WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinic staff click

  1. AutoClickChem: click chemistry in silico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D Durrant

    Full Text Available Academic researchers and many in industry often lack the financial resources available to scientists working in "big pharma." High costs include those associated with high-throughput screening and chemical synthesis. In order to address these challenges, many researchers have in part turned to alternate methodologies. Virtual screening, for example, often substitutes for high-throughput screening, and click chemistry ensures that chemical synthesis is fast, cheap, and comparatively easy. Though both in silico screening and click chemistry seek to make drug discovery more feasible, it is not yet routine to couple these two methodologies. We here present a novel computer algorithm, called AutoClickChem, capable of performing many click-chemistry reactions in silico. AutoClickChem can be used to produce large combinatorial libraries of compound models for use in virtual screens. As the compounds of these libraries are constructed according to the reactions of click chemistry, they can be easily synthesized for subsequent testing in biochemical assays. Additionally, in silico modeling of click-chemistry products may prove useful in rational drug design and drug optimization. AutoClickChem is based on the pymolecule toolbox, a framework that may facilitate the development of future python-based programs that require the manipulation of molecular models. Both the pymolecule toolbox and AutoClickChem are released under the GNU General Public License version 3 and are available for download from http://autoclickchem.ucsd.edu.

  2. AutoClickChem: click chemistry in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Jacob D; McCammon, J Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Academic researchers and many in industry often lack the financial resources available to scientists working in "big pharma." High costs include those associated with high-throughput screening and chemical synthesis. In order to address these challenges, many researchers have in part turned to alternate methodologies. Virtual screening, for example, often substitutes for high-throughput screening, and click chemistry ensures that chemical synthesis is fast, cheap, and comparatively easy. Though both in silico screening and click chemistry seek to make drug discovery more feasible, it is not yet routine to couple these two methodologies. We here present a novel computer algorithm, called AutoClickChem, capable of performing many click-chemistry reactions in silico. AutoClickChem can be used to produce large combinatorial libraries of compound models for use in virtual screens. As the compounds of these libraries are constructed according to the reactions of click chemistry, they can be easily synthesized for subsequent testing in biochemical assays. Additionally, in silico modeling of click-chemistry products may prove useful in rational drug design and drug optimization. AutoClickChem is based on the pymolecule toolbox, a framework that may facilitate the development of future python-based programs that require the manipulation of molecular models. Both the pymolecule toolbox and AutoClickChem are released under the GNU General Public License version 3 and are available for download from http://autoclickchem.ucsd.edu.

  3. Neural Point-and-Click Communication by a Person With Incomplete Locked-In Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, Daniel; Jarosiewicz, Beata; Masse, Nicolas Y; Stavisky, Sergey D; Simeral, John D; Newell, Katherine; Oakley, Erin M; Cash, Sydney S; Friehs, Gerhard; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2015-06-01

    A goal of brain-computer interface research is to develop fast and reliable means of communication for individuals with paralysis and anarthria. We evaluated the ability of an individual with incomplete locked-in syndrome enrolled in the BrainGate Neural Interface System pilot clinical trial to communicate using neural point-and-click control. A general-purpose interface was developed to provide control of a computer cursor in tandem with one of two on-screen virtual keyboards. The novel BrainGate Radial Keyboard was compared to a standard QWERTY keyboard in a balanced copy-spelling task. The Radial Keyboard yielded a significant improvement in typing accuracy and speed-enabling typing rates over 10 correct characters per minute. The participant used this interface to communicate face-to-face with research staff by using text-to-speech conversion, and remotely using an internet chat application. This study demonstrates the first use of an intracortical brain-computer interface for neural point-and-click communication by an individual with incomplete locked-in syndrome. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Click-Evoked Auditory Efferent Activity: Rate and Level Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothalingam, Sriram; Kurke, Julianne; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2018-05-07

    There currently are no standardized protocols to evaluate auditory efferent function in humans. Typical tests use broadband noise to activate the efferents, but only test the contralateral efferent pathway, risk activating the middle ear muscle reflex (MEMR), and are laborious for clinical use. In an attempt to develop a clinical test of bilateral auditory efferent function, we have designed a method that uses clicks to evoke efferent activity, obtain click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs), and monitor MEMR. This allows for near-simultaneous estimation of cochlear and efferent function. In the present study, we manipulated click level (60, 70, and 80 dB peak-equivalent sound pressure level [peSPL]) and rate (40, 50, and 62.5 Hz) to identify an optimal rate-level combination that evokes measurable efferent modulation of CEOAEs. Our findings (n = 58) demonstrate that almost all click levels and rates used caused significant inhibition of CEOAEs, with a significant interaction between level and rate effects. Predictably, bilateral activation produced greater inhibition compared to stimulating the efferents only in the ipsilateral or contralateral ear. In examining the click rate-level effects during bilateral activation in greater detail, we observed a 1-dB inhibition of CEOAE level for each 10-dB increase in click level, with rate held constant at 62.5 Hz. Similarly, a 10-Hz increase in rate produced a 0.74-dB reduction in CEOAE level, with click level held constant at 80 dB peSPL. The effect size (Cohen's d) was small for either monaural condition and medium for bilateral, faster-rate, and higher-level conditions. We were also able to reliably extract CEOAEs from efferent eliciting clicks. We conclude that clicks can indeed be profitably employed to simultaneously evaluate cochlear health using CEOAEs as well as their efferent modulation. Furthermore, using bilateral clicks allows the evaluation of both the crossed and uncrossed elements of the auditory

  5. Staff nurse clinical leadership: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Eduardo C; Yoder, Linda H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a concept analysis of staff nurse clinical leadership (SNCL). A clear delineation of SNCL will promote understanding and encourage communication of the phenomenon. Clarification of the concept will establish a common understanding of the concept, and advance the practice, education, and research of this phenomenon. A review of the literature was conducted using several databases. The databases were searched using the following keywords: clinical leadership, nursing, bedside, staff nurse, front-line, front line, and leadership. The search yielded several sources; however, only those that focused on clinical leadership demonstrated by staff nurses in acute care hospital settings were selected for review. SNCL is defined as staff nurses who exert significant influence over other individuals in the healthcare team, and although no formal authority has been vested in them facilitates individual and collective efforts to accomplish shared clinical objectives. The theoretical definition for SNCL within the team context will provide a common understanding of this concept and differentiate it from other types of leadership in the nursing profession. This clarification and conceptualization of the concept will assist further research of the concept and advance its practical application in acute care hospital settings. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The ZeroAccess Auto-Clicking and Search-Hijacking Click Fraud Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    payloads and instead began distributing Bitcoin miners and click fraud modules.3 From a technical perspective, the primary click fraud malware used in...this era operated in the indiscriminate “auto-clicking” fashion we describe in Section 5. Alongside the click fraud and Bitcoin payloads, ZeroAccess

  7. Emotional intelligence, performance, and retention in clinical staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codier, Estelle; Kamikawa, Cindy; Kooker, Barbara M; Shoultz, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Emotional intelligence has been correlated with performance, retention, and organizational commitment in professions other than nursing. A 2006 pilot study provided the first evidence of a correlation between emotional intelligence and performance in clinical staff nurses. A follow-up study was completed, the purpose of which was to explore emotional intelligence, performance level, organizational commitment, and retention. A convenience sample of 350 nurses in a large medical center in urban Hawaii participated in this study. This article reports the findings pertaining to the subset of 193 clinical staff nurses who responded. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test instrument was used to measure emotional intelligence abilities. Performance was defined as ranking on a clinical ladder. Commitment was scored on a Likert scale. The following variables measured retention: total years in nursing, years in current job, total years anticipated in current job, and total anticipated career length. Emotional intelligence scores in clinical staff nurses correlated positively with both performance level and retention variables. Clinical staff nurses with higher emotional intelligence scores demonstrated higher performance, had longer careers, and greater job retention.

  8. Click chemistry for the conservation of cellular structures and fluorescent proteins: ClickOx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschberger, Anna; Niehörster, Thomas; Sauer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide, are known to cause structural damage not only in living, but also in fixed, cells. Copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry) is known to produce ROS. Therefore, fluorescence imaging of cellular structures, such as the actin cytoskeleton, remains challenging when combined with click chemistry protocols. In addition, the production of ROS substantially weakens the fluorescence signal of fluorescent proteins. This led us to develop ClickOx, which is a new click chemistry protocol for improved conservation of the actin structure and better conservation of the fluorescence signal of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins. Herein we demonstrate that efficient oxygen removal by addition of an enzymatic oxygen scavenger system (ClickOx) considerably reduces ROS-associated damage during labeling of nascent DNA with ATTO 488 azide by Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. Standard confocal and super-resolution fluorescence images of phalloidin-labeled actin filaments and GFP/yellow fluorescent protein-labeled cells verify the conservation of the cytoskeleton microstructure and fluorescence intensity, respectively. Thus, ClickOx can be used advantageously for structure preservation in conventional and most notably in super-resolution microscopy methods. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Treatment Effects of Maxillary Flat Occlusal Splints for Painful Clicking of the Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Wen Chang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Existing therapies for symptoms related to painful clicking of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ have rarely met with complete success and predicting prognosis remains difficult. Few studies have reported the efficacy of maxillary flat occlusal splints (MFOSs for the treatment of painful clicking of the TMJ, and few studies have evaluated the predisposing factors that influence the clinical outcomes of MFOSs. The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment efficacy of MFOSs for painful clicking of the TMJ, and to determine the factors influencing TMJ therapy with MFOSs. We conducted a retrospective study of 109 patients suffering from unilateral clicking concurrent with preauricular area pain for at least 2 months between 2004 and 2008. Seventy-five patients were treated with an MFOS, while 34 patients did not receive MFOS therapy. Clicking score, pain-free maximal mouth opening, pain score, duration of the clicking sounds, age and bruxism were recorded during treatment and involved into the reviews. The degree of joint clicking was determined by a stethoscope placed in the anterolateral area of the external auditory canal and was divided into four grades. Data were analyzed using a Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher's exact test, and Student's t test. Results showed statistically significant differences in treatment outcomes between the MFOS-treated and control groups in clicking index, maximal mouth opening, pain and complete remission rates of symptoms within 1 year. Furthermore, for patients treated with MFOS, there were statistically significant differences in the clinical outcomes between those with a high clicking index and those with a low index before treatment. Factors significantly correlated with successful outcomes of MFOS included nocturnal bruxism, patient age and duration of clicking. MFOSs can be used to treat patients with painful clicking of the TMJ and related symptoms. The severity of clicking, bruxism, age and duration of

  10. Nursing staff perceptions of student contributions in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter-Smith, Cheryl; Helms, Jennifer E; Burris, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Because nursing is a practice discipline, students are placed in clinical settings to collaborate with professional nurses in caring for patients. This descriptive study aimed to explore the benefits and limitations of undergraduate nursing students in the clinical setting. A 54-item instrument, Nursing Students' Contributions to Clinical Agencies, was used to collect data from staff nurses (N = 84) at three hospitals. The instrument also provided space for participants to share qualitative data, which revealed perceptions with which staff nurses were likely to agree and three key themes: Eager to Learn, Willing to Help, and Serving Their Time. The major implication for students is that they are often judged on their assertiveness skills and should offer assistance so they appear eager to learn. Faculty must ascertain that students understand their objectives for the clinical rotation and share those objectives with the staff nurses to enhance their learning experience. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Developing an appropriate staff mix for anticoagulation clinics: functional job analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam, Desta A.; Shan, Xiaojun; Chung, Sung H.; Khasawneh, Mohammad T.; Lukesh, William; Park, Angela; Rose, Adam

    2018-05-01

    Anticoagulation clinics (ACCs) are specialty clinics that manage patients with blood clotting problems. Since labor costs usually account for a substantial portion of a healthcare organization's budget, optimizing the number and types of staff required was often the focus, especially for ACCs, where labor-intensive staff-patient interactions occur. A significant portion of tasks performed by clinical pharmacists might be completed by clinical pharmacist technicians, which are less-expensive resources. While nurse staffing models for a hospital inpatient unit are well established, these models are not readily applicable to staffing ACCs. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to develop a framework for determining the right staff mix of clinical pharmacists and clinical pharmacy technicians that increases the efficiency of care delivery process and improves the productivity of ACC staff. A framework is developed and applied to build a semi-automated full-time equivalent (FTE) calculator and compare various staffing scenarios using a simulation model. The FTE calculator provides the right staff mix for a given staff utilization target. Data collected from the ACCs at VA Boston Healthcare System is used to illustrate the FTE calculator and the simulation model. The result of the simulation model can be used by ACC managers to easily determine the number of FTEs of clinical pharmacists and clinical pharmacy technicians required to reach the target utilization and the corresponding staffing cost.

  12. Click-to-Chelate: Development of Technetium and Rhenium-Tricarbonyl Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Mindt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Click-to-Chelate approach is a highly efficient strategy for the radiolabeling of molecules of medicinal interest with technetium and rhenium-tricarbonyl cores. Reaction of azide-functionalized molecules with alkyne prochelators by the Cu(I-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC; click reaction enables the simultaneous synthesis and conjugation of tridentate chelating systems for the stable complexation of the radiometals. In many cases, the functionalization of (biomolecules with the ligand system and radiolabeling can be achieved by convenient one-pot procedures. Since its first report in 2006, Click-to-Chelate has been applied to the development of numerous novel radiotracers with promising potential for translation into the clinic. This review summarizes the use of the Click-to-Chelate approach in radiopharmaceutical sciences and provides a perspective for future applications.

  13. "Click" i polymerer 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2012-01-01

    "Click"-reaktioner til fremstilling af ledende polymerer med funktionelle håndtag og bipolymermaterialer......"Click"-reaktioner til fremstilling af ledende polymerer med funktionelle håndtag og bipolymermaterialer...

  14. Understanding the interface between clinical and laboratory staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankie van den Broek

    2014-07-01

    Objectives: To propose a new conceptual model to gain insight and analyse factors that influence the laboratory–clinical staff interface. Methods: To develop the conceptual model, a literature study was performed, regulatory guidelines and standards for laboratories were analysed and discussions were held with experts on the topic. Result: A conceptual model and analytical framework provided good guidance in understanding and assessing the organisational and personal factors shaping the interface. The model was based on three elements: (1 the three phases of communication (pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical; (2 the organisational and personal factors of interaction; and (3 the socio-political, economic and cultural context in which clinicians and laboratory staff operate. Conclusion: Assessment of the interface between clinicians and laboratory workers can be performed in a systematic way. Applying this model will provide information to managers of health institutions and heads of laboratories and clinical departments about what happens when clinicians and laboratory staff interact, thus aiding them in designing strategies to improve this interface.

  15. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  16. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  17. Exploring Organizational Barriers to Strengthening Clinical Supervision of Psychiatric Nursing Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This article reports findings from a longitudinal controlled intervention study of 115 psychiatric nursing staff. The twofold objective of the study was: (a) To test whether the intervention could increase clinical supervision participation and effectiveness of existing supervision practices, and...... in the experienced effectiveness of supervision. It is concluded that organizational support is an imperative for implementation of clinical supervision......., and (b) To explore organizational constraints to implementation of these strengthened practices. Questionnaire responses and registration of participation in clinical supervision were registered prior and subsequent to the intervention consisting of an action learning oriented reflection on staff......'s existing clinical supervision practices. Major organizational changes in the intervention group during the study period obstructed the implementation of strengthened clinical supervision practices, but offered an opportunity for studying the influences of organizational constraints. The main findings were...

  18. Integrating Doulas Into First-Trimester Abortion Care: Physician, Clinic Staff, and Doula Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chor, Julie; Lyman, Phoebe; Ruth, Jean; Patel, Ashlesha; Gilliam, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Balancing the need to provide individual support for patients and the need for an efficient clinic can be challenging in the abortion setting. This study explores physician, staff, and specially trained abortion doula perspectives on doula support, one approach to patient support. We conducted separate focus groups with physicians, staff members, and doulas from a high-volume, first-trimester aspiration abortion clinic with a newly established volunteer abortion doula program. Focus groups explored 1) abortion doula training, 2) program implementation, 3) program benefits, and 4) opportunities for improvement. Interviews were transcribed and computer-assisted content analysis was performed; salient findings are presented. Five physicians, 5 staff members, and 4 abortion doulas participated in separate focus group discussions. Doulas drew on both their prior personal skills and experiences in addition to their abortion doula training to provide women with support at the time of abortion. Having doulas in the clinic to assist with women's emotional needs allowed physicians and staff to focus on technical aspects of the procedure. In turn, both physicians and staff believed that introducing doulas resulted in more patient-centered care. Although staff did not experience challenges to integrating doulas, physicians and doulas experienced initial challenges in incorporating doula support into the clinical flow. Staff and doulas reported exchanging skills and techniques that they subsequently used in their interactions with patients. Physicians, clinic staff, and doulas perceive abortion doula support as an approach to provide more patient-centered care in a high-volume aspiration abortion clinic. © 2018 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  19. Click synthesis of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Mei; Kuang Chunxiang

    2009-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on synthesis radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET). The recent years witnessed applications of click chemistry to PET radiopharmaceutical synthesis,because of its distinctive advantages including high speed,yield and stereospecificity under mild conditions. Synthesis of 18 F-labeled and 11 C-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and intermediates via click chemistry are reviewed. The future trend of click chemistry for the synthesis of PET radiopharmaceutical is prospected. (authors)

  20. PREVENTING CLICK EVENT HIJACKING BY USER INTENTION INFERENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailas Patil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Web applications are getting more complex and dynamic. By exploiting layout and JavaScript features of a web page, attackers can create web page objects that hijack users’ clicks. Such objects look like normal web page objects, but users’ clicks on these objects lead to unexpected browser actions, such as visiting different URLs or sending out malicious requests. We call this type of attacks click event hijacking attacks. The Facebook Clickjacking attack is an example, which puts a transparent layer containing the victim web application on top of another web page that lures users to click. While users think they click on the underlying web page, they actually click in the victim web application, resulting in unauthorized actions to the web application. In this paper, we propose a solution to mitigate the problem of click event hijacking by inferring users’ intentions. Our solution ClickGuard ensures that the browser’s behavior after a click matches the user’s original intention. The proposed solution is implemented as a Mozilla Firefox extension and evaluated its effectiveness against click event hijacking attacks.

  1. AZIDE-ALKYNE CLICK POLYMERIZATION: AN UPDATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-kun Li; Jing-zhi Sun; An-jun Qin; Ben Zhong Tang

    2012-01-01

    The great achievements of click chemistry have encouraged polymer scientists to use this reaction in their field.This review assembles an update of the advances of using azide-alkyne click polymerization to prepare functional polytriazoles (PTAs) with linear and hyperbranched structures.The Cu(Ⅰ)-mediated click polymerization furnishes 1,4-regioregular PTAs,whereas,the metal-free click polymerization of propiolates and azides produces PTAs with 1,4-regioisomer contents up to 90%.The PTAs display advanced functions,such as aggregation-induced emission,thermal stability,biocompatibility and optical nonlinearity.

  2. Linking Metal Ions via Inorganic Click (iClick) Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veige, Adam [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    This final report discusses the major objectives of the project, a discussion of the objectives achieved, a discussion of the objectives that failed, and finally, a discussion of future directions given the new knowledge obtained. This one-year seed project (with one year no-cost extension) contained three objectives: A) Expand the scope of iClick synthesis beyond AuI/AuI reactions. B) Elucidate a CuI-catalyzed iClick reaction. C) Synthesize and characterize tri- and tetra-metallic complexes as models for metallopolymers. Objectives A and C were achieved, whereas only parts of objective B were achieved.

  3. Think Before You Click

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Be aware of what attachments you open and what Internet programs you agree to download, the simple click of a mouse can be enough to introduce a virus at CERN and cause widespread damage. Modern viruses are a serious threat to our computers and networks. CERN limits the security risks that these programs pose through the use of its firewall, by constantly updating its anti-virus software, by detecting un-patched security holes, and by blocking many dangerous attachments as they pass through e-mail gateways, but these defenses do not guarantee 100% security. Our habits of clicking "ok" automatically on the Internet and opening attachments without thinking, are the behaviors that modern viruses are using to get past our security protections. Viruses can sit on the Internet waiting for us to activate them as we surf the web. Many of us simply click 'ok' when presented with dialogue boxes and this is exactly what the virus wants: clicking can be enough to download and infect our computers. Viruses can travel as...

  4. Clinical Nurse Specialists Guide Staff Nurses to Promote Practice Accountability Through Peer Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, Julie; Halvorson, Betty; Hersh, Mary; Torres, Clare; Lillington, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the clinical nurse specialist role in developing and implementing a staff nurse education program to promote practice accountability using peer review principles. Peer review is essential for professional nursing practice demanding a significant culture change. Clinical nurse specialists in a Magnet-designated community hospital were charged with developing a staff nurse peer review education program. Peer review is a recognized mechanism of professional self-regulation to ensure delivery of quality care. The American Nurses Association strongly urges incorporating peer review in professional nursing practice models. Clinical nurse specialists play a critical role in educating staff nurses about practice accountability. Clinical nurse specialists developed an education program guided by the American Nurses Association's principles of peer review. A baseline needs assessment identified potential barriers and learning needs. Content incorporated tools and strategies to build communication skills, collaboration, practice change, and peer accountability. The education program resulted in increased staff nurse knowledge about peer review and application of peer review principles in practice. Clinical nurse specialists played a critical role in helping staff nurses understand peer review and its application to practice. The clinical nurse specialist role will continue to be important in sustaining the application of peer review principles in practice.

  5. Is it possible to strengthen psychiatric nursing staff's clinical supervision?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of a meta-supervision intervention in terms of participation, effectiveness and benefits of clinical supervision of psychiatric nursing staff. BACKGROUND: Clinical supervision is regarded as a central component in developing mental health nursing practices, but the evidence...... an intervention group (n = 40) receiving the meta-supervision in addition to attending usual supervision or to a control group (n = 43) attending usual supervision. METHODS: Self-reported questionnaire measures of clinical supervision effectiveness and benefits were collected at base line in January 2012...... and at follow-up completed in February 2013. In addition, a prospective registration of clinical supervision participation was carried out over 3 months subsequent to the intervention. RESULTS: The main result was that it was possible to motivate staff in the intervention group to participate significantly more...

  6. Clinical staff nurse leadership: Identifying gaps in competency development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks-Meeks, Sherron

    2018-01-01

    To date, there has been no development of a complete, applicable inventory of clinical staff nurse (CSN) leadership role competencies through a valid and reliable methodology. Further, the CSN has not been invited to engage in the identification, definition, or development of their own leadership competencies. Compare existing leadership competencies to identify and highlight gaps in clinical staff nurse leadership role competency development and validation. Literature review. The CSN has not participated in the development of CSN leadership role competencies, nor have the currently identified CSN leadership role competencies been scientifically validated through research. Finally, CSN leadership role competencies are incomplete and do not reflect the CSN perspective. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Attitudes of palliative care clinical staff toward prolonged grief disorder diagnosis and grief interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Esther L; Deane, Frank P; Barclay, Gregory D; Bourne, Joan; Connolly, Vivienne

    2017-07-03

    The provision of psychological support to caregivers is an important part of the role of the clinical staff working in palliative care. Staff knowledge and attitudes may determine their openness to referring caregivers to a psychological intervention. We recently developed a self-help intervention for grief and psychological distress among caregivers and were interested in exploring the extent to which staff knowledge and attitudes might affect future implementation. The aims of our study were to: (1) examine the acceptability of self-help psychological intervention for caregivers among palliative care clinical staff; (2) examine potential attitudinal barriers toward prolonged grief disorder (PGD) as a diagnosis and interventions for grief; and (3) bolster staff confidence in skills and knowledge in identifying and managing caregiver psychological distress. An anonymous survey was distributed among clinical staff at two inpatient units and two community health services that assessed the acceptability of self-help interventions for caregivers, attitudes about PGD diagnosis and grief intervention, and staff confidence in skills and knowledge in assessing caregiver psychological distress. Overall, clinical staff were positively oriented toward self-help for caregivers and intervention for grief. They were also basically confident in their skills and knowledge. While it was positive PGD attitudes that were associated with acceptability of self-help for caregivers, it was both positive and negative PGD attitudes that were associated more specifically with a willingness to refer caregivers to such an intervention. Our findings are useful in highlighting the issues to be considered in the implementation of a self-help intervention within the healthcare service. Clinical staff seemed positively oriented toward engaging with a psychological intervention for caregivers and likely to act as key allies in implementation.

