WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical applications emanated

  1. Emanation thermal analysis. Application in solid state chemistry, analytical chemistry and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.; Tel'deshi, Yu.

    1986-01-01

    Voluminous material on application of emenation thermal analysis for investigation of solids is systematized. General concepts and historical review of development of the method are given. Methods of introduction of inert gases into solids are considered. Theoretical aspects of inert gas evolution from solids labelled by radioactive gas or its maternal isotope are stated. The methods for measuring inert gases are considered. The possibilities, limitations and perspectives of development of radiometric emanation methods for the solution of various problems of analytical chemistry and thechnology are discussed

  2. The Applicability of Traditional Protection Methods to Lines Emanating from VSC-HVDC Interconnectors and a Novel Protection Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimin Xue

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage source converter (VSC-based high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC interconnectors can realize accurate and fast control of power transmission among AC networks, and provide emergency power support for AC networks. VSC-HVDC interconnectors bring exclusive fault characteristics to AC networks, thus influencing the performance of traditional protections. Since fault characteristics are related to the control schemes of interconnectors, a fault ride-through (FRT strategy which is applicable to the interconnector operating characteristic of working in four quadrants and capable of eliminating negative-sequence currents under unbalanced fault conditions is proposed first. Then, the additional terms of measured impedances of distance relays caused by fault resistances are derived using a symmetrical component method. Theoretical analysis shows the output currents of interconnectors are controllable after faults, which may cause malfunctions in distance protections installed on lines emanating from interconnectors under the effect of fault resistances. Pilot protection is also inapplicable to lines emanating from interconnectors. Furthermore, a novel pilot protection principle based on the ratio between phase currents and the ratio between negative-sequence currents flowing through both sides is proposed for lines emanating from the interconnectors whose control scheme aims at eliminating negative-sequence currents. The validity of theoretical analysis and the protection principle is verified by PSCAD/EMTDC simulations.

  3. Radon emanation from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markkanen, M.; Arvela, H.

    1992-01-01

    The results of gamma spectrometric sample measurements of radon ( 222 Rn) emanation coefficients and radium concentrations ( 226 Ra) from about 800 Finnish soil samples are presented. The radon emanation rate was measured in about 400 soil samples, using radon-tight cans and Lucas cells. The effects of water content and temperature on radon emanation were investigated, using various samples of different soil types. Radon emanation and the effect of water content on radon emanation were investigated separately for different grain sizes (samples of till). The results provide some information on radon emanation in different soil types and relate emanation in laboratory conditions to conditions in ground soil. In routine measurements of radon emanation from soil samples, use of a 5% water content was considered advisable. The correction coefficients of radon emanation varied between 0.3 and 1.5, depending on the water content and soil type. At 5% water content, hardly any difference was found between radon emanation at temperatures of 20 and 1 o C. Radon emanation was found to be an inverse function of grain sizes larger than 0.5 mm in diameter. (author)

  4. Exposure emanation methods of prospecting for mineral deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titov, V.L.; Venkov, V.A.; Avdeeva, T.Ya.; Kuvshinnikova, E.I.

    1985-01-01

    Fundamentals of the theory and practice of new methods for prospecting of mineral deposits-exposure emanation surveys are stated. Different modifications of these methods are considered: emanation track method, electron alphametry, technique based on the recording of alpha radiation of radon daughter products and thermoluminescent dosemeters. Advanatges of these methods as compared with the conventional emanation survey using emanometers and methods based on the recording of gamma radiation intensity are shown. Problems of the theory and practical aspects of the concrete modifications application as well as systems for data acquisition and processing fields of the methods application, technique of works performance and survey data interpretation are considered in detail; methods sensitivity, probable mechanisms of radon transport in bowels, role of a depth component of the radiactive emanation concentration field are evaluated. Examples of the method application in practice are given, emanation anomalies and their evaluation methods are classified

  5. Radon emanation characteristics of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.; Mauch, M.L.; Rogers, V.C.

    1982-01-01

    Radon emanation from uranium mill tailings was examined with respect to the mechanisms of emanation and the physical properties of the tailings which affect emanation. Radon emanation coefficients were measured at ambient moisture on 135 samples from the 1981 field test site at the Grand Junction tailings pile. These coefficients showed a similar trend with moisture to those observed previously with uranium ores, and averaged 0.10 + or - 0.02 at dryness and 0.38 + or - 0.04 for all samples having greater than five weight-percent moisture. Small differences were noted between the maximum values of the coefficients for the sand and slime fractions of the tailings. Separate measurements on tailings from the Vitro tailings pile exhibited much lower emanation coefficients for moist samples, and similar coefficients for dry samples. Alternative emanation measurement techniques were examined and procedures are recommended for use in future work

  6. Radon emanation on San Andreas Fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.-Y.

    1978-01-01

    It is stated that subsurface radon emanation monitored in shallow dry holes along an active segment of the San Andreas fault in central California shows spatially coherent large temporal variations that seem to be correlated with local seismicity. (author)

  7. Radon emanation in tectonically active areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    Subsurface radon emanation has been continuously monitored for up to three years by the Track Etch method in shallow dry holes at more than 60 sites along several tectonic faults in central California and at 9 sites near the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. The measured emanation in these tectonically active areas shows large long-term variations that may be related mainly to crustal strain changes

  8. Radon emanation coefficients in sandy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, K.; Polaskova, A.; Baranova, A.; Sykora, I.; Hola, O.

    1998-01-01

    In this contribution the results of the study of an influence of the water content on the emanation coefficient for two sandy soil samples are reported. These samples were chosen on the because of the long-term continual monitoring of the 222 Rn concentration just in such types of soils and this radon concentration showed the significant variations during a year. These variations are chiefly given in connection with the soil moisture. Therefore, the determination of the dependence of the emanation coefficient of radon on the water content can help to evaluate the influence of the soil moisture variations of radon concentrations in the soil air. The presented results show that the emanation coefficient reaches the constant value in the wide interval of the water content for both sandy soil samples. Therefore, in the common range of the soil moisture (5 - 20 %) it is impossible to expect the variations of the radon concentration in the soil air due to the change of the emanation coefficient. The expressive changes of the radon concentration in the soil air can be observed in case of the significant decrease of the emanation coefficient during the soil drying when the water content decreases under 5 % or during the complete filling of the soil pores by the water. (authors)

  9. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Clinical application of ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin as a human natural hormone is involved in fundamental regulatory processes of eating and energy balance. Ghrelin signals the nutrient availability from the gastrointestinal tract to the central nervous system, up-regulates food intake and lowers energy expenditure mainly through hypothalamic mediators acting both centrally and peripherally including the gastrointestinal tract (motility, epithelium), promotes both neuro-endocrine and inflammatory signals to increase skeletal muscle growth and decrease protein breakdown, and increases lipolysis while body fat utilization is reduced. Ghrelin does more to exert its probably sentinel role around "human energy": it influences through mainly extra-hypothalamic actions the hedonic and incentive value of food, mood and anxiety, sleep-wake regulation, learning and memory, and neurogenesis. Recently numerous ghrelin gene-derived peptides were discovered, demonstrating the complexity within the ghrelin/ghrelin receptor axis. For clinical applications, not only the natural ghrelin and its slice variants, but also several modified or artificial molecules acting at ghrelin-associated receptors were and are developed. Current clinical applications are limited to clinical studies, focusing mainly on cachexia in chronic heart failure, COPD, cancer, endstage- renal-disease or cystic fibrosis, but also on frailty in elderly, gastrointestinal motility (e.g., gastroparesis, functional dyspepsia, postoperative ileus), after curative gastrectomy, anorexia nervosa, growth hormone deficient patients, alcohol craving, sleep-wake regulation (e.g. major depression), or sympathetic nervous activity in obesity. The results of completed, preliminary studies support the clinical potential of ghrelin, ghrelin gene-derived peptides, and artificial analogues, suggesting that larger clinical trials are demanded to move ghrelin towards an available and reimbursed pharmaceutical intervention.

  11. The carrying out of a radiometric analysis method applicable to Moroccan phosphates. Study of the uranium amounts, of the U/Ra equilibrium ratio and of 222-radon emanation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choukri, A.

    1987-01-01

    A radiometric analysis method for the determination of the uranium and the radium amounts in Moroccan phosphate has been carried out, using NaI(Tl) scintillator to detect gamma radiation of 238-U and 235-U radioactive daughters. The analysis results permit to calculate the U/Ra equilibrium ratio and the emanation rates of 222-Rn versus temperature. The U/Ra disequilibria permit to detect the secondary contribution of a recent uranium. The 222-Rn emanation rates are useful in the evaluation of the radiological hazards related to the phosphate radioactivity. This method was applied to study the phosphate Ganntour deposit and showed that the uranium content ranges from 25ppm to 350ppm, that the U/Ra ratio ranges from 0.6 to 2.2 with an exceptional value of 4.5. The emanation rate of natural radon is between 0% and 27%. The radon forced emanation by heating or by adding different acids has also been studied. The phosphate attack with H 2 SO 4 and HNO 3 , using the analysis method, showed that a maximum degassing appears at 0.9cc/g for H 2 SO 4 and 1.1cc/g for HNO 3 . By adding H 2 SO 4 , 30% of uranium (without radium) passed in the solution and by adding HNO 3 uranium and radium are divided among the solid and the liquid phases. 22 refs., 49 figs., 25 tabs. (author)

  12. Fractal theory of radon emanation from solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semkow, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    The author developed a fractal theory of Rn emanation from solids, based on α recoil from the α decay of Ra. Range straggling of the recoiling Rn atoms in the solid state is included and the fractal geometry is used to describe the roughness of the emanating surface. A fractal dimension D of the surface and the median projected range become important parameters in calculating the radon emanating power E R from solids. A relation between E R and the specific surface area measured by the gas adsorption is derived for the first time, assuming a uniform distribution of the precursor Ra throughout the samples. It is suggested that the E R measurements can be used to determine D of the surfaces on the scale from tens to hundreds of nm. One obtains, for instance, D = 2.17 ± 0.06 for Lipari volcanic glass and D = 2.83 ± 0.03 for pitchblende. In addition, the author suggests a new process of penetrating recoil and modify the role of indirect recoil. The penetrating recoil may be important for rough surfaces, in which case Rn loses its kinetic energy by penetrating a large number of small surface irregularities. The indirect recoil may be important at the very last stage of energy-loss process, for kinetic energies below ∼ 5 keV

  13. Preparation of radionuclide {sup 212}Pb by emanation method and its subsequent application in radioindicator study of adsorption processes on the bentonite rocks; Priprava radionuklidu {sup 212}Pb emanacnou metodou a jeho nasledna aplikacia pri radioindikatorovom studiu adsorpcnych procesov na bentonitovych horninach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viglasova, E; Rosskopfova, O; Galambos, M [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Katedra jadrovej chemie, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-04-25

    The paper deals with the preparation of the radionuclide {sup 212}Pb by emanation and its further application in the study of adsorption processes in bentonite rocks. Chronic toxicity of Pb, as of one of the oldest contaminants, causes disturbances in reproductive behaviour, brain damage, neurological disorders, kidney activity damage and many others. {sup 212}Pb has radiogenic origin, it belongs to a series of {sup 232}Th and considering its short half-time time its occurrence is linked primarily to Th. Emanation is a suitable method for preparation of {sup 212}Pb, as a subsidiary radionuclide of a decay series of {sup 232}Th. Due to the electric field at a voltage of 310 V the {sup 212}Pb was captured from Th-source on niobium emanator sheets. Then it leached from there into HNO{sub 3} solution. After adjusting the pH solution and sample preparation there took place a radioindicator study of the effect of mixing time of solid and liquid phase on adsorption percentage of Pb. Adsorption of Pb was studied on bentonite from Slovakian deposits Lieskovec in relation to their use as a tightening barrier of different landfill sites. (authors)

  14. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C.; Juenger, Maria C.G.; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Radon ( 222 Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ± 5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling. - Highlights: • Fly ash or metakaolin SCMs can neutralize or reduce concrete emanation fractions. • The specific activity of constituents is a poor predictor of the concrete emanation fraction. • Exhalation from fly ash concretes represents a small fraction of the total indoor radon concentration

  15. Interpretation and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter discusses the factors to be kept in mind during routine interpretation of MR images. This includes the factors that determine contrast on standard spin-echo images and some distinguishing features between true lesions and artifactually simulated lesions. This chapter also indicates the standard protocols for MRI of various portions of the body. Finally, the current indications for MRI of various portions of the body are suggested; however, it is recognized that the indications for MRI are rapidly increasing and consequently, at the time of publication of this chapter, it is likely that many more applications will have become evident. Interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR) images requires consideration of anatomy and tissue characteristics and extraction of artifacts resulting from motion and other factors

  16. Detailed radon emanation mapping in Northern Latium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumento, F.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed radon surveys over 5,000 km 2 of Northern Latium, covering the northern part of the volcanic province of Central Italy, commenced in the mid eighties as part of a geothermal exploration programme; the surveys have subsequently been continued and amplified with environmental protection in mind. The area is now covered by ground emission maps, radon levels in water supplies, emissions from the different lithologies and concentrations in houses. The high uraniferous content of the volcanics, the porous nature of the ubiquitous pyroclastics, and active geothermal systems in the area combine to convey to ground level high concentrations of radon. The emissions show strong lateral variations which are geologically and tectonically controlled, such that only detailed surveys reveal the extent and locations of anomalous radon emanations. Unfortunately, long ago towns often developed in strategic locations. For Northern Latium this means on volcanic highs formed by faulted tuff blocks, two geological features associated with particularly high radon emissions. As a result, in contrast to the low average indoor radon concentrations for the greater part of Italy, in some of these town the average values exceed 450 Bq/m 3 . (author). 1 fig

  17. Virtual colonoscopy: clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laghi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC), also known as computed tomography Colonography (CTC), is a non-invasive test for the examination of the colon based on volumetric, thin-collimation CT acquisition of a cleansed and air-distended colon. The technique is easy, less labour-intensive than barium enema and conventional colonoscopy, and is inherently safer. Several studies demonstrate the ability of VC in the detection of colonic neoplastic lesions, not only large carcinomas, but also polyps. Currently, the most widely accepted clinical indication is incomplete or unsuccessful colonoscopy, which may be the result of redundant colon, patient intolerance to the procedure, spasm not resolving even with the use of spasmolytics, obstructing colo-rectal cancer. VC is also used to detect cancer in frail and immobile patients to avoid sedation during colonoscopy or the turning required during barium enema. The use of VC in patients under surveillance following colo-rectal cancer surgery is under investigation. Further studies are necessary in order to assess the cost-effectiveness of this approach. For colo-rectal cancer screening, a practical approach is to consider VC as a currently credible alternative screening method and as a reasonable alternative to the other colo-rectal cancer screening tests when a patient is unable or unwilling to undergo conventional colonoscopy. (orig.)

  18. Virtual colonoscopy: clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laghi, A. [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza, Polo Didattico Pontino, Latina (Italy)

    2005-11-15

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC), also known as computed tomography Colonography (CTC), is a non-invasive test for the examination of the colon based on volumetric, thin-collimation CT acquisition of a cleansed and air-distended colon. The technique is easy, less labour-intensive than barium enema and conventional colonoscopy, and is inherently safer. Several studies demonstrate the ability of VC in the detection of colonic neoplastic lesions, not only large carcinomas, but also polyps. Currently, the most widely accepted clinical indication is incomplete or unsuccessful colonoscopy, which may be the result of redundant colon, patient intolerance to the procedure, spasm not resolving even with the use of spasmolytics, obstructing colo-rectal cancer. VC is also used to detect cancer in frail and immobile patients to avoid sedation during colonoscopy or the turning required during barium enema. The use of VC in patients under surveillance following colo-rectal cancer surgery is under investigation. Further studies are necessary in order to assess the cost-effectiveness of this approach. For colo-rectal cancer screening, a practical approach is to consider VC as a currently credible alternative screening method and as a reasonable alternative to the other colo-rectal cancer screening tests when a patient is unable or unwilling to undergo conventional colonoscopy. (orig.)

  19. Pediatric DXA: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkovitz, Larry A.; Sparke, Paul; Henwood, Maria J.

    2007-01-01

    Normal bone mineral accrual requires adequate dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients; hepatic and renal activation of vitamin D; normal hormone levels (thyroid, parathyroid, reproductive and growth hormones); and neuromuscular functioning with sufficient stress upon the skeleton to induce bone deposition. The presence of genetic or acquired diseases and the therapies that are used to treat them can also impact bone health. Since the introduction of clinical DXA in pediatrics in the early 1990s, there has been considerable investigation into the causes of low bone mineral density (BMD) in children. Pediatricians have also become aware of the role adequate bone mass accrual in childhood has in preventing osteoporotic fractures in late adulthood. Additionally, the availability of medications to improve BMD has increased with the development of bisphosphonates. These factors have led to the increased utilization of DXA in pediatrics. This review summarizes much of the previous research regarding BMD in children and is meant to assist radiologists and clinicians with DXA utilization and interpretation. (orig.)

  20. Radon emanation from backfilled mill tailings in underground uranium mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Patitapaban; Mishra, Devi Prasad; Panigrahi, Durga Charan; Jha, Vivekananda; Patnaik, R Lokeswara; Sethy, Narendra Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Coarser mill tailings used as backfill to stabilize the stoped out areas in underground uranium mines is a potential source of radon contamination. This paper presents the quantitative assessment of radon emanation from the backfilled tailings in Jaduguda mine, India using a cylindrical accumulator. Some of the important parameters such as (226)Ra activity concentration, bulk density, bulk porosity, moisture content and radon emanation factor of the tailings affecting radon emanation were determined in the laboratory. The study revealed that the radon emanation rate of the tailings varied in the range of 0.12-7.03 Bq m(-2) s(-1) with geometric mean of 1.01 Bq m(-2) s(-1) and geometric standard deviation of 3.39. An increase in radon emanation rate was noticed up to a moisture saturation of 0.09 in the tailings, after which the emanation rate gradually started declining with saturation due to low diffusion coefficient of radon in the saturated tailings. Radon emanation factor of the tailings varied in the range of 0.08-0.23 with the mean value of 0.21. The emanation factor of the tailings with moisture saturation level over 0.09 was found to be about three times higher than that of the absolutely dry tailings. The empirical relationship obtained between (222)Rn emanation rate and (226)Ra activity concentration of the tailings indicated a significant positive linear correlation (r = 0.95, p < 0.001). This relationship may be useful for quick prediction of radon emanation rate from the backfill material of similar nature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C; Juenger, Maria C G; Siegel, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ±5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling. © 2013.

  2. Clinical Application of Nape Acupuncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Xiao-yin; CUI Yi-jun

    2003-01-01

    @@ Nape Acupuncture refers to an acupuncture method at nuchal region. It was initiated and applied in clinic by Dr. HUA Yan-ling from Shanghai Research Institute of Acupuncture and Meridian and it can be used for treating diseases of nervous, circulatory and motor systems. Especially, it is more effective for brain-origin diseases. The author ever studied this acupuncture method from Dr. Hua and found it was effective according to clinical application. Now several typical cases are reported as follows.

  3. Emanations and 'induced' radioactivity: from mystery to (mis)use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, Z.I.

    1999-01-01

    The natural Rn isotopes were discovered within the period 1899-1902 and at that time referred to as emanations because they came out (emanated) of sources/materials containing actinium, thorium and radium, respectively. The (somewhat mysterious) emanations appeared to disintegrate into radioactive decay products which by depositing at solid surfaces gave rise to 'induced' radioactivity i.e. radioactive substances with various half-lives. Following the discovery of the emanations the volume of the research involving them and their disintegration products grew steeply. The identity of a number of these radioactive products was soon established. Radium emanation was soon used as a source of RaD ( 210 Pb) to be applied as an 'indicator' (radiotracer) for lead in a study on the solubility of lead sulphide and lead chromate. Moreover, radium and its emanation were introduced into the medical practice. Inhaling radon and drinking radon-containing water became an accepted medicinal use (or misuse?) of that gas. Shortly after the turn of the century, the healing (?) action of natural springs (spas) was attributed to their radium emanation, i.e. radon. Bathing in radioactive spring water and drinking it became very popular. Even today, bathing in radon-containing water is still a common medical treatment in Jachymov, Czech Republic. (author)

  4. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  5. Discharge of water containing waste emanating from land to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    containing waste (wastewater), which emanates from land-based sources and which directly impact on the marine environment. These sources include sea outfalls, storm water drains, canals, rivers and diffuse sources of pollution. To date ...

  6. Intercomparison of radon emanation in Moroccan and Tunisian phosphate rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, A.; Membrey, F.; Klein, D.; Chambaudet, A.; Iraqui, R.

    1992-01-01

    We suggest a method for measuring the emanation of radon gas of phosphates mineral from different origins using solid state track nuclear detectors (CR39 and LR115) with the aim to determinate radioactivity effects on the human. (author)

  7. Uranium-bearing wastes and their radon emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo; Imamura, Mitsutaka; Gunji, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    There are no data available with regard to radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes; such data are needed for the assessment of radiation exposure from radon that will be generated in the distant future as one uranium progeny at shallow land disposal sites for uranium-bearing wastes. There are many kinds of uranium-bearing wastes. However, it is not necessary to measure the radon emanation coefficients for all of them for two reasons. First, the radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium are determined by the uranium chemical form, the manner of uranium deposition on the waste matrix, and the size of the particles which constitute the waste matrix. Therefore, only a few representative measurements are sufficient for such uranium-bearing wastes. Second, it is possible to make theoretical calculations of radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. In the present study, simulated uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium were prepared, their radon emanation coefficients were measured and radon emanation coefficients were calculated theoretically for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. The obtained radon emanation coefficients are distributed at higher values than those for ubiquitous soils and rocks in the natural environment. Therefore, it is not correct to just compare uranium concentrations among uranium-bearing wastes, ubiquitous soils and rocks in terms of radiation exposure. The radon emanation coefficients obtained in the present study have to be employed together with the uranium concentration in uranium-bearing wastes in order to achieve proper assessment of radiation exposure. (author)

  8. The radium distribution in some Swedish soils and its effects on radon emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edsfeldt, Cecilia

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this study has been to clarify how the radium distribution in soils affects the radon emanation. The distribution of radium, uranium and thorium has been determined using sequential extractions. In the study, soils from two different locations were investigated. In the first part the applicability of the sequential extraction method for determining Ra distribution in different soil types was investigated, using a simple sequential extraction method. Sampled soils were clay, sand and till from the vicinity of the Stockholm Esker. The main part of Rn emanating Ra was associated with Fe oxides in the soil. The methods applied provided information about the radon risk of the soil, but, in order to gain more information on the processes governing Ra distribution and radon emanation in soils, a more detailed sequential extraction procedure would be desirable. The second part consisted of a detailed study of the radionuclide distribution and the geochemistry in a podzolised glacial till from Kloten in northern Vaestmanland. A more detailed sequential extraction procedure was used, and the specific surface area of samples was measured. Samples were taken from E, B, and C horizons; radium and thorium were enriched in the B horizon, whereas uranium had its maximum concentration in the C horizon. Extractable radium primarily occurred in the exchangeable pool, possibly organically complexed, whereas extractable uranium and thorium were mainly Fe oxide bound. Oxide-bound Ra was important only in the B horizon. The radon emanation was not correlated with the amount of exchangeable Ra, but instead with the oxide bound Ra. However, the amount of oxide-bound Ra was too small to account for all the emanated Rn, thus, exchangeable Ra was interpreted as the main source of emanated Rn. This exchangeable Ra was more emanative in the B horizon than in the C horizon. The explanation is the larger surface area of the B horizon samples; the specific surface area appears to be the

  9. Emanation of radon-222 in uraniferous phosphorite from Pernambuco, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, M.L.O.; França, E.J.; Amaral, D.S.; Silva, K.E.M.; Hazin, C.A.; Farias, E.E.G.

    2017-01-01

    The concentration of radon-222 activity available for transport to the surface through the pore space can be defined as radon emanation. From the decay of radium-226, whose half-life is 1850 years, it is associated with the development of neoplasia, such as lung cancer. In the Metropolitan Region of Recife, sedimentary rocks known as phosphorites have been known since 1959, so, from the radiometric characterization of the Paulista and Igarassu Municipality, in Pernambuco, emanation tests were carried out, aiming to determine the emanation power of radon in samples of uraniferous phosphorite from the Recife Metropolitan Region. Initially, 6 independent samples of phosphorites with activity concentration of 226 Ra> 400 Bq kg -1 were comminuted. Portions of 5g were conditioned in a radon chamber with 500 mL volume for measurements. The linear fit of the model converged after 200 interactions with selection of the best fit by the Chi-Square test, through the Origin® 8.0 program. After analysis of the samples, radon emanation power was estimated in the range of 7% to 15%, with a mean value of 10.8%. The methodology used to determine the emanation parameters in samples of uraniferous phosphorite was adequate, observing an inversely proportional relation between the concentration of the radium-226 and the emanation power

  10. Clinical applications of immunoglobulin: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Zago Novaretti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunoglobulin is the most used blood product in the clinical practice. Immunoglobulin applications have increased quickly since the elucidation of its immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties which turned this blood product into a precious tool in the treatment of numerous diseases that present with humoral immune deficiency or that cause immune system dysfunction. Currently, the approved indications for Ig are: primary immunodeficiencies, secondary immunodeficiencies (multiple myeloma or chronic lymphoid leukemia, Kawasaki syndrome, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Guillain Barré syndrome, graft-versus-host disease following bone marrow transplantation and repeat infections in HIV children. On the other hand, there are numerous "off-label" indications of immunoglobulin, which represent 20-60% of all clinical applications of this drug. It is important to study all these indications and, above all, the scientific evidence for its use, in order to provide patients with a new therapeutic option without burdening the health system. This review results from a wide selection of papers identified in the Pubmed and Lilacs scientific electronic databases. A group of descriptors were used from human immunoglobulin to the names of each disease that immunoglobulin is clinically applied. Our main objective is to list the numerous indications of immunoglobulin, both authorized and "off-label" and to analyze these indications in the light of the most recent scientific evidence.

  11. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, Sharma, E-mail: issaranu@gmail.com; Gayatri, Sharma, E-mail: sharmagayatri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College of Engineering & Technology, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  12. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  13. Study of radon emanation from uranium mill tailings. Relations between radon emanating power and physicochemical properties of the material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, D.

    1999-01-01

    The uranium extraction from ores leads to large amounts of mill tailings still containing radionuclides, such as thorium-230 and radium-226, which generate radon-222. Without protective action, radon exposition may be high enough to cause concern for health of populations living in the vicinity of an uranium mill tailings disposal. This exposition pathway has therefore to be taken into account in the radiological impact studies. The emanating power, i.e. the part of radon atoms which escape from the solid particles, is directly involved in the radon source term evaluation. It may be determined for a given material by laboratory measurements. Emanating powers from 0.08 to 0.33 have been obtained for mill tailings from Jouac (Limousin, France), at various moisture contents. In order to reduce the relations of dependence between some of the emanation parameters, more simple phases, kaolinite and polymeric resins, have been studied. Those experiments have led us to the selection of the mechanisms and the parameters to consider for the development of an emanation modelling. The whole of the results obtained point out the radon sorption, in various proportions depending on the materials. The moisture content influence on the emanation from materials containing fine particles have been confirmed: the emanation increases with this parameter until a continuous water film surrounding the particles have been formed, and then become constant. This 'water effect' occurs in a moisture content range, which depends on the material porosity. Elsewhere, the presence of amorphous phases may led to a high radon emanation. (author)

  14. Anomalous radon emanation linked to preseismic electromagnetic phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Omori

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous emanation of radon (222Rn was observed preceding large earthquakes and is considered to be linked to preseismic electromagnetic phenomena (e.g. great changes of atmospheric electric field and ionospheric disturbances. Here we analyze atmospheric radon concentration and estimate changes of electrical conditions in atmosphere due to preseismic radon anomaly. The increase of radon emanation obeys crustal damage evolution, following a power-law of time-to-earthquake. Moreover, the radon emanation decreases the atmospheric electric field by 40%, besides influencing the maximum strength of atmospheric electric field by 104–105 V/m enough to trigger ionospheric disturbances. These changes are within the ranges observed or explaining electromagnetic phenomena associated with large earthquakes.

  15. Clinical applications of contrast echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Leon Galindo

    2005-01-01

    The echocardiography is the technique more used for the diagnosis and pursuit of the cardiovascular illnesses; therefore, their diagnostic precision has acquired a vital importance in the handling of the patients with cardiovascular pathologies. However, with relative frequency, the diagnostic capacity of the echocardiography exam is diminished by limitations of the acoustic window, mainly in-patient with obesity, lung illnesses and alterations of the thoracic wall. This can be obviated with the use of the intra-esophagus echocardiography, although this it is a procedure semi-invasive and not very practical of carrying out in all the patients with problems of acoustic window. In this article the clinical applications are revised more common of the contrast echocardiography

  16. Clinical applications of iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberl, S.

    1998-01-01

    Expectation maximisation (EM) reconstruction largely eliminates the hot and cold streaking artifacts characteristic of filtered-back projection (FBP) reconstruction around localised hot areas, such as the bladder. It also substantially reduces the problem of decreased inferior wall counts in MIBI myocardial perfusion studies due to ''streaking'' from high liver uptake. Non-uniform attenuation and scatter correction, resolution recovery, anatomical information, e.g. from MRI or CT tracer kinetic modelling, can all be built into the EM reconstruction imaging model. The properties of ordered subset EM (OSEM) have also been used to correct for known patient motion as part of the reconstruction process. These uses of EM are elaborated more fully in some of the other abstracts of this meeting. Currently we use OSEM routinely for: (i) studies where streaking is a problem, including all MIBI myocardial perfusion studies, to avoid hot liver inferior wall artifact, (ii) all whole body FDG PET, all lung V/Q SPECT (which have a short acquisition time) and all gated 201 TI myocardial perfusion studies due to improved noise characteristics of OSEM in these studies; (iii) studies with measured, non-uniform attenuation correction. With the accelerated OSEM algorithm, iterative reconstruction is practical for routine clinical applications and we have found OSEM to provide clearly superior reconstructions for the areas listed above and are investigating its application to other studies. In clinical use, we have not found OSEM to introduce artifacts which would not also occur with FBP, e.g. uncorrected patient motion will cause artifacts with both OSEM and FBP

  17. Modelization of the radon emanation from natural sources in the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabir, A.; Marah, H.; Hlou, L.; Klein, D.; Chambaudet, A.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the radon emanation and hence the risk to populations, we have adapted an original mathematical model based on the method of distribute parcels (L. Hlou, These d'etat, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra, MAROC, 1994). This allows us to follow the migration, in time and space, of a quantity of radon produced in a unit volume as a function of the geological, morphological and structural characteristics of the site studied. Knowing the petrographic and pedologic parameters enables us to calculate the radon concentration in all points inside the soil of the site as well as the radon emanation in the atmosphere. It is therefore possible to calculate the radiological risk for populations brought to live on the site studied. Different applications of this model have been realised in Morocco and in France to demonstrate its efficiency. (author)

  18. Emanation thermal analysis of SiC based materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bálek, V.; Zeleňák, V.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Šubrt, Jan; Haneda, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 1 (2002), s. 83-89 ISSN 1418-2874 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 180 Grant - others:EFDA(XE) TTMA-001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : emanation thermal analysis * SEM * SiC nanocomposites Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.598, year: 2002

  19. Calculation of radon emanation from a radiferous pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zettwoog, Pierre.

    1980-07-01

    The theory of unidimensional diffusion of radon in a porous medium, either radiferous or not, is presented taking into account the effects of humidity and the adsorption of radon on the medium. Experimental procedures for determining the two main characteristics of diffusion in a medium, the relaxation length of the diffusion of radon and the emanating power, are described [fr

  20. Transport properties and microstructure changes of talc characterized by emanation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pérez-Maqueda, L. A.; Balek, Vladimír; Poyato, J.; Šubrt, Jan; Beneš, M.; Ramírez-Valle, V.; Buntseva, I.M.; Beckman, I. N.; Pérez-Rodríguez, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 1 (2008), s. 253-258 ISSN 1388-6150 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523 Grant - others:MST(ES) MAT 2005-04838 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : DTA emanation thermal analysis * microstructure changes * radon diffusion Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.630, year: 2008

  1. Clinical application of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    1999-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has replaced planar imaging techniques for myocardial scintigraphy. Thallium-201 was the dominant agent employed for myocardial perfusion imaging. Today new technetium-99m labelled radionuclides have been used as excellent alternatives to 201 Tl for detection of coronary artery disease, prognostification, and even assessment of myocardial viability. Pharmacologic stress imaging using either dipyridamole, adenosine or dobutamine is a substitute for exercise stress. Accurate determination of myocardial viability is vitally important for clinical decision making for patients with LV dysfunction who will most benefit from revascularization. Stunned and hibernated myocardium may result in profound regional LTV dysfunction in absence of necrosis. The various approach such as stress-redistribution-reinjection imaging, rest-redistribution imaging and stress-redistribution-24 hours delayed imaging has been utilized to assess myocardial viability with 201 Tl. Quantitative assessment of 99m Tc MIBI uptake reflect the degree of viability. 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, has been used for scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation. Cardiac sympathetic denervation, assessed by 123 I-MIBG, due to ischemia in non-Q myocardial infarction and unstable angina has been shown. Quantitative cardiac MIBG scintigram was shown to have prognostic value in patients with severe congestive heart failure. 23 I-BMIPP (ρ-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) has been used to assess myocardial fatty acid utilization. BMIPP has the memory function of ischemia in unstable angina, since decreased BMIPP uptake persists several days after ischemic episode. Nuclear cardiology in Japan has experienced an expansion in the techniques including use of new radionuclides, 99m Tc perfusion agents, 123 I-MIBG and 23 I-BMIPP and in associated clinical application to the various cardiac diseases

  2. Estimation of radon emanation coefficient for soil and flyash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, S.K.; Swarnkar, M.; Ajmal, P.Y.; Pandit, G.G.; Puranik, V.D.

    2012-01-01

    Since terrestrial materials include radium ( 226 Ra) originating from the decay of uranium ( 238 U), all such materials release radon ( 222 Rn) to varying degrees. When a radium atom decays to radon, the energy generated is strong enough to send the radon atom a distance of about 40 nanometers-this is known as alpha recoil. For a radon atom to escape the radium atom must be within the recoil distance from the grain surface of flyash or soil and the direction of recoil must send the radon atom toward the outside of the grain. Therefore, all of the radon atoms generated by the radium contained in flyash or soil grain are actually not released into pore spaces and mobilized. The fraction of radon atoms generated from radium decay that are released from into flyash or soil pore space is defined as the radon emanation coefficient or emanating power, of the material. Grain size and shape are two of the important factors that control the radon emanation coefficient because they determine in part how much uranium and radium is near enough to the surface of the grain to allow the newly-formed radon to escape into a pore space. In a porous medium, where the radon is in radioactive equilibrium with its parent radium, the emanation coefficient is given by the expression: where C 0 is the undiluted radon activity concentration in the pores of the medium, and C Ra is the radium activity concentration of the sample. The 226 Ra activity concentration of the flyash and soil sample were determined by using the g-spectrometry. C 0 was determined by the can experiment using LR-115 for flyash and soil samples. The C 0 values for flyash and soil samples were found to be 245.7 Bq/m 3 and 714.3 Bq/m 3 respectively. The radon emanation coefficient for flyash was found to be 0.0024 while that for soil was 0.0092. Therefore the soil sample was found to be four times higher radon emanation coefficient than flyash which is in line with the results reported in the literatures. This may suggest

  3. Clinical application of functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniwaki, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Described is the present state of clinical application of fMRI in the preoperative assessment of brain tumors, and plasticity in and pathophysiology of central diseases. For the tumor resection, fMRI is useful for risk assessment of postoperative nerve dysfunction, for selection of the patient rather suitable for brain mapping at the invasive surgery than at the pre-operation and for guidance of the operation itself. Preoperative fMRI alone can neither distinguish the regions of the primary and secondary functions nor exhibit the relation between the tumor and white matter fibers but there are compensatory means for these drawbacks. Benefit of preoperative fMRI has not yet been based on the evidence on double blind trials. Combination of fMRI imaging and electroencephalography (EEG) finding has shown that, in generalized epilepsy, extensive and stimulated activation occurs in both frontal/occipital regions and in thalamus area, respectively, and that the concomitant lowered activities are conceivably the reflection of burst discharge in normal brain functions. Plasticity in the human brain has been demonstrated by fMRI in cerebral vascular diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and depression has been better understood by fMRI investigations revealing regions with elevated and reduced activities. Studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have shown similar change of activities with functional reductions of the right dorsolateral frontal anterior area and of dorsal frontal cingulate gyrus, together with stimulated wider regions to given tasks. As above, fMRI has greatly contributed to our understanding of diseases of central nervous system and is to be expected to expand wider in this field. (T.T.)

  4. A micromegas detector for {sup 222}Rn emanations measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, J. A.; Garza, J. G.; Irastorza, I. G.; Mirallas, H. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Altas Energías, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-08-08

    The {sup 222}Rn emanation has significant contribution in the overall background for rare event searches experiments. In order to measure this emanations a high sensitivity detector has been designed. The detection method is based on the electrostatic collection of the {sup 222}Rn daughters on a Micromegas detector. Using a chamber with a volume of 21.2 l for the collection of {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po progeny of {sup 222}Rn and a 12 × 12cm{sup 2} pixelized Micromegas for the α detection. The advantages of the Micromegas detectors are the low intrinsic radioactivity and the track reconstruction of the α’s, having excellent capabilities for event discrimination.

  5. Recalibration of the 226Ra emanation analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, H.F. Jr.; Markun, F.

    1982-01-01

    The 226 Ra emanation system was found to require recalibration. The gain of the various counting systems was established to about +-0.5%. The variance introduced into the analysis by multiple counting systems was low and corresponded to a fractional standard deviation of +-0.5%. The variance introduced into the analysis by both multiple counting systems and multiple counting chambers needs to be redetermined but is less than a fractional standard deviation of +-2%. The newly established calibration factor of 5.66 cpm/pg 226 Ra is about 6% greater than that used previously. The leakage of radon into the greased fittings of the emanation flask which was indicated in an earlier study was not confirmed

  6. Newton's Metaphysics of Space as God's Emanative Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquette, Dale

    2014-09-01

    In several of his writings, Isaac Newton proposed that physical space is God's "emanative effect" or "sensorium," revealing something interesting about the metaphysics underlying his mathematical physics. Newton's conjectures depart from Plato and Aristotle's metaphysics of space and from classical and Cambridge Neoplatonism. Present-day philosophical concepts of supervenience clarify Newton's ideas about space and offer a portrait of Newton not only as a mathematical physicist but an independent-minded rationalist philosopher.

  7. Radon sources emanation in granitic soil and saprolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollenberg, H.; Flexser, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Brimhall, G.; Lewis, C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1993-08-01

    Petrological and geochemical examinations of soil, saprolite, and quartz diorite protolith have been made at the Small Structures field site, Ben Lomond Mountain, California. Variations in Ra in soil and saprolite are mainly controlled by heterogeneities inherited from the parent quartz diorite. Fission-track radiography shows that U is concentrated in the primary accessory minerals, zircon and sphene. However, most importantly for Rn emanation, U is also concentrated in secondary sites: weathered sphene, biotite and plagioclase, grain coatings, and Fe-rich fracture linings which also contain a rare-earth phosphate mineral. This occurrence of U along permeable fracture zones suggests that soil-gas Rn from depth (> 2 m) is a significant contributor to Rn availability near the surface. Zones highest in emanation occur where fine pedogenic phases: gibbsite, amorphous silica, and iron oxyhydroxide are most abundant. Mass balance analyses of this soil-saprolite profile are in progress and preliminary indicate that a high-emanation zone corresponds to the upper portion of a zone of accumulation of U and Ba.

  8. Clinical application of digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Nagasaka, Hideo; Himi, Kazuhisa [Nihon Univ., Tokyo. School of Medicine

    1983-04-01

    Utility of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) by fluorography was advocated with demonstrable clinical cases. DSA is drawing attention for use at the outpatient clinic because it is relatively noninvasive, involves less risk than that by catheterization, and can be performed by intravenous injection. It also has a number of advantages such as instantaneous imaging and possible imaging of multiple sites by the same procedure. It still be extensively used in clinical practice not only as a screening method, but also as a functional imaging one.

  9. Magnetic Nanoparticles From Fabrication to Clinical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thanh, Nguyen TK

    2012-01-01

    Offering the latest information in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) research, Magnetic Nanoparticles: From Fabrication to Clinical Applications provides a comprehensive review, from synthesis, characterization, and biofunctionalization to clinical applications of MNPs, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. This book, written by some of the most qualified experts in the field, not only fills a hole in the literature, but also bridges the gaps between all the different areas in this field. Translational research on tailored magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications spans a variet

  10. Clinical applications of Gallium-68

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Gallium-68 is a positron-emitting radioisotope that is produced from a 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator. As such it is conveniently used, decoupling radiopharmacies from the need for a cyclotron on site. Gallium-68-labeled peptides have been recognized as a new class of radiopharmaceuticals showing fast target localization and blood clearance. 68 Ga-DOTATOC, 8 Ga-DOTATATE, 68 Ga-DOTANOC, are the most prominent radiopharmaceuticals currently in use for imaging and differentiating lesions of various somatostatin receptor subtypes, overexpressed in many neuroendocrine tumors. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of clinical studies with 68 Ga over the past few years around the world, including within the United States. An estimated ∼10,000 scans are being performed yearly in Europe at about 100 centers utilizing 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs within clinical trials. Two academic sites within the US have also begun to undertake human studies. This review will focus on the clinical experience of selected, well-established and recently applied 68 Ga-labeled imaging agents used in nuclear medicine. - Highlights: ► A summary of the emerging clinical uses of 68 Ga-based radiopharmaceuticals is provided. ► 68 Ga-PET may prove as or more clinically robust than the corresponding 18 F-labeled agents. ► 68 Ga-radiopeptides were studied for targeting of somatostatin receptors subtypes. ► 68 Ga-DOTATOC, 68 Ga-DOTATATE, 68 Ga-DOTANOC, are currently in clinical trials

  11. Clinical application of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battermann, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of treatments and clinical experiments with neutrons (from a medical d+T neutron generator with an output of 10 12 neutrons per second) are reported and discussed. Data on RBE values are presented after single doses and multiple fractions of neutrons and 60 Co-gamma rays on pulmonary metastases. The results of pilot studies on head and neck tumours, brain tumours and pelvic tumours are discussed. The accuracy of the calculated dose is tested with some in-vivo experiments during neutron irradiation of the pelvis. Estimations of RBE values for tumour control, skin damage and intestinal damage after fractionated neutron therapy are dealt with and the results obtained in treatment of sarcomas are discussed. The preliminary results are given of some clinical trials in Amsterdam. Also some data from other centres are reviewed. From these data some remarks about the future of neutron therapy are made. (Auth.)

  12. Echolalia: issues and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, A L

    1979-11-01

    Echolalic behaviors have been reported within the context of various pathologies but have remained poorly defined. Consequently, it is not easy to determine whether and to what extent normal repetition can be separated from pathological echoing. Hence, it is unclear whether the occurrence of echolalic behavior may be useful for differential diagnostic purposes. Also, much room is left for controversies about the clinical management of echolalic behavior. This article reviews the various conditions associated with echolalia and the role of repetitions in normal language behavior. Suggestions are made in terms of the various dimensions along which echolalic behavior should be assessed, as well as of the desirability of particular intervention techniques.

  13. Clinical applications of transient elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Sik Jung

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver disease represents a major public health problem, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As prognosis and management depend mainly on the amount and progression of liver fibrosis, accurate quantification of liver fibrosis is essential for therapeutic decision-making and follow-up of chronic liver diseases. Even though liver biopsy is the gold standard for evaluation of liver fibrosis, non-invasive methods that could substitute for invasive procedures have been investigated during past decades. Transient elastography (TE, FibroScan® is a novel non-invasive method for assessment of liver fibrosis with chronic liver disease. TE can be performed in the outpatient clinic with immediate results and excellent reproducibility. Its diagnostic accuracy for assessment of liver fibrosis has been demonstrated in patients with chronic viral hepatitis; as a result, unnecessary liver biopsy could be avoided in some patients. Moreover, due to its excellent patient acceptance, TE could be used for monitoring disease progression or predicting development of liver-related complications. This review aims at discussing the usefulness of TE in clinical practice.

  14. Cranial MRI: Current clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Kortman, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Human MR images were first published by the Nottingham group in 1980. Since that time, there have been steady improvements in image quality and significant reductions in imaging time. After initial studies by the Hammersmith group in London, investigators at UCSF published studies comparing CT with MR, clearly demonstrating the higher sensitivity of MR to pathologic intracranial processes. Since that time, several investigators have demonstrated the efficacy of MR in the evaluation of a wide range of intracranial pathologic processes, including neoplasms, demyelinating disease, trauma, and congenital abnormalities. In the authors' studies comparing MR with CT in 400 consecutive cases of suspected CNS pathology, MR detected abnormalities which were not seen on CT in 30 percent of these cases. MR has become established as the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of a broad range of CNS abnormalities and is rapidly being implemented not only at university medical centers but also in community hospitals and free-standing clinics. This chapter deals with fundamental principles of MR image interpretation and provides insight into current clinical indications for MR in intracranial disorders

  15. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the

  16. Clinical application of TDF concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Irie, Goro

    1987-01-01

    Our clinical data has demonstrated that the NSD-TDF concept is valid in evaluation of radiation response in terms of predicting the total dose required to produce normal-tissue injury and local tumor control. However, in certain type of tumors such as maxillary cancers and esophagus cancers, the probability of tumor control was reversely related to the TDF values at about 120 to 130. This raises a potential possibility of ''supralethal phenomenon'' that is defined as a concomitant presence of recurrent tumor and radiation-induced necrotic tissue after high-dose irradiation. There has been accumulated data suggesting that the exponents of overall time (0.11) in NSD formula might yield a wrong shape of dose-response curve, resulting in a failure in prediction of late damage. However, it is considered that the NSD-TDF concept is still a practical model as far as it is used as a clue for calculation of alternative fractionation in daily radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Clinical Application of Wedge Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Rak; Ahn, Yong Chan; Huh, Sueng Jae

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : In general. The wedge factors which are used clinical practices are ignored of dependency on field sizes and depths. In this present, we investigated systematically the depth and field size dependency to determine the absorbed dose more accurately. Methods : The wedge factors for each wedge filter were measured at various depth (depth of Dmax, 5cm, 10cm, and 15cm) and field sizes (5 X 5cm, 10 X 10cm, 15 X 15cm, 20 X 20 cm) by using 4-,6-, and 10-MV X rays. By convention, wedge factors are determined by taking the ratio of the central axis ionization readings when the wedge filter is in place to those of the open field in same field size and measurement depth. In this present work, we determined the wedge factors for 4-, 6-, and 10-MV X rays from Clinac 600C and 2100C linear accelerators (manufactured by Varian Associates, Inc., Palo Alto, CA). To confirm that the wedge was centered., measurements were done with the two possible wedge position and various collimator orientations. Results : The standard deviations of measured values are within 0.3% and the depth dependence of wedge factor is greater for the lower energies. Especially, the variation of wedge factor is no less than 5% for 4- and 6- MV X rays with more than 45 .deg. wedge filter. But there seems to be a small dependence on field size. Conclusion : The results of this study show a dependence on the point of measurement. There also seems to be a small dependence on field size. And so, we should consider the depth and field size dependence in determining the wedge factors. If one wedge factor were to be used for each wedge filter, it seems that the measurement for a 10cm X 10cm field size at a depth of 10cm would be a reasonable choice

  18. XML, Ontologies, and Their Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunjiang; Shen, Bairong

    2016-01-01

    The development of information technology has resulted in its penetration into every area of clinical research. Various clinical systems have been developed, which produce increasing volumes of clinical data. However, saving, exchanging, querying, and exploiting these data are challenging issues. The development of Extensible Markup Language (XML) has allowed the generation of flexible information formats to facilitate the electronic sharing of structured data via networks, and it has been used widely for clinical data processing. In particular, XML is very useful in the fields of data standardization, data exchange, and data integration. Moreover, ontologies have been attracting increased attention in various clinical fields in recent years. An ontology is the basic level of a knowledge representation scheme, and various ontology repositories have been developed, such as Gene Ontology and BioPortal. The creation of these standardized repositories greatly facilitates clinical research in related fields. In this chapter, we discuss the basic concepts of XML and ontologies, as well as their clinical applications.

  19. Clinical applications of resting state functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Fox

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During resting conditions the brain remains functionally and metabolically active. One manifestation of this activity that has become an important research tool is spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal of fMRI. The identification of correlation patterns in these spontaneous fluctuations has been termed resting state functional connectivity (fcMRI and has the potential to greatly increase the translation of fMRI into clinical care. In this article we review the advantages of the resting state signal for clinical applications including detailed discussion of signal to noise considerations. We include guidelines for performing resting state research on clinical populations, outline the different areas for clinical application, and identify important barriers to be addressed to facilitate the translation of resting state fcMRI into the clinical realm.

  20. Fluoride emanations from fatories: experimental study of the action of fluorine plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiani, H; Gautier, R

    1925-01-01

    Research work from 1883 onward and the author's own experiments on the damages done to plants by fluoric emanations from aluminum and/or chemical fertilizer factories are reviewed. Fluoric compounds may act through the soil and water that feed the plants, or directly on the plant organs exposed to fluorine-polluted air. Of the various toxic gases, hydrofluoric acid is the most noxious since it forms thick fogs with the humidity in the air. The effects are cumulative and may not become visible before repeated exposure of the plants to the gases. The toxic action of NaF derives from its ability to precipitate lime and to attach itself to other substances, such as proteins. Also, fluorine salts have antiseptic action on unicellular elements, and this has had practical applications. At the doses utilized, alkaline salts of fluorine do not precipitate albumin, and can hamper microbial growth. On the other hand, examination of plant lesions enables the detection of their fluoric, as opposed to other (sulfur, chlorine) origin. Stoklasa claims that the amount of emanation and smoke has increased 100-fold in the last century, reducing the crops in some regions by 30 to 90%. The work on fodder from industrial areas was confirmed by experiments with fluorine compounds in air and in water.

  1. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter

    2010-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa. From very basic experiments, fMRI has evolved into a clinical application for daily routine brain imaging. There have been various improvements in both the imaging technique as such as well as in the statistical analysis. In this volume, experts in the field share their knowledge and point out possible technical barriers and problems explaining how to solve them. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, presurgical applications, and special issues in various clinical fields. Other modalities for brain mapping such as PET, TMS, and MEG are also compared with fMRI. This book is intended to give a state-of-the-art overview and to serve as a reference and guide for clinical applications of fMRI. (orig.)

  2. The clinical applicability of music therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    in lengthy and complex theses is seldom accessible to the practitioner working ‘at the coal-face’; and sometimes lacks clear direction on how the results are applicable in everyday therapy. For results to be implemented in clinical practice and disseminated to colleagues in related fields as well as senior...

  3. Clinical applications of preimplantation genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezina, Paul R; Kutteh, William H

    2015-02-19

    Genetic diagnostic technologies are rapidly changing the way medicine is practiced. Preimplantation genetic testing is a well established application of genetic testing within the context of in vitro fertilization cycles. It involves obtaining a cell(s) from a developing embryo in culture, which is then subjected to genetic diagnostic analysis; the resulting information is used to guide which embryos are transferred into the uterus. The potential applications and use of this technology have increased in recent years. Experts agree that preimplantation genetic diagnosis is clinically appropriate for many known genetic disorders. However, some applications of such testing, such as preimplantation genetic screening for aneuploidy, remain controversial. Clinical data suggest that preimplantation genetic screening may be useful, but further studies are needed to quantify the size of the effect and who would benefit most. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2015.

  4. Field fluxes and speciation of arsines emanating from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestrot, Adrien; Feldmann, Joerg; Krupp, Eva M; Hossain, Mahmud S; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Meharg, Andrew A

    2011-03-01

    The biogeochemical cycle of arsenic (As) has been extensively studied over the past decades because As is an environmentally ubiquitous, nonthreshold carcinogen, which is often elevated in drinking water and food. It has been known for over a century that micro-organisms can volatilize inorganic As salts to arsines (arsine AsH(3), mono-, di-, and trimethylarsines, MeAsH(2), Me(2)AsH, and TMAs, respectively), but this part of the As cycle, with the exception of geothermal environs, has been almost entirely neglected because of a lack of suited field measurement approaches. Here, a validated, robust, and low-level field-deployable method employing arsine chemotrapping was used to quantify and qualify arsines emanating from soil surfaces in the field. Up to 240 mg/ha/y arsines was released from low-level polluted paddy soils (11.3 ± 0.9 mg/kg As), primarily as TMAs, whereas arsine flux below method detection limit was measured from a highly contaminated mine spoil (1359 ± 212 mg/kg As), indicating that soil chemistry is vital in understanding this phenomenon. In microcosm studies, we could show that under reducing conditions, induced by organic matter (OM) amendment, a range of soils varied in their properties, from natural upland peats to highly impacted mine-spoils, could all volatilize arsines. Volatilization rates from 0.5 to 70 μg/kg/y were measured, and AsH(3), MeAsH(2), Me(2)AsH, and TMAs were all identified. Addition of methylated oxidated pentavalent As, namely monomethylarsonic acid (MMAA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), to soil resulted in elevated yearly rates of volatilization with up to 3.5% of the total As volatilized, suggesting that the initial conversion of inorganic As to MMAA limits the rate of arsine and methylarsines production by soils. The nature of OM amendment altered volatilization quantitatively and qualitatively, and total arsines release from soil showed correlation between the quantity of As and the concentration of dissolved organic

  5. Radon and Thoron emanation testwork on Nolans Rare Earths ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonter, Mark; Grose, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a series of experiments performed on two bulk ore samples for Arafura Resources' Nolans Rare Earths project, intended to derive information on radon (Rn222) and thoron (Rn220) emanation rates (fluxes) under various circumstances. This data is needed to enable development of predictions of Rn and Tn releases from exposed mine bench ore, ore stockpiles, and tailings, and thus assist in estimation of airborne concentrations within the areas of the future Mine and Processing plant. In turn these estimates will provide guidance on the quantitative risk and the necessity or otherwise of invoking specific control measures, either in design or in operating procedures. This testwork was carried out during the period 2nd to 15th July, at Arafura's Winnellie facility in Darwin. Conclusions are that for uncrushed ore, Rn flux numbers are around 1.0Bq/m"2/s, Tn numbers appear to cluster around 200-300 Bq/m"2/s. Crushing gave no change in Rn flux, Tn flux was doubled for calc-silicate material. Wetting gave significant reductions for both Rn and Tn for ores sampled, and clay capping reduced Rn flux marginally but Tn was reduced by a factor of 100.

  6. Clinical applications of PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Ha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of PET, PET/CT focusing on the technical aspects, PET radiopharmaceutical developments and current clinical applications as well. The newest technologic advances have been reviewed, including improved crystal design, acquisition modes, reconstruction algorithms, etc. These advancements will continue to improve contrast, decrease noise, and increase resolution. Combined PET/CT system provides faster attenuation correction and useful anatomic correlation to PET functional information. A number of new radiopharmaceuticals used for PET imaging have been developed, however, FDG have been considered as the principal PET radiotracer. The current clinical applications of PET and PET/CT are widespread and include oncology, cardiology and neurology. (author)

  7. A comprehensive review of radon emanation measurements for mineral, rock, soil, mill tailing and fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2011-01-01

    To our knowledge, this paper is the most comprehensive review to cover most studies, published in the past three decades at least, of radon emanation measurements. The radon emanation fraction, a possibility of radon atoms generated in a material escaping from its grains, has been widely measured for a variety of materials. The aim of this review is to organize a huge number of such data accumulated. The representative values of the emanation fraction for minerals, rocks, soils, mill tailings and fly ashes were derived to be 0.03, 0.13, 0.20, 0.17 and 0.03, respectively. Current knowledge of the emanation processes was also summarized to discuss their affected factors. - Highlights: → Recent radon emanation measurements were thoroughly reviewed. → Averages of radon emanation fractions: 0.03 (mineral), 0.13 (rock), 0.20 (soil), 0.17 (mill tailing) and 0.03 (fly ash). → Grain-size effect was not significantly found for size larger than 1 μm. → Pore water generally enhances the emanation fraction by a factor of 5 or less. → Definition of 'radon emanation' should be shared among researchers.

