: This epidemiological study was carried out between April 2010 and September 2012 at the Immunodeficiency Clinic of Mashhad. All patients with clinical manifestations of immunodeficiency who were referred to our clinic during this period of time were included in this study. 41 patients aged from 10 months to 51 years, were evaluated. Results: Forty one patients, aged between 10 months and 51 years were evaluated. Eleven patients had a primary immunodeficiency, four cases had a secondary immunodeficiency, in three patients an underlying structural disease were found, eight patients were predisposed to recurrent infections as a result of allergies and finally, fifteen cases were found to be normal individuals.   Discussion: Most patients with recurrent infection have a normal immune system. Allergic disorders are the most common predisposing factor to recurrent infection. However, as immunodeficiency disorders are potentially serious, early diagnosis can improve the quality of life and outcome and prevent severe sequels in future.

  17. THE BACHELOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY IN BRAZIL

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    H. G. Cordeiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The economic and social development of Brazil in the last decade has contributed to the installation of new graduate and undergraduate programs, as are the case with bachelor degrees in Biochemistry at UFV, UFSJ and UEM. These graduates are prepared to work in industry, research institutes and universities in areas of knowledge involving Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This is happening in developed countries since the first half of the last century, surprising and late is the implementation of bachelor of Biochemistry in Brazil. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the Bachelor in Biochemistry in Brazil from the perspective of the main difficulties of implementing and courses maintenance. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a descriptive research with a qualitative approach. Interviews were conducted with undergraduate students, graduates, professors, staff and managers from bachelor degrees in Biochemistry at UFV, UFSJ and UEM. The sampling procedure was non probabilistic for judgment (choice of the subjects involved and interested in the course of biochemistry to undergraduate students, graduates, professors and staff and non probabilistic for convenience to managers. The qualitative assessment to depict the representative keywords was performed using words cloud by WordleTM. RESULTS: The study included 5 managers, 24 professors, 12 staff, 25 undergraduate students, 5 graduates. For the students the main reason for the course selection should be scientific vocation and affinity with chemistry and biology; most cited positive parameters were faculty and great structure, practical classes and broad playing field; most cited negatives were high mandatory disciplines, little student free time and lack of sophisticated equipment. Despite the conception of the programs have happened in different contexts and regions we noted similarities deficiencies and distresses. CONCLUSION: Difficulties must be

  18. The Biochemistry Tetrahedron and the Development of the Taxonomy of Biochemistry External Representations (TOBER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Marcy H.; Raker, Jeffrey R.; Becker, Nicole; Harle, Marissa; Sutcliffe, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Visual literacy, the ability to interpret and create external representations (ERs), is essential to success in biochemistry. Studies have been conducted that describe students' abilities to use and interpret specific types of ERs. However, a framework for describing ERs derived through a naturalistic inquiry of biochemistry classrooms has not…

  19. INTERNET ASSISTED LEARNING OF BIOCHEMISTRY

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    R.M. Lima

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The revolution  in information  technology  has included the INTERNET to the available  resources for biochemical  education.  There  is a great  deal of biochemical  information, and  the  amount is increas- ing rapidly,  indeed  exponentially.  The  aim of this work is to analyze  the  biochemical  issues cellular respiration, photosynthesis and membrane  transport available  in web pages, taking  into account con- tents  quality,  trustworthiness and effectiveness. Firstly  1st secondary level students were inquired by a questionnaire on their use of INTERNET resources.  More then 80 percent of them were regular users. The  results  confirm the  already  known  potential of INTERNET in education.  Fourteen sites  were analyzed  regarding  to contents, presence  of bibliographical, references,  authorship, titles  responsible and adequacy  to the target public.  In relation  to contents, presence of conceptual  errors, illustrations and other  stimulatory elements  were analyzed.  The great  majority  did not mention  bibliographic  ref- erences and target public.  Less than  half divulged responsible  names and/or their  graduation status. Some sites contained critical  conceptual  errors,  as the mention  of, as examples:  during  the cell active transport process, of energy (ATP waste (desperdício by the cell; the yeast is a pluricellular  fungal; and  the  oxygen is essential  for anaerobic  respiration.  However,  one of the  sites,  where  such  errors were found, was the only one to mention  enzymes and regulation  steps of cellular respiration. Half of the sites present identical  texts  and figures. None of the analyzed  sites thus  was considered excellent. Our data  strenghthen the need for rigorous evaluation concerning of scholarly research  of biochemical theme  on the web.INTERNET ASSISTED LEARNING OF  BIOCHEMISTRY

  20. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: Clinical, laboratory, and imaging manifestations in patients with hepatic involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) commonly involves liver and spleen but only a few literature has reported the imaging features. In this article, we present the imaging features of the liver and spleen in HES patients together with clinical and laboratory features. This study included 5 HES patients with hepatic involvement. Extensive laboratory tests including multiple hematologic, serologic, parasitological, and immunologic examinations were performed. Imaging studies included CT, ultrasound (US)of upper abdomen and hepatosplenic scintigraphy. All patients were periodically examined by laboratory and imaging studies for 4 to 24 months. The common clinical presentations were weakness, mild fever, and dry cough. All patients revealed leukocytosis with eosinophilia of 40 to 80% and benign eosinophilic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. The percutaneous biopsy of the hepatic focal lesions performed in 2 patients showed numerous benigin eosinophilic infiltrates and one of them revealed combined calibration necrosis of hepatocytes. All cases revealed hepatomegaly with multiple focal lesions on at least on of CT, US, or scintigraphy. These findings completely disappeared in 2 to 6 months following medication of corticosteroid or antihistamines. The HES involved the liver and CT, US, or scintigraphic studies showed hepatic multifocal lesions with hepatomegaly. Differential diagnosis of these findings should include metastatic disease, lymphoma, leukemia, candidiasis or other opportunistic infections

  1. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: Clinical, laboratory, and imaging manifestations in patients with hepatic involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gi Beom; Lee, Jong Min; Sung, Yeong Soon; Kang, Duk Sik [Kyungpook Natioanl University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ok Hwoa [Dongkang general Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    The hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) commonly involves liver and spleen but only a few literature has reported the imaging features. In this article, we present the imaging features of the liver and spleen in HES patients together with clinical and laboratory features. This study included 5 HES patients with hepatic involvement. Extensive laboratory tests including multiple hematologic, serologic, parasitological, and immunologic examinations were performed. Imaging studies included CT, ultrasound (US)of upper abdomen and hepatosplenic scintigraphy. All patients were periodically examined by laboratory and imaging studies for 4 to 24 months. The common clinical presentations were weakness, mild fever, and dry cough. All patients revealed leukocytosis with eosinophilia of 40 to 80% and benign eosinophilic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. The percutaneous biopsy of the hepatic focal lesions performed in 2 patients showed numerous benigin eosinophilic infiltrates and one of them revealed combined calibration necrosis of hepatocytes. All cases revealed hepatomegaly with multiple focal lesions on at least on of CT, US, or scintigraphy. These findings completely disappeared in 2 to 6 months following medication of corticosteroid or antihistamines. The HES involved the liver and CT, US, or scintigraphic studies showed hepatic multifocal lesions with hepatomegaly. Differential diagnosis of these findings should include metastatic disease, lymphoma, leukemia, candidiasis or other opportunistic infections.

  2. An evaluation of clinical laboratory services in sub-Saharan Africa. Ex africa semper aliquid novi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, I P; Carter, J Y

    1997-11-01

    Pathology services represent the rational, scientific basis of the practice of clinical care. It does not represent deus ex machina, an implausible solution to a complex plot, but rather the way in which clinical care can be audited, controlled, guided and kept appropriate to the funds and the skills available. Arguments are presented to support this statement as well as to analyse what is wrong with health care, from the point of view of laboratory medicine, in sub-Saharan Africa. In most African countries 'first world' technology has to be imported by economies barely able to sustain the basic requirements of human life. Badly needed foreign exchange is obtained by growing export crops at the cost of traditional lifestyle, disenfranchising communities, urbanisation, and even at the cost not being able to grow food. War, corruption, lack of accountability even in the Western sense of being able to go to the polls every so often, lack of empowerment, low literacy rate etc all debase the communities, with minimal exceptions, of Africa. Health care is under the same capricious rule as all other public services: investment in laboratories is poor and most have no access to a professional laboratory at all. More investment, not less; expansion of pathology services not restricting them, is needed throughout the continent. PMID:9469247

  3. Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Lead Hepatotoxicity in the Workers of a Car Battery Manufacturing Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Dadpour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational lead poisoning is common in workers of some industries, but lead hepatotoxicity has rarely been reported. Several animal studies have revealed lead induced liver damage but clinical studies concerning the manifestations of lead induced liver toxicity in humans are scares. This study was designed to investigate the clinical manifestations and pathological parameters of hepatic dysfunction and its relationship with blood and urine lead concentrations in a car battery-manufacturing workers. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in Mashhad, Iran, during April-June 2011. One hundred and twelve workers underwent blood and urine sampling for determination of lead concentrations and liver function tests. Clinical signs and symptoms of possible lead hepatotoxicity were investigated. Results: Mean (±SD age of the workers was 28.78 (±5.17 yr with a daytime work of 8.67 (±1.41 h and mean work duration of 3.89 (±2.40 yr. Mean blood lead concentration (BLC and urine lead concentration (ULC were 398.95 (±177.41 µg/l and 83.67(±50 μg/l, respectively. We found no correlation between the clinical findings and BLC or ULC. A weak correlation (R: 0.27, P=0.087 between serum alkaline phosphatase concentration and BLC was obtained. No significant relationship was found between other liver function tests and BLC or ULC. Conclusion: We found no specific clinical and laboratory abnormalities of liver in the workers of car battery manufacturer who had chronic lead toxicity. Further investigations with more specific laboratory tests such as LDH5 and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT as well as novel biomarkers of metal induced hepatotoxicity might be helpful in evaluating lead hepatotoxicity.

  4. EPIDEMIOLOGY, CLINICAL AND LABORATORY FEATURES OF CRIMEAN-CONGO HEMORRHAGIC FEVER IN GEORGIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashakidze, E; Mikadze, I

    2015-10-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus transmitted to humans by Hyalomma ticks or by direct contact with the blood of infected humans or domestic animals. The most common clinical signs of CCHF are fever, nausea, headache, diarrhea, myalgia, petechial rash, and bleeding. CCHF is a severe disease in humans with a fatality rate up to 15-85%. This study was undertaken to determine the predictors of fatality among patients with CCHF based on epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory findings. 34 patients were enrolled in the study, aged 4 to 77; 17 - male and 17 female. 3 of them were fatal cases. All of them were from Shua Kartli: Khashuri, Gori and Kaspi districts, involved in farming/handling livestock and the history of tick bite was present in most of patients. Evaluation of the epidemiological characteristics of this cases showed that the female to male ratio was nearly similar. The disease is common in the rural areas of the region, mostly in the actively working age group and almost all patients were farmers. The results of our study show that the most cardinal clinical and laboratory features of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever are - acute beginning of disease, high fever, intoxication and hemorrhagic symptoms, thrombocytopenia, high level of aminotransferases and creatine. Predictors of fatality are: an altered mental status, in early stage of disease dramatic decreased thrombocytes count and significantly high level of aspartate aminotransferase, also longer the mean prothrombin time and INR. PMID:26483375

  5. Clinical and laboratory characteristic of cases of primary HIV infection with the central nervous system impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Musatov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In article results of study of the incidence and the characteristics of the central nervous system impairment at the primary HIV-infection among adults are presented. In 2007–2010 to the infectious hospital were admitted 106 330 patients (HIV positive patient were excluded from these date. According to laboratory testing procedures primary HIV infection were detected among 513 (4.8% patients. Different neurologic disorders have been diagnosed among 35 patients (6.8%. Among 16 patients with the impairment of the central nervous system the most frequent clinical variant was aseptic meningitis (14 cases. HIV infection 2Б stage was detected for 2 patients, 2В stage – 14 patients, or category А1 – 1 patients, А2 – 6 patients, А3 – 8 patients (1 case without detection of СD4 cells. Clinical and laboratory criteria of different forms of meningitis (subclinical, easy, moderate, and severe are established. The majority of patients with signs of the central nervous system disorders had the various clinical symptoms characterizing an acute retroviral syndrome. Among 14 cases secondary diseases have been detected, including candidiasis (8 cases, 1 case for pneumocystic pneumonia, seborrheic dermatitis, pneumonia, a sinusitis, cryptococcal meningitis and neurosyphilis.

  6. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical and laboratory parameters in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusbaumer Charly

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is the most frequent infection-related cause of death. The reference standard to diagnose CAP is a new infiltrate on chest radiograph in the presence of recently acquired respiratory signs and symptoms. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical signs and symptoms and laboratory biomarkers for CAP. Methods 545 patients with suspected lower respiratory tract infection, admitted to the emergency department of a university hospital were included in a pre-planned post-hoc analysis of two controlled intervention trials. Baseline assessment included history, clinical examination, radiography and measurements of procalcitonin (PCT, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP and leukocyte count. Results Of the 545 patients, 373 had CAP, 132 other respiratory tract infections, and 40 other final diagnoses. The AUC of a clinical model including standard clinical signs and symptoms (i.e. fever, cough, sputum production, abnormal chest auscultation and dyspnea to diagnose CAP was 0.79 [95% CI, 0.75–0.83]. This AUC was significantly improved by including PCT and hsCRP (0.92 [0.89–0.94]; p Conclusion PCT, and to a lesser degree hsCRP, improve the accuracy of currently recommended approaches for the diagnosis of CAP, thereby complementing clinical signs and symptoms. PCT is useful in the severity assessment of CAP.

  7. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs

  8. Physicochemical inactivation of Lassa, Ebola, and Marburg viruses and effect on clinical laboratory analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical specimens from patients infected with Lassa, Ebola, or Marburg virus may present a serious biohazard to laboratory workers. The authors have examined the effects of heat, alteration of pH, and gamma radiation on these viruses in human blood and on the electrolytes, enzymes, and coagulation factors measured in laboratory tests that are important in the care of an infected patient. Heating serum at 60 degrees C for 1 h reduced high titers of these viruses to noninfectious levels without altering the serum levels of glucose, blood urea nitrogen, and electrolytes. Dilution of blood in 3% acetic acid, diluent for a leukocyte count, inactivated all of these viruses. All of the methods tested for viral inactivation markedly altered certain serum proteins, making these methods unsuitable for samples that are to be tested for certain enzyme levels and coagulation factors

  9. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  10. Prime costs of clinical laboratory services in Tehran Valiasr Hospital in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouroozi, T; Salehi, A

    2014-01-01

    Prime cost determinations can increase managerial effectiveness in budget allocation and strategic planning. This study was designed to calculate the prime cost of clinical laboratory services in Tehran Valiasr Hospital using the activity-based costing (ABC) model. The highest costs were for human recourses (44%) and the lowest for energy (5%). The largest proportion of activities (97%) was by specialists, reflecting the importance of human recourses in prime costs. The highest prime cost was for urinalysis (11% of tests) and the lowest for sodium determination (21% of tests), which demonstrates that prime cost decreases as service frequency increases. The average estimated prime cost was 63% higher than the fees established by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education. The results show that the Tehran Valiasr Hospital laboratory faces a budgetary deficit. The prime cost of services can be reduced by improving human recourse management and standardization of resource consumption. PMID:24995740

  11. The appropriateness of clinical microbiology laboratory investigations: a retrospective study of the cost and clinical relevance of specimen management and processing

    OpenAIRE

    Abdi, Yasin

    2012-01-01

    Each year, NHS clinical laboratories carry out more than 700 million laboratory tests, of which 50 million are microbiology investigations. Several studies have shown that between 25% and 40% of all tests sent to the laboratory are unnecessary, and up to 46% of ordered microbiology tests are inappropriate. In light of these accounts, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the process of microbiology specimen management in order to assess microbiology test utilisation and the appropriate...

  12. Assessment of noise levels in clinical and laboratory areas of dental teaching institution, Ahmedabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujal M Parkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To measure and assess the noise levels produced by different dental equipments. Materials and Methods: Measurement of the noise level was performed in preclinics, clinics, and dental laboratory of different departments of Ahmedabad Dental College and Hospital. The noise levels were determined using a Mini sound meter (CEM USA, which was placed at the dentist′s and laboratory technician′s ear level and at a distance of 1 m from a main noise source. The level of noise was measured in decibel (dB while the instruments were at maximum running speed. Results: In dental laboratory, the nosiest dental equipment was gypsum lathe trimmer with the noise level ranging from 87.36 to 98.3 dB. In preclinical area, the sound produced by low-speed air-rotor ranges from 66.68 to 69.28 dB. In clinical areas, the highest noise produced was by high-speed air-rotor (73.36 to 81.8 dB. The noise created by suction pump when in contact with mucosa was in range from 73.1 to 80.32 dB. The noise levels generated during cutting were significantly higher (P < 0.05 than those of noncutting, which was proved in the course of the measurements. Conclusion: At the end of the study it can be concluded that the sound levels are below that causes damage to the human ear (85 dB. However, dental technicians and other personnel working all day in noisy laboratories could be at risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss if they did not choose not to wear ear protection.

  13. Hematological and Biochemistry Profile and Risk Factors Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Guyana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini Kurup

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the hematological and biochemistry profile of patients with or without HIV-TB at the Georgetown Chest Clinic, Guyana. Methods. An observational, laboratory based study was designed to assess the relationship of PTB and HIV with patients routine biochemical and hematological values. The study was conducted during the period January 2013 to December 2014; a total sample size of 316 patients was enrolled following exclusion and inclusion criteria. Results. Mean age of study population was 40.1 ± 13.8 (95% CI 38.6–41.7 and most were between 40 and 49 age group (27.8%, 95% CI 23.2–33.0. More males were in the study 74.4% (95% CI 69.3–78.8 than females 81% (95% CI 21.1–30.7. 30% (95% CI 25.3–35.3 had a sputum smear grade of 3+ and 62.5% (95% CI 47.0–75.7 showed a CD4 count <200. The study demonstrated significantly low hemoglobin (Hb 91.7% (95% CI 78.2–97.1, low WBC 27.8% (95% CI 15.8–44.0, high indirect bilirubin 7.4% (95% CI 2.1–23.3, ALT 41.8% (95% CI 28.4–56.7, and AST 72.2% (95% CI 57.3–83.3 among TB-HIV patients. Homelessness RR (relative risk 2.2 (95% CI 0.48–12.3, smoking RR 1.09 (95% CI 1.01–1.19, and gender (male RR 1.2 (95% CI 0.61–2.26 were main associated risk factors. Conclusions. There is slight variation among PTB and PTB-HIV coinfected patients in some hematological and biochemistry parameters.

  14. QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN CLINICAL LABORATORIES ACCORDING TO THE ISO 15189:2007 STANDARD - EVALUATION OF THE BENEFITS OF IMPLEMENTATION IN AN ASSISTED REPRODUCTION LABORATORY

    OpenAIRE

    A.D. Sialakouma; Palmer, G A; M. Botsaki; X. Papanikou; N.M. Vaxevanidis

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical science is a sensitive discipline and presents unique challenges due to its social character, continuous development and competitiveness. The issue of quality management systems and accreditation is gaining increasing interest in this sector. All over Europe, Health Services Units have started to introduce quality management systems and harmonization of criteria for accreditation is of increasing importance. Moreover, clinical laboratories, like the Assisted Reproduction laboratori...