  8. Impact of relational coordination on staff and patient outcomes in outpatient surgical clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Logan, Caroline; Cronenwett, Jack; Foster, Tina C; Freeman, Richard; Godfrey, Marjorie; Vidal, Dale Collins

    2018-01-05

    Pressures are increasing for clinicians to provide high-quality, efficient care, leading to increased concerns about staff burnout. This study asks whether staff well-being can be achieved in ways that are also beneficial for the patient's experience of care. It explores whether relational coordination can contribute to both staff well-being and patient satisfaction in outpatient surgical clinics where time constraints paired with high needs for information transfer increase both the need for and the challenge of achieving timely and accurate communication. We studied relational coordination among surgeons, nurses, residents, administrators, technicians, and secretaries in 11 outpatient surgical clinics. Data were combined from a staff and a patient survey to conduct a cross-sectional study. Data were analyzed using ordinary least squares and random effects regression models. Relational coordination among all workgroups was significantly associated with staff outcomes, including job satisfaction, work engagement, and burnout. Relational coordination was also significantly associated with patients' satisfaction with staff and their overall visit, though the association between relational coordination and patients' satisfaction with their providers did not reach statistical significance. Even when patient-staff interactions are relatively brief, as in outpatient settings, high levels of relational coordination among interdependent workgroups contribute to positive outcomes for both staff and patients, and low levels tend to have the opposite effect. Clinical leaders can increase the expectation of positive outcomes for both staff and their patients by implementing interventions to strengthen relational coordination.

  9. All in the family: matrimonial mitral valve clicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desser, K B; Bokhari, S I; Benchimol, A; Romney, D

    1981-05-01

    Mitral valve clicks with or without late systolic murmurs were detected in genetically unrelated marital partners of 5 families. The first family represented 2 successive nonconsanguineous marital unions with 3 generations of mitral valve clicks. The second family included 1 natural and 2 adopted children with clinical and echographic evidence of mitral valve prolapse. The third family was comprised of asymptomatic parents, both with nonejection clicks and mitral valve prolapse, whose daughter presented 3 years previously with syncope, palpitations, and combined mitral and tricuspid valve prolapse. The fourth family had 3 members with auscultatory and ultrasonic manifestations of billowing mitral valve, whereas the fourth member had "silent mitral valve prolapse." The fifth family represented a mother with auscultatory and echographic evidence of mitral valve prolapse; her 14-year-old daughter had both mitral and tricuspid valve prolapse, whereas the son had a bicuspid aortic valve. Both children were products of a prior marriage, and her husband has symptomatic mitral valve prolapse. We conclude that matrimonial mitral valve prolapse probably reflects the purported (6--10%) prevalence of this disorder in the general population. The consequences of such marital union on progeny is currently unclear and warrants future investigation.

  10. A qualitative analysis of staff-client interactions within a breast cancer assessment clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nightingale, J.M.; Murphy, F.; Eaton, C.; Borgen, R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Breast screening clients recalled to an assessment clinic experience high levels of anxiety. The culture of the assessment clinic may impact upon client experience, which may influence their future re-engagement in screening. This study aimed to explore the culture of staff-client interactions within a breast cancer assessment clinic. Materials and methods: Following an ethnographic approach, twenty-three client journeys were observed, followed by semi-structured interviews with the clients. The observation and interview data were analysed to produce research themes, which were then explored within two focus groups to add a practitioner perspective. Results: Multiple staff-client interaction events were observed over a period of several weeks. Client interview feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Three recurrent and sequential themes emerged: breaking down barriers, preparing the ground and sign-posting. These themes outline the changing focus of staff-client interactions during the client's clinic journey, encompassing how anxieties were expressed by clients, and responded to by practitioners. Conclusion: This study was the first to explore in depth the staff-client interaction culture within a breast assessment clinic using an ethnographic approach. A new perspective on professional values and behaviours has been demonstrated via a model of staff-client interaction. The model documents the process of guiding the client from initial confusion and distress to an enhanced clarity of understanding. A recommendation most likely to have a positive impact on the client experience is the introduction of a client navigator role to guide the clients through what is often a lengthy, stressful and confusing process. - Highlights: • This study was the first to explore staff-client interaction within breast assessment clinics. • Assessment clinic culture may affect client perceptions and future re-engagement in screening. • An ethnographic approach

  11. Efficiency achievements from a user-developed real-time modifiable clinical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Roderick O; Patrick, Jon; Besiso, Ali

    2015-02-01

    This investigation was initiated after the introduction of a new information system into the Nepean Hospital Emergency Department. A retrospective study determined that the problems introduced by the new system led to reduced efficiency of the clinical staff, demonstrated by deterioration in the emergency department's (ED's) performance. This article is an investigation of methods to improve the design and implementation of clinical information systems for an ED by using a process of clinical team-led design and a technology built on a radically new philosophy denoted as emergent clinical information systems. The specific objectives were to construct a system, the Nepean Emergency Department Information Management System (NEDIMS), using a combination of new design methods; determine whether it provided any reduction in time and click burden on the user in comparison to an enterprise proprietary system, Cerner FirstNet; and design and evaluate a model of the effect that any reduction had on patient throughput in the department. The methodology for conducting a direct comparison between the 2 systems used the 6 activity centers in the ED of clerking, triage, nursing assessments, fast track, acute care, and nurse unit manager. A quantitative study involved the 2 systems being measured for their efficiency on 17 tasks taken from the activity centers. A total of 332 task instances were measured for duration and number of mouse clicks in live usage on Cerner FirstNet and in reproduction of the same Cerner FirstNet work on NEDIMS as an off-line system. The results showed that NEDIMS is at least 41% more efficient than Cerner FirstNet (95% confidence interval 21.6% to 59.8%). In some cases, the NEDIMS tasks were remodeled to demonstrate the value of feedback to create improvements and the speed and economy of design revision in the emergent clinical information systems approach. The cost of the effort in remodeling the designs showed that the time spent on remodeling is

  12. 76 FR 30175 - Draft Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... consider public release of financial disclosure information related to an approved marketing application...] (Formerly FDA-1999-D-0792) Draft Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial... entitled ``Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by Clinical...

  13. Characterization of drug-related problems identified by clinical pharmacy staff at Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Birkholm, Trine; Fischer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010, a database of drug related problems (DRPs) was implemented to assist clinical pharmacy staff in documenting clinical pharmacy activities locally. A study of quality, reliability and generalisability showed that national analyses of the data could be conducted. Analyses...... at the national level may help identify and prevent DRPs by performing national interventions. Objective The aim of the study was to explore the DRP characteristics as documented by clinical pharmacy staff at hospital pharmacies in the Danish DRP-database during a 3-year period. Setting Danish hospital pharmacies....... Method Data documented in the DRP-database during the initial 3 years after implementation were analyzed retrospectively. The DRP-database contains DRPs reported at hospitals by clinical pharmacy staff. The analyses focused on DRP categories, implementation rates and drugs associated with the DRPs. Main...

  14. Work-role transition: from staff nurse to clinical nurse educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Liz; Neville, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    This article presents the findings of a study describing Clinical Nurse Educators' experiences, as they recall their transition from staff nurse to the Clinical Nurse Educator role, within a New Zealand District Health Board. Nurse Educator roles influence clinical practice and professional development of nurses, and although designated as a senior role nationally, the complexities and size of the role are poorly understood. A qualitative descriptive methodology utilising transition theory as a conceptual framework underpinned the study. A sample of eight Clinical Nurse Educators from a New Zealand District Health Board were interviewed about their transition from experienced staff nurse to inexperienced senior nurse. Data were analysed using a general inductive approach. Participants found the Clinical Nurse Educator role was more complex than anticipated, with no preparation for the role and sub-optimal orientation periods being provided by the District Health Board. As a result, signs of stress were evident as the enormity of the role became apparent. Consequently, employers need to ensure that appropriate orientation programmes and mentorship are inherent in health care organisations.

  15. Heat-induced-radiolabeling and click chemistry: A powerful combination for generating multifunctional nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hushan Yuan

    Full Text Available A key advantage of nanomaterials for biomedical applications is their ability to feature multiple small reporter groups (multimodality, or combinations of reporter groups and therapeutic agents (multifunctionality, while being targeted to cell surface receptors. Here a facile combination of techniques for the syntheses of multimodal, targeted nanoparticles (NPs is presented, whereby heat-induced-radiolabeling (HIR labels NPs with radiometals and so-called click chemistry is used to attach bioactive groups to the NP surface. Click-reactive alkyne or azide groups were first attached to the nonradioactive clinical Feraheme (FH NPs. Resulting "Alkyne-FH" and "Azide-FH" intermediates, like the parent NP, tolerated 89Zr labeling by the HIR method previously described. Subsequently, biomolecules were quickly conjugated to the radioactive NPs by either copper-catalyzed or copper-free click reactions with high efficiency. Synthesis of the Alkyne-FH or Azide-FH intermediates, followed by HIR and then by click reactions for biomolecule attachment, provides a simple and potentially general path for the synthesis of multimodal, multifunctional, and targeted NPs for biomedical applications.

  16. Computer Security: one click and BOOM…

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2016-01-01

    Browsing the World Wide Web is not as easy as it seems… One wrong click and all your passwords (CERN, Facebook, PayPal, Amazon, etc.) could be stolen; all your activities could be clandestinely monitored (mouse movements and clicks, words typed, screenshots, microphone and webcam recordings, etc.); confidential documents could be stolen; and an attack path (a so-called back-door) into CERN could be opened…    As a result, you would have to reinstall your computer from scratch and change all your passwords! One of our colleagues learned this the hard way. One wrong click in summer 2015 permitted malicious attackers to infiltrate CERN but, fortunately, no real damage was done. Still, the cost of investigating the incident ran to several tens of thousands of Swiss francs and a lot of time was wasted trying to understand the attacker’s intent and the extent of the infiltration... With the goal of increasing more awareness of the risk of clicking on li...

  17. A study on job satisfaction among clinical and non-clinical hospital staff in a teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, O O; Coker, A O; Onuoha, B

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies had demonstrated that continuous and effective productivity of hospital staff are linked to job satisfaction and only those who are satisfied with their job can be maximally effective and productive. This cross-sectional descriptive survey was designed to determine the levels of job satisfaction among various groups of health care professionals working in a teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Two hundred clinical and non-clinical hospital staff were invited to take part in the study. They completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Job Descriptive Index (JDI). The results indicated that majority clinical and non-clinical staff were satisfied with their jobs as regards the parameters of the JDI compared with those not satisfied with their jobs. The government and health policy makers should continue to pay attention to boost job morale and satisfaction of medical health workers to continue to make them to be satisfied with their job.

  18. Using Texting for Clinical Communication in Surgery: A Survey of Academic Staff Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdouse, Mohammed; Devon, Karen; Kayssi, Ahmed; Goldfarb, Jeremy; Rossos, Peter; Cil, Tulin D

    2018-03-01

    Text messaging has become ubiquitous and is being increasingly used within the health care system. The purpose of this study was to understand texting practices for clinical communication among staff surgeons at a large academic institution. Staff surgeons in 4 subspecialties (vascular, plastics, urology, and general surgery) were surveyed electronically. A total of 62 surgeons from general surgery (n = 33), vascular surgery (n = 6), plastic surgery (n = 13), and urology (n = 10) completed the study (response rate 30%). When conveying urgent patient-related information, staff surgeons preferred directly calling other staff surgeons (61.5%) and trainees (58.8%). When discussing routine patient information, staff surgeons used email to reach other staff surgeons (54.9%) but preferred texting (62.7%) for trainees. The majority of participants used texting because it is fast (65.4%), convenient (69.2%) and allows transmitting information to multiple recipients simultaneously (63.5%). Most felt that texting enhances patient care (71.5%); however, only half believed that it enhanced trainees' educational experiences. The majority believed that texting identifiable patient information breaches patient confidentiality. Our data showed high adoption of text messaging for clinical communication among surgeons, particularly with trainees. The majority of surgeons acknowledge security concerns inherent in texting for patient care. Existing mobile communication platforms fail to meet the needs of academic surgeons. Further research should include guidelines related to texting in clinical practice, educational implications of texting, and technologies to better meet the needs of clinicians working in an academic surgical settings.

  19. Click rates and silences of sperm whales at Kaikoura, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Lesley A.; Dawson, Stephen M.; Jaquet, Nathalie

    2005-07-01

    Analysis of the usual click rates of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) at Kaikoura, New Zealand, confirms the potential for assessing abundance via ``click counting.'' Usual click rates over three dive cycles each of three photographically identified whales showed that 5 min averages of usual click rate did not differ significantly within dives, among dives of the same whale or among whales. Over the nine dives (n=13 728 clicks) mean usual click rate was 1.272 clicks s-1 (95% CI=0.151). On average, individual sperm whales at Kaikoura spent 60% of their time usual clicking in winter and in summer. There was no evidence that whale identity or stage of the dive recorded affects significantly the percentage of time spent usual clicking. Differences in vocal behavior among sperm whale populations worldwide indicate that estimates of abundance that are based on click rates need to based on data from the population of interest, rather than from another population or some global average.

  20. Click bait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Jonas Nygaard; Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    and curiosity so the readers click (or tap on) the headline and read on. In this article, we map the use of forward-referring headlines in online news journalism by conducting an analysis of 100,000 headlines from 10 different Danish news websites. The results show that commercialization and tabloidization seem...

  1. Safety Culture and Senior Leadership Behavior: Using Negative Safety Ratings to Align Clinical Staff and Senior Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Shawn; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    This report describes how staff-designed behavior changes among senior leaders can have a positive impact on clinical nursing staff and enhance the culture of safety in a community hospital. A positive culture of safety in a hospital improves outcomes for patients and staff. Senior leaders are accountable for developing an environment that supports a culture of safety. At 1 community hospital, surveys demonstrated that staff members did not view senior leaders as supportive of or competent in creating a culture of safety. After approval from the hospital's institutional review board was obtained, clinical nurses generated and selected ideas for senior leader behavior change. The new behaviors were assessed by a convenience sample survey of clinical nurses. In addition, culture of safety survey results were compared. Risk reports and harm events were also measured before and after behavior changes. The volume of risk and near-miss reports increased, showing that clinical staff were more inclined to report events after senior leader communication, access, and visibility increased. Harm events went down. The culture of safety survey demonstrated an improvement in the senior leadership domain in 4 of 6 units. The anonymous convenience survey demonstrated that staff members recognized changes that senior leaders had made and felt that these changes positively impacted the culture of safety. By developing skills in communication, advocacy, visibility, and access, senior leaders can enhance a hospital's culture of safety and create stronger ties with clinical staff.

  2. Temporal suppression and augmentation of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhulst, Sarah; Harte, James; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates and models temporal suppression of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs). This suppression-effect is created when a suppressor-click is presented close in time to a test-click. The analysis was carried out for short time-frames of short- and long-latency CEOAEs...... suppression is present in all CEOAEs for inter-click intervals (ICIs) less than 8 ms. The long-latency CEOAEs showed augmentation (i.e., negative suppression) for ICIs of 6-7 ms which was not reported for the short-latency CEOAE at these ICIs. A phenomenological approach is adopted here to explain both...

  3. Community treatment adoption of contingency management: a conceptual profile of U.S. clinics based on innovativeness of executive staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Bryan; Rabun, Carl

    2013-07-01

    Community adoption of contingency management (CM) varies considerably, and executive innovativeness may help explain variance due to its presumed influence on clinic decision-making. Sixteen U.S. opioid treatment programs (OTPs) were visited, with ethnographic interviewing used in casual contacts with executives to inform their eventual classification by study investigators into one of Rogers' (2003) five adopter categories. Audio-recorded interviews were also conducted individually with the executive and three staff members (N = 64) wherein they reported reactions to clinic CM implementation during the prior year, from which study investigators later identified salient excerpts during interview transcript reviews. The executive sample was progressive, with 56% classified as innovators or early adopters. Implementation reports and corresponding staff reactions were generally consistent with what might be expected according to diffusion theory. Clinics led by innovators had durably implemented multiple CM applications, for which staff voiced support. Clinics led by early adopters reported CM exposure via research trial participation, with mixed reporting of sustained and discontinued applications and similarly mixed staff views. Clinics led by early majority adopters employed CM selectively for administrative purposes, with staff reticence about its expansion to therapeutic uses. Clinics led by late majority adopters had either deferred or discontinued CM adoption, with typically disenchanted staff views. Clinics led by a laggard executive evidenced no CM exposure and strongly dogmatic staff views against its use. Study findings are consistent with diffusion theory precepts, and illustrate pervasive influences of executive innovativeness on clinic practices and staff impressions of implementation experiences. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Clicks versus Citations: Click Count as a Metric in High Energy Physics Publishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitton, Ayelet; /UC, San Diego /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    High-energy physicists worldwide rely on online resources such as SPIRES and arXiv to perform gather research and share their own publications. SPIRES is a tool designed to search the literature within high-energy physics, while arXiv provides the actual full-text documents of this literature. In high-energy physics, papers are often ranked according to the number of citations they acquire - meaning the number of times a later paper references the original. This paper investigates the correlation between the number of times a paper is clicked in order to be downloaded and the number of citations it receives following the click. It explores how physicists truly read what they cite.

  5. Synthesis of Diblock Codendrimer by Double Click Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Wook; Han, Seung Choul; Ji, Won Ho [Dong-A Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Sungho [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyeon [Gachon Univ., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Efficient double click methods for the synthesis of diblock codendrimers were developed. The synthetic strategy involved the sequential click reactions between an alkyne and an azide. The short core building block, 1,4-diazidobutane, was chosen to serve as the azide functionalities for dendrimer growth via click reactions with the alkyne-functionalized PAMAM dendrons as hydrophilic dendron and alkyne-functionalized Frechet-type dendrons as hydrophobic dendron. The structure of diblock codendrimers was confirmed by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and GPC analysis.

  6. Synthesis of Diblock Codendrimer by Double Click Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Wook; Han, Seung Choul; Ji, Won Ho; Jin, Sungho; Kim, Ji Hyeon

    2012-01-01

    Efficient double click methods for the synthesis of diblock codendrimers were developed. The synthetic strategy involved the sequential click reactions between an alkyne and an azide. The short core building block, 1,4-diazidobutane, was chosen to serve as the azide functionalities for dendrimer growth via click reactions with the alkyne-functionalized PAMAM dendrons as hydrophilic dendron and alkyne-functionalized Frechet-type dendrons as hydrophobic dendron. The structure of diblock codendrimers was confirmed by 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and GPC analysis

  7. Spectrogram analysis of low to mid frequency marine mammal clicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Larue, James P.; Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Kuczaj, Stan A.; Rayborn, Grayson H.; Walker, Christopher D.

    2004-05-01

    Previous investigators have proposed explanations for some sperm whale click structure and pointed out that the separation of individual pulses within the click might be used to determine approximately the size of the sperm whales. Recently, Mohl et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 1124-1154 (2003)] have shown that echo-location click structure is highly dependent on the received angle. In data measured by the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center using bottom-moored hydrophones in the northern Gulf of Mexico in the summers of 2001 and 2002, rich click structures were observed in the spectrograms of many click trains, some of which exhibit strikingly consistent spectral nulls across the train. Although this structure in the spectra could be due to propagation effects, investigations to date suggest this possibility is highly unlikely, as discussed in the next abstract. Therefore it is at least plausible that the structure could be used to identify individual animals. This is known to be a difficult problem in the case of sperm whales because of the angle dependence of at least some of their clicks. These difficulties are discussed, as is the possible use of the spectrograms of the clicks to identify individuals. [Research supported by ONR.

  8. Clicking in a killer whale habitat: narrow-band, high-frequency biosonar clicks of harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena and Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line A Kyhn

    Full Text Available Odontocetes produce a range of different echolocation clicks but four groups in different families have converged on producing the same stereotyped narrow band high frequency (NBHF click. In microchiropteran bats, sympatric species have evolved the use of different acoustic niches and subtly different echolocation signals to avoid competition among species. In this study, we examined whether similar adaptations are at play among sympatric porpoise species that use NBHF echolocation clicks. We used a six-element hydrophone array to record harbour and Dall's porpoises in British Columbia (BC, Canada, and harbour porpoises in Denmark. The click source properties of all porpoise groups were remarkably similar and had an average directivity index of 25 dB. Yet there was a small, but consistent and significant 4 kHz difference in centroid frequency between sympatric Dall's (137±3 kHz and Canadian harbour porpoises (141±2 kHz. Danish harbour porpoise clicks (136±3 kHz were more similar to Dall's porpoise than to their conspecifics in Canada. We suggest that the spectral differences in echolocation clicks between the sympatric porpoises are consistent with evolution of a prezygotic isolating barrier (i.e., character displacement to avoid hybridization of sympatric species. In practical terms, these spectral differences have immediate application to passive acoustic monitoring.

  9. Hearing sensation levels of emitted biosonar clicks in an echolocating Atlantic bottlenose dolphin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhai Li

    Full Text Available Emitted biosonar clicks and auditory evoked potential (AEP responses triggered by the clicks were synchronously recorded during echolocation in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus trained to wear suction-cup EEG electrodes and to detect targets by echolocation. Three targets with target strengths of -34, -28, and -22 dB were used at distances of 2 to 6.5 m for each target. The AEP responses were sorted according to the corresponding emitted click source levels in 5-dB bins and averaged within each bin to extract biosonar click-related AEPs from noise. The AEP amplitudes were measured peak-to-peak and plotted as a function of click source levels for each target type, distance, and target-present or target-absent condition. Hearing sensation levels of the biosonar clicks were evaluated by comparing the functions of the biosonar click-related AEP amplitude-versus-click source level to a function of external (in free field click-related AEP amplitude-versus-click sound pressure level. The results indicated that the dolphin's hearing sensation levels to her own biosonar clicks were equal to that of external clicks with sound pressure levels 16 to 36 dB lower than the biosonar click source levels, varying with target type, distance, and condition. These data may be assumed to indicate that the bottlenose dolphin possesses effective protection mechanisms to isolate the self-produced intense biosonar beam from the animal's ears during echolocation.

  10. Cloning and characterization of luciferase from a Fijian luminous click beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Yasuo; Futahashi, Ryo; Niwa, Kazuki; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Luminous click beetle is distributed almost exclusively in Central and South America with a single genus in Melanesia. Among these click beetles, the description of Melanesian species has been fragmentary, and its luciferase gene and phylogenetic relation to other click beetles still remain uncertain. We collected a living luminous click beetle, Photophorus jansonii in Fiji. It emits green-yellow light from two spots on the pronotum and has no ventral luminous organ. Here, we cloned a luciferase gene from this insect by RT-PCR. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high identity of ~85% to the luciferases derived from other click beetle species. The luciferase of the Fijian click beetle was produced as a recombinant protein to characterize its biochemical properties. The Km for D-luciferin and ATP were 173 and 270 μm, respectively. The luciferase was pH-insensitive and the spectrum measured at pH 8.0 showed a peak at 559 nm, which was in the range of green-yellow light as seen in the luminous spot of the living Fijian click beetle. The Fijian click beetle luciferase was assigned to the Elateridae clade by a phylogenetic analysis, but it made a clearly different branch from Pyrophorus group examined in this study. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Metabolic Syndrome in Patients attending the Staff Clinic of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/objective: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterised by a clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors. It contributes to morbidity and mortality in adults. The objective of the study was to identify new cases and associated factors of MetS in patients attending a tertiary hospital staff clinic. Materials and methods: The ...