  8. A study of radon emanation from waste rock at Northern Territory uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.; Gan, T.H.; Elliott, G.

    1983-01-01

    Field measurements were made of radon emanation rates from waste rock sources at Ranger, Nabarlek and Rum Jungle, three Northern Territory uranium mine sites. The preliminary mean emanation rate was approximately 50 Bq m - 2 s - 2 per percent ore grade

  9. Development of clinical application of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun [and others

    2000-04-01

    The aim is to develop the clinical radiation therapy techniques, which increase local control and cure rate of cancer. The contents were 1. technique of stereotactic radiotherapy 2. technique of intraoperative radiation therapy(IORT) 3. technique of fractionated radiotherapy 4. technique of 3D conformal therapy 5. chemoradiotherapy in lung cancer, rectal cancer and biliopancreatic cancer 6. network based information communication system of radiation oncology 7. animal studies for the best application of chemoradiotherapy and for elucidating mechanism of slide effect in radiotherapy. The results were 1. completion of quality assurance protocol, frame and mounting system 2. completion of applicator of IORT 3. clinical protocol of fractionated radiotherapy 4. clinical protocol of 3D conformal therapy for brain, head and neck, breast and lung cancer 5. completion of multimodality treatment protocol for lung, rectal and biliopancreatic cancer 6. completion of database system for patient information and simulation image 7. standardization of estimation for radiation induced pneumonitis in animal model. Future plans are (1) developed fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy system will be commercialized (2) developed applicator of brachytherapy for IORT will be commercialized (3) 3D conformal therapy will increase local control rate for brain tumor and decrease complications such as zerostomia after treatment for nasopharygeal cancer (4) training manpower and skills for randomized clinical trial (5) suggest possibility of clinical usefulness of oral 5-fluorouracil (6) to provide basic technique for electric chart (7) promote developing database system for image information (8) also in view of double edge sword effect of NO, it is possible to modify the NO production from irradiation to increase the tolerance to radiation.

  10. Development of clinical application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun

    2000-04-01

    The aim is to develop the clinical radiation therapy techniques, which increase local control and cure rate of cancer. The contents were 1. technique of stereotactic radiotherapy 2. technique of intraoperative radiation therapy(IORT) 3. technique of fractionated radiotherapy 4. technique of 3D conformal therapy 5. chemoradiotherapy in lung cancer, rectal cancer and biliopancreatic cancer 6. network based information communication system of radiation oncology 7. animal studies for the best application of chemoradiotherapy and for elucidating mechanism of slide effect in radiotherapy. The results were 1. completion of quality assurance protocol, frame and mounting system 2. completion of applicator of IORT 3. clinical protocol of fractionated radiotherapy 4. clinical protocol of 3D conformal therapy for brain, head and neck, breast and lung cancer 5. completion of multimodality treatment protocol for lung, rectal and biliopancreatic cancer 6. completion of database system for patient information and simulation image 7. standardization of estimation for radiation induced pneumonitis in animal model. Future plans are 1) developed fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy system will be commercialized 2) developed applicator of brachytherapy for IORT will be commercialized 3) 3D conformal therapy will increase local control rate for brain tumor and decrease complications such as zerostomia after treatment for nasopharygeal cancer 4) training manpower and skills for randomized clinical trial 5) suggest possibility of clinical usefulness of oral 5-fluorouracil 6) to provide basic technique for electric chart 7) promote developing database system for image information 8) also in view of double edge sword effect of NO, it is possible to modify the NO production from irradiation to increase the tolerance to radiation

  11. Effects of various tailings covers on radon gas emanation from pyritic uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, N.K.; Lim, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Radon emanation studies were carried out at an inactive pyritic uranium tailings site in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada, to evaluate the effects of various existing dry and wet covers on radon flux rates. Measurements were taken using activated charcoal cartridges for various surface covers consisting of bare, vegetated, acidophilic moss with high degree of water saturation, compacted crushed rock and gravel, and winter snow. The results showed that at a given site, there was no significant difference in radon emanation rates between various tailings covers and bare tailings. In particular, no increase In radon emanation rates from vegetated areas compared to bare tailings was observed. Radon emanation rates varied spatially depending on tailings grain size, porosity, moisture content and on pressure and water table variations. The emanation rates were higher for tailings with low water contents compared to those for wet and moss covered tailings

  12. Clinical applications of SPECT-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Biersack, Hans-Juergen (eds.) [University Hospital Bonn (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2014-06-01

    Covers the full spectrum of clinical applications of SPECT/CT in diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases. Includes chapters on the use of SPECT/CT for dosimetry and for therapy planning. Completely up to date. Many helpful illustrations. SPECT/CT cameras have considerably improved diagnostic accuracy in recent years. Such cameras allow direct correlation of anatomic and functional information, resulting in better localization and definition of scintigraphic findings. In addition to this anatomic referencing, CT coregistration provides superior quantification of radiotracer uptake based on the attenuation correction capabilities of CT. Useful applications of SPECT/CT have been identified not only in oncology but also in other specialties such as orthopedics and cardiology. This book covers the full spectrum of clinical applications of SPECT/CT in diagnosis and therapy planning of benign and malignant diseases. Opening chapters discuss the technology and physics of SPECT/CT and its use for dosimetry. The role of SPECT/CT in the imaging of a range of pathologic conditions is then addressed in detail. Applications covered include, among others, imaging of the thyroid, bone, and lungs, imaging of neuroendocrine tumors, cardiac scintigraphy, and sentinel node scintigraphy. Individual chapters are also devoted to therapy planning in selective internal radiation therapy of liver tumors and bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT. Readers will find this book to be an essential and up-to-date source of information on this invaluable hybrid imaging technique.

  13. Possibility of clinical applications of forest medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, we have conducted a series of studies of the effect of forest therapy on human health and established forest therapy as a new preventive strategy. We have found that forest therapy has many beneficial effects on human health. However, there is almost no study dealing with the possibility of clinical applications of forest therapy. In this review, we discuss the possibility of clinical applications of forest therapy from the following viewpoints: 1. Forest therapy can decrease blood pressure, heart rate, sympathetic nerve activity, and levels of stress hormones, such as urinary adrenaline and noradrenaline, and can increase parasympathetic nerve activity, suggesting its preventive effect on hypertension. 2. Forest therapy can also decreace the scores for anxiety, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion and increase the score for vigor in the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test, suggesting its preventive effect on mental depression. 3. Forest therapy can increase the activity and number of human natural killer (NK) cells and the intracellular levels of anticancer proteins, suggesting its preventive effect on cancers. 4. These findings suggest that forest therapy may have preventive effects on lifestyle-related diseases. However, the above preventive effects of forest therapy should be confirmed in clinical research.

  14. Clinical application of helical CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Huiliang; Zhu Xinjin; Liang Rujian; Liang Jianhao; Ou Weiqian; Wen Haomao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of 16-slice helical CT colonography in the diagnosis of colon tumor and polypus. Methods: 16-slice helical CT volumetric scanning was performed in 18 patients with colonic disease, including colonic tumor (n=16) and colonic polypus (n=2). 3D images, virtual endoscopy and multiplanar reformation were obtained in the AW4.1 workstation. CT appearances were compared with operation and fiberoptic colonoscopy. Results: Satisfied results were achieved from 18 patients, no difference found in results between CT colonography and operation in 16 patients with colonic tumor. Conclusion: 16-slice helical CT colonography is of great value in preoperative staging of colonic tumor and have a high value in clinical application. (authors)

  15. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  16. Bioethics of Clinical Applications of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Carlo

    2017-04-12

    The clinical applications of stem cells pose a multitude of problems, including safety, efficacy, information and consent, the right to unproven treatments, the "right to try", costs, access, sustainability, scientific scrupulousness, patents and regulatory aspects, to name but a few. This article does not address individual issues, but rather introduces and discusses some of the possible approaches to solving the problems. The first part compares the consequentialist and deontological approaches, offering an overview of "top-down" and "bottom-up" models and proposing the principles of personalism as applied in clinical settings. The second part of the article suggests practical frameworks for organising the ethical issues, focusing in particular on the medical indications, patient preferences, quality of life, and contextual features.

  17. Clinical applications of bovine colostrum therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Müller, Klaus; Sangild, Per Torp

    2014-01-01

    Bovine colostrum, the first milk that cows produce after parturition, contains high levels of growth factors and immunomodulatory components. Some healthy and diseased individuals may gain health benefits by consuming bovine colostrum as a food supplement. This review provides a systematic...... to populations, outcomes, and methodological quality, as judged by the Jadad assessment tool. Many studies used surrogate markers to study the effects of bovine colostrum. Studies suggesting clinical benefits of colostrum supplementation were generally of poor methodological quality, and results could...... not be confirmed by other investigators. Bovine colostrum may provide gastrointestinal and immunological benefits, but further studies are required before recommendations can be made for clinical application. Animal models may help researchers to better understand the mechanisms of bovine colostrum supplementation...

  18. Radon emanation of heterogeneous basin deposits in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Frédéric; Gajurel, Ananta Prasad; Perrier, Frédéric; Upreti, Bishal Nath; Richon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Effective radium-226 concentration ( EC Ra) has been measured in soil samples from seven horizontal and vertical profiles of terrace scarps in the northern part of Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The samples belong to the Thimi, Gokarna, and Tokha Formations, dated from 50 to 14 ky BP, and represent a diverse fluvio-deltaic sedimentary facies mainly consisting of gravelly to coarse sands, black, orange and brown clays. EC Ra was measured in the laboratory by radon-222 emanation. The samples ( n = 177) are placed in air-tight glass containers, from which, after an accumulation time varying from 3 to 18 days, the concentration of radon-222, radioactive decay product of radium-226 and radioactive gas with a half-life of 3.8 days, is measured using scintillation flasks. The EC Ra values from the seven different profiles of the terrace deposits vary from 0.4 to 43 Bq kg -1, with profile averages ranging from 12 ± 1 to 27 ± 2 Bq kg -1. The values have a remarkable consistency along a particular horizon of sediment layers, clearly demonstrating that these values can be used for long distance correlations of the sediment horizons. Widely separated sediment profiles, representing similar stratigraphic positions, exhibit consistent EC Ra values in corresponding stratigraphic sediment layers. EC Ra measurements therefore appear particularly useful for lithologic and stratigraphic discriminations. For comparison, EC Ra values of soils from different localities having various sources of origin were also obtained: 9.2 ± 0.4 Bq kg -1 in soils of Syabru-Bensi (Central Nepal), 23 ± 1 Bq kg -1 in red residual soils of the Bhattar-Trisuli Bazar terrace (North of Kathmandu), 17.1 ± 0.3 Bq kg -1 in red residual soils of terrace of Kalikasthan (North of Trisuli Bazar) and 10 ± 1 Bq kg -1 in red residual soils of a site near Nagarkot (East of Kathmandu). The knowledge of EC Ra values for these various soils is important for modelling radon exhalation at the ground surface, in particular

  19. Radon emanation of heterogeneous basin deposits in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girault, F.; Perrier, F.; Ananta Prasad Gajurel; Bishal Nath Upreti; Richon, P.

    2011-01-01

    Effective radium-226 concentration (EC Ra ) has been measured in soil samples from seven horizontal and vertical profiles of terrace scarps in the northern part of Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The samples belong to the Thimi, Gokarna, and Tokha Formations, dated from 50 to 14 ky BP, and represent a diverse fluvio-deltaic sedimentary facies mainly consisting of gravelly to coarse sands, black, orange and brown clays. EC Ra was measured in the laboratory by radon-222 emanation. The samples (n = 177) are placed in airtight glass containers, from which, after an accumulation time varying from 3 to 18 days, the concentration of radon-222, radioactive decay product of radium-226 and radioactive gas with a half-life of 3.8 days, is measured using scintillation flasks. The EC Ra values from the seven different profiles of the terrace deposits vary from 0.4 to 43 Bq kg -1 , with profile averages ranging from 12 ± 1 to 27 ± 2 Bq kg -1 . The values have a remarkable consistency along a particular horizon of sediment layers, clearly demonstrating that these values can be used for long distance correlations of the sediment horizons. Widely separated sediment profiles, representing similar stratigraphic positions, exhibit consistent EC Ra values in corresponding stratigraphic sediment layers. EC Ra measurements therefore appear particularly useful for lithologic and stratigraphic discriminations. For comparison, EC Ra values of soils from different localities having various sources of origin were also obtained: 9.2 ± 0.4 Bq kg -1 in soils of Syabru-Bensi (Central Nepal), 23 ± 1 Bq kg -1 in red residual soils of the Bhattar-Trisuli Bazar terrace (North of Kathmandu), 17.1 ± 0.3 Bq kg -1 in red residual soils of terrace of Kalikasthan (North of Trisuli Bazar) and 10 ± 1 Bq kg -1 in red residual soils of a site near Nagarkot (East of Kathmandu). The knowledge of EC Ra values for these various soils is important for modelling radon exhalation at the ground surface, in particular

  20. Clinical application of radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1978-01-01

    In clinical application of radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy, it is important to gain the maximal therapeutic benefit. At present we have no agents that improve the therapeutic ratio by enhancing the effect of radiation on the tumor cell selectively. Therefore, it is necessary to use combining some or all of following procedures: (1) the intraarterial infusion of the agents, (2) the selective localization by reason of the biological affinity of the agents, (3) the surgical removal of the non-sensitized tumor residue and (4) the selective sensitization of the tumor due to its shorter cell cycle. (author)

  1. Prostate specific antigen and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yang

    2000-01-01

    Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA), a serine proteases, is a glycoprotein consisting of a single polypeptide chain. Secreted exclusively by epithelial cells of the prostate gland, PSA is found largely in seminal plasma. Only a small amount of PSA can be found in normal serum. Serum PSA levels are found to be, considerably increased in prostate cancer patients. A number of studies on PSA have made great achievement on its biochemistry, analytical method and clinical application. PSA as one of the most important tumor marker, is used to help diagnosis and monitor the therapeutic efficacy of prostate cancer

  2. PET/MRI. Methodology and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrio, Ignasi [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona, Hospital Sant Pau (Spain). Dept. Medicina Nuclear; Ros, Pablo (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Case, Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Provides detailed information on the methodology and equipment of MRI-PET. Covers a wide range of clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Written by an international group of experts in MRI and PET. PET/MRI is an exciting novel diagnostic imaging modality that combines the precise anatomic and physiologic information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the molecular data obtained with positron emission tomography (PET). PET/MRI offers the promise of a simplified work flow, reduced radiation, whole-body imaging with superior soft tissue contrast, and time of flight physiologic information. It has been described as the pathway to molecular imaging in medicine. In compiling this textbook, the editors have brought together a truly international group of experts in MRI and PET. The book is divided into two parts. The first part covers methodology and equipment and comprises chapters on basic molecular medicine, development of specific contrast agents, MR attenuation and validation, quantitative MRI and PET motion correction, and technical implications for both MRI and PET. The second part of the book focuses on clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Imaging of major neoplasms, including lymphomas and tumors of the breast, prostate, and head and neck, is covered in individual chapters. Further chapters address functional and metabolic cardiovascular examinations and major central nervous system applications such as brain tumors and dementias. Risks, safety aspects, and healthcare costs and impacts are also discussed. This book will be of interest to all radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians who wish to learn more about the latest developments in this important emerging imaging modality and its applications.

  3. An assessment on the recycling opportunities of wastes emanating from scrap metal processing in Mauritius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauthoor, Sumayya, E-mail: sumayya.mauthoor@umail.uom.ac.mu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Mauritius, Réduit (Mauritius); Mohee, Romeela [Professor of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, National Research Chair in Solid Waste Management, Mauritius Research Council (Mauritius); Kowlesser, Prakash [Solid Waste/Beach Management Unit, Ministry of Local Government and Outer Islands (Mauritius)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Scrap metal processing wastes. • Areas of applications for slag, electric arc furnace dust, mill scale and wastewater sludge. • Waste generation factor of 349.3 kg per ton of steel produced. • Waste management model. - Abstract: This paper presents an assessment on the wastes namely slag, dust, mill scale and sludge resulting from scrap metal processing. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that there are various ways via which scrap metal processing wastes can be reused or recycled in other applications instead of simply diverting them to the landfill. These wastes are briefly described and an overview on the different areas of applications is presented. Based on the results obtained, the waste generation factor developed was 349.3 kg per ton of steel produced and it was reported that slag represents 72% of the total wastes emanating from the iron and steel industry in Mauritius. Finally the suitability of the different treatment and valorisation options in the context of Mauritius is examined.

  4. Teleultrasound: Historical Perspective and Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Cunha Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The health care of patients in rural or isolated areas is challenged by the scarcity of local resources, limited patient access to doctors and hospitals, and the lack of specialized professionals. This has led to a new concept in telemedicine: teleultrasonography (or teleultrasound, which permits ultrasonographic diagnoses to be performed remotely. Telemedicine and teleultrasonography are effective in providing diagnostic imaging services to these populations and reduce health care costs by decreasing the number and duration of hospitalizations and reducing unnecessary surgical procedures. This is a narrative review to present the potential clinical applications of teleultrasonography in clinical practice. The results indicate that although barriers persist for implementing teleultrasonography in a more universal and routine way, advances in telecommunications, Internet bandwidth, and the high resolution currently available for portable ultrasonography suggest teleultrasonography applications will continue to expand. Teleultrasound appears to be a valuable addition to remote medical care for isolated populations with limited access to tertiary healthcare facilities and also a useful tool for education and training.

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation of an Atrial Tachycardia Emanating From the Non-coronary Aortic Cusp Guided by an Electroanatomic Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin Bortone

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on an atrial tachycardia (AT, emanating from the non-coronary (NC aortic cusp, ablated with the aid of an electro-anatomical navigation system. In this setting, the electrocardiographic, electrophysiologic (EP, anatomical, and ablative considerations are discussed.Although NC aortic cusp focal ATs are an uncommon EP finding, their ablation is effective and safe, especially from an atrio-ventricular (AV conductive point of view. This origin of AT must be invoked and systematically disclosed when a peri-AV nodal AT origin is suspected, in order to avoid a potentially harmful energy application at the vicinity of the AV conductive tissue.

  6. Evaluation of Information Leakage via Electromagnetic Emanation and Effectiveness of Tempest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hidema

    It is well known that there is relationship between electromagnetic emanation and processing information in IT devices such as personal computers and smart cards. By analyzing such electromagnetic emanation, eavesdropper will be able to get some information, so it becomes a real threat of information security. In this paper, we show how to estimate amount of information that is leaked as electromagnetic emanation. We assume the space between the IT device and the receiver is a communication channel, and we define the amount of information leakage via electromagnetic emanations by its channel capacity. By some experimental results of Tempest, we show example estimations of amount of information leakage. Using the value of channel capacity, we can calculate the amount of information per pixel in the reconstructed image. And we evaluate the effectiveness of Tempest fonts generated by Gaussian method and its threshold of security.

  7. Radon Emanation from NORM-Contaminated Pipe Scale, Soil, and Sediment at Petroleum Industry Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rood, A.S.; White, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a study of radon (Rn) emanation from pipe scale and soil samples contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Samples were collected at petroleum production sites in Oklahoma, Michigan, Kentucky, and Illinois. For comparison, data are also presented from preliminary studies conducted at sites in Texas and Wyoming. All samples collected were analyzed for their Rn emanation fraction, defined as the fraction of 222Rn produced that enters the interconnected pore space within a medium contaminated with 226Ra before the 222Rn undergoes radioactive decay. This measure represents one of the important parameters that determine the overall Rn activity flux from any solid medium. The goal of this project was to determine whether Rn emanation from pipe scale and soil is similar to emanation from uranium mill tailings

  8. Emanation of 232U and its radioactive daughter products from respirable size particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuddihy, R.G.; Griffith, W.C.; Hoover, M.D.; Kanapilly, G.M.; Stalnaker, N.D.

    1978-01-01

    This study is to develop a model for the emanation of 232 U and its radioactive daughter products from particles of Th-U fuel material. The radiation doses to internal organs following inhalation of these particles can only be calculated by knowing the rate of emanation of the daughters from particles in the lung and the subsequent excretion or translocation of the daughters to other organs. The emanation mechanisms are recoil of the daughter nuclei from the particle during alpha decay of the parent, diffusion of inert gas daughters from the particle and dissolution of the particle itself in biological fluids. Experiments to evaluate these mechanisms will involve ThO 2 and UO 2 particles in the size range 0.1 to 1.0 μm MMAD uniformly labeled with 232 U. The influence of the material temperature history on emanation will be investigated by heat treating particles at 600 and 1400 0 C

  9. A theoretical and experimental EPFM study of cracks emanating from a hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekhoven, M.J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented of a combined theoretical and experimental study on the onset of crack extension in the EPFM regime for through cracks emanating from a circular hole in a plate under tensile load, with emphasis on the applicability of the J-concept for predicting such extensions. This configuration was selected both because of its general importance and as a first approximation for a nozzle-to-vessel geometry. Theoretical investigations consisted of elastic-plastic finite element computations both for 3-point bend specimens and for plate geometry. J values were calculated using the contour-integral definition for J, and by the method of virtual crack extension. The applicability of simplified analytical approximations for J was also investigated. COD data were derived from finite element computed displacements. Experimental investigations included Jsub(Ic) tests on a series of bend specimens and crack extensions tests on a series of cracked perforated plate models. For practical reasons aluminium 2024-T 351 was selected as a suitable model material within the aims of the study. Onset of crack extension was determined by the heat-tinting procedure throughout the experiments, in some cases supplemented by fractographic investigations. The various theoretical solutions and experimental observations were compared and a number of conclusions were drawn. (author)

  10. Mismatch negativity: clinical and other applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näätänen, R; Escera, C

    2000-01-01

    The perspectives of application of the mismatch negativity (MMN), generated by the brain's automatic response to change in auditory stimulation, are discussed. In light of the fact that the MMN (and its magnetic equivalent MMNm) currently provides the only objective measure of the accuracy of the central auditory function, these perspectives appear very promising. The MMN can be measured in the absence of attention and task requirements, which makes it particularly suitable for testing different clinical populations and infants. Furthermore, the MMN enables one to evaluate the accuracy of auditory discrimination separately for any acoustic feature, such as frequency, intensity and duration, and for learned categories, such as the phonemes of a particular language. In addition, by measuring the decay of the MMN amplitude as a function of the interstimulus interval, it is possible to estimate the duration of sensory (echoic) memory. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Clinical application of magnetic resonance coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Akihiko; Onoe, Teruyuki; Kodera, Akifumi; Ohtsuki, Tetsuya; Shiomi, Akio; Ida, Masaaki; Sawada, Takahisa

    1999-01-01

    We performed the magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) in the cases which underwent coronary angiography (CAG) and obtained images were compared. Lesion with significant constriction more than 75% on CAG were determined as abnormal findings on MRCA, however, lesions with about 50% constriction were as the normal findings. On the assessment of the re-constriction after PTCA, the changes in signal were found in about half of cases. This may come from the contribution of flexion lesions, the difficulty to assess moderate constriction after PTCA, etc. For the anomalous aortic origin of coronary artery, peripheral large vessels could be simultaneously imaged by MRCA and be also assessed among their clear spatial relationship. Although MRCA has some problems on the assessment for flexion or moderate constriction, these results suggested that MRCA is useful to clinical application as the non-invasive examination. (K.H.)

  12. Radiolabeled peptides: experimental and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.; Pallela, V.R.

    1998-01-01

    Radiolabeled receptor specific biomolecules hold unlimited potential in nuclear medicine. During the past few years much attention has been drawn to the development radiolabeled peptides for a variety of diagnostic applications, as well as for therapy of malignant tumors. Although only one peptide, In-111-DTPA-(D)-Phe 1 -octreotide, is available commercially for oncologic imaging, many more have been examined in humans with hematological disorders, and the early results appear to be promising. Impetus generated by these results have prompted investigators to label peptides with such radionuclides as Tc-99m, I-123, F-18, Cu-64, and Y-90. This review is intended to highlight the qualities of peptides, summarize the clinical results, and address some important issues associated with radiolabeling of highly potent peptides. While doing so, various methods of radiolabeling have been described, and their strengths and weaknesses have also been discussed. (author)

  13. Coleopteran Antimicrobial Peptides: Prospects for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monde Ntwasa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are activated in response to septic injury and have important roles in vertebrate and invertebrate immune systems. AMPs act directly against pathogens and have both wound healing and antitumor activities. Although coleopterans comprise the largest and most diverse order of eukaryotes and occupy an earlier branch than Drosophila in the holometabolous lineage of insects, their immune system has not been studied extensively. Initial research reports, however, indicate that coleopterans possess unique immune response mechanisms, and studies of these novel mechanisms may help to further elucidate innate immunity. Recently, the complete genome sequence of Tribolium was published, boosting research on coleopteran immunity and leading to the identification of Tribolium AMPs that are shared by Drosophila and mammals, as well as other AMPs that are unique. AMPs have potential applicability in the development of vaccines. Here, we review coleopteran AMPs, their potential impact on clinical medicine, and the molecular basis of immune defense.

  14. Variation of Radon Emanation in Workplaces as a Function of Room Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norafatin Khalid; Amran Abdul Majid; Aznan Fazli Ismail; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Redzuwan Yahaya; Izzaty Azani Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Modern life style requires people to spend most of their time indoors either in a house or in the workplace. Most modern buildings are made from soil based material which may consist of low concentration of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). It is known that one of the daughters of natural uranium is 226 Ra which eventually produce radon ( 222 Rn) gas. Recently, more evidence has linked lung cancer to exposure to high levels of radon and also to cigarette-smoking. Consequently, this research was conducted to study the radon emanation rates in different workplaces. The radon emanations in 27 rooms with three different dimension (54 m 3 , 210 m 3 and 351 m 3 ) and different building materials were determined for 96 hours using Sun Nuclear Radon Monitor. The radon emanations in the rooms studied were found to be in the range of 20.6 Bq m -3 hour -1 to 134.3 Bq m -3 hour -1 .The increase in humidity was found to significantly increase the radon emanation rates in the building, whereas the increase in temperature will result the decrease of radon emanation rates. In addition, the findings shows that the radon emanation rates in building were higher during the night until early in the morning which is in agreement with the findings on humidity and temperature factors. (author)

  15. Flat detectors and their clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahn, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic and interventional flat detector X-ray systems are penetrating the market in all application segments. First introduced in radiography and mammography, they have conquered cardiac and general angiography and are getting increasing attention in fluoroscopy. Two flat detector technologies prevail. The dominating method is based on an indirect X-ray conversion process, using cesium iodide scintillators. It offers considerable advantages in radiography, angiography and fluoroscopy. The other method employs a direct converter such as selenium which is particularly suitable for mammography. Both flat detector technologies are based on amorphous silicon active pixel matrices. Flat detectors facilitate the clinical workflow in radiographic rooms, foster improved image quality and provide the potential to reduce dose. This added value is based on their large dynamic range, their high sensitivity to X-rays and the instant availability of the image. Advanced image processing is instrumental in these improvements and expand the range of conventional diagnostic methods. In angiography and fluoroscopy the transition from image intensifiers to flat detectors is facilitated by ample advantages they offer, such as distortion-free images, excellent coarse contrast, large dynamic range and high X-ray sensitivity. These characteristics and their compatibility with strong magnetic fields are the basis for improved diagnostic methods and innovative interventional applications. (orig.)

  16. The human volatilome: volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, feces and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Costello, Ben de Lacy; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Pleil, Joachim; Ratcliffe, Norman; Risby, Terence

    2014-09-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with its roots in antiquity. Antoine Lavoisier discovered carbon dioxide in exhaled breath during the period 1777-1783, Wilhelm (Vilém) Petters discovered acetone in breath in 1857 and Johannes Müller reported the first quantitative measurements of acetone in 1898. A recent review reported 1765 volatile compounds appearing in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, saliva, human breast milk, blood and feces. For a large number of compounds, real-time analysis of exhaled breath or skin emanations has been performed, e.g., during exertion of effort on a stationary bicycle or during sleep. Volatile compounds in exhaled breath, which record historical exposure, are called the 'exposome'. Changes in biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations can be used to mirror metabolic or (patho)physiological processes in the whole body or blood concentrations of drugs (e.g. propofol) in clinical settings-even during artificial ventilation or during surgery. Also compounds released by bacterial strains like Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumonia could be very interesting. Methyl methacrylate (CAS 80-62-6), for example, was observed in the headspace of Streptococcus pneumonia in concentrations up to 1420 ppb. Fecal volatiles have been implicated in differentiating certain infectious bowel diseases such as Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Cholera. They have also been used to differentiate other non-infectious conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, alterations in urine volatiles have been used to detect urinary tract infections, bladder, prostate and other cancers. Peroxidation of lipids and other biomolecules by reactive oxygen species produce volatile compounds like ethane and 1-pentane. Noninvasive detection and therapeutic monitoring of oxidative stress would be highly desirable in autoimmunological, neurological, inflammatory diseases and cancer

  17. MR urography: examination techniques and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Adam, G.B.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2001-03-01

    Modern MR urography is performed on the basis of two different imaging strategies, which can be used complementarily to cover almost all aspects in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract diseases. The first technique utilizes unenhanced, heavily T2-weighted pulse sequences to obtain static-fluid images of the urinary tract. T2-weighted MR urograms have proved to be excellent in the visualization of the markedly dilated urinary tract, even if the renal excretory function is quiescent. Static-fluid MR urography is less suitable for imaging of disorders that occur in the nondilated collecting system. The second MR urography technique is analogous to the methodology of conventional intravenous pyelography and is, therefore, designated as excretory MR urography. For this purpose, a non-nephrotoxic gadolinium chelate is intravenously administered and after its renal excretion, the gadolinium-enhanced urine is visualized using fast T1-weighted gradient-echo sequences. The combination of gadolinium and low-dose furosemide (5-10 mg) is the key for achieving a uniform distribution of the contrast material inside the entire urinary tract and, secondly, to avoid high endoluminal gadolinium concentrations, which cause signal loss of the urine due to T2{sup *} effects. Gadolinium excretory MR urography allows to obtain high-quality images of both nondilated and obstructed urinary tracts in patients with normal or moderately impaired renal function. This article reviews the principles of T2- and T1-weighted MR urography in detail and informs how to use these techniques safely in potential clinical applications such as chronic urolithiasis, intrinsic and extrinsic tumor diseases, and congenital anomalies. Magnetic resonance urography performed in combination with standard MR imaging offers a potential to reduce the need for invasive retrograde pyelography. Although the economic aspect is still problematic, it is obvious that MR urography will continue to increase its role in

  18. Study of radon emanation from uranium mill tailings. Relations between radon emanating power and physicochemical properties of the material; Etude de l'emanation du radon a partir de residus de traitement de minerais d'uranium. Mise en evidence de relations entre le facteur d'emanation et les caracteristiques du materiau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, D

    1999-07-01

    The uranium extraction from ores leads to large amounts of mill tailings still containing radionuclides, such as thorium-230 and radium-226, which generate radon-222. Without protective action, radon exposition may be high enough to cause concern for health of populations living in the vicinity of an uranium mill tailings disposal. This exposition pathway has therefore to be taken into account in the radiological impact studies. The emanating power, i.e. the part of radon atoms which escape from the solid particles, is directly involved in the radon source term evaluation. It may be determined for a given material by laboratory measurements. Emanating powers from 0.08 to 0.33 have been obtained for mill tailings from Jouac (Limousin, France), at various moisture contents. In order to reduce the relations of dependence between some of the emanation parameters, more simple phases, kaolinite and polymeric resins, have been studied. Those experiments have led us to the selection of the mechanisms and the parameters to consider for the development of an emanation modelling. The whole of the results obtained point out the radon sorption, in various proportions depending on the materials. The moisture content influence on the emanation from materials containing fine particles have been confirmed: the emanation increases with this parameter until a continuous water film surrounding the particles have been formed, and then become constant. This 'water effect' occurs in a moisture content range, which depends on the material porosity. Elsewhere, the presence of amorphous phases may led to a high radon emanation. (author)

  19. Clinical application of PET in abdominal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon

    2002-01-01

    Clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is rapidly increasing for the detection and staging of cancer at whole-body studies performed with the glucose analogue tracer 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FG). Although FDG PET cannot match the anatomic resolution of conventional imaging techniques in the liver and the other abdominal organs, it is particularly useful for identification and characterization of the entire body simultaneously. FDG PET can show foci of metastatic disease that may not be apparent at conventional anatomic imaging and can aid in the characterizing of indeterminate soft-tissue masses. Most abdominal cancer requires surgical management. FGD PET can improve the selection of patients for surgical treatment and thereby reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with inappropriate surgery. FDG PET is also useful for the early detection of recurrence and the monitoring of therapeutic effect. The abdominal cancers, such as gastroesophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer and pancreatic cancer, are common malignancies in Korea, and PET is one of the most promising and useful methodologies for the management of abdominal cancers

  20. Whole body detectors for clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silar, J.

    The requirements are presented on the parameters of whole-body detectors suitable for clinical retention assays and the detector-patient configuration described. A whole-body detector was developed with an axial configuration of two pairs of large-volume scintillation detectors with NaI(Tl) crystals. One pair is placed under the bed, the other above the bed on which the patient is being examined. The axes of the crystals are located at a distance of 90 cm apart. The field of vision of the detector is described for the application of a 137 Cs source in the air and in a 24 cm layer of water. The positive characteristics of the detector are listed as being homogeneous sensitivity, energy resolution, long-term stability of signal pulse amplitude and average pulse rate in the integral mode. The results obtained show that the detector may be used to evaluate the level of contamination of persons by gamma emitters within the region of approximately 800 Bq to 74 MBq. The error in converting the number of signal pulses in the integral mode does not exceed 50% for gamma emitters with a photon energy above 30O keV. (J.B.)

  1. Feline genetics: clinical applications and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2010-11-01

    DNA testing for domestic cat diseases and appearance traits is a rapidly growing asset for veterinary medicine. Approximately 33 genes contain 50 mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. A variety of commercial laboratories can now perform cat genetic diagnostics, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. DNA is easily obtained from a cat via a buccal swab with a standard cotton bud or cytological brush, allowing DNA samples to be easily sent to any laboratory in the world. The DNA test results identify carriers of the traits, predict the incidence of traits from breeding programs, and influence medical prognoses and treatments. An overall goal of identifying these genetic mutations is the correction of the defect via gene therapies and designer drug therapies. Thus, genetic testing is an effective preventative medicine and a potential ultimate cure. However, genetic diagnostic tests may still be novel for many veterinary practitioners and their application in the clinical setting needs to have the same scrutiny as any other diagnostic procedure. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, potential sources of error for genetic testing, and the pros and cons of DNA results in veterinary medicine. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's internal genome. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detailed effects of particle size and surface area on 222Rn emanation of a phosphate rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haquin, Gustavo; Yungrais, Zohar; Ilzycer, Danielle; Zafrir, Hovav; Weisbrod, Noam

    2017-12-01

    The dependency of radon emanation on soil texture was investigated using the closed chamber method. Ground phosphate rock with a large specific surface area was analyzed, and the presence of inner pores, as well as a high degree of roughness and heterogeneity in the phosphate particles, was found. The average radon emanation of the dry phosphate was 0.145 ± 0.016. The emanation coefficient was highest (0.169 ± 0.019) for the smallest particles (210 μm). The reduction rate followed an inverse power law. As expected, a linear dependence between the emanation coefficient and the specific surface area was found, being lower than predicted for the large specific surface area. This was most likely due to an increase in the embedding effect of radon atoms in adjacent grains separated by micropores. Results indicate that knowledge of grain radium distribution is crucial to making accurate emanation predictions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radioactive emanations in fumarole gases of a series of volcanoes in Kamchatka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamchuk, Yu.V.; Firstov, P.P.

    1986-01-01

    The results of measurements of volume activity of emanations in fumarole gases of a series of acting volcanoes in Kamchatka during 1980-1983 are presented. The value of radon concentration in Avachinski volcano fumaroles equal ∼ 2 emanes did not change substantially as compared with the data for 1966. The highest activity (11.5±0.4 emanes) is registered in the Bezymyannyj volcano fumaroles. The emanation site survey of fumarole fields of the second cone of the Great fractured Tolbachinski eruption (GFTE) revealed the narrowly localized zone of radioactive emanation emissions. The radon emission in the above zone in 1981 constitutes (2.3 ± 0.4)x10 -6 Ci/s. Using this estimation, time (34-42 days) and average rate (2.5-3.0 m/h) of depth gases hoisting from magmatic focus are calculated as well as filtration rock characteristics in the narrowly localized near-mouth zone of the second cone of GCTE North outburst in the post eruptive period: permeability coefficient (0.1-4.3 darci), porosity (3-15 %) and mean value of cracks and pores opening (0.6-2.0)x10 -3 cm). The found characteristic values proved to be compared with parameters of crushing zone near epicenters of underground nuclear explosions

  4. Theoretical aspects of the Semkow fractal model in the radon emanation in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz G, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    The basic elements of the Fractals theory are developed. The physical basis of radon emission in solids are described briefly. It is obtained that the emanation power E R of mineral grains is scaled as r 0 D-3 (r 0 : grain radius). From a logarithmic graph E R versus grain size is deduced the fractal dimension of the emanation surface. The experimental data of different materials give an interval in the fractal dimension D between 2.1 and 2.8 (Author)

  5. Study of radon emanation variations in Morocco soil, correlations with seismic activities and atmospheric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukhal, H.; Cherkaoui, T.E.; Lferde, M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to verify the possibility of radon signal use in earthquake prediction, a study of radon emanation variation in soil was undertaken. Regular measurements have been carried out in five cities of Morocco ( Rabat, Tetouan, Ifrane, Khouribga, Berchid). The measuring method is based on the solid state nuclear track detectors technique. The good correlation between the different seismic activities and the variations of radon emanation rate in the five stations, have shown the interest of radon use in the earthquake prediction. 1 tab., 2 figs., 2 refs. (author)

  6. Stress-intensity factors for cracks emanating from the loaded fastener hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, V.; Hsu, Y. C.

    1977-01-01

    Using a series approach and the Muskhelishvili formulation in the two-dimensional theory of elasticity, stress-intensity factors K are derived for problems in which cracks emanate radially from the boundary of an arbitrarily loaded internal circular hole in an infinite plate. Numerical values are obtained for K(I) and K(II) for radial cracks from a hole containing a loose-fitted pin or rivet that is pulled perpendicular to the crack direction in the plane of the plate. The method is a general one for determining K for a set of symmetrically emanating radial cracks for a variety of concentrated or distributed tractions on the circular hole.

  7. Impulsive radon emanation on a creeping segment of the San Andreas fault, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.-Y.

    1984-01-01

    Radon emanation was continuously monitored for several months at two locations along a creeping segment of the San Andreas fault in central California. The recorded emanations showed several impulsive increases that lasted as much as five hours with amplitudes considerably larger than meteorologically induced diurnal variations. Some of the radon increases were accompanied or followed by earthquakes or fault-creep events. They were possibly the result of some sudden outbursts of relatively radon-rich ground gas, sometimes triggered by crustal deformation or vibration. (Auth.)

  8. Magnetoencephalography: From first steps to clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmoniemi, Risto

    2014-03-01

    -density imaging (Nieminen et al. Magn Reson Imaging, 2013). MEG has established itself as a standard tool in human neuroscience (Hamalainen et al., Rev Mod Phys 65:413-97, 1993). It is used increasingly in clinical applications such as in locating motor or language areas prior to brain surgery or in determining characteristics of epileptic activity of patients. Support from the Academy of Finland is acknowledged.

  9. Radiolabeled amino acids : Basic aspects and clinical applications in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, PL; Vaalburg, W; Pruim, J; de Vries, EGE; Langen, KJ; Piers, DA

    As the applications of metabolic imaging are expanding, radiolabeled amino acids may gain increased clinical interest, This review first describes the basic aspects of amino acid metabolism, then continues with basic aspects of radiolabeled amino acids, and finally describes clinical applications,

  10. [Advances of Molecular Diagnostic Techniques Application in Clinical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Bin-Wu

    2016-11-01

    Over the past 20 years,clinical molecular diagnostic technology has made rapid development,and became the most promising field in clinical laboratory medicine.In particular,with the development of genomics,clinical molecular diagnostic methods will reveal the nature of clinical diseases in a deeper level,thus guiding the clinical diagnosis and treatments.Many molecular diagnostic projects have been routinely applied in clinical works.This paper reviews the advances on application of clinical diagnostic techniques in infectious disease,tumor and genetic disorders,including nucleic acid amplification,biochip,next-generation sequencing,and automation molecular system,and so on.

  11. Smartphone Applications for the Clinical Oncologist in UK Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozati, Hamoun; Shah, Sonya Pratik; Shah, Neha

    2015-06-01

    A number of medical smartphone applications have been developed to assist clinical oncology specialists. Concerns have arisen that the information provided may not be under sufficient scrutiny. This study aims to analyse the current applications available for clinical oncologists in the UK. Applications aimed specifically at physician clinical oncologists were searched for on the major smartphone operating systems: Apple iOS; Google Android; Microsoft Windows OS; and Blackberry OS. All applications were installed and analysed. The applications were scrutinised to assess the following information: cost; whether the information included was referenced; when the information was last updated; and whether they made any reference to UK guidelines. A novel rating score based on these criteria was applied to each application. Fifty applications were identified: 24 for Apple's iOS; 23 for Google's Android; 2 for Blackberry OS; and 1 for Windows OS. The categories of applications available were: drug reference; journal reference; learning; clinical calculators; decision support; guidelines; and dictionaries. Journal reference and guideline applications scored highly on our rating system. Drug reference application costs were prohibitive. Learning tools were poorly referenced and not up-to-date. Smartphones provide easy access to information. There are numerous applications devoted to oncology physicians, many of which are free and contain referenced, up-to-date data. The cost and quality of drug reference and learning applications have significant scope for improvement. A regulatory body is needed to ensure the presence of peer-reviewed, validated applications to ensure their reliability.

  12. Functional MRI in children: clinical and research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, James L.; Holland, Scott K.

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI has become a critical research tool for evaluating brain function and developmental trajectories in children. Its clinical use in children is becoming more common. This presentation will review the basic underlying physiologic and technical aspects of fMRI, review research applications that have direct clinical relevance, and outline the current clinical uses of this technology. (orig.)

  13. Emanation thermal analysis study of the preparation of ruthenia-titania-based finely dispersed powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balek, V.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Zeleňák, V.; Večerníková, Eva; Šubrt, Jan; Haneda, H.; Bezdička, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 248, č. 1 (2002), s. 47-53 ISSN 0021-9797 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : emanation thermal analysis * TiO2 * RuO2 Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.466, year: 2002

  14. Theoretical concepts of fractal geometry semkow by radon emanation in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz G, H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work is to introduce the fractal geometry concept to the study of gaseous emanations in solids, specially with reference to radon emission in mineral grains. The basic elements of fractals theory are developed. A fractal is defined as an auto similar subassembly, which fractal dimension is greater than the topological dimension. Starting from this, and making a brief description of the physicals basis of radon emission in solids, a model between emanation power (E R ) and the ratio s/v (surface to volume), is founded. A Gaussian model is assumed for extent of recoil from alpha decay of Ra-226. Using the results of Pfeifer it is obtained that distribution of pore size is scaled like Br -D-1 , where D: fractal[dimension, B: constant and r: pore radius. After an adequate mathematics expansion, it is found that the expression for emanation power is scaled like r 0 D-3 (r 0 grain radius). We may concluded that if we have a logarithmic graph of E R vs size of grain we can deduce the fractal dimension of the emanation surface. The experimental data of different materials provides an interval into fractal dimension D , between 2.1 to 2.86. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab

  15. Emanation thermal analysis - Ready to fulfill the future needs of materials characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balek, Vladimír; Šubrt, Jan; Mitsuhashi, T.; Beckman, I. N.; Gyoryova, K.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 1 (2002), s. 15-35 ISSN 1418-2874 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : emanation thermal analysis * microstructure * sintering Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.598, year: 2002

  16. Dependence of radon emanation of red mud bauxite processing wastes on heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobbagy, V.; Somlai, J.; Kovacs, J.; Szeiler, G.; Kovacs, T.

    2009-01-01

    Natural radioactivity content, radon emanation and some other physical characteristics of red mud were investigated, so that to identify the possibilities of the safe utilization of such material as a building material additive. Based on the radionuclide concentration, red mud is not permitted to be used directly as a building material, however, mixing of a maximum 20% red mud and 80% clay meets the requirements. The main aim of this work was to determine the dependence of the emanation factor of red mud firing temperature and some other parameters. The relevant experimental procedure was carried out in two different ways: without any additional material, and by adding a known amount of sawdust (5-35 wt%) then firing the sample at a given temperature (100-1000 deg. C). The average emanation factor of the untreated dry red mud was estimated to 20%, which decreased to about 5% at a certain heat treatment. Even lower values were found using semi-reductive atmosphere. It has been concluded that all emanation measurements results correlate well to the firing temperature, the specific surface and the pore volume.

  17. Helium and radon-emanation bibliography. Selected references of geologic interest to uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkisson, C.W.; Reimer, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Selected references on helium and radon gas emanations and geologically related topics are given. There are 172 references primarily related to helium geology, 129 to radon geology, and 171 to helium and radon. These references are of geologic interest to uranium exploration

  18. Use of emanation thermal analysis in the microstructure diagnostics of aluminia coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balek, V.; Beneš, M.; Šubrt, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2008), s. 85-89 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : aluminia coatings * emanation thermal analysis * SEM Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.644, year: 2008

  19. Use of emanation thermal analysis to characterize thermal reactivity of brannerite mineral

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balek, V.; Vance, E.R.; Zeleňák, V.; Málek, Z.; Šubrt, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 1 (2007), s. 93-98 ISSN 1388-6150 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LA 292; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 879 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : brannerite * emanation thermal analysis Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2007

  20. Radium-226 content and emanating power of some timepieces manufactured in the years 1926--1951

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, A.T.; Huff, D.R.

    Thirty-two radium-dial timepieces manufactured in the years 1926 to 1951 by a company in Connecticut were individually sealed in small steel cans for determination of radium-C ( 214 Bi) activity by γ-ray spectroscopy. Each can was counted within a few hours after sealing and again 5 or 6 days later; from the two observations, radium-C activities at time of sealing (nonemanating radium content) and at equilibrium (total radium content) were calculated. The mean radium-226 content of 22 pocket watches was 348 nCi (range, 159 to 606), and the mean emanating power (1-nonemanating Ra/total Ra) was 0.175 (range, 0.09 to 0.33). The mean radium-226 content of 9 wrist watches was 150 nCi (range, 54 to 449), and the mean emanating power was 0.242 (range, 0.12 to 0.34). The radium-226 content of the one small clock was 633 nCi, and its emanating power was 0.15. The concentration of radon-222 in the air of a sealed room of dimensions 3 x 3 x 3 m would be increased by about 3 pCi/l if a watch containing 400 nCi of radium-226 with an emanating power of 0.2 were left in the room for a few weeks. (U.S.)

  1. Line x-ray source for diffraction enhanced imaging in clinical and industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    Mammography is one type of imaging modalities that uses a low-dose x-ray or other radiation sources for examination of breasts. It plays a central role in early detection of breast cancers. The material similarity of tumor-cell and health cell, breast implants surgery and other factors, make the breast cancers hard to visualize and detect. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), first proposed and investigated by D. Chapman is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, which produced images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. It shows dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging when applied to the same phantom. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also on the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. This imaging method may improve image quality of mammography, other medical applications, industrial radiography for non-destructive testing and x-ray computed tomography. However, the size, and cost, of a synchrotron source limits the application of the new modality to be applicable at clinical levels. This research investigates the feasibility of a designed line x-ray source to produce intensity compatible to synchrotron sources. It is composed of a 2-cm in length tungsten filament, installed on a carbon steel filament cup (backing plate), as the cathode and a stationary oxygen-free copper anode with molybdenum coating on the front surface serves as the target. Characteristic properties of the line x-ray source were computationally studied and the prototype was experimentally investigated. SIMIION code was used to computationally study the electron trajectories emanating from the filament towards the molybdenum target. A Faraday cup on the prototype device, proof-of-principle, was used to measure the distribution of electrons on the target, which compares favorably to computational results. The intensities of characteristic x-ray for molybdenum

  2. Clinical Application Of Serological Tests For Syphilis

    OpenAIRE

    Lawee, David

    1980-01-01

    This article differentiates and describes the serological tests for syphilis— antitreponemal antibody tests (TPI, FTA-ABS, TPHA), non-treponemal antigen test (VDRL)—their clinical and serological correlation, the responses to therapy and the biologically false positive syndrome.

  3. Status and headway of the clinical application of artificial ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors first reviewed the history of clinical application of artificial ligaments. Then, the status of clinical application of artificial ligaments was detailed. Some artificial ligaments possessed comparable efficacy to, and fewer postoperative complications than, allografts and autografts in ligament reconstruction, especially for the anterior cruciate ligament. At the end, the authors focused on the development of two types of artificial ligaments: polyethylene glycol terephthalate artificial ligaments and tissue-engineered ligaments. In conclusion, owing to the advancements in surgical techniques, materials processing, and weaving methods, clinical application of some artificial ligaments so far has demonstrated good outcomes and will become a trend in the future.

  4. [Application of Delphi method in traditional Chinese medicine clinical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Ying-fei; Mao, Jing-yuan

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, Delphi method has been widely applied in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical research. This article analyzed the present application situation of Delphi method in TCM clinical research, and discussed some problems presented in the choice of evaluation method, classification of observation indexes and selection of survey items. On the basis of present application of Delphi method, the author analyzed the method on questionnaire making, selection of experts, evaluation of observation indexes and selection of survey items. Furthermore, the author summarized the steps of application of Delphi method in TCM clinical research.

  5. Radiation repair models for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Roger G

    2018-02-28

    A number of newly emerging clinical techniques involve non-conventional patterns of radiation delivery which require an appreciation of the role played by radiation repair phenomena. This review outlines the main models of radiation repair, focussing on those which are of greatest clinical usefulness and which may be incorporated into biologically effective dose assessments. The need to account for the apparent "slowing-down" of repair rates observed in some normal tissues is also examined, along with a comparison of the relative merits of the formulations which can be used to account for such phenomena. Jack Fowler brought valuable insight to the understanding of radiation repair processes and this article includes reference to his important contributions in this area.

  6. Clinical and experimental applications of sodium phenylbutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2011-09-01

    Histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase are enzymes responsible for histone acetylation and deacetylation, respectively, in which the histones are acetylated and deacetylated on lysine residues in the N-terminal tail and on the surface of the nucleosome core. These processes are considered the most important epigenetic mechanisms for remodeling the chromatin structure and controlling the gene expression. Histone acetylation is associated with gene activation. Sodium phenylbutyrate is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that has been approved for treatement of urea cycle disorders and is under investigation in cancer, hemoglobinopathies, motor neuron diseases, and cystic fibrosis clinical trials. Due to its characteristics, not only of histone deacetylase inhibitor, but also of ammonia sink and chemical chaperone, the interest towards this molecule is growing worldwide. This review aims to update the current literature, involving the use of sodium phenylbutyrate in experimental studies and clinical trials.

  7. Ion beam therapy fundamentals, technology, clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The book provides a detailed, up-to-date account of the basics, the technology, and the clinical use of ion beams for radiation therapy. Theoretical background, technical components, and patient treatment schemes are delineated by the leading experts that helped to develop this field from a research niche to its current highly sophisticated and powerful clinical treatment level used to the benefit of cancer patients worldwide. Rather than being a side-by-side collection of articles, this book consists of related chapters. It is a common achievement by 76 experts from around the world. Their expertise reflects the diversity of the field with radiation therapy, medical and accelerator physics, radiobiology, computer science, engineering, and health economics. The book addresses a similarly broad audience ranging from professionals that need to know more about this novel treatment modality or consider to enter the field of ion beam therapy as a researcher. However, it is also written for the interested public an...

  8. Thymomodulin: biological properties and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouttab, N M; Prada, M; Cazzola, P

    1989-01-01

    Thymomodulin (Ellem Industria Farmaceutica s.p.a., Milan, Italy) is a calf thymus acid lysate derivative, composed of several peptides with a molecular weight range of 1-10 kD. Thymomodulin did not exhibit any mutagenic effect. Furthermore, thymomodulin used in animal studies showed no toxicity even when used at high concentrations. Of major significance are the observations in murine and human systems that thymomodulin remains active when administered orally. In vitro and in vivo administered thymomodulin was able to induce the maturation of T-lymphocytes. Additionally, studies in vitro showed that this thymic derivative can enhance the functions of mature T-lymphocytes with cascading effects on B-cell and macrophage functions. Extensive human clinical trials with thymomodulin showed that this agent can improve the clinical symptoms observed with various disease processes, including infections, allergies and malignancies, and can improve immunological functions during ageing.

  9. The preliminary clinical application of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Caifang; Yang Huilin; Tang Tianshi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the method of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and investigate its clinical efficacy. Methods: Twenty five cases (13 patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures, 8 cases with metastatic neoplasms and 4 cases with hemangiomas) were treated by the injection of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) under DSA fluoroscopic guidance. The time of follow-up ranged from 1-15 months. Results: The procedure was successful in all patients. Among 25 patients, 18 experienced with complete relief of pain, 6 with conspicuous relief, 1 with no significant change. Two patients showed transient symptom of radiculopathy and no clinical complication in others. Conclusions: PVP is a safe and feasible treatment for patients with hemangiomas as vertebral fractures caused by malignancies and osteoporosis

  10. [Clinical applications of thermoplasticized gutta percha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincente Gómez, A

    1990-01-01

    Step-Back technique or similar is the method of choice for the thermoplasticized gutta-percha. There are no significant differences in the apical seal produced by different filling techniques. There is a little volumetric reduction, similar than in the regular gutta-percha points, when cooling gutta-percha. The results of a clinical study about thermoplasticized gutta-percha with and without sealer are similar than in a control group filled by lateral condensation.

  11. CT appearances of emphysema and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinlian; Ma Daqing; Chen Budong; He Wen; Guan Yansheng; Zhang Yansong; Tang Hongqu; Wang Zhenguang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CT appearances of different types of emphysema and to determine the clinic value for differential diagnosis. Methods: Twenty-three specimens with emphysema selected from 33 autopsy specimens were included in this study. All specimens were inflated and fixed by Heitzman's method, then examined by spiral CT scan. The CT appearances of different types of emphysema in every specimen were analyzed. After the specimens were cut into 10 mm thickness slices, the CT- pathologic correlation was done. Fifteen clinical cases confirmed by pathology or clinical process were all performed spiral CT scan and analyzed, including emphysema-accompanying pneumonia 11 cases, emphysema-accompanying nodule 4 cases. Result: Centriacinar emphysema (CAE)can be seen in 21 of 23 specimens, pancinar emphysema(PAE) can be seen in 5 of 23 specimens, all coexisting with CAE. Distal acinar emphysema(DAE) can be seen in 19 of 23 specimens, irregular emphysema can be seen in 3 of 23 specimens. In all specimens, emphysema can be seen in bilateral lung fields, distributing similarly. Seventeen of 23 eases (17/23) showed no less than two types of emphysema. Fourteen cases of emphysema- accompanying pneumonia (clinic: 11 cases, specimen: 3 cases) showed 'pseudocavity' or 'pseudohoneycombing' (emphysema lesion that had not been filled in the consolidation). Four eases of emphysema-accompanying nodule showed 'pseudopleuralhollow' (wall of DAE or bulla connecting with nodule). Conclusion: The CT manifestations of emphysema, the characteristics of distribution and multi- type of emphysema coexisting can help differentiate cystic air space diseases. The characteristics of complications of emphysema, the 'pseudocavity', 'pseudohoneycombing' and 'pseudopleuralhollow', may be help for differential diagnosis. (authors)

  12. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to typ...