  15. Effects of intensive mariculture on sediment biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pusceddu, Antonio; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Mirto, Simone;

    2007-01-01

    The exponential growth of off-shore mariculture that has occurred worldwide over the last 10 years has raised concern about the impact of the waste produced by this industry on the ecological integrity of the sea bottom. Investigations into this potential source of impact on the biochemistry of the...... sea floor have provided contrasting results, and no compelling explanations for these discrepancies have been provided to date. To quantify the impact of fish-farm activities on the biochemistry of sediments, we have investigated the quantity and biochemical composition of sediment organic matter in...... regions, with the exception of seagrass sediments in Spain, the biochemistry of the sediments showed significant differences between the control and fish-farm locations. However, the variables explaining the differences observed varied among the regions and between habitats, suggesting idiosyncratic...

  16. Laboratory animals pulmonary clearance study with chromium 51 labelled polystyrene spherical particles: investigations for clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polystyrene spherical particles labelled with chromium 51, retaining a small amount of chromium acetylacetonate, were administered through different ways to laboratory animals, mice, rats, dogs and monkeys, in order to work out a suitable technique for clinical investigations. The following results were obtained: radioactive labelling may be considered as stable because in vivo chromium elution from the particles does not exceed 0.1% daily. No short-term toxicity has been found for any of the ways of administration due to acetylacetonate or the particles themselves. Long-term pulmonary clearance of inhaled polystyrene particles is close to that of metallic oxides, and no detectable nuisance was observed

  17. The significance of indirect costs—application to clinical laboratory test economics using computer facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Hindriks, F. R.; Bosman, A.; Rademaker, P. F.

    1989-01-01

    The significance of indirect costs in the cost price calculation of clinical chemistry laboratory tests by way of the production centres method has been investigated. A cost structure model based on the ‘production centres’ method, the Academisch Ziekenhuis Groningen (AZG) 1-2-3 model, is used for the calculation of cost and cost prices as an add-in tool to the spreadsheet program Lotus 1-2-3. The system specifications of the AZG 1-2-3 cost structure model have been extended with facilities t...

  18. Clinical evaluation of analytical variations in serum creatinine measurements: why laboratories should abandon Jaffe techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drion Iefke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-equivalence in serum creatinine (SCr measurements across Dutch laboratories and the consequences hereof on chronic kidney disease (CKD staging were examined. Methods National data from the Dutch annual external quality organization of 2009 were used. 144 participating laboratories examined 11 pairs of commutable, value-assigned SCr specimens in the range 52–262 μmol/L, using Jaffe or enzymatic techniques. Regression equations were created for each participating laboratory (by regressing values as measured by participating laboratories on the target values of the samples sent by the external quality organization; area under the curves were examined and used to rank laboratories. The 10th and 90th percentile regression equation were selected for each technique separately. To evaluate the impact of the variability in SCr measurements and its eventual clinical consequences in a real patient population, we used a cohort of 82424 patients aged 19–106 years. The SCr measurements of these 82424 patients were introduced in the 10th and 90th percentile regression equations. The newly calculated SCr values were used to calculate an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the 4-variable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry traceable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. Differences in CKD staging were examined, comparing the stratification outcomes for Jaffe and enzymatic SCr techniques. Results Jaffe techniques overestimated SCr: 21%, 12%, 10% for SCr target values 52, 73 and 94 μmol/L, respectively. For enzymatic assay these values were 0%, -1%, -2%, respectively. eGFR using the MDRD formula and SCr measured by Jaffe techniques, staged patients in a lower CKD category. Downgrading to a lower CKD stage occurred in 1-42%, 2-37% and 12–78.9% of patients for the 10th and 90th percentile laboratories respectively in CKD categories 45–60, 60–90 and >90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Using enzymatic techniques, downgrading

  19. Lack of effect of cannabis-based treatment on clinical and laboratory measures in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centonze, Diego; Mori, Francesco; Koch, Giacomo; Buttari, Fabio; Codecà, Claudia; Rossi, Silvia; Cencioni, Maria Teresa; Bari, Monica; Fiore, Stefania; Bernardi, Giorgio; Battistini, Luca; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2009-12-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is involved in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS), and relief from pain and spasticity has been reported in MS patients self-medicating with marijuana. A cannabis-based medication containing Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol (Sativex) has been approved in some countries for the treatment of MS-associated pain. The effects of this pharmaceutical preparation on other clinically relevant aspects of MS pathophysiology, however, are still unclear. In 20 MS patients, we measured the effects of Sativex on clinically measured spasticity and on neurophysiological and laboratory parameters that correlate with spasticity severity or with the modulation of the ECS. Sativex failed to affect spasticity and stretch reflex excitability. This compound also failed to affect the synthesis and the degradation of the endocannabinoid anandamide, as well as the expression of both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in various subpopulations of peripheral lymphocytes. PMID:19768368

  20. Noninvasive monitoring of tidal volume with an extensometer: laboratory and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, J

    1993-02-01

    The extensometer or "rubbery ruler" (RR) is a new torso transducer with potential application in the field of respiratory pattern analysis. This paper determines whether the RR can measure tidal volume over a clinically useful time frame following spirometric calibration. Laboratory testing identified no error or baseline drift during 774,000 controlled stretches. Clinical testing in a variety of patients demonstrated that 96.6% of derived spirometric values were contained within an error range of +15.2% to -16.9% of spirometrically measured tidal volume and that accuracy did not change over a period of one hour. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device merits further investigation. PMID:8447609

  1. Evaluation of oxidative stress and whole blood viscosity for clinical laboratory testing of smoking toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel U. Nwose

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are no clearly established clinical biochemical markers for cigarette smoking despite the knowledge that cigarette smoking is a risk factor for various diseases, especially cardiovascular complications of respiratory pathologies. However, there are reports of significant increases in blood viscosity and oxidative stress among smokers. The main objective of the study was to ascertain the association of toxicity from cigarette smoking on whole blood viscosity in our data. Methods: This study analysed the archived clinical data of 20 cigarette smokers and 20 apparently healthy individuals. Results: The data show that on average, oxidative stress levels are relatively the same between groups, while whole blood viscosity is statistically significantly lower in non-smokers compared to smokers. Conclusions: This report suggests that oxidative stress induced whole blood hyper-viscosity could be a valid biomarker for laboratory testing of smoking toxicity among cigarette smokers. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2332-2336

  2. Continuous and Prolonged Intravenous β-Lactam Dosing: Implications for the Clinical Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupper, Mordechai; Kuti, Joseph L; Nicolau, David P

    2016-10-01

    Beta-lactam antibiotics serve as a cornerstone in the management of bacterial infections because of their wide spectrum of activity and low toxicity. Since resistance rates among bacteria are continuously on the rise and the pipeline for new antibiotics does not meet this trend, an optimization of current beta-lactam treatment is needed. This review provides an overview of optimization through use of prolonged- and continuous-infusion dosing strategies compared with more traditional intermittent infusions. Included is an overview of the scientific basis for using these nontraditional prolonged- and continuous-infusion-based regimens, with a focus on major areas in which the clinical laboratory can support the clinical use of these regimens. PMID:27413094

  3. Tuberculous meningits in adults in Turkey: Epidemiology, diagnosis, clinic and laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study was performed to assess the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinic, and laboratory of the patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in a multicentral study. The medical records of adult cases with TBM treated at 12 university hospitals throughout Turkey, between 1985 and 1998 were reviewed using a standardized protocol. The diagnosis of TMB was established with the clinical and laboratory findings and/or microbiological confirmation in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The non-microbiologically confirmed cases were diagnosed with five diagnostic sub-criteria which CSF findings, radiological findings, extra-neural tuberculosis, epidemiological findings and response to antituberculous therapy. A total of 469 patients were included in this study. Majority of the patients were from Southeast Anatolia (164 patients, 35.0%) and (108 patients, 23.0%) from East Anatolia regions. There was a close contact with a tuberculous patient in 88 of 341 patients (25.8%) and with a tuberculous family member in 53 of 288 patients (18.4%). BCG scar was positive in 161 of 392 patients (41.1%). Tuberculin skin test was done in 233 patients and was found to be negative in 75. Totally 115 patients died (24.5%) of whom 23 died in 24 hour after admittance. The diagnosis was confirmed with clinical findings and CSF culture and/or Ziehl-Nelson staining in 88 patients (18.8%). Besides clinical criteria, there were three or more diagnostic sub-criteria in 252 cases (53.7%), two diagnostic sub-criteria in 99 cases (21.1%), and any diagnostic sub-criteria in 30 patients (6.4%). Since TBM is a very critical disease, early diagnosis and treatment may reduce fatal outcome and morbidity

  4. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of adolescents with platelet function disorders and heavy menstrual bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amesse Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet function disorders (PFDs have emerged as an important etiology of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB in adolescents. However, neither clinical nor laboratory data have been methodically analyzed in this population subset. The objective of this study was to evaluate these parameters in order to distinguish characteristics of the disorder that in turn will lead to earlier diagnosis and therapy initiation. Methods Retrospective review of medical records from postmenarcheal adolescents with documented PFDs referred to a hemophilia treatment center and university faculty practices for bleeding diatheses with their clinical and laboratory data evaluated. Results Of 63 teens with documented PFDs, HMB was the most common clinical manifestation of PFD (43; 68.3%. Of these, 37 (86% were diagnosed with PFD either at or after menarche with the diagnosis based on HMB symptoms alone. Only 6 (14% were diagnosed with a PFD prior to menarche, based on associated bleeding, i.e., epistaxis, ecchymosis, and all developed HMB after menstruation onset. Interestingly, 20 girls were diagnosed with a PFD prior to menarche and of these, only 6 (30% went on to develop HMB after pubertal transition, while the majority (14; 70% did not. The average age-at-PFD diagnosis was 14.5yrs, significantly differing from the 10.9yrs average age-at-PFD diagnosis in their counterparts that, after menarche, did not develop HMB (PP P Conclusions Adolescents with PFDs and HMB appear to be clinically distinct from their non-HMB counterparts. This group of girls is characterized by HMB the major bleeding symptom, significantly high incidences of blood group O and the δ-SPD with a PFD diagnosed well after menarche. High false negative standard platelet function study results indicate additional diagnostic strategies, particularly for δ-SPD, should be considered.

  5. Obtaining valid laboratory data in clinical trials conducted in resource diverse settings: lessons learned from a microbicide phase III clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Crucitti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the last decade several phase III microbicides trials have been conducted in developing countries. However, laboratories in resource constrained settings do not always have the experience, infrastructure, and the capacity to deliver laboratory data meeting the high standards of clinical trials. This paper describes the design and outcomes of a laboratory quality assurance program which was implemented during a phase III clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of the candidate microbicide Cellulose Sulfate 6% (CS [1]. METHODOLOGY: In order to assess the effectiveness of CS for HIV and STI prevention, a phase III clinical trial was conducted in 5 sites: 3 in Africa and 2 in India. The trial sponsor identified an International Central Reference Laboratory (ICRL, responsible for the design and management of a quality assurance program, which would guarantee the reliability of laboratory data. The ICRL provided advice on the tests, assessed local laboratories, organized trainings, conducted supervision visits, performed re-tests, and prepared control panels. Local laboratories were provided with control panels for HIV rapid tests and Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG amplification technique. Aliquots from respective control panels were tested by local laboratories and were compared with results obtained at the ICRL. RESULTS: Overall, good results were observed. However, discordances between the ICRL and site laboratories were identified for HIV and CT/NG results. One particular site experienced difficulties with HIV rapid testing shortly after study initiation. At all sites, DNA contamination was identified as a cause of invalid CT/NG results. Both problems were timely detected and solved. Through immediate feedback, guidance and repeated training of laboratory staff, additional inaccuracies were prevented. CONCLUSIONS: Quality control guidelines when applied in field laboratories ensured the reliability and validity

  6. The Usefulness of Clinical and Laboratory Parameters for Predicting Severity of Dehydration in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hoxha, Teuta Faik; Azemi, Mehmedali; Avdiu, Muharrem; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Grajqevci, Violeta; Petrela, Ela

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: An accurate assessment of the degree of dehydration in infants and children is important for proper decision-making and treatment. This emphasizes the need for laboratory tests to improve the accuracy of clinical assessment of dehydration. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between clinical and laboratory parameters in the assessment of dehydration. Methods: We evaluated prospectively 200 children aged 1 month to 5 years who presented with diarrhea, vomi...

  7. Clinical and laboratory features and response to treatment in patients presenting with vitamin B12 deficiency-related neurological syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron S; Kumar Sudhir; Vijayan J; Jacob J; Alexander M; Gnanamuthu C

    2005-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the clinical and laboratory features of patients admitted with vitamin B12 deficiency-related (B12def) neurological syndromes. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A hospital-based retrospective and prospective study conducted at a referral teaching hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Consecutive patients admitted with vitamin B12 deficiency-related neurological disorders during a three-year period from June 2000 to May 2003 were included. Data regarding clinical and laboratory fea...

  8. Mould Routine Identification in the Clinical Laboratory by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Carole Cassagne; Stéphane Ranque; Anne-Cécile Normand; Patrick Fourquet; Sandrine Thiebault; Chantal Planard; Marijke Hendrickx; Renaud Piarroux

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MALDI-TOF MS recently emerged as a valuable identification tool for bacteria and yeasts and revolutionized the daily clinical laboratory routine. But it has not been established for routine mould identification. This study aimed to validate a standardized procedure for MALDI-TOF MS-based mould identification in clinical laboratory. MATERIALS AND METHODS: First, pre-extraction and extraction procedures were optimized. With this standardized procedure, a 143 mould strains reference ...

  9. The frequency of clinical and laboratory findings of hypernatremia and factors affecting its severity in term newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Hajieh Borna; Shiva Rafati; Fathemeh Haj Ebrahim Tehrani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypernatremic dehydration in neonate is a serious potentially life treating can damage the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and laboratory signs of hypernatremic dehydration in term infant. Methods: A cross sectional study was performed from April 2010 to March 2012 in 111 neonates with sodium>145 mmol/l who were admitted at the Mostafa Khomeini and Hazrat Zainab Hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The incidence of clinical and laboratory findi...

  10. Laboratory Techniques for the Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombaugh, Dorothy

    1972-01-01

    Describes modifications of laboratory procedures for the BSCS Green Version biology, including dissection, microbiology, animal behavior, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics that make the methods suitable for direct experimentation by blind students. Discusses models as substitutes for microscopy. (AL)

  11. Molecular-based mycobacterial identification in a clinical laboratory setting: a comparison of two methods.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, N

    2012-01-01

    Many mycobacterial species are pathogenic to humans, with infection occurring worldwide. Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a well-described global phenomenon, but other mycobacterial species are increasingly shown to be the cause of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary infection and are managed differently from M. tuberculosis infection. Rapid and accurate differentiation of mycobacterial species is, therefore, critical to guide timely and appropriate therapeutic and public health management. This study evaluates two commercially available DNA strip assays, the Genotype Common Mycobacteria (CM) assay (Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany) and the Speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay (Vircell, Spain) for their usefulness in a clinical laboratory setting. Both assays were evaluated on 71 clinical mycobacterial isolates, previously identified using Gen-Probe AccuProbe and through a UK mycobacteriology reference laboratory, as well as 29 non-mycobacterial isolates. Concordant results were obtained for 98% of isolates using both assays. The sensitivity was 97% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 93.3-100%) for the CM assay and 98.6% (95% CI: 95.9-100%) for the Speed-oligo assay. Overall, both assays proved to be useful tools for rapid and sensitive mycobacterial species identification, although interpretation of results was easier with the CM assay. Finally, results were available within one day, compared to current identification times which range between seven days and four weeks.

  12. Hereditary angioedema: Historical aspects, classification, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and laboratory diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, David A

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disorder first described in 1888 by Sir William Osler. Since then, our understanding of this condition has increased tremendously. This article reviews the historical aspects, classification, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and laboratory diagnosis of HAE. A review was performed of historical and current literature of HAE. HAE I and II are related to insufficient production of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) or production of a dysfunctional C1-INH protein, respectively. HAE III is not related to C1-INH deficiency and the pathogenesis is unknown. Bradykinin appears to be the main mediator responsible for angioedema in patients with C1-INH deficiencies. Angioedema of the extremities, face, and upper airway along with gastrointestinal angioedema are the most common clinical features in HAE. The laboratory tests that are most commonly used in the diagnosis of HAE include C4, C1-INH concentration, and C1-INH function. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of HAE have led to several advances in the therapy of this disease. Despite our more thorough understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of HAE, many questions remain unanswered. PMID:21262092

  13. The Relative Frequency, Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Adult Glomerulonephritidies in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Emami Naini

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Renal diseases information is population-based and has great geographic variability. Due to the lack of national renal data registry system, there is no information on the prevalence rate, and clinical and laboratory features of various glomerulonephritidies (GNs in Iran. Methods: In a retrospective cross sectional study, we analyzed 462 adult renal biopsies in Hashemi Nejad hospital, Tehran, Iran. We determined the prevalence rate and the frequency of different clinical and laboratory findings in patients with different GNs. We also compared our results with the reports from other countries. Results: There were 267(57.8% males and 195(42.2% females. The mean age (± SD was 33.6 ± 15.7 (range, 13-75 years old. After exclusion of 55 biopsies with pathologies other than GNs and in the remaining 407 biopsies, membranous glomerulopathy (MGN was the most common GN (23.6%, followed by IgAN (13.5%, membranoproliferative GN (11.5%, systemic lupus nephritis (10.6%, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (10.3%, and minimal change disease (9.8%. These 6 GNs comprised the majority (79.4% of all GNs. Conclusion: MGN is the most common form of GN, followed by IgAN, MPGN, SLE-GN, FSGS and MCD in adult patients in our study. The multi-center studies with a larger sample size are needed for more comprehensive data in Iranian population. Key words: Glomerulonephritidies, Epidemiology, Renal Biopsy, Glomeulopathy

  14. Practical aspects of the use of FMEA tool in clinical laboratory risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elizabete Mendes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This paper presents the failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA tool in a clinical laboratory through the introduction of new technology for blood gas and serum ionized calcium in multi-parameter analyzers such as Point of Care Testing (POCT. OBJECTIVE: To present FMEA as a tool for risk managing and improvement with the introduction of new technologies in a public laboratory. METHODS: The change of multiparameter gas analyzer type POCT was defined and described as a process. Subsequently, the criteria were presented to the risk assessment and its quantification. We studied the failure modes that might occur in this process. We established three action plans involving improvements to be made in the technological change. FMEA was applied in two stages: at the beginning of the project and after the implementation of the proposed measures. RESULTS: The first plan involved administrative measures related to the bidding process; the second preventive action involved the possibility of which supplier would win the bid by studying the efficiency of the analyzer and its impact on productivity; the third set of actions was directed to improvements in the relationship with the clinical staff in order to minimize occasional complaints. The last actions referred to employing new employees to meet the growing demand. CONCLUSION: FMEA proved to be a reliable tool for performance improvement, which proactively identifies, prioritizes and mitigates patient risks.