  12. Temporal suppression and augmentation of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhulst, Sarah; Harte, James; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates temporal suppression of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs), occurring when a suppressor-click is presented close in time to a test-click (e.g. 0-8ms). Various temporal suppression methods for examining temporal changes in cochlear compression were evaluated and me...... under test. Temporal suppression was shown to be comparable for CEOAEs and SSOAEs, indicating similar underlying cochlear nonlinear mechanisms. This study contributes to a better understanding of the temporal properties of cochlear dynamics....

  13. A comparison of muscular activity during single and double mouse clicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Stefan; Forsman, Mikael; Hallbeck, Susan

    2005-05-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in the neck/shoulder region and the upper extremities are a common problem among computer workers. Occurrences of motor unit (MU) double discharges with very short inter-firing intervals (doublets) have been hypothesised as a potential additional risk for overuse of already exhausted fibres during long-term stereotyped activity. Doublets are reported to be present during double-click mouse work tasks. A few comparative studies have been carried out on overall muscle activities for short-term tasks with single types of actions, but none on occurrences of doublets during double versus single clicks. The main purpose of this study was to compare muscle activity levels of single and double mouse clicks during a long-term combined mouse/keyboard work task. Four muscles were studied: left and right upper trapezius, right extensor digitorum communis (EDC) and right flexor carpi ulnaris. Additionally, MU activity was analysed through intramuscular electromyography in the EDC muscle for a selection of subjects. The results indicate that double clicking produces neither higher median or 90th percentile levels in the trapezius and EDC muscles, nor a higher disposition for MU doublets, than does single clicking. Especially for the 90th percentile levels, the indications are rather the opposite (in the EDC significantly higher during single clicks in 8 of 11 subjects, P < 0.05). Although it cannot be concluded from the present study that double clicks are harmless, there were no signs that double clicks during computer work generally constitute a larger risk factor for WMSDs than do single clicks.

  14. Harbor porpoise clicks do not have conditionally minimum time bandwidth product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that odontocete clicks have minimal time frequency product given their delay and center frequency values is tested by using an in-phase averaged porpoise click compared with a pure tone weighted with the same envelope. These signals have the same delay and the same center frequency...... values but the time bandwidth product of the artificial click is only 0.76 that of the original. Therefore signals with the same parameters exist that have a lower time bandwidth product. The observation that porpoise clicks are in fact minimum phase is confirmed for porpoise clicks and this property...... is argued to be incompatible with optimal reception, if auditory filters are also minimum phase....

  15. Click Spam Prevention Model for Online Advertisement

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Zingirian; Michele Benini

    2018-01-01

    This paper shows a vulnerability of the pay-per-click accounting of Google Ads and proposes a statistical tradeoff-based approach to manage this vulnerability. The result of this paper is a model to calculate the overhead cost per click necessary to protect the subscribers and a simple algorithm to implement this protection. Simulations validate the correctness of the model and the economical applicability.

  16. Quality management and job related factors predicting satisfaction of dental clinic staff in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merisalu, Eda; Männik, Georg; Põlluste, Kaja

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the role of managerial style, work environment factors and burnout in determining job satisfaction during the implementation of quality improvement activities in a dental clinic. Quantitative research was carried out using a prestructured anonymous questionnaire to survey 302 respondents in Kaarli Dental Clinic, Estonia. Dental clinic staff assessed job satisfaction, managerial style, work stress and burnout levels through the implementation period of ISO 9000 quality management system in 2003 and annually during 2006-2009. Binary logistic regression was used to explain the impact of satisfaction with management and work organisation, knowledge about managerial activities, work environment and psychosocial stress and burnout on job satisfaction. The response rate limits were between 60% and 89.6%. Job satisfaction increased significantly from 2003 to 2006 and the percentage of very satisfied staff increased from 17 to 38 (pwork organisation and working environment, as well as factors related to career, security and planning. The average scores of emotional exhaustion showed significant decrease, correlating negatively with job satisfaction (pwork environment by decreasing burnout symptoms and increased job satisfaction in staff.

  17. Learning of Multimodal Representations With Random Walks on the Click Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Lu, Xinyan; Song, Jun; Yan, Shuicheng; Zhang, Zhongfei Mark; Rui, Yong; Zhuang, Yueting

    2016-02-01

    In multimedia information retrieval, most classic approaches tend to represent different modalities of media in the same feature space. With the click data collected from the users' searching behavior, existing approaches take either one-to-one paired data (text-image pairs) or ranking examples (text-query-image and/or image-query-text ranking lists) as training examples, which do not make full use of the click data, particularly the implicit connections among the data objects. In this paper, we treat the click data as a large click graph, in which vertices are images/text queries and edges indicate the clicks between an image and a query. We consider learning a multimodal representation from the perspective of encoding the explicit/implicit relevance relationship between the vertices in the click graph. By minimizing both the truncated random walk loss as well as the distance between the learned representation of vertices and their corresponding deep neural network output, the proposed model which is named multimodal random walk neural network (MRW-NN) can be applied to not only learn robust representation of the existing multimodal data in the click graph, but also deal with the unseen queries and images to support cross-modal retrieval. We evaluate the latent representation learned by MRW-NN on a public large-scale click log data set Clickture and further show that MRW-NN achieves much better cross-modal retrieval performance on the unseen queries/images than the other state-of-the-art methods.

  18. Applications of Azide-Based Bioorthogonal Click Chemistry in Glycobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Click chemistry is a powerful chemical reaction with excellent bioorthogonality features: biocompatible, rapid and highly specific in biological environments. For glycobiology, bioorthogonal click chemistry has created a new method for glycan non-invasive imaging in living systems, selective metabolic engineering, and offered an elite chemical handle for biological manipulation and glycomics studies. Especially the [3 + 2] dipolar cycloadditions of azides with strained alkynes and the Staudinger ligation of azides and triarylphosphines have been widely used among the extant click reactions. This review focuses on the azide-based bioorthogonal click chemistry, describing the characteristics and development of these reactions, introducing some recent applications in glycobiology research, especially in glycan metabolic engineering, including glycan non-invasive imaging, glycomics studies and viral surface manipulation for drug discovery as well as other applications like activity-based protein profiling and carbohydrate microarrays.

  19. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and C in Clinical Staffs (Doctor an

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mokhayeri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Health care workers who have contact with blood and secretions have an increased occupational risk for blood transmitted infections. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and C infections and evaluation of the level of HBV antibody titer in clinical staffs (doctor and Nurse of the four hospitals in Khorramabad city, Iran. This cross sectional study investigated 462 clinical staffs (doctor and nurse in the government hospitals of Khorramabad city. The history of HB vaccination and contact with blood and secretions and body fluids recorded. 5cc blood was collected from each person and HBSAg and HBSAb and HCVAb were measured by ELISA method. Among 462 participants 381 (82.47% were women and 81 (17.53% were men, 9(1.95% participants were positive for hepatitis, there were 7 (1.52% cases positive for HBs Ag, 2 (0.43% cases for HCV Ab. HCV and HBV prevalence was highest in the age group of 45 to 54 and 30 to 40 years respectively, prevalence rates were higher in females compared to males, from a total of 9 Infected participants, 3 had a history of needle stick injury, 6 had a history of surgery, also, none of these nine hepatitis positive subjects had the experience of blood reception, hepatitis patients have work experience in the surgical ward, operating rooms and emergency. According to the results of this study prevalence of HBV and HCV in clinical staffs (doctor and nurse in hospitals less than other people. The doctors and nurses have the highest rate of knowledgeable about preventive and control methods of hepatitis.

  20. Recent Advances in Click Chemistry Applied to Dendrimer Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Arseneault

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers are monodisperse polymers grown in a fractal manner from a central point. They are poised to become the cornerstone of nanoscale devices in several fields, ranging from biomedicine to light-harvesting. Technical difficulties in obtaining these molecules has slowed their transfer from academia to industry. In 2001, the arrival of the “click chemistry” concept gave the field a major boost. The flagship reaction, a modified Hüisgen cycloaddition, allowed researchers greater freedom in designing and building dendrimers. In the last five years, advances in click chemistry saw a wider use of other click reactions and a notable increase in the complexity of the reported structures. This review covers key developments in the click chemistry field applied to dendrimer synthesis from 2010 to 2015. Even though this is an expert review, basic notions and references have been included to help newcomers to the field.

  1. Click Bait: You Won’t Believe What Happens Next!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Alves

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this chapter is to investigate Click Bait, one of the strategies most commonly used by online news journalists aiming to make their headlines more attractive to readers. The chapter begins by studying Social Networks and the power they give marketers in spreading information. Next, a historical context to Click Bait is presented through its origins as Yellow Journalism, a 19th century journalism trend focused on hyperbolizing news headlines in order to increase sales. Finally, Click Bait is studied as the online application of techniques like Yellow Journalism. This section analyzes semantics and some of the most popular headline construction formulas. Literature on this matter concluded that the use of certain headline construction formulas yields significant increase in click-through rates. These increases could be beneficial to the publishing organization as they increase advertising impressions, but could also be detrimental, as these hyperbolic headlines may make readers feel manipulated.

  2. DNA barcoding of Japanese click beetles (Coleoptera, Elateridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Yuichi; Ôhira, Hitoo; Murase, Yukio; Moriyama, Akihiko; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae) represent one of the largest groups of beetle insects. Some click beetles in larval form, known as wireworms, are destructive agricultural pests. Morphological identification of click beetles is generally difficult and requires taxonomic expertise. This study reports on the DNA barcoding of Japanese click beetles to enable their rapid and accurate identification. We collected and assembled 762 cytochrome oxidase subunit I barcode sequences from 275 species, which cover approximately 75% of the common species found on the Japanese main island, Honshu. This barcode library also contains 20 out of the 21 potential pest species recorded in Japan. Our analysis shows that most morphologically identified species form distinct phylogenetic clusters separated from each other by large molecular distances. This supports the general usefulness of the DNA barcoding approach for quick and reliable identification of Japanese elaterid species for environmental impact assessment, agricultural pest control, and biodiversity analysis. On the other hand, the taxonomic boundary in dozens of species did not agree with the boundary of barcode index numbers (a criterion for sequence-based species delimitation). These findings urge taxonomic reinvestigation of these mismatched taxa.

  3. DNA barcoding of Japanese click beetles (Coleoptera, Elateridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Oba

    Full Text Available Click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae represent one of the largest groups of beetle insects. Some click beetles in larval form, known as wireworms, are destructive agricultural pests. Morphological identification of click beetles is generally difficult and requires taxonomic expertise. This study reports on the DNA barcoding of Japanese click beetles to enable their rapid and accurate identification. We collected and assembled 762 cytochrome oxidase subunit I barcode sequences from 275 species, which cover approximately 75% of the common species found on the Japanese main island, Honshu. This barcode library also contains 20 out of the 21 potential pest species recorded in Japan. Our analysis shows that most morphologically identified species form distinct phylogenetic clusters separated from each other by large molecular distances. This supports the general usefulness of the DNA barcoding approach for quick and reliable identification of Japanese elaterid species for environmental impact assessment, agricultural pest control, and biodiversity analysis. On the other hand, the taxonomic boundary in dozens of species did not agree with the boundary of barcode index numbers (a criterion for sequence-based species delimitation. These findings urge taxonomic reinvestigation of these mismatched taxa.

  4. Click Spam Prevention Model for On-Line Advertisement

    OpenAIRE

    Zingirian, Nicola; Benini, Michele

    2018-01-01

    This paper shows a vulnerability of the pay-per-click accounting of Google Ads and proposes a statistical tradeoff-based approach to manage this vulnerability. The result of this paper is a model to calculate the overhead cost per click necessary to protect the subscribers and a simple algorithm to implement this protection. Simulations validate the correctness of the model and the economical applicability.

  5. Relationships with clinical staff after a diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with patients' experience of care and abuse in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Peter; Holcombe, Christopher; Clark, Louise; Krespi, Rita; Fisher, Jean; Hill, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    Patients experiencing the crisis of the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer need to form trusting and supportive relationships with clinical staff. However, adverse childhood experiences damage the ability to form supportive relationships as adults. We tested the prediction that women recalling childhood abuse and lack of parental care would experience poorer support from clinical staff caring for them around the time of diagnosis and surgical treatment of breast cancer. Two to 4 days after surgery, women with primary breast cancer (N=355) self-reported: childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse and parental care; perceived social support; support experienced from the surgeon and breast and ward nurses; and current emotional distress. Logistic regression analyses and covariance structure modeling tested the dependence of perceived professional support on childhood abuse and care and on current social support, controlling for emotional distress and age. Women who reported feeling fully supported by clinical staff were more likely to recall no abuse and good parental care. The influence of parental care, but not abuse, was explained by its association with experiencing good social support generally, which was itself associated with feeling fully supported by clinical staff. These relationships were independent of current emotional distress. Patients' ability to feel fully supported by clinical staff reflects not only how much support staff make available but also patients' experience of close relationships in childhood. We suggest that, whereas lack of parental care compromises adult supportive relationships in general, abuse specifically reduces support from clinical staff.

  6. Pricing of on-line advertising: pay-per-view or pay-per-click?

    OpenAIRE

    Fjell, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the choice of pay-per-view (PPV) and price-per-click (PPC) when a web publisher is a price taker in the market for advertising banners, and the number of visits is decreasing in advertising. The main result is that the web publisher should always choose either PPV or PPC. If the click-through rate is exogenous, then the optimal amount of advertising is the same for both pricing metholds and the choice of pricing method is given by the click-through rate. If the click-through rate i...

  7. Functionalization of chitosan by click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheaburu-Yilmaz, Catalina Natalia; Karavana, Sinem Yaprak; Yilmaz, Onur

    2017-12-01

    Chitosan modification represents a challenge nowadays. The variety of compounds which can be obtained with various architectures and different functionalities made it attractive to be used in fields like pharmacy and material science. Presents study deals with the chemical modification of chitosan by using click chemistry technique. The study adopted the approach of clicking azidated chitosan with a synthesized alkyne terminated polymer i.e. poly N isopropylacrylamide with thermoresponsive properties. Structures were confirmed by the FT-IR and HNMR spectra. Thermal characterization was performed showing different thermal behaviour with the chemical modification. The final synthesized graft copolymer can play important role within pharmaceutical formulations carrying drugs for topical or oral treatments.

  8. Cows, clicks, ciphers, and satire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Tyler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The social network game Farmville, which allows players to grow crops, raise animals, and produce a variety of goods, proved enormously successful within a year of its launch in 2009, attracting 110 million Facebook users. However, the game has been criticised for its mindless mechanics, which require little more than repeated clicking on its colourful icons. By way of parody, Ian Bogost’s Cow Clicker permits its players to simply click on a picture of a cow once every six hours. In this essay I extend Bogost’s critique and suggest that Cow Clicker highlights not just the soulless inanity of Farmville gameplay but also the paucity of that game’s portrayal of the painful reality of a dairy cow’s punishing daily existence and untimely end.

  9. CuAAC-Based Click Chemistry in Self-Healing Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhler, Diana; Michael, Philipp; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2017-10-17

    Click chemistry has emerged as a significant tool for materials science, organic chemistry, and bioscience. Based on the initial concept of Barry Sharpless in 2001, the copper(I)-catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has triggered a plethora of chemical concepts for linking molecules and building blocks under ambient conditions, forming the basis for applications in autonomous cross-linking materials. Self-healing systems on the other hand are often based on mild cross-linking chemistries that are able to react either autonomously or upon an external trigger. In the ideal case, self-healing takes place efficiently at low temperatures, independent of the substrate(s) used, by forming strong and stable networks, binding to the newly generated (cracked) interfaces to restore the original material properties. The use of the CuAAC in self-healing systems, most of all the careful design of copper-based catalysts linked to additives as well as the chemical diversity of substrates, has led to an enormous potential of applications of this singular reaction. The implementation of click-based strategies in self-healing systems therefore is highly attractive, as here chemical (and physical) concepts of molecular reactivity, molecular design, and even metal catalysis are connected to aspects of materials science. In this Account, we will show how CuAAC reactions of multivalent components can be used as a tool for self-healing materials, achieving cross-linking at low temperatures (exploiting concepts of autocatalysis or internal chelation within the bulk CuAAC and systematic optimization of the efficiency of the used Cu(I) catalysts). Encapsulation strategies to separate the click components by micro- and nanoencapsulation are required in this context. Consequently, the examples reported here describe chemical concepts to realize more efficient and faster click reactions in self-healing polymeric materials. Thus, enhanced chain diffusion in (hyper

  10. 78 FR 13070 - Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... marketing applications, (2) what is meant by ``due diligence'' in obtaining financial disclosures from...: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by...

  11. Facile design of biomaterials by 'click' chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the so‐called ‘click chemistry’ a decade ago has significantly improved the chemical toolbox for producing novel biomaterials. This review focuses primarily on the application of Cu(I)‐catalysed azide–alkyne 1,3‐cycloadditon in the preparation of numerous, diverse biomaterials...... chemistry is elaborated. The present state of creating functional and biologically active surfaces by click chemistry is presented. Finally, conducting surfaces based on an azide‐functionalized polymer with prospective biological sensor potential are introduced. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry...

  12. "+CLICK": pilot of a web-based training program to enhance ART adherence among HIV-positive youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shegog, Ross; Markham, Christine M; Leonard, Amy D; Bui, Thanh C; Paul, Mary E

    2012-01-01

    Youth account for almost half of all new HIV infections in the United States. Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) is critical for successful management, yet reported adherence rates for youth are often low. This study pilot-tested "+CLICK," an innovative, web-based, adherence intervention for HIV-positive youth as an adjunct to traditional clinic-based, self-management education. The theory-based application, developed for HIV-infected youth, 13-24 years of age, provides tailored activities addressing attitudes, knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy related to ART adherence. HIV-positive youth (N=10) pilot-tested "+CLICK" to assess usability (ease of use, credibility, understandability, acceptability, motivation) and short-term psychosocial outcomes (importance and self-efficacy related to ART adherence) using a single-group, pre-/post-test study design in a hospital-based pediatric clinic (n=8) and home (n=2) location. Youth were mostly female (80%) and Black (80%). Mean age was 17.8 years (SD=2.65, range 14-22). All were infected perinatally and had been living with HIV all their lives. Most learned their HIV status by age 10 years. Sixty percent reported an undetectable viral load, whilst 10% reported a viral load of over 50,000. Half (50%) reported a normal CD4 count, whilst 20% reported having low CD4 (90%). Most (70%) indicated they would use "+CLICK" again. Short-term psychosocial outcomes indicate significant increase in medication adherence self-efficacy (pART adherence. Further research on long-term and behavioral effects is indicated prior to broader dissemination into clinical practice.

  13. Ukufundisa izicuku zeziqhakancu emagameni (Teaching click clusters in words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gxowa-Dlayedwa, Ntombizodwa Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some teachers find it uninteresting and difficult to teach isiXhosa phonemes and syllables to grade one to three learners. This has a negative impact as the literacy results are low because learners’ reading and writing skills are poor. The linguistics terms featuring in the title, namely; consonants, vowels and syllables as found in words facilitate reading, and thus improve literacy standards in every language. IsiXhosa is one of the eleven official languages in South Africa. Phonemes include clicks and/or click cluster and vowels. On the other hand, there are people who are interested in learning to speak isiXhosa, but the difficulties encountered during the pronunciation of clicks discourage many of them. This study believes that the knowledge of phonemes and syllables will boost the literacy standard in isiXhosa. Therefore, the purposes of this study are to show that clicks and click clusters are found in major word categories which are in life circles. Secondly, if words are divided into segments, it becomes easy to produce them in print and reading skills. Thirdly, reading is possible in every language, and most importantly, skills are transferable. The current study therefore, argues that the knowledge of phonemes and syllables facilitates reading and creative writing skills. The data used in this study were taken from a novel written by Sidlayi (2009. Few examples have been given by the researchers themselves with an objective to clarify some ideas.

  14. Click it or ticket evaluation, 2008–2009 : traffic tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Click It or Ticket (CIOT) is a high-visibility enforcement : program to increase seat belt use. Click It or Ticket was : adopted as a national program in 2003 and is credited : with steady increases in seat belt use across the Nation. : In 2009, seat...

  15. Recording and quantification of ultrasonic echolocation clicks from free-ranging toothed whales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Teglberg; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    Toothed whales produce short, ultrasonic clicks of high directionality and source level to probe their environment acoustically. This process, termed echolocation, is to a large part governed by the properties of the emitted clicks. Therefore derivation of click source parameters from free......-ranging animals is of increasing importance to understand both how toothed whales use echolocation in the wild and how they may be monitored acoustically. This paper addresses how source parameters can be derived from free-ranging toothed whales in the wild using calibrated multi-hydrophone arrays and digital...... of discrete versions of toothed whale clicks that are meaningful in a biosonar context....

  16. [Opinions and attitudes of clinical staff on systems for the assessment and treatment of children's pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullan, A M; Fernández, E; Badia, M; Lorente, F; Malmierca, F; Zapatero, I

    2013-08-01

    Many factors affect the assessment and treatment of pain, among them being the knowledge and attitudes of clinical staff. The goal of this work was to determine the opinions and attitudes of clinical staff from two hospitals on the different aspects of the assessment and treatment of children's pain. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire issued to clinical staff. The questionnaire was given to the professionals, doctors, and nursing staff of the paediatric services of two hospitals, and to an incidental sample of paediatric doctors. Of the 146 questionnaires sent out, 105 were completed. Participants indicated that standardised scales and physiological recordings were the least frequently used methods to assess children's pain. Participants considered that pharmacological techniques for the treatment of pain were used more frequently than non-pharmacological techniques, at all ages. Participants acknowledged being significantly more knowledgeable about pharmacological methods to relieve paediatric pain than about non-pharmacological methods. There is margin for improvement in systems for the assessment and treatment of children's pain as regards the more frequent and standardised use of techniques and standardised tools for the assessment of pain, and the greater administration of non-pharmacological strategies for its treatment. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of echolocation clicks from geographically sympatric killer whales and long-finned pilot whales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskesen, Ida; Wahlberg, Magnus; Simon, Malene

    2010-01-01

    The source characteristics of biosonar signals from sympatric killer whales and long-finned pilot whales in a Norwegian fjord were compared. A total of 137 pilot whale and more than 2000 killer whale echolocation clicks were recorded using a linear four-hydrophone array. Of these, 20 pilot whale...... clicks and 28 killer whale clicks were categorized as being recorded on-axis. The clicks of pilot whales had a mean apparent source level of 196 dB re 1 lPa pp and those of killer whales 203 dB re 1 lPa pp. The duration of pilot whale clicks was significantly shorter (23 ls, S.E.¼1.3) and the centroid...... frequency significantly higher (55 kHz, S.E.¼2.1) than killer whale clicks (duration: 41 ls, S.E.¼2.6; centroid frequency: 32 kHz, S.E.¼1.5). The rate of increase in the accumulated energy as a function of time also differed between clicks from the two species. The differences in duration, frequency...