  13. Assessment of (222)Rn emanation from ore body and backfill tailings in low-grade underground uranium mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Devi Prasad; Sahu, Patitapaban; Panigrahi, Durga Charan; Jha, Vivekanand; Patnaik, R Lokeswara

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of (222)Rn emanation from the ore and backfill tailings in an underground uranium mine located at Jaduguda, India. The effects of surface area, porosity, (226)Ra and moisture contents on (222)Rn emanation rate were examined. The study revealed that the bulk porosity of backfill tailings is more than two orders of magnitude than that of the ore. The geometric mean radon emanation rates from the ore body and backfill tailings were found to be 10.01 × 10(-3) and 1.03 Bq m(-2) s(-1), respectively. Significant positive linear correlations between (222)Rn emanation rate and the (226)Ra content of ore and tailings were observed. For normalised (226)Ra content, the (222)Rn emanation rate from tailings was found to be 283 times higher than the ore due to higher bulk porosity and surface area. The relative radon emanation from the tailings with moisture fraction of 0.14 was found to be 2.4 times higher than the oven-dried tailings. The study suggested that the mill tailings used as a backfill material significantly contributes to radon emanation as compared to the ore body itself and the (226)Ra content and bulk porosity are the dominant factors for radon emanation into the mine atmosphere.

  14. The clinical application of linagliptin in Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao CQ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chu-qing Cao, Yu-fei Xiang, Zhi-guang Zhou Key Laboratory of Diabetes Immunology, Ministry of Education, National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases, Institute of Metabolism and Endocrinology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Asia has a growing diabetic population. Linagliptin, a member of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor class, is unique in its nonlinear pharmacokinetics with the characteristics of rapid attainment of steady state, little accumulation, predominantly nonrenal route of elimination, prolonged terminal half-life, and sustained inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 enzyme. No clinically relevant difference in pharmacokinetics was observed between Asians and non-Asians. The management of type 2 diabetes is increasingly challenging with the progression of disease, especially with the requirements of minimal hypoglycemia, weight gain, fluid retention, and other adverse effects. Linagliptin was efficacious and well-tolerated in Asian type 2 diabetes patients with or without renal or hepatic dysfunctions, comparable to that in Caucasians. This review will focus on the usage of linagliptin in clinical studies in Asians. Keywords: linagliptin, Asians, type 2 diabetes

  15. Clinical applications of sequencing take center stage

    OpenAIRE

    Glusman, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    A report on the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting, Marco Island, Florida, USA, February 20-23, 2013. This year's Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting reflected the current state of 'next generation' sequencing (NGS) technologies: significantly reduced competition and innovation, and a strong focus on standardization and application. Announcements of technological breakthroughs - a hallmark of previous AGBT meetings - were markedly absent, but existin...

  16. Biosensors and invasive monitoring in clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Córcoles, Emma P

    2013-01-01

    This volume examines the advances of invasive monitoring by means of biosensors and microdialysis. Physical and physiological parameters are commonly monitored in clinical settings using invasive techniques due to their positive outcome in patients’ diagnosis and treatment. Biochemical parameters, however, still rely on off-line measurements and require large pieces of equipment. Biosensing and sampling devices present excellent capabilities for their use in continuous monitoring of patients’ biochemical parameters. However, certain issues remain to be solved in order to ensure a more widespread use of these techniques in today’s medical practices.

  17. Clinical applications of selected binaural effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffsinger, D

    1982-01-01

    Examination was made of the behaviors exhibited on selected binaural tasks by 556 persons with diagnosed peripheral hearing loss or central nervous system damage. The tasks used included loudness balancing (LB), intracranial midline imaging (MI), masking level differences (MLD), and binaural beats (BB). The methods used were chosen for their clinical utility. Loudness balancing and midline imaging were of the most diagnostic value when hearing loss was present. Masking level differences were best at detecting pathology which did not produce hearing loss. None of the techniques were sensitive to cortical damage.

  18. Clinical applications of corneal confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Tavakoli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitra Tavakoli1, Parwez Hossain2, Rayaz A Malik11Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Manchester and Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK; 2University of Southampton, Southampton Eye Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UKAbstract: Corneal confocal microscopy is a novel clinical technique for the study of corneal cellular structure. It provides images which are comparable to in-vitro histochemical techniques delineating corneal epithelium, Bowman’s layer, stroma, Descemet’s membrane and the corneal endothelium. Because, corneal confocal microscopy is a non invasive technique for in vivo imaging of the living cornea it has huge clinical potential to investigate numerous corneal diseases. Thus far it has been used in the detection and management of pathologic and infectious conditions, corneal dystrophies and ecstasies, monitoring contact lens induced corneal changes and for pre and post surgical evaluation (PRK, LASIK and LASEK, flap evaluations and Radial Keratotomy, and penetrating keratoplasty. Most recently it has been used as a surrogate for peripheral nerve damage in a variety of peripheral neuropathies and may have potential in acting as a surrogate marker for endothelial abnormalities.Keywords: corneal confocal microscopy, cornea, infective keratitis, corneal dystrophy, neuropathy

  19. Clinically Applicable Inhibitors Impacting Genome Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Anu; Garcia-Moreno, Juan F; Brown, James A L; Bourke, Emer

    2018-05-13

    Advances in technology have facilitated the molecular profiling (genomic and transcriptomic) of tumours, and has led to improved stratification of patients and the individualisation of treatment regimes. To fully realize the potential of truly personalised treatment options, we need targeted therapies that precisely disrupt the compensatory pathways identified by profiling which allow tumours to survive or gain resistance to treatments. Here, we discuss recent advances in novel therapies that impact the genome (chromosomes and chromatin), pathways targeted and the stage of the pathways targeted. The current state of research will be discussed, with a focus on compounds that have advanced into trials (clinical and pre-clinical). We will discuss inhibitors of specific DNA damage responses and other genome stability pathways, including those in development, which are likely to synergistically combine with current therapeutic options. Tumour profiling data, combined with the knowledge of new treatments that affect the regulation of essential tumour signalling pathways, is revealing fundamental insights into cancer progression and resistance mechanisms. This is the forefront of the next evolution of advanced oncology medicine that will ultimately lead to improved survival and may, one day, result in many cancers becoming chronic conditions, rather than fatal diseases.

  20. Clinical applications of choroidal imaging technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Chhablani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroid supplies the major blood supply to the eye, especially the outer retinal structures. Its understanding has significantly improved with the advent of advanced imaging modalities such as enhanced depth imaging technique and the newer swept source optical coherence tomography. Recent literature reports the findings of choroidal changes, quantitative as well as qualitative, in various chorioretinal disorders. This review article describes applications of choroidal imaging in the management of common diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, high myopia, central serous chorioretinopathy, chorioretinal inflammatory diseases, and tumors. This article briefly discusses future directions in choroidal imaging including angiography.

  1. Frontiers of biostatistical methods and applications in clinical oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Crowley, John

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art of biostatistical methods and their applications in clinical oncology. Many methodologies established today in biostatistics have been brought about through its applications to the design and analysis of oncology clinical studies. This field of oncology, now in the midst of evolution owing to rapid advances in biotechnologies and cancer genomics, is becoming one of the most promising disease fields in the shift toward personalized medicine. Modern developments of diagnosis and therapeutics of cancer have also been continuously fueled by recent progress in establishing the infrastructure for conducting more complex, large-scale clinical trials and observational studies. The field of cancer clinical studies therefore will continue to provide many new statistical challenges that warrant further progress in the methodology and practice of biostatistics. This book provides a systematic coverage of various stages of cancer clinical studies. Topics from modern cancer clinical ...

  2. Alanine dosimetry for clinical applications. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.

    2006-05-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Therapy level alanine dosimetry at the UK Nationational Physical Laboratory, alanine as a precision validation tool for reference dosimetry, composition of alanine pellet dosimeters, the angular dependence of the alanine ESR spectrum, the CIAE alanine dosimeter for radiotherapy level, a correction for temporal evolution effects in alanine dosimetry, next-generation services foe e-traceability to ionization radiation national standards, establishing e-traceability to HIST high-dose measurement standards, alanine dosimetry of dose delivery from clinical accelerators, the e-scan alanine dosimeter reader, alanine dosimetry at ISS, verification of the integral delivered dose for IMRT treatment in the head and neck region with ESR/alanine dosimetry, alanine dosimetry in helical tomotherapy beams, ESR dosimetry research and development at the University of Palermo, lithium formate as a low-dose EPR radiation dosimeter, sensitivity enhancement of alanine/EPR dosimetry. (HSI)

  3. Clinical Applications for EPs in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Matthew A; Kaplan, Peter W

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients, evoked potential (EP) testing is an important tool for measuring neurologic function, signal transmission, and secondary processing of sensory information in real time. Evoked potential measures conduction along the peripheral and central sensory pathways with longer-latency potentials representing more complex thalamocortical and intracortical processing. In critically ill patients with limited neurologic exams, EP provides a window into brain function and the potential for recovery of consciousness. The most common EP modalities in clinical use in the intensive care unit include somatosensory evoked potentials, brainstem auditory EPs, and cortical event-related potentials. The primary indications for EP in critically ill patients are prognostication in anoxic-ischemic or traumatic coma, monitoring for neurologic improvement or decline, and confirmation of brain death. Somatosensory evoked potentials had become an important prognostic tool for coma recovery, especially in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. In this population, the bilateral absence of cortical somatosensory evoked potentials has nearly 100% specificity for death or persistent vegetative state. Historically, EP has been regarded as a negative prognostic test, that is, the absence of cortical potentials is associated with poor outcomes while the presence cortical potentials are prognostically indeterminate. In recent studies, the presence of middle-latency and long-latency potentials as well as the amplitude of cortical potentials is more specific for good outcomes. Event-related potentials, particularly mismatch negativity of complex auditory patterns, is emerging as an important positive prognostic test in patients under comatose. Multimodality predictive algorithms that combine somatosensory evoked potentials, event-related potentials, and clinical and radiographic factors are gaining favor for coma prognostication.

  4. Piezoelectric surgery in implant dentistry: clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Masako Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pizosurgery has therapeutic characteristics in osteotomies, such as extremely precise, selective and millimetric cuts and a clear operating field. Piezoelectricity uses ultrasonic frequencies, which cause the points specially designed for osteotomy to vibrate. The points of the instrument oscillate, allowing effective osteotomy with minimal or no injury to the adjacent soft tissues, membranes and nerve tissues. This article presents the various applications of piezoelectricity in oral implant surgery such as: removal of autogenous bone; bone window during elevation of the sinus membrane and removal of fractured implants. The cavitational effect caused by the vibration of the point and the spray of physiological solution, provided a field free of bleeding and easy to visualize. The study showed that the piezoelectric surgery is a new surgical procedurethat presents advantages for bone cutting in many situations in implant dentistry, with great advantages in comparison with conventional instrumentation. Operating time is longer when compared with that of conventional cutters.

  5. Genetics of ischemic stroke: future clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael M

    2006-11-01

    Ischemic stroke has long been thought to have a genetic component that is independent of conventional vascular risk factors. It has been estimated that over one half of stroke risk is determined by inherited genes. However, until recently, strong evidence of genetic influence on ischemic stroke has been subject to criticism because the risk factors for stroke are also inherited and because previous studies suffered from limitations imposed by this highly heterogeneous neurological disorder. Recent advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of specific genetic loci that impart susceptibility to ischemic stroke. We review the studies of these genes and discuss the future potential applications of genetic markers on the management of ischemic stroke patients.

  6. Radiolabelled blood elements techniques and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past few years, in nuclear medicine, the diagnostic applications of radiolabelled blood elements in general, and of radiolabelled white blood cells in particular, have become increasingly popular. This is primarily due to the introduction of lipid soluble 111 In-oxine as an agent, which not only is an excellent and a reliable tracer for blood cells but also enables the investigators to study the in vivo cell kinetics and map the localization of labelled cells by external gamma scintigraphy. The tracer has the modest half life of 67 hours and decays with the emission of two gamma photons (173 and 247 keV) in high abundance. This technique has provided a powerful tool to study the in vivo cell kinetics in health and localize abnormal lesions in diseases which invoke intense focal cellular concentration

  7. Radiolabelled blood elements techniques and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, M L

    1993-12-31

    Over the past few years, in nuclear medicine, the diagnostic applications of radiolabelled blood elements in general, and of radiolabelled white blood cells in particular, have become increasingly popular. This is primarily due to the introduction of lipid soluble {sup 111}In-oxine as an agent, which not only is an excellent and a reliable tracer for blood cells but also enables the investigators to study the in vivo cell kinetics and map the localization of labelled cells by external gamma scintigraphy. The tracer has the modest half life of 67 hours and decays with the emission of two gamma photons (173 and 247 keV) in high abundance. This technique has provided a powerful tool to study the in vivo cell kinetics in health and localize abnormal lesions in diseases which invoke intense focal cellular concentration 5 figs, 2 tabs

  8. The progress and clinical application of radionuclide neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenxin; He Pinyu

    2008-01-01

    Development of site-specific brain radiopharmaceuticals extends the the functional neuroimaging applications in the diagnosis and monitoring treatments of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. This article highlights recent advances and clinical applications of the functional neuroimaging in Parkinson disease, epilepsy, dementia, substance abuse, psychiatric disorders and brain functional research. (authors)

  9. The use of emanation thermal analysis for the evaluation of Fe2O3 reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1977-01-01

    The ETA method using 220 Rn was applied in studying the ZnO - Fe 2 O 3 reaction. The higher is the temperature at which the maximum is reached on the emanation vs. temperature curve of the mixture, the lower the indicated reactivity of Fe 2 O 3 used (temperature range 790 to 980 degC). The degree of order in the lattice of the ZnFe 2 O 4 formed may be judged from the emanation power at 850 to 1000 degC. Fe 2 O 3 pre-annealed to 1100 degC shows the lowest reactivity with ZnO. Associated with it is a lower capacity of forming the perfect ZnFe 2 O 4 structure. The ETA results are compared with those obtained by DTA and by dilatometry. (M.K.)

  10. Noninvasive analysis of volatile biomarkers in human emanations for health and early disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Saito, Keita; Kato, Hisato; Masuda, Kazufumi

    2013-06-01

    Early disease diagnosis is crucial for human healthcare and successful therapy. Since any changes in homeostatic balance can alter human emanations, the components of breath exhalations and skin emissions may be diagnostic biomarkers for various diseases and metabolic disorders. Since hundreds of endogenous and exogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from the human body, analysis of these VOCs may be a noninvasive, painless, and easy diagnostic tool. Sampling and preconcentration by sorbent tubes/traps and solid-phase microextraction, in combination with GC or GC-MS, are usually used to analyze VOCs. In addition, GC-MS-olfactometry is useful for simultaneous analysis of odorants and odor quality. Direct MS techniques are also useful for the online real-time detection of VOCs. This review focuses on recent developments in sampling and analysis of volatile biomarkers in human odors and/or emanations, and discusses future use of VOC analysis.

  11. A charcoal canister survey of radon emanation at the rehabilitated uranium mine site at Nabarlek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, J.R.; Patterson, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a recent survey of radon emanation measurements from the rehabilitated Nabarlek mine site. It was mined out in 1979, decommissioned in 1995 and provided a good test bed for assessment of rehabilitation in terms of radon flux attenuation. Measurements have been made with charcoal canisters. Studies to measure the radon-220 flux by observing Tl-208 progeny of thoron the effectiveness of trial covers and meteorological considerations will be reported

  12. A charcoal canister survey of radon emanation at the rehabilitated uranium mine site at Nabarlek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, J R; Patterson, J R [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a recent survey of radon emanation measurements from the rehabilitated Nabarlek mine site. It was mined out in 1979, decommissioned in 1995 and provided a good test bed for assessment of rehabilitation in terms of radon flux attenuation. Measurements have been made with charcoal canisters. Studies to measure the radon-220 flux by observing Tl-208 progeny of thoron the effectiveness of trial covers and meteorological considerations will be reported.

  13. Clinical Applications of Reverse Panoramic Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha S Reddy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The essence of oral and maxil-lofacial radiology is not only to be an important tool in the diagnostic assessment of dental patients but also to equip the clinician with the ability to interpret images of certain maxillocraniofacial structures of importance to dental, medical and surgical practices. Although combinations of several conven-tional x-ray projections can be adequate in a number of clinical situations, radiographic assessment of certain craniofacial structures some-times needs to be facilitated by other imaging modalities. A not-so-recent development called reverse panoramic radiography may be a useful adjuvant to such a situation, at least in the near future. It is essentially a technique where the patient is placed backwards in the panoramic machine in a reverse position in such a way that x-ray beam is directed through the patient’s face and the exit beam then passes through the patient’s head on the opposite side where it is captured on the receptor. The following manuscript is an attempt to throw light on this technique and the impact it may have on dental, medical and surgical practices. The advantages and disadvantages of reverse panoramic radiography and it’s comparison to conventional panoramic radiographs and other skull views are also dis-cussed.

  14. Clinical applications of cortisol measurements in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Vincent L; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C

    2015-10-01

    Cortisol measurements in blood, saliva and urine are frequently used to examine the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in clinical practice and in research. However, cortisol levels are subject to variations due to acute stress, the diurnal rhythm and pulsatile secretion. Cortisol measurements in body fluids are not always a reflection of long-term cortisol exposure. The analysis of cortisol in scalp hair is a relatively novel method to measure cumulative cortisol exposure over months up to years. Over the past years, hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) have been examined in association with a large number of somatic and mental health conditions. HCC can be used to evaluate disturbances of the HPA axis, including Cushing's syndrome, and to evaluate hydrocortisone treatment. Using HCC, retrospective timelines of cortisol exposure can be created which can be of value in diagnosing cyclic hypercortisolism. HCC have also been shown to increase with psychological stressors, including major life events, as well as physical stressors, such as endurance exercise and shift work. Initial studies show that HCC may be increased in depression, but decreased in general anxiety disorder. In posttraumatic stress disorder, changes in HCC seem to be dependent on the type of traumatic experience and the time since traumatization. Increased hair cortisol is consistently linked to obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Potentially, HCC could form a future marker for cardiovascular risk stratification, as well as serve as a treatment target. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  15. Clinical application of cerebral dynamic perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLand, F.H.

    1975-01-01

    Radionuclide cerebral perfusion studies are assuming a far greater importance in the detection and differential diagnosis of cerebral lesions. Perfusion studies not only contribute to the differential diagnosis of lesions but in certain cases are the preferred methods by which more accurate clinical interpretations can be made. The characteristic blood flow of arterio-venous malformations readily differentiates this lesion from neoplasms. The decreased perfusion or absent perfusion observed in cerebral infarctions is diagnostic without concurrent evidence from static images. Changes in rates and direction of blood flow contribute fundamental information to the status of stenosis and vascular occlusion and, in addition, offer valuable information on the competency and routes of collateral circulation. The degree of cerebral perfusion after cerebral vascular accidents appears to be directly related to patient recovery, particularly muscular function. Cerebral perfusion adds a new parameter in the diagnosis of subdural haematomas and concussion and in the differentiation of obscuring radioactivity from superficial trauma. Although pictorial displays of perfusion blood flow will offer information in most cerebral vascular problems, the addition of computer analysis better defines temporal relationships of regional blood flow, quantitative changes in flow and the detection of the more subtle increases or decreases in cerebral blood flow. The status of radionuclide cerebral perfusion studies has taken on an importance making it the primary modality for the diagnosis of cerebral lesions. (author)

  16. Phrenic Nerve Stimulation: Technology and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdunnur, Shane V; Kim, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation is a technique used to reanimate the diaphragm of patients with central nervous system etiologies of respiratory insufficiency. Current clinical indications include congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, spinal cord injury above C4, brain stem injury, and idiopathic severe sleep apnea. Presurgical evaluation ensures proper patient selection by validating the intact circuit from the phrenic nerve through alveolar oxygenation. The procedure involves placing leads around the phrenic nerves bilaterally and attaching these leads to radio receivers in a subcutaneous pocket. The rate and amplitude of the current is adjusted via an external radio transmitter. After implantation, each patient progresses through a conditioning phase that strengthens the diaphragm and progressively provides independence from the mechanical ventilator. Studies indicate that patients and families experience an improved quality of life and are satisfied with the results. Phrenic nerve stimulation provides a safe and effective means for reanimating the diaphragm for certain patients with respiratory insufficiency, providing independence from mechanical ventilation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Radon emanation chamber: High sensitivity measurements for the SuperNEMO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulé, B. [Université Bordeaux 1, Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, Chemin du Solarium, Le Haut-Vigneau, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Collaboration: SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    Radon is a well-known source of background in ββ0ν experiments due to the high Q{sub β} value of one of its daughter nucleus, {sup 214}Bi. The SuperNEMO collaboration requires a maximum radon contamination of 0.1 mBq/m{sup 3} inside its next-generation double beta decay detector. To reach such a low activity, a drastic screening process has been set for the selection of the detector's materials. In addition to a good radiopurity, a low emanation rate is required. To test this parameter, a Radon Emanation Setup is running at CENBG. It consists in a large emanation chamber connected to an electrostatic detector. By measuring large samples and having a low background level, this setup reaches a sensitivity of a few μ Bq. m{sup −2}. d{sup −1} and is able to qualify materials used in the construction of the SuperNEMO detector.

  18. Measurement of radon emanation of drainage layer media by liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turtiainen, T.

    2009-01-01

    Slab-on-ground is a typical base floor construction type in Finland. The drainage layer between the slab and soil is a layer of sand, gravel or crushed stone. This layer has a minimum thickness of 200 mm and is sometimes even 600 mm thick, and thus may be a significant contributor to indoor air radon. In order to investigate radon emanation from the drainage layer material, a simple laboratory test was developed. Many organic solvents have high Ostwald coefficients for radon, i.e., the ratio of the volume of gas absorbed to the volume of the absorbing liquid, which enables direct absorption of radon into a liquid scintillation cocktail. Here, we first present equations relating to the processes of gas transfer in emanation measurement by direct absorption into liquid scintillation cocktails. In order to optimize the method for emanation measurement, four liquid scintillation cocktails were assessed for their ability to absorb radon from air. A simple apparatus consisting of a closed glass container holding an open liquid scintillation vial was designed and the diffusion/absorption rate and Ostwald coefficient were determined for a selected cocktail. Finally, a simple test was developed based on this work. (author)

  19. Study of 222Rn emanation levels present in naturally occurring radioactive materials - NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Marcia Valeria F.E. Sa; Crispim, Verginia Reis; Lima, Clara Teresa S.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM), contaminating oil and gas installations, is usual in the petroleum industry, and can be severe enough to expose the workers to elevated levels of radiation. The segregation of contaminated residues although necessary, is still a problem without a satisfactory solution. Currently, the most practical and economic option for discarding this material is to stock it in areas of the installation with controlled access. Certain equipment used in the petroleum industry has scale and sludge that could be associated to important levels of radioactivity. Typically, the scales are mixtures of carbonate and sulphate minerals, such as barite (BaSO 4 ), that easily incorporate 226 Ra and 228 Ra in their structures. The objective of this work was to measure the emanations of the radon present in NORM samples, via diffusion chambers containing a nuclear track detector (CR-39). The images of α particle tracks emanated by 222 Rn registered on CR-39 were observed with a Nikon E400 optic microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix digital camera and then stored in a database, to later count the tracks using the computational program, Image Pro plus. Since the number of those tracks resulted proportional to the emanation rate of 222 Rn this methodology allowed the comparison of contamination levels in analyzed samples. (author)

  20. Study of radon-222 emanation from sedimentary phosphates and corresponding phosphogypsum. Temperature effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boujrhal, F.M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of temperature on radon emanation from the phosphates of various regions of Morocco, from corresponding phosphogypsum and from teeth fossilized of Youssoufia phosphate. The interpretation of obtained results was carried out by the physicochemical studies with various approaches; the X-ray diffraction analysis, the measurement of the specific surface area and porousness, the determination of the oxygen content by activation analysis with 14 MeV neutron. The thermal treatment between 100 and 900 degrees C conducted to the following points: - An increase of the radon degassing rate, which is first slow when the temperature increase from 20 to 600 degrees C, then becomes brutal beyond this temperature. We attributed this variation to the training effect ( transport effect ) of radon by the others gas susceptible to be released with thermal effect, particularly the CO sub 2. - The reduction of the radon emanation power versus temperature. We could demonstrate a linear correlation between the power emanation and the specific surface area. 122 refs., 102 figs., 20 tabs. (Author)

  1. Study of radon exhalation and emanation rates from fly ash samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj Kumari; Jain, Ravinder; Kant, Krishan; Gupta, Nitin; Garg, Maneesha; Yadav, Mani Kant

    2013-01-01

    Fly ash, a by-product of burnt coal is technologically important material being used for manufacturing of bricks, sheets, cement, land filling etc. The increased interest in measuring radon exhalation and emanation rates in fly ash samples is due to its health hazards and environmental pollution and the same have been measured to assess the radiological impact of radon emanated from fly ash disposal sites. Samples of fly ash from different thermal power stations in northern India and National Council for Cement and Building Materials (NCB) were collected and analysed for the measurements. For the measurement, alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors were used. Gamma spectrometry and can technique was used for the measurements. The experimental data show that fly ash samples emanate radon in significant amount and this consequently, may result in increased radon levels in dwellings built by using fly ash bricks and excessive radiation exposure to workers residing in the surroundings of fly ash dumping sites. (author)

  2. Connection between radon emanation and some structural properties of coal-slag as building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somlai, J.; Jobbagy, V.; Somlai, K.; Kovacs, J.; Nemeth, Cs.; Kovacs, T.

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclides of natural origin may accumulate in different industrial waste materials and by-products. The use of coal bottom ash or coal-slag as building material in Hungary is widespread. Because of the elevated radium content of coal-slag, high radon concentration has been detected in buildings containing coal-slag as building material. In two towns, where buildings contain coal-slag with almost the same radium concentration, the indoor radon concentrations have been found to differ significantly. In order to investigate the cause of the difference in the emanation coefficients, slag samples from the two locations were examined for grain-size distribution, density, pore volume, and specific surface. The applied methods were: gamma spectrometry for the radium concentration of the samples; Lucas cell method for the radon emanation; nitrogen absorption-desorption isotherms analyzed using the BET theory and mercury poremeter for the specific surface and pore volume. It was found that the great difference in the emanation coefficients (1.35±0.13% and 14.3±0.92%) of the coal-slag samples is primarily influenced by the pore volume and the specific surface

  3. Study of the emanation levels of 222Rn present in Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials - NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Marcia Valeria de Fatima da Encarnacao Sa

    2009-01-01

    The presence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM), contaminating oil and gas facilities, is a common fact in the petroleum industry, and can be severe enough to expose the workers to elevated levels of radiation. Thus, contaminated residues need to be segregated but, this is still a problem without a satisfactory solution. Currently, the most practical and economic option for discarding this material is to stock it in areas of the facility whose access is controlled. Certain equipment used in the petroleum industry has scale and sludge that could be associated to important levels of radioactivity. Typically, the scale is a mixture of carbonate and sulphate minerals, such as barite (BaSO 4 ), that easily incorporates 226 Ra and 228 Ra in its structures. The objective of this work was to measure the emanations of the radon present in these NORM samples, via diffusion chambers containing a nuclear track detector (CR-39). The images of particle alpha tracks emanated by 222 Rn registered on CR-39 were observed with a Nikon E400 optic microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix digital camera and then stored in a database, to later count the tracks using the computational program, Image Pro plus. Being that the emanation rate of 222 Rn was proportional to the number of these tracks the methodology permitted the comparison of contamination levels of the analyzed samples. (author)

  4. Clinical applications of SONIALVISION 100 digital diagnostic table system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiomi, Takeshi; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Iinuma, Masao; Takemoto, Hajime; Tanaka, Shuji

    2003-01-01

    This report refers to the clinical applications of our newly developed SONIALVISION 100 fully digitalized X-ray diagnostic table system. The main design concept of the SONIALVISION 100 system is the improvement of workflow in various clinical fields. The development of digital imaging technologies has come to allow fully digitalized X-ray diagnostic table systems to be widely utilized in various clinical applications, including interventional radiology (IVR) and examinations using contrast medium. This report mainly refers to the clinical applications of the Shimadzu SONIALVISION 100 digitalized X-ray diagnostic table system, also presenting some typical image data demonstrating the high efficiency, made available through the use of this new system, in high-speed spot imaging and digital tomography. (author)

  5. U.S. laboratory and field trials of metofluthrin (SumiOne) emanators for reducing mosquito biting outdoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, J R; Shono, Y; Iwasaki, T; Ishiwatari, T; Spero, N; Benzon, G

    2007-03-01

    Metofluthrin (SumiOne is a novel, vapor-active pyrethroid that is highly effective against mosquitoes. Laboratory and field trials were conducted in the United States to evaluate the mosquito repellent activity of metofluthrin-treated paper substrates ("emanators"). Initial studies were conducted to evaluate the field performance of 900-cm(2) paper fan emanators impregnated with 160 mg metofluthrin, where Aedes canadensis was the predominant species. Emanators reduced landing rates on human volunteers by between 85% and 100% compared to untreated controls. Subsequent tests with 4,000-cm(2) paper strip emanators impregnated with 200 mg metofluthrin were conducted in a wind tunnel as a precursor to conducting field trials using human bait and laboratory-reared Aedes aegypti. Paper strips, which were pre-aged in a fume hood to determine duration of protection, gave 89-91% reductions in landing rates compared with controls. Similar reductions in biting activity were also noted. Following these tests, field trials to assess effect on landing rates were conducted with emanators positioned 1.22 m on either side of volunteers protected from biting by Tyvek suits, with pre- and posttreatment counts being made. In Florida (predominantly Ochlerotatus spp.) 91-95% reductions were noted 10-30 min after emanators were deployed, while in Washington State (mostly Aedes vexans) 95-97% reductions were observed. These results demonstrate that metofluthrin-treated emanators are highly effective at repelling mosquitoes.

  6. Infant intersubjectivity: research, theory, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevarthen, C; Aitken, K J

    2001-01-01

    rhythms of infant behaviour, especially in communication, and neonates' extraordinary capacities for reactive and evocative imitation. The correct functioning of this integrated neural motivating system is found to be essential to the development of both the infant's purposeful consciousness and his or her ability to cooperate with other persons' actions and interests, and to learn from them. The relevance of infants' inherent intersubjectivity to major child mental health issues is highlighted by examining selected areas of clinical concern. We review recent findings on postnatal depression, prematurity, autism, ADHD, specific language impairments, and central auditory processing deficits, and comment on the efficacy of interventions that aim to support intrinsic motives for intersubjective communication when these are not developing normally.

  7. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan [Medizinisch Radiologisces Institut (MRI), Zuerich (Switzerland); Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2013-11-01

    State of the art overview of fMRI. Covers technical issues, methods of statistical analysis, and the full range of clinical applications. Revised and expanded edition including discussion of novel aspects of analysis and further important applications. Includes comparisons with other brain mapping techniques and discussion of potential combined uses. Since functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa, fMRI has evolved into an invaluable clinical tool for routine brain imaging, and there have been substantial improvements in both the imaging technique itself and the associated statistical analysis. This book provides a state of the art overview of fMRI and its use in clinical practice. Experts in the field share their knowledge and explain how to overcome diverse potential technical barriers and problems. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, the full range of clinical applications, methods of statistical analysis, and special issues in various clinical fields. Comparisons are made with other brain mapping techniques, such as DTI, PET, TMS, EEG, and MEG, and their combined use with fMRI is also discussed. Since the first edition, original chapters have been updated and new chapters added, covering both novel aspects of analysis and further important clinical applications.

  8. Platelet Rich Plasma- mechanism of action and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina N. Cozma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a blood-derived fraction containing high level of platelets, a high concentration of leukocytes and growth factors. PRP therapy has been growing as a viable treatment alternative for a number of clinical applications and has a potential benefit for use in wound healing. Nowadays platelet rich plasma is used in stimulating wound healing in skin and soft tissue ulcerations, accelerating wound healing in diabetic patients and facilitating bone proliferation in orthopedic and trauma surgery. It has also applications in maxillofacial surgery, spinal surgery, plastic and esthetic surgery, heart surgery and burns. This review of the literature shows a limited number of studies realized on humans that sustain PRP applications in orthopedic and plastic surgery. As the use of PRP increases, more properly structured clinical studies are necessary to confirm the results and to establish clearly the techniques of preparing, the conditions and the clinical indications of applying this therapy.

  9. Mineralized Collagen: Rationale, Current Status, and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ye Qiu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of the rationale for the in vitro mineralization process, preparation methods, and clinical applications of mineralized collagen. The rationale for natural mineralized collagen and the related mineralization process has been investigated for decades. Based on the understanding of natural mineralized collagen and its formation process, many attempts have been made to prepare biomimetic materials that resemble natural mineralized collagen in both composition and structure. To date, a number of bone substitute materials have been developed based on the principles of mineralized collagen, and some of them have been commercialized and approved by regulatory agencies. The clinical outcomes of mineralized collagen are of significance to advance the evaluation and improvement of related medical device products. Some representative clinical cases have been reported, and there are more clinical applications and long-term follow-ups that currently being performed by many research groups.

  10. Clinical application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    ZHU Chuanlong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is the common outcome of chronic liver diseases of various causes. At present, liver biopsy is the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis, but it has limitations and is invasive, which leads to the development of noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis. The article mainly introduces the technology and application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis from the aspects of clinical manifestation, serology, and radiology. It has pointed out the clinical value o...

  11. Application and Exploration of Big Data Mining in Clinical Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Guo, Shu-Li; Han, Li-Na; Li, Tie-Ling

    2016-03-20

    To review theories and technologies of big data mining and their application in clinical medicine. Literatures published in English or Chinese regarding theories and technologies of big data mining and the concrete applications of data mining technology in clinical medicine were obtained from PubMed and Chinese Hospital Knowledge Database from 1975 to 2015. Original articles regarding big data mining theory/technology and big data mining's application in the medical field were selected. This review characterized the basic theories and technologies of big data mining including fuzzy theory, rough set theory, cloud theory, Dempster-Shafer theory, artificial neural network, genetic algorithm, inductive learning theory, Bayesian network, decision tree, pattern recognition, high-performance computing, and statistical analysis. The application of big data mining in clinical medicine was analyzed in the fields of disease risk assessment, clinical decision support, prediction of disease development, guidance of rational use of drugs, medical management, and evidence-based medicine. Big data mining has the potential to play an important role in clinical medicine.

  12. Application and Exploration of Big Data Mining in Clinical Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Guo, Shu-Li; Han, Li-Na; Li, Tie-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review theories and technologies of big data mining and their application in clinical medicine. Data Sources: Literatures published in English or Chinese regarding theories and technologies of big data mining and the concrete applications of data mining technology in clinical medicine were obtained from PubMed and Chinese Hospital Knowledge Database from 1975 to 2015. Study Selection: Original articles regarding big data mining theory/technology and big data mining's application in the medical field were selected. Results: This review characterized the basic theories and technologies of big data mining including fuzzy theory, rough set theory, cloud theory, Dempster–Shafer theory, artificial neural network, genetic algorithm, inductive learning theory, Bayesian network, decision tree, pattern recognition, high-performance computing, and statistical analysis. The application of big data mining in clinical medicine was analyzed in the fields of disease risk assessment, clinical decision support, prediction of disease development, guidance of rational use of drugs, medical management, and evidence-based medicine. Conclusion: Big data mining has the potential to play an important role in clinical medicine. PMID:26960378

  13. Practical clinical applications of the computer in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.R.; Erickson, J.J.; Patton, J.A.; Jones, J.P.; Lagan, J.E.; Rollo, F.D.

    1978-01-01

    The impact of the computer on the practice of nuclear medicine has been felt primarily in the area of rapid dynamic studies. At this time it is difficult to find a clinic which routinely performs computer processing of static images. The general purpose digital computer is a sophisticated and flexible instrument. The number of applications for which one can use the computer to augment data acquisition, analysis, or display is essentially unlimited. In this light, the purpose of this exhibit is not to describe all possible applications of the computer in nuclear medicine but rather to illustrate those applications which have generally been accepted as practical in the routine clinical environment. Specifically, we have chosen examples of computer augmented cardiac, and renal function studies as well as examples of relative organ blood flow studies. In addition, a short description of basic computer components and terminology along with a few examples of non-imaging applications are presented

  14. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin. (U.K.)

  15. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, R.J. (Glasgow Western Infirmary (UK))

    1984-09-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin.

  16. Clinical application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Chuanlong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis is the common outcome of chronic liver diseases of various causes. At present, liver biopsy is the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis, but it has limitations and is invasive, which leads to the development of noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis. The article mainly introduces the technology and application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis from the aspects of clinical manifestation, serology, and radiology. It has pointed out the clinical value of these noninvasive diagnosis techniques, and it discusses the progress in clinical research and its limitations for noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis.

  17. STUDY ABOUT CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BRAIN ATLAS IN PAEDIATRICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fanhang; LIU Cuiping; RENG Xiaoping; JIANG Lian

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To explore clinical application on brain atlas in paediatrics. Methode: Brain atlas was applied in diagnosis and treatment of paediatric diseases and its clinical value was discussed in 1990 ~2001. The manifestation of these diseases in brain atlas were analysed and the manifestation of CT of 67 cases and manifestations of EEG of 37 cases with that of BA were compared. Results The changes of cerebral electrical activity of these diseases were reflected objectively and showed directly in BA. Conclusion Brain atlas not only can point out quality of disease but also define position of disease. Therefore, brain atlas has important clinical value in paediatrics.

  18. [Latest development in mass spectrometry for clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, Masahiko

    2013-09-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has seen enormous growth in special clinical chemistry laboratories. It significantly increases the analytic potential in clinical chemistry, especially in the field of low molecular weight biomarker analysis. This review summarizes the state of the art in mass spectrometry and related techniques for clinical application with a main focus on recent developments in LC-MS. Current trends in ionization techniques, automated online sample preparation techniques coupled with LC-MS, and ion mobility spectrometry are discussed. Emerging mass spectrometric approaches complementary to LC-MS are discussed as well.

  19. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren

    2003-01-01

    During the last decade use of dendritic cells (DC) has moved from murine and in vitro studies to clinical trials as adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. Here they function as delivery vehicles for exogenous tumor antigens, promoting an efficient antigen presentation. The development of protocols...... for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity...

  20. Radon emanation rate in construction materials and various design of house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Asyraf Osman

    2012-01-01

    Indoor air quality are important factors that need to be addressed because it can affect the health and comfort of occupants in it. Among the major sources of indoor air pollution are radon gas. Radiological risk due to radon gas due to its intake into the human body is the major cause of lung cancer. This study was conducted to determine the radon emanation rate that occurs naturally in the building materials and its contains in several kinds of house. Construction materials studied are sand, gravel, cement and bricks. Terrace houses, double storey terrace houses, flats and wooden houses were studied in radon emanation in various types of houses. Radon emanation rates in building materials in a variety of home and the home measured using Sun Nuclear radon monitor (model 1029) and radon gas concentrations are measured in units of Bq m -3 . From the results, granites have recorded the highest radon emissions that is 2.67 μBq kg -1 s -1 , followed by sand with 2.53 μBq kg -1 s -1 . The bricks emission rate were recorded was 2.47 μBq kg -1 s -1 , while Cement recorded the lowest with only 1.46 μBq kg -1 s -1 . In study of radon in a variety of home, the results showed that the single storey terrace houses recorded the highest reading of 25.67 ± 4.96 Bq m -3 . First level Double storey terrace houses recorded 23.24 ± 3.72 Bq m -3 compared with a second level of two-storey terrace house which recorded emission rate of 16.43 ± 2.53 Bq m -3 . Flats were recorded the second lowest with only 13.07 ± 2.38 Bq m -3 . House that recorded the lowest reading was wooden houses that recorded 9.53 ± 1.96 Bq m -3 . (author)

  1. [The clinical application of three dimention printing technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, S Z; Fang, C H

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the three-dimentional(3D)printing technology is gradually applied in medicine.Now, the 3D printing has already play an important role in medical education, surgical device development, prosthesis implantation and so on.There are still many challenges and difficulties in the clinical overall application of 3D printing for some time, but it also contains a huge application prospect.Once with appropriate applications of this technology, it will be a major breakthrough in iatrical history once more.

  2. Radon and thoron emanation measurements and the effect of ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriveau, G.W.; Harbottle, G.

    1980-01-01

    In the past, corrections for annual dose rate calculations have used a qualitative approach to the effect of ground water saturation and radon and thoron loss. An example is presented of how this correction can now be precisely determined using natural gamma-ray activities to determine the amount of emanation from ceramic sherds and soil, both in a dry state and saturated with ground water. The experimental data also provide information concerning disequilibria in 234 Th and 226 Ra regions of the decay series. Additionally, approximate values of uranium and thorium concentrations (sufficiently accurate for authenticity work) are provided

  3. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT: advantages and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.

    2006-01-01

    The application of hybrid SPECT cameras in Nuclear Medicine follows the revolutionary introduction of PET/CT. This review focuses on the advantages and limitations of SPECT/CT in its various clinical indications. It appears that SPECT/CT will be a clear factor of progress for Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  4. Family Environments and Adaptation: A Clinically Applicable Typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Andrew G.; Moos, Rudolf H.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a typology of family environments based on multidimensional assessments of a representative sample of community families. Identified seven family types. Found family differences in environmental stressors and coping resources affected family members' levels of functioning. Discusses clinical and research applications of the typology.…

  5. An overview of PET/MR, focused on clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio Antonio; Masch, William Roger; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Sahani, Dushyant Vasudeo; Gee, Michael Stanley; Menezes, Leon; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Gervais, Debra; Rosen, Bruce Robert

    2017-02-01

    Hybrid PET/MR scanners are innovative imaging devices that simultaneously or sequentially acquire and fuse anatomical and functional data from magnetic resonance (MR) with metabolic information from positron emission tomography (PET) (Delso et al. in J Nucl Med 52:1914-1922, 2011; Zaidi et al. in Phys Med Biol 56:3091-3106, 2011). Hybrid PET/MR scanners have the potential to greatly impact not only on medical research but also, and more importantly, on patient management. Although their clinical applications are still under investigation, the increased worldwide availability of PET/MR scanners, and the growing published literature are important determinants in their rising utilization for primarily clinical applications. In this manuscript, we provide a summary of the physical features of PET/MR, including its limitations, which are most relevant to clinical PET/MR implementation and to interpretation. Thereafter, we discuss the most important current and emergent clinical applications of such hybrid technology in the abdomen and pelvis, both in the field of oncologic and non-oncologic imaging, and we provide, when possible, a comparison with clinically consolidated imaging techniques, like for example PET/CT.

  6. Immunoregulation by Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Biological Aspects and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Manrreza, Marta E.; Montesinos, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiation into mesenchymal lineages and that can be isolated from various tissues and easily cultivated in vitro. Currently, MSCs are of considerable interest because of the biological characteristics that confer high potential applicability in the clinical treatment of many diseases. Specifically, because of their high immunoregulatory capacity, MSCs are used as tools in cellular therapies for clinical protocols involving immune system alterations. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge about the capacity of MSCs for the immunoregulation of immunocompetent cells and emphasize the effects of MSCs on T cells, principal effectors of the immune response, and the immunosuppressive effects mediated by the secretion of soluble factors and membrane molecules. We also describe the mechanisms of MSC immunoregulatory modulation and the participation of MSCs as immune response regulators in several autoimmune diseases, and we emphasize the clinical application in graft versus host disease (GVHD). PMID:25961059

  7. Clinical Applications of 3D Printing: Primer for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, David H; Trace, Anthony Paul; Ali, Sayed; Hodgdon, Taryn; Zygmont, Matthew E; DeBenedectis, Carolynn M; Smith, Stacy E; Richardson, Michael L; Patel, Midhir J; Decker, Summer J; Lenchik, Leon

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing refers to a number of manufacturing technologies that create physical models from digital information. Radiology is poised to advance the application of 3D printing in health care because our specialty has an established history of acquiring and managing the digital information needed to create such models. The 3D Printing Task Force of the Radiology Research Alliance presents a review of the clinical applications of this burgeoning technology, with a focus on the opportunities for radiology. Topics include uses for treatment planning, medical education, and procedural simulation, as well as patient education. Challenges for creating custom implantable devices including financial and regulatory processes for clinical application are reviewed. Precedent procedures that may translate to this new technology are discussed. The task force identifies research opportunities needed to document the value of 3D printing as it relates to patient care. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Single cell analysis contemporary research and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cossarizza, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the current state of the art in single cell analysis, an area that involves many fields of science – from clinical hematology, functional analysis and drug screening, to platelet and microparticle analysis, marine biology and fundamental cancer research. This book brings together an eclectic group of current applications, all of which have a significant impact on our current state of knowledge. The authors of these chapters are all pioneering researchers in the field of single cell analysis. The book will not only appeal to those readers more focused on clinical applications, but also those interested in highly technical aspects of the technologies. All of the technologies identified utilize unique applications of photon detection systems.

  9. Clinical applications of robotic technology in vascular and endovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, George A; Riga, Celia V; Mayer, Erik K; Cheshire, Nicholas J W; Bicknell, Colin D

    2011-02-01

    Emerging robotic technologies are increasingly being used by surgical disciplines to facilitate and improve performance of minimally invasive surgery. Robot-assisted intervention has recently been introduced into the field of vascular surgery to potentially enhance laparoscopic vascular and endovascular capabilities. The objective of this study was to review the current status of clinical robotic applications in vascular surgery. A systematic literature search was performed in order to identify all published clinical studies related to robotic implementation in vascular intervention. Web-based search engines were searched using the keywords "surgical robotics," "robotic surgery," "robotics," "computer assisted surgery," and "vascular surgery" or "endovascular" for articles published between January 1990 and November 2009. An evaluation and critical overview of these studies is reported. In addition, an analysis and discussion of supporting evidence for robotic computer-enhanced telemanipulation systems in relation to their applications in laparoscopic vascular and endovascular surgery was undertaken. Seventeen articles reporting on clinical applications of robotics in laparoscopic vascular and endovascular surgery were detected. They were either case reports or retrospective patient series and prospective studies reporting laparoscopic vascular and endovascular treatments for patients using robotic technology. Minimal comparative clinical evidence to evaluate the advantages of robot-assisted vascular procedures was identified. Robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic procedures have been reported by several studies with satisfactory results. Furthermore, the use of robotic technology as a sole modality for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and expansion of its applications to splenic and renal artery aneurysm reconstruction have been described. Robotically steerable endovascular catheter systems have potential advantages over conventional catheterization systems

  10. Divine Emanation As Cosmic Origin: Ibn Sînâ and His Critics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamsuddin Arif

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The question of cosmic beginning has always attracted considerable attention from serious thinkers past and present. Among many contesting theories that have emerged, that of emanation was appropriated by Muslim philosophers like Ibn Sînâ in order to reconcile the Aristotelian doctrine of the eternity of matter with the teaching of al-Qur’ân on the One Creator-God. According to this theory, the universe, which comprises a multitude of  entities, is generated from a transcendent Being, the One, that is unitary, through the medium of  a hierarchy of  immaterial substances. While the ultimate source is undiminished, the beings which are emanated are progressively less perfect as they are further removed from the first principle. The process is conceived as being atemporal and often compared to the efflux of light from a luminous body, or to water flowing from a spring. This metaphysical theory has enabled Ibn Sînâ to solve the vexed problem: given an eternally existing world and one eternally existing God, how can the two necessarily co-exist without having the perfect, simple unity of God destroyed by contact with the multiplicity of material things? The following essay delineates and evaluates both Ibn Sînâ’s arguments as well as the counter-arguments of  his critics.

  11. The use of geochemical barriers for reducing contaminants emanating from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groffman, A.R.; Longmire, P.; Mukhopadhyay, B.; Downs, W.

    1991-01-01

    A problem facing the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Project is the contamination of local ground water by leachate emanating form the tailings piles. These fluids have a low pH and contain heavy metals and trace elements such as arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, selenium, and uranium. In order to meet ground water standards low hydraulic conductivity covers are installed over the tailings embankment. in some cases it may be necessary to install a geochemical barrier down gradient from the tailings embankment in order to remove the hazardous constituents. By using geochemical barriers to reduce undesirable species form a contaminant plume, fluids emanating form beneath a repository can in effect be scrubbed before entering the water table. Materials containing adsorbing clays, iron oxyhydroxides and zeolites, and reducing materials such as coal and peat, are being used effectively to attenuate contaminants form uranium mill tailings. Experiments to directly determine attenuation capacities of selected buffer/adsorption materials were conducted in the laboratory. Batch leach tests were conducted in lieu of column tests when the hydraulic conductivity of materials was too low to use in columns and shales

  12. Calibration of a degassing-emanation line for 222Rn determination in seawater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Luciana Aparecida

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to calibrate a degassing-emanation line and to determine 222 Rn and 226 Ra activity concentrations in seawater samples. This methodology, also called Lucas method, consists in the extraction of radon (originally dissolved in seawater), collection of the gas in a liquid nitrogen cold trap and transfer from the trap to an alpha scintillation cell. Total extraction efficiencies of the 4 degassing-emanation systems were determined by measuring 226 Ra reference solutions. The efficiencies obtained for these 4 systems varied from 21 % to 62%. This work also presents preliminary results of a study carried out in a series of small embayements of Ubatuba, Sao Paulo State-Brazil: Flamengo Bay, Fortaleza Bay, Mar Virado Bay and Ubatuba Bay. Concentration of Rn in excess varied from 0,011 to 0,317 Bq/L for Flamengo Bay, from 0,009 to 0,130 Bq/L for Fortaleza Bay, from 0,018 to 0,050 Bq/L for Mar Virado Bay and from 0,004 to 0,120 Bq/L for Ubatuba Bay. The results obtained for the concentration of 222 Rn in excess in a transect at Flamengo Bay varied from 0,002 to 0,036 Bq/L. Higher concentrations of 222 Rn in excess were obtained in Flamengo Bay, Fortaleza Bay and Ubatuba bay. It was also observed that the concentration of 222 Rn in excess increases with depth, as expected. (author)

  13. Use of generator substitution to determine the real attenuation of informative signals in the compromising emanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Golyakhov

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A determination of real attenuation of information signal's radiation on a way from the source to a possible location of intelligence devices is considered to be the most difficult operation while assessing information security against leakage of electromagnetic emanation. In this context the problem of automation of this kind of measurement is of great interest. It takes considerable effort and time to measure the attenuation by existing automated systems. That is why the measurements are generally taken within the limited range of frequencies only. Along with that, a spectre of a single information impulse has a leaf-structure and is solid on every frequency leaf. So electromagnetic field intensity attenuation measurement carried on the some preselected frequencies is not able to represent the complete attenuation characteristics. The measurements of attenuation in the whole informative signal spectre within the given frequency range requires a few thousand measurements, which makes the current method ineffective and time consuming. The relevant specialized automatized measurement systems of security verification has active protection system noise measurement mode, which can be used to measure the real attenuation. In this article a rather exact method of real attenuation of informative signal of video subsystem of electron-ray tube monitor measurement is described and confirmed in experiment. The measurements were made using specialized automatized system “Sigurd” and video subsystem informative signal noise generator. The described method allows a significant reduction of  the time needed for specialized investigations of security verification on electromagnetic emanation.

  14. Radon emanation and soil moisture effects on airborne gamma-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasty, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed to explain variations in airborne gamma-ray measurements over a calibration range near Ottawa, Ontario. The gamma-ray flux from potassium and the thorium decay series showed an expected decrease with increasing soil moisture. However, the gamma-ray flux from the uranium decay series was highest in the spring when the ground was water-saturated and even covered with snow. These results are explained through the build-up of radon and its associated gamma-ray-emitting decay products in the clay soil of the calibration range with increasing soil moisture. Similar results were found from airborne measurements over other clay soils. However, measurements over sandy soils showed that the count rates from all three radio elements increased with decreasing soil moisture. This difference between soil types was attributed to the lower radon emanation of the more coarse-grained sandy soils compared to finer-grained clay soils. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that any estimate of the natural gamma-ray field caused by radium in the ground must take into consideration the radon emanation coefficient of the soil. The radon diffusion coefficient of the soil must also be considered since it depends strongly on soil moisture. This has significant implications for the assessment of outdoor radiation doses using laboratory analyses of soil samples and the use of ground and airborne gamma-ray measurements for radon potential mapping

  15. Generalizing the Arden Syntax to a Common Clinical Application Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    The Arden Syntax for Medical Logic Systems is a standard for encoding and sharing knowledge in the form of Medical Logic Modules (MLMs). Although the Arden Syntax has been designed to meet the requirements of data-driven clinical event monitoring, multiple studies suggest that its language constructs may be suitable for use outside the intended application area and even as a common clinical application language. Such a broader context, however, requires to reconsider some language features. The purpose of this paper is to outline the related modifications on the basis of a generalized Arden Syntax version. The implemented prototype provides multiple adjustments to the standard, such as an option to use programming language constructs without the frame-like MLM structure, a JSON compliant data type system, a means to use MLMs as user-defined functions, and native support of restful web services with integrated data mapping. This study does not aim to promote an actually new language, but a more generic version of the proven Arden Syntax standard. Such an easy-to-understand domain-specific language for common clinical applications might cover multiple additional medical subdomains and serve as a lingua franca for arbitrary clinical algorithms, therefore avoiding a patchwork of multiple all-purpose languages between, and even within, institutions.

  16. 7T: Physics, safety, and potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraff, Oliver; Quick, Harald H

    2017-12-01

    With more than 60 installed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems worldwide operating at a magnetic field strength of 7T or higher, ultrahigh-field (UHF) MRI has been established as a platform for clinically oriented research in recent years. Profound technical and methodological developments have helped overcome the inherent physical challenges of UHF radiofrequency (RF) signal homogenization in the human body. The ongoing development of dedicated RF coil arrays was pivotal in realizing UHF body MRI, beyond mere brain imaging applications. Another precondition to clinical application of 7T MRI is the safety testing of implants and the establishment of safety concepts. Against this backdrop, 7T MRI and MR spectroscopy (MRS) recently have demonstrated capabilities and potentials for clinical diagnostics in a variety of studies. This article provides an overview of the immanent physical challenges of 7T UHF MRI and discusses recent technical solutions and safety concepts. Furthermore, recent clinically oriented studies are highlighted that span a broad application spectrum from 7T UHF brain to body MRI. 4 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1573-1589. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Review and classification of variability analysis techniques with clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, Andrea; Longtin, André; Seely, Andrew J E

    2011-10-10

    Analysis of patterns of variation of time-series, termed variability analysis, represents a rapidly evolving discipline with increasing applications in different fields of science. In medicine and in particular critical care, efforts have focussed on evaluating the clinical utility of variability. However, the growth and complexity of techniques applicable to this field have made interpretation and understanding of variability more challenging. Our objective is to provide an updated review of variability analysis techniques suitable for clinical applications. We review more than 70 variability techniques, providing for each technique a brief description of the underlying theory and assumptions, together with a summary of clinical applications. We propose a revised classification for the domains of variability techniques, which include statistical, geometric, energetic, informational, and invariant. We discuss the process of calculation, often necessitating a mathematical transform of the time-series. Our aims are to summarize a broad literature, promote a shared vocabulary that would improve the exchange of ideas, and the analyses of the results between different studies. We conclude with challenges for the evolving science of variability analysis.

  18. Review and classification of variability analysis techniques with clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of patterns of variation of time-series, termed variability analysis, represents a rapidly evolving discipline with increasing applications in different fields of science. In medicine and in particular critical care, efforts have focussed on evaluating the clinical utility of variability. However, the growth and complexity of techniques applicable to this field have made interpretation and understanding of variability more challenging. Our objective is to provide an updated review of variability analysis techniques suitable for clinical applications. We review more than 70 variability techniques, providing for each technique a brief description of the underlying theory and assumptions, together with a summary of clinical applications. We propose a revised classification for the domains of variability techniques, which include statistical, geometric, energetic, informational, and invariant. We discuss the process of calculation, often necessitating a mathematical transform of the time-series. Our aims are to summarize a broad literature, promote a shared vocabulary that would improve the exchange of ideas, and the analyses of the results between different studies. We conclude with challenges for the evolving science of variability analysis. PMID:21985357

  19. Dental student attitudes towards communication skills instruction and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Carly T

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated dental students' attitudes towards communication skills instruction and clinical application and explored the impact of a one-semester course and year in school on students' attitudes, measured by the Communication Skills Attitude Scale. Demographic characteristics and self-assessment of communication skills were also analyzed. The study employed a pretest-posttest survey design combined with cross-sectional data. Participants were first- and fourth-year students at a U.S. dental school. Out of a possible 120 students, 106 (fifty-seven D1 and forty-nine D4) participated in the pretest, an 88 percent response rate; out of a possible 121 students, 115 (fifty-seven D1 and fifty-eight D4) participated in the posttest, a 95 percent response rate. In the results, D4 students consistently demonstrated less positive attitudes towards communication skills instruction and more negative attitudes regarding the importance of interpersonal skills in clinical encounters than did their D1 counterparts. A single communications course had no discernible effect on attitudes or self-assessments for either cohort. Females reported more positive attitudes towards clinical application of interpersonal skills than did males. Gender significantly interacted with two demographic variables: primary language and parent as health care professional. Female children of health care professionals reported poorer attitudes towards clinical communication skills training and application than did their male counterparts. Generally, parental occupation in health care moderated the decrease in positive attitudes over time towards clinical usefulness of communication skills. The D4 students rated their communication skills higher than did the D1 students. Students who demonstrated more positive attitudes towards communication skills training and application were more likely to say their own skills needed improvement.