  15. Establishment of baseline haematology and biochemistry parameters in wild adult African penguins (Spheniscus demersus)

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, Nola J.; Schaefer, Adam M.; Stephen D. van der Spuy; Gous, Tertius A

    2015-01-01

    There are few publications on the clinical haematology and biochemistry of African penguins (Spheniscus demersus) and these are based on captive populations. Baseline haematology and serum biochemistry parameters were analysed from 108 blood samples from wild, adult African penguins. Samples were collected from the breeding range of the African penguin in South Africa and the results were compared between breeding region and sex. The haematological parameters that were measured were: haematoc...

  16. Clinical and laboratory description of a series of cases of acute viral myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Paula Cardin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Describe the clinical and laboratory profile, follow-up, and outcome of a series of cases of acute viral myositis. METHOD: A retrospective analysis of suspected cases under observation in the emergency department was performed, including outpatient follow-up with the recording of respiratory infection and musculoskeletal symptoms, measurement of muscle enzymes, creatine phosphokinase (CPK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, transaminases (AST and ALT, blood count, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the acute phase and during follow-up until normalization. RESULTS: Between 2000 and 2009, 42 suspected cases were identified and 35 (27 boys were included. The median age was 7 years and the diagnosis was reported in 89% in the first emergency visit. The observed respiratory symptoms were cough (31%, rhinorrhea (23%, and fever (63%, with a mean duration of 4.3 days. Musculoskeletal symptoms were localized pain in the calves (80%, limited ambulation (57%, gait abnormality (40%, and muscle weakness in the lower limbs (71%, with a mean duration of 3.6 days. There was significant increase in CPK enzymes (5507 ± 9180 U/L, LDH (827 ± 598 U/L, and AST (199 ± 245 U/L, with a tendency to leukopenia (4590 ± 1420 leukocytes/mm3. The complete recovery of laboratory parameters was observed in 30 days (median, and laboratory and clinical recurrence was documented in one case after 10 months. CONCLUSION: Typical symptoms with increased muscle enzymes after diagnosis of influenza and self-limited course of the disease were the clues to the diagnosis. The increase in muscle enzymes indicate transient myotropic activity related to seasonal influenza, which should be considered, regardless of the viral identification, possibly associated with influenza virus or other respiratory viruses.

  17. [International standardization of laboratory information systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, T

    1997-06-01

    The standardization of clinical laboratory information systems is one of the most difficult but important subjects for clinical laboratory community and laboratorians. International Standard Organization (ISO) has the projects in this field (JTC1/SC7) which is the part of approach to the international laboratory standardization (ISO/TC 212). US NCCLS and European CEN/TC 251 are working under ISO/TC 212. In the United States, the National Academy for Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) had started recently to organize the international collaboration program on the subject. The Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (JSCP)'s Council of Laboratory Informatics had joined this program in 1995. NACB/AACC's Ad Hoc Committee which was organized in 1996 is now trying to collect the general opinions ("what and how") through their internet home page. The current status of the works on the standardization of clinical laboratory information systems in the U.S., Europe, and Japan is reviewed briefly in this article. HL7 electronic data exchange specification and clinical testing coding systems such as LOINC coding project and JSCP's coding project are also reviewed. PMID:9306712

  18. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  19. Age Related Clinical and Laboratory Manifestations of Enteric Fever in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Patankar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Scanty literature is available on age related clinical features in children in Western India. A study wasthereby conducted to evaluate the clinical profile of enteric fever patients admitted in our hospital in theyear 2007. All patients with fever with Widal positive and/or with culture grown salmonella were included.A retrospective analysis of their clinical features, laboratory parameters and antimicrobial therapy wasdone. A total of 33 patients were included and divided into two age groups; 5 years. Meanage of presentation was 5 + 3 years. Male: Female ratio was 2:1. Common clinical features were fever(100%, hepatomegaly (82%, elevated liver enzymes (85%, anemia (88% and elevated ESR (80%.None of the patients had constipation. In the age group of 5 years age group. Of all the first line antibiotics used, Ceftriaxone was used in 29 (87.88%patients, Ciprofloxacin in 3 (9.1% patients, and Cefotaxime in 1 (3% patient. Failure of first line antibioticswas seen in 10 (30.3% patients. Complications were seen in 6 (18.18% patients, of which 2 (33.33%had serositis, 1 (16.67% each had osteomyelitis, synovitis, splenic abscess and shock. 31 (93.9% patientsrecovered. 1 (3% died and 1 (3% was lost to follow-up. Recovery was faster in 5 years old (9.4 ± 4.5 days (P = 0.01.Fever, hepatomegaly,elevated liver enzymes, anemia and elevated ESR are the common clinical features of enteric fever inchildren. Diarrhea is more common in younger children whereas relative bradycardia and gall bladdersludge is more common in older children. Constipation is not a feature. Recovery is better in youngerchildren. 30% of our patients had resistance to third generation cephalosporins as first line antibiotics.

  20. Rhetorical Structure of Biochemistry Research Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoksilapatham, Budsaba

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a move analysis [Swales, J. (1990). "Genre analysis." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] of 60 biochemistry research articles. First, a corpus was systematically compiled to ensure that it represents core journals in the focused discipline. Then, coding reliability analysis was conducted to demonstrate…

  1. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

  2. Jmol-Enhanced Biochemistry Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderholm, Matthew; Reynolds, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    We developed a protein research project for a one-semester biochemistry lecture class to enhance learning and more effectively train students to understand protein structure and function. During this semester-long process, students select a protein with known structure and then research its structure, sequence, and function. This project…

  3. 75 FR 30041 - Medicare Program; Public Meeting in Calendar Year 2010 for New Clinical Laboratory Tests Payment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ...This notice announces a public meeting to receive comments and recommendations (including accompanying data on which recommendations are based) from the public on the appropriate basis for establishing payment amounts for a specified list of new Clinical Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes for clinical laboratory tests in calendar year (CY) 2011. The meeting provides a forum for interested......

  4. BRUCELLOSIS: REVIEW OF CLINICAL AND LABORATORY FEATURES AND THERAPEUTIC REGIMENS IN 44 CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Afsharpaiman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBrucellosis is not uncommon in children in endemic areas. We described clinical and laboratory features and therapeutic regimens for brucellosis in children under 14 who admitted in the Pediatric Medical Center Hospital, Tehran, Iran from March 1988 until February 2001. The male: female ratio was 2:1. Family history of brucellosis and consumption of un-pasteurized milk and dairy products was positive in 20.4% and 65.9%, respectively. The common clinical findings were arthritis (79.5%, fever (77.4%, anorexia (61.4%, sweating (52.3%, splenomegaly (43.2%, hepatomegaly (34.1% and lymphadenopathy (13.65. Anemia, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were recorded in 56.8%, 31.8% and 9.1%, respectively. Out of all patients, seropositivity rate for brucellosis was found in 97.7% using serum agglutination test. Culture of blood and bone marrow specimen were positive in 30% and 50% of samples obtained, respectively. Rifampin and co-trimoxazole were the most commonly used combination in 68.1%. The overall relapse rate was 13.6%. Arthritis and fever were the most common clinical findings of brucellosis. Wright test is a very sensitive method to detect brucella infection. Public education and control measures should be applied to prevent the zoonotic and human brucellosis. 

  5. A STUDY ON CLINICAL, LABORATORY PROFILE AND OUTCOME OF DENGUE FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanamali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES : In recent days there is an alarming increase in the incidence of dengue fever and has emerged as a serious international public health threat with almost half of the world's population at risk for infection . Very few studies have been conducted in this part of our country and hence this study was undertaken to study the clinical picture, la boratory profile and outcome of dengue fever in and around khammam. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study was conducted over one year at Mamata General Hospital, during which 190 cases were diagnosed as dengue fever which were taken into study and eval uated for clinical, laboratory profile and their outcome. RESULTS : Out of 190 patients taken into study, fever was the most common presentation followed by headache. Thrombocytopenia was seen in 75% of the patients. Bleeding manifestations were seen in pat ients with platelet counts less than 40000/mm 3 . 18 patients were diagnosed as DHF, 6 patients were diagnosed as DSS. During our study 10 patients expired. CONCLUSION: The clinical and hematological picture of dengue fever is like any other viral fevers and the bleeding manifestations are seen in patients whose platelet counts decreases less than 40000/mm 3 only

  6. Using Elearning techniques to support problem based learning within a clinical simulation laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Charles; Hoy, Derek; Topp, Helena; Trinder, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the results of the first phase of a project that used eLearning to support students' learning within a simulated environment. The locus was a purpose built Clinical Simulation Laboratory (CSL) where the School's newly adopted philosophy of Problem Based Learning (PBL) was challenged through lecturers reverting to traditional teaching methods. The solution, a student-centred, problem-based approach to the acquisition of clinical skills was developed using learning objects embedded within web pages that substituted for lecturers providing instruction and demonstration. This allowed lecturers to retain their facilitator role, and encouraged students to explore, analyse and make decisions within the safety of a clinical simulation. Learning was enhanced through network communications and reflection on video performances of self and others. Evaluations were positive, students demonstrating increased satisfaction with PBL, improved performance in exams, and increased self-efficacy in the performance of nursing activities. These results indicate that an elearning approach can support PBL in delivering a student centred learning experience. PMID:15360935

  7. Biochemistry in the idea of graduation students

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    D. F. Escoto et al

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: Biochemistry is an interdisciplinary area that allows us to study chemical phenomena in live organisms. That way, its study is of extreme importance, in all levels, to enlarge the comprehension of natural phenomena. However, it is barely explored in the basic education and often fragmented in the higher education, or in graduation degrees that contemplate this area. Especially in the teacher training, where the fragmentation of knowledge can contribute to form wrong concepts. Based on that, this work aims to identify the concept of Biochemistry according to the future teachers of Natural Science. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The work was developed with 3º, 5º and 9º semesters students of the natural science degree on Universidade Federal do Pampa. 50 students, from 18 to 56 years old, were interviewed. The data was obtained through a semi-structured questionnaire. The methodology of categorization and analysis of content with emergent categories of speech was chosen for the analysis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Initially, 11 categories were chosen by content similarity. In descending order: chemical reactions in organisms, chemistry area, chemistry of life, cell metabolism, the study of living beings, origin of life, biology area, organic balance, chemical-biological study. The reports made possible to identify that most students do understand with clarity the goal of studying biochemistry. Although, we can see that there are some students that fragment the area, what means, they try to discriminate chemistry from biology. This way, they demonstrate a difficulty to comprehend biochemistry as interdisciplinary, what makes it hard to contextualize the built knowledge. It is important to develop strategies to overcome the fragmentation of knowledge, so that biochemistry can be comprehended in its fullness and help on the teaching processes that will be developed by the future teachers.

  8. Clinical-Laboratory Parallels in Patients with Demodectic Blepharitis at Cosmecevtic’s Use

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    I. B. Medvedev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the influence of the new cosmecevtic — cream «Demazol» on the dynamics of clinical and laboratory parameters (akarogramms with Demodex blepharitis.Patients and methods. There were 56 patients with Demodex blepharitis with symptoms of blepharitis or blepharoconjunctivitis in the study. In all cases, the clinical diagnoses were confirmed by laboratory investigations of epilated lashes. The akarogramms indicated the number of adult mite larvae and eggs of parasites separately for each eye. The cream was applied topically on the eyelids 2 times a day following our instructions, and before this, we provided pretreatment alcohol eucalyptus or sage tincture. The course of treatment was 1.5 months. Alongside this, we conducted drug correction of the status of the tear film via artificial tears eyedrops and therapy of blepharitis or blepharoconjunctivitis withantibiotics, steroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. A controlled laboratory testing for the presence of the mite Demodex folliculorum was undertaken after the course of treatment with cream. Evaluation of the efficacy of the cream was undertaken in accordance with the age of patients (up to 70 groups of patients 70 years and older, and the amount of mites.Results. The cosmetic cream «Demazol» had eliminated all forms of the mite Demodex — adults, larvae and eggs of parasites after 45 days of application. The number of mites after the course was significantly reduced: 5.7 times (by the number of adults; 3.7 times (the number of larvae and 12 times (the number of parasite eggs. Reduction the number of ticks was noted in general by 95% of patients; full or substantial reduction by 62.5%, proving the specific efficacy of «Demazol.» The clinical effect of varying degrees (excluding akarogramm was noted in 49 of 56 patients (87.5%. The percentage of patients with a moderate pronounced effect from the cream was 78.6%. The combination of a pronounced

  9. A Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Course for Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Novell, J. M.; Cid, E.; Gomis, R.; Barbera, A.; Guinovart, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a course for reinforcing the knowledge of biochemistry in secondary school science teachers. The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Barcelona designed a course to bring these teachers up to date with this discipline. In addition to updating their knowledge of biochemistry and molecular…

  10. Television Medical Dramas as Case Studies in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Julie T.

    2009-01-01

    Several case studies from popular television medical dramas are described for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. These cases, which illustrate fundamental principles of biochemistry, are used as the basis for problems that can be discussed further in small groups. Medical cases provide an interesting context for biochemistry with video…

  11. The biochemistry of blister fluid from pediatric burn injuries: proteomics and metabolomics aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Tuo; Broszczak, Daniel A; Broadbent, James A; Cuttle, Leila; Lu, Haitao; Parker, Tony J

    2016-01-01

    Burn injury is a prevalent and traumatic event for pediatric patients. At present, the diagnosis of burn injury severity is subjective and lacks a clinically relevant quantitative measure. This is due in part to a lack of knowledge surrounding the biochemistry of burn injuries and that of blister fluid. A more complete understanding of the blister fluid biochemistry may open new avenues for diagnostic and prognostic development. Burn insult induces a highly complex network of signaling processes and numerous changes within various biochemical systems, which can ultimately be examined using proteome and metabolome measurements. This review reports on the current understanding of burn wound biochemistry and outlines a technical approach for 'omics' profiling of blister fluid from burn wounds of differing severity. PMID:26581649

  12. Molecular analysis and association with clinical and laboratory manifestations in children with sickle cell anemia

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    Roberta Faria Camilo-Araújo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze the frequency of βS-globin haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia, and their influence on clinical manifestations and the hematological profile of children with sickle cell anemia. Method: The frequency of βS-globin haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia and any association with clinical and laboratorial manifestations were determined in 117 sickle cell anemia children aged 3–71 months. The confirmation of hemoglobin SS and determination of the haplotypes were achieved by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and alpha-thalassemia genotyping was by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (single-tube multiplex-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The genotype distribution of haplotypes was 43 (36.7% Central African Republic/Benin, 41 (35.0% Central African Republic/Central African Republic, 20 (17.0% Rare/atypical, and 13 (11.1% Benin/Benin. The frequency of the α3.7 deletion was 1.71% as homozygous (−α3.7/−α3.7 and 11.9% as heterozygous (−α3.7/αα. The only significant association in respect to haplotypes was related to the mean corpuscular volume. The presence of alpha-thalassemia was significantly associated to decreases in mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and reticulocyte count and to an increase in the red blood cell count. There were no significant associations of βS-globin haplotypes and alpha-thalassemia with clinical manifestations. Conclusions: In the study population, the frequency of alpha-thalassemia was similar to published data in Brazil with the Central African Republic haplotype being the most common, followed by the Benin haplotype. βS-globin haplotypes and interaction between alpha-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia did not influence fetal hemoglobin concentrations or the number of clinical manifestations.

  13. Current status of US programs for training clinical laboratory scientists and anticipated impact of healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M G; Sacks, D B

    1995-06-01

    We surveyed directors of medical technology (MT) and postdoctoral clinical chemistry (CC) training programs and of clinical pathology (CP) and combined anatomic/clinical pathology (AP/CP) residency programs regarding the number, quality, training emphasis, and job-placement experience of trainees for 1985-95 as well as the directors' opinions on the impact of "healthcare reform." Responses were received from directors of 94 of 249 (38%) MT programs, 14 of 15 (93%) CC programs, and 63 of 138 (46%) pathology residency programs. In all four categories the numbers of trainees have increased steadily over the last 5 to 7 years but are expected to remain stable or decrease slightly. Directors of MT and CC programs expect increasing difficulty placing their graduates; directors of AP/CP and CP residency programs do not. Although > 60% of MT graduates have entered private hospitals, this is anticipated to decrease, with a concomitant increase in university hospital placements. Of the AP/CP residents, > 60% and < 5% accepted service- and research-oriented positions, respectively. In contrast, 83% of CP residents entered university hospitals, with half of these taking research-oriented positions. Among CC graduates, 41% joined university hospitals and 10-15% accepted positions in each of either private hospitals or industry or reference laboratories. The emphasis of training varies, with clinical service and pathophysiology the major focus in AP/CP programs. CP and CC programs take two distinct approaches--some accentuating management, and others emphasizing research. Finally, MT program directors appear the most optimistic regarding the opportunities that healthcare reform may present. PMID:7768016

  14. QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN CLINICAL LABORATORIES ACCORDING TO THE ISO 15189:2007 STANDARD - EVALUATION OF THE BENEFITS OF IMPLEMENTATION IN AN ASSISTED REPRODUCTION LABORATORY

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    A.D. Sialakouma

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical science is a sensitive discipline and presents unique challenges due to its social character, continuous development and competitiveness. The issue of quality management systems and accreditation is gaining increasing interest in this sector. All over Europe, Health Services Units have started to introduce quality management systems and harmonization of criteria for accreditation is of increasing importance. Moreover, clinical laboratories, like the Assisted Reproduction laboratories and biochemical laboratories are required to apply a Quality Management System in order to ensure their correct, scientific and effective operation. Ultimately, it is a moral obligation for every health care organisation to supply the best possible care for the patient. The specific features and the diversity of clinical laboratories led to the introduction (2003 and, recently to the revision (2007 of the international standard ISO 15189, which is the first international standard developed specifically to address the requirements for accreditation of this type of laboratory. The basic principles for the quality assurance in the clinical laboratories are: x Complete and unambiguous standardized operating procedures. x Complete and unambiguous directives of operation. x Obligatory detailed written documentation, i.e., how each action is done, who will do it, where will this action take place and when. x Suitable scheduling of calibration/control/preventive maintenance of laboratory equipment and recording of each activity. x Distribution of responsibilities among the staff and continuous education and briefing according to current scientific data. x Complete and informed record file keeping. x Continuous improvement which is monitored with the adoption of quantified indicators. x Internal and external audit of all activities. x Troubleshooting. All these principles should be supported by the Management in order that the necessary adaptations should be made

  15. Practicing participative management in the clinical laboratory. Foster a productive and satisfying staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissoneau, R; McPherson, J

    1991-01-01

    Employee participation and involvement are at the leading edge of management thinking today. Not only behaviorally oriented managers, but managers of all styles include personnel in decision-making. The purpose of this article is to communicate to clinical laboratory managers some recent developments in people management. Several suggestions for team building and the desired outcome of worker participation are included. Although employee participation has been a major issue in management for 10 years, many business schools still emphasize only the traditional quantitative subjects of accounting, finance, statistics, and systems engineering. Obviously, these subjects are important, but modern managers must learn qualitative or behavioral material as well. Students are affected by the lack of a notable behavioral emphasis. Unfortunately, some students think that learning in the behavioral domain is unimportant. Too often, these students encounter problems later in their careers with employees and can only wish for greater knowledge. PMID:10111320

  16. [Measurement of natriuretic peptides in heart failure: the good laboratory and clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, L Gábor; Nyolczas, Noémi; Habon, Tamás; Sepp, Róbert; Piroth, Zsolt; Hajas, Ágota; Boncz, Imre; Tomcsányi, János; Kappelmayer, János; Merkely, Béla

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (BNP, NT-proBNP) play a pivotal role in cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly due to their roles in vasodilatation, natriuresis, diuresis and due to their antiproliferative properties. Proper measurement of the natriuretic peptide levels may help differentiate between respiratory and cardiac forms of dyspnea, diagnose early forms of heart failure, evaluate severity of heart failure (prognosis) and monitor the efficacy of therapy. In many countries natriuretic peptide levels are being used as one of the earliest diagnostics tools to evaluate the involvement of the heart. Current theoretical and clinical data confirm the importance of natriuretic peptides in routine healthcare. These roles are clearly described in international recommendations and guidelines. In the current review the authors discuss the problems of the measurement of natriuretic peptides in Hungary, including several aspects related to laboratory medicine, cardiology and health economy. PMID:26211747

  17. Clinical and laboratory features of pheochromocytoma in a 52-year-old female patient

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    Otmara Aranguren Barreto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to describe the clinical and laboratory features of a female patient suffering from pheochromocytoma. The case is a 52-year-old female patient who presents to our healthcare center with high blood pressure, cold limbs, sweating, jitteriness, and episodes of oppressive chest pain that appear several times per day. She also reports fatigue and a 13-kilogram weight loss. The sonogram revealed a nodular image in the right adrenal gland that had low echogenicity and regular margins measuring 5 mm. The image was confirmed with a contrast-enhanced adrenal CAT scan. Urine vanillylmandelic acid levels were high and an adrenal biopsy confirmed a pheochromocytoma measuring 4.5 x 3.5 x 3 cm.