  18. Vocal reporting of echolocation targets: dolphins often report before click trains end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, S H; Elsberry, W R; Blackwood, D J; Kamolnick, T; Todd, M; Carder, D A; Chaplin, Monica; Cranford, T W

    2012-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) wore opaque suction cups over their eyes while stationing behind an acoustically opaque door. This put the dolphins in a known position and orientation. When the door opened, the dolphin clicked to detect targets. Trainers specified that Dolphin S emit a whistle if the target was a 7.5 cm water filled sphere, or a pulse burst if the target was a rock. S remained quiet if there was no target. Dolphin B whistled for the sphere. She remained quiet for rock and for no target. Thus, S had to choose between three different responses, whistle, pulse burst, or remain quiet. B had to choose between two different responses, whistle or remain quiet. S gave correct vocal responses averaging 114 ms after her last echolocation click (range 182 ms before and 219 ms after the last click). Average response for B was 21 ms before her last echolocation click (range 250 ms before and 95 ms after the last click in the train). More often than not, B began her whistle response before her echolocation train ended. The findings suggest separate neural pathways for generation of response vocalizations as opposed to echolocation clicks. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  19. General Dialdehyde Click Chemistry for Amine Bioconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahipanah, Sina; O'Brien, Paul J; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2017-05-17

    The development of methods for conjugating a range of molecules to primary amine functional groups has revolutionized the fields of chemistry, biology, and material science. The primary amine is a key functional group and one of the most important nucleophiles and bases used in all of synthetic chemistry. Therefore, tremendous interest in the synthesis of molecules containing primary amines and strategies to devise chemical reactions to react with primary amines has been at the core of chemical research. In particular, primary amines are a ubiquitous functional group found in biological systems as free amino acids, as key side chain lysines in proteins, and in signaling molecules and metabolites and are also present in many natural product classes. Due to its abundance, the primary amine is the most convenient functional group handle in molecules for ligation to other molecules for a broad range of applications that impact all scientific fields. Because of the primary amine's central importance in synthetic chemistry, acid-base chemistry, redox chemistry, and biology, many methods have been developed to efficiently react with primary amines, including activated carboxylic acids, isothiocyanates, Michael addition type systems, and reaction with ketones or aldehydes followed by in situ reductive amination. Herein, we introduce a new traceless, high-yield, fast click-chemistry method based on the rapid and efficient trapping of amine groups via a functionalized dialdehyde group. The click reaction occurs in mild conditions in organic solvents or aqueous media and proceeds in high yield, and the starting dialdehyde reagent and resulting dialdehyde click conjugates are stable. Moreover, no catalyst or dialdehyde-activating group is required, and the only byproduct is water. The initial dialdehyde and the resulting conjugate are both straightforward to characterize, and the reaction proceeds with high atom economy. To demonstrate the broad scope of this new click

  20. Click It or Ticket Evaluation, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The 2011 Click It or Ticket (CIOT) mobilization followed a typical selective traffic enforcement program (STEP) sequence, involving paid media, earned media, and enforcement. A nationally representative telephone survey indicated that the mobilizatio...

  1. Using the e-Chasqui, web-based information system, to determine laboratory guidelines and data available to clinical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Joaquin A; Yagui, Martin; Contreras, Carmen C; Palma, Betty; Shin, Sonya S; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2008-11-06

    13% of all drug susceptibility tests (DSTs) performed at a public laboratory in Peru were duplicate. To determine reasons for duplicate requests an online survey was implemented in the e-Chasqui laboratory information system. Results showed that 59.6% of tests were ordered because clinical staff was unaware of ordering guidelines or of a previous result. This shows a benefit of using a web-based system and the lack of laboratory information available to clinical staff in Peru.

  2. Research staff training in a multisite randomized clinical trial: Methods and recommendations from the Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robrina; Morris, David W; Greer, Tracy L; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of and recommendations for meeting the challenges of training research staff for multisite studies are limited despite the recognized importance of training on trial outcomes. The STRIDE (STimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise) study is a multisite randomized clinical trial that was conducted at nine addiction treatment programs across the United States within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) and evaluated the addition of exercise to addiction treatment as usual (TAU), compared to health education added to TAU, for individuals with stimulant abuse or dependence. Research staff administered a variety of measures that required a range of interviewing, technical, and clinical skills. In order to address the absence of information on how research staff are trained for multisite clinical studies, the current manuscript describes the conceptual process of training and certifying research assistants for STRIDE. Training was conducted using a three-stage process to allow staff sufficient time for distributive learning, practice, and calibration leading up to implementation of this complex study. Training was successfully implemented with staff across nine sites. Staff demonstrated evidence of study and procedural knowledge via quizzes and skill demonstration on six measures requiring certification. Overall, while the majority of staff had little to no experience in the six measures, all research assistants demonstrated ability to correctly and reliably administer the measures throughout the study. Practical recommendations are provided for training research staff and are particularly applicable to the challenges encountered with large, multisite trials.

  3. Implementing web-based ping-pong-type e-communication to enhance staff satisfaction, multidisciplinary cooperation, and clinical effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Pei-Han; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Lai, Chun-Liang; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Hsieh, Hui-Ling; Shih, Yi-Ting; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Huang, Li-Wen; Lin, Yi-An; Lin, Po-Hao; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Liu, Dai-Wei; Hsu, Feng-Chun; Tsai, Shiang-Jiun; Liu, Jia-Chi; Chung, En-Seu; Lin, Hon-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Frequent multidisciplinary communication is essential in conducting daily radiotherapy (RT) practice. However, traditional oral or paper-based communication has limitations. E-communication has been suggested, but its effects are still not well demarcated in the field of radiation oncology. Objects: In our web-based integrated information platform, we constructed a ping-pong-type e-communication function to transfer specific notations among multidisciplinary RT staffs. The purpose was to test whether applying this e-communication can increase effectiveness of multidisciplinary cooperation when compared with oral or paper-based practice. Staff satisfaction and clinical benefits were also demonstrated. Design and setting: A real-world quality-improving study was conducted in a large center of radiation oncology. Participants and dataset used: Before and after applying multidisciplinary e-communication (from 2014 to 2015), clinical RT staffs were surveyed for their user experience and satisfaction (n = 23). For measuring clinical effectiveness, a secondary database of irradiated head and neck cancer patients was re-analyzed for comparing RT toxicities (n = 402). Interventions: Applying ping-pong-type multidisciplinary reflective e-communication was the main intervention. Outcome measures: For measuring staff satisfaction, eight domains were surveyed, such as timeliness, convenience, and completeness. For measuring clinical effectiveness of multidisciplinary cooperation, event rates of severe (i.e., grade 3–4) RT mucositis and dermatitis were recorded. Results: Overall, when compared with oral communication only, e-communication demonstrated multiple benefits, particularly on notation-review convenience (2.00 ± 1.76 vs 9.19 ± 0.81; P communication showed statistically significant benefits on all eight domains, especially on notation-review convenience (5.05 ± 2.11 vs 9.19 ± 0.81; P communication (8.76 ± 0

  4. Click It or Ticket Evaluation, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The 201 Click It or Ticket (CIOT) mobilization followed a typical elective traffic enforcement program TEP) sequence, involving paid media, earned media, and enforcement. A nationally representative telephone survey indicated that the mobilization wa...

  5. Ionic liquid syntheses via click chemistry: expeditious routes toward versatile functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjafari, Arsalan

    2018-03-25

    Since the introduction of click chemistry by K. B. Sharpless in 2001, its exploration and exploitation has occurred in countless fields of materials sciences in both academic and industrial spheres. Click chemistry is defined as an efficient, robust, and orthogonal synthetic platform for the facile formation of new carbon-heteroatom bonds, using readily available starting materials. Premier examples of click reactions are copper(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition (CuAAC) and the thiol-X (X = ene and yne) coupling reactions to form C-N and C-S bonds, respectively. The emphasis of this review is centered on the rapidly expanding area of click chemistry-mediated synthesis of functional ionic liquids via CuAAC, thiol-X and oxime formation, and selected examples of nucleophilic ring-opening reactions, while offering some thoughts on emerging challenges, opportunities and ultimately the evolution of this field. Click chemistry offers tremendous opportunities, and introduces intriguing perspectives for efficient and robust generation of tailored task-specific ionic liquids - an important class of soft materials.

  6. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  7. Ways to suppress click and pop for class D amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haishi; Zhang Bo; Sun Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Undesirable audio click and pop may be generated in a speaker or headphone. Compared to linear (class A/B/AB) amplifiers, class D amplifiers that comprise of an input stage and a modulation stage are more prone to producing click and pop. This article analyzes sources that generate click and pop in class D amplifiers, and corresponding ways to suppress them. For a class D amplifier with a single-ended input, click and pop is likely to be due to two factors. One is from a voltage difference (V DIF ) between the voltage of an input capacitance (V CIN ) and a reference voltage (V REF ) of the input stage, and the other one is from the non-linear switching during the setting up of the bias and feedback voltages/currents (BFVC) of the modulation stage. In this article, a fast charging loop is introduced into the input stage to charge V CIN to roughly near V REF . Then a correction loop further charges or discharges V CIN , substantially equalizing it with V REF . Dummy switches are introduced into the modulation stage to provide switching signals for setting up BFVC, and the power switches are disabled until the BFVC are set up successfully. A two channel single-ended class D amplifier with the above features is fabricated with 0.5 μm Bi-CMOS process. Road test and fast Fourier transform analysis indicate that there is no noticeable click and pop. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  8. Ways to suppress click and pop for class D amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haishi, Wang; Bo, Zhang; Jiang, Sun

    2012-08-01

    Undesirable audio click and pop may be generated in a speaker or headphone. Compared to linear (class A/B/AB) amplifiers, class D amplifiers that comprise of an input stage and a modulation stage are more prone to producing click and pop. This article analyzes sources that generate click and pop in class D amplifiers, and corresponding ways to suppress them. For a class D amplifier with a single-ended input, click and pop is likely to be due to two factors. One is from a voltage difference (VDIF) between the voltage of an input capacitance (VCIN) and a reference voltage (VREF) of the input stage, and the other one is from the non-linear switching during the setting up of the bias and feedback voltages/currents (BFVC) of the modulation stage. In this article, a fast charging loop is introduced into the input stage to charge VCIN to roughly near VREF. Then a correction loop further charges or discharges VCIN, substantially equalizing it with VREF. Dummy switches are introduced into the modulation stage to provide switching signals for setting up BFVC, and the power switches are disabled until the BFVC are set up successfully. A two channel single-ended class D amplifier with the above features is fabricated with 0.5 μm Bi-CMOS process. Road test and fast Fourier transform analysis indicate that there is no noticeable click and pop.

  9. An API-based search system for one click access to information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionita, Dan; Tax, Niek; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    This paper proposes a prototype One Click access system, based on previous work in the field and the related 1CLICK-2@NTCIR10 task. The proposed solution integrates methods from into a three tier algorithm: query categorization, information extraction and output generation and offers suggestions on

  10. Front-office staff can improve clinical tobacco intervention: health coordinator pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Frederic; Naish, Brigham; Buwembo, Isaac

    2013-11-01

    To learn whether front-line personnel in primary care practices can increase delivery of clinical tobacco interventions and also help smokers address physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression. Uncontrolled before-and-after design. Vancouver, BC, area (4 practices); northern British Columbia (2 practices). Six practices, with 1 staff person per practice serving as a "health coordinator" who tracked and, after the baseline period, delivered preventive interventions to all patients who smoked. To assess delivery of preventive interventions, each practice was to sample 300 consecutive patient records, both at baseline and at follow-up 15 months later. Front-office staff were recruited, trained, paid, and given ongoing support to provide preventive care. Clinicians supplemented this care with advice and guided the use of medication. Effectiveness of the intervention was based on comparison, at baseline and at follow-up, of the proportion of patients with any of the following 6 proven intervention components documented in their medical records: chart reminder, advice received, self-management plan, target quit date, referral, and follow-up date (as they applied to tobacco, physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression). A Tobacco Intervention Flow Sheet cued preventive care, and its data were entered into a spreadsheet (which served as a smokers' registry). Qualitative appraisal data were noted. For tobacco, substantial increases occurred after the intervention period in the proportion of patients with each of the intervention components noted in their charts: chart reminder (20% vs 94%); provision of advice (34% vs 79%); self-management plan (14% vs 57%); target quit date (5% vs 11%); referral (6% vs 11%); and follow-up date (7% vs 42%). Interventions for physical inactivity and depression showed some gains, but there were no gains for at-risk alcohol use. Front-line staff, patients, and clinicians were enthusiastic about the services offered

  11. Assessing segmentation processes by click detection: online measure of statistical learning, or simple interference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana; Gaillard, Vinciane; Cleeremans, Axel; Destrebecqz, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    Statistical learning can be used to extract the words from continuous speech. Gómez, Bion, and Mehler (Language and Cognitive Processes, 26, 212-223, 2011) proposed an online measure of statistical learning: They superimposed auditory clicks on a continuous artificial speech stream made up of a random succession of trisyllabic nonwords. Participants were instructed to detect these clicks, which could be located either within or between words. The results showed that, over the length of exposure, reaction times (RTs) increased more for within-word than for between-word clicks. This result has been accounted for by means of statistical learning of the between-word boundaries. However, even though statistical learning occurs without an intention to learn, it nevertheless requires attentional resources. Therefore, this process could be affected by a concurrent task such as click detection. In the present study, we evaluated the extent to which the click detection task indeed reflects successful statistical learning. Our results suggest that the emergence of RT differences between within- and between-word click detection is neither systematic nor related to the successful segmentation of the artificial language. Therefore, instead of being an online measure of learning, the click detection task seems to interfere with the extraction of statistical regularities.

  12. Use of artificial intelligence to analyze clinical database reduces workload on surgical house staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, E A; Steinberg, B M; LeBoutillier, M; Coppa, G F; Roses, D F

    1994-08-01

    The current quantity and diversity of hospital clinical, laboratory, and pharmacy records have resulted in a glut of information, which can be overwhelming to house staff. This study was performed to measure the impact of artificial intelligence analysis of such data on the junior surgical house staff's workload, time for direct patient care, and quality of life. A personal computer was interfaced with the hospital computerized patient data system. Artificial intelligence algorithms were applied to retrieve and condense laboratory values, microbiology reports, and medication orders. Unusual laboratory tests were reported without artificial intelligence filtering. A survey of 23 junior house staff showed a requirement for a total of 30.75 man-hours per day, an average of 184.5 minutes per service twice a day for five surgical services each with an average of 40.7 patients, to manually produce a report in contrast to a total of 3.4 man-hours, an average of 20.5 minutes on the same basis (88.9% reduction, p medical practice has created an explosion of information, which is a burden for surgical house staff. Artificial intelligence preprocessing of the hospital database information focuses attention, eliminates superfluous data, and significantly reduces surgical house staff clerical work, allowing more time for education, research, and patient care.

  13. Click nucleic acid ligation: applications in biology and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2012-08-21

    Biochemical strategies that use a combination of synthetic oligonucleotides, thermostable DNA polymerases, and DNA ligases can produce large DNA constructs up to 1 megabase in length. Although these ambitious targets are feasible biochemically, comparable technologies for the chemical synthesis of long DNA strands lag far behind. The best available chemical approach is the solid-phase phosphoramidite method, which can be used to assemble DNA strands up to 150 bases in length. Beyond this point, deficiencies in the chemistry make it impossible to produce pure DNA. A possible alternative approach to the chemical synthesis of large DNA strands is to join together carefully purified synthetic oligonucleotides by chemical methods. Click ligation by the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne (CuAAC) reaction could facilitate this process. In this Account, we describe the synthesis, characterization, and applications of oligonucleotides prepared by click ligation. The alkyne and azide oligonucleotide strands can be prepared by standard protocols, and the ligation reaction is compatible with a wide range of chemical modifications to DNA and RNA. We have employed click ligation to synthesize DNA constructs up to 300 bases in length and much longer sequences are feasible. When the resulting triazole linkage is placed in a PCR template, various DNA polymerases correctly copy the entire base sequence. We have also successfully demonstrated both in vitro transcription and rolling circle amplification through the modified linkage. This linkage has shown in vivo biocompatibility: an antibiotic resistance gene containing triazole linkages functions in E. coli . Using click ligation, we have synthesized hairpin ribozymes up to 100 nucleotides in length and a hammerhead ribozyme with the triazole linkage located at the substrate cleavage site. At the opposite end of the length scale, click-ligated, cyclic mini-DNA duplexes have been used as models to study base pairing. Cyclic duplexes have

  14. Aiming and clicking in young children's use of the computer mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, A.; Reitsma, P.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the abilities of young children to aim and click with a computer mouse. Young children have not yet fully developed their motor skills and they are therefore more likely than adults to click next to targets on the computer screen. Because in educational software

  15. Modeling the acceptance of clinical information systems among hospital medical staff: an extended TAM model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melas, Christos D; Zampetakis, Leonidas A; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Moustakis, Vassilis

    2011-08-01

    Recent empirical research has utilized the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to advance the understanding of doctors' and nurses' technology acceptance in the workplace. However, the majority of the reported studies are either qualitative in nature or use small convenience samples of medical staff. Additionally, in very few studies moderators are either used or assessed despite their importance in TAM based research. The present study focuses on the application of TAM in order to explain the intention to use clinical information systems, in a random sample of 604 medical staff (534 physicians) working in 14 hospitals in Greece. We introduce physicians' specialty as a moderator in TAM and test medical staff's information and communication technology (ICT) knowledge and ICT feature demands, as external variables. The results show that TAM predicts a substantial proportion of the intention to use clinical information systems. Findings make a contribution to the literature by replicating, explaining and advancing the TAM, whereas theory is benefited by the addition of external variables and medical specialty as a moderator. Recommendations for further research are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Complex Surface Concentration Gradients by Stenciled "Electro Click Chemistry"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Steen; Lind, Johan Ulrik; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    2010-01-01

    Complex one- or two-dimensional concentration gradients of alkynated molecules are produced on azidized conducting polymer substrates by stenciled "electro click chemistry". The latter describes the local electrochemical generation of catalytically active Cu(I) required to complete a "click...... reaction" between alkynes and azides at room temperature. A stencil on the counter electrode defines the shape and multiplicity of the gradient(s) on the conducting polymer substrate, while the specific reaction conditions control gradient steepness and the maximum concentration deposited. Biologically...

  17. Improving Web Page Retrieval using Search Context from Clicked Domain Names

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, R.

    Search context is a crucial factor that helps to understand a user’s information need in ad-hoc Web page retrieval. A query log of a search engine contains rich information on issued queries and their corresponding clicked Web pages. The clicked data implies its relevance to the query and can be

  18. Synthesis of hydrogel via click chemistry for DNA electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Chiara; Sola, Laura; Elliott, Jim; Chiari, Marcella

    2017-09-01

    This work introduces a novel sieving gel for DNA electrophoresis using a classical click chemistry reaction, the copper (I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), to cross-link functional polymer chains. The efficiency of this reaction provides, under mild conditions, hydrogels with near-ideal network connectivity and improved physical properties. Hydrogel formation via click chemistry condensation of functional polymers does not involve the use of toxic monomers and UV initiation. The performance of the new hydrogel in the separation of double stranded DNA fragments was evaluated in the 2200 TapeStation system, an analytical platform, recently introduced by Agilent that combines the advantages of CE in terms of miniaturization and automation with the simplicity of use of slab gel electrophoresis. The click gel enables addition of florescent dyes prior to electrophoresis with considerable improvement of resolution and separation efficiency over conventional cross-linked polyacrylamide gels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Deteção de anomalias em modelos de publicidade Pay-Per-Click

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Eduardo Luís da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Engenharia Informática Nowadays, online advertisement is one of the most effective and profitable marketing strategies. An example of strong growth in online advertisement is the Pay-Per-Click Advertising Model where all parties are benefited. Due to the number of stakeholders and the amount of money involved, it is inevitable to find efficient methods to analyse the validity of clicks on online advertising, specifically in Pay-Per-Click. The co...

  20. Level of confidence in venepuncture and knowledge in determining causes of blood sample haemolysis among clinical staff and phlebotomists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhumula-Nkhoma, Nellie; Whittaker, Vicki; McSherry, Robert

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the association between confidence level in venepuncture and knowledge in determining causes of blood sample haemolysis among clinical staff and phlebotomists. Various collection methods are used to perform venepuncture, also called phlebotomy, the act of drawing blood from a patient using a needle. The collection method used has an impact on preanalytical blood sample haemolysis. Haemolysis is the breakdown of red blood cells, which makes the sample unsuitable. Despite available evidence on the common causes, extensive literature search showed a lack of published evidence on the association of haemolysis with staff confidence and knowledge. A quantitative primary research design using survey method. A purposive sample of 290 clinical staff and phlebotomists conducting venepuncture in one North England hospital participated in this quantitative survey. A three-section web-based questionnaire comprising demographic profile, confidence and competence levels, and knowledge sections was used to collect data in 2012. The chi-squared test for independence was used to compare the distribution of responses for categorical data. anova was used to determine mean difference in the knowledge scores of staff with different confidence levels. Almost 25% clinical staff and phlebotomists participated in the survey. There was an increase in confidence at the last venepuncture among staff of all categories. While doctors' scores were higher compared with healthcare assistants', p ≤ 0·001, nurses' were of wide range and lowest. There was no statistically significant difference (at the 5% level) in the total knowledge scores and confidence level at the last venepuncture F(2,4·690) = 1·67, p = 0·31 among staff of all categories. Evidence-based measures are required to boost staff knowledge base of preanalytical blood sample haemolysis for standardised and quality service. Monitoring and evaluation of the training, conducting and monitoring haemolysis rate are

  1. Are occlusal characteristics, headache, parafunctional habits and clicking sounds associated with the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriti, Leandro; Motta, Lara Jansiski; Silva, Paula Fernanda da Costa; Leal de Godoy, Camila Haddad; Alfaya, Thays Almeida; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] To assess the association between the oclusal characteristics, headache, parafunctional habits and clicking sounds and signs/symptoms of TMD in adolescents. [Subjects] Adolescents between 14 and 18 years of age. [Methods] The participants were evaluated using the Helkimo Index and a clinical examination to track clicking sounds, parafunctional habits and other signs/symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Subjects were classified according to the presence or absence of headache, type of occlusion, facial pattern and type of bite. In statistical analyse we used the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test, with a level of significance of 5%. [Results] The sample was made up of 81 adolescents with a mean age of 15.64 years; 51.9% were male. The prevalence of signals/symptoms of TMD was 74.1%, predominantly affecting females. Signals/symptoms of TMD were significantly associated with clicking sounds, headache and nail biting. No associations were found between signals/symptoms of TMD and angle classification, type of bite and facial pattern. [Conclusion] Headache is one of the most closely associated symptoms of TMD. Clicking sounds were found in the majority of cases. Therefore, the sum of two or more factors may be necessary for the onset and perpetuation of TMD.

  2. Conductive Polymer Functionalization by Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hvilsted, Søren; Hansen, Thomas Steen

    2008-01-01

    Click chemistry is used to obtain new conductive polymer films based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) from a new azide functional monomer. Postpolymerization, 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions in DMF, using a catalyst system of CUS04 and sodium ascorbate, and different alkynes are performed...

  3. Temporal suppression of long-latency click-evoked otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhulst, Sarah; Harte, James; Dau, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive set of results from double click suppression experiments on otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) have been presented by Hine and Thornton (2002) and Kapadia and Lutman (2000). They found that suppression of a click-evoked otoacoustic emission (CEOAE) varied with the timing and level...... subjects showed that the nonlinear suppression effect remained on the long-latency CEOAE, indicating that both SOAEs and CEOAEs originate from the same cochlear nonlinearities, as earlier suggested by Kemp and Chum (1980). The apparent similar origin of both types of emissions implies that the same...

  4. Attitudes of Staff Nurse Preceptors Related to the Education of Nurses with Learning Disabilities in Clinical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine Marie

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation presents a quantitative study of the attitudes of staff nurse preceptors toward nursing students with learning disabilities. There are an increased number of nursing students with learning disabilities. These students may have additional challenges in clinical settings, particularly if clinical settings do not understand or…

  5. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions in children and adolescents with gender identity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, Sarah M; Menks, Willeke M; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Klink, Daniel T; Bakker, J.

    2014-01-01

    Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are echo-like sounds that are produced by the inner ear in response to click-stimuli. CEOAEs generally have a higher amplitude in women compared to men and neonates already show a similar sex difference in CEOAEs. Weaker responses in males are proposed to

  7. Click-Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions in Children and Adolescents with Gender Identity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, S.M.; Menks, W.M.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; Klink, D.T.; Bakker, J.