  20. Are the MDS-UPDRS-based composite scores clinically applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkos, Attila; Kovács, Márton; Aschermann, Zsuzsanna; Harmat, Márk; Janszky, József; Karádi, Kázmér; Kovács, Norbert

    2018-02-28

    The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society-sponsored UPDRS (MDS-UPDRS) is a powerful clinical outcome measure. To evaluate the feasibility of various MDS-UPDRS-based composite scores and determine their minimal clinically important difference threshold values. Overall, 1,113 paired investigations of 452 patients were reviewed implementing three different techniques simultaneously. Based on the ordinal regression modeling, the MDS-UPDRS II+III, MDS-UPDRS I+II+III, and the total score of MDS-UPDRS are clinically applicable outcome measures. Any improvement greater than 4.9 points or any worsening more than 4.2 points on MDS-UPDRS II+III represent a minimal, yet clinically meaningful, change. In reference to MDS-UPDRS I+II+III, the smallest changes considered clinically relevant were 6.7 and 5.2 points for improvement and deterioration, respectively. The thresholds for the total score of MDS-UPDRS were 7.1 points for improvement and 6.3 points for worsening. Our findings support the application of various MDS-UPDRS-based composite scores. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Application of virtual reality technology in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Yu, Fei; Shi, Dongquan; Shi, Jianping; Tian, Zongjun; Yang, Jiquan; Wang, Xingsong; Jiang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    The present review discusses the application of virtual reality (VR) technology in clinical medicine, especially in surgical training, pain management and therapeutic treatment of mental illness. We introduce the common types of VR simulators and their operational principles in aforementioned fields. The clinical effects are also discussed. In almost every study that dealt with VR simulators, researchers have arrived at the same conclusion that both doctors and patients could benefit from this novel technology. Moreover, advantages and disadvantages of the utilization of VR technology in each field were discussed, and the future research directions were proposed.

  2. [Literature survey on botanical origin and clinical application of traditional Tibetan medicine "Shengdeng"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De-Dao; Meng, Xian-Hua; Zhang, Ying-Shan; Chen, Gen-Ping; Huang, Yu-Lan

    2012-10-01

    "Shengdeng" is its Tibetan transliteration referring to many medicines. Tibetan doctors and pharmacists in different areas use different drugs in formulation and clinical application, which are easily confused. In order to grasp the formula and clinical application accurately, we conduct a literature survey on history and current state of botanical origin and clinical application of "Shengdeng", making clear the application of various herbs named "Shengdeng" and providing reference to all Tibetan researchers and clinical workers in formulation and clinical application.

  3. Clinical Applications of CO2 and H2 Breath Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Si-qian;CHEN Bao-jun;LUO Zhi-fu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Breath test is non-invasive, high sensitivity and high specificity. In this article, CO2 breath test, H2 breath test and their clinical applications were elaborated. The main applications of CO2 breath test include helicobacter pylori test, liver function detection, gastric emptying test, insulin resistance test, pancreatic exocrine secretion test, etc. H2 breath test can be applied in the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption and detecting small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. With further research, the breath test is expected to be applied in more diseases diagnosis.

  4. MALDI-TOF-mass spectrometry applications in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Piseth; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Fournier, Pierre Edouard; La Scola, Bernard; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2010-11-01

    MALDI-TOF-mass spectrometry (MS) has been successfully adapted for the routine identification of microorganisms in clinical microbiology laboratories in the past 10 years. This revolutionary technique allows for easier and faster diagnosis of human pathogens than conventional phenotypic and molecular identification methods, with unquestionable reliability and cost-effectiveness. This article will review the application of MALDI-TOF-MS tools in routine clinical diagnosis, including the identification of bacteria at the species, subspecies, strain and lineage levels, and the identification of bacterial toxins and antibiotic-resistance type. We will also discuss the application of MALDI-TOF-MS tools in the identification of Archaea, eukaryotes and viruses. Pathogenic identification from colony-cultured, blood-cultured, urine and environmental samples is also reviewed.

  5. Instructional Storytelling: Application of the Clinical Judgment Model in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbrell, Jessica

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the teaching and learning implications of instructional storytelling (IST) in nursing education or its potential connection to nursing theory. The literature establishes storytelling as a powerful teaching-learning method in the educational, business, humanities, and health sectors, but little exploration exists that is specific to nursing. An example of a story demonstrating application of the domains of Tanner's clinical judgment model links storytelling with learning outcomes appropriate for the novice nursing student. Application of Tanner's clinical judgment model offers consistency of learning experience while preserving the creativity inherent in IST. Further research into student learning outcomes achievement using IST is warranted as a step toward establishing best practices with IST in nursing education. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(5):305-308.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Leverage hadoop framework for large scale clinical informatics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao; Bahroos, Neil; Sadhu, Eugene; Jackson, Tommie; Chukhman, Morris; Johnson, Robert; Boyd, Andrew; Hynes, Denise

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present our experiences using the Apache Hadoop framework for high data volume and computationally intensive applications, and discuss some best practice guidelines in a clinical informatics setting. There are three main aspects in our approach: (a) process and integrate diverse, heterogeneous data sources using standard Hadoop programming tools and customized MapReduce programs; (b) after fine-grained aggregate results are obtained, perform data analysis using the Mahout data mining library; (c) leverage the column oriented features in HBase for patient centric modeling and complex temporal reasoning. This framework provides a scalable solution to meet the rapidly increasing, imperative "Big Data" needs of clinical and translational research. The intrinsic advantage of fault tolerance, high availability and scalability of Hadoop platform makes these applications readily deployable at the enterprise level cluster environment.

  7. Platelet Immunology in China: Research and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoguang; Zhou, Yan; Li, Lilan; Zhong, Zhoulin; Li, Hengchong; Li, Haiyan; Yu, Mei; Shen, Weidong; Ni, Heyu

    2017-04-01

    Immunization against human platelet alloantigens (HPAs) is associated with a number of clinical complications. The detection and identification of clinically relevant platelet antibodies are important for the diagnosis and management of patients affected with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias. Human platelet alloantigen frequencies and the characteristics of antiplatelet antibodies vary widely between ethnic groups. Since 2008, the importance of platelet immunology in the field of transfusion medicine has gained greater recognition by clinical laboratories in China. Laboratories in China have established and improved methods for platelet antibody detection and HPA genotyping techniques, which are used for the diagnosis of alloimmune platelet disorders in clinic and research environments. Research has revealed the frequencies of HPA alleles in different Chinese ethnic groups and compared the differences in HPA gene frequencies between the Chinese Han and other ethnic groups of the world. Production of anti-CD36 isoantibodies is an important risk factor for immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in the Chinese population. Advances in research and clinical application of platelet immunology have significantly improved the clinical diagnosis, treatment including transfusion support, and prevention of alloimmune platelet disorders in the Chinese population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. An approach to discriminatively determine thoron and radon emanation rates for a granular material with a scintillation cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakoda, Akihiro; Meisenberg, Oliver; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    A powder sandwich technique was applied to determine thoron ("2"2"0Rn) and radon ("2"2"2Rn) emanation rates for a granular material. The feature of this technique is the sample preparation, in which a granular material is put and fixed between two membrane filters. Airflow is directly given to this sandwich sample, will include thoron and radon emanated from the material, and then is transferred to the detector. This method makes sure that thoron and radon emanated are not retained in pore space within the sample volume, which is crucial for the appropriate emanation test. This technique was first introduced by Kanse et al. (2013) with the intention to measure the emanation of thoron - but not of radon - from materials having much higher "2"2"4Ra activity than "2"2"6Ra. In the present study, the methodology for the discriminative determination of thoron and radon emanation rates from a granular material has been examined using a flow-through scintillation cell and sandwich sample. The mathematical model was developed to differentiate total alpha counts into thoron- and radon-associated counts. With a sample of uranium ore, this model was experimentally validated by comparison between the scintillation cell and a reference detector that can discriminatively measure thoron and radon concentrations. Furthermore, the detection limits and uncertainties were evaluated to discuss the characteristics of this method. Key parameters for improving the determination of thoron and radon emanations were found to be the background radon concentration and the leakage of radon from the measurement system, respectively. It was concluded that the present method is advantageous to a sample that has much higher "2"2"6Ra activity than "2"2"4Ra. - Highlights: • The methodology of appropriate and discriminative measurement of thoron and radon emanation is presented. • Measurement of thoron and radon emanated from a sample was made using a scintillation cell. • Detection limits and

  9. Multimodal imaging of bone metastases: From preclinical to clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Ellmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the skeletal system are commonly observed in cancer patients, highly affecting the patients' quality of life. Imaging plays a major role in detection, follow-up, and molecular characterisation of metastatic disease. Thus, imaging techniques have been optimised and combined in a multimodal and multiparametric manner for assessment of complementary aspects in osseous metastases. This review summarises both application of the most relevant imaging techniques for bone metastasis in preclinical models and the clinical setting.

  10. Platelet Rich Plasma- mechanism of action and clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina N. Cozma; Laura Raducu; Cristian R. Jecan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a blood-derived fraction containing high level of platelets, a high concentration of leukocytes and growth factors. PRP therapy has been growing as a viable treatment alternative for a number of clinical applications and has a potential benefit for use in wound healing. Nowadays platelet rich plasma is used in stimulating wound healing in skin and soft tissue ulcerations, accelerating wound healing in diabetic patients and facilitating bone proliferation in ortho...

  11. Scattered radiation from applicators in clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battum, L J van; Zee, W van der; Huizenga, H

    2003-01-01

    In radiotherapy with high-energy (4-25 MeV) electron beams, scattered radiation from the electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. In most currently available treatment planning systems for radiotherapy this component is not explicitly included and handled only by a slight change of the intensity of the primary beam. The scattered radiation from an applicator changes with the field size and distance from the applicator. The amount of scattered radiation is dependent on the applicator design and on the formation of the electron beam in the treatment head. Electron applicators currently applied in most treatment machines are essentially a set of diaphragms, but still do produce scattered radiation. This paper investigates the present level of scattered dose from electron applicators, and as such provides an extensive set of measured data. The data provided could for instance serve as example input data or benchmark data for advanced treatment planning algorithms which employ a parametrized initial phase space to characterize the clinical electron beam. Central axis depth dose curves of the electron beams have been measured with and without applicators in place, for various applicator sizes and energies, for a Siemens Primus, a Varian 2300 C/D and an Elekta SLi accelerator. Scattered radiation generated by the applicator has been found by subtraction of the central axis depth dose curves, obtained with and without applicator. Scattered radiation from Siemens, Varian and Elekta electron applicators is still significant and cannot be neglected in advanced treatment planning. Scattered radiation at the surface of a water phantom can be as high as 12%. Scattered radiation decreases almost linearly with depth. Scattered radiation from Varian applicators shows clear dependence on beam energy. The Elekta applicators produce less scattered radiation than those of Varian and Siemens, but feature a higher effective angular variance. The scattered

  12. [Progress of midfacial fat compartments and related clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lihong; Wang, Jinhuang; Li, Yang; Liu, Dalie

    2018-02-01

    To review the research progress of midfacial fat compartments, and to thoroughly understand its current state of the anatomy and the aging morphologic characters of midfacial fat compartments, as well as the current status of clinical applications. The recent literature concerning the midfacial fat compartments and related clinical applications were extensively reviewed and analyzed. Midfacial fat layer has been considered as a fusion and a continuous layer, experiencing a global atrophy when aging. As more anatomical researches have done, recent studies have shown that midfacial fat layer is broadly divided into superficial and deep layers, which are both divided into different fat compartments by fascia, ligaments, or muscles. Midfacial fat compartments tend to atrophy with age, specifically in the deep fat compartments while hypertrophy in the superficial fat compartments. Clinical applications show that fat volumetric restoration with deep medial cheek fat and Ristow's space can restore the appearance of midface effectively. In recent years, the researches of midfacial fat compartments have achieved obvious progress, which will provide new ideas and basis for fat volumetric restoration. Corresponding treatments are selected based on different sites and different layers with different aging changes, reshaping a more youthful midface.

  13. Estimation of effective dose from Rn emanating from 'the minus ion' effect wallpaper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Y.; Minowa, H.; Morita-Murase, Y.; Furuta, E.

    2006-01-01

    We have examined the wall papers which declared 'the minus ion' effect to estimate external and internal exposure dose from them. Results of gamma-ray spectrometry revealed that they contain 0.03 to 0.35 Bq·g -1 of Th-series nuclides, 208 Tl, 212 Pb, 212 Bi and 228 Ac, and U-series one, 214 Pb. Distributions of radioactive nuclides in the samples were measured using an imaging plate and a FLA-2000 (Fuji Photo Film). The radiation doses from the printed side of the wall papers were 5 to 15 times higher than that of the back side. The 222 Rn concentrations emanating from the wall papers in a sealed container of 50 liter were measured using the PICO-RAD radon detectors. One wall paper showed two to five times higher than the background value. (author)

  14. Emanation thermal analysis. Principle of the method, preparation of samples and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.; Pentinghaus, H.J.

    1993-12-01

    Principles of the title method are outlined and the sample preparation procedures and instrumental designs are described. The publication is divided into chapters as follows: (I) Introduction; (II) Sample labelling: (II.1) Introducing parent nuclides as a source of inert gas in solid; Distribution of inert gas in the sample; (II.2) Introducing inert gases without parent nuclides (using the recoil effect of nuclear reactions and using ion bombardment); (II.3) Choice of the suitable labelling technique; (III) Equipment for emanation thermal analysis: (III.1) Inert gas detection and measurement of inert gas release rate; (III.2) System of carrier gas flow and stabilization; (IV) Determination of the optimal conditions for radon release rate measurement; (V) Example of ETA measurement. (P.A.). 1 tab., 10 figs. 5 refs

  15. Radon and thoron emanation from various marble materials: impact on the workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misdaq, M.A.; Amghar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium ( 238 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) concentrations were measured inside different pulverized marble material samples by using a method based on determining detection efficiencies of the CR-39 and LR-115 II solid state nuclear track detectors for the emitted alpha particles. Radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) alpha-activities per unit volume were evaluated inside and outside the marble samples studied. Radon emanation coefficient was determined for the considered marble samples. Alpha- and beta-activities per unit volume of air due to radon, thoron and their progenies were measured in the atmosphere of a marble factory. Equilibrium factors between radon and its progeny and thoron and its decay products were evaluated in the air of the studied marble factory. The committed equivalent doses due to short-lived radon decay products were determined in different regions of the respiratory tract of workers in the considered marble factory

  16. Radiometric maps of Israel - Partial contribution to the understanding of potential radon emanations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulkan, U.; Shirav, M.

    1997-01-01

    An airborne radiometric survey over parts of Israel was carried out in 1981. The system was comprised from 10 Nal 4 inch x 4 inch x 16 inch detectors, arranged in 4,4 and 2 sensors, with total volume of 1560 inch 3 , and one 4 inch x 4 inch x 16 inch uplooking Nal detector. Flight nominal height was 400 feet. It was found that the Mount Scopus Group (of Senonian origin) is the main source for high uranium - phosphorite rocks of this group contain up to 150 ppm U. Comparing the eU radiometric map with a map of potential radon emanation from rock units, reveals a fair correlation - high radon emanation usually follow the distribution of the Mount Scopus Group in Israel. The correlation between the two maps is excellent over arid terrain where soil cover is missing, whereas over semi-arid - humid areas (western and northern Israel), where soil and cultivation covers are developed, the eU levels over Mount Scopus Group's outcrops are much lower due to absorption of the radiation, and do not depict the full radon potential. Detailed mapping of radon hazards usually exhibit poor correlation between airborne eU data and direct pore radon measurements, even in arid terrain. This phenomenon is attributed to the fact that a radon ''source rock'' (e.g. phosphorite) could be covered with a few up to some tenths of meters of uranium-barren rock. About 0.5 meter cover is enough to absorb all radiation, causing very low airborne eU readings, while the radon free way in this rock is about 10 meters, yielding high pore radon levels when directly measured

  17. Hazardous waste disposal in relationship to radon gas emanation in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, H.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive/toxic radon gas (Rn) produced naturally in the ground by the normal decay of uranium (U) and radium (Ra) is widely distributed in trace amounts in the earth's crust. It is a colorless, odorless and tasteless element and is one of the six generally known noble gases which are inert gases lacking the usual or anticipated chemical or biological action. Most radon gas is concentrated in the oxidation belt which is at a relatively shallow depth from the ground surface. Under normal conditions, the amount of radon gas seeping into the atmosphere or entering into residential buildings is very little and will not be harmful to human health. In recent years, due to population growth, a progressive living standard and industrial progress, many natural farm lands, forests and wetlands have been destroyed by conversion into residential and industrial compounds; consequently, such construction activities and industrial waste disposal changes the dynamic equilibrium of the ecosystem which can trigger and accelerate radon gas emanation and mobilization. This change is the major reason for the problem of indoor radon concentration which has significantly increased in recent years. Recent findings indicate that radon is not a totally inert element as previously thought. It can be influenced by local environments such as temperature, pH value, ion exchange, redox reaction, etc. to some degree. Also radon gas interacts with soil, water, air and others; unfortunately, the interface mechanisms between radon and the environment are not yet clearly understood and little information on these aspects is available. In this paper only the hazardous waste disposal causes for radon emanation are discussed. To deal with such complex phenomena, a new approach is presented that assumes radon gas interaction with the environment through dust in the air and suspensions in the water and soil-water system

  18. Present knowledge of the effect of cracks on radon emanation from tailings, with implications for mine rehabilitation at Olympic Dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, J.R.; Patterson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The weather parameters of air pressure, temperature, rainfall and wind speed affect the rate of radon-222 emanation from the surface of mine tailings. A second set of conditions which form cracks or fissures in tailings and their covers, will also affect the radon flux density and they must be considered in the design of any cover for a rehabilitation program. The Olympic Dam mine expansion program, beginning in 1995, involves a substantial increase in the size of the copper/uranium tailings. As part of monitoring and progressive rehabilitation of the tailings, the rate of emanation of radon-222 from tailings' surfaces was measured, with and without the gross defects of cracking. Theoretical predictions and measurements made in the U.S., are compared with rates of emanation from a cracked surface, modelled as homogeneous with additional surface area due to cracks

  19. [Polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Part II: application in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, D; Fulín, P; Slouf, M; Jahoda, D; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2010-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is one of the up-to-date organic polymer thermoplastics with applications in orthopaedics and trauma medicine. This study presents a detailed analysis of its tests and applications in clinical medicine. A wide range of PEEK modifications and composites are commercially available, e.g., PEEK-Classix, PEEK-Optima, Endolign and Motis. They differ in their physical properties, which makes them suitable for different applications. Other forms, so-called PEEK bioactive composites, contain beta-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite. Research in this field is also concerned with the surface finish of this polymer thermoplastic and involves macroporous titanium and hydroxyapatite layers, or treatment with laser for an exactly defined surface structure. The clinical applications of PEEK and its composites include, in addition to components for spinal surgery, osteosynthesis plates, screws, intramedullary nails or external fixators, which are implants still at the stage of prototypes. In this review, attention is paid to the use of PEEK thermoplastics for joint replacement. Mid-term studies involving hundreds of patients have shown that, for instance, the VerSys Epoch Fullcoat Hip System (Zimmer) has a markedly lower stress-shielding effect. Carbon fibre-reinforced (CFR-PEEK) composites are used to make articulating components for total hip replacement. Their convenient properties allow for production of much thinner liners and an enlargement of the femoral head diameter, thus reducing the wear of joint implants. CFR-PEEK composites are particularly effective for hip resurfacing in which the Mitch PCR (Stryker) acetabular component has been used with good results. The MOTIS polymer acetabular cup (Invibio Ltd.) is another example. Further PEEK applications include the construction of finger-joint prostheses (Mathys AG), suture anchors (Stryker) and various kinds of augmentations (Medin). Based on the information obtained, the authors suggest

  20. Clinical application of Assessment of Parenting Competencies (APC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    This paper is part of a symposium on music therapy with families with Kirsi Tuomi as Chair. It revolves around the clinical application of a new music therapy assessment model on parent-child interaction and parenting competencies. APC was developed for emotional neglected children and their pare......This paper is part of a symposium on music therapy with families with Kirsi Tuomi as Chair. It revolves around the clinical application of a new music therapy assessment model on parent-child interaction and parenting competencies. APC was developed for emotional neglected children......, child somatic hospitals, centers for refuges and other populations where it would be clinical relevant to assess the parent-child interaction. APC is an observational and improvisational based assessment model evaluating dyads of parent and child (child age range is 5-12). It produces information...... (numbers, graphs, and descriptions) of parent-child interaction and parenting competencies including nonverbal communication, level of attunement in the dyad, and level of emotional support from the parent. It is based on video analysis and a fixed assessment protocol. It was developed through a completed...

  1. Dentin biomodification: strategies, renewable resources and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedran-Russo, Ana K; Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James; Castellan, Carina S; Phansalkar, Rasika S; Aguiar, Thaiane R; Vidal, Cristina M P; Napotilano, José G; Nam, Joo-Won; Leme, Ariene A

    2014-01-01

    The biomodification of dentin is a biomimetic approach, mediated by bioactive agents, to enhance and reinforce the dentin by locally altering the biochemistry and biomechanical properties. This review provides an overview of key dentin matrix components, targeting effects of biomodification strategies, the chemistry of renewable natural sources, and current research on their potential clinical applications. The PubMed database and collected literature were used as a resource for peer-reviewed articles to highlight the topics of dentin hierarchical structure, biomodification agents, and laboratorial investigations of their clinical applications. In addition, new data is presented on laboratorial methods for the standardization of proanthocyanidin-rich preparations as a renewable source of plant-derived biomodification agents. Biomodification agents can be categorized as physical methods and chemical agents. Synthetic and naturally occurring chemical strategies present distinctive mechanism of interaction with the tissue. Initially thought to be driven only by inter- or intra-molecular collagen induced non-enzymatic cross-linking, multiple interactions with other dentin components are fundamental for the long-term biomechanics and biostability of the tissue. Oligomeric proanthocyanidins show promising bioactivity, and their chemical complexity requires systematic evaluation of the active compounds to produce a fully standardized intervention material from renewable resource, prior to their detailed clinical evaluation. Understanding the hierarchical structure of dentin and the targeting effect of the bioactive compounds will establish their use in both dentin-biomaterials interface and caries management. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical applications of 7 T MRI in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolk, Anja G. van der; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.; Visser, Fredy; Luijten, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    This review illustrates current applications and possible future directions of 7 Tesla (7 T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the field of brain MRI, in clinical studies as well as clinical practice. With its higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) compared to lower field strengths, high resolution, contrast-rich images can be obtained of diverse pathologies, like multiple sclerosis (MS), brain tumours, aging-related changes and cerebrovascular diseases. In some of these diseases, additional pathophysiological information can be gained compared to lower field strengths. Because of clear depiction of small anatomical details, and higher lesion conspicuousness, earlier diagnosis and start of treatment of brain diseases may become possible. Furthermore, additional insight into the pathogenesis of brain diseases obtained with 7 T MRI could be the basis for new treatment developments. However, imaging at high field comes with several limitations, like inhomogeneous transmit fields, a higher specific absorption rate (SAR) and, currently, extensive contraindications for patient scanning. Future studies will be aimed at assessing the advantages and disadvantages of 7 T MRI over lower field strengths in light of clinical applications, specifically the additional diagnostic and prognostic value of 7 T MRI

  3. Clinical applications of 7 T MRI in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, Anja G. van der, E-mail: A.G.vanderKolk@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Hendrikse, Jeroen, E-mail: J.Hendrikse@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M., E-mail: J.J.M.Zwanenburg@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, Fredy, E-mail: F.Visser-2@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Luijten, Peter R., E-mail: P.Luijten@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    This review illustrates current applications and possible future directions of 7 Tesla (7 T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the field of brain MRI, in clinical studies as well as clinical practice. With its higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) compared to lower field strengths, high resolution, contrast-rich images can be obtained of diverse pathologies, like multiple sclerosis (MS), brain tumours, aging-related changes and cerebrovascular diseases. In some of these diseases, additional pathophysiological information can be gained compared to lower field strengths. Because of clear depiction of small anatomical details, and higher lesion conspicuousness, earlier diagnosis and start of treatment of brain diseases may become possible. Furthermore, additional insight into the pathogenesis of brain diseases obtained with 7 T MRI could be the basis for new treatment developments. However, imaging at high field comes with several limitations, like inhomogeneous transmit fields, a higher specific absorption rate (SAR) and, currently, extensive contraindications for patient scanning. Future studies will be aimed at assessing the advantages and disadvantages of 7 T MRI over lower field strengths in light of clinical applications, specifically the additional diagnostic and prognostic value of 7 T MRI.

  4. Distributed user interfaces for clinical ubiquitous computing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bång, Magnus; Larsson, Anders; Berglund, Erik; Eriksson, Henrik

    2005-08-01

    Ubiquitous computing with multiple interaction devices requires new interface models that support user-specific modifications to applications and facilitate the fast development of active workspaces. We have developed NOSTOS, a computer-augmented work environment for clinical personnel to explore new user interface paradigms for ubiquitous computing. NOSTOS uses several devices such as digital pens, an active desk, and walk-up displays that allow the system to track documents and activities in the workplace. We present the distributed user interface (DUI) model that allows standalone applications to distribute their user interface components to several devices dynamically at run-time. This mechanism permit clinicians to develop their own user interfaces and forms to clinical information systems to match their specific needs. We discuss the underlying technical concepts of DUIs and show how service discovery, component distribution, events and layout management are dealt with in the NOSTOS system. Our results suggest that DUIs--and similar network-based user interfaces--will be a prerequisite of future mobile user interfaces and essential to develop clinical multi-device environments.

  5. Development and clinical application of In Vivo dosimetry for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Hirofumi; Oita, Masataka; Tominaga, Masahide; Oto, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    In practical radiotherapy, it is important to deliver radiation to the target correctly and safely according to the treatment planning. The control of radiation dose delivered to each patient in radiotherapy mainly relies on the prediction based on the result of pre-treatment verification and irradiation accuracy of treatment machines. In Vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy is the procedure of quality assurance by the way of direct measurement for the patient whether the calculated prescribed dose in the treatment planning is delivered precisely. The history of In Vivo dosimetry is relatively long, and the TLD dosimetry for clinical radiotherapy started in early 1970's. After 1980's, owing to the development of semiconductor devices such as diode detectors, semiconductor arrays, the clinical applications for the dosimetry and diagnostic radiation imaging devices which contributed to the development of electric portal imaging devices and 2D semiconductor detectors were introduced. In recent years, these radiation measurement devices and non-invasive methods have been developed, they are becoming widespread as clinical practice. In this paper, we reviewed the In Vivo dosimetry devices and their characteristics, and technical application for radiotherapy. (author)

  6. TU-AB-207-03: Tomosynthesis: Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maidment, A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis

  7. TU-AB-207-03: Tomosynthesis: Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maidment, A. [Univ Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) is becoming increasingly common in breast imaging and many other applications. DT is a form of computed tomography in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into a tomographic data set. The angular range and number of projections is determined both by the imaging task and equipment manufacturer. For example, in breast imaging between 9 and 25 projections are acquired over a range of 15° to 60°. It is equally valid to treat DT as the digital analog of classical tomography - for example, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” is an acronym for “synthetic tomography”. DT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DT systems is a hybrid between CT and classical tomographic methods. This lecture will consist of three presentations that will provide a complete overview of DT, including a review of the fundamentals of DT, a discussion of testing methods for DT systems, and a description of the clinical applications of DT. While digital breast tomosynthesis will be emphasized, analogies will be drawn to body imaging to illustrate and compare tomosynthesis methods. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis, including the determinants of image quality and dose. To learn how to test the performance of tomosynthesis imaging systems. To appreciate the uses of tomosynthesis in the clinic and the future applications of tomosynthesis.

  8. Emanation-thermal characteristics of Ba-salts of some aromatic acids in the temperature range between 298 and 373 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balek, V; Prachar, M [Ustav Jaderneho Vyzkumu, Rez (Czechoslovakia); Kroupa, J [Vyzkumny Ustav Syntetickych Pryskyric a Laku, Pardubice (Czechoslovakia)

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the emanation-thermal characteristics of Ba salts of some monocarboxylic acids (phtalic, isophtalic and terephtalic) and dicarboxylic acids (benzoic, salicylic, 1,4-aminobenzoic, 1,2-Cl-benzoic and 1,2-I-benzoic). It is shown that the emanation thermal characteristics measured in the temperature range between 298 and 373 K are suitable for estimating diffusion properties of studied organic solids. An apparatus for determining emanation-thermal characteristics is proposed.

  9. Clinical application of urodilatin in Type 2 diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yihua; Cao Xingjian; Chen Yuxiang; Zhang Kexia; Jin Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of urodilatin (URO) in tubular injury of DM2. Methods: 41 healthy controls, 33 type 2 diabetics without nephropathy, 37 patients with early stage of diabetic nephropathy and 26 patients with clinical diabetic nephropathy were enrolled in the study and categorized into four groups. Urodilatin was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The changes of urodilatin levels among four groups were analyzed, and correlation analyses were performed between urodilatin and urinary micro-albumin/urine creatinine(mA/UCr). The efficiency index of URO were evaluated by receiver operation characteristic (ROC). Results: Compared with those in the controls,diabetics without nephropathy, early stage of diabetic nephropathy and clinical diabetic nephropathy, the urodilatin level decreased significantly in the course of diabetic nephropathy (P<0.001). The value of URO was significantly correlated with mA/UCr (r=-0.626, P<0.01). In early phase of DM2, The area under curve was 0.759. When the cut-off vaule of URO was ≤51.5 pg/ml, The sensitivity and specificity were 67.14% and 70.29%, respectively. Furthermore, Urodilatin had similar diagnosis efficiency with mA/UCr. Conclusion: The decrease of urodilatin level had clinical value in pristine tubular injury of DM2 and can serve as an evaluation parameter. (authors)

  10. Clinical applications of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubenberger, J.; Bayer, S.; Thiel, T.; Hennig, J.; Langer, M.

    1998-01-01

    In spite of all the scientific advances of the past few years, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain has not attained the status of a routine examination technique with clinically accepted indications. The method should be considered as an additional option to MR imaging for inherited and acquired encephalopathic changes as well as, in future, for localization diagnosis of epilepsies. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation without a prior intensive clinical and imaging investigation is not useful. Above all, factors influencing metabolite distribution such as for example, serum osmolability must be known. Methodological prerequisites for the clinical application of proton resonance spectroscopy are, first of all, a high stability of the chosen technique as well as a sufficiently certain quantification of metabolites and the availability of a reference group. The use of short echo times is necessary for the quantification of glutamine and the osmolyte myo-inositol. Indications for individual cases in which clinical investigations and MR topography cannot provide sufficient certainty and spectroscopy can furnish additional information are, in addition to uses in neuropediatrics, the suspicion of Alzheimer's dementia, HIV encephalopathy in early manifestations, and unclarified depressions of consciousness accompanying liver cirrhosis. (orig.) [de

  11. Recent progress in the clinical application of partial splenic embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yaojun; Liu Changjiang; Wang Yaojun

    2012-01-01

    Partial splenic embolization (PSE) is a non-surgical procedure used to treat hypersplenism in various clinical settings and thus to avoid the disadvantages of splenectomy. PSE can be employed for the treatment of a variety of diseases including hypersplenism, thrombocytopenia, portal hypertension, splenic arterial aneurysms, etc. PSE can effectively relieve the splenic artery steal syndrome which occurred after liver transplantation, and therefore significantly improve the blood perfusion of the recipient liver. Besides, PSE can also be adopted to reduce the bleeding risk in patients with esophageal and gastric varices caused by portal hypertension. PSE is beneficial to the improvement of peripheral hematologic parameters, which helps the patients successfully undergo the high-dose chemotherapy or interferon therapy. In addition, PSE possesses potential curative effect for thrombocytopenia related diseases such as chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the recent progress in the clinical application of partial splenic embolization. (authors)

  12. Application of Next-generation Sequencing in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Seifi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Next-generation sequencing (NGS is the catch all terms that used to explain several different modern sequencing technologies which let us to sequence nucleic acids much more rapidly and cheaply than the formerly used Sanger sequencing, and as such have revolutionized the study of molecular biology and genomics with excellent resolution and accuracy. Over the past years, many academic companies and institutions have continued technological advances to expand NGS applications from research to the clinic. In this review, the performance and technical features of current NGS platforms were described. Furthermore, advances in the applying of NGS technologies towards the progress of clinical molecular diagnostics were emphasized. General advantages and disadvantages of each sequencing system are summarized and compared to guide the selection of NGS platforms for specific research aims.

  13. Clinical application of SPECT and PET in cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ra, Young Shin

    2003-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) and positron emission tomography(PET) are modern imaging techniques that allow for both qualitative are quantitative assessment of hemodynamic changes in cerebrovascular diseases. SPECT has been becoming an indispensable method to investigate regional cerebral blood flow because equipment and isotope are easily available in most general hospitals. Acetazolamide stress SPECT has also been proved to be useful to evaluate the cerebrovascular reserve of occlusive cerebrovascular diseases and to select surgical candidate. PET has gained wide spread clinical use in the evaluation of the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of extracranial or intracranial arterial obstructive disease despite its complexity and limited availability. PET has been established as an invaluable tool in the pathophysilogy investigation of acute ischemic stroke. The potentials, limitations, and clinical applications of SPECT and PET in various cerebrovascular diseases will be discussed in this article with reviews of literatures

  14. Clinical application of transnasal feeding tube placement under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Kunyuan; Ni Caifang; Liu Yizhi; Zhu Xiaoli; Zou Jianwei; Jin Yonghai; Chen Long; Sun Ge; Sun Lingfang; Zhang Dong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of duodenal feeding tube placement under fluoroscopic guidance and its clinical application. Methods: The transnasal duodenal nutriment tubes placement under fluoroscopic guidance were performed in 59 patients from June 3th, 2003 to August 17th, 2007. The successful placement of the feeding tube was defined as that of the tube tip was fixed at or distal to the duodenojejunal junction. Results: 57 out of 59 patients were successfully managed by feeding tube placement, with primary successful rate of 96.6% (57/59). The remaining two failures were due to overdistention of the stomach and were further managed after gastrointestinal decompression thoroughly. The mean fluoroscopy time of the procedure was 17.8 minutes with no severe immediate or delayed complications. Conclusion: The transnasal duodenal nutrient feeding tube placement under fluoroscopic guidance is a safe,economic, and effective management for enteral nutrition, providing extensive clinical utilization. (authors)

  15. [Applications of MALDI-TOF technology in clinical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, S; Nassif, X; Ferroni, A

    2015-02-01

    Until now, the identification of micro-organisms has been based on the cultural and biochemical characteristics of bacterial and fungal species. Recently, Mass Spectrometry type Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF MS) was developed in clinical microbiology laboratories. This new technology allows identification of micro-organisms directly from colonies of bacteria and fungi within few minutes. In addition, it can be used to identify germs directly from positive blood culture bottles or directly from urine samples. Other ways are being explored to expand the use of MALDI-TOF in clinical microbiology laboratories. Indeed, some studies propose to detect bacterial antibiotic resistance while others compare strains within species for faster strain typing. The main objective of this review is to update data from the recent literature for different applications of MALDI-TOF technique in microbiological diagnostic routine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of ion chromatography in clinical studies and pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Rajmund

    2014-01-01

    Ion chromatography is a well-established regulatory method for analyzing anions and cations in environmental, food and many other samples. It offers an enormous range of possibilities for selecting stationary and mobile phases. Additionally, it usually helps to solve various separation problems, particularly when it is combined with different detection techniques. Ion chromatography can also be used to determine many ions and substances in clinical and pharmaceutical samples. It provides: availability of high capacity stationary phases and sensitive detectors; simple sample preparation; avoidance of hazardous chemicals; decreased sample volumes; flexible reaction options on a changing sample matrix to be analyzed; or the option to operate a fully-automated system. This paper provides a short review of the ion chromatography applications for determining different inorganic and organic substances in clinical and pharmaceutical samples.

  17. Clinical application of SPECT and PET in cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ra, Young Shin [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) and positron emission tomography(PET) are modern imaging techniques that allow for both qualitative are quantitative assessment of hemodynamic changes in cerebrovascular diseases. SPECT has been becoming an indispensable method to investigate regional cerebral blood flow because equipment and isotope are easily available in most general hospitals. Acetazolamide stress SPECT has also been proved to be useful to evaluate the cerebrovascular reserve of occlusive cerebrovascular diseases and to select surgical candidate. PET has gained wide spread clinical use in the evaluation of the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of extracranial or intracranial arterial obstructive disease despite its complexity and limited availability. PET has been established as an invaluable tool in the pathophysilogy investigation of acute ischemic stroke. The potentials, limitations, and clinical applications of SPECT and PET in various cerebrovascular diseases will be discussed in this article with reviews of literatures.

  18. Radio sterilized human ligaments and their clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna Z, D.; Reyes F, M. L.; Diaz M, I.; Hernandez R, G.

    2009-10-01

    The ligaments are human tissues that are used in the transplantation area. A ligament is an anatomical structure in band form, composed by resistant fibers that connect the tissues that unite the bones with the articulations. In an articulation, the ligaments allow and facilitate the movement inside the natural anatomical directions, while it restricts those movements that are anatomically abnormal, impeding lesions that could arise of this type of movements. The kneecap ligament is a very important tissue in the knee mobility and of walking in the human beings. This ligament can injure it because of automobile accidents, for sport lesions or illnesses, and in many cases the only form of recovering the knee movement is carried out a transplant with the purpose of replacing the damage ligament by allo gen kneecap ligament processed in specialized Tissue Banks where the tissue is sterilized with gamma radiation of 60 Co at very low temperatures, obtaining high quality ligaments for clinical application in injured patients. The kneecap ligaments are processed in the Tissue Banks with a segment of kneecap bone, a segment of tibial bone, the contained ligament between both bones and in some cases a fraction of the quadriceps tendon. In this work is given a description of the selection method of the tissue that includes the donor's serologic control, the kneecap ligament processing in the Radio Sterilized Tissues Bank, its sterilization with gamma radiation of 60 Co, also it is indicated like the clinical application of the allo gen ligament was realized in a hasty patient and whose previous crossed ligament was injured. Finally the results are presented from the tissue obtaining until the clinical application of it is, and in this case is observed a favorable initial evolution of the transplantation patient. (Author)

  19. Clinical applications of gamma delta T cells with multivalent immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew C Deniger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma delta T cells hold promise for adoptive immunotherapy because of their reactivity to bacteria, viruses, and tumors. However, these cells represent a small fraction (1-5% of the peripheral T-cell pool and require activation and propagation to achieve clinical benefit. Aminobisphosphonates specifically expand the Vgamma9Vdelta2 subset of gamma delta T cells and have been used in clinical trials of cancer where objective responses were detected. The Vgamma9Vdelta2 TCR heterodimer binds multiple ligands and results in a multivalent attack by a monoclonal T cell population. Alternatively, populations of gamma delta T cells with oligoclonal or polyclonal TCR repertoire could be infused for broad-range specificity. However, this goal has been restricted by a lack of applicable expansion protocols for non-Vgamma9Vdelta2 cells. Recent advances using immobilized antigens, agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, tumor-derived artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC, or combinations of activating mAbs and aAPC have been successful in expanding gamma delta T cells with oligoclonal or polyclonal TCR repertoires. Immobilized MHC Class-I chain-related A was a stimulus for gamma delta T cells expressing TCRdelta1 isotypes, and plate-bound activating antibodies have expanded Vdelta1 and Vdelta2 cells ex vivo. Clinically-sufficient quantities of TCRdelta1, TCRdelta2, and TCRdelta1negTCRdelta2neg have been produced following co-culture on aAPC, and these subsets displayed differences in memory phenotype and reactivity to tumors in vitro and in vivo. Gamma delta T cells are also amenable to genetic modification as evidenced by introduction of alpha beta TCRs, chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, and drug-resistance genes. This represents a promising future for the clinical application of oligoclonal or polyclonal gamma delta T cells in autologous and allogeneic settings that builds on current trials testing the safety and efficacy of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells.

  20. Clinical Applications of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Pediatric Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Shalini; Papanicolaou, Andrew C; McGregor, Amy; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W

    2015-08-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation is now an accepted technique that is used as a diagnostic aid and in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders in adults, and is being increasingly used in children. In this review, we will discuss the basic principles and safety of one noninvasive brain stimulation method, transcranial magnetic stimulation. Improvements in the spatial accuracy of transcranial magnetic stimulation are described in the context of image-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation. The article describes and provides examples of the current clinical applications of transcranial magnetic stimulation in children as an aid in the diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and discusses future potential applications. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a noninvasive tool that is safe for use in children and adolescents for functional mapping and treatment, and for many children it aids in the preoperative evaluation and the risk-benefit decision making. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Nanomedicine, microarrays and their applications in clinical microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan Deveci

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Growing interest in the future medical applications of nanotechnology is leading to the emergence of a new scientific field that called as “nanomedicine”. Nanomedicine may be defined as the investigating, treating, reconstructing and controlling human biology and health at the molecular level, using engineered nanodevices and nanostructures. Microarray technology is a revolutionary tool for elucidating roles of genes in infectious diseases, shifting from traditional methods of research to integrated approaches. This technology has great potential to provide medical diagnosis, monitor treatment and help in the development of new tools for infectious disease prevention and/or management. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the current application of microarray platforms and nanomedicine in the study of experimental microbiology and the impact of this technology in clinical settings.

  2. Preconditioning, postconditioning and their application to clinical cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloner, Robert A; Rezkalla, Shereif H

    2006-05-01

    Ischemic preconditioning is a well-established phenomenon first described in experimental preparations in which brief episodes of ischemia/reperfusion applied prior to a longer coronary artery occlusion reduce myocardial infarct size. There are ample correlates of ischemic preconditioning in the clinical realm. Preconditioning mimetic agents that stimulate the biochemical pathways of ischemic preconditioning and protect the heart without inducing ischemia have been examined in numerous experimental studies. However, despite the effectiveness of ischemic preconditioning and preconditioning mimetics for protecting ischemic myocardium, there are no preconditioning-based therapies that are routinely used in clinical medicine at the current time. Part of the problem is the need to administer therapy prior to the known ischemic event. Other issues are that percutaneous coronary intervention technology has advanced so far (with the development of stents and drug-eluting stents) that ischemic preconditioning or preconditioning mimetics have not been needed in most interventional cases. Recent clinical trials such as AMISTAD I and II (Acute Myocardial Infarction STudy of ADenosine) suggest that some preconditioning mimetics may reduce myocardial infarct size when given along with reperfusion or, as in the IONA trial, have benefit on clinical events when administered chronically in patients with known coronary artery disease. It is possible that some of the benefit described for adenosine in the AMISTAD 1 and 2 trials represents a manifestation of the recently described postconditioning phenomenon. It is probable that postconditioning--in which reperfusion is interrupted with brief coronary occlusions and reperfusion sequences--is more likely than preconditioning to be feasible as a clinical application to patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction.

  3. Applicable or non-applicable: investigations of clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Chess

    2016-02-01

    characteristics they initially chose as potential for clinical heterogeneity. Very few studies mentioned clinician training, compliance, brand, co-interventions, dose route, ethnicity, prognostic markers and psychosocial variables as covariates to investigate as potentially clinically heterogeneous. Addressing aspects of clinical heterogeneity was not different between Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews. Conclusions The ability to quantify and compare the clinical differences of trials within a meta-analysis is crucial to determining its applicability and use in clinical practice. Despite Cochrane Collaboration emphasis on methodology, the proportion of reviews that assess clinical heterogeneity is less than those of non-Cochrane reviews. Our assessment reveals that there is room for improvement in assessing clinical heterogeneity in both Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews.

  4. Clinical application of positron emission tomography for diagnosis of dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Kazunari [Hyogo Brain and Heart Center, Himeji (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Clinical applications of PET studies for dementia are reviewed in this paper. At the mild and moderate stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), glucose metabolism is reduced not only in the parietotemporal region but also in the posterior cingulate and precuneus. At the advanced stage of AD, there is also a metabolic reduction in the frontal region. In AD patients, glucose metabolism is relatively preserved in the pons, sensorimotor cortices, primary visual cortices, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. In patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, glucose metabolism in the primary visual cortices is reduced, and this reduction appears to be associated with the reduction pattern in AD patients. In patients with frontotemporal dementia, reduced metabolism in the frontotemporal region is the main feature of this disease, but reduced metabolism in the basal ganglia, and/or parietal metabolic reduction can be associated with the frontotemporal reduction. When corticobasal degeneration is associated with dementia, the reduction pattern of dementia is similar to the reduction pattern in AD and the hallmarks of diagnosing corticobasal degeneration associated with dementia are a reduced metabolism in the primary sensorimotor region and/or basal ganglia and an asymmetric reduction in the two hemispheres. FDG-PET is a very useful tool for the diagnosis of early AD and for the differential diagnosis of dementia. I also describe clinical applications of PET for the diagnosis of dementia in Japan. (author)

  5. Clinical application of positron emission tomography for diagnosis of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kazunari

    2002-01-01

    Clinical applications of PET studies for dementia are reviewed in this paper. At the mild and moderate stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), glucose metabolism is reduced not only in the parietotemporal region but also in the posterior cingulate and precuneus. At the advanced stage of AD, there is also a metabolic reduction in the frontal region. In AD patients, glucose metabolism is relatively preserved in the pons, sensorimotor cortices, primary visual cortices, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. In patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, glucose metabolism in the primary visual cortices is reduced, and this reduction appears to be associated with the reduction pattern in AD patients. In patients with frontotemporal dementia, reduced metabolism in the frontotemporal region is the main feature of this disease, but reduced metabolism in the basal ganglia, and/or parietal metabolic reduction can be associated with the frontotemporal reduction. When corticobasal degeneration is associated with dementia, the reduction pattern of dementia is similar to the reduction pattern in AD and the hallmarks of diagnosing corticobasal degeneration associated with dementia are a reduced metabolism in the primary sensorimotor region and/or basal ganglia and an asymmetric reduction in the two hemispheres. FDG-PET is a very useful tool for the diagnosis of early AD and for the differential diagnosis of dementia. I also describe clinical applications of PET for the diagnosis of dementia in Japan. (author)

  6. Personalized skincare: from molecular basis to clinical and commercial applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiewicz E

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ewa Markiewicz, Olusola Clement Idowu Research & Development, Hexis Lab, Science Central, The Core, Bath Lane, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Abstract: Individual responses of human skin to the environmental stress are determined by differences in the anatomy and physiology that are closely linked to the genetic characteristics such as pigmentation. Ethnic skin phenotypes can be distinguished based on defined genotypic traits, structural organization and compartmentalized sensitivity to distinct extrinsic aging factors. These differences are not only responsible for the variation in skin performance after exposure to damaging conditions, but can also affect the mechanisms of drug absorption, sensitization and other longer term effects. The unique characteristics of the individual skin function and, particularly, of the ethnic skin type are currently considered to shape the future of clinical and pharmacologic interventions as a basis for personalized skincare. Individual approaches to skincare render a novel and actively growing area with a range of biomedical and commercial applications within cosmetics industry. In this review, we summarize the aspects of the molecular and clinical manifestations of the environmental stress on human skin and proposed protective mechanisms that are linked to ethnic differences and pathophysiology of extrinsic skin aging. We subsequently discuss the possible applications and translation of this knowledge into personalized skincare. Keywords: pigmentation, gene polymorphism, photodamage, environmental stress, cosmetics

  7. Effects of barium chloride treatment of uranium mill tailings and ore on radon emanation and 226Ra levels. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, S.A.; Flot, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of barium chloride treatments on: reduction of 222 Rn emanation from mill wastes; reduction of 226 Ra levels in wastewater; and decreased leachability of 226 Ra from mill wastes. Baseline 226 Ra concentrations were determined for ore and tailings as well as radon emanation fractions. Uranium ore was treated with soluble barium at concentrations of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg per litre of slurry. The leach-liquor declined in 226 Ra concentration by as much as 50%. When soluble potassium as well as barium was used in the treatment process at equal concentrations of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg per litre of slurry, a similar reduction was observed. No significant difference was noted between the two treatment regimes. An accelerated leaching experiment was performed on the ore treated with barium chloride. All treatment groups except that treated with 10 mg of soluble barium per litre of slurry showed significant decreases in leachability. Available 222 Rn (corresponds with radon emanation fraction) was measured in treated and untreated ore. Ore treated with concentrations of Ba ++ up to 1.00 mg per gram of ore did not show a statistically significant reduction in available 222 Rn, however when potassium sulfate was also added, a significant decline was noted. This study suggests that barium chloride treatments reduce radon emanation from mill wastes and reduce 226 Ra levels in wastewater. Leachability of 226 Ra from treated samples decreased markedly. 19 references, 8 figures, 7 tables

  8. Interim report to the Northern Ecosystem Initiative from the Northern Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network (EMAN-North)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakelyn, L.; Eamer, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Northern Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network (EMAN-North) has received funding for a proposal submitted to the Northern Ecosystems Initiative (NEI) in January 2001. EMAN-North is a network that coordinates ecological monitoring in northern Canada. Its geographic scope comprises 40 per cent of the geographic area of Canada, including Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, and an area near Churchill, Manitoba. Funding was awarded because the proposed EMAN-North project addressed the NEI priority of Monitoring Ecosystem Status and Trends, and Ecosystem Impacts of Climate Change. The project was also aimed at improving the network's capacity for long-term ecological monitoring, assessment and reporting. Several activities deal specifically with ecological impacts of climate change. This paper described the need and the context for ecological monitoring in northern Canada and defined a strategic direction for EMAN-North. The project will include many individuals involved in ecological monitoring in the north to deliver information on ecosystem changes to decision-makers and the public. refs., tabs., figs

  9. Clinical applications of 3-dimensional printing in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yizhou, E-mail: yizhou.zhao@dal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Moran, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Yewondwossen, Mammo; Allan, James; Clarke, Scott [Department of Medical Physics, Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Rajaraman, Murali; Wilke, Derek; Joseph, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Robar, James L. [Department of Medical Physics, Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 2Y9 (Canada)

    2017-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is suitable for the fabrication of complex radiotherapy bolus. Although investigated from dosimetric and feasibility standpoints, there are few reports to date of its use for actual patient treatment. This study illustrates the versatile applications of 3D printing in clinical radiation oncology through a selection of patient cases, namely, to create bolus for photon and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), as well as applicators for surface high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Photon boluses were 3D-printed to treat a recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the nasal septum and a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the posterior pinna. For a patient with a mycosis fungoides involving the upper face, a 3D-printed MERT bolus was used. To treat an SCC of the nose, a 3D-printed applicator for surface brachytherapy was made. The structures' fit to the anatomy and the radiotherapy treatment plans were assessed. Based on the treatment planning computed tomography (CT), the size of the largest air gap at the interface of the 3D-printed structure was 3 mm for the SCC of the nasal septum, 3 mm for the BCC of the pinna, 2 mm for the mycosis fungoides of the face, and 2 mm for the SCC of the nose. Acceptable treatment plans were obtained for the SCC of the nasal septum (95% isodose to 99.8% of planning target volume [PTV]), the BCC of the pinna (95% isodose to 97.7% of PTV), and the mycosis fungoides of the face (90% isodose to 92.5% of PTV). For the latter, compared with a plan with a uniform thickness bolus, the one featuring the MERT bolus achieved relative sparing of all the organs at risk (OARs) distal to the target volume, while maintaining similar target volume coverage. The surface brachytherapy plan for the SCC of the nose had adequate coverage (95% isodose to 95.6% of clinical target volume [CTV]), but a relatively high dose to the left eye, owing to its proximity to the tumor. 3D printing can be implemented effectively in

  10. Clinical applications of 3-dimensional printing in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yizhou; Moran, Kathryn; Yewondwossen, Mammo; Allan, James; Clarke, Scott; Rajaraman, Murali; Wilke, Derek; Joseph, Paul; Robar, James L.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is suitable for the fabrication of complex radiotherapy bolus. Although investigated from dosimetric and feasibility standpoints, there are few reports to date of its use for actual patient treatment. This study illustrates the versatile applications of 3D printing in clinical radiation oncology through a selection of patient cases, namely, to create bolus for photon and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), as well as applicators for surface high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Photon boluses were 3D-printed to treat a recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the nasal septum and a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the posterior pinna. For a patient with a mycosis fungoides involving the upper face, a 3D-printed MERT bolus was used. To treat an SCC of the nose, a 3D-printed applicator for surface brachytherapy was made. The structures' fit to the anatomy and the radiotherapy treatment plans were assessed. Based on the treatment planning computed tomography (CT), the size of the largest air gap at the interface of the 3D-printed structure was 3 mm for the SCC of the nasal septum, 3 mm for the BCC of the pinna, 2 mm for the mycosis fungoides of the face, and 2 mm for the SCC of the nose. Acceptable treatment plans were obtained for the SCC of the nasal septum (95% isodose to 99.8% of planning target volume [PTV]), the BCC of the pinna (95% isodose to 97.7% of PTV), and the mycosis fungoides of the face (90% isodose to 92.5% of PTV). For the latter, compared with a plan with a uniform thickness bolus, the one featuring the MERT bolus achieved relative sparing of all the organs at risk (OARs) distal to the target volume, while maintaining similar target volume coverage. The surface brachytherapy plan for the SCC of the nose had adequate coverage (95% isodose to 95.6% of clinical target volume [CTV]), but a relatively high dose to the left eye, owing to its proximity to the tumor. 3D printing can be implemented effectively in

  11. Clinical applications of cobalt-radionuclides in neuro-imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H.M.L

    1998-04-01

    The aim of the studies embodied in this thesis was to investigate the clinical applicability of Co in euro-imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). To this purpose, a set of closely related pilot studies were performed in patients suffering from several neurological diseases affecting the brain. Chapter 2 discusses the physiological role of Co and both indications and complications of Co-administration in the past. The probable deposition mechanism of Co is described, potential (absence of) evidence of Co mimicking Ca in vivo is discussed, a comparison is made with other tracer-analogues (Ga, TI, Rb) and several hypotheses with respect to the pharmacokinetic behaviour of Co and the role of (inflammatory) proteins and cells are forwarded. The etiologic mechanism(s), clinical symptoms, Ca-related pathophysiology and (most recent) imaging techniques are reviewed of Multiple Sclerosis, cerebrovascular stroke, traumatic brain injury and primary brain tumours. The major goal of these respective reviews is both a rough outline of present insights and near-future developments and an assessment of the (im)possibilities in visualising the actual substrate of disease. Since Co is assumed to reflect (the common pathway of) Ca, an application of Co (based on cell-decay and inflammation) may be hypothesised in all of the diseases mentioned. These considerations served as a theoretical basis for our further studies in clinical practice. Chapter 3 (Original reprints) presents the actual results, whil Chapter 4 (General discussion) reflects on lessons that can be learned from the present work and consequently formulates some suggestions for future (extended) studies. The contours of possible new emerging areas of interest (dementia of the Alzheimer type; vascular dementia; stunned myocardium) are drawn in continuation of the foregoing studies. 47 refs.