  18. SUSCEPTIBILITY TEST FOR FUNGI: CLINICAL AND LABORATORIAL CORRELATIONS IN MEDICAL MYCOLOGY

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    Ana ALASTRUEY-IZQUIERDO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYDuring recent decades, antifungal susceptibility testing has become standardized and nowadays has the same role of the antibacterial susceptibility testing in microbiology laboratories. American and European standards have been developed, as well as equivalent commercial systems which are more appropriate for clinical laboratories. The detection of resistant strains by means of these systems has allowed the study and understanding of the molecular basis and the mechanisms of resistance of fungal species to antifungal agents. In addition, many studies on the correlation of in vitro results with the outcome of patients have been performed, reaching the conclusion that infections caused by resistant strains have worse outcome than those caused by susceptible fungal isolates. These studies have allowed the development of interpretative breakpoints for Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., the most frequent agents of fungal infections in the world. In summary, antifungal susceptibility tests have become essential tools to guide the treatment of fungal diseases, to know the local and global disease epidemiology, and to identify resistance to antifungals.

  19. An Inexpensive Biophysics Laboratory Apparatus for Acquiring Pulmonary Function Data with Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkay, Gregory

    2001-11-01

    Interest on the part of the Physics Department at KSC in developing a computer interfaced lab with appeal to biology majors and a need to perform a clinical pulmonological study to fulfill a biology requirement led to the author's undergraduate research project in which a recording spirometer (typical cost: $15K) was constructed from readily available materials and a typical undergraduate lab computer interface. Simple components, including a basic photogate circuit, CPU fan, and PVC couplings were used to construct an instrument for measuring flow rates as a function of time. Pasco software was used to build an experiment in which data was collected and integration performed such that one could obtain accurate values for FEV1 (forced expiratory volume for one second) and FVC (forced vital capacity) and their ratio for a large sample of subjects. Results were compared to published norms and subjects with impaired respiratory mechanisms identified. This laboratory exercise is one with which biology students can clearly identify and would be a robust addition to the repertoire for a HS or college physics or biology teaching laboratory.

  20. The elephant in the room (and how to lead it out): In-clinic laboratory quality challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Bente; Weiser, Glade

    2014-01-01

    Over 30 yr of technological evolution have resulted in sophisticated instrumentation for in-clinic laboratories, yet there is no regulatory oversight of diagnostic testing quality. Long overdue, the veterinary profession must address quality assurance (QA) of diagnostic testing. Each practice must weigh the responsibility for laboratory instrumentation test results that are often a combination of in-clinic and send-out testing. Challenges faced by clinic staff maintaining in-clinic laboratories include lack of training in QA and quality control (QC), lack of emphasis placed on QA/QC by instrument suppliers, QC financial and time costs, and a general lack of laboratory QA/QC support resources in the veterinary community. Possible solutions include increased continuing education opportunities and the provision of guidelines and other resources by national veterinary organizations; specialty certification of veterinary technicians; an increasing role of veterinary clinical pathologists as QA/QC consultants; and development of external quality assessment programs aimed at veterinary practices. The potential exists for animal health companies to lead in this effort by innovating instrument design, providing QC services, and exploiting instrument connectivity to monitor performance. Veterinary laboratory QA/QC is a neglected aspect of the profession. In coming years, veterinarians will hopefully find increased support for this core practice component. PMID:25251431

  1. Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Jukić, Igor; Zekić, Josip; Vučetić, Vlatko; Franić, Miljenko; Petrovečki, Mladen; Đerek, Lovorka; Unić, Adriana; Marijančević, Domagoj

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Intensive exercising may significantly damage muscles which is reflected in pain, fatigue and the increase of muscle proteins concentrations in blood such are creatinin kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LD), myoglobin (MB) and other biochemical parameters including urea serum concentration (SU). Biochemical markers vary with age, sex, race, muscle mass, physical activity and climate conditions. They also assist us in determining the limit between the capacity for adaptation to ...

  2. Clinical, laboratory, psychiatric and magnetic resonance findings in patients with Sydenham chorea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faustino, Patricia C.; Terreri, Maria Teresa R.A.; Rocha, Antonio J. da; Zappitelli, Marcelo C.; Lederman, Henrique M.; Hilario, Maria Odete E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical and laboratory characteristics, psychiatric manifestations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in children and adolescents with Sydenham chorea (SyC). The imaging examination was repeated 1 year after the acute phase of SyC. There were 19 patients with a mean age of 11.7 years and a predominance of females (79%);68% had generalized chorea and 53% moderate chorea. SyC presented as an isolated manifestation in 74%. No association between SyC and obsessive-compulsive disorder was found. Mental health problems were present in 45% of the patients. MRI analysis revealed persistent alterations in the caudate nucleus in three patients (16%), who presented recurrent episodes of chorea during the study. In one patient, MRI revealed the presence of nodular heteropathy close to the caudate nucleus region. We conclude that attention problems can be associated with acute clinical features of SyC and persistent alterations in the basal nuclei, evidenced by MRI, can be found in some patients who tend to suffer prolonged attacks and a greater number of recurrences. (orig.)

  3. Clinical manifestation and laboratory findings in positive blood culture in neonatal septicemia

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    Gholamreza Khademi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/objective: Neonatal septicemia is one of the major causes of mortality in newborns. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in positive blood culture in neonatal septicemia. Methods: In this retrospective study, we allocated 100 records positive blood culture of neonates suffering from septicemia. A questionnaire was completed for each patient consisting the age at admission, gender, weight at birth, admission time, type of delivery, pre- or post-term delivery and the clinical symptoms. Types of organism causing sepsis, and their resistance to antibiotics were evaluated and method for empirical treatment was recommended. Results: Respiratory distress, cyanosis and lethargy were more common in the patients. The antibiogram showed Ampicillin resistance in 86% and Gentamycin resistance in 66% of studied records. Also, 36% cases of positive blood culture with gram-negative and 64% with gram-positive bacteria were observed. The most common bacteria in blood cultures were negative-coagulase Staphylococcus (%35, Staphylococcus Aureus (%24, Klebsiella (%18, respectively. Other bacteria were Enterobacter, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus (%5, Acinetobacter (%3, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Negative-Gram Bacilli (%2 and Ceratia (%1. The most common effective antibiotics against bacterial growth in Antibiograms were Vancomycin, Cephalosporin, Amikacin, Co-trimoxazole and Gentamycin. Conclusion: Since the most common bacteria in neonatal septicemia cases were negative-coagulase Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus Aureus, Klebsiella, the pediatricians must select the regiments that cover gram-negative bacteria for empirical antibiotic treatments.

  4. Study on clinical and laboratory diagnostic of Lyme disease in dogs after experimental infection

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    Savić Sara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental infection was done on 13 dogs, with B. burgdorferi s.l., in the epitzootiological area where Lyme disease in dogs and humans is present. Prior to the experimental infection, dogs in the experiment had no contact with B. burgdorferi, and they were kept in isolation. Serological methods used in the study were complement fixation and ELISA test. Biochemical blood analysis was done, also. The experimental infection of dogs was done with a referent ATCC B. burgdorferi s.l. culture, and with the isolates of B. burgdorferi s.l. previousely gained from Ixodes ricinus ticks collected on selected locations of the observed region in the northern part of Serbia (Vojvodina province. After the experimental infection, clinical symptoms were not seen in dogs and positive serological results were found in 70% of experimentally infected dogs. Immunodiagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of Lyme disease in dogs are established. In dogs without clinical symptoms for Lyme disease, when clarifying the laboratory results, one must have in mind the epizootiological situation of the region and also the possibility of former contact of the dog with B. burgdorferi s.l. For epizootiological surveys, CF can be used as an approximate screening method, with obligatory conformation with ELISA in the case of positive findings.

  5. The long-term stability of reconstituted exametazime: a clinical and laboratory evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99Tcm-exametazime has become recognized as an effective agent for in vitro leucocyte labelling. However, the material is relatively expensive and exhibits instability, being recommended for use within 30 min. Following subdivision and low-temperature storage of unlabelled exametazime we have evaluated long-term stability in a clinical setting and provided some laboratory support for the observations. Vials of exametazime were reconstituted with sodium chloride injection BP and subdivided into three aliquots prior to storage at -66oC. At intervals up to 27 days they were used for routine leucocyte labelling with percentage labelling efficiency being recorded. Additional aliquots were tested for lipophilic primary complex and radiochemical impurities using thin layer chromatography over a similar period. Results on 92 patients gave a mean leucocyte labelling efficiency of 37% (range 10-78%). Chromatography supported the patient data. The percentage of primary exametazime remaining after 24 days' storage (55%) compared favourably with that in a freshly prepared aliquot, subdispensed but not stored (66%). Subdivision and refrigerated storage of unlabelled exametazime at -66oC appears to preserve its radiolabelling capacity and the ability of the 99Tcm-exametazime to label leucocytes. This combination of long-term stability and improved cost-effectiveness may promote more widespread utilization of this pharmaceutical in clinical nuclear medicine. (author)

  6. A Laboratory Test Expert System for Clinical Diagnosis Support in Primary Health Care

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    Rodrigo Fernandez-Millan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Decision Support Systems have the potential to reduce lack of communication and errors in diagnostic steps in primary health care. Literature reports have showed great advances in clinical decision support systems in the recent years, which have proven its usefulness in improving the quality of care. However, most of these systems are focused on specific areas of diseases. In this way, we propose a rule-based expert system, which supports clinicians in primary health care, providing a list of possible diseases regarding patient’s laboratory tests results in order to assist previous diagnosis. Our system also allows storing and retrieving patient’s data and the history of patient’s analyses, establishing a basis for coordination between the various health care levels. A validation step and speed performance tests were made to check the quality of the system. We conclude that our system could improve clinician accuracy and speed, resulting in more efficiency and better quality of service. Finally, we propose some recommendations for further research.

  7. Tularemia in Children: Evaluation of Clinical, Laboratory and Treatment Outcomes of 15 Tularemia Cases

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    Ekrem Koyuncu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tularemia is a zoonotic diseases caused by Francisella tularensis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings of 15 children with the diagnosis of tularemia.Materials and Methods: Fifteen cases admitted with fever, sore throat, lymphadenopathy and a F. tularensis antibody titer of 1/160 and above in the microagglutination test (MAT were evaluated retrospectively. Their sociodemographic characteristics, contact with animals, history of tick bite, duration of complaints, clinical and laboratory findings, treatments and clinical courses were studied.Results: The mean age of patients was 11.5±5.1 (3-17 years and 61.3% were male. Fifty-three percent of the patients were living in rural areas, and had contact with contaminated water. Swelling in the neck (93.3%, sore throat (66.7% and fever (66.7% were the most frequently observed symptoms. Oropharyngeal tularemia (66.7% was predominated. In 27% of the patients LAPs were drained surgically, and in 13.3% of cases they were drained by itself. The mean duration between onset of tularemia symptoms and diagnosis was 53±45.3 (5-150 days. Sixty percent of patients were received beta-lactam-antibiotics before admission. It was noted that 6 patients with suppurative lymph nodes were admitted to hospital within median 61 (20-150 days, while others were admitted within median 35 (5-75 days (p<0.05. Mean leukocyte count was 8558.6±1384.5 (6030-11400/mm3, mean CRP was 5.8±2.9 (1-6.7 mg/dl, and mean ESR was 33.1±28.9 (6-103 mm/h. MAT showed that titers ranged from 1/160 to 1/1280. Gentamicin was given in seven patients (47%, streptomycin in five patients (33%, and doxycycline in 3 patients (20%.Conclusions: Tularemia should to be taken into account in the differential diagnosis in patients having tonsillopharyngitis and cervical lymphadenopathy without response to beta-lactam antibiotics in rural areas. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2013;11:61-6

  8. Clinical and laboratory peculiarities of acute myocardial infarction after chronic tonsillitis

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    Shvarts Y.G.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The definition of the relationship of clinical and laboratory features of acute myocardial infarction depending on the suffering of chronic tonsillitis. Materials and methods. The study included 54 patients with acute myocardial infarction suffering for 1-2 days. The collection of the anamnesis, assessment of clinical factors, inspection of the palatine tonsils, clinical and biochemical blood tests have been done. Markers of myocardial necrosis, an electrocardiogram with calculation of a dispersion of interval QT, echocardiogram have been taken into account. Results. 45 of 54 patients reported the symptoms of chronic tonsillitis in their lifetime. At 17 patients the previous diagnosis of chronic tonsillitis has been made, in 6 of them bilateral tonsillectomy was held. All of the patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 with proven chronic tonsillitis (17 patients and 2 — the others (37 patients. At patients with chronic tonsillitis substantially more developed acute heart failure at sick this group glucose of the blood at receipt was higher than in 2 groups (p=0,004, given distinction was independent of presence of diabetes. According to the echocardiography 1 group of patients determined course-diastolic dimensions of the right ventricle increase in comparison with 2 groups (p=0,01. Conclusion. In patients with chronic tonsillitis more severe course of acute myocardial infarction has been determined, which became evident in the relatively high values of blood glucose on admission. The frequent development of congestive heart failure, and increase of the course-diastolic dimensions of the right ventricle have been also revealed.

  9. Clinical and laboratory aspects of a trichinellosis outbreak in Izmir, Turkey

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    Turk M.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data were collected during an outbreak of trichinellosis, which occurred in Izmir, Turkey, between January and March 2004. The source of the infection was raw meatballs made with a mixture of uncooked beef and pork. Of 474 persons who were admitted at the Ataturk Training and Research Hospital during this period with a history of raw meatball consumption, the diagnosis of trichinellosis was confirmed for 154 (32.5 %, 87 males and 67 females; mean age 31 years, range 6-67 years. Among persons with a confirmed diagnosis, 79 % had myalgia, 77 % weakness and malaise, 63 % arthralgia, 40 % jaw pain, 68 % fever, 63 % periorbital and/or facial oedema, 49 % oedema at the trunk and limb, 42 % abdominal pain, 40 % nausea and vomiting, 28 % diarrhoea, 23 % subconjunctival haemorrhage, 25 % macular or petechial rash, 4 % subungual haemorrhage, 15 % cardiac complaints and 0.2 % neurological complaints. Nine patients (5.8 % were hospitalised due to severe myalgia (n = 2, high fever (n = 3, neurological manifestations (n = 1, thrombophlebitis (n = 2 and palmar erythema (n = 1. Eosinophilia was present in 88 % of the confirmed cases at the admission. Elevated levels of serum creatine phosphokinase, lactic dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase were detected in 72 %, 70 % and 16 % of the confirmed cases, respectively. The seroconversion occurred in most of the infected people between the 4th and 6th weeks after the infection. All of the confirmed cases were treated with mebendazole. People with severe symptoms were treated also with prednisolone (60 mg/day for three days and those with a moderately severe clinical pattern received a non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (naproxen sodium, 550 mg/day. All confirmed cases recovered without any clinical sequela.

  10. Clinical and laboratory evidence of Trichomonas vaginalis infection among women of reproductive age in rural area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Fule

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaginitis is a commonly encountered complaint and one of the most frequent reasons for patient visit to obstetrician-gynaecologists. Three vaginal infections are frequent causes of a vaginal discharge: (1 bacterial vaginosis, (2 vulvovaginal candidiasis and (3 trichomonas vaginitis. Differences in the clinical presentation are helpful in diagnosis. Characteristic signs and symptoms for these three vaginal infections are distinct, but on many occasions, they are overlapping. The aim of the present study was to find the prevalence and correlation between the clinical spectrum and laboratory evidence of Trichomonas vaginalis infection by simple, reliable, confirmatory and specific method, i.e. microscopic examination of wet mount preparation and acridine stain of vaginal fluid. Materials and Methods: Irrespective of HIV status, a total of 156 women with vaginal discharge were studied for establishing diagnosis of genital tract infection. The cases of bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis were excluded from the study. Vaginal speculum assisted high vaginal swabs were collected from women with discharge, during collection vagina was inspected for obvious signs. Results: Of the 156 women with vaginal discharge, 19 (12.06 % showed T. vaginalis infection. All the women belonged to active reproductive age group, i.e. 20-40 years. Itching dysuria, and offensive, malodorous, thin, yellowish vaginal discharge were the main and consistent complaints. Only in 2 (1.52% cases, vaginal speculum examination revealed erythema and punctuate haemorrhage, the so-called "strawberry′ vagina. The pH was recorded to be >4.5. Conclusion: Clinical differentiation of various forms of infectious vaginitis is unreliable. The prevalence of T. vaginalis infection at 12.06% was found among rural young women of reproductive age using simple and reliable screening wet mount microscopy.