    2014-01-01

    Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are echo-like sounds that are produced by the inner ear in response to click-stimuli. CEOAEs generally have a higher amplitude in women compared to men and neonates already show a similar sex difference in CEOAEs. Weaker responses in males are proposed to

  8. Service quality and perceived value of technology-based service encounters: evaluation of clinical staff satisfaction in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chung-Jye; Chang, Hsin Hsin; Eng, Cheng Joo; Wong, Kit Hong

    Previous research has evaluated technology-based service encounters (TBSEs) in the delivery of health care by assessing patient satisfaction. This study examined service quality and perceived value of TBSEs used in health organisations from the perspective of clinical staff, with staff technology readiness as a moderator. A quantitative survey was conducted in Taiwan, across private and public healthcare organisations. Results showed that TBSEs had a direct effect on service quality and perceived value, which in turn had a direct effect on staff satisfaction in using TBSEs. However, service quality had no effect on perceived value when moderated by technology readiness. Theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Implementation and Evaluation of a Pilot Training to Improve Transgender Competency Among Medical Staff in an Urban Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina; Pollard-Thomas, Paula; Pagano, William; Levitt, Nathan; Lopez, Evelyn I; Golub, Sarit A; Radix, Asa E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Transgender individuals (TGI), who identify their gender as different from their sex assigned at birth, continue facing widespread discrimination and mistreatment within the healthcare system. Providers often lack expertise in adequate transgender (TG) care due to limited specialized training. In response to these inadequacies, and to increase evidence-based interventions effecting TG-affirmative healthcare, we implemented and evaluated a structural-level intervention in the form of a comprehensive Provider Training Program (PTP) in TG health within a New York City-based outpatient clinic serving primarily individuals of color and of low socioeconomic status. This pilot intervention aimed to increase medical staff knowledge of TG health and needs, and to support positive attitudes toward TGI. Methods: Three 2-h training sessions were delivered to 35 clinic staff across 4 months by two of the authors experienced in TG competency training; the training sessions included TG-related identity and barriers to healthcare issues, TG-specialized care, and creating TG-affirmative environments, medical forms, and billing procedures. We evaluated changes through pre-post intervention surveys by trainees. Results: Compared to pre-training scores, post-training scores indicated significant (1) decreases in negative attitudes toward TGI and increases in TG-related clinical skills, (2) increases in staff's awareness of transphobic practices, and (3) increases in self-reported readiness to serve TGI. The clinic increased its representation of general LGBT-related images in the waiting areas, and the staff provided highly positive training evaluations. Conclusion: This PTP in TG health shows promise in leading to changes in provider attitudes and competence, as well as clinic systems, especially with its incorporation in continuing education endeavors, which can, in turn, contribute to health disparities reductions among TG groups.

  10. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Staff and students' perceptions and experiences of teaching and assessment in Clinical Skills Laboratories: interview findings from a multiple case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Catherine E; Casey, Dympna; Shaw, David; Murphy, Kathy

    2012-08-01

    The Clinical Skills Laboratory has become an essential structure in nurse education and several benefits of its use have been identified. However, the literature identifies the need to examine the transferability of skills learned there into the reality of practice. This research explored the role of the Clinical Skills Laboratory in preparing nursing students for the real world of practice. This paper focuses specifically on the perceptions of the teaching and assessment strategies employed there. Qualitative multiple case study design. Five case study sites. Interviewees (n=58) included academic staff, clinical staff and nursing students. Semi-structured interviews. The Clinical Skills Laboratory can provide a pathway to practice and its authenticity is significant. Teaching strategies need to incorporate communication as well as psychomotor skills. Including audio-visual recording into assessment strategies is beneficial. Effective relationships between education institutions and clinical settings are needed to enhance the transferability of the skills learned. The Clinical Skills Laboratory should provide an authentic learning environment, with the appropriate use of teaching strategies. It is crucial that effective links between educators and clinical staff are established and maintained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinic Workload, the Quality of Staff Relationships and Diabetes Management in Community Health Centers Catering to Latino and Chinese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Bustamante, Arturo; Martinez, Ana; Chen, Xiao; Rodriguez, Hector P

    2017-06-01

    We examine whether workplace climate-quality of staff relationships (QSR) and manageable clinic workload (MCW) are related to better patient care experiences and diabetes care in community health centers (CHCs) catering to Latino and Chinese patients. Patient experience surveys of adult patients with type 2 diabetes and workplace climate surveys of clinicians and staff from CHCs were included in an analytic sample. Comparisons of means analyses examine patient and provider characteristics. The associations of QSR, MCW and the diabetes care management were examined using regression analyses. Diabetes care process were more consistently provided in CHCs with high quality staff relations and more manageable clinic workload, but HbA1c, LDL cholesterol, and blood pressure outcomes were no different between clinics with high vs. low QSR and MCW. Focusing efforts on improvements in practice climate may lead to more consistent provision of important processes of diabetes care for these patients.

  13. Click It or Ticket evaluation : 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Click It or Ticket (CIOT) mobilizations are intense, short-duration, widely publicized enforcement efforts used to improve seat belt use. Annual national mobilizations have been conducted in May every year since 2003. National and State expenditures ...

  14. VeriClick: an efficient tool for table format verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, George; Tamhankar, Mangesh

    2012-01-01

    The essential layout attributes of a visual table can be defined by the location of four critical grid cells. Although these critical cells can often be located by automated analysis, some means of human interaction is necessary for correcting residual errors. VeriClick is a macro-enabled spreadsheet interface that provides ground-truthing, confirmation, correction, and verification functions for CSV tables. All user actions are logged. Experimental results of seven subjects on one hundred tables suggest that VeriClick can provide a ten- to twenty-fold speedup over performing the same functions with standard spreadsheet editing commands.

  15. Deep Multimodal Distance Metric Learning Using Click Constraints for Image Ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Yang, Xiaokang; Gao, Fei; Tao, Dacheng

    2017-12-01

    How do we retrieve images accurately? Also, how do we rank a group of images precisely and efficiently for specific queries? These problems are critical for researchers and engineers to generate a novel image searching engine. First, it is important to obtain an appropriate description that effectively represent the images. In this paper, multimodal features are considered for describing images. The images unique properties are reflected by visual features, which are correlated to each other. However, semantic gaps always exist between images visual features and semantics. Therefore, we utilize click feature to reduce the semantic gap. The second key issue is learning an appropriate distance metric to combine these multimodal features. This paper develops a novel deep multimodal distance metric learning (Deep-MDML) method. A structured ranking model is adopted to utilize both visual and click features in distance metric learning (DML). Specifically, images and their related ranking results are first collected to form the training set. Multimodal features, including click and visual features, are collected with these images. Next, a group of autoencoders is applied to obtain initially a distance metric in different visual spaces, and an MDML method is used to assign optimal weights for different modalities. Next, we conduct alternating optimization to train the ranking model, which is used for the ranking of new queries with click features. Compared with existing image ranking methods, the proposed method adopts a new ranking model to use multimodal features, including click features and visual features in DML. We operated experiments to analyze the proposed Deep-MDML in two benchmark data sets, and the results validate the effects of the method.

  16. Developing students' time management skills in clinical settings: practical considerations for busy nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan

    2011-06-01

    In clinical settings, nursing staff often find themselves responsible for students who have varying time management skills. Nurses need to respond sensitively and appropriately, and to teach nursing students how to prioritize and better allocate time. This is important not only for developing students' clinical skills but also for shaping their perceptions about the quality of the placement and their willingness to consider it as a potential work specialty. In this column, some simple, practical strategies that nurses can use to assist students with improving their time management skills are identified. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. 76 FR 12742 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Clinical Investigations of Devices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2008-D-0457] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Clinical Investigations of Devices Indicated... other electrical continence devices; protective garment for incontinence; surgical mesh; electrosurgical...

  18. Effect of Broadband Nature of Marine Mammal Echolocation Clicks on Click-Based Population Density Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing...will be applied also to other species such as sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) (whose high source level assures long range detection and amplifies...improve the accuracy of marine mammal density estimation based on counting echolocation clicks, and will be applicable to density estimates obtained

  19. Click Chemistry for the Synthesis of RGD-Containing Integrin Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Colombo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years click chemistry reactions, and in particular coppercatalyzed cycloadditions, have been used intensively for the preparation of new bioconjugate molecules and materials applicable to biomedical and pharmaceutical areas. This review will be focused on conjugates of the tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp formed by means of click chemistry reactions. This sequence is a well known binding motif for specific transmembrane proteins and is involved in cellular adhesion to the extracellular matrix, allowing the selective recognition of the biomolecule or polymer in which it is incorporated.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Click Chemistry Mediated Activity-Based Protein Profiling in Cell Lysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinliang Yang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Activity-based protein profiling uses chemical probes that covalently attach to active enzyme targets. Probes with conventional tags have disadvantages, such as limited cell permeability or steric hindrance around the reactive group. A tandem labeling strategy with click chemistry is now widely used to study enzyme targets in situ and in vivo. Herein, the probes are reacted in live cells, whereas the ensuing detection by click chemistry takes place in cell lysates. We here make a comparison of the efficiency of the activity-based tandem labeling strategy by using Cu(I-catalyzed and strain-promoted click chemistry, different ligands and different lysis conditions.

  1. Directionality of sperm whale sonar clicks and its relation to piston radiation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm, K.; Møhl, Bertel

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the applicability to sperm whales of the theory of sound radiating from a piston. The theory is applied to a physical model and to a series of sperm whale clicks. Results show that wave forms of off-axis signals can be reproduced by convolving an on-axis signal...... with the spatial impulse response of a piston. The angle of a recorded click can be estimated as the angle producing the spatial impulse response that gives the best match with the observation when convolved with the on-axis wave form. It is concluded that piston theory applies to sperm whale sonar click emission....

  2. Click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels: emerging platforms for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjiao; Chen, Jing; Deng, Chao; Suuronen, Erik J; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have emerged as versatile and viable platforms for sustained protein release, targeted drug delivery, and tissue engineering due to excellent biocompatibility, a microporous structure with tunable porosity and pore size, and dimensions spanning from human organs, cells to viruses. In the past decade, remarkable advances in hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have been achieved with click chemistry. It is a most promising strategy to prepare gels with varying dimensions owing to its high reactivity, superb selectivity, and mild reaction conditions. In particular, the recent development of copper-free click chemistry such as strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, radical mediated thiol-ene chemistry, Diels-Alder reaction, tetrazole-alkene photo-click chemistry, and oxime reaction renders it possible to form hydrogels, microgels and nanogels without the use of potentially toxic catalysts or immunogenic enzymes that are commonly required. Notably, unlike other chemical approaches, click chemistry owing to its unique bioorthogonal feature does not interfere with encapsulated bioactives such as living cells, proteins and drugs and furthermore allows versatile preparation of micropatterned biomimetic hydrogels, functional microgels and nanogels. In this review, recent exciting developments in click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels, as well as their biomedical applications such as controlled protein and drug release, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiologic and Clinical Characteristics of Migraine and Tension-Type Headaches among Hospitals Staffs of Shiraz (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayatollahi Seyyed Mohammad Taghi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Headache is a common symptom that constitutes a major health problem to all countries in the world. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of migraine and tension -type headaches(TTH, its associated occupational risk factors among Shiraz hospitals staffs, and to report on clinical characteristics of migraine and TTH with using the International Headache Society (IHS diagnosis criteria. A random sample of 1023 staffs constituting a 20% sample of the hospitals staff population was selected. Sampling method was categorical random sampling. Within each group sampling was carried out systematically. Data were collected by screening questionnaire followed by clinical interviews, general physical and neurological examination, and diagnostic criteria of IHS. Prevalence of migraine, TTH and coexisting migraine and TTH were estimated as 11.2% (115 cases, 19.5% (199 subjects and 3.2% (33 subjects respectively. In this study , clinical characteristics of headache including type, site, number , intensity ,concomitant symptom of headaches had been surveyed. TTH and migraine headaches were significantly associated with self reported abnormal sleep pattern and female gender (P < 0.001. Also TTH was negatively associated with total 24hr duration of sleep and history of involvement in second job significantly (P<0.026. The average of prevalence of migraine and TTH were lower than their counter parts in western countries but higher than previous studies conducted in other Asian countries. Clinical characteristics were almost parallel with IHS criteria, headache- related missed work rates were higher for subjects with migraine headache, and also TTH and migraine were separate disorders and were not as a part of a continuum of headache disorders. Headache disorders deserve more attention, especially concerning strategies leading to adequate primary prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Addressing demoralization in clinical staff: a true test of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Stewart

    2011-11-01

    Demoralization is a state that occurs when an individual's personal or professional goals, principles, or values are threatened. Psychiatrists working in mental healthcare organizations may experience demoralization for numerous reasons, including diminished funding for valued programs, personnel reductions, and administrative burdens hindering patient care. Demoralization places psychiatrists and other mental health professionals at increased risk for burnout, and its associated problems related to physical and mental difficulties, poor patient care, and staff losses and turnover. Demoralization, therefore, presents an important challenge to medical and clinical leaders who must address this issue to maintain the organizational commitment to optimal patient-centered care. This can be done using sound and accepted leadership principles coupled with a values orientation. The paper provides an illustration.

  5. The experiences of English as second language radiation therapy students in the undergraduate clinical program: Perceptions of staff and students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolderston, Amanda [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Room 5-969, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)], E-mail: amanda.bolderston@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Palmer, Cathryne; Flanagan, Wendy; McParland, Neil [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Room 5-969, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2008-08-15

    Introduction: This qualitative study explores the experiences of undergraduate radiation therapy students who have English as a second language (ESL) in the clinical environment, as well as the experiences of staff members who teach these students. Specific study aims were to increase understanding of the issues faced by this subset of students, including identifying potential barriers to clinical learning. Methods and design: A qualitative methodology was utilized with focus groups as the data collection tool to gain insights from students/recent graduates whose primary language was not English, as well as from staff members who educate this group of students in the clinical environment. Two focus groups were conducted; Group 1 (n = 6) consisted of ESL graduates/students and Group 2 (n = 5) consisted of radiation therapy staff members and clinical coordinators who are actively involved in the education of ESL students. Comparative data analysis of the transcribed discussions was carried out using content analysis and categorized according to the emergent themes. Results: Three overarching themes were identified for both groups, 'Communication', 'Differences' and 'Dealing with it...' The primary barrier for ESL students was seen as proficiency in English, which manifested in a number of ways. This resulted in a lack of confidence and a subsequent sense of alienation. External challenges identified were unfamiliarity with Canadian systems and cultural differences. Support strategies identified included the use of mentorship, professional development and external support for teaching staff and journaling, among others. Conclusions: There are identified challenges for ESL students in the clinical environment, thus it is important to provide support for this population to improve learning outcomes. Recommendations for practice, arising from the study as well as the available literature included: allowing extra time, assisting with

  6. The experiences of English as second language radiation therapy students in the undergraduate clinical program: Perceptions of staff and students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolderston, Amanda; Palmer, Cathryne; Flanagan, Wendy; McParland, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This qualitative study explores the experiences of undergraduate radiation therapy students who have English as a second language (ESL) in the clinical environment, as well as the experiences of staff members who teach these students. Specific study aims were to increase understanding of the issues faced by this subset of students, including identifying potential barriers to clinical learning. Methods and design: A qualitative methodology was utilized with focus groups as the data collection tool to gain insights from students/recent graduates whose primary language was not English, as well as from staff members who educate this group of students in the clinical environment. Two focus groups were conducted; Group 1 (n = 6) consisted of ESL graduates/students and Group 2 (n = 5) consisted of radiation therapy staff members and clinical coordinators who are actively involved in the education of ESL students. Comparative data analysis of the transcribed discussions was carried out using content analysis and categorized according to the emergent themes. Results: Three overarching themes were identified for both groups, 'Communication', 'Differences' and 'Dealing with it...' The primary barrier for ESL students was seen as proficiency in English, which manifested in a number of ways. This resulted in a lack of confidence and a subsequent sense of alienation. External challenges identified were unfamiliarity with Canadian systems and cultural differences. Support strategies identified included the use of mentorship, professional development and external support for teaching staff and journaling, among others. Conclusions: There are identified challenges for ESL students in the clinical environment, thus it is important to provide support for this population to improve learning outcomes. Recommendations for practice, arising from the study as well as the available literature included: allowing extra time, assisting with improving English proficiency

  7. Flexible Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting from Mouse Click Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsu Cha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study energy harvesting from the mouse click motions of a robot finger and a human index finger using a piezoelectric material. The feasibility of energy harvesting from mouse click motions is experimentally and theoretically assessed. The fingers wear a glove with a pocket for including the piezoelectric material. We model the energy harvesting system through the inverse kinematic framework of parallel joints in a finger and the electromechanical coupling equations of the piezoelectric material. The model is validated through energy harvesting experiments in the robot and human fingers with the systematically varying load resistance. We find that energy harvesting is maximized at the matched load resistance to the impedance of the piezoelectric material, and the harvested energy level is tens of nJ.

  8. Integrating Click-Through and Eye-Tracking Logs for Decision-Making Process Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan PETRUSEL

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In current software every click of the users is logged, therefore a wealth of click-through information exists. Besides, recent technologies have made eye-tracking affordable and an alternative to other human-computer interaction means (e.g. mouse, touchscreens. A big challenge is to make sense of all this data and convert it into useful information. This paper introduces a possible solution placed in the context of decision-making processes. We show how the decision maker's activity can be traced using two means: mouse tracing (i.e. clicks and eye-tracking (i.e. eye fixations. Then, we discuss a mining approach, based on the log, which extracts a Decision Data Model (DDM. We use the DDM to determine, post-hoc, which decision strategy was employed. The paper concludes with a validation based on a controlled experiment.

  9. Synthesis of New 3-(2-Chloroquinolin-3-yl)-5-Phenylisoxazole Derivatives via Click-Chemistry Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Galleguillos, Carlos; Saavedra, Luis A.; Gutierrez, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of new substituted 3-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl)-5-phenylisoxazole (3a-j) by click chemistry in good to moderate yields. This approach is based on the regioselective copper(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition between different nitrile oxides derived from 2-chloroquinoline- 3-carbaldehyde (2a-j) and phenylacetylene. Finally these derivatives were screened for their antibacterial evaluation in vitro against three Gram-negative clinical bacteria: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii using standard methods. (author)

  10. Synthesis of New 3-(2-Chloroquinolin-3-yl)-5-Phenylisoxazole Derivatives via Click-Chemistry Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Galleguillos, Carlos; Saavedra, Luis A.; Gutierrez, Margarita [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica, Instituto de Quimica de Recursos Naturales, Universidad de Talca (Chile)

    2014-02-15

    Herein, we report the synthesis of new substituted 3-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl)-5-phenylisoxazole (3a-j) by click chemistry in good to moderate yields. This approach is based on the regioselective copper(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition between different nitrile oxides derived from 2-chloroquinoline- 3-carbaldehyde (2a-j) and phenylacetylene. Finally these derivatives were screened for their antibacterial evaluation in vitro against three Gram-negative clinical bacteria: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii using standard methods. (author)

  11. Implications of staff 'churn' for nurse managers, staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Roche, Michael; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Catling-Paull, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the term "churn" is used not only because of the degree of change to staffing, but also because some of the reasons for staff movement are not classified as voluntary turnover. The difficulties for the nurse managing a unit with the degree of "churn" should not be under-estimated. Changes to skill mix and the proportions of full-time, agency, and temporary staff present challenges in providing clinical leadership, scheduling staff, performance management, and supervision. Perhaps more importantly, it is likely that there is an impact on the continuity of care provided in the absence of continuity of staffing. A greater understanding of the human and financial costs and consequences, and a willingness to change established practices at the institutional and ward level, are needed.

  12. A diabetes management mentor program: outcomes of a clinical nurse specialist initiative to empower staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modic, Mary Beth; Canfield, Christina; Kaser, Nancy; Sauvey, Rebecca; Kukla, Aniko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to enhance the knowledge of the bedside nurse in diabetes management. A forum for ongoing support and exploration of clinical problems, along with the distribution of educational tools were the components of this program. Diabetes accounts for 30% of patients admitted to the hospital. It has become more challenging to manage as the treatment choices have increased. There are a number of researchers who have identified nurse and physician knowledge of diabetes management principles as suboptimal. DESCRIPTION OF THE INNOVATION: Staff nurses are educated for a role as a Diabetes Management Mentor and are expected to educate/dialogue with peers monthly, model advocacy and diabetes patient education skills, facilitate referrals for diabetes education, and direct staff to resources for diabetes management. Diabetes Management Mentors feel more confident in their knowledge of diabetes and their ability to resolve clinical issues as they arise. The Diabetes Management Mentor role is another avenue for nurses to refine their clinical knowledge base and acquire skills to share with colleagues while remaining at the bedside. The clinical nurse specialist is expertly prepared to foster the professional development of bedside nurses while simultaneously making a positive impact on disease management. Opportunity for future investigation includes efficacy of teaching tools on diabetes mastery, the effect of clinical nurse specialist mentoring on a select group of bedside nurses, and the Diabetes Management Mentor's impact on prevention of near-miss events.

  13. Factors to consider in the introduction of huddles on clinical wards: perceptions of staff on the SAFE programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapley, Emily; Sharples, Evelyn; Lachman, Peter; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Wolpert, Miranda; Deighton, Jessica

    2018-02-01

    To explore paediatric hospital staff members' perceptions of the emerging benefits and challenges of the huddle, a new safety improvement initiative, as well as the barriers and facilitators to its implementation. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews to explore staff perspectives and experiences. Situation Awareness For Everyone (SAFE), a safety improvement programme, was implemented on a sample of National Health Service (NHS) paediatric wards from September 2014 to June 2016. Previously untested in England, the huddle was a central component of the programme. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 76 staff members on four wards ~4 months after the start of the programme. A thematic analysis showed that staff perceived the huddle as helping to increase their awareness of important issues, improve communication, facilitate teamwork, and encourage a culture of increased efficiency, anticipation and planning on the ward. Challenges of the huddle included added pressure on staff time and workload, and the potential for junior nurses to be excluded from involvement, thus perhaps inadvertently reinforcing medical hierarchies. Staff also identified several barriers and facilitators to the huddle process, including the importance of senior nursing and medical staff leadership and managing staff time and capacity issues. The findings point towards the potential efficacy of the huddle as a way of improving hospital staff members' working environments and clinical practice, with important implications for other sites seeking to implement such safety improvement initiatives. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Mental strain among staff at medical rehabilitation clinics in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Mirjam

    2011-01-20

    The aim of the study is to compare the frequency of mental strain effects on employees in somatic and psychosomatic rehabilitation clinics as well as between the different occupational groups. Associations between mental strain effects and working conditions, cooperation in the team and employee satisfaction are also investigated. The present study is cross-sectional with a descriptive-explorative design. It is composed of a survey with standardized questionnaires (Human Service Workload, Questionnaire on Teamwork and Questionnaire on Staff Satisfaction in Medical Rehabilitation) and global items, and was conducted among all employees of twelve rehabilitation teams (five somatic and seven psychosomatic rehabilitation clinics (n=549)). The response rate of the survey averaged 45% (n=252). One in four participants reported being emotionally exhausted. There were significantly more emotionally exhausted employees working in the psychosomatic (31%) than in the somatic rehabilitation clinics (16%) (X(2)=7.403, df=1, pemployee satisfaction (r=-.38 to r=-.50, pintrinsic motivation, dissatisfaction). The results clearly show that the employees in medical rehabilitation clinics have a high stress level at work, a situation which is also known in other health care organizations. Observations of strong associations between cooperation in the team and strain effects confirm the positive impact of social support in the daily work routine. Correlation between the subjective appraisal of working conditions and the impact of strain is mostly high. It can be assumed that the strain effects can be influenced positively with supportive team and human resource development (person-related interventions) and interventions that enhance working conditions (condition-related interventions).