  12. A clinically applicable six-segmented foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mits, Sophie; Segers, Veerle; Woodburn, Jim; Elewaut, Dirk; De Clercq, Dirk; Roosen, Philip

    2012-04-01

    We describe a multi-segmented foot model comprising lower leg, rearfoot, midfoot, lateral forefoot, medial forefoot, and hallux for routine use in a clinical setting. The Ghent Foot Model describes the kinematic patterns of functional units of the foot, especially the midfoot, to investigate patient populations where midfoot deformation or dysfunction is an important feature, for example, rheumatoid arthritis patients. Data were obtained from surface markers by a 6 camera motion capture system at 500 Hz. Ten healthy subjects walked barefoot along a 12 m walkway at self-selected speed. Joint angles (rearfoot to shank, midfoot to rearfoot, lateral and medial forefoot to midfoot, and hallux to medial forefoot) in the sagittal, frontal, and transverse plane are reported according to anatomically based reference frames. These angles were calculated and reported during the foot rollover phases in stance, detected by synchronized plantar pressure measurements. Repeated measurements of each subject revealed low intra-subject variability, varying between 0.7° and 2.3° for the minimum values, between 0.5° and 2.1° for the maximum values, and between 0.8° and 5.8° for the ROM. The described movement patterns were repeatable and consistent with biomechanical and clinical knowledge. As such, the Ghent Foot model permits intersegment, in vivo motion measurement of the foot, which is crucial for both clinical and research applications. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  13. Routine clinical application of virtual reality in abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampogna, Gianluca; Pugliese, Raffaele; Elli, Marco; Vanzulli, Angelo; Forgione, Antonello

    2017-06-01

    The advantages of 3D reconstruction, immersive virtual reality (VR) and 3D printing in abdominal surgery have been enunciated for many years, but still today their application in routine clinical practice is almost nil. We investigate their feasibility, user appreciation and clinical impact. Fifteen patients undergoing pancreatic, hepatic or renal surgery were studied realizing a 3D reconstruction of target anatomy. Then, an immersive VR environment was developed to import 3D models, and some details of the 3D scene were printed. All the phases of our workflow employed open-source software and low-cost hardware, easily implementable by other surgical services. A qualitative evaluation of the three approaches was performed by 20 surgeons, who filled in a specific questionnaire regarding a clinical case for each organ considered. Preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative guidance was feasible for all patients included in the study. The vast majority of surgeons interviewed scored their quality and usefulness as very good. Despite extra time, costs and efforts necessary to implement these systems, the benefits shown by the analysis of questionnaires recommend to invest more resources to train physicians to adopt these technologies routinely, even if further and larger studies are still mandatory.

  14. Approach to pharmacological and clinical applications of Anisi aetheroleum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mohamed Mohamed Koriem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anisi aetheroleum is the oil obtained from Pimpinella anisum L. (P. anisum by steam distillation. P. anisum seeds were air-dried, and then the dry seeds were crushed, pulverized, and weighed in sequence for anise oil preparation. P. anisum is one of the oldest medicinal plants that belong to family Apiaceae. The fruit of P. anisum is harvested in August and September. P. anisum is widespread in Asia, Africa and Europe. Local names of P. anisum include anise, anisoon, roomy, saunf, sweet cumin and yansoon. The anise oil odour is aromatic while the oil tastes sweet. The average daily dose of Anisi aetheroleum is 0.3 g. trans-Anethole is the major ingredient of the anise oil. Anisi aetheroleum also displays a protective action against neurotoxicity. In addition, Anisi aetheroleum increases glucose absorption and reduces urine output in the rat. The plant oil have pharmacological (antimicrobial, hepatoprotective, anticonvulsant, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, bronchodilator, estrogenic, expectorant and insecticidal effects and clinical effects on nausea, constipation, menopausal period, virus, diabetes, obesity and sedative action. Owing to the wide application of Anisi aetheroleum in pharmacological and clinical fields, it is recommended for more clinical trails to discover a new medication from the active constituents of the plant oil in the future to treat human diseases especially chronic ones.

  15. Magnetoencephalography: Fundamentals and Established and Emerging Clinical Applications in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeutigam, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography is a noninvasive, fast, and patient friendly technique for recording brain activity. It is increasingly available and is regarded as one of the most modern imaging tools available to radiologists. The dominant clinical use of this technology currently centers on two, partly overlapping areas, namely, localizing the regions from which epileptic seizures originate, and identifying regions of normal brain function in patients preparing to undergo brain surgery. As a consequence, many radiologists may not yet be familiar with this technique. This review provides an introduction to magnetoencephalography, discusses relevant analytical techniques, and presents recent developments in established and emerging clinical applications such as pervasive developmental disorders. Although the role of magnetoencephalography in diagnosis, prognosis, and patient treatment is still limited, it is argued that this technology is exquisitely capable of contributing indispensable information about brain dynamics not easily obtained with other modalities. This, it is believed, will make this technology an important clinical tool for a wide range of disorders in the future

  16. The clinical application of mobile technology to disaster medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Timothy; Morrison, Cecily; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2012-10-01

    Mobile health care technology (mHealth) has the potential to improve communication and clinical information management in disasters. This study reviews the literature on health care and computing published in the past five years to determine the types and efficacy of mobile applications available to disaster medicine, along with lessons learned. Five types of applications are identified: (1) disaster scene management; (2) remote monitoring of casualties; (3) medical image transmission (teleradiology); (4) decision support applications; and (5) field hospital information technology (IT) systems. Most projects have not yet reached the deployment stage, but evaluation exercises show that mHealth should allow faster processing and transport of patients, improved accuracy of triage and better monitoring of unattended patients at a disaster scene. Deployments of teleradiology and field hospital IT systems to disaster zones suggest that mHealth can improve resource allocation and patient care. The key problems include suitability of equipment for use in disaster zones and providing sufficient training to ensure staff familiarity with complex equipment. Future research should focus on providing unbiased observations of the use of mHealth in disaster medicine.

  17. Mechanomyographic Parameter Extraction Methods: An Appraisal for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morufu Olusola Ibitoye

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The research conducted in the last three decades has collectively demonstrated that the skeletal muscle performance can be alternatively assessed by mechanomyographic signal (MMG parameters. Indices of muscle performance, not limited to force, power, work, endurance and the related physiological processes underlying muscle activities during contraction have been evaluated in the light of the signal features. As a non-stationary signal that reflects several distinctive patterns of muscle actions, the illustrations obtained from the literature support the reliability of MMG in the analysis of muscles under voluntary and stimulus evoked contractions. An appraisal of the standard practice including the measurement theories of the methods used to extract parameters of the signal is vital to the application of the signal during experimental and clinical practices, especially in areas where electromyograms are contraindicated or have limited application. As we highlight the underpinning technical guidelines and domains where each method is well-suited, the limitations of the methods are also presented to position the state of the art in MMG parameters extraction, thus providing the theoretical framework for improvement on the current practices to widen the opportunity for new insights and discoveries. Since the signal modality has not been widely deployed due partly to the limited information extractable from the signals when compared with other classical techniques used to assess muscle performance, this survey is particularly relevant to the projected future of MMG applications in the realm of musculoskeletal assessments and in the real time detection of muscle activity.

  18. Use of Emanation Thermal Analysis in the characterization of nuclear waste forms and their alteration products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V; Malek, Z.; Banba, T.; Mitamura, H.; Vance, E.R.

    1999-01-01

    Emanation Thermal Analysis (ETA) was used for the characterization of thermal behavior of two nuclear waste glasses, basalt volcanic glass and perovskite ceramics before and after hydrolytic treatment. The release of radon, formed by the spontaneous α-decay of 228 Th and 224 Ra and incorporated into samples to a maximum depth of 100 nm from the surface due to the recoil, was measured during heating of the samples from 20 to 1200degC and subsequent cooling. Temperatures of the annealing of surface roughness, micro-cracks and other defects, produced by manufacture and/or by subsequent treatment of glass and ceramic samples, were determined using the ETA. Microstructure changes of glass corrosion accompanying their dehydration and thermal decomposition were characterized by the radon release rate changes. The effect of hydrolytic alteration on the thermal behavior of the nuclear waste glass was revealed by ETA in an early corrosion stage. In the alteration product of the perovskite ceramics the diffusion mobility of radon was assessed in the temperature range 1000-1200degC. The thermal stability of radiation-induced defects in perovskite ceramic powder bombarded by He + ions to doses of 10 14 and 10 16 ions/cm 2 was determined by means of ETA. (author)

  19. Heat transfer and flow structure evaluation of a synthetic jet emanating from a planar heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-01-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  20. Animal models of osteogenesis imperfecta: applications in clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enderli TA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tanya A Enderli, Stephanie R Burtch, Jara N Templet, Alessandra Carriero Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL, USA Abstract: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI, commonly known as brittle bone disease, is a genetic disease characterized by extreme bone fragility and consequent skeletal deformities. This connective tissue disorder is caused by mutations in the quality and quantity of the collagen that in turn affect the overall mechanical integrity of the bone, increasing its vulnerability to fracture. Animal models of the disease have played a critical role in the understanding of the pathology and causes of OI and in the investigation of a broad range of clinical therapies for the disease. Currently, at least 20 animal models have been officially recognized to represent the phenotype and biochemistry of the 17 different types of OI in humans. These include mice, dogs, and fish. Here, we describe each of the animal models and the type of OI they represent, and present their application in clinical research for treatments of OI, such as drug therapies (ie, bisphosphonates and sclerostin and mechanical (ie, vibrational loading. In the future, different dosages and lengths of treatment need to be further investigated on different animal models of OI using potentially promising treatments, such as cellular and chaperone therapies. A combination of therapies may also offer a viable treatment regime to improve bone quality and reduce fragility in animals before being introduced into clinical trials for OI patients. Keywords: OI, brittle bone, clinical research, mouse, dog, zebrafish

  1. Properties and clinical application of zirconia bioceramics in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čedomir Oblak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A group of inorganic non-metal biomaterials, that are commonly used in clinical medicine to replace or repair tissues, can be classified as a bioceramics. This group includes bioactive glasses, glass-ceramics, hydroxy-apatite and some other calcium phosphates. In addition, some bio-inert engineering ceramics materials have become increasingly utilised, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide and their composites being the most popular. With the developement of yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconium oxide ceramics (Y-TZP medical community received a high strength biomaterial that is currently a material of choice for the manufacturing of medical devices. Y-TZP ceramics is becoming also increasingly used in dental medicine, where frameworks are manufactured by the use of computer-assisted technology.Conclusions: The article describes the basic properties of zirconia oxide ceramics important for the use in clinical medicine; high strength and fracture toughness, biocompatibility and negligible radiation. The ageing issue of this particular material, which is attributable to the thermo-dynamical instability of tetragonal zirconium oxide in hydrothermal conditions, is also discussed. When exposed to an aqueous environment over long periods of time, the surface of the Y-TZP ceramic will start transforming spontaneously into the monoclinic structure. The mechanism leading to the t-m transformation is temperature-dependent and is accompanied by extensive micro-cracking, which ultimately leads to strength degradation. The degradation might influence the clinical success rate of medical devices and therefore Y-TZP femoral heads are no longer made of pure zirconium oxide. Composites of zirconium and aluminium oxides are used instead, that are currently the strongest ceramic materials used in clinical medicine. In this work the clinical application of zirconia oxide ceramics in dental medicine is also presented. Conventional porcelain fused to metal

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pediatric neuroradiology: clinical and research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Nelson, Marvin D.; Blueml, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers a unique, noninvasive approach to assess pediatric neurological abnormalities at microscopic levels by quantifying cellular metabolites. The most widely available MRS method, proton ( 1 H; hydrogen) spectroscopy, is FDA approved for general use and can be ordered by clinicians for pediatric neuroimaging studies if indicated. There are a multitude of both acquisition and post-processing methods that can be used in the implementation of MR spectroscopy. MRS in pediatric neuroimaging is challenging to interpret because of dramatic normal developmental changes that occur in metabolites, particularly in the first year of life. Still, MRS has been proven to provide additional clinically relevant information for several pediatric neurological disease processes such as brain tumors, infectious processes, white matter disorders, and neonatal injury. MRS can also be used as a powerful quantitative research tool. In this article, specific research applications using MRS will be demonstrated in relation to neonatal brain injury and pediatric brain tumor imaging. (orig.)

  3. The clinical application of the digital imaging in urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yuelong; Xie Sumin; Zhang Li; Li Huayu

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of the digital imaging in the urography. Methods: In total 112 patients underwent digital urography, including intravenous pyelography (IVP) in 38 cases and retrograde pyelography in 74 cases. Results: the entire urinary tract was better shown on digital imaging, which was accurate in locating the obstruction of urinary tract and helped the qualitative diagnosis. Digital urography was especially valuable in detecting urinary calculus. In 38 cases of IVP, the results were normal in 5 patients, renal stone in 12, ureteral stone in 13, ureteral stenosis in 6 and nephroblastom in 2. In the 74 cases of retrograde pyelography, benign ureteral stenosis was found in 31 patients, ureteral stone in 27, ureteral polyp in 2, urethral stone in 8 and benign urethral stenosis in 6. Conclusion: Digital imaging technique is of big value in the diagnosis of urinary tract lesions

  4. Clinical application of dual modes NMR scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Kazuhiro; Sao, Katsuyoshi; Inao, Motohide; Mogi, Yoshimasa; Nagai, Masahiko

    1983-01-01

    The initial stage of clinical application of this method using the FONAR QED 80-α system was reprted. In normal subjects this system produced higher T 1 values for the gray matter than those for the white matter both in the cerebrum and cerebellum. Cases of cerebral infarction showed prolongation of the T 1 value at the infarction site. Cases of cerebral atrophy showed definitely high T 1 values of the white matter near the lateral ventricle. The T 1 value did not fluctuate greatly at the hematoma site in cases of intracerebral hematoma, but was high in the area surrounding the hematoma. Thus, the T 1 value seemed important for assessment of edema surrounding the hematoma. In brain tumors, the major lesion showed a high T 1 . The system has induced no subjective or objective signs of hazards. (Chiba, N.)

  5. Clinical Application of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Hong-jie; Gao, Song; Yang, Xin-chun; Cai, Jun; Zhao, Wen-shu; Sun, Hao; Geng, Yong-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are generated by reprogramming human somatic cells through the overexpression of four transcription factors: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. iPSCs are capable of indefinite self-renewal, and they can differentiate into almost any type of cell in the body. These cells therefore offer a highly valuable therapeutic strategy for tissue repair and regeneration. Recent experimental and preclinical research has revealed their potential for cardiovascular disease diagnosis, drug screening and cellular replacement therapy. Nevertheless, significant challenges remain in terms of the development and clinical application of human iPSCs. Here, we review current progress in research related to patient-specific iPSCs for ex vivo modeling of cardiovascular disorders and drug screening, and explore the potential of human iPSCs for use in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Clinical application of the five-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiger, Thomas A; Presnall, Jennifer Ruth

    2013-12-01

    The Five-Factor Model (FFM) has become the predominant dimensional model of general personality structure. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a clinical application. A substantial body of research indicates that the personality disorders included within the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) can be understood as extreme and/or maladaptive variants of the FFM (the acronym "DSM" refers to any particular edition of the APA DSM). In addition, the current proposal for the forthcoming fifth edition of the DSM (i.e., DSM-5) is shifting closely toward an FFM dimensional trait model of personality disorder. Advantages of this shifting conceptualization are discussed, including treatment planning. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Universal ethical principles and their application in clinical drug trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonorazky, Sergio Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Since 1931, and especially since the Nuremberg Code of 1947, an increasing number of declarations, regulations, norms, guidelines, laws, resolutions, and rules intended to create conditions for better protection of subjects participating in research studies have been published, although some have meant setbacks in the human rights of vulnerable populations. As such, violations of the dignity of experimental subjects in clinical trials continue. What researchers investigate and how the research is done, the quality and transparency of the data, and the analysis and the publication of results (of both raw and processed data) respond to the financial interests of the pharmaceutical companies, coming into permanent tension with bioethical principles and the needs of society. The active participation of civil society is necessary to make it so that pharmaceutical research, results and applications subordinate economic benefits to the protection of human rights.

  8. Citrus bergamia essential oil: from basic research to clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eNavarra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Citrus bergamia Risso et Poiteau, also known as Bergamot, is a plant belonging to the Rutaceae family, defined as a hybrid of bitter orange and lemon. It is an endemic plant of the Calabria region (Italy. Bergamot fruit is primarily used for the extraction of its essential oil (bergamot essential oil: BEO, employed in perfume, cosmetics, food and confections.The aim of this review was to collect recent data from the literature on Citrus bergamia essential oil and, through a critical analysis, focus on safety and the beneficial effects on human health. Clinical studies on the therapeutic applications of BEO exclusively focus on the field of aromatherapy, suggesting that its use can be useful for reducing anxiety and stress.

  9. Agmatine: clinical applications after 100 years in translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piletz, John E; Aricioglu, Feyza; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Gilad, Varda H; Haenisch, Britta; Halaris, Angelos; Hong, Samin; Lee, Jong Eun; Li, Jin; Liu, Ping; Molderings, Gerhard J; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Satriano, Joseph; Seong, Gong Je; Wilcox, George; Wu, Ning; Gilad, Gad M

    2013-09-01

    Agmatine (decarboxylated arginine) has been known as a natural product for over 100 years, but its biosynthesis in humans was left unexplored owing to long-standing controversy. Only recently has the demonstration of agmatine biosynthesis in mammals revived research, indicating its exceptional modulatory action at multiple molecular targets, including neurotransmitter systems, nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and polyamine metabolism, thus providing bases for broad therapeutic applications. This timely review, a concerted effort by 16 independent research groups, draws attention to the substantial preclinical and initial clinical evidence, and highlights challenges and opportunities, for the use of agmatine in treating a spectrum of complex diseases with unmet therapeutic needs, including diabetes mellitus, neurotrauma and neurodegenerative diseases, opioid addiction, mood disorders, cognitive disorders and cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical beam monitor—Pre-clinical evaluation and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frais-Kölbl, Helmut; Griesmayer, Erich; Schreiner, Thomas; Georg, Dietmar; Pernegger, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Future medical ion beam applications for cancer therapy which are based on scanning technology will require advanced beam diagnostics equipment. For a precise analysis of beam parameters we want to resolve time structures in the range of microseconds to nanoseconds. A prototype of an advanced beam monitor was developed by the University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt and its research subsidiary Fotec in co-operation with CERN RD42, Ohio State University and the Jožef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana. The detector is based on polycrystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamond substrates and is equipped with readout electronics up to 2 GHz analog bandwidth. In this paper we present the design of the pCVD-detector system and results of tests performed in various particle accelerator based facilities. Measurements performed in clinical high energy photon beams agreed within 1.2% with results obtained by standard ionization chambers.

  11. Medical beam monitor—Pre-clinical evaluation and future applications

    CERN Document Server

    Frais-Kölbl, H; Schreiner, T; Georg, D; Pernegger, H

    2007-01-01

    Future medical ion beam applications for cancer therapy which are based on scanning technology will require advanced beam diagnostics equipment. For a precise analysis of beam parameters we want to resolve time structures in the range of microseconds to nanoseconds. A prototype of an advanced beam monitor was developed by the University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt and its research subsidiary Fotec in co-operation with CERN RD42, Ohio State University and the Jožef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana. The detector is based on polycrystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamond substrates and is equipped with readout electronics up to 2 GHz analog bandwidth. In this paper we present the design of the pCVD-detector system and results of tests performed in various particle accelerator based facilities. Measurements performed in clinical high energy photon beams agreed within 1.2% with results obtained by standard ionization chambers.

  12. Clinical application of scrotal flap on penis lengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Qinqiang; Li, Shirong; Wu, Julong; Wang, Zhenxiang; Yang, Dongyun; Tao, Ling

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the clinical application of the scrotal flap on penis lengthening. One hundred and fifty-two patients were operated using the scrotal flap from July 1998 to January 2008 at the Department of Plastic and Aesthetic, Surgery Southwest Hospital, Chongqing, China. The procedure consisted of designing a positive sign shaped incision 1.5cm above the root of the penis, dissect and release the superficial suspensory ligament and part of the deep suspensory ligament, then cover the elongated cavernosum with proper scrotal flap. Six-month to 5-year follow-up showed that all patients were satisfied with the good contour and function of the penis. The operation was successful. The method of using scrotal flap on penis lengthening has the following advantages: simple operation, reliable blood supply of the flap, one-stage operation, and satisfactory postoperative results. It is a preferable operation technique for penis lengthening.

  13. Epigenetics and allergy: from basic mechanisms to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potaczek, Daniel P; Harb, Hani; Michel, Sven; Alhamwe, Bilal Alashkar; Renz, Harald; Tost, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Allergic diseases are on the rise in the Western world and well-known allergy-protecting and -driving factors such as microbial and dietary exposure, pollution and smoking mediate their influence through alterations of the epigenetic landscape. Here, we review key facts on the involvement of epigenetic modifications in allergic diseases and summarize and critically evaluate the lessons learned from epigenome-wide association studies. We show the potential of epigenetic changes for various clinical applications: as diagnostic tools, to assess tolerance following immunotherapy or possibly predict the success of therapy at an early time point. Furthermore, new technological advances such as epigenome editing and DNAzymes will allow targeted alterations of the epigenome in the future and provide novel therapeutic tools.

  14. [Applications of MALDI-TOF-MS in clinical microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonnelle, Etienne; Nassif, Xavier

    2011-10-01

    For twenty years, mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a particularly powerful tool for analysis and characterization of proteins in research. It is only recently that this technology, especially MALDI-TOF-MS (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight) has entered the field of routine microbiology. This method has proven to be reliable and safe for the identification of bacteria, yeasts, filamentous fungi and dermatophytes. MALDI-TOF-MS is a rapid, precise and cost-effective method for identification, compared to conventional phenotypic techniques or molecular biology. Its ability to analyse whole microorganisms with few sample preparation has greatly reduced the time to identification (1-2 min). Furthermore, this technology can be used to identify bacteria directly from clinical samples as blood culture bottles or urines. Future applications will be developed in order to provide direct information concerning virulence or resistance protein markers. © 2011 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  15. Computational psychiatry as a bridge from neuroscience to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Quentin J M; Maia, Tiago V; Frank, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Translating advances in neuroscience into benefits for patients with mental illness presents enormous challenges because it involves both the most complex organ, the brain, and its interaction with a similarly complex environment. Dealing with such complexities demands powerful techniques. Computational psychiatry combines multiple levels and types of computation with multiple types of data in an effort to improve understanding, prediction and treatment of mental illness. Computational psychiatry, broadly defined, encompasses two complementary approaches: data driven and theory driven. Data-driven approaches apply machine-learning methods to high-dimensional data to improve classification of disease, predict treatment outcomes or improve treatment selection. These approaches are generally agnostic as to the underlying mechanisms. Theory-driven approaches, in contrast, use models that instantiate prior knowledge of, or explicit hypotheses about, such mechanisms, possibly at multiple levels of analysis and abstraction. We review recent advances in both approaches, with an emphasis on clinical applications, and highlight the utility of combining them.

  16. CT colonography after colostomy - clinical application and technical feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text:Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical application and technical implementation of computed tomographic (CT ) colonoscopy in patients undergoing sigmoid or rectal resection and following sigmoid colostomy in the course of standard diagnostic postoperative follow-up and prior to the reconstructive colon surgery. Materials and Methods: The study included 48 patients who underwent anterior abdomen-perineal or rectal resection and subsequent sigmoid colostomy in case of sigma or rectum carcinoma. The pre-procedure bowel preparation included a full colon cleansing and barium-based fecal tagging. The balloon catheter (18 F) is placed in the colonic stoma. The balloon is insufflated with 15-30 ml saline or air. The balloon was gently pulled until opening of the stoma has been closed completely. In 15 patients, a second catheter was placed in the remaining rectum. Contrast scanning in supination was done for all patients. An additional scanning in left and right lateral position was necessary for 9 patients. Results: All studies were carried out without any major complications. All patients tolerated the intubation and insufflation of air into the intestinal lumen. Two patients (4%) have evaluated the examination as uncomfortable. In 6 patients (12.5 %) it was impossible to evaluate the intestinal segments because due to a collapse of the wall. Five of them were localized in the descending colon. In 5 patients there was a significant amount of residual intestinal contents. The fecal tagging and intravenous contrast enhancing allowed the assessment of these intestinal segments. The rectal residue was correctly assessed in all patients in terms of length, position and wall changes. Conclusion: CT colonoscopy is applicable after sigmostoma in patients with abdomen-perineal and anterior rectal resection. Further in-depth studies are needed to determine the clinical indications and reliability of the method

  17. Clinical application of fluorescence in situ hybridization for prenatal diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-fang JIANG

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish and optimize the procedures of fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH), and evaluate its clinical value in rapid prenatal diagnosis of fetal numerical abnormality of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, Y. Methods Amniotic fluid or fetal blood was sampled by routine invasive procedures. After the amniotic fluid cells or fetal blood cells were separated and sequentially processed with hypotonic solution, fixation solution, smear and high temperature, they were hybridized in situ with two panels of specific fluorescence probes to detect numerical abnormality of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, Y. All the samples were also cultured and analyzed for their karyotype by conventional methods. Results When it was used as a diagnostic criterion of chromosomal number that the fluorescence signals were observed in ≥90% cells, GLP 13/GLP 21 probe panel showed 2 green/2 red fluorescence signals and CSP18/CSP X/CSP Y probe panel showed 2 blue/2 yellow (female or 2 blue/1 yellow/1 red fluorescence signals (male under normal condition. The test reports of all 196 cases were sent out in 72-96 hours, and 7 cases of Down syndrome, 2 cases of trisomy 18 and 1 case of sex chromosomal numerical abnormality were detected, which were accordant with karyotype analysis results reported one month later. Conclusions FISH has potential for clinical application, and is applicable to rapid prenatal diagnosis of fetal numerical abnormality of chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, Y. The rapid FISH, together with conventional karyotyping, offer a valuable means for prenatal diagnosis of fetal aneuploidies.

  18. MR angiography of the body. Technique and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, Emanuele [Pisa Univ. Radiodiagnostica 1 Universitaria (Italy). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Dept. of Oncology, Transplants, and Advanced Technologies in Medicine; Cosottini, Mirco [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Unit of Neuroradiology Dept. of Neurosciences; Caramella, Davide (eds.) [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Dept. of Oncology, Transplants, and Advanced Technologies in Medicine

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) continues to undergo exciting technological advances that are rapidly being translated into clinical practice. It also has evident advantages over other imaging modalities, including better patient safety compared with CT angiography and superior accuracy and contrast resolution compared with ultrasonography. With the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations, this book reviews the current role of MRA of the body. It is divided into three sections. The first section is devoted to issues relating to image acquisition technique and sequences. Individual chapters focus on flow-based MRA, contrast media, contrast-enhanced MRA, artifacts, and image processing. The second and principal section of the book addresses the clinical applications of MRA in various parts of the body, including the neck vessels, the spine, the thoracic aorta and pulmonary vessels, the heart and coronary arteries, the abdominal aorta and renal arteries, and peripheral vessels. The role of the blood pool contrast agents for the diagnosis and characterization of vascular disease is fully explored. The final section considers the role of MRA in patients undergoing liver or pancreas and kidney transplantation. This book will be an invaluable aid to all radiologists who work with MRA. (orig.)

  19. Positive expiratory pressure - Common clinical applications and physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Lannefors, Louise; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    Breathing out against resistance, in order to achieve positive expiratory pressure (PEP), is applied by many patient groups. Pursed lips breathing and a variety of devices can be used to create the resistance giving the increased expiratory pressure. Effects on pulmonary outcomes have been discussed in several publications, but the expected underlying physiology of the effect is seldom discussed. The aim of this article is to describe the purpose, performance, clinical application and underlying physiology of PEP when it is used to increase lung volumes, decrease hyperinflation or improve airway clearance. In clinical practice, the instruction how to use an expiratory resistance is of major importance since it varies. Different breathing patterns during PEP increase or reduce expiratory flow, result in movement of EPP centrally or peripherally and can increase or decrease lung volume. It is therefore necessary to give the right instructions to obtain the desired effects. As the different PEP techniques are being used by diverse patient groups it is not possible to give standard instructions. Based on the information given in this article the instructions have to be adjusted to give the optimal effect. There is no consensus regarding optimal treatment frequency and number of cycles included in each treatment session and must also be individualized. In future research, more precise descriptions are needed about physiological aims and specific instructions of how the treatments have been performed to assure as good treatment quality as possible and to be able to evaluate and compare treatment effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A clinically applicable adjuvant for an atherosclerosis vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Vassallo, Melanie; Mitzi, Jessica; Winkels, Holger; Pei, Hong; Kimura, Takayuki; Miller, Jacqueline; Wolf, Dennis; Ley, Klaus

    2018-06-22

    Vaccination with MHC-II-restricted peptides from Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) with complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant (CFA/IFA) is known to protect mice from atherosclerosis. This vaccination induces antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2c antibody responses and a robust CD4 T cell response in lymph nodes. However, CFA/IFA cannot be used in humans. To find a clinically applicable adjuvant, we tested the effect of vaccinating Apoe-deficient mice with ApoB peptide P6 (TGAYSNASSTESASY). In a broad screening experiment, Addavax, a squalene oil similar to MF59, was the only adjuvant that showed similar efficacy as CFA/IFA. This was confirmed in a confirmation experiment for both the aortic arch and whole aorta analyzed by en face analysis after atherosclerotic lesion staining. Mechanistically, restimulated peritoneal cells from mice immunized with P6 in Addavax released significant amounts of IL-10. Unlike P6 in CFA/IFA, vaccination with P6 in Addavax did not induce any detectable IgG1 or IgG2c antibodies to P6. These data suggest that squalene-based adjuvants such as MF59 are good candidate adjuvants for developing a clinically effective atherosclerosis vaccine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  2. Challenges of the Unknown: Clinical Application of Microbial Metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Rose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fast, high throughput and low cost whole genome sequencing holds great promise within public health microbiology, with applications ranging from outbreak detection and tracking transmission events to understanding the role played by microbial communities in health and disease. Within clinical metagenomics, identifying microorganisms from a complex and host enriched background remains a central computational challenge. As proof of principle, we sequenced two metagenomic samples, a known viral mixture of 25 human pathogens and an unknown complex biological model using benchtop technology. The datasets were then analysed using a bioinformatic pipeline developed around recent fast classification methods. A targeted approach was able to detect 20 of the viruses against a background of host contamination from multiple sources and bacterial contamination. An alternative untargeted identification method was highly correlated with these classifications, and over 1,600 species were identified when applied to the complex biological model, including several species captured at over 50% genome coverage. In summary, this study demonstrates the great potential of applying metagenomics within the clinical laboratory setting and that this can be achieved using infrastructure available to nondedicated sequencing centres.

  3. Models to Study NK Cell Biology and Possible Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Anthony E; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Aguilar, Ethan G; Murphy, William J

    2015-08-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes of the innate immune system, responsible for direct targeting and killing of both virally infected and transformed cells. NK cells rapidly recognize and respond to abnormal cells in the absence of prior sensitization due to their wide array of germline-encoded inhibitory and activating receptors, which differs from the receptor diversity found in B and T lymphocytes that is due to the use of recombination-activation gene (RAG) enzymes. Although NK cells have traditionally been described as natural killers that provide a first line of defense prior to the induction of adaptive immunity, a more complex view of NK cells is beginning to emerge, indicating they may also function in various immunoregulatory roles and have the capacity to shape adaptive immune responses. With the growing appreciation for the diverse functions of NK cells, and recent technological advancements that allow for a more in-depth understanding of NK cell biology, we can now begin to explore new ways to manipulate NK cells to increase their clinical utility. In this overview unit, we introduce the reader to various aspects of NK cell biology by reviewing topics ranging from NK cell diversity and function, mouse models, and the roles of NK cells in health and disease, to potential clinical applications. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. The clinical application of nuclide bone imaging in malignant lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Xing; Tang Mingdeng; Lin Duanyu; Ni Leichun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application value of nuclide bone imaging in malignant lymphoma. Methods: 71 cases of patients were diagnosed by pathology as malignant lymphoma, among whom there were 8 cases of Hodgkin disease (HL) and 63 cases of non-Hodgkin disease (NHL). The examinations were performed from 2.5 to 6 hours later after the intravenous injection of 99m Tc-MDP (555-925 MBq). Results: 31 cases were bone-infiltrating lesions, including 3 cases of HL and 28 cases of NHL. The total number of the focus was 103, except 2 cases of bone lack, including 35 foci in vertebral column (34.65%), 30 foci in limb and joint (29.70%), 14 foci in rib (13.86%), 13 foci in elvis (12.0%), 5 foci in skull (4.95%) and 4 foci in sternum (3.96%). Conclusion: The nuclide bone imaging has a high value in the clinical stage, therapeutic observation and prognosis of bone-infiltrating malignant lymphoma. (authors)

  5. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P.; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A.; Andrade, Almir F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  6. Clinical Application of Renograph IR-03 for the Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Isaris

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The renography using renograph is one of clinical modality to investigate the renal function among other such as laboratory medical check up and X-rays. The prototype of renograph IR-03 designed by BATAN has been constructed and the laboratory tests as well as clinical tests have been carried out at PRPN-BATAN Serpong and General Hospital Dr. Sardjito Jogyakarta, respectively. Cost associated with the clinical use of renograph at the hospital are analyzed according to the two major components: radiopharmaceutical cost and the use of equipment. Annual cost of operational of renograph by estimate number of patient is about 2,000 is IDR. 30.0 millions for radiopharmaceutical 131Iodine. Total Direct Cost is about IDR. 212.5 millions and the Capital Cost for one unit renograph is IDR. 250 millions. The Break Event Point of invest one unit renograph is 1194 procedures (0.597%, or about IDR. 209,475 millions, which the cost for each procedure is IDR. 85,000.-. This value is depending on several variables, especially number of procedure can be reached. The cash flow analyses by Rate of Return (ROR showed that the value of i* is 22.6% is much greater than the value of MARR or saving rate of interest in the Bank now is about < 10%. The Payback Period calculation to see on how interesting the investment of renograph and its prospect for application in the hospitals showed about 1.818 years, that is good prospect economically

  7. Technical basis of radiation therapy. Practical clinical applications. 5. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, Seymour H. [Karolinska Institutet Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncol-Pathol; Perez, Carlos A. [Washington Univ. Medical Center, St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Purdy, James A. [California Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Poortmans, Philip [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-07-01

    This well-received book, now in its fifth edition, is unique in providing a detailed description of the technological basis of radiation therapy. Another novel feature is the collaborative writing of the chapters by North American and European authors. This considerably broadens the book's perspective and increases its applicability in daily practice throughout the world. The book is divided into two sections. The first covers basic concepts in treatment planning, including essential physics and biological principles related to time-dose-fractionation, and explains the various technological approaches to radiation therapy, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, tomotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and high and low dose rate brachytherapy. Issues relating to quality assurance, technology assessment, and cost-benefit analysis are also reviewed. The second part of the book discusses in depth the practical clinical applications of the different radiation therapy techniques in a wide range of cancer sites. All of the chapters have been written by leaders in the field. This book will serve to instruct and acquaint teachers, students, and practitioners in the various fields of oncology with the basic technological factors and approaches in radiation therapy. (orig.)

  8. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, Antonio; Vilanova, Joan C.

    2014-01-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  9. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; MRI Health Time Group, Jaen (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Univ. (Spain). Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta. Caterina; Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr. (ed.) [CDPI and IRM, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Rossi, Santiago E. [Centro de Diagnostico, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  10. [Nursing methodology applicated in patients with pressure ulcers. Clinical report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez Romero, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The application of functional patterns lets us to make a systematic and premeditated nursing assessment, with which we obtain a lot of relevant patient data in an organized way, making easier to analize them. In our case, we use Marjory Gordon's functional health patterns and NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification), NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification) taxonomy. The overall objective of this paper is to present the experience of implementation and development of nursing methodology in the care of patients with pressure ulcers. In this article it's reported a case of a 52-year-old female who presented necrosis of phalanxes in upper and lower limbs and suffered amputations of them after being hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit. She was discharged with pressure ulcers on both heels. GENERAL ASSESSMENT: It was implemented the nursing theory known as "Gordon's functional health patterns" and the affected patterns were identified. The Second Pattern (Nutritional-Metabolic) was considered as reference, since this was the pattern which altered the rest. EVOLUTION OF THE PATIENT: The patient had a favourable evolution, improving all the altered patterns. The infections symptoms disappeared and the pressure ulcers of both heels healed completely. The application of nursing methodology to care patients with pressure ulcers using clinical practice guidelines, standardized procedures and rating scales of assessment improves the evaluation of results and the performance of nurses.

  11. Clinical nuclear medicine applications in Turkey and specific renal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbas, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear cardiology, nuclear oncology, pediatric nuclear medicine and nuclear endocrinology are the main application areas of clinical nuclear medicine in Turkey. Not only imaging studies, but also therapeutic application of radiopharmaceuticals is also performed at many institutes, such as hyperthyroidism treatment with radioiodine, thyroid cancer ablation and metastases treatment with radioiodine, radio synovectomy, metastatic pain therapy, and recently radioimmunotherapy of lymphomas. Almost all radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are obtained commercially from European countries, except 18-FDG which is obtained from two cyclotrons in Turkey. More than 30.000 renal procedures are performed at the University hospitals in a year. Pediatric age groups is approximately % 55 of patients. 99mTc-DTPA (%44), 99mTc-DMSA (%37), 99mTc-MAG3 (%17) and 99mTc-EC (%2) are the most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals for renal imaging. More than 6.000 vials of several pharmaceuticals are used for renal cortical scintigraphy (%35), dynamic renal imaging (%34), renal scintigraphy with diuretic (%27) and captopril scintigraphy (%4). Most common indication for renal cortical scintigraphy is detection of cortical scarring (%53). In addition, using single plasma sample method or gamma-camera method renal clearance measurements with 99mTc-MAG3 99mTc-DTPA have been used at some institutions

  12. Clinical nuclear medicine applications in Turkey and specific renal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbas, B.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology, nuclear oncology, pediatric nuclear medicine and nuclear endocrinology are the main application areas of clinical nuclear medicine in Turkey. Not only imaging studies, but also therapeutic application of radiopharmaceuticals is also performed at many institutes, such as hyperthyroidism treatment with radioiodine, thyroid cancer ablation and metastases treatment with radioiodine, radio synovectomy, metastatic pain therapy, and recently radioimmunotherapy of lymphomas. Almost all radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are obtained commercially from European countries, except 18-FDG which is obtained from two cyclotrons in Turkey. More than 30.000 renal procedures are performed at the University hospitals in a year. Pediatric age groups is approximately % 55 of patients. 99m Tc-DTPA (%44), 99m Tc-DMSA (%37), 99m Tc-MAG3 (%17) and 99m Tc-EC (%2) are the most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals for renal imaging. More than 6.000 vials of several pharmaceuticals are used for renal cortical scintigraphy (%35), dynamic renal imaging (%34), renal scintigraphy with diuretic (%27) and captopril scintigraphy (%4). Most common indication for renal cortical scintigraphy is detection of cortical scarring (%53). In addition, using single plasma sample method or gamma-camera method renal clearance measurements with 99m Tc-MAG3 99m Tc-DTPA have been used at some institutions. (author)

  13. 78 FR 60885 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Notice Request: Application Process for Clinical Research Training...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Notice Request: Application Process for Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at the Clinical... Research Training and Medical Education, NIH Clinical Center, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1158, Bethesda, MD 20892... Process for Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at the Clinical Center and its Impact on...

  14. 78 FR 79703 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Application Process for Clinical Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ...; 30-Day Comment Request: Application Process for Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at..., MD, Deputy Director, Office of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education, NIH Clinical Center... Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at the Clinical Center and its Impact on Course and...

  15. [Recent development of metabonomics and its applications in clinical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Jiang, Ying; He, Fu-Chu

    2008-04-01

    In the post-genomic era, systems biology is central to the biological sciences. Functional genomics such as transcriptomics and proteomics can simultaneous determine massive gene or protein expression changes following drug treatment or other intervention. However, these changes can't be coupled directly to changes in biological function. As a result, metabonomics and its many pseudonyms (metabolomics, metabolic profiling, etc.) have exploded onto the scientific scene in the past several years. Metabonomics is a rapidly growing research area and a system approach for comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the global metabolites in a biological matrix. Analytical chemistry approach is necessary for the development of comprehensive metabonomics investigations. Fundamentally, there are two types of metabonomics approaches: mass-spectrometry (MS) based and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies. Metabonomics measurements provide a wealth of data information and interpretation of these data relies mainly on chemometrics approaches to perform large-scale data analysis and data visualization, such as principal and independent component analysis, multidimensional scaling, a variety of clustering techniques, and discriminant function analysis, among many others. In this review, the recent development of analytical and statistical techniques used in metabonomics is summarized. Major applications of metabonomics relevant to clinical and preclinical study are then reviewed. The applications of metabonomics in study of liver diseases, cancers and other diseases have proved useful both as an experimental tool for pathogenesis mechanism re-search and ultimately a tool for diagnosis and monitoring treatment response of these diseases. Next, the applications of metabonomics in preclinical toxicology are discussed and the role that metabonomics might do in pharmaceutical research and development is explained with special reference to the aims and achievements of the

  16. Human factors consideration in clinical applications of virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C H; Griffin, M J

    1997-01-01

    Virtual reality environments have many potential applications in medicine, including surgical training, tele-operated robotic surgery, assessment and rehabilitation of behavioural and neurological disorders and diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation of physical disabilities. Although there is much potential for the use of immersive virtual reality environments in clinical applications, there are problems which could limit their ultimate usability. Some users have experienced side-effects during and after exposure to virtual reality environments. The symptoms include ocular problems, disorientation and balance disturbances, and nausea. Susceptibility to side-effects can be affected by age, ethnicity, experience, gender and physical fitness, as well as the characteristics of the display, the virtual environment and the tasks. The characteristics of the virtual reality system have also been shown to affect the ability of users to perform tasks in a virtual environment. Many of these effects can be attributed to delays between the sampling of head and limb positions and the presentation of an appropriate image on the display. The introduction of patients to virtual reality environments, for assessment, therapy or rehabilitation, raises particular safety and ethical issues. Patients exposed to virtual reality environments for assessment and rehabilitation may have disabilities which increase their susceptibility to certain side-effects. Special precautions therefore need to be taken to ensure the safety and effectiveness of such virtual reality applications. These precautions include minimisation of possible side-effects at the design stage. Factors are identified which are likely to affect the incidence of side-effects during and after exposures, and which need to be understood in order to minimise undesirable consequences. There is also a need for the establishment of protocols for monitoring and controlling exposures of patients to virtual reality environments. Issues

  17. Radon emanations: a tectonic indicator in the Dharamsala area of Himalayan Frontal Zone, Himachal Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    While throughout the length of Himalayas good exposures of the tertiary and the pre-Tertiary occurs occur, but in the Dharamsala and its adjoining areas of Himalayan Frontal Zone, tertiary and the pre-Tertiary rocks are present within a short aerial distance. This diverse lithology within a short span of distance along with the structural heterogeneity has made this region of Himalayas tectonically significant. This unique tectano-stratigraphic configuration of this area is primarily attributed to the major faults and folds which are either along the Himalayan trend or transverse to it. Interestingly the area is seismically active and falls in the High Seismic Zone-V of seismic atlas of India. It has been observed that regional thrusts systems and lineaments, control seismo-tectonic activity in the region. Contemporary geomorphological re-adjustments in the form of erosion intensity (meandering/drainage pattern or river incision) as a result of active nature of lineaments have been observed. In addition, due to the rampant seismic activity in the region especially in year 2013, the area has witnessed a sequence of landslides. The study further reveals these the signatures of morphological adjustment coincide with zones which have deciphered higher proportions of radon activity. Because radon transport through rocks is largely dependent on the geology of the area, which includes lithology, compaction, porosity structural/tectonic features like thrusts, faults, joints and fractures. Occurrences of landslide the thrust zones, coupled with high emanations of radon (both in soil and water) alludes attention towards dominant role of neo-tectonic activity in the area. (author)

  18. Tracing Fast Electron Beams Emanating from the Magnetic Reconnection Site in a Solar Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Yu, S.; Battaglia, M.; Krucker, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fast electron beams propagating in the solar corona can emit radio waves commonly known as type III radio bursts. At decimetric wavelengths, these bursts are emitted from the low corona where flare energy release is thought to take place. As such, decimetric type III radio bursts can serve as an excellent tool to directly trace fast electron beams in the vicinity of the flare energy release site. Here we report observations of decimetric type III bursts during a jet event using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in 1-2 GHz. Taking advantage of VLA's highly sensitive spectral imaging capability with an ultra-high cadence of 50 ms, we derive detailed trajectories of fast electron beams (with a bulk speed of at least 0.3-0.5c, or several tens of keV) and place them in the context of extreme ultraviolet and X-ray images obtained by SDO/AIA and RHESSI. Our results show that the electron beams originated in a region just below the jet and above the lower-lying small-scale flare loops, presumably where the magnetic energy release took place. We show that the electron beams appear in groups, each with a duration of only a few seconds. Each group, consisting of beams propagating along magnetic field lines at different angles, is seen to emanate from a single site trailing the jet, interpreted as the magnetic reconnection null point. Our results suggest, at least for the present case, that the fast electron beams were energized directly at the magnetic reconnection site which was highly inhomogeneous and fragmentary possibly down to kilometer scales.

  19. Determination of radioactivity in and radon emanation coefficient of selected building materials and estimation of radiation exposure from their use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    Building materials commonly used in the construction industry and those that were manufactured with waste products of the phosphate industry, and phosphate ores were examined for radioactivity content. Each material was analyzed for Ra-226, Ra-228, and K-40 by gamma-ray spectrometry. The measured radionuclide concentrations for the building materials examined ranged from 0.2-3.9 pCi g -1 for Ra-226, 0.3-1.8 pCi g -1 for Ra-228, and 2.3-37 pCi g -1 for K-40. Waste products of elemental phosphorus manufacture had activity concentrations that ranged from 4.2-54 pCi g -1 for Ra-226, 0.3-1.0 pCi g -1 for Ra-228, and 1.4-6.6 pCi g -1 for K-40. The activity concentrations for phosphate ores from Tennessee and Montana were 5.3 and 36 pCi g -1 for Ra-226, 0.5 and 0.6 pCi g -1 for Ra-228, and 4.8 and 9.0 pCi g -1 for K-40, respectively. The emanation coefficients for the building materials examined ranged from 6.86 x 10 -4 - 5.99 x 10 -2 . Those for the waste products of the phosphate industry ranged from 2.21 x 10 -4 - 3.06 x 10 -2 . The phosphate ores had emanation coefficients in the order of 10 -2 . The emanation coefficients for mineral wool and wall-board slightly increased when measured at a relative humidity of 100% instead of 0%. No dependence of emanation coefficient on humidity was observed for Tenn. phosphate slag

  20. Clinical applications of gamma-detection probes - radioguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneebaum, S.; Stadler, J.; Skornick, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Radioguided surgery (RGS) is a surgical technique that enables the surgeon to identify tissue ''marked'' by a radionuclide before surgery, based on the tissue characteristics, the radioactive tracer and its carrying molecule, or the affinity of both. Thus, yet another tool has been added to the inspection and palpation traditionally used by the surgeon. Current clinical applications of radioguided surgery are: radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) for colon cancer, sentinel-node mapping for malignant melanoma (which has become state-of-the-art), sentinel-node mapping for breast, vulvar and penile cancer, and detection of parathyroid adenoma and bone tumour (such as osteid osteoma). Although the same gamma-detecting probe (GDP) may be used for all these applications, the carrier substance and the radionuclide differ. MoAb and peptides are used for RIGS, sulphur colloid for sentinel-node mapping, iodine-125 for RIGS, technetium-99m for sentinel node, parathyroid and bone. The mode of injection also differs, but there are some common principles of gamma-guided surgery. RIGS enables the surgeon to corroborate tumour existence, find occult metastases, and assess the margins of resection; this may result in a change on the surgical plan. Sentinel lymph-node (SLN) scintigraphy for melanoma guides the surgeon to find the involved lymph nodes for lymph-node dissection. SLN for breast cancer is being investigated with promising results. This procedure has also changed the outlook of lymph-node pathology by giving the pathologist designated tissue samples for more comprehensive examination. Gamma-guided surgery will result in more accurate and less unnecessary surgery, better pathology and, hopefully, in better patient survival. (orig.)

  1. The effect of time-dependent ventilation and radon (thoron) gas emanation rates in underground uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical radiation mine model, suitable for underground uranium mines, has been investigated. In this model, the rate of ventilation and/or the radon (thoron) gas emanation from mine walls are time-dependent. Several cases of practical interest have been investigated including sinusoidal, linear, exponential, stepwise, or a combination of two or more of the above. Analytical solutions were obtained for the time-dependent radon (thoron) gas emanation rate. However, because of the extreme analytical complexity of the solutions corresponding to the time-dependent ventilation rate case, numerical solutions were found using a special Runge-Kutta procedure and the Hamming's modified predictor-corrector method for the solution of linear initial-value problems. The mine model makes provisions for losses of radioactivity, other than by ventilation and radioactive decay, by, say, plate-out on mine walls, and by other mechanisms. Radioactivity data, i.e., radon, thoron, and their progeny, obtained with the above mine model for a number of ventilation and emanation conditions, are presented. Experimental data obtained in an inactive stope of an underground uranium mine for a time-dependent air flow case are shown. Air flow conditions (ventilation rate) were determined by tracer gas techniques using SF 6

  2. Measurement of 222Rn flux, 222Rn emanation and 226Ra concentration from injection well pipe scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rood, A.S.; Kendrick, D.T.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) has been recognized since the early 1930s in petroleum reservoirs and in oil and gas production and processing facilities. NORM was typically observed in barite scale that accumulated on the interior of oil production tubing and in storage tank and heater-treater separation sludge. Recent concern has been expressed over the health impacts from the uncontrolled release of NORM to the public. There are several potential exposure pathways to humans from oil-field NORM. Among these is inhalation of radon gas and its daughter products. For this exposure pathway to be of any significance, radon must first be released from the NORM matrix and diffuse in free air. The radon emanation fraction refers to the fraction of radon atoms produced by the decay of radium, that migrate from the bulk material as free gaseous atoms. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the radon release rates from NORM-scale contaminated production tubing being stored above ground, characterize the radon emanation fraction of the bulk scale material when removed from the tubing, and characterize the radium concentrations of the scale. Accurate characterization of 222 Rn emanation fractions from pipe scale may dictate the type of disposal options available for this waste. Characterization of radon release from stored pipes will assist in determining if controls are needed for workers or members of the public downwind from the source. Due to the sensitive nature of this data, the location of this facility is not disclosed

  3. Effects of barium chlorine treatment of uranium ore on 222Rn emanation and 226Ra leachability from mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, S.A.; Church, S.L.; Whicker, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this laboratory study was to investigate the effectiveness of barium chloride treatment of uranium ore on 222 Rn emanation from mill tailings, 226 Ra level in waste-water, and the leachability of radium from tailings. It has been shown that barium sulfate is an excellent carrier for radium and that barium sulfate crystals have high retention capacity for radon gas produced by radium trapped within the lattice. Ground uranium ore from a mine in Wyoming was mixed with water to form a 1:1 ratio before barium and potassium chlorides were added at concentrations of 0, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg per liter of slurry. The ore was then subjected to a simulated mill process using sulfuric acid leaching. The liquid representing tailings pond water was separated and analyzed for 226 Ra and the solid fraction, representing mill tailings, was tested for radon emanation and the leachability of radium by deionized water. This study suggests that barium treatment of uranium ore prior to sulfuric acid leaching could be effective in reducing radon emanation from tailings and also in reducing the 226 Ra concentration of waste-water. Leachability of radium from treated tailings was markedly reduced

  4. Complement inhibition in pre-clinical models of periodontitis and prospects for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Kajikawa, Tetsuhiro; Wang, Baomei; Yancopoulou, Despina; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2016-06-01

    Periodontitis is a dysbiotic inflammatory disease leading to the destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. Current therapies are not always effective and this prevalent oral disease continues to be a significant health and economic burden. Early clinical studies have associated periodontitis with elevated complement activity. Consistently, subsequent genetic and pharmacological studies in rodents have implicated the central complement component C3 and downstream signaling pathways in periodontal host-microbe interactions that promote dysbiosis and inflammatory bone loss. This review discusses these mechanistic advances and moreover focuses on the compstatin family of C3 inhibitors as a novel approach to treat periodontitis. In this regard, local application of the current lead analog Cp40 was recently shown to block both inducible and naturally occurring periodontitis in non-human primates. These promising results from non-human primate studies and the parallel development of Cp40 for clinical use highlight the feasibility for developing an adjunctive, C3-targeted therapy for human periodontitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Weightbath hydrotraction treatment: application, biomechanics, and clinical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márta Kurutz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Márta Kurutz1, Tamás Bender21Department of Structural Mechanics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary; 2Department of Physical Medicine, Polyclinic and Hospital of the Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God, Budapest, Medical University of Szeged, HungaryBackground and purpose: Weightbath hydrotraction treatment (WHT is a simple noninvasive effective method of hydro- or balneotherapy to stretch the spine or lower limbs, applied successfully in hospitals and health resort sanitaria in Hungary for more than fifty years. This study aims to introduce WHT with its biomechanical and clinical effects. History, development, equipment, modes of application, biomechanics, spinal traction forces and elongations, indications and contraindications of WHT are precented.Subjects and methods: The calculation of traction forces acting along the spinal column during the treatment is described together with the mode of suspension and the position of extra weight loads applied. The biomechanics of the treatment are completed by in vivo measured elongations of lumbar segments using a special underwater ultrasound measuring method. The clinical effects, indications, and contraindications of the treatment are also presented.Results: In the underwater cervical suspension of a human body, approximately 25 N stretching load occurs in the cervical spine, and about 11 N occurs in the lumbar spine. By applying extra weights, the above tensile forces along the spinal column can be increased. Thus, the traction effect can be controlled by applying such loads during the treatment. Elongations of segments L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5–S1 were measured during the usual WHT of patients suspended cervically in water for 20 minutes, loaded by 20–20 N lead weights on the ankles. The mean initial elastic elongations of spinal segments were about 0.8 mm for patients aged under 40 years, 0.5 mm between 40–60 years, and 0.2 mm for patients over 60 years. The mean

  6. Selection, processing and clinical application of muscle-skeletal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna Z, D.; Reyes F, M.L.; Lavalley E, C.; Castaneda J, G.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the increase in the average of the world population's life, people die each time to more age, this makes that the tissues of support of the human body, as those muscle-skeletal tissues, when increasing the individual's age go weakening, this in turn leads to the increment of the illnesses like the osteoporosis and the arthritis, that undoubtedly gives as a result more injure of the muscle-skeletal tissues joined a greater number of traffic accidents where particularly these tissues are affected, for that the demand of tissues muscle-skeletal for transplant every day will be bigger. The production of these tissues in the Bank of Radio sterilized Tissues, besides helping people to improve its quality of life saved foreign currencies because most of the muscle-skeletal tissues transplanted in Mexico are of import. The use of the irradiation to sterilize tissues for transplant has shown to be one of the best techniques with that purpose for what the International Atomic Energy Agency believes a Technical cooperation program to establish banks of tissues using the nuclear energy, helping mainly to countries in development. In this work the stages that follows the bank of radio sterilized tissues of the National Institute of Nuclear Research for the cadaverous donor's of muscle-skeletal tissue selection are described, as well as the processing and the clinical application of these tissues. (Author)

  7. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT in imaging the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huellner, Martin W.; Strobel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Today, SPECT/CT is increasingly used and available in the majority of larger nuclear medicine departments. Several applications of SPECT/CT as a supplement to or replacement for traditional conventional bone scintigraphy have been established in recent years. SPECT/CT of the upper and lower extremities is valuable in many conditions with abnormal bone turnover due to trauma, inflammation, infection, degeneration or tumour. SPECT/CT is often used in patients if conventional radiographs are insufficient, if MR image quality is impaired due to metal implants or in patients with contraindications to MR. In complex joints such as those in the foot and wrist, SPECT/CT provides exact anatomical correlation of pathological uptake. In many cases SPECT increases the sensitivity and CT the specificity of the study, increasing confidence in the final diagnosis compared to planar images alone. The CT protocol should be adapted to the clinical question and may vary from very low-dose (e.g. attenuation correction only), to low-dose for anatomical correlation, to normal-dose protocols enabling precise anatomical resolution. The aim of this review is to give an overview of SPECT/CT imaging of the extremities with a focus on the hand and wrist, knee and foot, and for evaluation of patients after joint arthroplasty. (orig.)