  11. Clinical and Epidemiological Characterization of Laboratory-Confirmed Autochthonous Cases of Zika Virus Disease in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Corona, Maria Eugenia; De la Garza Barroso, Ana Lucía; Rodriguez Martínez, Jose Cruz; Luna Guzmán, Norma Irene; Ruiz Matus, Cuitláhuac; Díaz Quiñonez, José Alberto; Lopez Martinez, Irma; Kuri Morales, Pablo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Since 2014, autochthonous circulation of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas was detected (Easter Island, Chile). In May 2015, Brazil confirmed autochthonous ­­transmission and in October of that year Colombia reported their first  cases. Now more than 52 countries have reported cases, including Mexico. To deal with this contingency in Mexico, several surveillance systems, in addition to systems for vector-borne diseases were strengthened with the participation of all health institutions. Also, the Ministry of Health defined an Action Plan against ZIKV for the whole country. Methods: We analyzed 93 autochthonous cases of ZIKV disease identified by Epidemiological Surveillance System for Zika Virus in Mexico. All autochthonous cases confirmed by laboratory since November 25, 2015 to February 19, 2016 were included. A description of clinical and epidemiological characteristics of 93 cases of ZIKV disease are presenting and, we describe the Action Plan against this public health emergency.  Results: The distribution of cases by sex was 61 men and 32 women; mean age was 35 years old (S.D. 15, range 6-90). The main clinical features in the 93 cases were fever (96.6%), rash (93.3%), non-purulent conjunctivitis (88.8%), headache (85.4%), and myalgia (84.3%). No deaths were reported. Conclusion: The ZIKV epidemic poses new challenges to public health systems. The information provided for basic, clinical, and epidemiological research, in addition to the data derived from epidemiological surveillance is essential. However, there are still many unanswered questions regarding mechanisms of transmission, complications, and impact of this virus. PMID:27158557

  12. Pracital examination in biochemistry: topics and procedures?

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    Vocke, Nils-Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Under the new revision of the German licensing regulations for physicians ("Approbationsordnung" the rules for the first national examinations (i.e. "Physikum", equivalent to medical school entrance exams have been changed. In addition to the written exam a novel "oral-practical" part is required. Here we describe the implications of this oral-practical exam on the examination procedures in the field of biochemistry/molecular biology. A strategy for its realization is proposed.

  13. THE PRESENCE OF BIOCHEMISTRY EXPERIMENTS IN TEXTBOOKS

    OpenAIRE

    C. E.S. Rocha; M. D. Büttenbender; R. Roehrs

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Being present in high school in chemistry and biology disciplines, biochemistry is to explain the chemical and biological reactions in cells. His concepts are seen as abstract and difficult to understand and can be contextualized through experimentation. Experimentation is used in the classroom to allow students to view the applicability of the contents through observation, creating hypotheses, discussion and conclusions. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pre...

  14. Pharmaco-epidemiological, clinical and laboratory characteristics of drug-induced liver injury in tuberculosis

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    M. V. Koroleva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: improving the efficiency of pharmacotherapy of drug-induced liver injury in tuberculosis by clarifying pharmaco-epidemiological, clinical and laboratory features.Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of primary medical records of 250 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, patients «Volgograd Regional Clinical TB Dispensary № 1». We evaluated the dynamics of biochemical parameters characterizing the development of hepatic cytolytic syndrome, examined the impact of gender and age on the incidence of liver damage, we investigated the relationship of clinical tuberculosis and chemotherapy regimen with the incidence of drug-induced liver injury, examined the clinical manifestations of liver disease.Results: Drug-induced liver injury as a complication of a specific anti-TB treatment was diagnosed in 67 patients (26,8%. In 170 patients (68,0% showed increase in alanine aminotransferase and asparaginaminotrasferazy. Hepatotoxicity significantly more common in patients with disseminated tuberculosis with the collapse of the lung tissue, smear, and a high degree of disease severity. Risk factors for drug liver damage were female gender and age older than 50 years. Women develop liver disease at an earlier date, and displays it harder than men. The earliest and most informative routine biochemical tests, reflecting the state of the liver in the dynamics are ALT and AST. It was found that the mode of the standard anti-TB treatment determines the type of liver injury: the first, 2a and 3rd modes prevails cytolytic hepatocellular type, with 2b mode – combined (mixed type 4th – type of cholestatic liver damage. It was found that repeated, after the development of hepatotoxic reactions, the appointment of anti-TB drugs without gepatoprotektsii in 94% of patients leads to repeated drug-induced liver damage. Cancel specific therapy against the background of cytolytic syndrome promotes the formation of

  15. Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy [in humans] [at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center][at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of research records of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy was conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Code of Federal Regulations, FDA Regulations and Good Clinical Practice Guidelines. Clinical data were collected FR-om subjects' research charts, and differences in conduct of studies at both centers were examined. Records maintained at Brookhaven National Laboratory were not in compliance with regulatory standards. Beth Israel's records followed federal regulations. Deficiencies discovered at both sites are discussed in the reports

  16. LABKA. A real-time computer system for the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, J U; Maruard, C D; Nielsen, H C

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to the real-time clinical laboratory information system (LABKA), which is implemented on a Hewlett-Packard 1000 system. The system is optimized for fast data handling combined with easy control of on-line results, data flow, and linking of related information. The design of LABKA is based on the principle of having a short reporting time together with simplified working procedures. The system can be adjusted to small as well as very large laboratories. Data control is achieved by status information being returned to the operator in real-time, thus avoiding having to use matching lists. This information is presented immediately in response to the procedure which has caused the error. This method of early error detection simplifies working procedures, inhibits accumulation of errors, and increases the flexibility and speed of data reporting. As a result, the number of requested stat analyses has been reduced by 50 percent. Working lists are not generally used. Instead, requisition information is transferred on-line to the instruments on request. A fourth-generation program system for entry, calculation, and test of manually entered data, called RUCAT (1), has been developed. This system enables the user to define forms on vdu-terminals, specify calculations, and test all manually entered data. The LABKA system can also produce cumulative reporting as standard reporting, in real time, fast and in a very high print quality. The real-time demands have strongly influenced the design and layout of the lab files and system design. PMID:2772556

  17. Effects of ostracism and sex on alcohol consumption in a clinical laboratory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Amy K; Cranford, Alexi N; Blumenthal, Heidemarie

    2015-09-01

    Drinking to cope with negative affect is a drinking pattern that leads to problematic alcohol use both in college and after graduation. Despite theory and correlational evidence to this effect, establishing a link between stress and alcohol consumption among college students in the laboratory has yielded both a limited number of studies and, at times, inconsistent results. The present study attempts to resolve these issues through investigating the effects of an ecologically relevant stressor-ostracism-on alcohol consumption in a clinical laboratory setting. Social drinking college students (N = 40; 55% female) completed a 5-min game of Cyberball and were randomly assigned either to be included or excluded in the virtual ball-toss game. The amount (in ml) of beer consumed in a subsequent mock taste test served as our primary dependent variable, with breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) as a secondary dependent variable. Results indicated that excluded participants reported a trend toward an increase in negative affect from pre- to post-Cyberball, and endorsed significantly lower self-esteem, belonging, control, and belief in a meaningful existence compared to included participants. A significant Sex × Condition effect indicated that excluded women consumed less beer than both included women and excluded men, supported by a nonsignificant trend in BrAC. Men did not differ in their consumption of beer as a result of Cyberball condition. Implications of sex and social context on alcohol use are discussed, as well as ostracism as a method for investigating relationships between social stress and alcohol use. PMID:25642585

  18. Clinical and laboratory differences between Epstein-Barr and cytomegalovirus infectious mononucleosis in children

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    Medović Raša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infective mononucleosis is most commonly caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, and in smaller percentage by cytomegalovirus (CMV. Objective. The aim of this paper was to determine the clinical and laboratory differences between EBV and CMV infectious mononucleosis in children. Methods. Cohort retrospective analytical research was conducted. We used data from medical history in six years period and monitored anamnestic data, frequency of inspection and palpation obtained data during physical examination, several laboratory tests, abdomen ultrasonography examination finding and emergence of disease complications. Statistical processing of data has been performed using SPSS 20. Results. Total number of examined children was 137, out of which 85.4% were with EBV and 14.6% with CMV infection. Affected children were most commonly younger than eight years. Boys were affected more often. There was no difference in frequency of high temperature, sore throat, bad breath, and respiratory symptomatology between examined children. Differences were discovered in frequency of stomachaches, eyelid swelling, skin rash and fatigue. Differences were not proven in the frequency of angina, lymphadenopathy and splenohepatomegaly between the groups. Values of transaminases and lactic dehydrogenases significantly decreased after seven days of hospitalization in both groups. In children with EBV, values of transaminases declined faster than in children with CMV. Anemia and bacterial superinfection of pharynx were most common disease complications. Thrombocytopenia was more common in children with CMV infection. Average duration of hospitalization was 6.7 days. Conclusion. In children with CMV abdominal pain, eyelid swelling, skin rash, fatigue and thrombocytopenia were more common. In children with EBV values of transaminases declined significantly faster.

  19. Optimized molecular resolution of cross-contamination alerts in clinical mycobacteriology laboratories

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    de Viedma Darío

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenomenon of misdiagnosing tuberculosis (TB by laboratory cross-contamination when culturing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB has been widely reported and it has an obvious clinical, therapeutic and social impact. The final confirmation of a cross-contamination event requires the molecular identification of the same MTB strain cultured from both the potential source of the contamination and from the false-positive candidate. The molecular tool usually applied in this context is IS6110-RFLP which takes a long time to provide an answer, usually longer than is acceptable for microbiologists and clinicians to make decisions. Our purpose in this study is to evaluate a novel PCR-based method, MIRU-VNTR as an alternative to assure a rapid and optimized analysis of cross-contamination alerts. Results MIRU-VNTR was prospectively compared with IS6110-RFLP for clarifying 19 alerts of false positivity from other laboratories. MIRU-VNTR highly correlated with IS6110-RFLP, reduced the response time by 27 days and clarified six alerts unresolved by RFLP. Additionally, MIRU-VNTR revealed complex situations such as contamination events involving polyclonal isolates and a false-positive case due to the simultaneous cross-contamination from two independent sources. Conclusion Unlike standard RFLP-based genotyping, MIRU-VNTR i could help reduce the impact of a false positive diagnosis of TB, ii increased the number of events that could be solved and iii revealed the complexity of some cross-contamination events that could not be dissected by IS6110-RFLP.

  20. Evaluation of clinical and laboratory predictors of fatality in patients with Hantavirus infection

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    Uğur Kostakoğlu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the clinical and laboratory predictors of fatality among patients with Hantavirus infection.Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted on the patients with Hantavirus infection between April 2009and October 2011 at the Black Sea and the Mediterranean regions in Turkey. Demographic, clinical and laboratory findings offatal cases and non-fatal cases at the admission were compared.Results: Twenty-two patients with confirmed Hantavirus infection were evaluated. Five patients died (22.7%. The cause ofdeath was massive bleeding. The rate of hemorrhage was significantly higher in the fatal cases than non-fatal cases (p<0.001.Massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage was seen in four of these patients, cerebral hemorrhage in two and both gastrointestinaland pulmonary hemorrhage in one. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC was present in four of the fatal cases and aremarkable cause of the bleeding (p=0.02. White blood cell count (WBC (p=0.002, creatine phosphokinase (CPK (p=0.011,blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN (p=0.014, C reactive protein (CRP (p=0.005 and D-dimer levels (p=0.001, prothrombin time (PT(p=0.023, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT (p=0.001 and international normalized ratio (INR (p=0.021 were significantlyhigher, and platelet counts (p=0.038 significantly lower in the fatal cases. Optimum diagnostic cut-off points for specificlaboratory parameters which may be predictive of fatality were; WBC=16,000 μL-1, PLT=30000 μL-1, PT=19.7 s, aPTT=36s, INR=1.2, D-dimer=9.3 μg/mL, CPK=600 U/L, BUN=47 mg/dL and CRP=13.4 mg/dL.Conclusions: Physicians should be aware of the high fatality risk for patients with Hantavirus infection with hemorrhage, elevatedWBC, CPK, BUN, CRP, PT, aPTT, INR and D-dimer and reduced platelet counts. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012; 2(4: 155-159Key words: Hantavirus; hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome; predictors of fatality; predictive factors

  1. Fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever in adults: emphasizing the evolutionary pre-fatal clinical and laboratory manifestations.

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    Ing-Kit Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A better description of the clinical and laboratory manifestations of fatal patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF is important in alerting clinicians of severe dengue and improving management. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Of 309 adults with DHF, 10 fatal patients and 299 survivors (controls were retrospectively analyzed. Regarding causes of fatality, massive gastrointestinal (GI bleeding was found in 4 patients, dengue shock syndrome (DSS alone in 2; DSS/subarachnoid hemorrhage, Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis/bacteremia, ventilator associated pneumonia, and massive GI bleeding/Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia each in one. Fatal patients were found to have significantly higher frequencies of early altered consciousness (≤24 h after hospitalization, hypothermia, GI bleeding/massive GI bleeding, DSS, concurrent bacteremia with/without shock, pulmonary edema, renal/hepatic failure, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among those experienced early altered consciousness, massive GI bleeding alone/with uremia/with E. faecalis bacteremia, and K. pneumoniae meningitis/bacteremia were each found in one patient. Significantly higher proportion of bandemia from initial (arrival laboratory data in fatal patients as compared to controls, and higher proportion of pre-fatal leukocytosis and lower pre-fatal platelet count as compared to initial laboratory data of fatal patients were found. Massive GI bleeding (33.3% and bacteremia (25% were the major causes of pre-fatal leukocytosis in the deceased patients; 33.3% of the patients with pre-fatal profound thrombocytopenia (<20,000/µL, and 50% of the patients with pre-fatal prothrombin time (PT prolongation experienced massive GI bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: Our report highlights causes of fatality other than DSS in patients with severe dengue, and suggested hypothermia, leukocytosis and bandemia may be warning signs of severe dengue. Clinicians should be alert to the potential development of massive GI bleeding

  2. Use of simple clinical and laboratory predictors to differentiate influenza from dengue and other febrile illnesses in the emergency room

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shi-Yu; Lee, Ing-Kit; Wang, Lin; Liu, Jien-Wei; Hung, Shih-Chiang; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chang, Tzu-Yao; Huang, Wen-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical differentiation of influenza from dengue and other febrile illnesses (OFI) is difficult, and available rapid diagnostic tests have limited sensitivity. Methods We conducted a retrospective study to compare clinical and laboratory findings between (i) influenza and dengue and (ii) influenza and OFI. Results Of 849 enrolled patients, the mean time between illness onset and hospital presentation was 1.7, 3.7, and 3 days for influenza, dengue, and OFI, respectively. Among pedi...

  3. Clinical laboratory evaluation of the Abbott MS-2 automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing system: report of a collaborative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Thornsberry, C; Anhalt, J P; Washington, J A; McCarthy, L R; Schoenknecht, F D; Sherris, J. C.; Spencer, H J

    1980-01-01

    The MS-2 system (Abbott Diagnostics, Division of Abbott Laboratories, Dallas, Tex.) was evaluated for its efficacy in determining the susceptibilities of both clinical and selected challenge (nonfastidious, facultative, and aerobic) isolates. The MS-2 results were compared with standard Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and microdilution results by using fresh clinical isolates. For gram-positive isolates other than enterococci, overall agreement between MS-2 and reference results was 93 to 98%. Wit...

  4. Clinical, Laboratory and Bacterial Profile of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis in Chronic Liver Disease Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the clinical and laboratory features, bacterial profile and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP) in Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital of Karachi. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: PMRC Centre for Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from April 2010 to March 2012. Methodology: CLD patients with ascites were recruited from PMRC Centre for Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi. Basic demographics, symptoms and clinical signs of patients were recorded. Patients with the history of antibiotic use within last 3 days or any intra-abdominal source of infection were excluded. Diagnostic paracentesis was done for ascitic fluid detailed report (D/R) and culture. Blood sample was collected for total leukocyte count, serum proteins and billirubin levels. Results: Out of a total 152 CLD patients, 38 (25%) were diagnosed with SBP. Eight (24.2%) patients presented with classical SBP, 20 (52.6%) had culture negative neutrocytic ascites and 10 (26%) had bacterascites. Fever, abdominal tenderness and constipation were common in SBP patients. Ascitic fluid culture was positive in 19 (50%) patients. E. coli (65%) was the predominant pathogen followed by Enterococcus species (15%). Resistance was high against cephalosporins (78%) and fluoroquinolones (69.6%) and least against amikacin (13%) and meropenem (12%). Conclusion: Ascitic fluid D/R and culture together can lead to the accurate diagnosis of SBP and can guide for the right antibiotic choice as resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotic is common in such patients. (author)

  5. Clinical-laboratory characteristics of ANA-positive chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Eli; Waitman, Dan-Andrei; Dickstein, Yoav; Davidovich, Valentina; Kahan, Natan R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the established association between chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria (CIU) and presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs), the prevalence of autoimmune comorbidities in this population has not been analyzed. Here, we aim to identify clinical and laboratory manifestations associated with ANA-positive CIU. ANA-positive patients were identified via electronic data capture from the electronic patient record database of Leumit Health care Services (LHS) of Israel. Patient characteristics, medical histories, and details of diagnostic workup, medical treatment, and follow-up were retrieved by performing a chart review of electronic patient records (EPRs). The prevalence of target diseases among ANA(+) CIU(+), ANA(+) CIU(-), and ANA(-) CIU(+) patients was calculated. A total of 91 ANA(+) CIU(+), 3131 ANA(+) CIU(-), and 478 ANA(-) CIU(+) patients were identified. The ANA(+) CIU(+) group was characterized by higher prevalence of Sjögren's syndrome (SS)-A 52 antibodies (Ab) (7.7% versus 2.4%; p = 0.008), SS-A 60 Ab (11% versus 2.8%; p = CIU(+) group. Additionally, ANA(+) CIU(+) patients were more likely to be diagnosed with thyroid autoimmune diseases, higher C-reactive protein (6.4 ± 10.3 versus 4.1 ± 8.8 mg/L; p = 0.027), and more profound basopenia (0.04 ± 0.09 versus 0.15 ± 0.11 cell/mm(3); p CIU patients. More ANA(+) CIU(+) patients were resistant to four-fold standard licensed doses of antihistamines than ANA(-) CIU(+) patients [11 (12.1%) versus 29 (6.1%); p = 0.046]. ANA-positive CIU is characterized by higher prevalence of SS-A 52, SS-A 60, and SS-B antibodies and poorer clinical response to antihistamine medications. PMID:25715242

  6. The Diagnostic Value of MRI in Brucella Spondylitis With Comparison to Clinical and Laboratory Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Ali Baradaran; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Chokan, Niaz Mohamad Jafari; Abbasi, Bita; Akhavan, Reza; Bolvardi, Ehsan; Soroureddin, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis is an endemic zoonotic disease, especially in the Middle East and Mediterranean regions and can involve many organs and tissue. Osteoarticular involvement is the most common complication. Spondylitis is its most prevalent clinical form in adults, and there may be difficult in diagnosis and treatment. In present study, we aimed to assess these diagnostic value of MRI, in patients with spondylitis due to brucella, comparing with clinical and laboratory findings. Method: Patients with low back pain who were admitted to Sheikhol-raees MRI center were included in this study. None of these patients had any documented infectious disease. Diagnosis of brucellosis was made, based on MRI findings, which would be approved by serology. After confirmation with serology, the group with positive serology were compared with the negative group, in sex, age, MRI findings level of vertebral involvements, signal intensity in T1 weighted and T2 weighted. Results: Among 53 patients with diagnosis of brucella spondylitis, 33 underwent serology study, 20 were positive and 13 were negative and the others consider out of study. From these 20, 3 had tuberculosis spondylitis, whose mean age was 56 and the 67% of them were male. Mean age in the positive brucella spondylitis were 46 and 67% of them were male. In negative group mean age was 55, and of whom 57% were male. There was no statistically significant difference in MRI findings such as changes in signal intensity, disk space narrowing, Intracanalicular mass, Abscess formation. Level of invlovment in vertebrae. Conclusion: The results of this study shows that although MRI is Modality of choice in diagnosis of spondylitis, it is not enough specific to diagnosis the reasons of spondylitis. PMID:27147801