  15. Electronic health record innovations: Helping physicians - One less click at a time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Uta; Chen, Lu; Mehta, Parag H

    2017-09-01

    Physician burnout is becoming an epidemic, due to the pressures of being productive, an imperfect electronic health record (EHR) system, and limited face-to-face time with patients. Poor usability in EHR-user interface can force users to go through more steps (i.e. more clicks on the computer) in accomplishing a task. This increased 'click burden' is a source of frustration for physicians. In the light of increased click burden and time due to meaningful use requirements, there is a need to improve the physician's experience by creating innovations in EHR. This case study describes an attempt by physicians at NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital to enhance the EHR experience with more efficient methods of documentation, chart review, ordering and patient safety. The EHR innovations trialled in this study were: a mobile documentation application; abnormal test results auto-populated into an EHR patient summary; physician alerts to reduce inappropriate test ordering; and a system of safety alerts on a dashboard. These innovations led to decreased click burden and allowed physicians to spend less time on the computer and more time with patients. Physician-driven changes to EHR systems have the potential to streamline virtual workflows and the management of health information and to improve patient safety, reduce physician burnout and increase physician job satisfaction.

  16. Modification of chemical and conformational properties of natural organic matter by click chemistry as revealed by ESI-Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    A click reaction is reported here for the first time as a useful technique to control the conformational stability of natural organic matter (NOM) suprastructures. Click conjugates were successfully formed between a previously butynylated NOM hydrophobic fraction and a hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG)-amino chain. The click products were shown by size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) hyphenated with Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) in electrospray ionization (ESI) (+), while precursors were visible in ESI (-). Despite their increase in molecular weight, HPSEC elution of click conjugates occurred after that of precursors, thus showing their departure from the NOM supramolecular association. This indicates that the click-conjugated NOM molecules were varied in their hydrophilic and cationic character and lost the capacity to accommodate in the original hydrophobic suprastructures. The most abundant product had the C16H30O5N4 formula, a click conjugate of butanoic acid, while other products were short-chained (C4-C8) linear unsaturated and hydroxylated carboxylic acids. Tandem MS revealed formation of triazole rings in clicked conjugates and their two fragmentations at the ester and the C-N alkyl-aryl bonds. The behavior of NOM molecules modified by click chemistry confirms that hydrophobicity and ionic charge of humic molecules play a pivotal role in stabilizing intermolecular forces in NOM. Moreover, the versatility of the click reaction may become useful to decorate NOM molecules with a variety of substrates, in order to alter NOM conformational and chemical properties and diversify its applications in the environment.

  17. The evidence-based practice profiles of academic and clinical staff involved in pre-registration nursing students' education: a cross sectional survey of US and UK staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Penney; Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Williamson, Kathleen; Rouse, Joanne; Upton, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Competency in evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement for graduate nurses. Despite a growing body of research exploring the EBP profiles of students, little research has explored the EBP profiles of nurse educators. To explore: the differences/similarities in the EBP profiles of US and UK clinical and academic faculty; the barriers nurse educators experience when teaching EBP; the impact of postgraduate education on EBP profile and; what nurse educators perceive "success" in implementing and teaching EBP to be. A cross-sectional online survey design was employed. Two Universities delivering undergraduate nursing education in the US and UK, in partnership with large hospital systems, small community hospitals, community settings, and independent sector health organisations. Eighty-one nurse educators working in academic and clinical contexts in the US and UK (US academic=12, US clinical=17, UK academic=9, UK clinical=43) were recruited opportunistically. Participants were emailed a weblink to an online survey, comprising demographic questions, the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire and open-ended questions about EBP barriers, facilitators and successes. Quantitative results indicated that academic faculty scored significantly higher on knowledge and skills of EBP, than clinical faculty, but revealed no other significant differences on EBP use or attitudes, or between US and UK professionals. Participants with postgraduate training scored significantly higher on EBP knowledge/skills, but not EBP attitudes or use. Qualitative findings identified key themes relating to EBP barriers and facilitators, including: Evidence-, organisational-, and teaching-related issues. Perceptions of successes in EBP were also described. Nurse educators working in the UK and US face similar EBP barriers to teaching and implementation, but view it positively and use it frequently. Clinical staff may require extra support to maintain their EBP knowledge and skills in

  18. Estimating Ads’ Click through Rate with Recurrent Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the Internet, online advertising spreads across every corner of the world, the ads' click through rate (CTR estimation is an important method to improve the online advertising revenue. Compared with the linear model, the nonlinear models can study much more complex relationships between a large number of nonlinear characteristics, so as to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the ads’ CTR. The recurrent neural network (RNN based on Long-Short Term Memory (LSTM is an improved model of the feedback neural network with ring structure. The model overcomes the problem of the gradient of the general RNN. Experiments show that the RNN based on LSTM exceeds the linear models, and it can effectively improve the estimation effect of the ads’ click through rate.

  19. Barriers to the use of the library service amongst clinical staff in an acute hospital setting: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gaynor; Preston, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on research into the reasons why clinical staff in an acute hospital may be reluctant to use library services. The research was conducted by Gaynor Thomas at the Prince Philip Hospital in Llanelli in Wales as part of the dissertation she completed for an MSc in Economics. She graduated in July 2014 from Aberystwyth University and has co-written the article with Hugh Preston, her dissertation supervisor. The article summarises the key findings from the interviews undertaken as part of the research process and lists the resulting recommendations. Gaynor also highlights the initiatives which have been put in place with the express aim of removing barriers to use and encouraging clinical staff to make the most of the library which is, she argues, a time-saving resource. AM. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  20. Specific Labeling of Zinc Finger Proteins using Non-canonical Amino Acids and Copper-free Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sung Hoon; Ferracane, Dean; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) play a key role in transcriptional regulation and serve as invaluable tools for gene modification and genetic engineering. Development of efficient strategies for labeling metalloproteins such as ZFPs is essential for understanding and controlling biological processes. In this work, we engineered ZFPs containing cysteine-histidine (Cys2-His2) motifs by metabolic incorporation of the unnatural amino acid azidohomoalanine (AHA), followed by specific protein labeling via click chemistry. We show that cyclooctyne promoted [3 + 2] dipolar cycloaddition with azides, known as copper-free click chemistry, provides rapid and specific labeling of ZFPs at high yields as determined by mass spectrometry analysis. We observe that the DNA-binding activity of ZFPs labeled by conventional copper-mediated click chemistry was completely abolished, whereas ZFPs labeled by copper-free click chemistry retain their sequence-specific DNA-binding activity under native conditions, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, protein microarrays and kinetic binding assays based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Our work provides a general framework to label metalloproteins such as ZFPs by metabolic incorporation of unnatural amino acids followed by copper-free click chemistry. PMID:22871171

  1. Use of personal phones by senior nursing students to access health care information during clinical education: staff nurses' and students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann-Price, Ruth A; Kennedy, Lynn D; Godwin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Research indicates that having electronic resources readily available increases learners' ability to make clinical decisions and confidence in patient care. This mixed-method, descriptive pilot study collected data about senior prelicensure nursing students using smartphones, a type of mobile electronic device (MED), in the clinical area. The smartphones contained nursing diagnosis, pharmacology, and laboratory information; an encyclopedia; and the MEDLINE database. Student (n = 7) data about smartphone use during a 10-week clinical rotation were collected via student-recorded usage logs and focus group recordings. Staff nurses' (n = 5) perceptions of students' use of smartphones for clinical educational resources were collected by anonymous survey. Both the focus group transcript and staff surveys were evaluated and the themes summarized by content analysis. Positive results and barriers to use, such as cost and technological comfort levels, are discussed. The results may help nurse educators and administrators initiate further research of MEDs as a clinical resource. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. 42 CFR 416.45 - Condition for coverage-Medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition for coverage-Medical staff. 416.45....45 Condition for coverage—Medical staff. The medical staff of the ASC must be accountable to the governing body. (a) Standard: Membership and clinical privileges. Members of the medical staff must be...

  3. Unsupervised Learning (Clustering) of Odontocete Echolocation Clicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    develop methods for clustering of marine mammal echolocation clicks to learn about species assemblages where little or no prior knowledge exists about... Mexico or the Atlanic. 2 APPROACH Acoustic encounters with odontocetes are detected automatically and noise-corrected cepstral features...Estmation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustic Monitoring (DCLDE). KL divergence maps were created for all known species, but the sperm whale

  4. Click chemistry based biomolecular conjugation monitoring using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palla, Mirko; Kumar, Shiv; Li, Zengmin

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a novel surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based technique for monitoring the conjugation of small molecules by the well-known click reaction between an alkyne and azido moiety on the partner molecules. The monitoring principle is based on the loss of the characteristic...... alkyne/azide Raman signal with triazole formation in the reaction as a function of time. Since these universal Raman reporter groups are specific for click reactions, this method may facilitate a broad range of applications for monitoring the conjugation efficiency of molecules in diverse areas...

  5. In situ click chemistry: from small molecule discovery to synthetic antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Heather D.; Lai, Bert; Lee, Su Seong; Lim, Jaehong; Nag, Arundhati; Pitram, Suresh; Rohde, Rosemary; Heath, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the fields of proteomics, molecular imaging, and therapeutics are closely linked to the availability of affinity reagents that selectively recognize their biological targets. Here we present a review of Iterative Peptide In Situ Click Chemistry (IPISC), a novel screening technology for designing peptide multiligands with high affinity and specificity. This technology builds upon in situ click chemistry, a kinetic target-guided synthesis approach where the protein target catalyzes the conjugation of two small molecules, typically through the azide–alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition. Integrating this methodology with solid phase peptide libraries enables the assembly of linear and branched peptide multiligands we refer to as Protein Catalyzed Capture Agents (PCC Agents). The resulting structures can be thought of as analogous to the antigen recognition site of antibodies and serve as antibody replacements in biochemical and cell-based applications. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in ligand design through IPISC and related approaches, focusing on the improvements in affinity and specificity as multiligands are assembled by target-catalyzed peptide conjugation. We compare the IPISC process to small molecule in situ click chemistry with particular emphasis on the advantages and technical challenges of constructing antibody-like PCC Agents. PMID:22836343

  6. Timing and context of dolphin clicks during and after mine simulator detection and marking in the open ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam H. Ridgway

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Two dolphins carrying cameras swam in the ocean as they searched for and marked mine simulators – buried, proud or moored. As the animals swam ahead of a boat they searched the ocean. Cameras on their harness recorded continuous sound and video. Once a target was detected, the dolphins received a marker to take to the simulator's location. During search and detection, dolphins made almost continuous trains of varying interval clicks. During the marking phase, shorter click trains were interrupted by periods of silence. As the dolphins marked simulators, they often produced victory squeals – pulse bursts that vary in duration, peak frequency and amplitude. Victory squeals were produced on 72% of marks. Sometimes after marking, or at other times during their long swims, the dolphins produced click packets. Packets typically consisted of two to 10 clicks with inter-click intervals of 7-117 ms followed by a silence of 223-983 ms. Click packets appeared unrelated with searching or marking. We suggest that the packets were used to improve signal to noise ratios for locating a boat or other distant object. Victory squeals produced when marking the targets suggest to us that the dolphins know when they have succeeded in this multipart task.

  7. Click polymerization for the synthesis of reduction-responsive polymeric prodrug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojin; Wang, Hongquan; Dai, Yu

    2018-05-01

    Click polymerization is a powerful polymerization technique for the construction of new macromolecules with well-defined structures and multifaceted functionalities. Here, we synthesize reduction-responsive polymeric prodrug PEG- b-(PSS- g-MTX)- b-PEG containing disulfide bonds and pendant methotrexate (MTX) via two-step click polymerization followed by conjugating MTX to pendant hydroxyl. MTX content in polymeric prodrug is 13.5%. Polymeric prodrug is able to form polymeric micelles by self-assembly in aqueous solution. Polymeric micelles are spherical nanoparticles with tens of nanometers in size. Of note, polymeric micelles are reduction-responsive due to disulfide bonds in the backbone of PEG- b-(PSS- g-MTX)- b-PEG and could release pendant drugs in the presence of the reducing agents such as dl-dithiothreitol (DTT).

  8. Evaluation of Kentucky's "Click It or Ticket" 2008 campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this report was to document the results of the "Click It or Ticket" 2008 campaign in Kentucky. The campaign involved a combination of earned media, paid media, and enforcement. : The evaluation of the campaign included documenting th...

  9. The combined effects of forward masking by noise and high click rate on monaural and binaural human auditory nerve and brainstem potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Hillel; Polyakov, Andrey; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Naomi

    2004-07-01

    To study effects of forward masking and rapid stimulation on human monaurally- and binaurally-evoked brainstem potentials and suggest their relation to synaptic fatigue and recovery and to neuronal action potential refractoriness. Auditory brainstem evoked potentials (ABEPs) were recorded from 12 normally- and symmetrically hearing adults, in response to each click (50 dB nHL, condensation and rarefaction) in a train of nine, with an inter-click interval of 11 ms, that followed a white noise burst of 100 ms duration (50 dB nHL). Sequences of white noise and click train were repeated at a rate of 2.89 s(-1). The interval between noise and first click in the train was 2, 11, 22, 44, 66 or 88 ms in different runs. ABEPs were averaged (8000 repetitions) using a dwell time of 25 micros/address/channel. The binaural interaction components (BICs) of ABEPs were derived and the single, centrally located equivalent dipoles of ABEP waves I and V and of the BIC major wave were estimated. The latencies of dipoles I and V of ABEP, their inter-dipole interval and the dipole magnitude of component V were significantly affected by the interval between noise and clicks and by the serial position of the click in the train. The latency and dipole magnitude of the major BIC component were significantly affected by the interval between noise and clicks. Interval from noise and the click's serial position in the train interacted to affect dipole V latency, dipole V magnitude, BIC latencies and the V-I inter-dipole latency difference. Most of the effects were fully apparent by the first few clicks in the train, and the trend (increase or decrease) was affected by the interval between noise and clicks. The changes in latency and magnitude of ABEP and BIC components with advancing position in the click train and the interactions of click position in the train with the intervals from noise indicate an interaction of fatigue and recovery, compatible with synaptic depletion and replenishing

  10. Injectable dextran hydrogels fabricated by metal-free click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Zihan; Shi, Ting; Zhao, Peng; An, Kangkang; Lin, Chao; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-04-01

    Injectable dextran-based hydrogels were prepared for the first time by bioorthogonal click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering. Click-crosslinked injectable hydrogels based on cyto-compatible dextran (Mw=10kDa) were successfully fabricated under physiological conditions by metal-free alkyne-azide cycloaddition (click) reaction between azadibenzocyclooctyne-modified dextran (Dex-ADIBO) and azide-modified dextran (Dex-N 3 ). Gelation time of these dextran hydrogels could be regulated in the range of approximately 1.1 to 10.2min, depending on the polymer concentrations (5% or 10%) and ADIBO substitution degree (DS, 5 or 10) of Dex-ADIBO. Rheological analysis indicated that the dextran hydrogels were elastic and had storage moduli from 2.1 to 6.0kPa with increasing DS of ADIBO from 5 to 10. The in vitro tests revealed that the dextran hydrogel crosslinked from Dex-ADIBO DS 10 and Dex-N 3 DS 10 at a polymer concentration of 10% could support high viability of individual rabbit chondrocytes and the chondrocyte spheroids encapsulated in the hydrogel over 21days. Individual chondrocytes and chondrocyte spheroids in the hydrogel could produce cartilage matrices such as collagen and glycosaminoglycans. However, the chondrocyte spheroids produced a higher content of matrices than individual chondrocytes. This study indicates that metal-free click chemistry is effective to produce injectable dextran hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Intense Ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Maria; Hanlon, Roger; Tyack, Peter

    2007-01-01

    an evolutionary selection pressure on cephalopods to develop a mechanism for detecting and evading sound-emitting toothed whale predators. Ultrasonic detection has evolved in some insects to avoid echolocating bats, and it can be hypothesized that cephalopods might have evolved similar ultrasound detection...... as an anti-predation measure. We test this hypothesis in the squid Loligo pealeii in a playback experiment using intense echolocation clicks from two squid-eating toothed whale species. Twelve squid were exposed to clicks at two repetition rates (16 and 125 clicks per second) with received sound pressure...... levels of 199-226dBre1μPa (pp) mimicking the sound exposure from an echolocating toothed whale as it approaches and captures prey. We demonstrate that intense ultrasonic clicks do not elicit any detectable anti-predator behaviour in L. pealeii and that clicks with received levels up to 226dBre1μPa (pp...

  12. Click trains and the rate of information processing: does "speeding up" subjective time make other psychological processes run faster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Luke A; Allely, Clare S; Wearden, John H

    2011-02-01

    A series of experiments demonstrated that a 5-s train of clicks that have been shown in previous studies to increase the subjective duration of tones they precede (in a manner consistent with "speeding up" timing processes) could also have an effect on information-processing rate. Experiments used studies of simple and choice reaction time (Experiment 1), or mental arithmetic (Experiment 2). In general, preceding trials by clicks made response times significantly shorter than those for trials without clicks, but white noise had no effects on response times. Experiments 3 and 4 investigated the effects of clicks on performance on memory tasks, using variants of two classic experiments of cognitive psychology: Sperling's (1960) iconic memory task and Loftus, Johnson, and Shimamura's (1985) iconic masking task. In both experiments participants were able to recall or recognize significantly more information from stimuli preceded by clicks than those preceded by silence.

  13. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among veterinary staff and dogs in private veterinary clinics in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kanako; Saito, Mieko; Shimokubo, Natsumi; Muramatsu, Yasukazu; Maetani, Shigeki; Tamura, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    To explore the prevalence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in veterinary medical practices, MRSA carriage was tested among 96 veterinarians (Vets), 70 veterinary technicians (VTs) and 292 dogs with which they had contact at 71 private veterinary clinics (VCs) in Hokkaido, Japan. MRSA isolates were obtained from 22 Vets [22.9%] and 7 VTs [10%]. The prevalence of MRSA among Vets was as high as that found in an academic veterinary hospital in our previous study. In contrast, only two blood donor dogs and one dog with liver disease (1.0%, 3/292) yielded MRSA. All MRSA-positive dogs were reared or treated in different VCs, in each of which at least one veterinary staff member carrying MRSA worked. Sequence types (ST) identified by multilocus sequence typing, spa types, and SCCmec types for canine MRSA isolates (ST5-spa t002-SCCmec II [from two dogs] or ST30-spa t021-SCCmec IV [from a dog]) were concordant with those from veterinary staff members in the same clinics as the MRSA-positive dogs, with which they had potentially had contact. Most MRSA isolates from veterinary staff were the same genotype (SCCmec type II and spa type t002) as a major hospital-acquired MRSA clone in Japan. The remaining MRSA was the same genotypes as domestic and foreign community-associated MRSA. Measures against MRSA infection should be provided in private VCs. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Pure Play vs. Bricks-and-Clicks: Who Reaps the Benefits of Virtual Retailing?

    OpenAIRE

    Youlong Zhuang; Albert L. Lederer

    2006-01-01

    Pure play and bricks-and-clicks represent today’s two major retailing models. The current study answers four questions comparing the two models in terms of the e-commerce benefits achieved and information systems management practices used to achieve them. It applies a Web-based survey to compare 69 pure plays to 348 bricks-and-clicks retailers in terms of the market expansion, customer service, back-end efficiency, inventory management, and cost reduction benefits reaped, as well as in term...

  15. Click chemistry for [99mTc(CO)3] labeling of Lys3-bombesin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro-Flores, G.; Rivero, I.A.; Santos-Cuevas, C.L.; Sarmiento, J.I.; Arteaga de Murphy, C.; Ocampo-Garcia, B.E.; Garcia-Becerra, R.; Ordaz-Rosado, D.

    2010-01-01

    99m Tc-HYNIC labeled Lys 3 -bombesin has shown specific binding to gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRP-r) over-expressed in cancer cells. Click chemistry offers an innovative functionalization strategy for biomolecules such as bombesin. The aim of this research was to apply a click chemistry approach for [ 99m Tc(CO) 3 ] labeling of Lys 3 -bombesin and to compare the in vitro MCF7 breast cancer cell uptake and biodistribution profile in mice with that of 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Lys 3 -bombesin. The results suggest a higher lipophilicity for 99m Tc(CO) 3 -triazole-Lys 3 -bombesin which explains its higher in vivo hepatobiliary elimination. Pancreas-to-blood ratio for 99m Tc(CO) 3 -triazole-Lys 3 -bombesin was 4.46 at 3 h and both bombesin radiopharmaceuticals showed specific recognition for GRP receptors in MCF7 cancer cells. Click chemistry is a reliable approach for [ 99m Tc(CO) 3 ] labeling of Lys 3 -bombesin.

  16. Resistance to group clinical supervision: A semistructured interview study of non-participating mental health nursing staff members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus, Niels; Delgado, Cynthia; Traynor, Michael; Gonge, Henrik

    2018-04-01

    This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has traditionally been theorized as a supervisee's maladaptive coping with anxiety in the supervision process. The aim of the present study was to examine resistance to group clinical supervision by interviewing nurses who did not participate in supervision. In 2015, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 Danish mental health nursing staff members who had been observed not to participate in supervision in two periods of 3 months. Interviews were audio-recorded and subjected to discourse analysis. We constructed two discursive positions taken by the informants: (i) 'forced non-participation', where an informant was in favour of supervision, but presented practical reasons for not participating; and (ii) 'deliberate rejection', where an informant intentionally chose to not to participate in supervision. Furthermore, we described two typical themes drawn upon by informants in their positioning: 'difficulties related to participating in supervision' and 'limited need for and benefits from supervision'. The findings indicated that group clinical supervision extended a space for group discussion that generated or accentuated anxiety because of already-existing conflicts and a fundamental lack of trust between group members. Many informants perceived group clinical supervision as an unacceptable intrusion, which could indicate a need for developing more acceptable types of post-registration clinical education and reflective practice for this group. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Click chemistry approach to functionalize two-dimensional macromolecules of graphene oxide nanosheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Kou; Hongkun He; Chao Gao

    2010-01-01

    A facile 'click chemistry' approach to functionalize 2D macromolecules of graphene oxide nanosheets with poly(ethylene glycol) of different molecular weights,polystyrene,palmitic acid and various amino acids was presented.FTIR,TGA,Raman spectroscopy,XPS,XRD,TEM,AFM and SEM were utilized to characterize the products.High degree of functionalization was achieved on the flat surfaces of graphene oxide,affording polymer-grafted 2D brushes and amino acids-immobilized nanosheets,which show improved solubility in organic solvents.The click chemistry strategy reported herein provides a facile and general method for functionalization of graphene oxide with macromolecules and desired biomolecules.

  18. Compact Web browsing profiles for click-through rate prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Bjarne Ørum; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    In real time advertising we are interested in finding features that improve click-through rate prediction. One source of available information is the bipartite graph of websites previously engaged by identifiable users. In this work, we investigate three different decompositions of such a graph...

  19. Microwave assisted click chemistry on a conductive polymer film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hansen, Thomas S.; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2011-01-01

    Microwave (MW) irradiation has been used to accelerate the functionalization of an azide functional poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) film by click chemistry. The absorption of MW energy by the conductive polymer has been exploited for localized activation of the reaction on the polymer surface...

  20. Optimisation of staff protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Marshall, N.W.; Rawlings, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose received by staff, but it is particularly important in interventional radiology. Staff doses may be reduced by minimizing the fluoroscopic screening time and number of images, compatible with the clinical objective of the procedure. Staff may also move to different positions in the room in an attempt to reduce doses. Finally, staff should wear appropriate protective clothing to reduce their occupational doses. This paper will concentrate on the optimization of personal shielding in interventional radiology. The effect of changing the lead equivalence of various protective devices on effective dose to staff has been studied by modeling the exposure of staff to realistic scattered radiation. Both overcouch x-ray tube/undercouch image intensified and overcouch image intensifier/undercouch x-ray tube geometries were simulated. It was deduced from this simulation that increasing the lead apron thickness from 0.35 mm lead to 0.5 mm lead had only a small reducing effect. By contrast, wearing a lead rubber thyroid shield or face mask is a superior means of reducing the effective dose to staff. Standing back from the couch when the x-ray tube is emitting radiation is another good method of reducing doses, being better than exchanging a 0.35 mm lead apron for a 0.5 mm apron. In summary, it is always preferable to shield more organs than to increase the thickness of the lead apron. (author)

  1. Respiratory rates measured by a standardised clinical approach, ward staff, and a wireless device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, A; Pedersen, N E; Lippert, A.