  8. CLINICAL APPLICATIONS OF CRYOTHERAPY AMONG SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPISTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Shawn W; Hawkins, Jeremy R

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic modalities (TM) are used by sports physical therapists (SPT) but how they are used is unknown. To identify the current clinical use patterns for cryotherapy among SPT. Cross-sectional survey. All members (7283) of the Sports Physical Therapy Section of the APTA were recruited. A scenario-based survey using pre-participation management of an acute or sub-acute ankle sprain was developed. A Select Survey link was distributed via email to participants. Respondents selected a treatment approach based upon options provided. Follow-up questions were asked. The survey was available for two weeks with a follow-up email sent after one week. Question answers were the main outcome measures. Reliability: Cronbach's alpha=>0.9. The SPT response rate = 6.9% (503); responses came from 48 states. Survey results indicated great variability in respondents' approaches to the treatment of an acute and sub-acute ankle sprain. SPT applied cryotherapy with great variability and not always in accordance to the limited research on the TM. Continuing education, application of current research, and additional outcomes based research needs to remain a focus for clinicians. 3.

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids in schizophrenia Part II: Clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róg Joanna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ω-3 unsaturated fatty acids are compounds belonging to the group of essential fatty acids (EFAs. The history of the discovery of EFAs dates back to the 1930s of the twentieth century, however, growing interest in ω-3 EFAs in the context of mental health has been observed since the year 2000. In view of their multidirectional action, these compounds are a promising form of adjunctive therapy of many illnesses, including psychiatric disorders. The present article aims to review the literature on the clinical applicability of ω-3 EFAs in treating schizophrenia. We present the results of preclinical studies in this area and the mechanisms of ω-3 EFAs action discussed by the authors. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating the possibility of using ω-3 EFAs in schizophrenia are characterized in detail. The results of the tests are not clear, which may result from the methodological diversity of interventions made. Ω-3 EFAs seem to be a promising form of adjunctive therapy of schizophrenia. Further research is needed, which will allow for defining groups of patients in which intervention will bring the expected results.

  10. Commissioning and first clinical application of mARC treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Nuesken, Frank G.; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert P.; Ruebe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The modulated arc (mARC) technique has recently been introduced for Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerators. We present the first experiences with the commissioning of the system and first patient treatments. Treatment planning and delivery are presented for the Prowess Panther treatment planning system or, alternatively, an in-house code. Dosimetric verification is performed both by point dose measurements and in 3D dose distribution. Depending on the target volume, one or two arcs can be used to create highly conformal plans. Dosimetric verification of the converted mARC plans with step-and-shoot plans shows deviations below 1 % in absolute point dose; in the 3D dose distribution, over 95 % of the points pass the 3D gamma criteria (3 % deviation in local dose and 3 mm distance to agreement for doses > 20 % of the maximum). Patient specific verification of the mARC dose distribution with the calculations has a similar pass rate. Treatment times range between 2 and 5 min for a single arc. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical application of the mARC technique. The mARC offers the possibility to save significant amounts of time, with single-arc treatments of only a few minutes achieving comparable dose distribution to IMRT plans taking up to twice as long. (orig.) [de

  11. A Comprehensive Review on Clinical Applications of Comet Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekarana, Vidya; Chand, Parkash

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of DNA damage and ineffective repair mechanisms are the underlying bio-molecular events in the pathogenesis of most of the life-threatening diseases like cancer and degenerative diseases. The sources of DNA damage can be either exogenous or endogenous in origin. Imbalance between the oxidants and antioxidants resulting in increased reactive oxygen species mostly accounts for the endogenously derived attacks on DNA. Among the various methods employed in the estimation of DNA damage, alkaline comet assay is proven to be a relatively simple and versatile tool in the assessment of DNA damage and also in determining the efficacy of DNA repair mechanism. The aim of this article is to review the application of comet assay in the field of medicine towards human biomonitoring, understanding the pathogenesis of cancer and progression of chronic and degenerative diseases, prediction of tumour radio & chemosensitivity and in male infertility. A standardized protocol and analysis system of various variants of comet assay in different types of cells, across the labs will be of useful and reliable clinical tool in the field of Medicine for the estimation of levels of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. PMID:25954633

  12. Development and clinical application of transient elastography(FibroScan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-feng CHEN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver fibrosis,an important step in the development of liver diseases,is an anaplerotic reaction of an organism to chronic liver damage caused by various kinds of pathogens.It is a common pathologic change in chronic liver diseases and the intermediate link in the development of liver cirrhosis.Liver fibrosis can be reversed in the early stage,as well as in the later stage.Cases of liver cirrhosis that are confirmed during the earlier stage can be treated and prognosticated more efficiently.Currently,liver biopsy is still the gold standard for diagnosing liver fibrosis.However,its invasiveness causes patients to refuse the examination.Noninvasive diagnostic technology for liver fibrosis has made considerable development in recent years.One of these technologies is transient elastography(FibroScan of liver stiffness using elastic shear wave,which has good accuracy and specificity for the determination of liver fibrosis.It is noninvasive,fast,repeatable,and it can evaluate liver fibrosis objectively and quantitatively.It will have a broad range of clinical applications in the future.

  13. The research of clinical application of computed tomographic virtual gastroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Pan Zhenyu; Zhai Xiaoli; Gu Hua; Wang Yajie; Ding Yi; Wang Li; Liang Ying; Zhai Renyou

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the values, methods and findings of computed tomographic virtual gastroscopy (CTVG). Methods: Sixty-nine patients underwent the examination of spiral CT after charged air into stomachs in different cubage. The CT scan conditions were collimating width 3 mm, pitch 1.2 - 2.5, scanning speed 0.8 s/360 degree, the raw data of CT volume scan was reconstructed in overlapping rate 33% - 67%. Then the images of CTVG were built using navigator software (GE AG, USA). Results: The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of CTVG were 92.8%, 96.4%, and 78.6%, respectively. CTVG corresponded well with fibrous gastroscopy and specimens in demonstrating the gastric lesions. CTVG was provided with the ability of revealing the tiny lesions of chronic atrophic gastritis, chronic erosive gastritis, chronic proliferative gastritis, and acute hemorrhagic gastritis in some degree. The high quality imaging of CTVG could be obtained in condition of collimating width 3 mm, pitch 1.2 - 1.5, overlapping 50% - 67%, well hold-breath, gastric cubage in full and feasible scan positions. Conclusion: CTVG is a rising means of gastric examination and has great value in clinic applications

  14. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT in imaging the extremities

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    Huellner, Martin W. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Strobel, Klaus [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Today, SPECT/CT is increasingly used and available in the majority of larger nuclear medicine departments. Several applications of SPECT/CT as a supplement to or replacement for traditional conventional bone scintigraphy have been established in recent years. SPECT/CT of the upper and lower extremities is valuable in many conditions with abnormal bone turnover due to trauma, inflammation, infection, degeneration or tumour. SPECT/CT is often used in patients if conventional radiographs are insufficient, if MR image quality is impaired due to metal implants or in patients with contraindications to MR. In complex joints such as those in the foot and wrist, SPECT/CT provides exact anatomical correlation of pathological uptake. In many cases SPECT increases the sensitivity and CT the specificity of the study, increasing confidence in the final diagnosis compared to planar images alone. The CT protocol should be adapted to the clinical question and may vary from very low-dose (e.g. attenuation correction only), to low-dose for anatomical correlation, to normal-dose protocols enabling precise anatomical resolution. The aim of this review is to give an overview of SPECT/CT imaging of the extremities with a focus on the hand and wrist, knee and foot, and for evaluation of patients after joint arthroplasty. (orig.)

  15. Development and clinical application of human gastrin radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginabreda, M.G.P.; Borghi, V.C.; Bettarello, A.

    1988-08-01

    The determination of human gastrin levels in the blood is very important for diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. This work describes the radioimmunoassay of gastrin developed according to Russell et al. and its clinical application measuring fasting levels of this hormone in normal subjects, gastrectomized, chagasics, patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), pernicious anemia (PA) and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES). Synthetic human gastrin was used for radioiodination and as standard, while the specific antibody was raised in rabbits. Gastrin was radioiodinated by a modification of the chloramine T technique and purified by anion exchange chromatography in QAE-Sephadex A-25 to a specific activity around 200 uCi/ug. The assays were performed by incubation of 125 I-gastrin, standard gastrin (zero to 500 pmol/l) or unknown samples with the antiserum for 4 days at 4 0 C. The antibody bound and free 125 I-gastrin was separated by adsorption of the latter to the charcoal. The basal gastrin values of normal subjects ranged from 2 to 74 pmol/l, being these levels higher in the chagasics (from 6 to 261 pmol/l). Higher levels of gastrin were determined in patients with CRF (from 12 to 350 pmol/l), PA (from 160 to 680 pmol/l) and with ZES(1010 pmol/l), while very low levels were confirmed in gastrectomized (from 1 to 8 pmol/l). (author) [pt

  16. Chemical compound-based direct reprogramming for future clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Yukimasa; Harada, Yoshinori; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Dai, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that a combination of chemical compounds enables direct reprogramming from one somatic cell type into another without the use of transgenes by regulating cellular signaling pathways and epigenetic modifications. The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generally requires virus vector-mediated expression of multiple transcription factors, which might disrupt genomic integrity and proper cell functions. The direct reprogramming is a promising alternative to rapidly prepare different cell types by bypassing the pluripotent state. Because the strategy also depends on forced expression of exogenous lineage-specific transcription factors, the direct reprogramming in a chemical compound-based manner is an ideal approach to further reduce the risk for tumorigenesis. So far, a number of reported research efforts have revealed that combinations of chemical compounds and cell-type specific medium transdifferentiate somatic cells into desired cell types including neuronal cells, glial cells, neural stem cells, brown adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, somatic progenitor cells, and pluripotent stem cells. These desired cells rapidly converted from patient-derived autologous fibroblasts can be applied for their own transplantation therapy to avoid immune rejection. However, complete chemical compound-induced conversions remain challenging particularly in adult human-derived fibroblasts compared with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). This review summarizes up-to-date progress in each specific cell type and discusses prospects for future clinical application toward cell transplantation therapy. PMID:29739872

  17. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer

  18. Spinal CT-guided injections. Clinical applications-limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatakis, V.; Vlachou, I.; Petrocheilou, G.; Safarika, V.; Geroukis, I.; Petinelli, A.; Stathopoulou, S.; Kokkinis, C.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Chronic spinal pain is an important health issue with serious social and financial consequences. Thus, application of minimal invasive procedures is a popular technique for immediate relief of pain. Objectives and tasks: Our purpose is to present CT guided intraspinal injection of pharmaceutical agents for the relief of persistent pain. Material and methods: Chronic localized or radicular spinal pain may be treated safely and efficiently with injection of various pharmaceutical agents (local anesthetic, opioid analgesic and steroids or combination of these). The possible sites of infiltration include: a) intervertebral joints (facets), b) sacroiliac joints, c)perineural infiltration of the affected nerve roots and d) the epidural space. We will mention the patients choice criteria (combination of clinical symptoms and specific pain evaluation questionnaire) as they are reported in the international bibliography. Finally, we will discuss the repeatability criteria of the method as well as its limitations. Results: CT-guided pharmaceutical agents injection for the relief of persistent spinal pain have an advantage against other methods because of the precision and safety that they offer to the localization and diagnosis of the pain cause. Conclusion: Small complications percentage and satisfactory results have made CT-guided spinal injections a popular technique for chronic back pain relief. In order to apply these techniques the good knowledge of the method, its possibilities and limitations is necessary

  19. Clinical application of radiation dosimetry on X-ray radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Takeo

    1995-01-01

    In the case of radiotherapy, it is important to give proper dose for a tumor, to be treated with the objective of therapy, and to evaluate the dose, considering dose for other organs at risk to a sufficient extent. To provide an exposure dose at the target volume of tumor parts, it should be required to get a good understanding of the correct dosimetric method and also to apply this to clinical application in practice. All over the country, so as not to produce any difference in the given dose, 'A practical code for the dosimetry of high energy X-rays in radiotherapy' was issued by the Japanese Associations of radiological physicists in 1972. In 1986, it was revised. At about 85% of therapeutic facilities in the country, radiation engineers perform dose measurements and controls. Therefore, I have explained the process of measurement and dose calculation, with the main objective directed at the engineers in charge of the radiotherapy so as to easily radiation dosimetry of X-ray with dosemeters and phantom used at each facility according to the 'practical code'. (author)

  20. The Clinical Application of MicroRNAs in Infectious Disease

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    Ruth E. Drury

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short single-stranded non-coding RNA sequences that posttranscriptionally regulate up to 60% of protein encoding genes. Evidence is emerging that miRNAs are key mediators of the host response to infection, predominantly by regulating proteins involved in innate and adaptive immune pathways. miRNAs can govern the cellular tropism of some viruses, are implicated in the resistance of some individuals to infections like HIV, and are associated with impaired vaccine response in older people. Not surprisingly, pathogens have evolved ways to undermine the effects of miRNAs on immunity. Recognition of this has led to new experimental treatments, RG-101 and Miravirsen—hepatitis C treatments which target host miRNA. miRNAs are being investigated as novel infection biomarkers, and they are being used to design attenuated vaccines, e.g., against Dengue virus. This comprehensive review synthesizes current knowledge of miRNA in host response to infection with emphasis on potential clinical applications, along with an evaluation of the challenges still to be overcome.

  1. The Clinical Application of MicroRNAs in Infectious Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Ruth E; O'Connor, Daniel; Pollard, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short single-stranded non-coding RNA sequences that posttranscriptionally regulate up to 60% of protein encoding genes. Evidence is emerging that miRNAs are key mediators of the host response to infection, predominantly by regulating proteins involved in innate and adaptive immune pathways. miRNAs can govern the cellular tropism of some viruses, are implicated in the resistance of some individuals to infections like HIV, and are associated with impaired vaccine response in older people. Not surprisingly, pathogens have evolved ways to undermine the effects of miRNAs on immunity. Recognition of this has led to new experimental treatments, RG-101 and Miravirsen-hepatitis C treatments which target host miRNA. miRNAs are being investigated as novel infection biomarkers, and they are being used to design attenuated vaccines, e.g., against Dengue virus. This comprehensive review synthesizes current knowledge of miRNA in host response to infection with emphasis on potential clinical applications, along with an evaluation of the challenges still to be overcome.

  2. Postischemic revascularization: from cellular and molecular mechanisms to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Smadja, David M; Lévy, Bernard I

    2013-10-01

    After the onset of ischemia, cardiac or skeletal muscle undergoes a continuum of molecular, cellular, and extracellular responses that determine the function and the remodeling of the ischemic tissue. Hypoxia-related pathways, immunoinflammatory balance, circulating or local vascular progenitor cells, as well as changes in hemodynamical forces within vascular wall trigger all the processes regulating vascular homeostasis, including vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and collateral growth, which act in concert to establish a functional vascular network in ischemic zones. In patients with ischemic diseases, most of the cellular (mainly those involving bone marrow-derived cells and local stem/progenitor cells) and molecular mechanisms involved in the activation of vessel growth and vascular remodeling are markedly impaired by the deleterious microenvironment characterized by fibrosis, inflammation, hypoperfusion, and inhibition of endogenous angiogenic and regenerative programs. Furthermore, cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, diabetes, and aging, constitute a deleterious macroenvironment that participates to the abrogation of postischemic revascularization and tissue regeneration observed in these patient populations. Thus stimulation of vessel growth and/or remodeling has emerged as a new therapeutic option in patients with ischemic diseases. Many strategies of therapeutic revascularization, based on the administration of growth factors or stem/progenitor cells from diverse sources, have been proposed and are currently tested in patients with peripheral arterial disease or cardiac diseases. This review provides an overview from our current knowledge regarding molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in postischemic revascularization, as well as advances in the clinical application of such strategies of therapeutic revascularization.

  3. Clinical application of DSA and evaluation of its methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Yong; Ma, Heping; Gu, Shubing; Zhou, Qunhui; Zhang, Shulan; Liu, Pengzni; Zhang, Junyi.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 160 patients of two hospitals received 192 DSA examinations with different contrast administrations, and techniques of performing DSA were analyzed, compared, and evaluated with reference to the literature. It was concluded that (1) the peripheral injection of contrast material for IVDSA via cannula is simpler than that via a short catheter, but the incidences of contrast extravasation in both cases are higher than with central injection. (2) Both the lower part of the superior vena cava and the right atrial cavity are safe sites for central injection. With central injection for IVDSA, the arterial iodine concentration is approximately double that of peripheral injection, and consistent high quality examinations of the intracranial vessels may be obtained. However, neither peripheral nor central injections can visualize the small vessels clearly. (3) IVDSA may be substituted for conventional angiography only in examinations of the aorta and its main branches. (4) IADSA is becoming a superior angiographic technique and its clinical application is increasing. In addition, means of avoiding contrast extravasation during IVDSA and the main points of selecting the optimal technique for DSA are described in this paper. (author)

  4. Optimized measurement of radium-226 concentration in liquid samples with radon-222 emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Aupiais, Jean; Girault, Frédéric; Przylibski, Tadeusz A.; Bouquerel, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Measuring radium-226 concentration in liquid samples using radon-222 emanation remains competitive with techniques such as liquid scintillation, alpha or mass spectrometry. Indeed, we show that high-precision can be obtained without air circulation, using an optimal air to liquid volume ratio and moderate heating. Cost-effective and efficient measurement of radon concentration is achieved by scintillation flasks and sufficiently long counting times for signal and background. More than 400 such measurements were performed, including 39 dilution experiments, a successful blind measurement of six reference test solutions, and more than 110 repeated measurements. Under optimal conditions, uncertainties reach 5% for an activity concentration of 100 mBq L"−"1 and 10% for 10 mBq L"−"1. While the theoretical detection limit predicted by Monte Carlo simulation is around 3 mBq L"−"1, a conservative experimental estimate is rather 5 mBq L"−"1, corresponding to 0.14 fg g"−"1. The method was applied to 47 natural waters, 51 commercial waters, and 17 wine samples, illustrating that it could be an option for liquids that cannot be easily measured by other methods. Counting of scintillation flasks can be done in remote locations in absence of electricity supply, using a solar panel. Thus, this portable method, which has demonstrated sufficient accuracy for numerous natural liquids, could be useful in geological and environmental problems, with the additional benefit that it can be applied in isolated locations and in circumstances when samples cannot be transported. - Highlights: • Radium-226 concentration measured with optimized accumulation in a container. • Radon-222 in air measured precisely with scintillation flasks and long countings. • Method tested by repetition tests, dilution experiments, and successful blind tests. • Estimated conservative detection limit without pre-concentration is 5 mBq L"−"1. • Method is portable, cost

  5. Calculating Clinically Significant Change: Applications of the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale to Evaluate Client Outcomes in Private Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter James

    2010-01-01

    The Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale is a therapist-rated measure of client outcome that has been widely used within the research literature. The current study aimed to develop reliable and clinically significant change indices for the CGI, and to demonstrate its application in private psychological practice. Following the guidelines…

  6. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  7. Percutaneous transsplenic catheterization of portal vein: technique and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Kangshun; Huang Mingsheng; Pang Pengfei; Zhou Bin; Xu Changmo; Qian Jiesheng; Li Zhengran; Jiang Zaibo; Shan Hong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous transsplenic portal vein catheterization (PTSPC). Methods: Thirty patients with portal hypertension underwent gastroesophageal variceal embolization via PTSPC route, 2 of which simultaneously underwent portal vein stenting. This study included the patients with portal venous obstruction (tumor embolus or thrombus) or the patients with serious liver atrophy caused by liver cirrhosis. The patients who had severe coagulation insufficiency (with prothrombin time > 20 s) were excluded. Of the 30 patients, 17 had primary hepatocellular carcinoma with main portal venous tumor embolus, 13 had cirrhosis with severe liver atrophy and (or)slight or moderate ascite. Before this study, all of 30 patients had a history of variceal bleeding, and 16 patients had a normal coagulation level, 10 patients had a mildly prolonged prothrombin time (14-17 s), 4 patients had a moderately prolonged prothrombin time (18-20 s). All of 30 patients underwent upper abdomen CT enhanced scanning before this procedure, and the site, direction, and depth of splenic vein branch puncture were decided by CT images. The technology of PTSPC, procedure-related complications, and its clinical application were retrospectively analyzed. Results: PTSPC was performed successfully in 28 of 30 patients. Two cases failed because of a small intrasplenic vein. Procedure-related complications occurred in 6 patients (20.0%), which had decrease of hemoglobin concentration (15-50 g/L). Four of them needed blood transfusion. In the six patients, one patient (3.3%) with abdominal cavity hemorrhage had a serious drop of blood pressure 2 hours after procedure, whose clinical symptoms were relieved after four units of packed RBC and a great quantity of fluid were transfused. Twenty-eight patients whose PTSPC were successfully performed underwent variceal embolization, 2 of them were placed with portal vein covered stents. During a median follow-up period of 6 months

  8. Human Locomotion in Hypogravity: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Lacquaniti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We have considerable knowledge about the mechanisms underlying compensation of Earth gravity during locomotion, a knowledge obtained from physiological, biomechanical, modeling, developmental, comparative, and paleoanthropological studies. By contrast, we know much less about locomotion and movement in general under sustained hypogravity. This lack of information poses a serious problem for human space exploration. In a near future humans will walk again on the Moon and for the first time on Mars. It would be important to predict how they will move around, since we know that locomotion and mobility in general may be jeopardized in hypogravity, especially when landing after a prolonged weightlessness of the space flight. The combination of muscle weakness, of wearing a cumbersome spacesuit, and of maladaptive patterns of locomotion in hypogravity significantly increase the risk of falls and injuries. Much of what we currently know about locomotion in hypogravity derives from the video archives of the Apollo missions on the Moon, the experiments performed with parabolic flight or with body weight support on Earth, and the theoretical models. These are the topics of our review, along with the issue of the application of simulated hypogravity in rehabilitation to help patients with deambulation problems. We consider several issues that are common to the field of space science and clinical rehabilitation: the general principles governing locomotion in hypogravity, the methods used to reduce gravity effects on locomotion, the extent to which the resulting behavior is comparable across different methods, the important non-linearities of several locomotor parameters as a function of the gravity reduction, the need to use multiple methods to obtain reliable results, and the need to tailor the methods individually based on the physiology and medical history of each person.

  9. Clinical application of MR susceptibility weighted imaging in cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Wenzhen; Qi Jianpin; Shen Hao; Wang Chengyuan; Xia Liming; Hu Junwu; Feng Dingyi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess clinical application value of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in cerebrovascular diseases. Method: Twenty-three patients with cerebrovascular disease were investigated, including 7 cases of cavernoma, 4 of venous hemangioma, 3 of small AVM, 1 of Sturge-Weber Syndrome, 2 of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and 6 of chronic cerebral infarction. All patients underwent standard Mill and SWI, and most of them also underwent enhanced T 1 WI and MRA. The corrected phase (CP) values were obtained at the lesions and control areas. Results: The average CP values of the lesions and the control areas were -0.112±0.032 and -0.013±0.004, respectively (t=2.167, P 2 WI. The cavemoma could be differentiated from the hemorrhage within lesions. Moreover, multiple microcavernomas were detected on SWI. In 4 cases of venous hemangioma, SWI detected spider-like lesions with more hair-thin pulp veins adjacent to the dilated draining vein than contrast MRI. In 3 cases of small AVM, SWI was more advantageous than MRA in clearly detecting the small feeding artery. In 1 case of Sturge-Weber Syndrome, SWI demonstrated large areas of calcification and the abnormal vessels on the cerebral surface and the deep part of the cerebrum at the same time. In 2 cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the deep draining veins and superficial venous rete were generally dilated and winding, and the hemorrhagic lesions could be detected earlier than conventional MR images in one case. In 6 eases of cerebral infarction, old hemorrhage was clearly displayed within the lesions. Conclusion: SWI has more predominant advantages than conventional MRI and MRA in detecting the low-flow cerebral vascular malformations, identifying microbleeds and cerebral infarction accompanying hemorrhage, and the dilation of cerebral deep or superficial veins in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Moreover, SWI can show the phase contrast between the lesions and the control areas. (authors)

  10. CREATION PRINCIPLES, MECHANISM OF ACTION AND CLINICAL APPLICATION OF PROBIOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kordon T.I

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the presented review the general data concerning probiotics is considered, i.e. definitions of the term, classification principles, and the core benefits of usage if compared to antibiotics. Are noted The criteria of choice and the characteristics of the main sorts of bacteria used as basic probiotics. Special attention in terms of usage for producing bacteriemic medicines is paid to Bacillus spore-former bacteria, as normal micro-flora exogenous components that do not produce biofilms. Bacillus sporeformer bacteria are also able to produce a wide spectrum of biologically active substances, including antibiotics, lysozyme, proteolytic enzymes, and able to influence the immunological reactivity of macro-organism, therefore stimulating the growth of secretory immunoglobulins`, macrophages`, natural killers` activity. The Subalinum biological features are considered. The basic for Subalinum is genetically modified strain of Bacillus subtillis 2335/105 with a plasmid, containing the gene for alpha-2 human interferon. The characteristics for genetically modified strains of E. coli is given, as being perspective for creating probiotics for effective treatment of diarrhea, caused by enterotoxigenic E.coli and Vibrio cholera. They are proposed for creating recombinant strains of bifidobacteria for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases` treatment and prevention. They are also prospective for making Lactococcus lactis recombinative strain for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's diseases` treatment. The potential dangers of drugs based on living organisms are being discussed. Some of the mechanisms of probiotics influence on the immune system and aspects of clinical application of probiotics for preventing and treating dysbiosis, atopy, intestinal infections of bacterial and viral, cardiovascular, cancer and secondary immunodeficiencies, are highlighted. The research paper contains the possibility of co-using probiotics as vaccination adjuvant.

  11. Methods and application of bone densitometry in clinical diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahner, H.W.; Riggs, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    With the awareness of osteoporosis as a major health problem for an aging population, there is great interest in early recognition and treatment of abnormal bone loss. Effective prevention of bone loss has to occur prior to the occurrence of irreparable damage. Standard radiographic procedures are not sensitive enough for the task. Therefore, a number of alternative procedures to estimate bone loss have been developed over the years, ranging from efforts to quantitate information obtained from radiographic images to sophisticated procedures such as neutron activation analysis or procedures based on the Compton scatter phenomenon. Only two procedures, photon absorptiometry and computed tomography (CT), have emerged as applicable for routine clinical use. In photon absorptiometry the entire bone mineral (cortical and trabecular bone) of a specific skeletal site is measured. CT allows measuring of bone mineral of trabecular or cortical bone alone. Normally, bone mass reaches a maximum in the third decade and then continuously declines. This age-related bone loss is greater in women in whom an accelerated rate of loss occurs at the menopause. When bone density reaches a critical fracture threshold, skeletal fractures occur (spine, hip, and distal long bones). The age at which this critical fracture threshold is reached depends on the maximal bone mass achieved in early adulthood and the rate of loss with increasing age. With the exception of NaF, present-day therapeutic efforts only retard or prevent bone loss but do not significantly add bone mineral to the skeleton. Recognition of high-risk groups and early treatment are therefore required. 79 references

  12. The Human Thioredoxin System: Modifications and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Isaac Hashemy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin system, comprising thioredoxin (Trx, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR and NADPH, is one of the major cellular antioxidant systems, implicated in a large and growing number of biological functions. Trx acts as an oxidoreductase via a highly conserved dithiol/disulfide motif located in the active site (-Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-Lys-. Different factors are involved in the regulation of Trx activity, including its expression level, localization, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications and some chemical inhibitors. Mammalian TrxRs are selenoproteins which have a –Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- N-terminal active site, as well as a C-terminal selenium-containing active site. Besides two Cys-residues in the redox-regulatory domain of cytosolic Trx (Trx1, human Trx1 has three additional Cys-residues. Post-translational modifications of human Trx1 which are involved in the regulation of its activity can happen via modification of Cys-residues including thiol oxidation, glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation or via modification of other amino acid residues such as nitration of Tyr-49. Because of the numerous functions of the thioredoxin system, its inhibition (mainly happens via the targeting TrxR can result in major cellular consequences, which are potentially pro-oxidant in nature, leading to cell death via necrosis or apoptosis if overexpression of Trx and other antioxidative enzymes can not recuperate cell response. Considering this feature, several anticancer drugs have been used which can inhibit TrxR. Elevated levels of Trx and/or TrxR have been reported in many different human malignancies, positively correlated with aggressive tumor growth and poor prognosis. Moreover, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects of Trx are reasons to study its clinical application as a drug.

  13. Deep learning guided stroke management: a review of clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Rui; Badgeley, Marcus; Mocco, J; Oermann, Eric K

    2018-04-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability, and outcome is directly related to timely intervention. Not all patients benefit from rapid intervention, however. Thus a significant amount of attention has been paid to using neuroimaging to assess potential benefit by identifying areas of ischemia that have not yet experienced cellular death. The perfusion-diffusion mismatch, is used as a simple metric for potential benefit with timely intervention, yet penumbral patterns provide an inaccurate predictor of clinical outcome. Machine learning research in the form of deep learning (artificial intelligence) techniques using deep neural networks (DNNs) excel at working with complex inputs. The key areas where deep learning may be imminently applied to stroke management are image segmentation, automated featurization (radiomics), and multimodal prognostication. The application of convolutional neural networks, the family of DNN architectures designed to work with images, to stroke imaging data is a perfect match between a mature deep learning technique and a data type that is naturally suited to benefit from deep learning's strengths. These powerful tools have opened up exciting opportunities for data-driven stroke management for acute intervention and for guiding prognosis. Deep learning techniques are useful for the speed and power of results they can deliver and will become an increasingly standard tool in the modern stroke specialist's arsenal for delivering personalized medicine to patients with ischemic stroke. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Human Locomotion in Hypogravity: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yury P; Sylos-Labini, Francesca; La Scaleia, Valentina; La Scaleia, Barbara; Willems, Patrick A; Zago, Myrka

    2017-01-01

    We have considerable knowledge about the mechanisms underlying compensation of Earth gravity during locomotion, a knowledge obtained from physiological, biomechanical, modeling, developmental, comparative, and paleoanthropological studies. By contrast, we know much less about locomotion and movement in general under sustained hypogravity. This lack of information poses a serious problem for human space exploration. In a near future humans will walk again on the Moon and for the first time on Mars. It would be important to predict how they will move around, since we know that locomotion and mobility in general may be jeopardized in hypogravity, especially when landing after a prolonged weightlessness of the space flight. The combination of muscle weakness, of wearing a cumbersome spacesuit, and of maladaptive patterns of locomotion in hypogravity significantly increase the risk of falls and injuries. Much of what we currently know about locomotion in hypogravity derives from the video archives of the Apollo missions on the Moon, the experiments performed with parabolic flight or with body weight support on Earth, and the theoretical models. These are the topics of our review, along with the issue of the application of simulated hypogravity in rehabilitation to help patients with deambulation problems. We consider several issues that are common to the field of space science and clinical rehabilitation: the general principles governing locomotion in hypogravity, the methods used to reduce gravity effects on locomotion, the extent to which the resulting behavior is comparable across different methods, the important non-linearities of several locomotor parameters as a function of the gravity reduction, the need to use multiple methods to obtain reliable results, and the need to tailor the methods individually based on the physiology and medical history of each person.

  15. Innovation in pediatric clinical education: application of the essential competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Birkmeier, Marisa; Anderson, Deborah K; Martin, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    At the Section on Pediatrics Education Summit in July 2012, consensus was achieved on 5 essential core competencies (ECCs) that represent a knowledge base essential to all graduates of professional physical therapist education programs. This article offers suggestions for how clinical instructors (CIs) might use the ECCs to identify student needs and guide student learning during a pediatric clinical education experience. Pediatric CIs potentially might choose to use the ECCs as a reference tool in clinical education to help (1) organize and develop general, clinic-specific clinical education objectives, (2) develop and plan individualized student learning experiences, (3) identify student needs, and (4) show progression of student learning from beginner to intermediate to entry level. The ECCs may offer CIs insights into the role of pediatric clinical education in professional physical therapist education.

  16. Stem cells: progressions and applications in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hosseini Bereshneh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated and multi pluripotent cells which can differentiate into a variety of mature cells and tissues such as nervous tissue, muscle tissue, epithelial tissue, skeletal tissue and etc. Stem cells from all different source have three unique features: 1 Proliferative capability: Stem cells are capable of self dividing and self renewing for long periods or more than six months at least that called immortalization. 2 Undifferentiated nature: It’s considered as one of the essential characteristics of stem cell, so it doesn't have any tissue-specific construction. 3 Differentiation to the different cells from all organs: This ability can Induced by tissue specific transcription factors. Because of that, they are so important in prevention and treatment of human disease. Depending on the sources from which they derive, they have different types which can be used to produce special cells and tissues. The most significant types of stem cells are; embryonic stem cells (ESCs which are derived from embryos, adult stem cells (ASCs which are derived from differentiated cells in a specific tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs which are produced from adult differentiated cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to act resemble to an embryonic stem cell and cord blood stem cells which contains haematopoietic stem cells and derived from the umbilical cord after gestation. By providing a medium containing of special growth factor, it is possible to orientated stem cell differentiation pathway and gained certain cells from them. The important uses of stem cells includes damaged heart tissue cells improvements and bone tissue repairing, cancer treatment, damaged neurological and spinal tissue repairing, improving burns and injuries and the treatment of diabetes, infertility and spermatogenesis dysfunction. Furthermore, the application of them in gene therapy is an important issue in the modern medicine science due to the role

  17. Commissioning and first clinical application of mARC treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Nuesken, Frank G.; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert P.; Ruebe, Christian [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Homburg, Saarland (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    The modulated arc (mARC) technique has recently been introduced for Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerators. We present the first experiences with the commissioning of the system and first patient treatments. Treatment planning and delivery are presented for the Prowess Panther treatment planning system or, alternatively, an in-house code. Dosimetric verification is performed both by point dose measurements and in 3D dose distribution. Depending on the target volume, one or two arcs can be used to create highly conformal plans. Dosimetric verification of the converted mARC plans with step-and-shoot plans shows deviations below 1 % in absolute point dose; in the 3D dose distribution, over 95 % of the points pass the 3D gamma criteria (3 % deviation in local dose and 3 mm distance to agreement for doses > 20 % of the maximum). Patient specific verification of the mARC dose distribution with the calculations has a similar pass rate. Treatment times range between 2 and 5 min for a single arc. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical application of the mARC technique. The mARC offers the possibility to save significant amounts of time, with single-arc treatments of only a few minutes achieving comparable dose distribution to IMRT plans taking up to twice as long. (orig.) [German] Die mARC (modulated arc) Technik wurde vor kurzen fuer Siemens ARTISTE Linearbeschleuniger eingefuehrt. Wir zeigen die ersten Erfahrungen mit der Kommissionierung des Systems sowie die ersten Patientenbestrahlungen. Bestrahlungsplanung und Behandlung werden fuer das Prowess Panther Bestrahlungsplanungssystem oder alternativ in einer in-house-Loesung praesentiert. Die dosimetrische Verifikation wurde sowohl mit Punktmessungen als auch fuer die 3D-Dosisverteilung durchgefuehrt. Je nach Zielvolumen koennen mit einem oder zwei Boegen hochkonformale Plaene erzeugt werden. Die dosimetrische Verifikation konvertierter mARC-Plaene gegen step-and-shoot-Plaene weicht in absoluter Dosis um

  18. Clinical application of domestica manufactured BHP6601 SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuwen; Tian Jiahe; Liu Zilai; He Yijie; Shao Mingzhe; Zhang Jinming

    2005-01-01

    Clinical imaging of 150 patients with varying demand is carried out with BHP6601 SPECT manufactured locally, and the results are compared with that obtained by an E. CAM system manufactured by Siemens. The results show that BHP6601 had an acceptable and stable performance from a technical point of view. It offers a sufficient ability for organ imaging of clinical requirement. (authors)

  19. Biomedical applications of mass spectrometry. Clinical uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahmer, U.I.; McCloskey, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The review covers typical or important examples of stable isotope usage in clinical fields during the period since the last triennial mass spectrometry conference in 1973. Items are included which involve uses of stable isotopes in human or clinically oriented studies, including measurements carried out on materials of human origin. 163 references. (U.K.)

  20. Clinical application of digital angiographic system DIGITEX2400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Masumi; Tanaka, Shuji; Fujino, Yoshiyuki; Yasumi, Masayuki (Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto (Japan))

    1992-10-01

    Digital angiography (DA) has been of widespread use clinically, and it has attracted considerable attention in angiographic examination today. And under the condition of the spread of interventional angiography, not only high quality image but also ease of operation are required to the system. The clinical usefullness of digital angiographic system DIGITEX2400 are reported in this paper. (author).

  1. Clinical application of digital angiographic system DIGITEX2400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masumi; Tanaka, Shuji; Fujino, Yoshiyuki; Yasumi, Masayuki

    1992-01-01

    Digital angiography (DA) has been of widespread use clinically, and it has attracted considerable attention in angiographic examination today. And under the condition of the spread of interventional angiography, not only high quality image but also ease of operation are required to the system. The clinical usefullness of digital angiographic system DIGITEX2400 are reported in this paper. (author)

  2. Hazard report. Don't use industrial-grade gases for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The use of industrial-grade gases instead of medical-grade gases for clinical applications increases the risk of introducing undesirable and even toxic contaminants into the clinical environment. Hospitals should have policies in place to ensure that gases of the appropriate type and grade are used for the intended application.

  3. Clinical applications of single photon emission tomography in neuromedicine. Pt. 2. Dementia, psychotic disorders, inflammation, trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartenstein, P.; Gruenwald, F.; Kuwert, T.; Tatsch, K.; Sabri, O.; Benkert, O.; Fahlbusch, R.; Gruender, G.; Herholz, K.; Weiller, C.

    2000-01-01

    This article gives in his second part a critical review of the clinical applications of SPECT with perfusion markers and receptor ligands in dementing disorders and psychosis. In addition this review discusses clinical applications of SPECT investigations with perfusion markers in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system and in brain trauma. (orig.) [de

  4. Microneedle delivery: clinical studies and emerging medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettis, Ronald J; Harvey, Alfred J

    2012-03-01

    The concept of microneedle drug delivery was described three decades ago; however, effective clinical demonstration has only occurred within the past 10-15 years. Substantial progress in microneedle design and fabrication including extensive in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo preclinical evaluation with various drugs, vaccines and other agents has transpired over the last decade. In contrast with this large volume of preclinical data, there are relatively few published microneedle clinical studies. To date, the clinical investigative focus has included testing to reduce dermal barrier properties and enhance transdermal delivery; evaluation of enhanced vaccine antigenicity, including development of the first commercial microneedle product for intradermal influenza vaccination; evaluation of altered microneedle protein pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, especially for insulin; and evaluation of the pain and other perceptions associated with microneedle usage. This review summarizes the various aspects of microneedle clinical evaluation to date and identifies areas requiring further clinical evaluation.

  5. Correlation between radon gas emanation and porosity in ornamental stones; Correlacao entre emanacao de gas radonio e porosidade de rochas ornamentais do Estado do Ceara, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Leiliane Rufina Pereira de; Artur, Antonio Carlos; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos, E-mail: leili_ane@hotmail.com, E-mail: acartur@rc.unesp.br, E-mail: dbonotto@rc.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Nogueira Neto, Jose de Araujo, E-mail: nogueira@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia

    2014-01-15

    This article makes correlations between levels of gas {sup 222}Rn emanation and corresponding porosity for thirteen samples of granitic rocks ornamental state of Ceara. For both determinations of physical indexes (bulk density, apparent porosity and water absorption, the levels of U, monitoring emanation of radon gas are made for a period of 25 days in confinement conditions of the samples under vacuum and petrographic studies of the characteristics rocks, with emphasis on the microfissural state. The sampled rocks provided low values of radon gas emanation between U 0,2 ppm and 13.6 ppm. The correlations between the various results show that the microporous network of the rock is determinant in the rate of emanation of radon gas, overlapping, including the influence of own levels of U present in the rocks. The results also show that the amount of radon gas emanating from the rock is small enough compared to the decay caused by the amount of {sup 238}U. The proposition of gas emanating relative to the total generated by rocks ranging between 0.4% and a maximum of 4.2%. (author)

  6. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital and clinic services... SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital and Clinic Services § 447.321 Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits...

  7. Clinical Application of Pharmacogenetics: Where are We Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing has the potential to improve drug therapy in an individual by informing appropriate drug dosing or drug selection in order to maximize efficacy and safety. Although multiple studies have illustrated the potential benefits of such testing when applied to specific drugs across a broad range of therapy areas, the uptake of PGx testing in routine clinical practice has been relatively limited. Implementation appears to be hampered by the absence of sufficiently strong evidence linking the results of testing with actionable benefits in terms of clinical outcomes. Meanwhile, there are now adequate data to allow dosing recommendations as have been developed by bodies including the Dutch Pharmacogenetics Working Group (DPWG) and the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) in several settings, including TPMT/thiopurines, CYP2C19/clopidogrel, CYP2D6/codeine, VKORC1-CYP2C9/warfarin, HLA-B*5701/abacavir, SLCO1B1/simvastatin and HLAB*5801/allopurinol. The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) and the International Association of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Clinical Toxicology (IATDMCT) have also recently initiated surveys in order to better understand the extent of, and the role played by, PGx testing in clinical practice. This should help identify where further training and education may be beneficial. To this end, in collaboration with ESPT, the IFCC Pharmacogenetic Laboratory Network has now been formed, with the aim of improving the uptake and quality of PGx testing. PMID:27683445

  8. Stress intensity factors for deep cracks emanating from the corner formed by a hole intersecting a plate surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgowan, J. J.; Smith, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (SIFs) at the end points of flaws emanating from the corner formed by the intersection of a plate with a hole were determined using stress freezing photoelasticity and a numerical technique known as the Taylor series correction method to extract the SIF values from the photoelastic data. The geometries studied were crack depth to thickness ratios of about 0.2, 0.5, and 0.75; crack depth to crack length ratios of about 1.0 to 2.0; and crack length to hole radius ratios of about 0.5 to 2.0. The SIFs were determined at the intersection of the flaw border with the plate surface (KS) and with the edge of the hole (KH). It is shown that extension of a crack emanating from a corner of intersection of a hole with a plate under monotonically increasing load is not self-similar and that as the flaw depth increases, KH decreases and KS increases. Existing theories and design criteria significantly overestimate the SIF at both the hole and the surface except for shallow flaws at the hole and deep flaws at the surface.

  9. From Sakata model to Goldberg-Ne'eman quarks and Nambu QCD phenomenology and 'right' and 'wrong' experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, Harry J.

    2007-01-01

    The basic theoretical milestones were the Sakata SU(3) symmetry, the Goldberg-Ne'eman composite model with SU(3) triplets having baryon number (1/3) and the Nambu color gauge Lagrangian. The transition was led in right and wrong directions by experiments interpreted by phenomenology. A 'good' experiment on p-bar p annihilation at rest showed that the Sakata model predictions disagreed with experiment. A 'bad' experiment prevented the use of the Goldberg-Ne'eman triplet model to predict the existence and masses of the Ξ * and Ω - . More 'good' experiments revealed the existence and mass of the Ξ * and the Ω - and the absence of positive strangeness baryon resonances, thus confirming the 'tenfold way'. Further 'good experiments' revealed the existence of the vector meson nonet, SU(3) breaking with singlet-octet mixing and the suppression of the φ → ρπ decay. These led to the quark triplet model. The paradox of peculiar statistics then arose as the Δ ++ and Ω - contained three identical spin-1/2 fermions coupled symmetrically to spin (3/2). This led to color and the Nambu QCD. The book 'Lie Groups for Pedestrians' used the Sakata model with the name 'sakaton' for the pnΛ triplet to teach the algebra of SU(3) to particle physicists in the U.S. and Europe who knew no group theory. The Sakata model had a renaissance in hypernuclear physics in the 1970's. (author)

  10. Psychological woundedness and its evaluation in applications for clinical psychology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Gavin; Partington, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating clinical psychology programme selectors' perceptions of psychological 'woundedness' in the autobiographical narratives of applicants for clinical psychology training. Woundedness was here defined in terms of the ongoing or residual psychological impact of adverse experiences and psychic conflicts. Ten selectors were presented with a sample of applicants' written autobiographical narratives, differentiated by the conspicuous presence or absence of psychological woundedness. The selectors, who were not informed of the specific aims of the study, ranked applicant protocols and were interviewed individually about their impressions of the protocols and the criteria that they used to rank them. Most selectors were positively biased toward 'wounded' narratives and suspicious of those in which woundedness was manifestly absent. Although generally disposed to favour wounded applicants, how woundedness was presented, rather than the mere presence of it, was a discriminating feature in selectors' appraisal of wounded narratives. Selectors were concerned that unresolved woundedness may compromise applicants' professional boundaries, impair self-reflective capacity and lead to damaging countertransference enactments. The relative extent to which applicant woundedness appeared to be resolved was significant in selectors' assessment of applicants' clinical training potential. A distinction is thus proposed between obstructive and facilitative woundedness in clinical psychology applicants. A sample of clinical psychology programme selectors identified psychological woundedness as a significant feature in applicant autobiographies. Selectors favoured applicant autobiographies showing evidence of woundedness. The distinction between obstructive and facilitative woundedness is important in how the selector sample evaluated woundedness. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liechtenstein, Therese, E-mail: t.liechtenstein.12@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Perez-Janices, Noemi; Escors, David [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Navarrabiomed Fundacion Miguel Servet, 3 Irunlarrea St., Hospital Complex of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2013-07-02

    The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(γ-)retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and β-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  12. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Escors, David

    2013-01-01

    The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(γ-)retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and β-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells

  13. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Escors

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(g-retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and b-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  14. Preclinical Murine Models for Lung Cancer: Clinical Trial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Kellar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine models for the study of lung cancer have historically been the backbone of preliminary preclinical data to support early human clinical trials. However, the availability of multiple experimental systems leads to debate concerning which model, if any, is best suited for a particular therapeutic strategy. It is imperative that these models accurately predict clinical benefit of therapy. This review provides an overview of the current murine models used to study lung cancer and the advantages and limitations of each model, as well as a retrospective evaluation of the uses of each model with respect to accuracy in predicting clinical benefit of therapy. A better understanding of murine models and their uses, as well as their limitations may aid future research concerning the development and implementation of new targeted therapies and chemotherapeutic agents for lung cancer.

  15. Nanomedicine in cancer therapy: challenges, opportunities, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicki, Andreas; Witzigmann, Dominik; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Huwyler, Jörg

    2015-02-28

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently available therapies are inadequate and spur demand for improved technologies. Rapid growth in nanotechnology towards the development of nanomedicine products holds great promise to improve therapeutic strategies against cancer. Nanomedicine products represent an opportunity to achieve sophisticated targeting strategies and multi-functionality. They can improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of conventional therapeutics and may thus optimize the efficacy of existing anti-cancer compounds. In this review, we discuss state-of-the-art nanoparticles and targeted systems that have been investigated in clinical studies. We emphasize the challenges faced in using nanomedicine products and translating them from a preclinical level to the clinical setting. Additionally, we cover aspects of nanocarrier engineering that may open up new opportunities for nanomedicine products in the clinic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Regenerative Medicine for Epilepsy: From Basic Research to Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Yasuhara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, which presents with various forms of seizures. Traditional treatments, including medication using antiepileptic drugs, remain the treatment of choice for epilepsy. Recent development in surgical techniques and approaches has improved treatment outcomes. However, several epileptic patients still suffer from intractable seizures despite the advent of the multimodality of therapies. In this article, we initially provide an overview of clinical presentation of epilepsy then describe clinically relevant animal models of epilepsy. Subsequently, we discuss the concepts of regenerative medicine including cell therapy, neuroprotective agents, and electrical stimulation, which are reviewed within the context of our data.

  17. [Clinical application evaluation of Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Internal Diseases in Traditional Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xue-Jie; Liu, Meng-Yu; Lian, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Li-Ying; Shi, Nan-Nan; Zhao, Jun

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the applicability and clinical applications of Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Internal Diseases in Traditional Chinese Medicine, so as to provide the basis for the revision of the guidelines. This study was completed by the research and promotion base for traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) standard. The methods of applicability evaluation and application evaluation were used in the study. The questionnaires were filled out to evaluate applicability of the guideline, including doctor's familiarity with the guideline,the quality of the guideline, applicable conditions and clinical applications. The prospective case study analysis method was used to evaluate application of the guideline, including evaluation of clinical application compliance and application results(such as clinical effects, safety and economy). There were two parts in the guideline, which were TCM guideline and Western medicine guideline. The results of applicability evaluation showed that there were no obvious differences between TCM guideline and Western medicine guideline in doctor's familiarity with guideline(85.43%, 84.57%) and the use of the guideline(52.10%, 54.47%); the guidelines with good quality, and higher scores in the scope of application and the use of the term rationality(91.94%, 93.35%); the rationality scores of relevant contents in syndrome differentiation and treatment were more than 75%; the applicable conditions were better, and the safety score was the the highest. The comprehensive applicability evaluation showed that the proportion of the application of TCM guideline and Western medicine guideline were 77.73%, 75.46%, respectively. The results of application evaluation showed that there was high degree coincidence between the guideline with its clinical application; except for "other treatment" and "recuperation and prevention" in TCM, other items got high scores which were more than 90%; in the evaluation of application effects, safety of the guideline

  18. The clinical application of PET/CT: a contemporary review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Z.; Partridge, M.; Trapp, J.V.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners into a single PET CT scanner has resulted in significant improvements in the diagnosis and staging of disease, particularly in the field of oncology. A decade on from the publication of the details of the first PET/CT scanner, we review the technology and applications of the modality. We examine the design aspects of combining two different imaging types into a single scanner, and the artefacts produced such as attenuation correction, motion and CT truncation artefacts. The article also provides a discussion and literature review of the applications of PET/CT to date, covering detection of tumours, radiotherapy treatment planning, patient management, and applications external to the field of oncology.

  19. International Conference on Scientific and Clinical Applications of Magnetic Carriers

    CERN Document Server

    Schütt, Wolfgang; Teller, Joachim; Zborowski, Maciej

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of uniform latex particles by polymer chemists of the Dow Chemical Company nearly 50 years ago opened up new exciting fields for scientists and physicians and established many new biomedical applications. Many in vitro diagnostic tests such as the latex agglutination tests, analytical cell and phagocytosis tests have since become rou­ tine. They were all developed on the basis of small particles bound to biological active molecules and fluorescent and radioactive markers. Further developments are ongoing, with the focus now shifted to applications of polymer particles in the controlled and di­ rected transport of drugs in living systems. Four important factors make microspheres interesting for in vivo applications: First, biocompatible polymer particles can be used to transport known amounts of drug and re­ lease them in a controlled fashion. Second, particles can be made of materials which bio­ degrade in living organisms without doing any harm. Third, particles with modified surfaces are a...

  20. Clinical efficacy of Jalaukawacharana (leech application) in Thrombosed piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Pradnya J; Raut, Subhash Y; Lakhapati, Arun M

    2012-04-01

    'Arsha' (hemorrhoids) is an ailment that affects all economical groups of population. Though the disease is within the limits of management, it has its own complications like severe hemorrhage, inflammation, and thrombosis, by which a patient gets severe pain and is unable to continue his routine work. Prior to surgical treatment of hemorrhoids, associated conditions like inflammation, strangulation, thrombosis, etc. need to be managed. Thrombosed piles possibly occur due to high venous pressure associated with severe anal pain. Leech (Hirudina medicanalis) application is found to be effective in reducing pain. In thrombosed piles, leech application has shown thrombolytic action, which contributes in re-establishment of circulation. It is observed in the study that, pus and mucous discharge have been reduced after leech application; which may be due to antimicrobial and mucolytic properties of leech. This method of treatment is found to be effective and increase the quality of life in patients suffering with thrombosed piles.

  1. Clinical application of antibody monoclonal humanized anti-EGFrnimotuzumab labeled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera Pintado, Alejandro; Peña Quián, Yamilé; Batista Cuéllar, Juan F.; Prats Capote, Anaís; Torres Aroche, Leonel A.; Casacó Santana, Caridad; Sánchez Mendosa, Elvia L.; Sánchez González, Yolaine; Romero Collado, Susana; Quesada Pozo, Rodobaldo; Valladares Oviedo, Lourdes; Masquida García, Elsa M.; Leyva Montaña, René; Casacó, Angel; Ramos Suzarte, Mayra; Crombet, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Most malignant tumors are of epithelial origin. These are characterized by overexpression of the receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR), which the neoplastic cells escape the regulatory mechanisms are allowed, so its high concentration of membrane is generally associated with a poor prognosis . By binding an antibody specifically to this receptor, preventing binding of EGF latter and activation mechanism tyrosine kinase inhibiting cell mitosis and apoptosis causing tumor cell. For this reason, the EGFr has been considered as an attractive target for anti-tumor therapy. The humanized monoclonal antibody anti-EGFr nimotuzumab was developed by the Center of Molecular Immunology (Havana, Cuba). Numerous clinical trials have been developed in the Department of Clinical Research Center Isotopes (Cuba), in which it has been applied this antibody, both labeled with 99mTc for immuno gammagraphic detection of tumors, as labeled with 188 Re for radioimmunotherapy of gliomas high degree of malignancy. The aim of this paper is to show the experience of the Department of Clinical Research of CENTIS in various clinical trials with marking for both immuno gammagraphics detection of tumors, such as for radioimmunotherapy nimotuzumab. (author)

  2. An Introduction to Silanes and Their Clinical Applications in Dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Özcan, Mutlu; Yli-Urpo, Antti; Pekka K. Vallittu, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This overview presents a description of organofunctional trialkoxysilane coupling agents (silanes), their chemistry, properties, use, and some of the main clinical experiences in dentistry. Materials and Methods: The main emphasis was on major dental journals that have been reviewed from

  3. An Introduction to Silanes and Their Clinical Applications in Dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, J.P.; Lassila, L.V.J.; Ozcan, M.; Yli-Urpo, A.; Vallittu, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This overview presents a description of organofunctional trialkoxysilane coupling agents (silanes), their chemistry, properties, use, and some of the main clinical experiences in dentistry. Materials and Methods: The main emphasis was on major dental journals that have been reviewed from

  4. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF TUMOUR MARKERS: A REvIEw

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... for use in treatment monitoring of colorectal, hepatocellular, prostatic, ovarian and pancreatic carcinomas ... for cancer in the clinical setting (1,3-6). Primary ... presentation is one of the determinants of prognosis in cancer. If a tumour marker concentration is related to the tumour size then it may be useful for.

  5. Radiometric system for clinical applications in the National Health System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesa Perez, G.; Arteche Diaz, R.; Camejo Batista, A.; Fonfria Bragado, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper it is presented the radiometric detection system SRNIC-02, manufactured at CEADEN. The system has three major components: a well-type Nal(TI) scintillator detector with its collimator, a measurement module, and the application software, which allows fixing the working parameters of the system, as well as the acquisition and processing of data. The system has two main applications in the National Health System, one for the quality control in Radiopharmacy, and in RIA/IRMA blood tests. There are 16 systems installed, in 13 provinces of the country up to this date. (Author)

  6. Clinical application and evaluation of TSH(IRMA) determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jimin; Zhu Cuiying; Cui Wenru

    1993-01-01

    The serum TSH level of 303 healthy persons ranged from 0.3-5.6 mU/l and 205 cases of hyperthyroidism, 56 cases of early stage hyperthyroidism, 67 cases of subclinical hyperthyroidism ranged 3 as far as the sensitivity for the diagnosis and prognostic monitoring of thyrotoxicosis is concerned. Comparison of TSH(64 cases) and TSH stimulating test was highly correlated, therefore the application of latter test can be greatly reduced. And also the establishment and application of TSH(IRMA) gives a strategic change of the diagnostic procedure of thyroid function test

  7. Contrast-enhanced Spectral Mammography: Technique, Indications, and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimani, Chandni; Matta, Danielle; Roth, Robyn G; Liao, Lydia; Tinney, Elizabeth; Brill, Kristin; Germaine, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) combines the benefits of full field digital mammography with the concept of tumor angiogenesis. Technique and practical applications of CESM are discussed. An overview of the technique is followed by a demonstration of practical applications of CESM in our practice. We have successfully implemented CESM into our practice as a screening, diagnostic, staging, and treatment response tool. It is important to understand the technique of CESM and how to incorporate it into practice. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic resonance angiography: Physical principles and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausmann, R.; Mueller, E.