  7. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases: implications for the clinical laboratory and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Sohei; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2008-12-01

    Production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) is one of the most important resistance mechanisms that hamper the antimicrobial treatment of infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae. ESBLs are classified into several groups according to their amino-acid sequence homology. While TEM and SHV enzymes were the most common ESBLs in the 1990s, CTX-M enzymes have spread rapidly among Enterobacteriaceae in the past decade. In addition, some epidemiological studies showed that organisms producing CTX-M enzymes had become increasingly prevalent in the community setting in certain areas in the world. Several novel enzymes with hydrolyzing activity against oxyimino-cephalosporins, albeit with additional enzymatic characteristics different from those of original TEM and SHV ESBLs (e.g., inhibitor-resistance), have been discovered and pose a problem on the definition of ESBLs. Although several methods to detect the production of ESBL are available in clinical laboratories, existence of other factors contributing resistance against beta-lactams, e.g., inducible production of Amp-C beta-lactamase by some species of Enterobacteriaceae, or inhibitor-resistance in some ESBLs may hinder the detection of ESBLs with these methods. Carbapenems are stable against hydrolyzing activity of ESBLs and are regarded as the drug of choice for the treatment of infections caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Although several other antimicrobial agents, such as fluoroquinolones and cephamycins, may have some role in the treatment of mild infections due to those organisms, clinical data that warrant the use of antimicrobial agents other than carbapenems in the treatment of serious infections due to those organisms are scarce for now. PMID:19127103

  8. Pulmonary embolism in the elderly: a review on clinical, instrumental and laboratory presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Luca Masotti1,8, Patrick Ray2, Marc Righini3, Gregoire Le Gal4, Fabio Antonelli5, Giancarlo Landini1, Roberto Cappelli6, Domenico Prisco7, Paola Rottoli81Internal Medicine, Cecina Hospital, Cecina, Italy; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France; 3Division of Angiology and Hemostasis, Geneva University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland; 4Department of Internal Medicine and Chest Diseases, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France; 5Clinical Chemistry, Cecina Hospital, Cecina, Italy; 6Department of Internal, Cardiovascular and Geriatric Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy; 7Department of Critical Care Medicine, Thrombosis Centre, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy; 8Departiment of Clinical Medicine and Immunological Sciences, Division of Respiratory Diseases, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyObjective: Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE remains difficult and is often missed in the elderly due to nonspecific and atypical presentation. Diagnostic algorithms able to rule out PE and validated in young adult patients may have reduced applicability in elderly patients, which increases the number of diagnostic tools use and costs. The aim of the present study was to analyze the reported clinical presentation of PE in patients aged 65 and more.Materials and Methods: Prospective and retrospective English language studies dealing with the clinical, instrumental and laboratory aspects of PE in patients more than 65 and published after January 1987 and indexed in MEDLINE using keywords as pulmonary embolism, elderly, old, venous thromboembolism (VTE in the title, abstract or text, were reviewed.Results: Dyspnea (range 59%–91.5%, tachypnea (46%–74%, tachycardia (29%–76%, and chest pain (26%–57% represented the most common clinical symptoms and signs. Bed rest was the most frequent risk factor for VTE (15%–67%; deep vein

  9. [Application of Flow Cytometry in Clinical Laboratories and Its Future Direction, Focusing Upon Multicolor Flow Cytometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Masahiko

    2015-07-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) has been introduced into clinical laboratories to determine the lineage and functional stage of differentiation of hematopoietic tumor cells using multiple immunophenotypic markers. Multi-parametric analysis, which simultaneously measures multiple cellular characteristics, not only provides a large amount of novel information for each sample studied, but also requires a reduced volume of the specimen and avoids redundancies of reagents within antibody panels. Through a series of novel developments in FCM hardware, software, and dye-chemistry, recently developed multicolor flow cytometers are capable of detecting 10 or more fluorochromes simultaneously and expeditiously, taking advantage of not only cluster analysis but also detecting rare cellular populations within complex materials. In this study, we applied the multicolor FCM technology for: i) T-cell lineage assessment in early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, ii) detection of a rare neoplastic population in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma composed of a complex mixture of cells, iii) assessment of bone marrow infiltration of B-cell lymphoma, and iv) sensitive detection of multiple myeloma cells with the use of a combination of antibodies, which is applicable to monitoring the response to treatment. PMID:26591434

  10. Primary infantile hyperparathyroidism: Clinical, laboratory, and radiographic features in 21 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of primary infantile hyperparathyroidism (PIH) are reported. In both cases the diagnosis was initially suspected from chest radiographs which were obtained to assess the etiology of fever and respiratory distress in one case and heart murmur in another. The first case responded well to subtotal parathyroidectomy. The second case had many unique features. (1) She never became overtly symptomatic. (2) She displayed a constellation of findings that are not yet emphasized. (3) Her indisputable radiographic findings of hyperparathyroidism vanished spontaneously by two months of age, whereas her biochemical alterations have persisted up to now, 2 1/2 years after birth. (4) Three members of her family have subclinical hyperparathyroidism (elevated serum parathormone, hypercalcemia, and hypophosphatemia). Our review of 19 more cases showed that PIH has no specific clinical symptoms and/or signs. Of the laboratory findings, hypercalcemia was most consistantly encountered. The radiographic findings, although not identical to those described in hyperparathyroid adults, had the greatest diagnostic specificity. The disorder carried a grave prognosis if not diagnosed promptly and managed surgically. (orig.)

  11. Behaviour of Clinical, Anthropometric and Laboratory Variables in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelaine Hernández Tamayo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosing patients with metabolic syndrome is important because of the high prevalence and risk they present. Objective: to determine the behaviour of some clinical, anthropometric and laboratory variables in patients with metabolic syndrome. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted. The sample included 161 patients selected at random in different research stages from a universe including all the patients who attended six different consultations in Urbano Noris municipality, Holguín, from September 2008 to June 2009. Diagnosis was performed according to the ATP-III. Variance analysis and Fisher's exact test in SPSS (α = 0.05 were applied. Results: Patients with metabolic syndrome (n = 103: 63.97% presented values over average weight, height, waist circumference, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, plasma cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides and glucose. Their HDL levels were lower. A significant association between metabolic syndrome and CRP, microalbuminuria, alterations in blood sugar levels and hypertension was proved. Conclusions: The importance of characterizing the metabolic syndrome for future interventions was determined.

  12. Clinical laboratorial analysis of 168 patients with galactorrhea from different etiologic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluated the data of 168 patients with galactorrhea throught factorial analysis. This method consists, initially, of an intercorrelation analysis, which serves as a base for the determination of a number of factors, one of them, which could be described as the patient's risk of having a pituitary tumour. This factor was formed, basically, by four elements: the existence of radiological changes, head pain, menstrual irregularities and the prolactin level. After the global study, the patients were analysed within the etiological subgroups, in several clinical and laboratorial aspects, as menstrual abnormalities, duration of the galactorrhea, prolactin level, dynamic tests to evaluate the prolactin secretion an the pituitary reserve, and by the therapeutic aspect. The results of the tests that measures the prolactin secretion were analysed, also, in terms of it's basal hormonal level, and have shown to be more dependent on them, than on the etiological group. We have compared the surgical, radioactive and bromocriptine treatment of pituitary tumours. There wasn't a satisfactory cure rate in any of them, which reinforces the need of an earlier recognition of these tumours. (author)

  13. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin for pancreatic cancer: from the laboratory to the clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have reported that gemcitabine and concurrent radiation is a promising therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer. We investigated whether the addition of cisplatin, which may increase the systemic efficacy of gemcitabine, would be synergistic with gemcitabine and/or radiation in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: BxPc3 and Panc-1 human pancreatic cancer cells were treated with three different schedules before radiation: (A) a sequential incubation of gemcitabine for 2 h followed by cisplatin for 2 h, (B) gemcitabine for 2 h, followed by washout of drug, replenishment of media for a 24-h incubation, followed by cisplatin for 2 h, and (C) gemcitabine for 24 h with a concurrent incubation of cisplatin for the last 2 h. Cells were assessed for clonogenic survival using a standard assay. Synergism was evaluated by the median effect analysis. Results: The schedule shown to be maximally synergistic for both cell lines was the consecutive 2-h gemcitabine, 2-h cisplatin exposure, particularly at surviving fractions of <0.5. Cisplatin did not produce radiosensitization nor did it affect gemcitabine-mediated radiosensitization. Conclusion: Cisplatin produces synergistic cytotoxicity with gemcitabine without compromising gemcitabine-mediated radiosensitization. On the basis of these laboratory and previous clinical observations, we have initiated a Phase I trial of cisplatin plus gemcitabine and radiotherapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer

  14. Childhood histoplasmosis in Colombia: Clinical and laboratory observations of 45 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Luisa F; Valencia, Yorlady; Tobón, Ángela M; Velásquez, Oscar; Santa, Cristian D; Cáceres, Diego H; Restrepo, Ángela; Cano, Luz E

    2016-10-01

    Histoplasmosis is an important mycosis in the Americas; and in children with no immune system abnormalities, histoplasmosis is typically a self-limited process. In contrast, in children with immune problems, disease manifestations are frequently more severe and include dissemination. From 1984 to 2010, a retrospective study of paediatric patients who had been diagnosed with histoplasmosis was performed. A total of 45 pediatric cases of histoplasmosis were identified. The most important risk factor was malnutrition (37%), followed by environmental exposure (33%). The patients exhibited pulmonary infiltrates (83%), fever (76%), cough, constitutional symptoms (38%), headache (35%), and lymph node hypertrophy (33%). Concerning the clinical forms, 64% of the patients presented with the progressive disseminated form that frequently affected the central nervous system (48%). Diagnostic laboratory tests indicated that the cultures were positive for 80% of the patients, the agar gel immunodiffusion was reactive in 95%, the M band of the precipitate was more commonly observed (81%), and the complement fixation tests were reactive in 88% of the patients. The timely diagnosis of histoplasmosis is important, and for this reason, it is hoped that the results of this study will lead pediatricians toward a better understanding of this mycosis in children. PMID:27118801

  15. Recurrent respiratory disorders in Polish Konik horses - clinical and laboratory findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niedźwiedź Artur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the causes of chronic respiratory disorders in Polish Konik horses maintained in a stable and pasture, under condition typical for pleasure horses in Poland. The study was conducted on 14 adult horses, consistent with regard to environment and living conditions. The horses were divided into two groups: seven horses not affected by any respiratory problem (control group and seven horses with history of lower airway disease (study group. Clinical and laboratory evaluation, endoscopic examination, bronchoalveolar lavage, tracheal wash, and lung ultrasound were performed in all horses. Median (25th and 75th percentiles for bronchoalveolar lavage fluid differential cell count in control horses was 55.8 (49.8 and 59.1 of macrophages, 41 (38.5 and 45.9 of lymphocytes, and 5.1 (4.1 and 5.3 of neutrophils, whereas in the study group they were 32.8 (25.9 and 35.7 of macrophages, 59.8 (51.3 and 64.8 of lymphocytes, and 38.1 (34.8 and 41.1 of neutrophils. It was concluded that chronic respiratory disorders in Polish Konik horses were probably caused by recurrent airway obstruction.

  16. Tularemia in children: evaluation of clinical, laboratory and therapeutic features of 27 tularemia cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali; Deveci, Köksal; Uysal, Ismail Onder; Güven, Ahmet Sami; Demir, Mevlüt; Uysal, Elif Bilge; Gültekin, Asim; Içağasioğlu, Füsun Dilara

    2012-01-01

    Tularemia is a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis. We aimed to explicate the clinical and laboratory findings of 27 consecutive tularemia patients who were included into the study. The average duration between onset of symptoms and diagnosis was 19.1 +/- 7.3 days. Sore throat (100%), fever (93%) and myalgia (100%) were the most frequently observed symptoms, while lymphadenopathy (100%), pharyngeal hyperemia (85%), tonsillitis (74%), and rash (7%) were the most frequently observed physical findings. Treatment failed in 6 patients: 1/13 streptomycin- (changed to doxycycline + streptomycin), 1/7 ciprofloxacin- (changed to streptomycin), and 4/7 gentamicin- (changed to streptomycin) receiving patients who had longer duration to treatment (26.5 +/- 2.9 days) than the 21 successfully treated cases (17.0 +/- 6.8 days). Tularemia should to be taken into account in the differential diagnosis in cases having tonsillopharyngitis and cervical lymphadenopathy without response to beta lactam/macrolide-group antibiotics in rural areas. We believe that streptomycin should be the first-line antibiotic in the treatment of pediatric tularemia cases, but it should be supported by comprehensive studies with larger patient series. PMID:22734295

  17. Generation of anti-idiotype antibodies for application in clinical immunotherapy laboratory analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanqi; Panousis, Con; Smyth, Fiona E; Murphy, Roger; Wirth, Veronika; Cartwright, Glenn; Johns, Terrance G; Scott, Andrew M

    2003-08-01

    The chimeric monoclonal antibody ch806 specifically targets the tumor-associated mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (de 2-7EGFR or EGFRVIII) and is currently under investigation for its potential use in cancer therapy. The humanised monoclonal antibody hu3S193 specifically targets the Lewis Y epithelial antigen and is currently in Phase I clinical trials in patients with advanced breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas. To assist the clinical evaluation of ch806 and hu3S193, laboratory assays are required to monitor their serum pharmacokinetics and quantitate any immune responses to the antibodies. Mice immunized with ch806 or hu3S193 were used to generate hybridomas producing antibodies with specific binding to ch806 or hu3S193 and competitive for antigen binding. These anti-idiotype antibodies (designated Ludwig Melbourne Hybridomas, LMH) were investigated as reagents suitable for use as positive controls for HAHA or HACA analyses and for measuring hu3S193 or ch806 in human serum. Anti-idiotypes with the ability to concurrently bind two target antibody molecules were identified, which enabled the development of highly reproducible, sensitive, specific ELISA assays for determining serum concentrations of hu3S193 and ch806 with a 3 ng/mL limit of quantitation using LMH-3 and LMH-12, respectively. BIAcore analyses determined high apparent binding affinity for both idiotypes: LMH-3 binding immobilized hu3S193, Ka = 4.76 x 10(8) M(-1); LMH-12 binding immobilised ch806, Ka = 1.74 x 10(9) M(-1). Establishment of HAHA or HACA analysis of sera samples using BIAcore was possible using LMH-3 and LMH-12 as positive controls for quantitation of immune responses to hu3S193 or ch806 in patient sera. These anti-idiotypes could also be used to study the penetrance and binding of ch806 or hu3S193 to tumor cells through immunohistochemical analysis of tumor biopsies. The generation of anti-idiotype antibodies capable of concurrently binding a target antibody on each variable

  18. Clinical feasibility and safety of a novel miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory in diagnosis and treatment for coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Ming; Han Yaling; Wang Geng; Yao Tianming; Sun Jingyang; Li Fei; Xu Kai

    2014-01-01

    Background The lack of medical facilities causes delayed diagnosis and treatment of coronary heart disease in remote mountainous area and/or at disaster site.The miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory was developed to be an intervention platform for coronary heart disease diagnosis and treatment by our team.Pre-clinical research indicated that the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory performed well in the rescue of critical cardiovascular diseases,even ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical safety and timeliness of the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory for emergent coronary interventional diagnosis and treatment.Methods X-ray radiation safety and disinfection efficacy in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory were tested during working status.Coronary angiography and/or percutaneous coronary intervention were performed in remote mountainous areas on patients who were first diagnosed as having coronary heart disease by senior interventional cardiologists.The percutaneous coronary intervention procedures and results from patients in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory were compared with patients who were treated in the hospital catheter lab.Results The X-ray radiation dosages in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory were 39.55 μGy/s,247.4 μGy/h,90.3 μGy/h and 39.4 μGy/h which were corresponded to 0 m,1 m,2 m and 3 m away from the tube central of the medium C-arm.And the radiation dosages used in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory were less than the corresponding positions in the hospital catheter lab.The numbers of bacteria colonies in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory in different environments range from (60±8) cfu/m3 to (120±10) cfu/m3 and met the demands of percutaneous coronary intervention.A total of 17 patients who received angiography in the miniature mobile

  19. Poster Display as an Alternative Evaluation Method to Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silas P. Rodrigues

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is present in dierent professional under gradation courses in which it seeks to attendseveral objectives. The discipline oered to the students of Biology Science Course at UFES is tra-ditionally organized in a series of lectures to the basic information, a laboratory class related to eachtopic and a three written tests. Our students, as many from other courses, study biochemistry justbecause they have to. The teacher can alter the student behavior by changing the way in which theyexamine them. This work describes and analyses the experience of using poster display as an assess-ment and includes feedback from the students and teachers. At the beginning of the term the activityis explained to the class and groups are formed. They are oriented to search a full research paper, with\\metabolism as a key word. During the students presentation, teachers and graduation studentsevaluate the production of a self-explanatory poster, assurance in the chosen work and involvementof all components of the group. A multiple-choice questionnaire was applied to 15-30 students fromthe ve classes that had already done the activity. The teachers and the graduation students also hadtheir opinions heard. 62.3 % of the students agreed that the activity accomplishes its objective tostimulate the integration of general knowledge and comprehension of a specic scientic work, while itpromotes the practice of presentation at seminars. 62.2 % believed that it allows the learner to showits knowledge in a better way and 51 % of the students were very much motivated within the activity.For 91.2 % of the students, they should choose the article, as it allows a better correlation betweenbiochemistry and personal anities (42.7 %. Also, 98 % believed that the activity should be carriedout in groups, because it allows a deeper discussion (53.6 %, stimulate group activities (20 % orpermits the materials costs division (22 %. Only 1.8 % of the learners thought that the

  20. Leadership Principles for Developing a Statewide Public Health and Clinical Laboratory System

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Steven A.; Brokopp, Charles D.; Size, Tim

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation established the national Laboratory Response Network (LRN) for bioterrorism readiness. A more broad application of the LRN is the National Laboratory System (NLS), an effort to promote the 10 Essential Public Health Services and the Core Functions and Capabilities of State Public Health Laboratories (hereafter, Core Functions). State publ...

  1. Pathogenesis of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: evasive after half a century of clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, E. L.

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease continue to be a problem for medical and public health communities—the fact that penicillin has failed to eradicate this disease process is irrefutable proof of the need for more laboratory, epidemiological, and clinical research

  2. Clinical Practice as Natural Laboratory for Psychotherapy Research: A Guide to Case-Based Time-Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borckardt, Jeffrey J.; Nash, Michael R.; Murphy, Martin D.; Moore, Mark; Shaw, Darlene; O'Neil, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Both researchers and practitioners need to know more about how laboratory treatment protocols translate to real-world practice settings and how clinical innovations can be systematically tested and communicated to a skeptical scientific community. The single-case time-series study is well suited to opening a productive discourse between practice…

  3. Crossing Over: The Lived Experiences of Clinical Laboratory Science Education Teachers as They Transition from Traditional to Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, Ruth B.