    2016-01-01

    in a medical ward. Respiratory rate was measured by three methods: a standardised approach over 60 s while patients lay still and refrained from talking, by ward staff and by a wireless electronic patch (SensiumVitals). The Bland-Altman method was used to compare measurements and three breaths per minute (BPM......) was considered a clinically relevant difference. RESULTS: We included 50 patients. The mean difference between the standardised approach and the electronic measurement was 0.3 (95% CI: -1.4 to 2.0) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -11.5 (95% CI: -14.5 to -8.6) and 12.1 (95% CI: 9.2 to 15.1) BPM. Removal...... of three outliers with huge differences lead to a mean difference of -0.1 (95% CI: -0.7 to 0.5) BPM and 95% limits of agreement of -4.2 (95% CI: -5.3 to -3.2) BPM and 4.0 (95% CI: 2.9 to 5.0) BPM. The mean difference between staff and electronic measurements was 1.7 (95% CI: -0.5 to 3.9) BPM; 95% limits...

  2. Methoxypropylamino β-cyclodextrin clicked AC regioisomer for enantioseparations in capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Yiying; Liu, Yun; Tang, Jian; Tang, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: In this paper, we demonstrate: • The click synthesis of a AC regioisomer cationic cyclodextrin (CD) as chiral selector. • The good enantioselectivities (chiral resolution over 5) for acidic racemates. • The strong chiral recognition of new CD by NMR study. • Baseline enantioseparation of some acidic racemates at CD of 0.5 mM. - Abstract: In this work, a novel methoxypropylamino β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) clicked AC regioisomer, 6 A -4-hydroxyethyl-1,2,3-triazolyl-6 C -3-methoxypropylamino β-cyclodextrin (HETz-MPrAMCD), was synthesized via nucleophilic addition and click chemistry. The chiral separation ability of this AC regioisomer cationic CD was evaluated toward 7 ampholytic and 13 acidic racemates by capillary electrophoresis. Dependence of enantioselectivity and resolution on buffer pH (5.5–8.0) and chiral selector concentration (0.5–7.5 mM) was investigated. Enantioselectivities (α ≥ 1.05) could be achieved for most analytes under optimal conditions except dansyl-DL-noreleucine and dansyl-DL-serine. The highest resolutions for 2-chloromandelic acid p-hydroxymandelic acid were 15.6 and 9.7 respectively. The inclusion complexation between HETz-MPrAMCD and each 3-phenyllactic acid enantiomer was also revealed with nuclear magnetic resonance study

  3. Methoxypropylamino β-cyclodextrin clicked AC regioisomer for enantioseparations in capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Yiying; Liu, Yun; Tang, Jian; Tang, Weihua, E-mail: whtang@mail.njust.edu.cn

    2015-04-08

    Highlights: In this paper, we demonstrate: • The click synthesis of a AC regioisomer cationic cyclodextrin (CD) as chiral selector. • The good enantioselectivities (chiral resolution over 5) for acidic racemates. • The strong chiral recognition of new CD by NMR study. • Baseline enantioseparation of some acidic racemates at CD of 0.5 mM. - Abstract: In this work, a novel methoxypropylamino β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) clicked AC regioisomer, 6{sup A}-4-hydroxyethyl-1,2,3-triazolyl-6{sup C}-3-methoxypropylamino β-cyclodextrin (HETz-MPrAMCD), was synthesized via nucleophilic addition and click chemistry. The chiral separation ability of this AC regioisomer cationic CD was evaluated toward 7 ampholytic and 13 acidic racemates by capillary electrophoresis. Dependence of enantioselectivity and resolution on buffer pH (5.5–8.0) and chiral selector concentration (0.5–7.5 mM) was investigated. Enantioselectivities (α ≥ 1.05) could be achieved for most analytes under optimal conditions except dansyl-DL-noreleucine and dansyl-DL-serine. The highest resolutions for 2-chloromandelic acid p-hydroxymandelic acid were 15.6 and 9.7 respectively. The inclusion complexation between HETz-MPrAMCD and each 3-phenyllactic acid enantiomer was also revealed with nuclear magnetic resonance study.

  4. Sperm whale clicks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bertel; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T.

    2000-01-01

    . A sound generator weighing upward of 10 tons and with a cross-section of 1 m is expected to generate high-intensity, directional sounds. This prediction from the Norris and Harvey theory is not supported by published data for sperm whale clicks ~source levels of 180 dB re 1 mPa and little, if any......In sperm whales ~Physeter catodon L. 1758! the nose is vastly hypertrophied, accounting for about one-third of the length or weight of an adult male. Norris and Harvey @in Animal Orientation and Navigation, NASA SP-262 ~1972!, pp. 397–417# ascribed a sound-generating function to this organ complex......, directionality!. Either the theory is not borne out or the data is not representative for the capabilities of the sound-generating mechanism. To increase the amount of relevant data, a five-hydrophone array, suspended from three platforms separated by 1 km and linked by radio, was deployed at the slope...

  5. Predicting clicks of PubMed articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuqing; Lu, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the popularity or access usage of an article has the potential to improve the quality of PubMed searches. We can model the click trend of each article as its access changes over time by mining the PubMed query logs, which contain the previous access history for all articles. In this article, we examine the access patterns produced by PubMed users in two years (July 2009 to July 2011). We explore the time series of accesses for each article in the query logs, model the trends with regression approaches, and subsequently use the models for prediction. We show that the click trends of PubMed articles are best fitted with a log-normal regression model. This model allows the number of accesses an article receives and the time since it first becomes available in PubMed to be related via quadratic and logistic functions, with the model parameters to be estimated via maximum likelihood. Our experiments predicting the number of accesses for an article based on its past usage demonstrate that the mean absolute error and mean absolute percentage error of our model are 4.0% and 8.1% lower than the power-law regression model, respectively. The log-normal distribution is also shown to perform significantly better than a previous prediction method based on a human memory theory in cognitive science. This work warrants further investigation on the utility of such a log-normal regression approach towards improving information access in PubMed.

  6. N-PEG´ylation of chitosan via "click chemistry" reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulbokaite, R.; Ciuta, G.; Netopilík, Miloš; Makuška, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 10 (2009), s. 771-778 ISSN 1381-5148 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/0659 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : chitosan * poly(ethylene glycol) * click chemistry Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.461, year: 2009

  7. Nanofabrication Yields. Hybridization and Click-Fixation of Polycyclic DNA Nanoassemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Lundberg, Erik P.; Plesa, Calin; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus; Lincoln, Per; Brown, Tom; Nordén, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    introduced site-specific click chemistry for making and purifying robust building blocks for future modular constructs of larger assemblies. Although the present yield of this robust module was only about 10%, it demonstrates a first step toward a general

  8. Staff perception of interprofessional working relationships after a work redesign intervention in a Danish orthopaedic hand unit outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beijer, Anke Elisabeth; Hansen, Torben Bæk; Stilling, Maiken; Jakobsen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that clinical pathways improve quality of care; however, knowledge is limited concerning the influence on and the benefits experienced by the interprofessional teams working with these pathways. Our working methods in a hand unit in an orthopaedic outpatient clinic in Denmark were redesigned to include, among other changes, the introduction of clinical pathways. Changes included standardising treatment and communication methods, delegating tasks from medical specialists to nurses, and providing nurses with their own consultation room. Using focus group interviews before and after the implementation of the new working methods, we investigated staff-perceived experiences of the effects on working relationships and the utilisation of professional skills and attitudes, resulting from the mentioned change in working methods. The results were changes in daily communication methods among healthcare staff and improvements in the actual communication and collaborative problem solving skills concerning standard patients with simple hand pathology; however, there are still challenges for patients with more complex hand pathology. Though this new interprofessional arrangement improves the use of nurse and medical specialist professional competencies, it also requires a high degree of trust among the team members.

  9. Barriers to Providing Health Education During Primary Care Visits at Community Health Centers: Clinical Staff Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Planas, Jessica; Pose, Alix; Smith, Linda

    2016-04-01

    The rapid increase of diverse patients living in the US has created a different set of needs in healthcare, with the persistence of health disparities continuing to challenge the current system. Chronic disease management has been discussed as a way to improve health outcomes, with quality patient education being a key component. Using a community based participatory research framework, this study utilized a web-based survey and explored clinical staff perceptions of barriers to providing patient education during primary care visits. With a response rate of nearly 42 %, appointment time allotment seemed to be one of the most critical factors related to the delivery of health education and should be considered key. The importance of team-based care and staff training were also significant. Various suggestions were made in order to improve the delivery of quality patient education at community health centers located in underserved areas.

  10. Training to raise staff awareness about safeguarding children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jane

    2015-04-01

    To improve outcomes for children and young people health organisations are required to train all staff in children's safeguarding. This creates difficulties for large complex organisations where most staff provide services to the adult population. Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust is a large acute and community trust that had difficulties in engaging staff in children's safeguarding training. Compliance rates for clinical staff who were trained in children's safeguarding were low and needed to be addressed. This article sets out why safeguarding training is important for all staff and how the trust achieved staff engagement and improved compliance rates. To evaluate, maintain and develop safeguarding knowledge, understanding, skills, attitude and behaviour further resources are planned to allow access to learning resources in a variety of formats.

  11. Evaluation of 4-[18F]fluoro-1-butyne as a radiolabeled synthon for click chemistry with azido compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Click chemistry is a useful approach for the preparation of novel radiopharmaceuticals. In this study, we evaluated 4-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-butyne as a radiolabeled synthon for click chemistry with azido compounds. Our results showed that nucleophilic substitution of 4-tosyloxy-1-butyne with K[ 18 F]F produces vinyl acetylene as well as 4-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-butyne, while the same reaction using 5-tosyloxy-1-pentyne gives exclusively 5-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-pentyne. Thus, ω-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-alkynes with chain lengths longer than four carbons may be better radiolabeled synthons for use in click chemistry.

  12. Challenges of maintaining research protocol fidelity in a clinical care setting: A qualitative study of the experiences and views of patients and staff participating in a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmer Andrew J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trial research has predominantly focused on patient and staff understandings of trial concepts and/or motivations for taking part, rather than why treatment recommendations may or may not be followed during trial delivery. This study sought to understand why there was limited attainment of the glycaemic target (HbA1c ≤6.5% among patients who participated in the Treating to Target in Type 2 Diabetes Trial (4-T. The objective was to inform interpretation of trial outcomes and provide recommendations for future trial delivery. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 45 patients and 21 health professionals recruited from 11 of 58 trial centres in the UK. Patients were broadly representative of those in the main trial in terms of treatment allocation, demographics and glycaemic control. Both physicians and research nurses were interviewed. Results Most patients were committed to taking insulin as recommended by 4-T staff. To avoid hypoglycaemia, patients occasionally altered or skipped insulin doses, normally in consultation with staff. Patients were usually unaware of the trial's glycaemic target. Positive staff feedback could lead patients to believe they had been 'successful' trial participants even when their HbA1c exceeded 6.5%. While some staff felt that the 4-T automated insulin dose adjustment algorithm had increased their confidence to prescribe larger insulin doses than in routine clinical practice, all described situations where they had not followed its recommendations. Staff regarded the application of a 'one size fits all' glycaemic target during the trial as contradicting routine clinical practice where they would tailor treatments to individuals. Staff also expressed concerns that 'tight' glycaemic control might impose an unacceptably high risk of hypoglycaemia, thus compromising trust and safety, especially amongst older patients. To address these concerns, staff tended to adapt the trial protocol to

  13. On-Surface Synthesis by Click Chemistry Investigated by STM and XPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadapoo, Sundar Raja

    2014-01-01

    Molecular synthesis is essential in the bottom-up approach of achieving highly stable nanostructures. On-surface synthesis is highly interesting from the basic science of view to improve the understanding of molecular behavior adsorbed on metal surfaces, and has potential applications such as mol......Molecular synthesis is essential in the bottom-up approach of achieving highly stable nanostructures. On-surface synthesis is highly interesting from the basic science of view to improve the understanding of molecular behavior adsorbed on metal surfaces, and has potential applications...... such as molecular electronics and surface functionalization. In this thesis, a well-defined click chemistry approach is followed, with the study of azide-alkyne cycloaddition on Cu(111) surface in UHV environment. A successful achievement of the click reaction product via on-surface synthesis has been shown, which...

  14. Pyrrolidine constrained bipyridyl-dansyl click fluoroionophore as selective Al(3+)sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Debabrata; Govindaraju, T

    2010-07-07

    A pyrrolidine constrained bipyridyl-dansyl (ionophore-fluorophore) conjugate with triazole linker was synthesised through click chemistry. The fluoroionophore serves as a selective ratiometric and colorimetric chemosensor for Al(3+) based on internal charge transfer (ICT).

  15. Echolocation click source parameters of Australian snubfin dolphins (Orcaella heinsohni)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Freitas, Mafalda; Smith, Joshua N; Jensen, Frants H

    2018-01-01

    The Australian snubfin dolphin (Orcaella heinsohni) is endemic to Australian waters, yet little is known about its abundance and habitat use. To investigate the feasibility of Passive Acoustic Monitoring for snubfin dolphins, biosonar clicks were recorded in Cygnet Bay, Australia, using a four-el...

  16. Nursing and pharmacy students' use of emotionally intelligent behaviours to manage challenging interpersonal situations with staff during clinical placement: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloughen, Andrea; Foster, Kim

    2017-04-20

    To identify challenging interpersonal interactions experienced by nursing and pharmacy students during clinical placement, and strategies used to manage those situations. Healthcare students and staff experience elevated stress when exposed to dynamic clinical environments, complex care and challenging professional relationships. Emotionally intelligent behaviours are associated with appropriate recognition and management of emotions evoked by stressful experiences and development of effective relationships. Nursing and pharmacy students' use of emotionally intelligent behaviours to manage challenging interpersonal situations is not well known. A qualitative design, using semi-structured interviews to explore experiences of challenging interpersonal situations during clinical placement (Phase two of a larger mixed-methods study). Final-year Australian university nursing and pharmacy students (n = 20) were purposefully recruited using a range of Emotional Intelligence scores (derived in Phase one), measured using the GENOS Emotional intelligence Inventory (concise version). Challenging interpersonal situations involving student-staff and intrastaff conflict, discourteous behaviour and criticism occurred during clinical placement. Students used personal and relational strategies, incorporating emotionally intelligent behaviours, to manage these encounters. Strategies included reflecting and reframing, being calm, controlling discomfort and expressing emotions appropriately. Emotionally intelligent behaviours are effective to manage stressful interpersonal interactions. Methods for strengthening these behaviours should be integrated into education of nursing and pharmacy students and qualified professionals. Education within the clinical/workplace environment can incorporate key interpersonal skills of collaboration, social interaction and reflection, while also attending to sociocultural contexts of the healthcare setting. Students and staff are frequently exposed

  17. Practices in security and confidentiality of HIV/AIDS patients' information: A national survey among staff at HIV outpatient clinics in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Khac Hai

    Full Text Available Breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy from the collection and use of medical records, particularly those of patients with HIV/AIDS or other diseases sensitive to stigmatization, should be prevented by all related stakeholders in healthcare settings. The main focus of this study was to assess practices regarding security and confidentiality of HIV-related information among staff at HIV outpatient clinics (HIV-OPCs in Vietnam.A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at all 312 HIV-OPCs across the country using an online survey technique.In general, the staff practices for securing and protecting patient information were at acceptable levels. Most staff had proper measures and practices for maintaining data security; however, the protection of patient confidentiality, particularly for data access, sharing, and transfer still required improvement. Most HIV-OPC staff had good or moderate knowledge and positive perceptions towards security and confidentiality issues. Staff who were not trained in the practice of security measures differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 3.74; 95%CI: 1.44-9.67; staff needing improved knowledge levels differed significantly from those with good (OR: 5.20; 95%CI: 2.39-11.32 and moderate knowledge levels (OR: 5.10; 95%CI: 2.36-11.00; and staff needing improved perception levels differed significantly from those with good (i.e., with 100% proper practices and moderate perception levels (OR: 5.67; 95%CI: 2.93-10.95. Staff who were not trained in the protection of data confidentiality differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.29-3.65.Training is an important factor to help raise the levels of proper practices regarding confidentiality and security, to improve knowledge and raise awareness about change among staff. The operation and management of HIV treatment and care in Vietnam are currently transitioning from separate healthcare clinics (HIV-OPC into units

  18. Practices in security and confidentiality of HIV/AIDS patients' information: A national survey among staff at HIV outpatient clinics in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khac Hai, Nguyen; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Jittamala, Podjanee; Thi Thu Huong, Phan; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2017-01-01

    Breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy from the collection and use of medical records, particularly those of patients with HIV/AIDS or other diseases sensitive to stigmatization, should be prevented by all related stakeholders in healthcare settings. The main focus of this study was to assess practices regarding security and confidentiality of HIV-related information among staff at HIV outpatient clinics (HIV-OPCs) in Vietnam. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at all 312 HIV-OPCs across the country using an online survey technique. In general, the staff practices for securing and protecting patient information were at acceptable levels. Most staff had proper measures and practices for maintaining data security; however, the protection of patient confidentiality, particularly for data access, sharing, and transfer still required improvement. Most HIV-OPC staff had good or moderate knowledge and positive perceptions towards security and confidentiality issues. Staff who were not trained in the practice of security measures differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 3.74; 95%CI: 1.44-9.67); staff needing improved knowledge levels differed significantly from those with good (OR: 5.20; 95%CI: 2.39-11.32) and moderate knowledge levels (OR: 5.10; 95%CI: 2.36-11.00); and staff needing improved perception levels differed significantly from those with good (i.e., with 100% proper practices) and moderate perception levels (OR: 5.67; 95%CI: 2.93-10.95). Staff who were not trained in the protection of data confidentiality differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.29-3.65). Training is an important factor to help raise the levels of proper practices regarding confidentiality and security, to improve knowledge and raise awareness about change among staff. The operation and management of HIV treatment and care in Vietnam are currently transitioning from separate healthcare clinics (HIV-OPC) into units integrated

  19. Practices in security and confidentiality of HIV/AIDS patients’ information: A national survey among staff at HIV outpatient clinics in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khac Hai, Nguyen; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Jittamala, Podjanee; Thi Thu Huong, Phan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy from the collection and use of medical records, particularly those of patients with HIV/AIDS or other diseases sensitive to stigmatization, should be prevented by all related stakeholders in healthcare settings. The main focus of this study was to assess practices regarding security and confidentiality of HIV-related information among staff at HIV outpatient clinics (HIV-OPCs) in Vietnam. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at all 312 HIV-OPCs across the country using an online survey technique. Results In general, the staff practices for securing and protecting patient information were at acceptable levels. Most staff had proper measures and practices for maintaining data security; however, the protection of patient confidentiality, particularly for data access, sharing, and transfer still required improvement. Most HIV-OPC staff had good or moderate knowledge and positive perceptions towards security and confidentiality issues. Staff who were not trained in the practice of security measures differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 3.74; 95%CI: 1.44–9.67); staff needing improved knowledge levels differed significantly from those with good (OR: 5.20; 95%CI: 2.39–11.32) and moderate knowledge levels (OR: 5.10; 95%CI: 2.36–11.00); and staff needing improved perception levels differed significantly from those with good (i.e., with 100% proper practices) and moderate perception levels (OR: 5.67; 95%CI: 2.93–10.95). Staff who were not trained in the protection of data confidentiality differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.29–3.65). Conclusions Training is an important factor to help raise the levels of proper practices regarding confidentiality and security, to improve knowledge and raise awareness about change among staff. The operation and management of HIV treatment and care in Vietnam are currently transitioning from separate

  20. Readiness for organisational change among general practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christl, B; Harris, M F; Jayasinghe, U W; Proudfoot, J; Taggart, J; Tan, J

    2010-10-01

    Increasing demands on general practice to manage chronic disease may warrant organisational change at the practice level. Staff's readiness for organisational change can act as a facilitator or barrier to implementing interventions aimed at organisational change. To explore general practice staff readiness for organisational change and its association with staff and practices characteristics. This is a cross-sectional study of practices in three Australian states involved in a randomised control trial on the effectiveness of an intervention to enhance the role of non-general practitioner staff in chronic disease management. Readiness for organisational change, job satisfaction and practice characteristics were assessed using questionnaires. 502 staff from 58 practices completed questionnaires. Practice characteristics were not associated with staff readiness for change. A multilevel regression analysis showed statistically significant associations between staff readiness for organisational change (range 1 to 5) and having a non-clinical staff role (vs general practitioner; B=-0.315; 95% CI -0.47 to -0.16; pchange which addresses the mix of practice staff. Moderately low job satisfaction may be an opportunity for organisational change.

  1. "Click" saccharide/beta-lactam hybrids for lectin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Claudio; Aizpurua, Jesus M; Balentová, Eva; Azcune, Itxaso; Santos, J Ignacio; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Cañada, Javier; Miranda, José Ignacio

    2008-06-05

    Hybrid glycopeptide beta-lactam mimetics designed to bind lectins or carbohydrate recognition domains in selectins have been prepared according to a "shape-modulating linker" design. This approach was implemented using the azide-alkyne "click" cycloaddition reaction, and as shown by NMR/MD experiments, binding of the resulting mimetics to Ulex Europaeus Lectin-1 (UEL-1) occurred after a "bent-to-extended" conformational change around a partially rotatable triazolylmethylene moiety.

  2. Protein addressing on patterned microchip by coupling chitosan electrodeposition and 'electro-click' chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Wen; Qiu, Ling; Nie, Zhen; Xiao, Ling; Payne, Gregory F; Du, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    Many applications in proteomics and lab-on-chip analysis require methods that guide proteins to assemble at surfaces with high spatial and temporal control. Electrical inputs are particularly convenient to control, and there has been considerable effort to discover simple and generic mechanisms that allow electrical inputs to trigger protein assembly on-demand. Here, we report the electroaddressing of a protein to a patterned surface by coupling two generic electroaddressing mechanisms. First, we electrodeposit the stimuli-responsive film-forming aminopolysaccharide chitosan to form a hydrogel matrix at the electrode surface. After deposition, the matrix is chemically functionalized with alkyne groups. Second, we ''electro-click' an azide-tagged protein to the functionalized matrix using electrical signals to trigger conjugation by Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions. Specifically, a cathodic potential is applied to the matrix-coated electrode to reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I) which is required for the click reaction. Using fluorescently-labeled bovine serum albumin as our model, we demonstrate that protein conjugation can be controlled spatially and temporally. We anticipate that the coupling of polysaccharide electrodeposition and electro-click chemistry will provide a simple and generic approach to electroaddress proteins within compatible hydrogel matrices.

  3. Impact of Group Clinical Supervision on Patient Education Process: A Comprehensive Assessment of Patients, Staff, and Organization Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Jafari Moghadam

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important barriers to patient education are nurses’ poor motivation and training, and poor quality of managerial supervision. Clinical supervision could be a powerful tool for overcoming these barriers. However, the associated patient, staff, and organization-related outcomes still require further research. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the patient-, staff-, and organization-related outcomes of group clinical supervision with the goal of improving patient education. Method: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 35 nurses and mothers of 94 children admitted to the surgery and nephrology wards of Dr. Sheikh Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, in 2016. A 3-month clinical supervision program consisting of support, education, feedback, and facilitation stages was implemented with the assistance of education facilitators. The data were collected using the questionnaire of patient’s satisfaction with nurses’ education, Herzberg’s job motivation questionnaire, and the checklists of nurses’ education performance and quality of education documentation. Data analysis was performed by Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher’s exact test, and independent-t test in SPSS, version 14. Results: The mean ages of the nurses, patients, and mothers were 30.3±6.7, 5.2±3.8, and 32.2±6.2, respectively. Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant improvement in patients’ satisfaction with nurses’ education performance (P

  4. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities.