    1992-01-01

    Within the last four years magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) developed very rapidly towards a well accepted screening technique for vascular examinations as a fast add-on to conventional MR. This review describes the basic physical principles as well as the different methods like time-of-flight and phase-sensitive MRA for visualization of blood vessels. Different applications of 3D, 2D sequential and 3D multivolume MRA are shown from various regions of the head and body. A short outlock to quantitative flow measurments is given in the last chapter including some interesting applications of these techniques which show the still expanding potential of magnetic resonance. (orig.) [de

  9. Human eye modelling for ophthalmic simulators project for clinic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Andrea; Santos, Adimir dos; Yoriyaz, Helio

    2002-01-01

    Most of eye tumors are treated by surgical means, which involves the enucleation of affected eyes. In terms of treatment and control of diseases, there is brachytherapy, which often utilizes small applicator of Co-60, I-125, Ru-106, Ir-192, etc. These methods are shown to be very efficient but highly cost. The objective of this work is propose a detailed simulator modelling for eye characterization. Additionally, this study can contribute to design and build a new applicator in order to reduce the cost and to allow more patients to be treated

  10. Development of a management protocol for the reduction of fuel consumption and decreasing of the emanations of CO2 as contaminant of environment in air service companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya Maroto, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    A management protocol is developed for air services companies to improve the eco-efficiency of its processes. The application of operational procedures have allowed the reduction of fuel consumption and decreased the emanations of CO 2 into the environment. The methodology of the research has consisted in quantitative and qualitative analysis of the variables and processes that have influenced significantly in the operation of airline fleet. An integral analysis is realized of the procedures of management and use of resources in the cockpits of the aircraft (Cockpit Resource Management) and navigation based in performance (NBP). The results of analysis are used to elaborate a protocol to minimize the fuel consumption and energy through the application of practices and operational procedures more efficient and safe. The environmental burdens associated with the services that are provided in the airline industry are minimized. The application of methods of improvement and procedures that are updated continuously have achieved the sustainability of the protocol. The operational procedures are applied to decrease the fuel consumption. Sensitization programs are developed for the utilization of more efficient operational practices and friendly with the environment. An incentive program is implemented to optimize the fuel consumption safely by pilots. A new procedure of flight scheduling is modified based on performance of the pilots and fleet degradation factors, assigning the pilots who have had higher consumption to airplanes with lower degradation, and the pilots who have had lower consumption, to airplanes with higher degradation. A self-liquidating incentive plan is developed based on the savings achieved in the operation in high-performance, could reinforce the change of attitude necessary for the group of pilots can support the implementation of the protocol [es

  11. Scattered radiation from applicators in clinical electron beams.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battum, L.J. van; Zee, W. van der; Huizenga, H.

    2003-01-01

    In radiotherapy with high-energy (4-25 MeV) electron beams, scattered radiation from the electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. In most currently available treatment planning systems for radiotherapy this component is not explicitly included and handled only by a slight

  12. Meta-Analysis: Application to Clinical Dentistry and Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    Meta-analysis is proposed as an effective alternative to conventional narrative review for extracting trends from research findings. This type of analysis is explained, advantages over more traditional review techniques are discussed, basic procedures and limitations are outlined, and potential applications in dental education and clinical…

  13. Clinical applications of imaging reconstruction by virtual sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Akihiro; Oohashi, Noritsugu; Maruyama, Takako; Tatebe, Hideharu; Fushimi, Nobutoshi; Asano, Takayuki; Inoue, Hiroshi; Okuno, Masataka

    2008-01-01

    One of the pitfalls in managing multiple liver tumors is the difficulty in identifying individual tumors on ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT)-assisted virtual sonography has been shown to improve sonographic diagnosis, however it requires additional equipment and software. We have developed a simple reconstruction method of virtual sonography (SRVS). We reconstructed SRVS mimicking ultrasonographic images, utilizing a workstation software attached to a multi-detector row CT system without any additional program. We have performed SRVS in 32 patients with 41 liver tumors that could hardly be identify on ultrasonography. SRVS assisted the identification of malignant form non-pathologic ones and thereby contributed to the appropriate clinical strategy including radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (18 tumors), liver biopsy (2 tumors), other therapies (4 tumors) and follow-up (17 tumors). We have developed virtual sonography using conventional CT software. SRVS seems useful in the clinical practice in managing liver tumors. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging- physical principles and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavri, Omprakash J.

    1996-01-01

    The advances in equipment and knowledge related to radiology are occurring at an astonishingly rapid rate. On November 8, 1895, William Conrad Roentgen discovered x-rays. In 1972, Godfrey Hounsfield and George Ambrose introduced computec tomography at a meeting of the British Institute of Radiology. In the same year, Paul Lauterbur published the idea of spatially resolving nuclear magnetic resonance samples, naming it zeugmatography. In 1977, Waldo Hinshaw and co-workers published a magnetic resonance image of a human hand and wrist, and by 1981 several centres were obtaining clinical magnetic resonance (MR) images. In a very short time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has gained acceptance as a clinically useful imaging tool. (author)

  15. Calcium silicate-based cements: composition, properties, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Alaa E; Parashos, Peter; Wong, Rebecca H K; Reynolds, Eric C; Manton, David J

    2017-05-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate-based cement (CSC) commonly used in endodontic procedures involving pulpal regeneration and hard tissue repair, such as pulp capping, pulpotomy, apexogenesis, apexification, perforation repair, and root-end filling. Despite the superior laboratory and clinical performance of MTA in comparison with previous endodontic repair cements, such as Ca(OH) 2 , MTA has poor handling properties and a long setting time. New CSC have been commercially launched and marketed to overcome the limitations of MTA. The aim of the present review was to explore the available literature on new CSC products, and to give evidence-based recommendations for the clinical use of these materials. Within the limitations of the available data in the literature regarding the properties and performance of the new CSC, the newer products could be promising alternatives to MTA; however, further research is required to support this assumption. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Pre-clinical MR elastography: Principles, techniques, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, P. V.; Garbow, J. R.

    2018-06-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a method for measuring the mechanical properties of soft tissue in vivo, non-invasively, by imaging propagating shear waves in the tissue. The speed and attenuation of waves depends on the elastic and dissipative properties of the underlying material. Tissue mechanical properties are essential for biomechanical models and simulations, and may serve as markers of disease, injury, development, or recovery. MRE is already established as a clinical technique for detecting and characterizing liver disease. The potential of MRE for diagnosing or characterizing disease in other organs, including brain, breast, and heart is an active research area. Studies involving MRE in the pre-clinical setting, in phantoms and artificial biomaterials, in the mouse, and in other mammals, are critical to the development of MRE as a robust, reliable, and useful modality.

  17. Clinical application of pharmacogenetics: focusing on practical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Matthew T; McCarthy, Jeanette J; Shin, Jaekyu

    2015-01-01

    Recent large-scale genetic-based studies have transformed the field of pharmacogenetics to identify, characterize and leverage genetic information to inform patient care. Genetic testing can be used to alter drug selection, optimize drug dosing and prevent unnecessary adverse events. As precision medicine becomes the mainstay in the clinic, it becomes critical for clinicians to utilize pharmacogenetics to guide patient care. One primary challenge is identifying patients where genetic tests that can potentially impact patient care. To address this challenge, our review highlights many practical issues clinicians may encounter: identifying candidate patients and clinical laboratories for pharmacogenetic testing, selecting highly curated resources to help asses test validity, reimbursing costs of pharmacogenetic tests, and interpreting of pharmacogenetic test results.

  18. Clinical Application of Scaffolds for Partial Meniscus Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Cathal J; Withers, Daniel P; Kurzweil, Peter R; Verdonk, Peter C

    2015-09-01

    Meniscal tears are common injuries often treated by partial meniscectomy. This may result in altered joint contact mechanics which in turn may lead to worsening symptoms and an increased risk of osteoarthritis. Meniscal scaffolds have been proposed as a treatment option aimed at reducing symptoms while also potentially reducing progression of degenerative change. There are 2 scaffolds available for clinical use at the present time; Collagen Meniscus Implant and Actifit. Medium-term to long-term data (4.9 to 11.3 y) demonstrate efficacy of partial meniscus replacement. The patients who seem to benefit most are chronic postmeniscectomy rather than acute meniscal injuries. Herein we report on available clinical data for Collagen Meniscus Implant and Actifit while describing our preferred surgical technique and postoperative rehabilitation program.

  19. The application of patient education in clinical interventional work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiuqing; Lv Shukun; Ma Shuxian; Shi Liang

    2010-01-01

    By introducing patient education into the nursing care of interventional therapy, the medical workers can effectively help and encourage the patients to actively participate in and cooperate with the interventional therapy and related nursing care service. Besides, the relevant education and guidance can greatly help the patients to promote functional restoration and psychological recovery. This article systematically describes the approaches, the principles, the choice of the right moment for health education and the education contents in clinical interventional work. (authors)

  20. Clinical application of percutaneous gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianping; Wang Zhongmin; Liu Tao; Chen Kemin; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Chen Zhijin; Shen Jieyun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous gastrostomy (PRG) and gastrojejunostomy (PRGJ) under fluoroscopic guidance, and to discuss its technical manipulation, the indications and contraindications as well as the complications. Methods: During the period from May 2002 to June 2010 in authors' hospital fluoroscopically-guided PRG or PRGJ was carried out in 40 patients. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. With Seldinger technique and under fluoroscopic guidance, a 14 F radiopaque gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy feeding catheter was successfully placed. The indications, operation procedures, clinical success rate, procedure-related complications, and tube indwelling time, etc. were discussed and analyzed. Results: PRG was conducted in 30 patients. The reasons for performing PRG included neurologic disease (n=13), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (n=6), gastroesophageal reflux due to disfunction of gastrointestinal tract (n=3), subtotal gastrectomy (n=2), esophagomediastinal fistula (n=1) and esophageal carcinoma (n=5). PRGJ was carried out in 10 patients. The disorders included bulbar paralysis (n=3), malignant duodenal obstruction (n=4) and previous gastrostomy-related complications (n=3). Two anchors were used in all patients receiving PRG or PRGJ. Clinical success was achieved in all study patients. No procedure-related or severe complications occurred. Minor complications were observed in four patients (10%), which included local soft tissue infection (n=1), severe puncture site pain (n=1), gastrostomy tube dislodgement (n=1) and obstruction of gastrojejunostomy tube (n=1). During the follow-up period, no aggravation of gastroesophageal reflux or aspiration pneumonia was observed in all patients. The tube indwelling time was 115 to 585 days (mean of 150 days) after tube placement. Conclusion: Fluoroscopically-guided percutaneous gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy is a safe, simple and minimally-invasive technique. This

  1. Skin Substitutes: A Brief Review of Types and Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Alrubaiy, Laith; Al-Rubaiy, Kathem K.

    2009-01-01

    Replacing skin defects has witnessed several developments over the centuries. It started with the introduction of skin grafting by Reverdin in 1871. Since then, varieties of skin grafting techniques have been used successfully. Despite being clinically useful, skin grafts have many limitations including the availability of the donor site especially in circumstances of extensive skin loss, immune rejection in allogenic skin grafts, pain, scarring, slow healing and infection.1,2 For these reaso...

  2. Clinical application of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU Songqiang

    2018-01-01

    Objective To investigate the indications and therapeutic effect of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR). Methods A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 17 patients who underwent DPPHR in Fujian Provincial Hospital from January 2013 to February 2017. Among these patients, 6 had chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic duct stones, 2 had chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst, 3 had solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreatic head, 3 had intraduc...

  3. [Innovative Prenatal Testing: Clinical Applications and Ethical Considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Shio-Jean; Chen, Chih-Ling; Huang, Tzu-Jung

    2017-10-01

    The biomedical technology related to prenatal screen/diagnosis has developed rapidly in recent decades. Many prenatal genetic examinations are now available to assist pregnant women to better understand the status and development of their fetus. Moreover, many commercial advertisements for innovative prenatal examinations are now shown in the media. Cell-free DNA Screening (cfDNA screening), a non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) procedure, is a safe and high accuracy test that may be done at an earlier gestational age to screen for fetal aneuploidy. The following questions should be considered when applying cfDNA screening in clinical practice: 1. what is cfDNA screening, 2. who are its potential users, and 3. what ethical and policy considerations are associated with this examination? This article provides relevant information, clinical practice guidelines, and ethical / policy considerations related to cfDNA screening. Discussing cases involving different clinical situations helps promote understanding of cfDNA screening and maternal-care quality.

  4. New preparations of the elemental diet and the clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoshi, S; Sato, H

    1981-01-01

    In 1978, we designed a new elemental diet, ED-AC, which modified after Vivonex-HN with the co-operation of Ajinomoto Co., Japan and Morton-Norwich Co., U.S.A.. ED-AC is now being used widely in Japan for enteral hyper-alimentation, even in case of pediatric surgery. We have new prepared another elemental diet, this time for infants, ED-P (pediatric). The ratio of amino acids in both ED was determined according the proposal of Professor Goro Inoue, Department of Nutrition, Tokushima University. The application of ED, particularly for surgical patients, has been most effective. the use of this diet for enteral hyperalimentation should find a wide application in surgical and medical practice.

  5. Review of Positive Psychology Applications in Clinical Medical Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Ann Macaskill

    2016-01-01

    This review examines the application of positive psychology concepts in physical health care contexts. Positive psychology aims to promote well-being in the general population. Studies identifying character strengths associated with well-being in healthy populations are numerous. Such strengths have been classified and Positive Psychology Interventions (PPIs) created to develop these strengths further in individuals. Positive psychology research is increasingly being undertaken in health care...

  6. CBF-measurement of Xe-133 inhalation. Validity and clinical applications in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risberg, J.

    1980-01-01

    Some methodological questions are dealt with, especially elimination of influence from non-cerebral sources of radiation. Experience from clinical applications of the method in psychiatry are briefly reviewed. (Auth.)

  7. Clinical application of somatosensory amplification in psychosomatic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakao Mutsuhiro

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many patients with somatoform disorders are frequently encountered in psychosomatic clinics as well as in primary care clinics. To assess such patients objectively, the concept of somatosensory amplification may be useful. Somatosensory amplification refers to the tendency to experience a somatic sensation as intense, noxious, and disturbing. It may have a role in a variety of medical conditions characterized by somatic symptoms that are disproportionate to demonstrable organ pathology. It may also explain some of the variability in somatic symptomatology found among different patients with the same serious medical disorder. It has been assessed with a self-report questionnaire, the Somatosensory Amplification Scale. This instrument was developed in a clinical setting in the U.S., and the reliability and validity of the Japanese and Turkish versions have been confirmed as well. Many studies have attempted to clarify the specific role of somatosensory amplification as a pathogenic mechanism in somatization. It has been reported that somatosensory amplification does not correlate with heightened sensitivity to bodily sensations and that emotional reactivity exerts its influence on somatization via a negatively biased reporting style. According to our recent electroencephalographic study, somatosensory amplification appears to reflect some aspects of long-latency cognitive processing rather than short-latency interoceptive sensitivity. The concept of somatosensory amplification can be useful as an indicator of somatization in the therapy of a broad range of disorders, from impaired self-awareness to various psychiatric disorders. It also provides useful information for choosing appropriate pharmacological or psychological therapy. While somatosensory amplification has a role in the presentation of somatic symptoms, it is closely associated with other factors, namely, anxiety, depression, and alexithymia that may also influence the same

  8. Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Laboratory: Applications in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Uttam; Zhang, Yan Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been used in research and specialized clinical laboratories for decades as a very powerful technology to identify and quantify compounds. In recent years, application of MS in routine clinical laboratories has increased significantly. This is mainly due to the ability of MS to provide very specific identification, high sensitivity, and simultaneous analysis of multiple analytes (>100). The coupling of tandem mass spectrometry with gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) has enabled the rapid expansion of this technology. While applications of MS are used in many clinical areas, therapeutic drug monitoring, drugs of abuse, and clinical toxicology are still the primary focuses of the field. It is not uncommon to see mass spectrometry being used in routine clinical practices for those applications.

  9. Clinical Application of Neuroplastic Brain Research in Eating Disorder Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail H. Natenshon

    2016-12-01

    Neurophysiological and psychophysiological treatment interventions, by carving new neuronal pathways and creating connectivity that augments brain circuitry, carry the potential to remediate body image and self-image distortions, reintegrating the fragmented eating disordered core self. To date, intentional partnering between therapist, ED patient, and neuroplastic brain has been rarely applied in the clinical milieu and minimally referenced in the treatment literature. By bringing current neuroplasticity research into frontline practice, ED practitioners not only bridge the research/practice gap, but redefine new directions for future ED research.

  10. Application of Attachment Theory in Clinical Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Thomas Joseph; Dziadosz, Gregory M

    2015-11-01

    This article proposes the use of attachment theory in clinical social work practice. This theory is very appropriate in this context because of its fit with social work concepts of person-in-situation, the significance of developmental history in the emergence of psychosocial problems, and the content of human behavior in the social environment. A literature review supports the significance of the theory. Included are ideas about how attachment styles and working models may be used in assessment and treatment to help clients achieve a secure attachment style.

  11. Clinical application and developmental trend of radiofrequency ablation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongfeng

    2009-01-01

    For recent two decades, radiofrequency ablation technology has made great progress in the field of the treatment for neoplasm. At the very beginning, radiofrequency ablation was adopted in treating the hepatic carcinoma, and since then it has been gradually practiced in treating malignancies of lung, bone, kidney, breast, prostate and other solid tumors. Statistical report of the year 2008 has indicated that in the aspect of similar therapeutic measures radiofrequency ablation therapy for tumors holds a 9% market share. Moreover, in the coming years the clinical use of this kind of therapy for tumors will be steadily increasing by 13% every year. (authors)

  12. Regional cerebral blood flow in psychiatry: Application to clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, K.F.; Weinberger, D.R.; Morihisa, J.M.; Zec, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    In the following sections, the authors describe aspects of the xenon-133 inhalation technique as it has been modified in their lab, as well as a number of considerations and prerequisites for setting up such a facility. The authors also discuss the processes by which they technically and clinically validated the methods used. Several case studies follow along with descriptions of the approaches they are taking in investigating psychiatric illnesses with rCBF. Since the concept of a relation between brain functional activity, metabolism, and blood flow has a long history, both in theory and in practice, they first briefly review some of this history and some of the principles involved

  13. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  14. [Contemplation on the application of big data in clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Medicine is another area where big data is being used. The link between clinical treatment and outcome is the key step when applying big data in medicine. In the era of big data, it is critical to collect complete outcome data. Patient follow-up, comprehensive integration of data resources, quality control and standardized data management are the predominant approaches to avoid missing data and data island. Therefore, establishment of systemic patients follow-up protocol and prospective data management strategy are the important aspects of big data in medicine.

  15. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research.

  16. INTELLIGENCE STUDIES IN FORENSIC CRIMINOLOGY OF FUGITIVE EMANATING DEFINITIVE AND LOCATIONAL PARAMETERS - Dissertation without Errata

    OpenAIRE

    Nyagudi, Nyagudi Musandu

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the problem of manhunts, against criminal fugitives. It establishesnew ways of describing and refining mechanisms and techniques, for manhunts. Methods used in thisdissertation to meet those objectives, include: review of case studies, benchmarking of techniques andthe analysis of techniques and concepts, which have been put forward by other scholars. Emphasishas been placed on the applicability of search techniques to a wide range of situations, and techniques for...

  17. Cocoa and Dark Chocolate Polyphenols: From Biology to Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrone, Thea; Russo, Matteo Antonio; Jirillo, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that cocoa and dark chocolate possess polyphenols as major constituents whose dietary consumption has been associated to beneficial effects. In fact, cocoa and dark chocolate polyphenols exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities switching on some important signaling pathways such as toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor κB/signal transducer and activator of transcription. In particular, cocoa polyphenols induce release of nitric oxide (NO) through activation of endothelial NO synthase which, in turn, accounts for vasodilation and cardioprotective effects. In the light of the above described properties, a number of clinical trials based on the consumption of cocoa and dark chocolate have been conducted in healthy subjects as well as in different categories of patients, such as those affected by cardiovascular, neurological, intestinal, and metabolic pathologies. Even if data are not always concordant, modifications of biomarkers of disease are frequently associated to improvement of clinical manifestations. Quite interestingly, following cocoa and dark chocolate ingestion, cocoa polyphenols also modulate intestinal microbiota, thus leading to the growth of bacteria that trigger a tolerogenic anti-inflammatory pathway in the host. Finally, many evidences encourage the consumption of cocoa and dark chocolate by aged people for the recovery of the neurovascular unit.

  18. Storytelling: a clinical application for undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Misty; Abbott, Amy

    2007-05-01

    Faculty from Creighton University School of Nursing participating in a grant set out to design and implement a model for teaching health care management in community-based settings. The goal of the grant was to cross-educate acute care faculty on how to provide holistic care to patients transitioning between acute care and the community with a focus on underserved and vulnerable populations and to incorporate this into acute care clinical experiences with students. One of the recurring topics during grant discussions was the importance of getting to know the patient's story and how it impacts the nurse-patient relationship. Key themes related to storytelling that emerged during grant meetings were listening, partnership, reciprocity, and solidarity. Grant participants identified various methods in which stories could be obtained and shared with others for educational purposes. Various storytelling techniques were implemented in the classroom and clinical settings as a means for teaching and learning. Examples of specific techniques implemented included case studies, journals, stories from practice, life reviews, and reminiscence therapy. The aim of the storytelling projects was to get students to gather information from multiple sources and to put it into a cohesive story in order to provide comprehensive, holistic, and individualized care.

  19. Clinical application of 99mTc-DTPA-HSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Yasuaki; Yamazaki, Junichi; Okuzumi, Ichio

    1989-01-01

    A newly developed blood pool imaging agent, Tc-99m DTPA-HSA (Tc-99m HSA-D), was clinically assessed in blood pool studies of patients with heart disease. Twenty mCi of Tc-99m HSA-D was iv injected to the patients. Similarly, conventional Tc-99m HSA was injected one week later for comparison. Blood counts of Tc-99m HSA-D were significantly higher than those of Tc-99m HSA at 30 minutes after iv injection (p<0.01) and at one, 3, and 6 hours (p<0.001). For the heart, liver, and lungs, sequential counts of Tc-99m HSA-D were also significantly higher than those of Tc-99m HSA. Free Tc-99m uptake in the stomach, thyroid gland, and kidneys was higher on Tc-99m HSA images than Tc-99m HSA-D images. Hepatic and pulmonary uptake of free Tc-99m that were visualized on Tc-99m HSA-D did not influence the diagnostic ability. None of the patients had clinical toxicity of Tc-99m HSA-D. The results indicate that Tc-99m HSA-D is a stable blood pool imaging agent. (Namekawa, K)

  20. [Clinical application of artificial condylar process for reconstructing temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiangdao; Shao, Zhanying; Wang, Fasheng; Duan, Yi

    2012-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and clinical outcomes of artificial condylar process in reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint. Between January 2005 and January 2010, the reconstructions of the temporomandibular joints with artificial condylar process were performed in 10 cases (11 sides, including 7 left sides and 4 right sides). There were 7 males and 3 females with an average age of 50 years (range, 40-68 years). Mandibular condyle defects were caused by mandible tumor in 7 patients with a mean disease duration of 15 months (range, 9-24 months) and by bilateral condylar fractures in 3 patients with the disease duration of 2, 3, and 2 days respectively. According to Neff classification, there were type M and A in 1 case, type M and B in 1 case, and type M in one side and subcondylar fracture in the other side in 1 case. Incisions in all patients healed by first intention, and no complication occurred. All cases were followed up 1 to 4 years, showed facial symmetry and good occluding relation, and the mouth opening was 22-38 mm (mean, 30 mm). No temporomandibular joint clicking or pain and no recurrence of tumor were observed. Most of the artificial condylar process were in good position except 1 deviated from the correct angle slightly. All the patients could have diet normally. The results of temporomandibular joint reconstruction after tumor resection with artificial condylar process are good, but the clinical outcome for intracapsular condylar fracture is expected to be further verified.

  1. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  2. Internet technology for clinical application in a digital radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, B.; Pietsch, M.; Vogl, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    Problem: To provide an overview and to assess the clinical feasibility of internet technology-based systems for hospital-wide image and report distribution as well as for video conferencing. Methods: The paper describes the theoretical concept behind, the various technical approaches and the experience gained from different systems. Results: Image and report distribution: Advantages include the universal availability of images and reports inside and outside hospitals; ease of use; security features; image and report integration; cost savings by reducing support and training efforts and by optimising available hardware. The main critical issues are performance and workflow integration with RIS and PACS. Video conferencing: Main advantages are the standardised, software-based approach and the low investments for hard- and software. Depending on the desired usage the communication performance can be seen as inappropriate. Conclusion: Today, internet technology-based systems appear to satisfy the main clinical needs in radiology. The mentioned drawbacks could be eliminated by means of modified software implementation and focused standardisation efforts. Considering the numerous advantages of these systems a further distribution can be expected for the future. (orig.) [de

  3. Clinical application of preoperative endovascular management for jugular paraganglioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Juming; Fan Guoping; Zhong Weixing; Zhang Yongping; Peng Haiteng; Cheng Yongde

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of preoperative angiography and embolization managements for jugular paraganglioma. Methods: Fourteen patients with jugular paraganglioma were carefully evaluated with CT, MRI and clinical ENT exams. Bilateral carotid and affected-side vertebral angiography together with embolization of the feeding arteries and tumor nidi were performed in all 14 patients before surgery. Internal carotid artery balloon occlusive test was employed to check the function of Willis' circle in 7 patients. The tumors were excised within 48 hours after embolization. Results: Preoperative angiographic and embolization procedures of jugular paraganglioma were successfully accomplished in all patients. The mean blood loss during the surgery was obviously less than usual. Of seven cases who passed the internal carotid artery balloon occlusive test,carotid artery ligation was adopted in 3. No new symptoms and signs of nervous system developed after the surgery and during the follow-up period. Conclusion: The angiography and embolization of feeding-arteries and tumor nidi, and the preoperative balloon occlusive test of carotid artery performed before the surgery of jugular paraganglioma are safe and reliable, which can be regarded as a routine preoperative preparation. (authors)

  4. Narrow-Band Imaging: Clinical Application in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Barbeiro

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Narrow-band imaging is an advanced imaging system that applies optic digital methods to enhance endoscopic images and improves visualization of the mucosal surface architecture and microvascular pattern. Narrow-band imaging use has been suggested to be an important adjunctive tool to white-light endoscopy to improve the detection of lesions in the digestive tract. Importantly, it also allows the distinction between benign and malignant lesions, targeting biopsies, prediction of the risk of invasive cancer, delimitation of resection margins, and identification of residual neoplasia in a scar. Thus, in expert hands it is a useful tool that enables the physician to decide on the best treatment (endoscopic or surgical and management. Current evidence suggests that it should be used routinely for patients at increased risk for digestive neoplastic lesions and could become the standard of care in the near future, at least in referral centers. However, adequate training programs to promote the implementation of narrow-band imaging in daily clinical practice are needed. In this review, we summarize the current scientific evidence on the clinical usefulness of narrow-band imaging in the diagnosis and characterization of digestive tract lesions/cancers and describe the available classification systems.

  5. Cocoa and Dark Chocolate Polyphenols: From Biology to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Magrone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that cocoa and dark chocolate possess polyphenols as major constituents whose dietary consumption has been associated to beneficial effects. In fact, cocoa and dark chocolate polyphenols exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities switching on some important signaling pathways such as toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor κB/signal transducer and activator of transcription. In particular, cocoa polyphenols induce release of nitric oxide (NO through activation of endothelial NO synthase which, in turn, accounts for vasodilation and cardioprotective effects. In the light of the above described properties, a number of clinical trials based on the consumption of cocoa and dark chocolate have been conducted in healthy subjects as well as in different categories of patients, such as those affected by cardiovascular, neurological, intestinal, and metabolic pathologies. Even if data are not always concordant, modifications of biomarkers of disease are frequently associated to improvement of clinical manifestations. Quite interestingly, following cocoa and dark chocolate ingestion, cocoa polyphenols also modulate intestinal microbiota, thus leading to the growth of bacteria that trigger a tolerogenic anti-inflammatory pathway in the host. Finally, many evidences encourage the consumption of cocoa and dark chocolate by aged people for the recovery of the neurovascular unit.

  6. Stem Cell Applications in Tendon Disorders: A Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries are a common cause of morbidity and a significant health burden on society. Tendons are structural tissues connecting muscle to bone and are prone to tearing and tendinopathy, an overuse or degenerative condition that is characterized by failed healing and cellular depletion. Current treatments, for tendon tear are conservative, surgical repair or surgical scaffold reconstruction. Tendinopathy is treated by exercises, injection therapies, shock wave treatments or surgical tendon debridement. However, tendons usually heal with fibrosis and scar tissue, which has suboptimal tensile strength and is prone to reinjury, resulting in lifestyle changes with activity restriction. Preclinical studies show that cell therapies have the potential to regenerate rather than repair tendon tissue, a process termed tenogenesis. A number of different cell lines, with varying degrees of differentiation, have being evaluated including stem cells, tendon derived cells and dermal fibroblasts. Even though cellular therapies offer some potential in treating tendon disorders, there have been few published clinical trials to determine the ideal cell source, the number of cells to administer, or the optimal bioscaffold for clinical use.

  7. Clinical application of positron emission tomography imaging in urologic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua; Wu Guangyuan

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an advanced noninvasive molecular imaging modality that is being investigated for use in the differentiation, diagnosis, and guiding therapy ora variety of cancer types. FDG PET has the unique clinical value in the differentiation, diagnosis, and monitoring therapy of prostate, such as bladder, renal, and testicle cancer. However, high false-positive and false-negative findings are observed in the detection of these tumors with FDG PET. 11 C-Choline (CH) and 11 C-acetate (AC) can overcome the pitfall of FDG, and appear to be more successful than FGD in imaging prostate cancer and bladder cancer. The short half-life of 11 C prevents the widespread use of CH and AC and 18 F-fluorocholine (FCH) and 18 F-fluoroacetate (FAC) seem to be potential tracers. Potential clinical value of the new PET tracers, such as 3'-deoxy-3'- 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT), 18 F-fluorodihydrotestosterone (FDHT), and 9-(4- 18 F-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)-guanine( 18 F-FHBG) in the detection of urologic tumors, can deserve further study. (authors)

  8. Cocoa and Dark Chocolate Polyphenols: From Biology to Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrone, Thea; Russo, Matteo Antonio; Jirillo, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that cocoa and dark chocolate possess polyphenols as major constituents whose dietary consumption has been associated to beneficial effects. In fact, cocoa and dark chocolate polyphenols exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities switching on some important signaling pathways such as toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor κB/signal transducer and activator of transcription. In particular, cocoa polyphenols induce release of nitric oxide (NO) through activation of endothelial NO synthase which, in turn, accounts for vasodilation and cardioprotective effects. In the light of the above described properties, a number of clinical trials based on the consumption of cocoa and dark chocolate have been conducted in healthy subjects as well as in different categories of patients, such as those affected by cardiovascular, neurological, intestinal, and metabolic pathologies. Even if data are not always concordant, modifications of biomarkers of disease are frequently associated to improvement of clinical manifestations. Quite interestingly, following cocoa and dark chocolate ingestion, cocoa polyphenols also modulate intestinal microbiota, thus leading to the growth of bacteria that trigger a tolerogenic anti-inflammatory pathway in the host. Finally, many evidences encourage the consumption of cocoa and dark chocolate by aged people for the recovery of the neurovascular unit. PMID:28649251

  9. Clinical Application of Growth Factors and Cytokines in Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Stephan; Brem, Harold; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic biological process that involves the coordinated efforts of multiple cell types and is executed and regulated by numerous growth factors and cytokines. There has been a drive in the past two decades to study the therapeutic effects of various growth factors in the clinical management of non-healing wounds (e.g. pressure ulcers, chronic venous ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers). For this review, we conducted a nonline search of Medline and Pub Medical and critically analyzed the literature regarding the role of growth factors and cytokines in the management of these wounds. We focused on currently approved therapies, emerging therapies and future research possibilities. In this review we discuss four growth factors and cytokines currently being used on and off label for the healing of wounds. These include: granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). While the clinical results of using growth factors and cytokines are encouraging, many studies involved a small sample size and are disparate in measured endpoints. Therefore, further research is required to provide definitive evidence of efficacy. PMID:24942811

  10. [Current status and clinical application prospect of Akabane's test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Du, Yanjun

    2016-06-12

    The Akabane's test is one of the meridian diagnostic methods. Compared with the current meridian diagnostic methods, it has the advantages of convenience and efficiency, but it also has several disadvantages such as the accuracy is difficult to control, the outcome interpretation is limited, etc. In this paper, the influence factors of Akabane's test were analyzed one by one, especially proposed personal opinion on outcome interpretation, which could ascertain the location and nature of disease, leading to disease syndrome. With accurate syndrome, the treatment plan could be established. The application prospect of Akabane's test was initially explored, and it was proposed that wearable automation equipment could be one of the development directions.

  11. Protein mislocalization: mechanisms, functions and clinical applications in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    The changes from normal cells to cancer cells are primarily regulated by genome instability, which foster hallmark functions of cancer through multiple mechanisms including protein mislocalization. Mislocalization of these proteins, including oncoproteins, tumor suppressors, and other cancer-related proteins, can interfere with normal cellular function and cooperatively drive tumor development and metastasis. This review describes the cancer-related effects of protein subcellular mislocalization, the related mislocalization mechanisms, and the potential application of this knowledge to cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. PMID:24709009

  12. Closing the gap between knowledge and clinical application: challenges for genomic translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Wylie; Korngiebel, Diane M

    2015-01-01

    Despite early predictions and rapid progress in research, the introduction of personal genomics into clinical practice has been slow. Several factors contribute to this translational gap between knowledge and clinical application. The evidence available to support genetic test use is often limited, and implementation of new testing programs can be challenging. In addition, the heterogeneity of genomic risk information points to the need for strategies to select and deliver the information most appropriate for particular clinical needs. Accomplishing these tasks also requires recognition that some expectations for personal genomics are unrealistic, notably expectations concerning the clinical utility of genomic risk assessment for common complex diseases. Efforts are needed to improve the body of evidence addressing clinical outcomes for genomics, apply implementation science to personal genomics, and develop realistic goals for genomic risk assessment. In addition, translational research should emphasize the broader benefits of genomic knowledge, including applications of genomic research that provide clinical benefit outside the context of personal genomic risk.

  13. Confocal microscopy patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S; Sánchez, V; González-Rodríguez, A; Parrado, C; Ullrich, M

    2014-06-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is currently the most promising noninvasive diagnostic tool for studying cutaneous structures between the stratum corneum and the superficial reticular dermis. This tool gives real-time images parallel to the skin surface; the microscopic resolution is similar to that of conventional histology. Numerous studies have identified the main confocal features of various inflammatory skin diseases and tumors, demonstrating the good correlation of these features with certain dermatoscopic patterns and histologic findings. Confocal patterns and diagnostic algorithms have been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity in melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. Possible present and future applications of this noninvasive technology are wide ranging and reach beyond its use in noninvasive diagnosis. This tool can also be used, for example, to evaluate dynamic skin processes that occur after UV exposure or to assess tumor response to noninvasive treatments such as photodynamic therapy. We explain the characteristic confocal features found in the main nonmelanoma skin tumors and discuss possible applications for this novel diagnostic technique in routine dermatology practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Biomaterials in Cardiovascular Research: Applications and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Kumar Jaganathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular biomaterials (CB dominate the category of biomaterials based on the demand and investments in this field. This review article classifies the CB into three major classes, namely, metals, polymers, and biological materials and collates the information about the CB. Blood compatibility is one of the major criteria which limit the use of biomaterials for cardiovascular application. Several key players are associated with blood compatibility and they are discussed in this paper. To enhance the compatibility of the CB, several surface modification strategies were in use currently. Some recent applications of surface modification technology on the materials for cardiovascular devices were also discussed for better understanding. Finally, the current trend of the CB, endothelization of the cardiac implants and utilization of induced human pluripotent stem cells (ihPSCs, is also presented in this review. The field of CB is growing constantly and many new investigators and researchers are developing interest in this domain. This review will serve as a one stop arrangement to quickly grasp the basic research in the field of CB.

  15. Clinical applications of the imatron fast CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, W.

    1986-01-01

    Utilizing three imaging modes, Cine CT has proven satisfactory in the assessment of left ventricular mass and function including ejection fractions and abnormalities of wall motion. It is helpful in documenting pericardial constrictions, as well as in assessing intracavitary tumors and thrombi. In the lungs, it is used to document AV fistulae and to evaluate the vascularity of mediastinal masses and to exclude invasion or major thoracic vessels. It can be used, as in the conventional scanner, for needle directed lung and chest well biopsies. It is frequently used in a airway studies to differentiate fixed from physiologic constrictions and to assess tracheomalacia and bronchopulmonary dysplasias. It can be used to plan radiation ports in the treatment of breast carcinoma. In the abdomen, successful applications include its use in the assessment of renal blood flow and the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as in screening of possible aortic aneurysms. In orthopedics, Cine CT is used to evaluate patellofermoral tracking in subluxations of the patella and used to evaluate subluxations and dislocations of the radio-ulnar joint. Cine CT by virtue of its speed and satisfactory spatial resolution is a significant imaging modality for evaluating the beating heart. Other applications include the evaluation of aortic aneurysms and dissections, para-aortic mass lesions, airway obstructions and patellar tracking and forearm subluxations

  16. PROTON RADIATION THERAPY: CLINICAL APPLICATION OPPORTUNITIES AND RESEARCH PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zabelin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the review of literature concerning use of proton beam therapy in treatment of oncology. The staticized data on comparison of effi ciency of this method at an eye melanoma are lit. Advantages of proton therapy on the level of local control and depression of frequency of development of the radio induced cataract are refl ected in the provided data. In evident material the technology of preparation and carrying out radiation of an eye is shortly covered with a fascicle of protons. The experience of use of proton therapy of tumors of a skull base got for the last several decades, showed good results. Physical properties of a fascicle of protons allow to achieve the maximum dose conformality, having lowered, thereby, a radial load on the next crucial anatomical structures. The presented material on an oncopediatrics shows insuffi cient knowledge of scientists concerning advantage of a fascicle of protons over modern methods of photon radiation. There are only preliminary clinical results concerning generally of treatment of cranyopharyngiomas. At cancer therapy of a mammary gland, proton therapy showed the best local control of postoperative recurrent tumors, and also depression of a dose load on the contralateral party. The available results of the retrospective analysis of clinical data in the University medical center of Lome Linda, testify to advantages of proton therapy of the localized prostate cancer. The lack of a biochemical recurrence and a local tumoral progression within 5 years after radiation was shown. The data obtained from experience of use of proton radiation therapy with passively scattered fascicle for cancer therapy of a prostate at an early stage showed the admixed results in comparison with modern methods of radiation therapy with the modulated intensity. In treatment of non-small cell cancer of mild advantage of proton therapy aren’t absolutely proved yet. There are data on extreme toxicity of a combination

  17. 77 FR 67396 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on August 20, 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, [[Page 67397...

  18. 77 FR 60143 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on July 18, 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown...

  19. 77 FR 72409 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on October 16, 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown...

  20. 78 FR 59064 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on June 21, 2013, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown...

  1. 76 FR 28990 - Ultra High Throughput Sequencing for Clinical Diagnostic Applications-Approaches To Assess...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Web cast of the public meeting, you must register online at http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/News... technologies are currently extensively used in research and are entering clinical diagnostic use; they are... technologies for clinical applications, appropriate evaluation tools (e.g., standards, well established...

  2. 77 FR 24985 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI) Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958(i), the Attorney General shall... on March 5, 2012, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton, Pennsylvania 18964...

  3. 78 FR 23594 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI) Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on March 5, 2013, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton...

  4. Clinical Application Projects (CAPs) for Health Science Students in Introductory Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyard, Rebecca A.

    Clinical Application Projects (CAPs) have been developed that allow dental hygiene and nursing students to apply introductory microbiology principles and skills learned in lecture and laboratory to a problem in an appropriate clinical situation. CAPs therefore substitute for the traditional study of "unknowns". Principles and processes emphasized…

  5. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne; Ravaghi, Hamid; Manoochehri, Jila; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS) network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA) policies in

  6. A magneto-motive ultrasound platform designed for pre-clinical and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ronaldo Thomaz Sampaio

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Magneto-motive ultrasound (MMUS combines magnetism and ultrasound (US to detect magnetic nanoparticles in soft tissues. One type of MMUS called shear-wave dispersion magneto-motive ultrasound (SDMMUS analyzes magnetically induced shear waves (SW to quantify the elasticity and viscosity of the medium. The lack of an established presets or protocols for pre-clinical and clinical studies currently limits the use of MMUS techniques in the clinical setting. Methods This paper proposes a platform to acquire, process, and analyze MMUS and SDMMUS data integrated with a clinical ultrasound equipment. For this purpose, we developed an easy-to-use graphical user interface, written in C++/Qt4, to create an MMUS pulse sequence and collect the ultrasonic data. We designed a graphic interface written in MATLAB to process, display, and analyze the MMUS images. To exemplify how useful the platform is, we conducted two experiments, namely (i MMUS imaging to detect magnetic particles in the stomach of a rat, and (ii SDMMUS to estimate the viscoelasticity of a tissue-mimicking phantom containing a spherical target of ferrite. Results The developed software proved to be an easy-to-use platform to automate the acquisition of MMUS/SDMMUS data and image processing. In an in vivo experiment, the MMUS technique detected an area of 6.32 ± 1.32 mm2 where magnetic particles were heterogeneously distributed in the stomach of the rat. The SDMMUS method gave elasticity and viscosity values of 5.05 ± 0.18 kPa and 2.01 ± 0.09 Pa.s, respectively, for a tissue-mimicking phantom. Conclusion Implementation of an MMUS platform with addressed presets and protocols provides a step toward the clinical implementation of MMUS imaging equipment. This platform may help to localize magnetic particles and quantify the elasticity and viscosity of soft tissues, paving a way for its use in pre-clinical and clinical studies.

  7. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition

  8. Qualitative Research in Palliative Care: Applications to Clinical Trials Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Christopher T; Tadmor, Avia; Fujisawa, Daisuke; MacDonald, James J; Gallagher, Emily R; Eusebio, Justin; Jackson, Vicki A; Temel, Jennifer S; Greer, Joseph A; Hagan, Teresa; Park, Elyse R

    2017-08-01

    While vast opportunities for using qualitative methods exist within palliative care research, few studies provide practical advice for researchers and clinicians as a roadmap to identify and utilize such opportunities. To provide palliative care clinicians and researchers descriptions of qualitative methodology applied to innovative research questions relative to palliative care research and define basic concepts in qualitative research. Body: We describe three qualitative projects as exemplars to describe major concepts in qualitative analysis of early palliative care: (1) a descriptive analysis of clinician documentation in the electronic health record, (2) a thematic content analysis of palliative care clinician focus groups, and (3) a framework analysis of audio-recorded encounters between patients and clinicians as part of a clinical trial. This study provides a foundation for undertaking qualitative research within palliative care and serves as a framework for use by other palliative care researchers interested in qualitative methodologies.

  9. Digital subtraction angiography with an Isocon camera system: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaric, Z.L.; Gomes, A.S.; Deckard, M.E.; Nelson, R.S.; Moler, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    A new imaging system for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was evaluated in 30 clinical studies. The image receptor is a 25 X 25 cm, 12 par gadolinium oxysulfate rare-earth screen whose light output is focused to a low-light-level Isocon camera. The video signal is digitized and processed by an image-array processor containing 31 512 X 512 memories 8 bits deep. In most patients, intraarterial DSA studies were done in conjunction with conventional arteriography. In these arterial studies, images adequate to make a specific diagnosis were obtained using half the radiation dose and half the amount of contrast material needed for conventional angiography. In eight intravenous studies performed either to identify renal artery stenosis or for evaluation of congenital heart anomalies, the images were diagnostic but objectionably noisy

  10. Clinical applications of a high quantum utilization scanner. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, P.H.; Cassen, B.

    1973-04-01

    The clinical usefulness of a tomographic imaging process employing a fast rectilinear scanner consisted of a spherical-cap nest of seven individual detectors (3'' x 1 / 2 '' activated sodium iodide) collimated to a common focal point at 10 cm. Hydraulic drives permitted a fast rectilinear scan to be made and, when raised or lowered, at different planes. Patients with well-defined brain lesions were studied using /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate or 203 Hg-chlormerodrin as tracers by measuring three dimensions of their lesions and anatomical location at the time of operation. Brain maps were used to identify this location at operation and also the location of images traced from film density displays of a conventional radioisotopic scan, the tomographic scan, and cerebral angiograms. (U.S.)

  11. Clinical application and research of tumor markers in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yumei

    2005-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors. There are many tumor markers for detecting colorectal cancer, some of which have been widely used in clinical area. However, still lack an ideal tumor marker of colorectal cancer. In this review, we simply characterized some common tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen, CA19-9, CA50, CA242 etc and their dignostic value. And here we discussed some combined detecting procedures which improve diagnostic accuracy of colorectal cancer. In addition, with the development of the biomoleculer technique, some newly discovered tumor markers and genetic marekers have gained great progress in the research of colorectal cancer, and will become a promissing technique in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. (authors)

  12. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC ...... the translation of MSC into clinic: Generation of MSC-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells, strategies to enhance homing of MSC to injured tissues, and targeting of MSC in vivo.......Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC...

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells: biological characteristics and potential clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2004-01-01

    are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Several studies have demonstrated the possible use of MSC in systemic transplantation for systemic diseases, local implantation for local tissue defects, as a vehicle for genes in gene therapy protocols or to generate transplantable tissues...... and organs in tissue engineering protocols. Before their widespread use in therapy, methods allowing the generation of large number of cells without affecting their differentiation potential as well as technologies that overcome immunological rejection (in case allogenic transplantation) must be developed.......Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are clonogenic, non-hematpoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages, for example, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages, for example, neuronal...

  14. Biocarbon urinary conduit: laboratory experience and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, L I; Raible, D A

    1980-07-01

    A new urinary conduit utilizing pure vitreous carbon has been used successfully in dogs. Pure carbon appears to be inert with respect to urine and urothelium. Lack of urinary salt encrustation on the exposed surface provides a well-functioning urinary conduit for vesical drainage. Twenty-one vesicostomies were performed in dogs. Careful follow-up and histologic studies of removed specimens were done to establish the biocompatibility of pure carbon. All vesicostomies functioned well. A description of the device, protocol, and results of laboratory experimentation are outlined. The surgical procedure is explained in detail. Results encourage the clinical trial of these devices in humans. Indications include patients with neurogenic vesicla dysfunction and those with total urinary incontinence, both of which require permanent indwelling catheters.

  15. Absorbable stent: focus on clinical applications and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Nieves; Macaya, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Coronary stents have improved very significantly the immediate and long-term results of percutaneous coronary interventions. However, once the vessel has healed, the scaffolding function of the stent is no longer needed, and the presence of a permanent metallic prosthesis poses important disadvantages. This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis. Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology. The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.

  16. Clinical application of dosimetry in electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiura, Takao

    1995-01-01

    In everyday radiotherapy we must carry out the determination of absorbed dose measurement according to JARP's protocol. We explained an outline of JARP's 1974 and 1986 protocol in electron beam therapy, and mentioned it about the matter that should examined. To use it easily in clinic, a simplified procedure based on precisely to JARP's 1986 protocol is practical, the character of this procedure settles briefly the determination of mean incident energy of electron beams and get ready to table of ionization to absorbed dose conversion factor for various ionization chamber. Also, this procedure almost not influence on the accuracy of determination. We described systematically practical procedure for requisite absorbed dose calculation in a patient in electron beam therapy. (author)

  17. Application of hormone receptor assay for clinical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Seiya

    1978-01-01

    A conception of hormone receptors was explained to understand radioreceptor assay (RRA), and various problems in the operation of this method were described mainly. The principle of RRA is the same as that of RIA and CPBA, and measured values by RRA resembled to those by bioassay more closely than those by RIA. However, the sensitivity of RRA was inferior to that of RIA. It was important in using this method especially for measurement of peptide hormone not to deactivate biological the base by radioactivation. As the significance of this method in clinical chemistry, it was mentioned that this method was one kind of experiment to observe the biological activity of hormones, and that properties analysis of receptors, studies on action mechanism, the structure and function of hormone, the pathological analysis of endocrine abnormalities, and the development of drugs and treatment methods for receptors may become possible by this method. The other usefulness of this method was also mentioned. (Kanao, N.)

  18. Application of hormone receptor assay for clinical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, S [Kitasato Univ. Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1978-06-01

    A conception of hormone receptors was explained to understand radioreceptor assay (RRA), and various problems in the operation of this method were described mainly. The principle of RRA is the same as that of RIA and CPBA, and measured values by RRA resembled to those by bioassay more closely than those by RIA. However, the sensitivity of RRA was inferior to that of RIA. It was important in using this method especially for measurement of peptide hormone not to deactivate biological the base by radioactivation. As the significance of this method in clinical chemistry, it was mentioned that this method was one kind of experiment to observe the biological activity of hormones, and that properties analysis of receptors, studies on action mechanism, the structure and function of hormone, the pathological analysis of endocrine abnormalities, and the development of drugs and treatment methods for receptors may become possible by this method. The other usefulness of this method was also mentioned.

  19. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress

  20. Clinical applications of MS-based protein quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Bassel; Mindt, Sonani; Neumaier, Michael; Findeisen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry-based assays are increasingly important in clinical laboratory medicine and nowadays are already commonly used in several areas of routine diagnostics. These include therapeutic drug monitoring, toxicology, endocrinology, pediatrics, and microbiology. Accordingly, some of the most common analyses are therapeutic drug monitoring of immunosuppressants, vitamin D, steroids, newborn screening, and bacterial identification. However, MS-based quantification of peptides and proteins for routine diagnostic use is rather rare up to now despite excellent analytical specificity and good sensitivity. Here, we want to give an overview over current fit-for-purpose assays for MS-based protein quantification. Advantages as well as challenges of this approach will be discussed with focus on feasibility for routine diagnostic use. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Nanotechnology in Dentistry: Clinical Applications, Benefits, and Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashirekha, Govind; Jena, Amit; Mohapatra, Satyajit

    2017-05-01

    Nanotechnology is emerging as an interdisciplinary field that is undergoing rapid development and has brought about enormous changes in medicine and dentistry. Nanomaterial-based design is able to mimic some of the mechanical and structural properties of native tissue and can promote biointegration. Nanotechnology has various applications in dentistry, including dentition renaturalization, therapy for dentin hypersensitivity, complete orthodontic realignment in a single visit, covalently bonding diamondized enamel, enhancing properties of root canal sealers, and continuous oral health maintenance using mechanical dentifrobots. A range of synthetic nanoparticles such as hydroxyapatite, bioglass, titanium, zirconia, and silver nanoparticles are proposed for dental restoration. This review focuses on the developments in the field of nanomaterials in dentistry in the form of tissue regeneration materials, implantable devices, nanocomposites, endodontic sealers etc. and issues of patient safety.