    2013-01-01

    A phenomenological study was undertaken to understand and describe the nature and meaning of the live experiences of faculty transition from traditional to teaching online clinical laboratory science courses. In order to gain insight into the lived experiences of faculty, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 faculty members. The task of the…

  4. BIOCHEMISTRY TEACHING WITH VIRTUAL DYNAMIC METABOLIC DIAGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Lazzarotto

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a game like educational software (courseware to study metabolic pathways, calledDiagrama Metabolico Din^amico Virtual (DMDV of Krebs Cycle. The experience acquired teachingwith the logical sequence tray games in the FFFCMPAs Biochemistry Course provides the beddingswith the use of this model as education method. With DMDV, students can assembly the sequenceof reactions that describe the desired metabolic pathway, create situational models which can guidehis/her choices, reduce the subject complexity of the scheme in knowledge construction presentingin a graphical way the current interrelations. Biochemistry teachers can use the present software inclassroom as well as distance classes. This product integrates multimedia resources extensively andis distributed in CD-ROM format. The virtual environment will make possible interaction of thestudent with the environment and with colleagues and teachers, through tools as chats and forum.Experience with the use of this method was carried through with two distinct groups of students.The rst group was composed by 11 students, who were more familiar with the content and answereda specic questionnaire to previously evaluate the software. The second group was formed by 24students regularly registered in the FFFCMPAs Biochemistry Course, who used the software as astudy method. The rst group considered DMDV of easy and pleasant navigation. The knowledgeevaluation of the second group students was made by a written test and the analysis of three conceptualmaps constructed by each one of them: one map before initiating the study with the DMDV, thesecond just after the study and the third one two months later. Every conceptual maps producedafter DMDV method showed an expansion of valid concepts if compared with the rst maps. Simplevisual comparison of maps shows that new elements where added. All students who passed throughthe experiment reached a greater than ve grade in the subjects written

  5. Guidelines for the Design of Biochemistry Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Lima

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The internet is a means of communication that cannot be disregarded by contemporaryeducational systems. Public and private incentive policies aimed at the application ofdigital devices in the exchange of knowledge in and outside schools have beenimplemented in the last decades. However, risks posed by academic research on line arewidely acknowledged with regard to the quality of information (Lourenço, 2010. One of themain aspects of this issue is the selection of reliable and potentially educational pagesdeveloped for specific target audiences. This study has the objective of providingguidelines for those who intend to develop sites, wiki pages, and educational PBwikisfocused on Biochemistry, or even adapt existing ones. Considering the fact that there is nospecific legislation for the use of the Internet in Brazil, it is necessary to stimulate selfregulationof the sector in order to establish minimum quality standards, safety, andreliability of sites containing information in the educational area. Thus, it is necessary toestablish some parameters to help guiding research for educational purposes on theinternet. To be a potentially didactic Biochemistry page, one must follow this set oforientation: clearly establish the target audience and, then, define the contents the properway. Once the materials have been organized, establish, whenever possible and pertinent,links with references to professional and/ or research home pages, to ProfessionalAssociations in the Biochemistry field, among others. Link the page to an institutionalresearch program, such as International Virtual Education Network, a program developedby the Brazilian Distance Education Department. Finally, it is necessary to provideinteractive possibilities and dynamic images of the biochemical processes studied in classthat will justify and differentiate the page from the many existing ones. Such proceduresare essential to guarantee that online searches made for educational

  6. Penta-coordinate phosphorous compounds and biochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林长学; 韩波; 赵玉芬; 万荣; 李艳梅; 冯亚兵; 成昌梅

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between penta-coordinate phosphorus compounds and biochemistry is briefly reviewed. Some interesting phenomena such as peptide formation, ester formation, ester exchange on phosphorus and N to O migration occur at room temperature when the amino group of amino acid is associated with phosphoryl group. Serine or threonine in conjugate of nucleo-side-amino acid could recognize different nucleobases. N-phosphoryl Histine and Ser-His dipep-tide could cleavage nucleic acid, protein and ester in neutral medium. It is found that the above phenomena all undergo penta-coordinate intermediate of phosphorus atom, which is proposed as the key factor to determine their activities.

  7. Radioactive isotopes in biochemistry (historical essay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large volume of facts, including little-known biobibliographic data on the the first reserchers who applied the method, are used in the study. The main attention is paid to the use of the method of labelled atoms, when considering intermediate exchange of substances and creating metabolic ways maps (the end of 30-ies - beginning of 50-ies). Using as an example the history of creation of the labelled atom method and its introduction into biochemistry, the problem of the research methods transfer from one branch of science to another is considered

  8. BIOCHEMISTRY OF SOME PERSPECTIVE TABLE GRAPES

    OpenAIRE

    Burlakov M. M.; Rodionova L. Y.; Troshin L. P.; Chausov V. M.

    2015-01-01

    The article contains results of the study of biochemistry of some perspective table grape varieties: Aniuta, Vodograi, Nizina and Jubilee Novocherkasska, yield in 2013 from the Central zone of Krasnodar region. At the time of redy yield the combination of sweetness and acidity of fruits were favorable. The ratio of fructose to glucose was 1.69; 1.36; 2.00; 1.13, respectively, in grapes Aniuta, Vodograi, Nisina, Jubilee Novocherkasska. According to the percentage of fructose in fruit juice var...

  9. Evaluation of Student-made Blogs in Basicand Advanced Biochemistry Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cubas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary results of the experience of student-made clinical biochemistry blogs were reported at SBBq-2010 (abstract K-5. Herein, five teaching-semesters and the opinion of former students were evaluated. Since the teaching-semester of 2008-1, Basic Biochemistry (BioBio students should prepare blog-assignments on clinical issues. Students' acceptance was evaluated through 6-point Likert-type questionnaires. Positive responses were those marking 4 to 6. A total of 348 BioBio students from five teaching-semesters answered the questionnaire; 77% of them agreed that preparing blogs was enjoyable, having a positive effect on their formation. Moreover, 81% of students agreed that BioBio blogs are relevant learning tools and 78% believedthat BioBio blogs boosted interest for biochemistry. Moreover, students' acceptance 1 year after taking BioBio was evaluated. Students (n=50 were dividedin (i those who had attended BioBio only, and (ii those who had also taken Advanced Biochemistry, together with blog tutoring. In the first group, 72% agreed that the information acquired during blog elaboration was useful atthe time of interview; 76% judged that blog elaboration boosted interest for the discipline. For thosein the second group evaluations were 100% and 82%, respectively. Results show maintenance of acceptance over 1 year and effective interest for blog-assignment for thosein basic and advanced biochemistry classes.

  10. Using pathology-specific laboratory profiles in Clinical Pathology to reduce inappropriate test requesting: two completed audit cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baricchi Roberto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic reviews have shown that, although well prepared, the Consensus Guidelines have failed to change clinical practice. In the healthcare district of Castelnovo né Monti (Reggio Emilia, Italy, it became necessary for the GPs and Clinical Pathologists to work together to jointly define laboratory profiles. Methods Observational study with two cycles of retrospective audit on test request forms, in a primary care setting. Objectives of the study were to develop pathology-specific laboratory profiles and to increase the number of provisional diagnoses on laboratory test request forms. A Multiprofessional Multidisciplinary Inter-hospital Work Team developed pathology-specific laboratory profiles for more effective test requesting. After 8 training sessions that used a combined strategy with multifaceted interventions, the 23 General Practitioners (GPs in the trial district (Castelnovo nè Monti tested the profiles; the 21 GPs in the Puianello district were the control group; all GPs in both districts participated in the trial. All laboratory tests for both healthcare districts are performed at the Laboratory located in the trial district. A baseline and a 1-year audit were performed in both districts on the GPs’ request forms. Results Seven pathology-specific laboratory profiles for outpatients were developed. In the year after the first audit cycle: 1 the number of tests requested in the trial district was distinctly lower than that in the previous year, with a decrease of about 5% (p  Conclusions The first audit cycle showed a significant decrease in the number of tests ordered only in the trial district. The combined strategy used in this study improved the prescriptive compliance of most of the GPs involved. The presence of the clinical pathologist is seen as an added value.

  11. Writing throughout the Biochemistry Curriculum: Synergistic Inquiry-Based Writing Projects for Biochemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Pamela; Streu, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a synergistic two-semester writing sequence for biochemistry courses. In the first semester, students select a putative protein and are tasked with researching their protein largely through bioinformatics resources. In the second semester, students develop original ideas and present them in the form of a research grant…

  12. A Changing Research and Publication Landscape for Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Mocz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This introductory editorial hopes to convey three points to its audience. First, it provides an overview of the new, peer-reviewed, open access journal Biochemistry Insights published by Libertas Academica. Second, it summarizes the benefits of open access publishing concepts to the biochemistry community. And third, it takes a brief look at the near future of biochemistry as a fundamental molecular science whose continued advances and latest developments will be the focus of the new journal. Biochemistry Insights looks forward to receiving research articles, review papers, commentaries and letters from all disciplines and specialties of the field.

  13. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder: demographic, clinical and laboratory findings in 93 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, E J; Boeve, B F; Silber, M H

    2000-02-01

    We describe demographic, clinical, laboratory and aetiological findings in 93 consecutive patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), which consists of excessive motor activity during dreaming in association with loss of skeletal muscle atonia of REM sleep. The patients were seen at the Mayo Sleep Disorders Center between January 1, 1991 and July 31, 1995. Eighty-one patients (87%) were male. The mean age of RBD onset was 60.9 years (range 36-84 years) and the mean age at presentation was 64.4 years (37-85 years). Thirty-two per cent of patients had injured themselves and 64% had assaulted their spouses. Subdural haematomas occurred in two patients. Dream content was altered and involved defence of the sleeper against attack in 87%. The frequency of nocturnal events decreased with time in seven untreated patients with neurodegenerative disease. MRI or CT head scans were performed in 56% of patients. Although four scans showed brainstem pathology, all of these patients had apparently unrelated neurodegenerative diseases known to be associated with RBD. Neurological disorders were present in 57% of patients; Parkinson's disease, dementia without parkinsonism and multiple system atrophy accounted for all but 14% of these. RBD developed before parkinsonism in 52% of the patients with Parkinson's disease. Five of the 14 patients with multiple system atrophy were female, and thus the strong male predominance in RBD is less evident in this condition. Psychiatric disorders, drug use or drug withdrawal were rarely causally related to RBD. Clonazepam treatment of RBD was completely or partially successful in 87% of the patients who used the drug. We conclude that RBD is a well-defined condition and that descriptions from different centres are fairly consistent. It is commonest in elderly males and may result in serious morbidity to patients and bed partners. There is a strong relationship to neurodegenerative disease, especially Parkinson's disease

  14. Effect of seasonal variation on adult clinical laboratory parameters in Rwanda, Zambia, and Uganda: implications for HIV biomedical prevention trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Ruzagira

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of seasonal variation on adult clinical laboratory parameters in Rwanda, Zambia, and Uganda and determine its implications for HIV prevention and other clinical trials.Volunteers in a cross-sectional study to establish laboratory reference intervals were asked to return for a seasonal visit after the local season had changed from dry to rainy or vice versa. Volunteers had to be clinically healthy, not pregnant and negative for HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and syphilis infection at both visits. At each visit, blood was taken for measurement of hemoglobin, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, red blood cells, platelets, total white blood cells (WBC, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, CD4/CD8 T cells, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, direct bilirubin, total bilirubin, total immunoglobulin gamma, total protein, creatinine, total amylase, creatine phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Consensus dry season reference intervals were applied to rainy season values (and vice versa and the proportion of 'out-of-range' values determined. Percentage differences between dry and rainy season parameter mean values were estimated.In this cohort of 903 volunteers, less than 10.0% of consensus parameter (except LDH values in one season were "out-of-range" in the other. Twenty-two (22 percent of rainy season LDH values fell outside of the consensus dry season interval with the higher values observed in the rainy season. Variability between consensus seasonal means ranged from 0.0% (total WBC, neutrophils, monocytes, basophils, and direct bilirubin to 40.0% (eosinophils. Within sites, the largest seasonal variations were observed for monocytes (Masaka, 11.5%, LDH (Lusaka, 21.7%, and basophils (Kigali, 22.2%.Seasonality had minimal impact on adult clinical laboratory parameter values in Rwanda, Zambia, and Uganda. Seasonal variation may not be an important factor in the

  15. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  16. Clinical and laboratory toxicity after intra-arterial radioembolization with (90y-microspheres for unresectable liver metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten L J Smits

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate clinical and laboratory toxicity in patients with unresectable liver metastases, treated with yttrium-90 radioembolization ((90Y-RE. METHODS: Patients with liver metastases treated with (90Y-RE, between February 1(st 2009 and March 31(st 2012, were included in this study. Clinical toxicity assessment was based on the reporting in patient's charts. Laboratory investigations at baseline and during a four-month follow-up were used to assess laboratory toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.02. The occurrence of grade 3-4 laboratory toxicity was stratified according to treatment strategy (whole liver treatment in one session versus sequential sessions. Response assessment was performed at the level of target lesions, whole liver and overall response in accordance with RECIST 1.1 at 3- and 6 months post-treatment. Median time to progression (TTP and overall survival were calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: A total of 59 patients, with liver metastases from colorectal cancer (n = 30, neuroendocrine tumors (NET (n = 6 and other primary tumors (n = 23 were included. Clinical toxicity after (90Y-RE treatment was confined to grade 1-2 events, predominantly post-embolization symptoms. No grade 3-4 clinical toxicity was observed, whereas laboratory toxicity grade 3-4 was observed in 38% of patients. Whole liver treatment in one session was not associated with increased laboratory toxicity. Three-months disease control rates for target lesions, whole liver and overall response were 35%, 21% and 19% respectively. Median TTP was 6.2 months for target lesions, 3.3 months for the whole liver and 3.0 months for overall response. Median overall survival was 8.9 months. CONCLUSION: The risk of severe complications or grade 3-4 clinical toxicity in patients with liver metastases of various primary tumors undergoing (90Y-RE is low. In contrast, laboratory toxicity grade 3

  17. Embryology training for Reproductive Endocrine fellows in the clinical human embryology laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Richard T.; Hong, Kathleen H.; Werner, Marie D.; Forman, Eric J.; Ruiz, Andrew; Cheng, Michael C.; Zhao, Tian; Upham, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if comprehensive embryology training for clinical Reproductive Endocrinology fellows could be completed to a level of proficiency equivalent to that of experienced embryologists. Method Clinical fellows were integrated into the clinical embryology team and were trained to perform all the various procedures utilized in clinical embryology. The fellows were trained to the same standards as the clinical embryology staff and underwent the same certification and sign off pro...

  18. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: clinical and laboratory features at diagnosis in 77 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenal, Florence; Berger, Francoise; Ghesquières, Hervé; Biron, Pierre; Hot, Arnaud; Callet-Bauchu, Evelyne; Chassagne, Catherine; Coiffier, Bertrand; Durieu, Isabelle; Rousset, Hugues; Salles, Gilles

    2007-09-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 77 patients with pathologically diagnosed angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma from a single city. There were 43 men and 34 women; the median age was 64.5 years (range, 30-91 yr). Average time between first symptoms of the disease and diagnosis was 3.6 months. At diagnosis, peripheral nodes were present in all but 1 patient, and were generalized in 90% of cases. Constitutional symptoms were reported in 77% of cases and spleen enlargement in 51%. A cutaneous eruption--morbilliform, urticarial, or more polymorphic--was present in 45% of patients; in one-third of them, the eruption occurred after drug administration. Other clinical manifestations included pleuritis (22%); arthralgia or arthritis (17%); ear, nose, and throat involvement (14%); central or peripheral neurologic manifestations (10%); and ascites (5%). Most patients presented with advanced disease at diagnosis (bone marrow involvement in 60% of cases). The main laboratory abnormalities were elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels (71%), inflammatory syndrome (67%), hypergammaglobulinemia (50%), anemia (51%), and lymphopenia (52%). Auto- or disimmune manifestations were reported in one-third of patients: autoimmune hemolytic anemia was present at diagnosis in 19% of patients and thrombocytopenic purpura in 7%. Documented vasculitis was described in 12% of cases. Clonality was analyzed in lymph nodes in 47 patients: T-cell and B-cell clones were found in 45 (96%) and 20 (45%) patients, respectively. Chromosomal abnormalities were identified in 62% of cases: trisomies 3, 5, 18, 19, additional X chromosome, and deletion of chromosome 7 were the most common abnormalities. The current study underlines the diversity of presenting manifestations of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. PMID:17873758

  19. The basis of clinical tribalism, hierarchy and stereotyping: a laboratory-controlled teamwork experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Clay-Williams, Robyn; Vecellio, Elia; Marks, Danielle; Hooper, Tamara; Westbrook, Mary; Westbrook, Johanna; Blakely, Brette; Ludlow, Kristiana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the basis of multidisciplinary teamwork. In real-world healthcare settings, clinicians often cluster in profession-based tribal silos, form hierarchies and exhibit stereotypical behaviours. It is not clear whether these social structures are more a product of inherent characteristics of the individuals or groups comprising the professions, or attributable to a greater extent to workplace factors. Setting Controlled laboratory environment with well-appointed, quiet rooms and video and audio equipment. Participants Clinical professionals (n=133) divided into 35 groups of doctors, nurses and allied health professions, or mixed professions. Interventions Participants engaged in one of three team tasks, and their performance was video-recorded and assessed. Primary and secondary measures Primary: teamwork performance. Secondary, pre-experimental: a bank of personality questionnaires designed to assess participants’ individual differences. Postexperimental: the 16-item Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS) to measure teamwork skills; this was self-assessed by participants and also by external raters. In addition, external, arm's length blinded observations of the videotapes were conducted. Results At baseline, there were few significant differences between the professions in collective orientation, most of the personality factors, Machiavellianism and conservatism. Teams generally functioned well, with effective relationships, and exhibited little by way of discernible tribal or hierarchical behaviours, and no obvious differences between groups (F (3, 31)=0.94, p=0.43). Conclusions Once clinicians are taken out of the workplace and put in controlled settings, tribalism, hierarchical and stereotype behaviours largely dissolve. It is unwise therefore to attribute these factors to fundamental sociological or psychological differences between individuals in the professions, or aggregated group differences. Workplace cultures are more likely to

  20. ASVCP guidelines: allowable total error guidelines for biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Kendal E; Flatland, Bente; Nabity, Mary; Freeman, Kathleen P

    2013-12-01

    As all laboratory equipment ages and contains components that may degrade with time, initial and periodically scheduled performance assessment is required to verify accurate and precise results over the life of the instrument. As veterinary patients may present to general practitioners and then to referral hospitals (both of which may each perform in-clinic laboratory analyses using different instruments), and given that general practitioners may send samples to reference laboratories, there is a need for comparability of results across instruments and methods. Allowable total error (TEa ) is a simple comparative quality concept used to define acceptable analytical performance. These guidelines are recommendations for determination and interpretation of TEa for commonly measured biochemical analytes in cats, dogs, and horses for equipment commonly used in veterinary diagnostic medicine. TEa values recommended herein are aimed at all veterinary settings, both private in-clinic laboratories using point-of-care analyzers and larger reference laboratories using more complex equipment. They represent the largest TEa possible without generating laboratory variation that would impact clinical decision making. TEa can be used for (1) assessment of an individual instrument's analytical performance, which is of benefit if one uses this information during instrument selection or assessment of in-clinic instrument performance, (2) Quality Control validation, and (3) as a measure of agreement or comparability of results from different laboratories (eg, between the in-clinic analyzer and the reference laboratory). These guidelines define a straightforward approach to assessment of instrument analytical performance. PMID:24320779

  1. Studies of transformer repair workers exposed to PCBs. II. Results of clinical laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmett, E.A.; Maroni, M.; Jefferys, J.; Schmith, J.; Levin, B.K.; Alvares, A.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-eight transformer repairmen currently exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 17 former transformer repairmen, and 56 comparison workers not known to be exposed to PCBs were studied. Measurements were made of serum liver function tests, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), lipid profile, thyroid function tests, and other serum biochemistry; hemoglobin; white cell count; 24-hour excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid, porphyrins, 17-hydroxycorticosteriods and 17-ketosteroids; sperm count; spirometry; and antipyrine half-life to evaluate microsomal mixed function oxidase induction. The total exposed group differed significantly from the comparison group in albumin, LDH, T4, T4-RT3 index, and actual/predicted FEV1. Significant differences among all three exposure groups were seen for albumin, T4, T4-RT3 index, and 17-hydroxycorticosteroid excretion. Differences in FEV1 were attributable to smoking. Significant correlations between serum PCBs and serum lipids were removed by adjustment for confounding variables. After adjustment for confounding variables, there was a statistically significant positive correlation between serum PCBs and GGT and a negative correlation between adipose PCBs and 17-hydroxycorticosteroid excretion. These may reflect subtle metabolic effects of PCBs.