  2. The functions and clinical applications of tumor-derived exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yingkuan; Shen, Yanwei; Chen, Ting; Xu, Fei; Chen, Xuewen; Zheng, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles with diameters ranging from 30 to 150 nm. They can be secreted by all cell types and transfer information in the form of their contents, which include proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, to other cells throughout the body. They have roles in normal physiological processes as well as in disease development. Here, we review recent findings regarding tumor-derived exosomes, including methods for their extraction and preservation. We also describe the actions of exosomes in tumorigenesis. The exosomal antigen-presenting effect during antitumor immune responses and its suppressive function in immune tolerance are discussed. Finally, we describe the potential application of exosomes to cancer therapy and liquid biopsy. PMID:27517627

  3. Principle and clinical application of direct dry printer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shaochun; Cheng Xiaomei; Yang Xufeng

    2009-01-01

    It was quite common and practicable that one high speed printer was connected to several DICOM modalities in hospitals with central printing system. For different image quality was demanded by different modalities, image quality should be controled at the printer side, to achieve acceptable high quality medical image on film. The principles and the application of the Direct Dry Printer were discussed in this article as an example. The characteristics of the Direct Dry Printer could produce good film with continuous tone, abundant grayscale and high-quality spatial resolution. It also had a number of' other advantages such as improved structure, higher image quality, faster print speed and more friendly to the environment. (authors)

  4. Criteria for palliation of bone metastases - Clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-02-01

    Bone metastases are a frequent complication of cancer. It is estimated that they arise in 14-70% of all tumour patients, while it was reported that they occur in 70-85% patients in autopsy material. Although they may arise from any primary malignant tumour, certain tumours such as breast, prostate, lung, thyroid, kidney and myeloma have a predilection for a spread to bone. Bone metastases frequently cause pain, but there are also clinical situations with bone metastases causing no pain at all. The overall importance of the problem of bone metastases is well recognized by the fact that each year hundreds of thousands of cancer patients develop bone metastases. For example, more than 100 000 new patients develop this condition in the United States of America, although the prevalence is estimated to be double the number of new cases. While it is virtually unknown how many cancer patients in the developing countries develop bone metastases, it is not unrealistic to expect that these figures largely surpass those coming from the developed countries. The reason is simply that more patients in the developing countries are diagnosed as having locally advanced or metastatic cancer that will eventually widely disseminate, including bone metastasis as well. Furthermore, at least some of the cancer patients may survive prolonged periods of time. They can also develop earlier and more severe symptoms than patients harbouring other types (locations) of metastases, emphasizing the importance of the overall problem of painful bone metastases. In addition, there is a big socioeconomic problem of bone metastasis, burdening health care systems worldwide, while having continuous adverse psychological effect on both patients and their families. The management of patients with metastatic bone pain must be a multidisciplinary approach and includes the use of analgesia, radiotherapy, surgery, chemotherapy, hormone treatment, radioisotopes and bisphosphonates. Analgesia, with non

  5. Criteria for palliation of bone metastases - Clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    Bone metastases are a frequent complication of cancer. It is estimated that they arise in 14-70% of all tumour patients, while it was reported that they occur in 70-85% patients in autopsy material. Although they may arise from any primary malignant tumour, certain tumours such as breast, prostate, lung, thyroid, kidney and myeloma have a predilection for a spread to bone. Bone metastases frequently cause pain, but there are also clinical situations with bone metastases causing no pain at all. The overall importance of the problem of bone metastases is well recognized by the fact that each year hundreds of thousands of cancer patients develop bone metastases. For example, more than 100 000 new patients develop this condition in the United States of America, although the prevalence is estimated to be double the number of new cases. While it is virtually unknown how many cancer patients in the developing countries develop bone metastases, it is not unrealistic to expect that these figures largely surpass those coming from the developed countries. The reason is simply that more patients in the developing countries are diagnosed as having locally advanced or metastatic cancer that will eventually widely disseminate, including bone metastasis as well. Furthermore, at least some of the cancer patients may survive prolonged periods of time. They can also develop earlier and more severe symptoms than patients harbouring other types (locations) of metastases, emphasizing the importance of the overall problem of painful bone metastases. In addition, there is a big socioeconomic problem of bone metastasis, burdening health care systems worldwide, while having continuous adverse psychological effect on both patients and their families. The management of patients with metastatic bone pain must be a multidisciplinary approach and includes the use of analgesia, radiotherapy, surgery, chemotherapy, hormone treatment, radioisotopes and bisphosphonates. Analgesia, with non

  6. Preliminary clinical applications of DTI in human cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Ting; Mai Weiwen; Liang Biling; Shen Jun; Huang Suiqiao; Hu Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To condcut preliminary study of the value of DTI(diffusion tensor imaging) in human cervical spinal cord. Methods: Twenty-one patients suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy and twenty volunteers without any clinical symptoms underwent routine MRI and DTI examination. DTI was performed in six non-collinear directions with single-shot fast spin echo echo, planar imaging sequence(b value = 400 s·mm -2 ). ADC(apparent diffusion coefficient) and FA(fractional anisotropy)values were measured by ROIs(regions of interest) in 4 different level segment spinal cord (C 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 ) in normal volunteers, in lesions and normal segmental spinal cord in clinical cases respectively. DTI original images were automatically processed by using IDL (Version 5.6) soft- ware to produce color tensor images. SPSS11.0 software for windows was used for t-test and one-way ANOVA analysis. The difference was considered statistically significant if P 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 , were analyzed and it was found that FA value between them had a significant difference by ANOVA, F=159.24, P 2/3 level. However, ADC value between 4 segments had no significant difference(F=2.191, P>0.05). (2)In patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, routine MRI T2WI showed abnormal signal in 9 cases, and showed no abnormal signal in 12 dases. In sixteen cases it was found that abnormal patchy green signal on colorized tensor maps appeared on the normal blue spinal cord. Also, in patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, there was significant difference in ADC and FA value between lesions and normal spinal cord (paired t test, for ADC, t=2.88, P 2/3 level segment spinal cord in normal volunteers (0.85 ± 0.03) is the highest among other segments. FA value decreases gradually along cervical spinal cord towards the caudal direction. However, the difference of ADC values amongst 4 segments is not significant. DTI colorized tensor maps can show more lesions than routine MRI

  7. Ultrasound signs of acute appendicitis in children - clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegar-Zubovic, S.; Lincender, L.; Dizdarevic, S.; Sefic, I.; Dalagija, F.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Acute appendicitis is a leading cause of the abdominal pain in children that need an urgent surgical treatment. Neither of individually clinical variables doesn't have a real discriminational nor predictive strength to be used as the only diagnostic test. A goal of this study is to define ultrasound criteria of the acute appendicitis by appointing of ultrasound parameters for this pathological condition, determine the relation between ultrasound signs and pathohistological finding, determine the connection of several ultrasound signs with a degree of the inflammation of the acute appendicitis. Methods. In the prospective study with an ultrasound method we examine 50 patients with clinical signs of the acute abdomen. In these patients, the sonographic diagnosis is confirmed by the surgical finding, in fact with a pathohistological diagnosis. A basic, positive sonograph finding of the acute appendicitis was the identification of tubular, noncompresive, aperistaltic bowel which demonstrates a connection with coecum and blind terminal. In our work we analysed the lasting of the symptoms until the hospital intervention in patients stratified according to the pathohistological finding. We used ultrasound equipment- Toshiba Sonolayer with convex 3.75 MHz and linear 8 MHz probes. Results. From 8 ultrasound signs of the acute appendicitis, only an anterior-posterior (AP) diameter of appendices, FAT (width of periappendicular fat tissue) and a peristaltic absence are positive ultrasound signs of the acute appendicitis. Appendicitis phlegmonosa is the most common pathohistological finding in our study (44%). Perforate gangrenous appendicitis and gangrenous appendicitis are represented in more than half of patients (30% + 22%), which suggests a long period of persisting symptoms until a hospital treatment. A statistic analysis shows a great possibility for using values of AP diameter, width of periapendicular fat tissue, just like the values of mural thickness in

  8. Prospect for application of umbilical cord blood to clinical treatment of radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Tingzhen; Ke Xiaoyan

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To look forward to the prospect for application of umbilical cord blood to clinical treatment of radiation sickness by analyzing the results using umbilical cord blood in laboratory experiments and clinical research. Method: The data on umbilical cord blood published in literature are reviewed. Results: The umbilical blood is rich in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, low in immunological activity of lymphocytes, expanded significantly ex vivo under selected culture condition readily available and collected easily. Conclusion: With the above advantages, the prospect for application of umbilical cord blood is encouraging, particularly in the clinical treatment of radiation sickness

  9. Clinical application of preoperative TAE in the nasopharyngeal angiofibromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yu'e; Zhang Jingxian; Tang Wenheng; Yan Zhiping

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of the preoperative intra-arterial embolization of the nasopharyngeal angiofibromas. Methods: The treatment group of 7 male patients with the nasopharyngeal angiofibromas were undergone angiographic evaluation and embolization of tumor-feeding vessels before surgery. All patients were embolized with gelfoam particles and PVA. The control group of 7 patients received surgical treatment without preoperative embolization. The authors compared the volumes of intraoperative bleeding and the blood transfusions during operations between the two groups. Results: All patients achieved symptomatic remission, with no complications. Comparing with the control group, the amount of intraoperative bleeding and the blood transfusions during operations were much less in the treatment group submitted to endovascular embolization. Marked edema in the peripheral region of tumor of the treatment group made the tumor easy to be dissociated. Conclusion: The intraoperative bleeding can be reduced significantly by preoperative embolization of supplying arteries to the nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, therefore it should be used routinely as an adjunct to surgery. (authors)

  10. Clinical applications of measurement of serum immunoreactive levels of erythropoietin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.E.; Chandra, M.; Garcia, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The purification of erythropoietin (Ep) in 1977 enabled investigators to more clearly define the role of this hormone in erythropoiesis in man. Radioimmunoassays were rapidly developed. Undoubtedly differences between levels of immunoreactive and biologically active Ep will be found but the resolution of these discrepancies will expand our understanding of the erythron. Recently others described a monoclonal antibody against Ep. Because of this breakthrough, large quantities of pure hormone should soon be available to a larger number of investigators than currently have access to it. The major clinical use of this hormone will probably be in the treatment of the anemia of chronic renal disease. In the relatively few years since the radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed, measurements of the levels of this hormone have been made in several disease states as well as in normal man. Most of the findings to date confirm the predictions that have been made over the years based on studies done using the rather crude bioassay for Ep. In the present study the authors shall review and expand on what is known about subjects with chronic lung and renal disease

  11. Clinical application of functional MRI for chronic epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woermann, F.G.; Labudda, K.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is frequently used in the presurgical diagnostic procedure of epilepsy patients, in particular for lateralization of speech and memory and for localization of the primary motor cortex to delineate the epileptogenic lesion from eloquent brain areas. fMRI is one of the non-invasive procedures in the presurgical diagnostic process, together with medical history, seizure semiology, neurological examination, interictal and ictal EEG, structural MRI, video EEG monitoring and neuropsychology. This diagnostic sequence leads either to the decision for or against elective epilepsy surgery or to the decision to proceed with invasive diagnostic techniques (Wada test, intra-operative or extra-operative cortical stimulation). It is difficult to evaluate the contribution of the fMRI test in isolation to the validity of the entire diagnostic sequence. Complications such as memory loss and aphasia in temporal lobe resections or paresis after frontal lobe resections are rare and rarely of disastrous extent. This further complicates the evaluation of the clinical relevance of fMRI as a predictive tool. In this article studies which investigated the concordance between fMRI and other diagnostic gold standards will be presented as well as the association between presurgical fMRI and postsurgical morbidity. (orig.) [de

  12. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong

    2008-01-01

    FDG PET has been used as a diagnostic tool for localization of seizure focus for last 2-3 decades. In this article, the clinical usefulness of FDG PET in the management of patients with epilepsy has been reviewed, which provided the evidences to justify the medicare reimbursement for FDG PET in management of patients with epilepsy. Literature review demonstrated that FDG PET provides an important information in localization of seizure focus and determination whether a patients is a surgical candidate or not. FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance in localization of seizure focus in neocortical epilepsy as well as temporal lobe epilepsy regardless of the presence of structural lesion on MRI. Particularly, FDG PET can provide the additional information when the results from standard diagnositic modality such as interictal or video-monitored EEG, and MRI are inconclusive or discordant, and make to avoid invasive study. Furthermore, the presence of hypometabolism and extent of metabolic extent has been reported as an important predictor for seizure free outcome. However, studies suggested that more accurate localization and better surgical outcome could be expected with multimodal approach by combination of EEG, MRI, and functional studies using FDG PET or perfusion SPECT rather than using a single diagnostic modality in management of patients with epilepsy. Complementary use of FDG PET in management of epilepsy is worth for good surgical outcome in epilepsy patients

  13. Adaptive Optical System for Retina Imaging Approaches Clinic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, N.; Zhang, Y.; Rao, X.; Wang, C.; Hu, Y.; Jiang, W.; Jiang, C.

    We presented "A small adaptive optical system on table for human retinal imaging" at the 3rd Workshop on Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine. In this system, a 19 element small deformable mirror was used as wavefront correction element. High resolution images of photo receptors and capillaries of human retina were obtained. In recent two years, at the base of this system a new adaptive optical system for human retina imaging has been developed. The wavefront correction element is a newly developed 37 element deformable mirror. Some modifications have been adopted for easy operation. Experiments for different imaging wavelengths and axial positions were conducted. Mosaic pictures of photoreceptors and capillaries were obtained. 100 normal and abnormal eyes of different ages have been inspected.The first report in the world concerning the most detailed capillary distribution images cover ±3° by ± 3° field around the fovea has been demonstrated. Some preliminary very early diagnosis experiment has been tried in laboratory. This system is being planned to move to the hospital for clinic experiments.

  14. Molecular biology of breast cancer stem cells: potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam P; Almeida, Fabio S; Chi, Alex; Nguyen, Ly M; Cohen, Deirdre; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) have been postulated recently as responsible for failure of breast cancer treatment. The purpose of this study is to review breast CSCs molecular biology with respect to their mechanism of resistance to conventional therapy, and to develop treatment strategies that may improve survival of breast cancer patients. A literature search has identified in vitro and in vivo studies of breast CSCs. Breast CSCs overexpress breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) which allows cancer cells to transport actively chemotherapy agents out of the cells. Radioresistance is modulated through activation of Wnt signaling pathway and overexpression of genes coding for glutathione. Lapatinib can selectively target HER-2 positive breast CSCs and improves disease-free survival in these patients. Metformin may target basal type breast CSCs. Parthenolide and oncolytic viruses are promising targeting agents for breast CSCs. Future clinical trials for breast cancer should include anti-cancer stem cells targeting agents in addition to conventional chemotherapy. Hypofractionation radiotherapy may be indicated for residual disease post chemotherapy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Absorbable stent: focus on clinical applications and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nieves Gonzalo, Carlos MacayaInterventional Cardiology, Cardiovascular Institute. Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Coronary stents have improved very significantly the immediate and long-term results of percutaneous coronary interventions. However, once the vessel has healed, the scaffolding function of the stent is no longer needed, and the presence of a permanent metallic prosthesis poses important disadvantages. This has led to the idea of creating new devices that are able to provide mechanical support for a determined period and then disappear from the vessel, allowing its natural healing and avoiding the risks associated with having a permanent metallic cage, such as stent thrombosis. Absorbable stents currently appear as one of the most promising fields in interventional cardiology. The present article will review the available clinical evidence regarding these devices at present and their future perspectives.Keywords: absorbable stent, bioresorbable stent, absorb, percutaneous coronary intervention

  16. Radiolabelling of autologous leucocytes: technique and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl-Jaeger, E.; Kolbe, H.; Ludwig, H.; Sinzinger, H.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-camera imaging after injection of radiolabelled autologous leucocytes can be very helpful in the diagnosis, localization and further clinical treatment of inflammatory diseases. We present a technique allowing sterile separation of white blood cells and labelling with 99m Tc-phytate or -oxine and with 111 In-oxine, -oxine sulphate or -tropolone. The method is non-invasive and the radiation dose amounts to less than 80 mrad using 100 μCi 111 Indium. The use of radiolabelled granulocytes is of particular diagnostic value in patients with septicaemia of unknown origin. Whole body scanning allows not only visualization of enhanced splenic uptake in septicaemia, but also localization of an inflammatory process. Preferential indications for a diagnostic approach using radiolabelled granulocytes are inflammatory abdominal processes which cannot easily be documented by means of other non-invasive techniques, such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's diseases and ulcerative colitis), arthritic processes and abscesses of the liver and spleen, as well as subphrenic and retroperitoneal abscesses. Untreated osteomyelitis can be located with the help of labelled granulocytes, but in patients treated with antibiotics a false negative result is obtained in approximately 50 % of cases for as yet unknown reasons, even in the presence of a still active osteomyelitic process. (Authors)

  17. Clinical Applications of the Eosinophilic Esophagitis Diagnostic Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is a recently recognized upper gastrointestinal allergic disorder characterized by esophageal dysfunction (e.g., dysphagia and esophageal eosinophilia of ≥15 eosinophils/high-power field in patients who have persistent esophagitis even on proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy. The histologic method is the gold standard of EoE diagnosis. However, EoE clinical symptoms do not always correlate with histology, and the histologic method has sensitivity and specificity issues due to the patchiness of EoE and the subjective nature of the method. The “EoE transcriptome” was initially discovered in 2006, which led to the invention of the EoE diagnostic panel (EDP. In addition to providing a definitive EoE diagnosis with high accuracy, the EDP has been useful in elucidating several key elements about the disease including the efficacy of specific drugs such as swallowed glucocorticoids and anti-IL-13 humanized antibody therapy, the relationship between EoE and PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia, and predicting the disease course and responsiveness to therapy. The EDP’s long-term potential arises from its plasticity to incorporate new genes and uncover novel disease pathogenesis. We expect that the EDP will be increasingly helpful for personalized medicine approaches and improved diagnostics and disease monitoring.

  18. Clinical application of iopamidol (pamiray 300) for cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Ho; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jin Na; Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Dong Joon; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Dong Ik

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of Pamiray 300 (Iopamidol; Dongkook Pharm, Seoul, Korea) as a nonionic contrast medium for cerebral angiography. One hundred patients undergoing cerebral angiography were randomly assigned to receive Pamiray 300 after written consent had been obtained. Patients with adverse reactions were divided into two groups. One group consisted of patients with minor adverse events such as heat sensation and pain, and the other group consisted of patients with major adverse events such as dyspnea, laryngeal edema and shock. The qualities of the radiographic images were stratified into five grades by three independent radiologists. No abnormality induced by Pamiray 300 was seen by a physical and neurological examination, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiogram, respiration rate measurement and partial fraction of arterial oxygen recording. No major and severe adverse events occurred throughout the study. Patient sex, age, disease category, underlying disease and administered contrast dosage showed no statistical significance with regards to the occurrence of adverse events. The opacification of blood vessels in all patients was 'good' or 'excellent'. Based on the results of this study, Pamiray 300 is a safe, efficacious and well-tolerated contrast medium for use in cerebral angiography. Thus, Pamiray 300 can be used as a competitive medium in cerebral angiography

  19. Clinical application of iopamidol (pamiray 300) for cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Ho; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jin Na; Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Dong Joon; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical safety and efficacy of Pamiray 300 (Iopamidol; Dongkook Pharm, Seoul, Korea) as a nonionic contrast medium for cerebral angiography. One hundred patients undergoing cerebral angiography were randomly assigned to receive Pamiray 300 after written consent had been obtained. Patients with adverse reactions were divided into two groups. One group consisted of patients with minor adverse events such as heat sensation and pain, and the other group consisted of patients with major adverse events such as dyspnea, laryngeal edema and shock. The qualities of the radiographic images were stratified into five grades by three independent radiologists. No abnormality induced by Pamiray 300 was seen by a physical and neurological examination, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiogram, respiration rate measurement and partial fraction of arterial oxygen recording. No major and severe adverse events occurred throughout the study. Patient sex, age, disease category, underlying disease and administered contrast dosage showed no statistical significance with regards to the occurrence of adverse events. The opacification of blood vessels in all patients was 'good' or 'excellent'. Based on the results of this study, Pamiray 300 is a safe, efficacious and well-tolerated contrast medium for use in cerebral angiography. Thus, Pamiray 300 can be used as a competitive medium in cerebral angiography.

  20. Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy. Clinical Applications of the Cryoprobe, Cryospray, and Cryoadhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBardino, David M; Lanfranco, Anthony R; Haas, Andrew R

    2016-08-01

    Cryotherapy is an evolving therapeutic and diagnostic tool used during bronchoscopy. Through rapid freeze-thaw cycles, cryotherapy causes cell death and tissue necrosis or tissue adherence that can be used via the flexible or rigid bronchoscope. This extreme cold can be used through the working channel of the bronchoscope via a specialized cryoprobe or directly with the use of spray cryotherapy. These properties allow for multiple bronchoscopic techniques, each with its own equipment and procedural, safety, and efficacy considerations. Bronchoscopic cryotherapy can be used in a variety of clinical scenarios, including the treatment of malignant and benign central airway obstruction and low-grade airway malignancy, foreign body removal or cryoextraction, endobronchial biopsy, and transbronchial biopsy. The bulk of the experience with bronchoscopic cryotherapy consists of uncontrolled case series of malignant central airway obstruction. There are also controlled data supporting the use of cryoadhesion for endobronchial biopsies, albeit with an increased risk of controllable bleeding. The use of cryoadhesion for transbronchial biopsies is an active area of investigation with limited controlled data. In addition, there are promising future directions using bronchoscopic cryotherapy, including chemosensitizing malignancy with cryotherapy and capitalizing on the synergy between cryotherapy and radiation.

  1. 131I-m IBG preparation and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassine, T.; Bakeir, M. A.; Al-Shnan, S.; Al-Asad, M.

    2001-12-01

    The factors affecting the preparation of 131 I-mIBG were studied and the optimal labelling and preparation conditions were determined in a manner that the requirements of GRP and GMP are satisfied. The m-IBG was labeled by isotopic exchange method where in situ produced Cu (II) was used as a catalyst. The Cu (II) was in situ produced by the effect of thiosulfate on Cu(II) ions in the presence of acetic acid. The optimal conditions were determined as: (The ratio of acetic acid to the iodide-131 solution is 0.5-1.5, the reaction temperature is (160 Centigrade), the reaction period is 60 minutes, and the quantity of m-IBG must be more than 1mg). At these conditions, high labelling yield of 98% was obtained. Further purification lead to an increase in the RCP to more than 99%. All preparations produced sterile and Pyrogen free solutions. The biodistribution studies in rats showed random distribution, which were slightly higher than that were shown in literature. These differences were attributed to the absence of stable iodine saturation of the rats prior to the injection of 131 I-mIBG in this study. Clinical studies using our products showed high localization in the tumors in case of neuroblastoma patients and in adrenal gland in case of pheochromocytoma patients. (author)

  2. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells: clinical applications in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Letizia; Mareschi, Katia; Ferrero, Ivana; Vassallo, Elena; Oliveri, Giuseppe; Boccaletti, Riccardo; Testa, Lucia; Livigni, Sergio; Fagioli, Franca

    2006-07-01

    Our study was aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of intraspinal cord implantation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a few well-monitored amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Seven patients affected by definite ALS were enrolled in the study and two patients were treated for compassionate use and monitored for at least 3 years. Bone marrow was collected from the posterior iliac crest according to the standard procedure and MSCs were expanded ex vivo according to Pittenger's protocol. The cells were suspended in 2 ml autologous cerebrospinal fluid and transplanted into the spinal cord by a micrometric pump injector. The in vitro expanded MSCs did not show any bacterial o fungal contamination, hemopoietic cell contamination, chromosomic alterations and early cellular senescence. No patient manifested major adverse events such as respiratory failure or death. Minor adverse events were intercostal pain irradiation and leg sensory dysesthesia, both reversible after a mean period of 6 weeks. No modification of the spinal cord volume or other signs of abnormal cell proliferation were observed. A significant slowing down of the linear decline of the forced vital capacity was evident in four patients 36 months after MSCs transplantation. Our results demonstrate that direct injection of autologous expanded MSCs into the spinal cord of ALS patients is safe, with no significant acute or late toxicity, and well tolerated. The clinical results seem to be encouraging.

  3. Clinical application of quantitative 99Tcm-pertechnetate thyroid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yongju; Xie Jian; Yan Xinhui; Wand Jiebin; Zhu Xuanmin; Liu Lin; Sun Haizhou

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of quantitative 99 Tc m -pertechnetate thyroid imaging for the diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation in patients with thyroid disease. Methods: With the Siemens Orbit SPECT, 99 Tc m sodium pertechnetate thyroid imaging was performed on a control group and 108 patients with Graves' disease, 58 patients with Hashimoto's disease, 41 patients with subacute thyroiditis. Three functional parameters were calculated as follows: AR=5 min thyroid count/1 min thyroid count; UI=20 min thyroid count/thigh count; T d =imaging interval between carotid and thyroid. Results: 1) Three functional parameters were basically concordant with serological parameters in patients with Graves' disease. While uptake was high in patients who had contracted Graves' disease for ≤0.5 year, for those whose disease relapsed within 2 years the 99 Tc m thyroid uptake increased when the antithyroid medication was stopped. 2) Thyroid images of hyperthyroid patients with Hashimoto's disease showed increased perfusion and 99 Tc m uptake, a pattern similar to that found in Graves' disease. Differences in T d , AR , UI were not significant among euthyroid, subclinical hypothyroid patients with Hashimoto's disease, so uptake ratios could indicate the thyroid activity. 3) Delayed thyroid image and diffuse uptake decrease were found in hyperthyroid patients with SAT, however, focal damages were observed in euthyroid patients. Conclusion: Quantitative 99 Tc m -pertechnetate thyroid imaging is a significantly helpful technique in the diagnosis and treatment for common thyroid disorders

  4. The Clinical Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been widely used as an important clinical tool for real-time in vivo cancer diagnosis. Raman information can be obtained from whole organisms and tissues, at the cellular level and at the biomolecular level. The aim of this paper is to review the newest developments of Raman spectroscopy in the field of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Raman spectroscopy can distinguish malignant tissues from noncancerous/normal tissues and can assess tumor margins or sentinel lymph nodes during an operation. At the cellular level, Raman spectra can be used to monitor the intracellular processes occurring in blood circulation. At the biomolecular level, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy techniques may help detect the biomarker on the tumor surface as well as evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Furthermore, Raman images reveal an inhomogeneous distribution of different compounds, especially proteins, lipids, microcalcifications, and their metabolic products, in cancerous breast tissues. Information about these compounds may further our understanding of the mechanisms of breast cancer.

  5. Clinical proteomics: Applications for prostate cancer biomarker discovery and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricoin, Emanuel F; Ornstein, David K; Liotta, Lance A

    2004-01-01

    The science of proteomics comprises much more than simply generating lists of proteins that change in expression as a cause of or consequence of pathophysiology. The goal of proteomics should be to characterize the information flow through the intercellular protein circuitry that communicates with the extracellular microenvironment and then ultimately to the serum/plasma macroenvironment. Serum proteomic pattern diagnostics is a new type of proteomic concept in which patterns of ion signatures generated from high dimensional mass spectrometry data are used as diagnostic classifiers. This recent approach has exciting potential for clinical utility of diagnostic patterns because low molecular weight metabolites, peptides, and protein fragments may have higher accuracy than traditional biomarkers of cancer detection. Intriguingly, we now have discovered that this diagnostic information exists in a bound state, complexed with circulating highly abundant carrier proteins. These diagnostic fragments may one day be harvested by circulating nanoparticles, designed to absorb, enrich, and amplify the repertoire of diagnostic biomarkers generated-even at the critical, initial stages of carcinogenesis. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  6. Pharmacotherapy of Insomnia with Ramelteon: Safety, Efficacy and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seithikurippu R. Pandi-Perumal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramelteon is a tricyclic synthetic analog of melatonin that acts specifically on MT 1 and MT 2 melatonin receptors. Ramelteon is the first melatonin receptor agonist approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of insomnia characterized by sleep onset difficulties. Ramelteon is both a chronobiotic and a hypnotic that has been shown to promote sleep initiation and maintenance in various preclinical and in clinical trials. The efficacy and safety of ramelteon in patients with chronic insomnia was initially confirmed in short-term placebo-controlled trials. These showed little evidence of next-day residual effects, withdrawal symptoms or rebound insomnia. Other studies indicated that ramelteon lacked abuse potential and had a minimal risk of producing dependence or adverse effects on cognitive or psychomotor performance. A 6-month placebo-controlled international study and a 1-year open-label study in the USA demonstrated that ramelteon was effective and well tolerated. Other potential off-label uses of ramelteon include circadian rhythm sleep disorders such as shift-work and jet lag. At the present time the drug should be cautiously prescribed for short-term treatment only.

  7. Mobile phone based clinical microscopy for global health applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N Breslauer

    Full Text Available Light microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases. In many regions of the world, however, the required equipment is either unavailable or insufficiently portable, and operators may not possess adequate training to make full use of the images obtained. Counterintuitively, these same regions are often well served by mobile phone networks, suggesting the possibility of leveraging portable, camera-enabled mobile phones for diagnostic imaging and telemedicine. Toward this end we have built a mobile phone-mounted light microscope and demonstrated its potential for clinical use by imaging P. falciparum-infected and sickle red blood cells in brightfield and M. tuberculosis-infected sputum samples in fluorescence with LED excitation. In all cases resolution exceeded that necessary to detect blood cell and microorganism morphology, and with the tuberculosis samples we took further advantage of the digitized images to demonstrate automated bacillus counting via image analysis software. We expect such a telemedicine system for global healthcare via mobile phone -- offering inexpensive brightfield and fluorescence microscopy integrated with automated image analysis -- to provide an important tool for disease diagnosis and screening, particularly in the developing world and rural areas where laboratory facilities are scarce but mobile phone infrastructure is extensive.

  8. Regulatory dendritic cell therapy: from rodents to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raïch-Regué, Dalia; Glancy, Megan; Thomson, Angus W

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are highly-specialized, bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells that induce or regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Regulatory or "tolerogenic" DC play a crucial role in maintaining self tolerance in the healthy steady-state. These regulatory innate immune cells subvert naïve or memory T cell responses by various mechanisms. Regulatory DC (DCreg) also exhibit the ability to induce or restore T cell tolerance in many animal models of autoimmune disease or transplant rejection. There is also evidence that adoptive transfer of DCreg can regulate T cell responses in non-human primates and humans. Important insights gained from in vitro studies and animal models have led recently to the development of clinical grade human DCreg, with potential to treat autoimmune disease or enhance transplant survival while reducing patient dependency on immunosuppressive drugs. Phase I trials have been conducted in type-1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of DCreg therapy. This mini-review will outline how observations made using animal models have been translated into human use, and discuss the challenges faced in further developing this form of regulatory immune cell therapy in the fields of autoimmunity and transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraordinary progress in understanding several key features of stem cells has been made in the last ten years, including definition of the niche, and identification of signals regulating mobilization and homing as well as partial understanding of the mechanisms controlling self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation. This progress produced invaluable tools for the development of rational cell therapy protocols that have yielded positive results in preclinical models of genetic and acquired diseases and, in several cases, have entered clinical experimentation with positive outcome. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are nonhematopoietic cells with multilineage potential to differentiate into various tissues of mesodermal origin. They can be isolated from bone marrow and other tissues and have the capacity to extensively proliferate in vitro. Moreover, MSCs have also been shown to produce anti-inflammatory molecules which can modulate humoral and cellular immune responses. Considering their regenerative potential and immunoregulatory effect, MSC therapy is a promising tool in the treatment of degenerative, inflammatory, and autoimmune diseases. It is obvious that much work remains to be done to increase our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating development, homeostasis, and tissue repair and thus to provide new tools to implement the efficacy of cell therapy trials.

  10. Natural Language Processing Technologies in Radiology Research and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tianrun; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Yu, Sheng; Kelil, Tatiana; Ripley, Beth; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    The migration of imaging reports to electronic medical record systems holds great potential in terms of advancing radiology research and practice by leveraging the large volume of data continuously being updated, integrated, and shared. However, there are significant challenges as well, largely due to the heterogeneity of how these data are formatted. Indeed, although there is movement toward structured reporting in radiology (ie, hierarchically itemized reporting with use of standardized terminology), the majority of radiology reports remain unstructured and use free-form language. To effectively “mine” these large datasets for hypothesis testing, a robust strategy for extracting the necessary information is needed. Manual extraction of information is a time-consuming and often unmanageable task. “Intelligent” search engines that instead rely on natural language processing (NLP), a computer-based approach to analyzing free-form text or speech, can be used to automate this data mining task. The overall goal of NLP is to translate natural human language into a structured format (ie, a fixed collection of elements), each with a standardized set of choices for its value, that is easily manipulated by computer programs to (among other things) order into subcategories or query for the presence or absence of a finding. The authors review the fundamentals of NLP and describe various techniques that constitute NLP in radiology, along with some key applications. ©RSNA, 2016 PMID:26761536

  11. Federated querying architecture with clinical & translational health IT application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livne, Oren E; Schultz, N Dustin; Narus, Scott P

    2011-10-01

    We present a software architecture that federates data from multiple heterogeneous health informatics data sources owned by multiple organizations. The architecture builds upon state-of-the-art open-source Java and XML frameworks in innovative ways. It consists of (a) federated query engine, which manages federated queries and result set aggregation via a patient identification service; and (b) data source facades, which translate the physical data models into a common model on-the-fly and handle large result set streaming. System modules are connected via reusable Apache Camel integration routes and deployed to an OSGi enterprise service bus. We present an application of our architecture that allows users to construct queries via the i2b2 web front-end, and federates patient data from the University of Utah Enterprise Data Warehouse and the Utah Population database. Our system can be easily adopted, extended and integrated with existing SOA Healthcare and HL7 frameworks such as i2b2 and caGrid.

  12. Key updates in the clinical application of electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Richard D; Reti, Irving M

    2017-04-01

    ECT is the oldest and most effective therapy available for the treatment of severe major depression. It is highly effective in individuals with treatment resistance and when a rapid response is required. However, ECT is associated with memory impairment that is the most concerning side-effect of the treatment, substantially contributing to the controversy and stigmatization surrounding this highly effective treatment. There is overwhelming evidence for the efficacy and safety of an acute course of ECT for the treatment of a severe major depressive episode, as reflected by the recent FDA advisory panel recommendation to reclassify ECT devices from Class III to the lower risk category Class II. However, its application for other indications remains controversial, despite strong evidence to the contrary. This article reviews the indication of ECT for major depression, as well as for other conditions, including catatonia, mania, and acute episodes of schizophrenia. This study also reviews the growing evidence supporting the use of maintenance ECT to prevent relapse after an acute successful course of treatment. Although ECT is administered uncommonly to patients under the age of 18, the evidence supporting its use is also reviewed in this patient population. Finally, memory loss associated with ECT and efforts at more effectively monitoring and reducing it are reviewed.

  13. 3D printing for clinical application in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Nongping; Zhao, Xia

    2017-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a promising technology that can use a patient's image data to create complex and personalized constructs precisely. It has made great progress over the past few decades and has been widely used in medicine including medical modeling, surgical planning, medical education and training, prosthesis and implants. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a powerful tool that has the potential to fabricate bioengineered constructs of the desired shape layer-by-layer using computer-aided deposition of living cells and biomaterials. Advances in 3D printed implants and future tissue-engineered constructs will bring great progress to the field of otolaryngology. By integrating 3D printing into tissue engineering and materials, it may be possible for otolaryngologists to implant 3D printed functional grafts into patients for reconstruction of a variety of tissue defects in the foreseeable future. In this review, we will introduce the current state of 3D printing technology and highlight the applications of 3D printed prosthesis and implants, 3D printing technology combined with tissue engineering and future directions of bioprinting in the field of otolaryngology.

  14. Separation of lactoferrin and clinical application of its radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang Yizhong; Wang Chongdao; Jin Jian

    1995-02-01

    A new method of separation and purification of lactoferrin (LF), its radioimmunoassay (LF-RIA), and application in the diagnosis of lung cancer are reported. The results showed that this method is much better than what were previously reported, with advantages of high yield, time-saving and economy. The results of the LF-RIA established were good. The coefficients of variation within a batch and between batches were 4.77% and 13.59% respectively and the recovery rate was 97.99%. There was no cross-reaction between lactoferrin and transferrin. The lactoferrin in the bronchial washing fluid (BLF) was determined in 36 lung cancer cases, 21 pulmonary infection cases and 4 normal controls. The results indicated that the BLF content in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the pulmonary infection group or the normal control group and the detection rate was the highest in lung adenocarcinoma. Pathological analysis indicated that the BLF was negatively related to the early and later tumor. (2 figs., 2 tabs.)

  15. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping: Contrast Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlei; Wei, Hongjiang; Gong, Nan-Jie; Cronin, Matthew; Dibb, Russel; Decker, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a recently developed MRI technique for quantifying the spatial distribution of magnetic susceptibility within biological tissues. It first uses the frequency shift in the MRI signal to map the magnetic field profile within the tissue. The resulting field map is then used to determine the spatial distribution of the underlying magnetic susceptibility by solving an inverse problem. The solution is achieved by deconvolving the field map with a dipole field, under the assumption that the magnetic field is a result of the superposition of the dipole fields generated by all voxels and that each voxel has its unique magnetic susceptibility. QSM provides improved contrast to noise ratio for certain tissues and structures compared to its magnitude counterpart. More importantly, magnetic susceptibility is a direct reflection of the molecular composition and cellular architecture of the tissue. Consequently, by quantifying magnetic susceptibility, QSM is becoming a quantitative imaging approach for characterizing normal and pathological tissue properties. This article reviews the mechanism generating susceptibility contrast within tissues and some associated applications. PMID:26844301

  16. Application of laser speckle displacement analysis to clinical dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberpatch, G. K. D.; Hood, J. A. A.

    1997-03-01

    Success of dental restorations is dependent on the integrity of the tooth/restoration interface. Distortion of teeth due to operative procedures has previously been measured using LVDT's and strain-gauges and has provided useful but limited information. This paper reports on the verification of a system for laser speckle photography and its use to quantitative distortions in teeth from matrix band application and the use of bonded composite resin restorations. Tightening of matrix bands around teeth results in an inward deformation of the cusps, increasing incrementally as the band is tightened. Deflections of 50 micrometer/cusp were recorded. A delayed recovery was noted consistent with the viscoelastic behavior of dentine. For bonded restorations recovery will place the adhesion interface in a state of tension when the band is released and may cause premature failure. Premolar teeth restored with bonded resin restorations exhibited inward displacement of cusps of 12 - 15 micrometer. Deformation was not within the buccal-lingual axis as suggested by prior studies. Molar teeth bonded with composite resin restoration exhibit complex and variable cusp displacement in both magnitude (0 - 30 micrometer) and direction. Complete and partial debonding could be detected. Interproximal cusp bending could be quantitated and lifting of the restoration from the cavity floor was detectable. Deformations evidenced indicate the tooth/restoration interface is in a stressed state and this may subsequently lead to failure. The technique has the potential to aid in development of restoration techniques that minimize residual stress.

  17. Radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors (II): clinical application and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanagas, Tomas; Gulbinas, Antanas; Pundzius, Juozas; Barauskas, Giedrius

    2010-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is one of the alternatives in the management of liver tumors, especially in patients who are not candidates for surgery. The aim of this article is to review applicability of radiofrequency ablation achieving complete tumor destruction, utility of imaging techniques for patients' follow-up, indications for local ablative procedures, procedure-associated morbidity and mortality, and long-term results in patients with different tumors. The success of local thermal ablation consists in creating adequate volumes of tissue destruction with adequate "clear margin," depending on improved delivery of radiofrequency energy and modulated tissue biophysiology. Different volumes of coagulation necrosis are achieved applying different types of electrodes, pulsing energy sources, utilizing sophisticated ablation schemes. Some additional methods are used to increase the overall deposition of energy through alterations in tissue electrical conductivity, to improve heat retention within the tissue, and to modulate tolerance of tumor tissue to hyperthermia. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound or positron emission tomography are applied to control the effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation. The long-term results of radiofrequency ablation are controversial.

  18. Natural Language Processing Technologies in Radiology Research and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tianrun; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Yu, Sheng; Kelil, Tatiana; Ripley, Beth; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The migration of imaging reports to electronic medical record systems holds great potential in terms of advancing radiology research and practice by leveraging the large volume of data continuously being updated, integrated, and shared. However, there are significant challenges as well, largely due to the heterogeneity of how these data are formatted. Indeed, although there is movement toward structured reporting in radiology (ie, hierarchically itemized reporting with use of standardized terminology), the majority of radiology reports remain unstructured and use free-form language. To effectively "mine" these large datasets for hypothesis testing, a robust strategy for extracting the necessary information is needed. Manual extraction of information is a time-consuming and often unmanageable task. "Intelligent" search engines that instead rely on natural language processing (NLP), a computer-based approach to analyzing free-form text or speech, can be used to automate this data mining task. The overall goal of NLP is to translate natural human language into a structured format (ie, a fixed collection of elements), each with a standardized set of choices for its value, that is easily manipulated by computer programs to (among other things) order into subcategories or query for the presence or absence of a finding. The authors review the fundamentals of NLP and describe various techniques that constitute NLP in radiology, along with some key applications. ©RSNA, 2016.

  19. Commercial Clinical Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    CRADA No. 95-CR-09 among the LITCO--now Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; a private company, Neutron Therapies Limited Liability Company, NTL formerly Ionix Corporation; and Washington State University was established in 1996 to further the development of BNCT. NTL has established a laboratory for the synthesis, under US FDA approved current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines, of key boron intermediates and final boron agents for BNCT. The company has focused initially on the development of the compound GB-10 (Na 2 B 10 H 10 ) as the first boron agent of interest. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for GB-10 has been filed and approved by the FDA for a Phase I human biodistribution trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme at UW under the direction of Professor Keith Stelzer, Principal Investigator (PI). These trials are funded by NTL under a contract with the UW, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the initial phases are nearing completion. Initial results show that boron-10 concentrations on the order of 100 micrograms per gram (100 ppm) can be achieved and maintained in blood with no indication of toxicity

  20. Platelets and their chemokines in atherosclerosis – clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp evon Hundelshausen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of platelets as important players in the process of atherogenesis has become increasingly accepted due to accumulating experimental and clinical evidence. Despite the progress in understanding the molecular details of atherosclerosis, particularly by using animal models, the inflammatory and thrombotic roles of activated platelet s especially in the human system remain difficult to dissect, as often only the complications of atherosclerosis i.e. stroke and myocardial infarction are definable but not the plaque burden.Platelet indices including platelet count and mean platelet volume and soluble mediators released by activated platelets are associated with atherosclerosis. The chemokine CXCL4 has multiple atherogenic activities e.g. altering the differentiation of T cells and macrophages by inhibiting neutrophil and monocyte apoptosis and by increasing the uptake of oxLDL and synergizing with CCL5. CCL5 is released and deposited on endothelium by activated platelets thereby triggering atherogenic monocyte recruitment, which can be attenuated by blocking the corresponding chemokine receptor CCR5. Atheroprotective and plaque stabilizing properties are attributed to CXCL12, which plays an important role in regenerative processes by attracting progenitor cells. Its release from luminal attached platelets accelerates endothelial healing after injury. Platelet surface molecules GPIIb/IIIa, GP1bα, P-selectin, JAM-A and the CD40/CD40L dyade are crucially involved in the interaction with endothelial cells, leukocytes and matrix molecules affecting atherogenesis. Beyond the effects on the arterial inflammatory infiltrate, platelets affect cholesterol metabolism by binding, modifying and endocytosing LDL particles via their scavenger receptors and contribute to the formation of lipid laden macrophages. Current medical therapies for the prevention of atherosclerotic therapies enable the elucidation of mechanisms linking platelets to inflammation

  1. Clinical application of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Songqiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the indications and therapeutic effect of duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 17 patients who underwent DPPHR in Fujian Provincial Hospital from January 2013 to February 2017. Among these patients, 6 had chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic duct stones, 2 had chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst, 3 had solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreatic head, 3 had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, 2 had serous cystadenoma of the pancreatic head, and 1 had mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreatic head. Results The time of operation was 200-360 minutes (mean 304.0±45.3 minutes, and the intraoperative blood loss was 50-500 ml (mean 267.5±116.1 ml. No patient died in the perioperative period. After surgery, 5 experienced biochemical leak, 2 experienced grade B pancreatic fistula, no patient experienced grade C pancreatic fistula, and 1 experienced gastroplegia; all these patients were cured and discharged after conservative treatment. The length of postoperative hospital stay was 17-78 days (mean 30.8±14.3 days. The 17 patients were followed up for 2 months to 4 years after surgery, and no patient experienced tumor recurrence, new-onset diabetes, dyspepsia, or common bile duct stenosis after surgery. Conclusion Besides ensuring the complete resection of tumor, DPPHR can reduce the incidence rate of surgical trauma and complications and shorten the time of operation and the length of hospital stay. Compared with pancreaticoduodenectomy, DPPHR can better preserve the endocrine and exocrine functions of the pancreas and improve patients′ postoperative quality of life.

  2. Red Blood Cell Mechanical Fragility Test for Clinical Research Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Luke A; Olia, Salim E; Kameneva, Marina V

    2017-07-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) susceptibility to mechanically induced hemolysis, or RBC mechanical fragility (MF), is an important parameter in the characterization of erythrocyte membrane health. The rocker bead test (RBT) and associated calculated mechanical fragility index (MFI) is a simple method for the assessment of RBC MF. Requiring a minimum of 15.5 mL of blood and necessitating adjustment of hematocrit (Ht) to a "standard" value (40%), the current RBT is not suitable for use in most studies involving human subjects. To address these limitations, we propose a 6.5 mL reduced volume RBT and corresponding modified MFI (MMFI) that does not require prior Ht adjustment. This new method was assessed for i) correlation to the existing text, ii) to quantify the effect of Ht on MFI, and iii) validation by reexamining the protective effect of plasma proteins on RBC MF. The reduced volume RBT strongly correlated (r = 0.941) with the established large volume RBT at matched Hts, and an equation was developed to calculate MMFI: a numerical estimation (R 2  = 0.923) of MFI if performed with the reduced volume RBT at "standard" (40%) Ht. An inversely proportional relationship was found between plasma protein concentration and RBC MF using the MMFI-reduced volume method, supporting previous literature findings. The new reduced volume RBT and modified MFI will allow for the measurement of RBC MF in clinical and preclinical studies involving humans or small animals. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Woo Choi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models.

  4. Surgery planning and navigation by laser lithography plastic replica. Features, clinical applications, and advantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihara, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Yuuko; Furuhata, Kentaro

    1995-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional replicas created using laserlithography has recently become popular for surgical planning and intraoperative navigation in plastic surgery and oral maxillofacial surgery. In this study, we investigated many clinical applications that we have been involved in regarding the production of three-dimensional replicas. We have also analyzed the features, application classes, and advantages of this method. As a result, clinical applications are categorized into three classes, which are 'three-dimensional shape recognition', 'simulated surgery', and 'template'. The distinct features of three-dimensional replicas are 'direct recognition', 'fast manipulation', and 'free availability'. Meeting the requirements of surgical planning and intraoperative navigation, they have produced satisfactory results in clinical applications. (author)

  5. [Evaluation of Web-based software applications for administrating and organising an ophthalmological clinical trial site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, K; Reznicek, L; Leicht, S; Ulbig, M; Wolf, A

    2013-07-01

    The importance and complexity of clinical trials is continuously increasing, especially in innovative specialties like ophthalmology. Therefore an efficient clinical trial site organisational structure is essential. In modern internet times, this can be accomplished by web-based applications. In total, 3 software applications (Vibe on Prem, Sharepoint and open source software) were evaluated in a clinical trial site in ophthalmology. Assessment criteria were set; they were: reliability, easiness of administration, usability, scheduling, task list, knowledge management, operating costs and worldwide availability. Vibe on Prem customised by the local university met the assessment criteria best. Other applications were not as strong. By introducing a web-based application for administrating and organising an ophthalmological trial site, studies can be conducted in a more efficient and reliable manner. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namkug

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models. PMID:26015880

  7. Medical imaging in clinical applications algorithmic and computer-based approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Bhateja, Vikrant; Hassanien, Aboul

    2016-01-01

    This volume comprises of 21 selected chapters, including two overview chapters devoted to abdominal imaging in clinical applications supported computer aided diagnosis approaches as well as different techniques for solving the pectoral muscle extraction problem in the preprocessing part of the CAD systems for detecting breast cancer in its early stage using digital mammograms. The aim of this book is to stimulate further research in medical imaging applications based algorithmic and computer based approaches and utilize them in real-world clinical applications. The book is divided into four parts, Part-I: Clinical Applications of Medical Imaging, Part-II: Classification and clustering, Part-III: Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) Tools and Case Studies and Part-IV: Bio-inspiring based Computer Aided diagnosis techniques. .

  8. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology policy on the application for, and implementation of, clinical practice guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harminder; Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Hookey, Lawrence; Enns, Robert; Bistritz, Lana; Rioux, Louis-Charles; Hope, Louise; Sinclair, Paul

    2014-01-01

    An important mandate of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG), as documented in the Association’s governance policies, is to optimize the care of patients with digestive disorders. Clinical practice guidelines are one means of achieving this goal. The benefits of timely, high-quality and evidenced-based recommendations include: Enhancing the professional development of clinical members through education and dissemination of synthesized clinical research;Improving patient care provided by members by providing focus on quality and evidence;Creating legislative environments that favour effective clinical practice;Enhancing the clinical care provided to patients with digestive disease by nongastroenterologists; andIdentifying areas that require further information or research to improve clinical care.The present document provides the foundation required to ensure that clinical practice guidelines produced by the CAG are necessary, appropriate, credible and applicable. These recommendations should be adhered to as closely as possible to obtain CAG endorsement. PMID:25314352

  9. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, Keiichiro

    2002-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  10. Cyclotron production of {sup 44}Sc for clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajewski, S.; Bilewicz, A. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Cydzik, I. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); European Commission Joint Research Center, Ispra (Italy). Inst. for Health and Consumer Protection; Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Heavy Ion Lab.; Abbas, K. [European Commission Joint Research Center, Ispra (Italy). Institute for Transuranium Elements; Bulgheroni, A.; Simonelli, F.; Holzwarth, U. [European Commission Joint Research Center, Ispra (Italy). Inst. for Health and Consumer Protection

    2013-08-01

    {sup 44} is a promising {beta}{sup +}-emitter for molecular imaging with intermediate half-life of 4 h. Due to the chemical similarity of Sc{sup 3+} to the Lu{sup 3+} and Y{sup 3+} cations, {sup 44}Sc-DOTA bioconjugates are expected to demonstrate similar properties in vivo as the {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 90}Y-bioconjugates, what is important in planning the radionuclide therapy. {sup 44}Sc can be obtained from the {sup 44}Ti/{sup 44}Sc generator. An alternative method for {sup 44}Sc production can be the irradiation of {sup 44}Ca target at small cyclotrons. The aim of our work was to optimize the parameters of {sup 44}CaCO{sub 3} irradiation and to develop a simple procedure for {sup 44}Sc separation from the calcium target. For optimization study, {sup 44}CaCO{sub 3} targets were irradiated by protons in the energy range of 5.6-17.5 MeV with 9 MeV being found to be the best energy for {sup 44}Ca irradiations. A simple and fast separation procedure of {sup 44}Sc from calcium target was developed using chelating resin Chelex 100. DOTATATE conjugate was successfully radiolabelled with high yield at elevated temperature using the produced {sup 44}Sc. While {sup 44}CaCO{sub 3} is relatively expensive, the cost of {sup 44}Sc-DOTATATE production can be reduced by target recovery. Due to low proton energy required to produce GBq activity level of {sup 44}Sc, the availability of {sup 44}Sc radioisotope could be enhanced to open new opportunities for applications in medical imaging. (orig.)

  11. Applications of mixed-methods methodology in clinical pharmacy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Muhammad Abdul; Closs, S José

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Mixed-methods methodology, as the name suggests refers to mixing of elements of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies in a single study. In the past decade, mixed-methods methodology has gained popularity among healthcare researchers as it promises to bring together the strengths of both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Methodology A number of mixed-methods designs are available in the literature and the four most commonly used designs in healthcare research are: the convergent parallel design, the embedded design, the exploratory design, and the explanatory design. Each has its own unique advantages, challenges and procedures and selection of a particular design should be guided by the research question. Guidance on designing, conducting and reporting mixed-methods research is available in the literature, so it is advisable to adhere to this to ensure methodological rigour. When to use it is best suited when the research questions require: triangulating findings from different methodologies to explain a single phenomenon; clarifying the results of one method using another method; informing the design of one method based on the findings of another method, development of a scale/questionnaire and answering different research questions within a single study. Two case studies have been presented to illustrate possible applications of mixed-methods methodology. Limitations Possessing the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake qualitative and quantitative data collection, analysis, interpretation and integration remains the biggest challenge for researchers conducting mixed-methods studies. Sequential study designs are often time consuming, being in two (or more) phases whereas concurrent study designs may require more than one data collector to collect both qualitative and quantitative data at the same time.

  12. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, Keiichiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Nakai, Toshiharu [Inst. of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  13. Clinical investigation on application of water swallowing to MR esophagography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinping, E-mail: zjpmri@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China); Hu, Weijian; Zang, Lin [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China); Yao, Yibin; Tang, Yongxiang; Qian, Zhen; Gao, Ping; Wu, Xiaoyan; Li, Shijian [Department of Radiology, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China); Xie, Zhenlan; Yuan, Xiaoqing [Department of Pathology, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To verify the clinical outcomes of applying water swallowing to MR esophagography. Methods: Thirty patients confirmed postoperatively or histopathologically with thoracic esophageal carcinoma by endoscopic biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers with normal esophagus underwent respectively conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection and water swallowing MR esophagography. Of those patients, 4 underwent second examination after radiotherapy. Assessment on imaging effects of MR esophagography was performed. Assessment on definition on MR esophagography of the tumor in both upper and lower ends, specific localization, tumor size finally measured, coincidence with the gross pathologic types and tumor staging were respectively performed by comparison with conventional MRI. Additionally, we evaluated the outcomes of radiotherapy by comparing the previous MR esophagography with the second one with interventional technique. Results: Of the total 44 images of MR esophagography, 97.7% (43/44) were in high resolution by sagittal view and 81.8% (36/44) by cross-section. 93.3% (56/60) of the MR esophagography were clearly defined with the neoplastic lesion ends in the 30 patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma, compared with 11.7% (7/60) by conventional MRI. The results were totally different in statistics (P < 0.005). Preoperative conventional MRI detection of the 22 cases in 25 undergone radical resection suggested vague diameter of the primary tumor and impossibly identified it at middle-lower thoracic esophagus in 5, and even failed to confirm gross pathologic types in 19 cases. Yet, MR esophagography with water swallowing represented accurate tumor length (graded as excellent) in 88% (22/25), localization in 100% (25/25), exact gross pathologic types in 88% (22/25), and accuracy for tumor staging in 80.8% (21/26) compared to 92.3% (24/26) by conventional MRI. Therapeutic effects achieved in 4 patients with radiotherapy. Conclusions: MR esophagography

  14. Radiometric emanation method for the assessment of the durability of building materials towards aggressive media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.; Beckman, I.N.

    1991-01-01

    A new express method has been suggested for testing durability of building materials in contact with aggressive liquids and gases. The method is based on the measurement of radon released from samples studied, continuously during the interaction of the sample with the aggressive medium. The samples are previously labeled by the source of radon atoms, i.e. thorium Th-228 and radium Ra-224 are incorporated in the samples to be tested. Due to high sensitivity of the method the first stages of the interaction between the cement stone (concrete) sample and aggressive liquid or gas can be followed. The express information about the relative durability of the building materials was obtained. This method was also advantageously used for the investigation of corrosion early stage of marble (calcium carbonate) by sulphur dioxide (in the concentrations of 500-3,000 ppm). The most advantageous application of the method is for rapid assessment of the relative durability of building materials, e.g. the information about the relative durability of the samples studied was obtained within several minutes, resp. hours, whereas by means of traditional chemical methods it needs several weeks or months

  15. Delivering key signals to the machine: seeking the electric signal that muscles emanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, A Y Bani; Maslan, M N; Izamshah, R; Mohamad, I S

    2014-01-01

    Due to the limitation of electric power generation in the human body, present human-machine interfaces have not been successful because of the nature of standard electronics circuit designs, which do not consider the specifications of signals that resulted from the skin. In general, the outcomes and applications of human-machine interfaces are limited to custom-designed subsystems, such as neuroprosthesis. We seek to model the bio dynamical of sub skin into equivalent mathematical definitions, descriptions, and theorems. Within the human skin, there are networks of nerves that permit the skin to function as a multi dimension transducer. We investigate the nature of structural skin. Apart from multiple networks of nerves, there are other segments within the skin such as minute muscles. We identify the segments that are active when there is an electromyography activity. When the nervous system is firing signals, the muscle is being stimulated. We evaluate the phenomena of biodynamic of the muscles that is concerned with the electromyography activity of the nervous system. In effect, we design a relationship between the human somatosensory and synthetic systems sensory as the union of a complete set of the new domain of the functional system. This classifies electromyogram waveforms linked to intent thought of an operator. The system will become the basis for delivering key signals to machine such that the machine is under operator's intent, hence slavery

  16. [Application of three compartment model and response surface model to clinical anesthesia using Microsoft Excel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Eiji; Abe, Mari

    2011-08-01

    With the spread of total intravenous anesthesia, clinical pharmacology has become more important. We report Microsoft Excel file applying three compartment model and response surface model to clinical anesthesia. On the Microsoft Excel sheet, propofol, remifentanil and fentanyl effect-site concentrations are predicted (three compartment model), and probabilities of no response to prodding, shaking, surrogates of painful stimuli and laryngoscopy are calculated using predicted effect-site drug concentration. Time-dependent changes in these calculated values are shown graphically. Recent development in anesthetic drug interaction studies are remarkable, and its application to clinical anesthesia with this Excel file is simple and helpful for clinical anesthesia.

  17. Medical Device Integrated Vital Signs Monitoring Application with Real-Time Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moqeem, Aasia; Baig, Mirza; Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Mirza, Farhaan; Lindén, Maria

    2018-01-01

    This research involves the design and development of a novel Android smartphone application for real-time vital signs monitoring and decision support. The proposed application integrates market available, wireless and Bluetooth connected medical devices for collecting vital signs. The medical device data collected by the app includes heart rate, oxygen saturation and electrocardiograph (ECG). The collated data is streamed/displayed on the smartphone in real-time. This application was designed by adopting six screens approach (6S) mobile development framework and focused on user-centered approach and considered clinicians-as-a-user. The clinical engagement, consultations, feedback and usability of the application in the everyday practices were considered critical from the initial phase of the design and development. Furthermore, the proposed application is capable to deliver rich clinical decision support in real-time using the integrated medical device data.

  18. [DESIGN AND CLINICAL APPLICATION OF LESSER TROCHANTERIC REDUCTION FIXATION SYSTEM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoze; Zhang, Ying; Xiao, Jin; Xie, Huibin; Yu, Jiefeng

    2015-02-01

    .319, P = 0.022). According to Harris hip score, the excellent and good rate was 83.3% in the study group (25/30) and was 58.1% in the control group (18/31), showing significant difference (Χ2 = 4.680, P = 0.049). The application of the lesser trochanteric reduction fixation system can reduce stripping of the soft tissue around the fracture fragments, shorten the operation time and the healing time, and preserve the function of the hip joint maximumly.

  19. Advances in quantitative UV-visible spectroscopy for clinical and pre-clinical application in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J Quincy; Vishwanath, Karthik; Palmer, Gregory M; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2009-02-01

    Methods of optical spectroscopy that provide quantitative, physically or physiologically meaningful measures of tissue properties are an attractive tool for the study, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of various cancers. Recent development of methodologies to convert measured reflectance and fluorescence spectra from tissue to cancer-relevant parameters such as vascular volume, oxygenation, extracellular matrix extent, metabolic redox states, and cellular proliferation have significantly advanced the field of tissue optical spectroscopy. The number of publications reporting quantitative tissue spectroscopy results in the UV-visible wavelength range has increased sharply in the past three years, and includes new and emerging studies that correlate optically measured parameters with independent measures such as immunohistochemistry, which should aid in increased clinical acceptance of these technologies.

  20. Mobile applications for handheld devices to screen and randomize acute stroke patients in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ai; Connelly, B; Abbott, Ei; Maland, E; Kim, J; Blake, J

    2012-08-01

    The availability of internet connectivity and mobile application software used by low-power handheld devices makes smart phones of unique value in time-sensitive clinical trials. Trial-specific applications can be downloaded by investigators from various mobile software distribution platforms or web applications delivered over HTTP. The Antihypertensive Treatment in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage (ATACH) II investigators in collaboration with MentorMate released the ATACH-II Patient Recruitment mobile application available on iPhone, Android, and Blackberry in 2011. The mobile application provides tools for pre-screening, assessment of eligibility, and randomization of patients. Since the release of ATACH-II mobile application, the CLEAR-IVH (Clot Lysis Evaluating Accelerated Resolution of Intraventricular Hemorrhage) trial investigators have also adopted such a mobile application. The video-conferencing capabilities of the most recent mobile devices open up additional opportunities to involve central coordinating centers in the recruitment process in real time.