  2. Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Patients with Tramadol Intoxication Referred to Razi Hospital During 2005-06

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Rahbar Taromsari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Frequency of Tramadol intoxication is increasing as a result of its useas a drug for suppression of withdrawal symptoms by opioids abusers and its wideaccessibility of this drug. Tramadol intoxication can lead to death and, therefore, earlyidentification of its clinical manifestations is crucial since early detection of theintoxication and its treatment could improve patients' survival This study investigatedthe frequency of clinical and laboratory findings in Tramadol intoxication.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients with Tramadol intoxication whoreferred to Razi Hospital in Rasht, Iran, during 2005-06 were examined. Theirmedical records were surveyed for demographic data, past medical history,neurological examination, and routine laboratory tests. All data were statisticallyanalyzed by SPSS software version 14.Result: The majority of the 306 patients (83.3% male were in the age range of 20-40 years and 68.6% of them had been educated up to high school. The mean dose ofingested Tramadol was 746± 453mg (mean± SD. Agitation (25.2% and seizure(20.3% were the most frequent reported symptoms. Among laboratory abnormalities,the most common findings were prolonged PT (18.3% and increased ALT (5.6%.Conclusion: The most common clinical presentation was agitation and the mostcommon laboratory finding was prolonged PT. Of all the patients, 3 cases wereadmitted to ICU. Although Tramadol poisoning might lead to death, there was onlyone death after Tramadol poisoning in the current study.

  3. Sexually transmitted infections in women: A correlation of clinical and laboratory diagnosis in cases of vaginal discharge syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyalaxmi Chauhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study compares the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of vaginal discharge syndrome. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was carried out at the gynaecology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in Gujarat, India. Material and Methods: Total of 180 females diagnosed as vaginal discharge or cervicitis based on syndromic approach and were recruited for the study. Their clinical profile was noted and they were investigated for bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, candidiasis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia infection. Results: Lower abdominal pain (35% followed by burning micturition (23.9% were the common associated complaints. Bacterial vaginosis was the most common clinical diagnosis, while trichomoniasis was least common. Upon laboratory investigation, 35.6% of cases of vaginal discharge and 12% of cases of cervicitis tested positive. Percentage of cases confirmed by laboratory investigation was 50, 27.8 and 41.7 for bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis and candidiasis respectively. Conclusion: Among all the females diagnosed as vaginal discharge syndrome, a very small percentage actually turned out to be positive upon laboratory testing.

  4. SeqReporter: automating next-generation sequencing result interpretation and reporting workflow in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Somak; Durso, Mary Beth; Wald, Abigail; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2014-01-01

    A wide repertoire of bioinformatics applications exist for next-generation sequencing data analysis; however, certain requirements of the clinical molecular laboratory limit their use: i) comprehensive report generation, ii) compatibility with existing laboratory information systems and computer operating system, iii) knowledgebase development, iv) quality management, and v) data security. SeqReporter is a web-based application developed using ASP.NET framework version 4.0. The client-side was designed using HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript. The server-side processing (VB.NET) relied on interaction with a customized SQL server 2008 R2 database. Overall, 104 cases (1062 variant calls) were analyzed by SeqReporter. Each variant call was classified into one of five report levels: i) known clinical significance, ii) uncertain clinical significance, iii) pending pathologists' review, iv) synonymous and deep intronic, and v) platform and panel-specific sequence errors. SeqReporter correctly annotated and classified 99.9% (859 of 860) of sequence variants, including 68.7% synonymous single-nucleotide variants, 28.3% nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants, 1.7% insertions, and 1.3% deletions. One variant of potential clinical significance was re-classified after pathologist review. Laboratory information system-compatible clinical reports were generated automatically. SeqReporter also facilitated quality management activities. SeqReporter is an example of a customized and well-designed informatics solution to optimize and automate the downstream analysis of clinical next-generation sequencing data. We propose it as a model that may envisage the development of a comprehensive clinical informatics solution. PMID:24220144

  5. A Comparison of Laboratory and Clinical Working Memory Tests and Their Prediction of Fluid Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jill T.; Elliott, Emily M.; Hill, B. D.; Calamia, Matthew R.; Gouvier, Drew

    2009-01-01

    The working memory (WM) construct is conceptualized similarly across domains of psychology, yet the methods used to measure WM function vary widely. The present study examined the relationship between WM measures used in the laboratory and those used in applied settings. A large sample of undergraduates completed three laboratory-based WM measures…

  6. Using Live Tissue Laboratories to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Doctor of Physical Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W. Allen; Noonan, Ann Cassidy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the use of animal laboratories has decreased in medical and basic science programs due to lack of trained faculty members, student concerns about animal welfare, and the increased availability of inexpensive alternatives such as computer simulations and videos. Animal laboratories, however, have several advantages over alternative forms…

  7. A National Comparison of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Capstone Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguanno, Ann; Mertz, Pamela; Martin, Debra; Bell, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the increasingly integrative nature of the molecular life sciences, the "American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" (ASBMB) recommends that Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) programs develop curricula based on concepts, content, topics, and expected student outcomes, rather than courses. To that end,…

  8. News from Online: WWW Sites for Biochemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Barry W.

    2002-05-01

    With so many biochemistry sites to choose from, searching the Web for biochemistry topics is like being a "kid in a candy shop." However, to reap the benefits, you must put in a bit of time and have a bit of patience. Good hunting.

  9. Using Pamphlets to Teach Biochemistry: A Service-Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melinda A.; Dunbar, David; Lopatto, David

    2013-01-01

    A service-learning project appropriate for a biochemistry or advanced biochemistry course was designed and implemented. The project involved students partnering with a homeless shelter to design informational pamphlets to be displayed at the shelter for the clients' use. The pamphlet topics were based on diseases studied within the course.…

  10. Commentary: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educators Launch National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Cheryl; Bell, Ellis; Johnson, Margaret; Mattos, Carla; Sears, Duane; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has launched an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded 5 year project to support biochemistry and molecular biology educators learning what and how students learn. As a part of this initiative, hundreds of life scientists will plan and develop a rich central resource for…

  11. Blended Learning in Biochemistry Education: Analysis of Medical Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardenski, Rosilaine de Fatima; de Espindola, Marina Bazzo; Struchiner, Miriam; Giannella, Tais Rabetti

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze first-year UFRJ medical students' perceptions about the implementation of a blended learning (BL) experience in their Biochemistry I course. During the first semester of 2009, three Biochemistry professors used the Constructore course management system to develop virtual learning environments (VLEs) for…

  12. Enhanced Podcasts for Teaching Biochemistry to Veterinary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    The teaching of biochemistry within medical disciplines presents certain challenges; firstly to relay a large body of complex facts and abstract concepts, and secondly to motivate students that this relatively difficult topic is worth their time to study. Here, nutrient biochemistry was taught within a multidisciplinary module as part of an…

  13. Evaluation of the Etiological, Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahattin Vurucu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: In this study we aimed to discuss the etiological risk factors, clinical and laboratory findings of the patients with cerebral palsy (CP according to the literature of knowledges. METHOD: The data including sex, age, social status of families, method of delivery, type of CP, risk factors, comorbidities, brain imaging and electroencephalograpy findings were retrospectively recorded from the patients’ files. RESULTS: A total of 180 patients were included in this study. Of the patients 58.3% were boy, 41.7% were girl, and mean age at diagnosis was 8.98±5.34 months. Of the patients 77.8% had vaginal birth, 22.2% had cesarean birth. The patients who had vaginal birth had statisticaly higher ratio of comorbidity, and lower mean diagnostic age, respectively (respectively p=0,027, p=0,031. Of the patients 88.3% had spastic CP, 10.6% had ataxic-hypotonic CP and 1.2% had other CP types. Of the patients 51,1% had at least one etiological risk factors. Most common etiological risk factors were perianal asfixi (22.7%, prematurity (15.5%, small for gestational age (7.2% and others (18.9%. Of the patients 79.5% had at least one comorbidity. Most common comorbidities were lenguage disabilities (60%, eye abnormalities (56.6%, mental retardation (53.3%, epilepsy (41.1% and others (12.1%. Of the patients 85.6% had at least one brain imaging abnormality. Most common brain imaging abnormalities were cortical atrophy (34.4%, abnormalities of corpus callosum (20%, periventricular leukomalacia (16.6%, encephalomalasia (10.5%, cerebral infarction (10%, hypoxic ischemic encephalopaty (6.6% and others (11.9%. CONCLUSION: Most of the our patients had spastic type CP, comorbidities including lenguage disabilities, eye abnormalities, mental retardation, and epilepsy and brain imaging abnormalities including cortical atrophy, abnormalities of corpus callosum, and periventricular leukomalacia. Therefore we consider that there may be a relationship between brain imaging

  14. COMPARATIVE CLINICAL, LABORATORY, AND INSTRUMENTAL EVALUATION OF INTERSTITIAL LUNG CHANGES IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Bestaev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a common extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Objective: to study the associations of the data of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT and the esti- mate of diffusing lung capacity (DLC with clinical and laboratory parameters in RA patients with and without ILD. Subjects and methods. 79 RA patients fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria (61 women and 18 men admitted to the Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology were included. Results. HRCT revealed signs of ILD in 58 (73% cases. The patients with ILD were divided into three groups: 1 18 (31% patients with ground glass opacities; 2 34 (58.6% patients with fibrosis; 3 6 (10.4% patients with the honeycomb lung. Twenty-one (27% patients with ILD were included in Group 4. In the ILD patients with ground glass opacities, the levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (ACCP antibodies and rheumatoid factor (RF were much above those in the patients without ILD (240 [166; 410.5], 480 [140; 850.5] and 73 [31; 101], 330,5 [118.5; 604.8], respectively. In the patients with ILD, the concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP (46 [35; 91] was higher than that in those without ILD (24 [18; 31]; p < 0.05. In the ILD patients with ground glass opacities, DLC was considerably below that in those with ILD – 59.2±11.2 and 79.8±12.1% of the normal value, respectively (p < 0.001. Conclusion. The associations found between ACCP antibodies and DLC, DAS28 and DLC may suggest that ACCP antibodies are implicated in the pathogenesis of ILD and the lung is involved in the immunoinflammatory process. The high percent of smokers detected in our investigation confirms the considerable role of smoking in the pathogene- sis of RA-associated ILD. In the RA patients with ILD, ground glass opacities must be an indicator of the activity of an immunopathological process in the lung.

  15. The changing landscape of genetic testing and its impact on clinical and laboratory services and research in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Ros; de Wert, Guido; Fowler, Brian; Krawczak, Michael; Vermeulen, Eric; Bakker, Egbert; Borry, Pascal; Dondorp, Wybo; Nijsingh, Niels; Barton, David; Schmidtke, Jörg; van El, Carla G; Vermeesch, Joris; Stol, Yrrah; Carmen Howard, Heidi; Cornel, Martina C

    2012-01-01

    The arrival of new genetic technologies that allow efficient examination of the whole human genome (microarray, next-generation sequencing) will impact upon both laboratories (cytogenetic and molecular genetics in the first instance) and clinical/medical genetic services. The interpretation of analytical results in terms of their clinical relevance and the predicted health status poses a challenge to both laboratory and clinical geneticists, due to the wealth and complexity of the information obtained. There is a need to discuss how to best restructure the genetic services logistically and to determine the clinical utility of genetic testing so that patients can receive appropriate advice and genetic testing. To weigh up the questions and challenges of the new genetic technologies, the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) held a series of workshops on 10 June 2010 in Gothenburg. This was part of an ESHG satellite symposium on the ‘Changing landscape of genetic testing', co-organized by the ESHG Genetic Services Quality and Public and Professional Policy Committees. The audience consisted of a mix of geneticists, ethicists, social scientists and lawyers. In this paper, we summarize the discussions during the workshops and present some of the identified ways forward to improve and adapt the genetic services so that patients receive accurate and relevant information. This paper covers ethics, clinical utility, primary care, genetic services and the blurring boundaries between healthcare and research. PMID:22453292

  16. Mould routine identification in the clinical laboratory by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Cassagne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MALDI-TOF MS recently emerged as a valuable identification tool for bacteria and yeasts and revolutionized the daily clinical laboratory routine. But it has not been established for routine mould identification. This study aimed to validate a standardized procedure for MALDI-TOF MS-based mould identification in clinical laboratory. MATERIALS AND METHODS: First, pre-extraction and extraction procedures were optimized. With this standardized procedure, a 143 mould strains reference spectra library was built. Then, the mould isolates cultured from sequential clinical samples were prospectively subjected to this MALDI-TOF MS based-identification assay. MALDI-TOF MS-based identification was considered correct if it was concordant with the phenotypic identification; otherwise, the gold standard was DNA sequence comparison-based identification. RESULTS: The optimized procedure comprised a culture on sabouraud-gentamicin-chloramphenicol agar followed by a chemical extraction of the fungal colonies with formic acid and acetonitril. The identification was done using a reference database built with references from at least four culture replicates. For five months, 197 clinical isolates were analyzed; 20 were excluded because they were not identified at the species level. MALDI-TOF MS-based approach correctly identified 87% (154/177 of the isolates analyzed in a routine clinical laboratory activity. It failed in 12% (21/177, whose species were not represented in the reference library. MALDI-TOF MS-based identification was correct in 154 out of the remaining 156 isolates. One Beauveria bassiana was not identified and one Rhizopus oryzae was misidentified as Mucor circinelloides. CONCLUSIONS: This work's seminal finding is that a standardized procedure can also be used for MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of a wide array of clinically relevant mould species. It thus makes it possible to identify moulds in the routine clinical laboratory setting

  17. Clinical laboratory, virologic, and pathologic changes in hamsters experimentally infected with Pirital virus (Arenaviridae): a rodent model of Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbrana, Elena; Mateo, Rosa I; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Popov, Vsevolod L; Newman, Patrick C; Tesh, Robert B

    2006-06-01

    The clinical laboratory, virologic, and pathologic changes occurring in hamsters after infection with Pirital virus (Arenaviridae) are described. Pirital virus infection in the hamsters was characterized by high titered viremia, leukocytosis, coagulopathy, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, hepatocellular and splenic necrosis, and marked elevation of serum transaminase levels. All of the animals died within 9 days. The clinical and histopathological findings in the Pirital virus-infected hamsters were very similar to those reported in severe human cases of Lassa fever, suggesting that this new animal model could serve as a low-cost and relatively safe alternative for studying the pathogenesis and therapy of Lassa fever. PMID:16760527

  18. Performance of ACMG-AMP Variant-Interpretation Guidelines among Nine Laboratories in the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Laura M; Jarvik, Gail P; Leo, Michael C; McLaughlin, Heather M; Akkari, Yassmine; Amaral, Michelle D; Berg, Jonathan S; Biswas, Sawona; Bowling, Kevin M; Conlin, Laura K; Cooper, Greg M; Dorschner, Michael O; Dulik, Matthew C; Ghazani, Arezou A; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Green, Robert C; Hart, Ragan; Horton, Carrie; Johnston, Jennifer J; Lebo, Matthew S; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Ou, Jeffrey; Pak, Christine M; Patel, Ronak Y; Punj, Sumit; Richards, Carolyn Sue; Salama, Joseph; Strande, Natasha T; Yang, Yaping; Plon, Sharon E; Biesecker, Leslie G; Rehm, Heidi L

    2016-06-01

    Evaluating the pathogenicity of a variant is challenging given the plethora of types of genetic evidence that laboratories consider. Deciding how to weigh each type of evidence is difficult, and standards have been needed. In 2015, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) and the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) published guidelines for the assessment of variants in genes associated with Mendelian diseases. Nine molecular diagnostic laboratories involved in the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium piloted these guidelines on 99 variants spanning all categories (pathogenic, likely pathogenic, uncertain significance, likely benign, and benign). Nine variants were distributed to all laboratories, and the remaining 90 were evaluated by three laboratories. The laboratories classified each variant by using both the laboratory's own method and the ACMG-AMP criteria. The agreement between the two methods used within laboratories was high (K-alpha = 0.91) with 79% concordance. However, there was only 34% concordance for either classification system across laboratories. After consensus discussions and detailed review of the ACMG-AMP criteria, concordance increased to 71%. Causes of initial discordance in ACMG-AMP classifications were identified, and recommendations on clarification and increased specification of the ACMG-AMP criteria were made. In summary, although an initial pilot of the ACMG-AMP guidelines did not lead to increased concordance in variant interpretation, comparing variant interpretations to identify differences and having a common framework to facilitate resolution of those differences were beneficial for improving agreement, allowing iterative movement toward increased reporting consistency for variants in genes associated with monogenic disease. PMID:27181684

  19. A clinical and laboratory study of chronic myeloid leukemia with atypical BCR-ABL fusion gene subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂晓敏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical and laboratory features of chronic myeloid leukemia(CML)with atypical e14a3 and e19a2 BCR-ABL fusion gene subtypes.Methods We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of CML patients with Ph chromosome positive confirmed by cytogenetic and FISH but classical e13a3(b2a2),e14a2(b3a2)and e1a2 fusion transcripts negative identified by

  20. A phase 1 clinical-laboratory study of clofarabine followed by cyclophosphamide for adults with refractory acute leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Judith E Karp; Ricklis, Rebecca M.; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Briel, Janet; Greer, Jacqueline; Gore, Steven D.; Smith, B. Douglas; McDevitt, Michael A.; Carraway, Hetty; Levis, Mark J.; Gandhi, Varsha

    2007-01-01

    Clofarabine has shown impressive response rates in patients with acute leukemias. In vitro investigations with clofarabine in combination with cyclophosphamide in primary cells have demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity and inhibition of DNA repair. Based on these clinical and laboratory observations, we designed a mechanism-based combination protocol with clofarabine and cyclophosphamide for patients with relapsed acute leukemias. Eighteen patients were treated with cyclophosphamide (200 mg/...