  5. Versatility of Alkyne-Modified Poly(Glycidyl Methacrylate) Layers for Click Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto-Cantu, Erick; Lokitz, Bradley S.; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan Pablo; Deodhar, Chaitra; Messman, Jamie M.; Ankner, John Francis; Kilbey, S. Michael II

    2011-01-01

    Functional soft interfaces are of interest for a variety of technologies. We describe three methods for preparing substrates with alkyne groups, which show versatility for 'click' chemistry reactions. Two of the methods have the same root: formation of thin, covalently attached, reactive interfacial layers of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) via spin coating onto silicon wafers followed by reactive modification with either propargylamine or 5-hexynoic acid. The amine or the carboxylic acid moieties react with the epoxy groups of PGMA, creating interfacial polymer layers decorated with alkyne groups. The third method consists of using copolymers comprising glycidyl methacrylate and propargyl methacrylate (pGP). The pGP copolymers are spin coated and covalently attached on silicon wafers. For each method, we investigate the factors that control film thickness and content of alkyne groups using ellipsometry, and study the nanophase structure of the films using neutron reflectometry. Azide-terminated polymers of methacrylic acid and 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization were attached to the alkyne-modified substrates using 'click' chemistry, and grafting densities in the range of 0.007-0.95 chains nm -2 were attained. The maximum density of alkyne groups attained by functionalization of PGMA with propargylamine or 5-hexynoic acid was approximately 2 alkynes nm -3 . The alkyne content obtained by the three decorating approaches was sufficiently high that it was not the limiting factor for the click reaction of azide-capped polymers.

  6. Engaging pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) clinical staff to lead practice improvement: the PICU participatory action research project (PICU-PAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Jean-Paul; Skippen, Peter W; Mosavianpour, Mir Kaber; Pitfield, Alexander; Chakraborty, Bubli; Hunte, Garth; Lindstrom, Ronald; Kissoon, Niranjan; McKellin, William H

    2014-01-08

    Despite considerable efforts, engaging staff to lead quality improvement activities in practice settings is a persistent challenge. At British Columbia Children's Hospital (BCCH), the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) undertook a new phase of quality improvement actions based on the Community of Practice (CoP) model with Participatory Action Research (PAR). This approach aims to mobilize the PICU 'community' as a whole with a focus on practice; namely, to create a 'community of practice' to support reflection, learning, and innovation in everyday work. An iterative two-stage PAR process using mixed methods has been developed among the PICU CoP to describe the environment (stage 1) and implement specific interventions (stage 2). Stage 1 is ethnographic description of the unit's care practice. Surveys, interviews, focus groups, and direct observations describe the clinical staff's experiences and perspectives around bedside care and quality endeavors in the PICU. Contrasts and comparisons across participants, time and activities help understanding the PICU culture and experience. Stage 2 is a succession of PAR spirals, using results from phase 1 to set up specific interventions aimed at building the staff's capability to conduct QI projects while acquiring appropriate technical skills and leadership capacity (primary outcome). Team communication, information, and interaction will be enhanced through a knowledge exchange (KE) and a wireless network of iPADs. Lack of leadership at the staff level in order to improve daily practice is a recognized challenge that faces many hospitals. We believe that the PAR approach within a highly motivated CoP is a sound method to create the social dynamic and cultural context within which clinical teams can grow, reflect, innovate and feel proud to better serve patients.

  7. Nanofabrication Yields. Hybridization and Click-Fixation of Polycyclic DNA Nanoassemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Lundberg, Erik P.

    2011-09-27

    We demonstrate the stepwise assembly of a fully addressable polycyclic DNA hexagon nanonetwork for the preparation of a four-ring system, one of the biggest networks yet constructed from tripodal building blocks. We find that the yield exhibits a distinct upper level <100%, a fundamental problem of thermodynamic DNA assembly that appears to have been overlooked in the DNA nanotechnology literature. A simplistic model based on a single step-yield parameter y can quantitatively describe the total yield of DNA assemblies in one-pot reactions as Y = yduplex n, with n the number of hybridization steps. Experimental errors introducing deviations from perfect stoichiometry and the thermodynamics of hybridization equilibria contribute to decreasing the value of yduplex (on average y = 0.96 for our 10 base pair hybridization). For the four-ring system (n = 31), the total yield is thus less than 30%, which is clearly unsatisfactory if bigger nanoconstructs of this class are to be designed. Therefore, we introduced site-specific click chemistry for making and purifying robust building blocks for future modular constructs of larger assemblies. Although the present yield of this robust module was only about 10%, it demonstrates a first step toward a general fabrication approach. Interestingly, we find that the click yields follow quantitatively a binomial distribution, the predictability of which indicates the usefulness of preparing pools of pure and robust building blocks in this way. The binomial behavior indicates that there is no interference between the six simultaneous click reactions but that step-yield limiting factors such as topological constraints and Cu(I) catalyst concentration are local and independent. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Organizational Consequences of Staff Turnover in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Danica K.; Edwards, Jennifer R.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of staff turnover on perceptions of organizational demands and support among staff who remained employed in substance abuse treatment programs. The sample consisted of 353 clinical staff from 63 outpatient agencies. Two scales from the Survey of Organizational Functioning (SOF) measured work-environment demands (Stress, Inadequate Staffing), and three measured supportive work relationships (Communication, Cohesion, Peer Collaboration). Results from a series of multilevel models documented that counselors working in programs that had previously experienced high staff turnover perceived higher demands and lower support within their organization, even after controlling for other potentially burdensome factors such as budget, census, and individual measures of workload. Two individual-level variables, caseload and tenure, were important determinants of work-environment demands, but were not related to supportive work relationships. Findings suggest that staff turnover increases workplace demands and decreases perceptions of support, and underscore the need to reduce stress and minimize subsequent turnover among clinical staff. PMID:22154028

  9. Interventions to improve teamwork and communications among healthcare staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, P; Rathbone, J; Catchpole, K

    2011-04-01

    Concern over the frequency of unintended harm to patients has focused attention on the importance of teamwork and communication in avoiding errors. This has led to experiments with teamwork training programmes for clinical staff, mostly based on aviation models. These are widely assumed to be effective in improving patient safety, but the extent to which this assumption is justified by evidence remains unclear. A systematic literature review on the effects of teamwork training for clinical staff was performed. Information was sought on outcomes including staff attitudes, teamwork skills, technical performance, efficiency and clinical outcomes. Of 1036 relevant abstracts identified, 14 articles were analysed in detail: four randomized trials and ten non-randomized studies. Overall study quality was poor, with particular problems over blinding, subjective measures and Hawthorne effects. Few studies reported on every outcome category. Most reported improved staff attitudes, and six of eight reported significantly better teamwork after training. Five of eight studies reported improved technical performance, improved efficiency or reduced errors. Three studies reported evidence of clinical benefit, but this was modest or of borderline significance in each case. Studies with a stronger intervention were more likely to report benefits than those providing less training. None of the randomized trials found evidence of technical or clinical benefit. The evidence for technical or clinical benefit from teamwork training in medicine is weak. There is some evidence of benefit from studies with more intensive training programmes, but better quality research and cost-benefit analysis are needed. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A unique collaborative nursing evidence-based practice initiative using the Iowa model: a clinical nurse specialist, a health science librarian, and a staff nurse's success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krom, Zachary R; Batten, Janene; Bautista, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to share how the collaboration of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS), a health science librarian, and a staff nurse can heighten staff nurses' awareness of the evidence-based practice (EBP) process. The staff nurse is expected to incorporate EBP into daily patient care. This expectation is fueled by the guidelines established by professional, accrediting, and regulatory bodies. Barriers to incorporating EBP into practice have been well documented in the literature. A CNS, a health science librarian, and a staff nurse collaborated to develop an EBP educational program for staff nurses. The staff nurse provides the real-time practice issues, the CNS gives extensive knowledge of translating research into practice, and the health science librarian is an expert at retrieving the information from the literature. The resulting collaboration at this academic medical center has increased staff nurse exposure to and knowledge about EBP principles and techniques. The collaborative relationship among the CNS, health science librarian, and staff nurse effectively addresses a variety of barriers to EBP. This successful collaborative approach can be utilized by other medical centers seeking to educate staff nurses about the EBP process.

  11. Optimized Cost per Click in Taobao Display Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Han; Jin, Junqi; Tan, Chang; Pan, Fei; Zeng, Yifan; Li, Han; Gai, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Taobao, as the largest online retail platform in the world, provides billions of online display advertising impressions for millions of advertisers every day. For commercial purposes, the advertisers bid for specific spots and target crowds to compete for business traffic. The platform chooses the most suitable ads to display in tens of milliseconds. Common pricing methods include cost per mille (CPM) and cost per click (CPC). Traditional advertising systems target certain traits of users and...

  12. Using quality measures for quality improvement: the perspective of hospital staff.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Aghaei Hashjin

    Full Text Available RESEARCH OBJECTIVE: This study examines the perspectives of a range of key hospital staff on the use, importance, scientific background, availability of data, feasibility of data collection, cost benefit aspects and availability of professional personnel for measurement of quality indicators among Iranian hospitals. The study aims to facilitate the use of quality indicators to improve quality of care in hospitals. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted over the period 2009 to 2010. Staff at Iranian hospitals completed a self-administered questionnaire eliciting their views on organizational, clinical process, and outcome (clinical effectiveness, patient safety and patient centeredness indicators. POPULATION STUDIED: 93 hospital frontline staff including hospital/nursing managers, medical doctors, nurses, and quality improvement/medical records officers in 48 general and specialized hospitals in Iran. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On average, only 69% of respondents reported using quality indicators in practice at their affiliated hospitals. Respondents varied significantly in their reported use of organizational, clinical process and outcome quality indicators. Overall, clinical process and effectiveness indicators were reported to be least used. The reported use of indicators corresponded with their perceived level of importance. Quality indicators were reported to be used among clinical staff significantly more than among managerial staff. In total, 74% of the respondents reported to use obligatory indicators, while this was 68% for voluntary indicators (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: There is a general awareness of the importance and usability of quality indicators among hospital staff in Iran, but their use is currently mostly directed towards external accountability purposes. To increase the formative use of quality indicators, creation of a common culture and feeling of shared ownership, alongside an increased uptake of clinical process and

  13. Assessing the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cells and In Vivo using Targeted Click Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Angela; Pell, Victoria R; Shaffer, Karl J; Evans, Cameron; Stanley, Nathan J; Robb, Ellen L; Prime, Tracy A; Chouchani, Edward T; Cochemé, Helena M; Fearnley, Ian M; Vidoni, Sara; James, Andrew M; Porteous, Carolyn M; Partridge, Linda; Krieg, Thomas; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P

    2016-02-09

    The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) is a major determinant and indicator of cell fate, but it is not possible to assess small changes in Δψm within cells or in vivo. To overcome this, we developed an approach that utilizes two mitochondria-targeted probes each containing a triphenylphosphonium (TPP) lipophilic cation that drives their accumulation in response to Δψm and the plasma membrane potential (Δψp). One probe contains an azido moiety and the other a cyclooctyne, which react together in a concentration-dependent manner by "click" chemistry to form MitoClick. As the mitochondrial accumulation of both probes depends exponentially on Δψm and Δψp, the rate of MitoClick formation is exquisitely sensitive to small changes in these potentials. MitoClick accumulation can then be quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This approach enables assessment of subtle changes in membrane potentials within cells and in the mouse heart in vivo. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Brain stem auditory potentials evoked by clicks in the presence of high-pass filtered noise in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncelet, L; Deltenre, P; Coppens, A; Michaux, C; Coussart, E

    2006-04-01

    This study evaluates the effects of a high-frequency hearing loss simulated by the high-pass-noise masking method, on the click-evoked brain stem-evoked potentials (BAEP) characteristics in dogs. BAEP were obtained in response to rarefaction and condensation click stimuli from 60 dB normal hearing level (NHL, corresponding to 89 dB sound pressure level) to wave V threshold, using steps of 5 dB in eleven 58 to 80-day-old Beagle puppies. Responses were added, providing an equivalent to alternate polarity clicks, and subtracted, providing the rarefaction-condensation potential (RCDP). The procedure was repeated while constant level, high-pass filtered (HPF) noise was superposed to the click. Cut-off frequencies of the successively used filters were 8, 4, 2 and 1 kHz. For each condition, wave V and RCDP thresholds, and slope of the wave V latency-intensity curve (LIC) were collected. The intensity range at which RCDP could not be recorded (pre-RCDP range) was calculated. Compared with the no noise condition, the pre-RCDP range significantly diminished and the wave V threshold significantly increased when the superposed HPF noise reached the 4 kHz area. Wave V LIC slope became significantly steeper with the 2 kHz HPF noise. In this non-invasive model of high-frequency hearing loss, impaired hearing of frequencies from 8 kHz and above escaped detection through click BAEP study in dogs. Frequencies above 13 kHz were however not specifically addressed in this study.

  15. Solvent-resistant nanofiltration for product purification and catalyst recovery in click chemistry reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Odena, Angels; Vandezande, Pieter; Fournier, David; Van Camp, Wim; Du Prez, Filip E; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2010-01-18

    The quickly developing field of "click" chemistry would undoubtedly benefit from the availability of an easy and efficient technology for product purification to reduce the potential health risks associated with the presence of copper in the final product. Therefore, solvent-resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) membranes have been developed to selectively separate "clicked" polymers from the copper catalyst and solvent. By using these solvent-stable cross-linked polyimide membranes in diafiltration, up to 98 % of the initially present copper could be removed through the membrane together with the DMF solvent, the polymer product being almost completely retained. This paper also presents the first SRNF application in which the catalyst permeates through the membrane and the reaction product is retained.

  16. Grafting of Polycaprolactone on Oxidized Nanocelluloses by Click Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Daneault

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is the grafting of polycaprolactone diol (PCL on the surface of oxidized nanocelluloses (ONC in order to enhance the compatibility between the hydrophilic cellulose nanofibres and the hydrophobic polymer matrix. This grafting was successfully realized with a new strategy known as click chemistry. In this context, the oxidized nanocelluloses bearing alkyl groups (ONC-PR were prepared by reacting amino groups of propargylamine (PR with carboxyl groups of ONC. In parallel, PCL was converted into azido-polycaprolactone (PCL-N3 in two steps: (i tosylation of polycaprolactone (PCL-OTs and (ii conversion of PCL-OTs into PCL-N3 by nucleophilic displacement using sodium azide. Finally, ONC-PR was reacted with PCL-N3 in heterogeneous conditions through click chemistry in order to prepare polycaprolactone grafted oxidized nanocellulose (ONC-g-PCL, which could be suitable for improving the interfacial adhesion in the composite materials. The grafted samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C-NMR spectroscopic techniques.

  17. Grafting of Polycaprolactone on Oxidized Nanocelluloses by Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkaddour, Abdelhaq; Jradi, Khalil; Robert, Sylvain; Daneault, Claude

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the grafting of polycaprolactone diol (PCL) on the surface of oxidized nanocelluloses (ONC) in order to enhance the compatibility between the hydrophilic cellulose nanofibres and the hydrophobic polymer matrix. This grafting was successfully realized with a new strategy known as click chemistry. In this context, the oxidized nanocelluloses bearing alkyl groups (ONC-PR) were prepared by reacting amino groups of propargylamine (PR) with carboxyl groups of ONC. In parallel, PCL was converted into azido-polycaprolactone (PCL-N3) in two steps: (i) tosylation of polycaprolactone (PCL-OTs) and (ii) conversion of PCL-OTs into PCL-N3 by nucleophilic displacement using sodium azide. Finally, ONC-PR was reacted with PCL-N3 in heterogeneous conditions through click chemistry in order to prepare polycaprolactone grafted oxidized nanocellulose (ONC-g-PCL), which could be suitable for improving the interfacial adhesion in the composite materials. The grafted samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C-NMR) spectroscopic techniques. PMID:28348327

  18. Moral Stress and Job Burnout Among Frontline Staff Conducting Clinical Research on Affective and Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Adam L; Fisher, Celia B

    2016-06-01

    There has been increased attention on job-related stress and burnout experienced by clinicians working with vulnerable and at-risk populations, including effects on personal mental health, therapeutic decision-making, and job effectiveness. Little is known, however, about the job-related stressors and symptoms of burnout experienced by clinical research staff working with similar populations, especially in terms of moral stress they may experience when adherence to scientific procedures appears to conflict with their personal commitment to address the clinical needs of their research participants or role as health care provider. In this national study, 125 frontline research workers conducting clinical research studies with individuals diagnosed with affective and anxiety disorders completed an online survey including measures assessing research work related moral stress, job burnout, organizational ethics climate and organizational research support. Results indicated that younger research workers, those whose research work was part of a graduate assistantship and perceptions of higher participant research risk were associated with higher levels of moral stress and job burnout. Supportive organizational climates were associated with lower levels of moral stress and job burnout. Recommendations for clinical research workers, supervisors and clinical training directors are discussed.

  19. EXCTRA - EXploiting the Click-TRAil : Assessing the benefits of Learning Analytics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conijn, Rianne; Snijders, Chris; Matzat, Uwe; Kleingeld, Ad; Nij Bijvank, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Learning Management Systems (LMS) are being used in the majority of educational institutions to provide learning materials online. As a by-product of these systems—every click is recorded—one gets a rich amount of data about students’ online behaviour. Recently many researchers have

  20. Navigation To and From a Page: Which Links Get Clicked From Where

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use Google Analytics navigation summary data to find out what page users most frequently click your Contact Us link from (Previous Page Path), or which links on your homepage are popular or unpopular (Next Page Path).

  1. Developing topic-specific search filters for PubMed with click-through data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Lu, Z

    2013-01-01

    Search filters have been developed and demonstrated for better information access to the immense and ever-growing body of publications in the biomedical domain. However, to date the number of filters remains quite limited because the current filter development methods require significant human efforts in manual document review and filter term selection. In this regard, we aim to investigate automatic methods for generating search filters. We present an automated method to develop topic-specific filters on the basis of users' search logs in PubMed. Specifically, for a given topic, we first detect its relevant user queries and then include their corresponding clicked articles to serve as the topic-relevant document set accordingly. Next, we statistically identify informative terms that best represent the topic-relevant document set using a background set composed of topic irrelevant articles. Lastly, the selected representative terms are combined with Boolean operators and evaluated on benchmark datasets to derive the final filter with the best performance. We applied our method to develop filters for four clinical topics: nephrology, diabetes, pregnancy, and depression. For the nephrology filter, our method obtained performance comparable to the state of the art (sensitivity of 91.3%, specificity of 98.7%, precision of 94.6%, and accuracy of 97.2%). Similarly, high-performing results (over 90% in all measures) were obtained for the other three search filters. Based on PubMed click-through data, we successfully developed a high-performance method for generating topic-specific search filters that is significantly more efficient than existing manual methods. All data sets (topic-relevant and irrelevant document sets) used in this study and a demonstration system are publicly available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Lu/downloads/CQ_filter/

  2. Au-Cu core-shell nanocube-catalyzed click reactions for efficient synthesis of diverse triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madasu, Mahesh; Hsia, Chi-Fu; Huang, Michael H

    2017-06-01

    Au-Cu core-shell nanocubes and octahedra synthesized in aqueous solution were employed to catalyze a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between phenylacetylene and benzyl azide in water at 50 °C for 3 h. Interestingly, the nanocubes were far more efficient in catalyzing this reaction, giving 91% yield of a regioselective 1,4-triazole product, while octahedra only recorded 46% yield. The Au-Cu nanocubes were subsequently employed to catalyze the click reaction between benzyl azide and a broad range of aromatic and aliphatic alkynes. The product yields ranged from 78 to 99%. Clearly the Au-Cu cubes exposing {100} surfaces are an excellent and green catalyst for click reactions.

  3. Organizational consequences of staff turnover in outpatient substance abuse treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Danica K; Becan, Jennifer E; Flynn, Patrick M

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of staff turnover on perceptions of organizational demands and support among staff who remained employed in substance abuse treatment programs. The sample consisted of 353 clinical staff from 63 outpatient agencies. Two scales from the Survey of Organizational Functioning measured work environment demands (stress and inadequate staffing), and 3 measured supportive work relationships (communication, cohesion, and peer collaboration). Results from a series of multilevel models documented that counselors working in programs that had previously experienced high staff turnover perceived higher demands and lower support within their organization, even after controlling for other potentially burdensome factors such as budget, census, and individual measures of workload. Two individual-level variables, caseload and tenure, were important determinants of work environment demands but were not related to supportive work relationships. Findings suggest that staff turnover increases workplace demands, decreases perceptions of support, and underscores the need to reduce stress and minimize subsequent turnover among clinical staff. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Click Chemistry Approach towards Flavin-Cyclodextrin Conjugates-Bioinspired Sulfoxidation Catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomanová, P.; Šturala, J.; Buděšínský, Miloš; Cibulka, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 11 (2015), s. 19837-19848 ISSN 1420-3049 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : click chemistry * cyclodextrin * flavin * monooxygenase * oxidation * sulfoxides * green chemistry Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.465, year: 2015 http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/20/11/19667/htm

  5. Selling You and Your Clicks: Examining the Audience Commodification of Google

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjin Kang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a political economy perspective, this paper argues that Google’s surplus value from advertising results from its extensive and transformative commodification of users. The unique features of Google as an advertising venue intensify the commodification of its users as compared to traditional media in several ways. First, the simplified valorization process of Google’s advertising methods enables Google to earn significantly more surplus value than those of traditional media. Also, Google’s personalized advertising strategies, its precise measurement of advertising costs based on users’ behaviors represented as “the number of clicks,” and the unclear distinction between advertisements and serviced content commodify its users’ online activities. Lastly, this essay asserts that Google commodifies the aggregated consciousnesses of its users because it sells keywords for advertisers to attach advertisements to search-data output, which are priced in accordance with their popularity. This “click-through” form of behavioral commodification has significant implications for the future of media.

  6. The Click It or Ticket evaluation, 2012 : traffic safety facts : research note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Click It or Ticket (CIOT) mobilizations are national, State, and local high-visibility enforcement (HVE) efforts designed to encourage motorists to buckle up. They have been conducted at the national level each year around Memorial Day since 2003. : ...

  7. The effects of temporo mandibular joint disorder with clicking symptom on children mastication performance in Deutero Malay race children aged 12-15 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Hartman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporo Mandibular Joint Disorder (TMD could be caused by forward head posture. Articular sound/TMJ clicking is the most often sign and symptom for TMD that could happen in human being. The presence of TMD such as TMJ clicking would cause an imbalance masticatory system. The purpose of this research is to investigate TMJ clicking effects to masticatory performance. This research was cross-sectional study with a type of epidemiology survey. Subject were children aged 12-15 years old Deutero-Malay sub-races Live in Bandung and was taken using multi-stage random sampling technique. Subject; consisted of 24 children as control group and 28 children as TMJ clicking group. Both group were then checked for masticatory performance using multiple sieve method and 20x chewing of artificial test food. Mastication performance value represented by median particle size (MPS particle distribution (b for each group. MPS from TMJ clicking group (3.0571,SD=0.9990 showed higher value than control group (2.28958,SD=0.66838. Statistic analysis with t-test showed that there’s a significant result in both of group (pvalue=0,0024, α = 0,05. Conclussion, temporo mandibular joint clicking subject has lower masticatory performance.

  8. Functionalization of PEDOT by Click Chemistry and ATRP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    Poly(3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is a conductive polymer which has received increasing attention and many developments have been investigated. PEDOT has been applied in many different areas such as biosensors or polymer solar cells. This work presents a modification of PEDOT films through...... Click Chemistry with alkynes followed by activator regenerated by electron transfer (ARGET) atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to develop PEDOT films with anti‐fouling properties through application of a model system based on a crosslinked surface of polystyrene PS‐N3....

  9. Multi-channel services for click and mortars : Development of a design method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, L.P.A.

    2006-01-01

    The rise of Internet commerce led to multiple predictions of disintermediation and the decline of physical shopping. However, a "click and mortar" approach, which combines online, offline and telephone contact, has added value for customers and for supplier profitability, as recent research

  10. Frequency of temporomandibular joint dysfunction with clicking symptom due to primary molar premature loss in children aged 6-12 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riana Hestu Laksitowati

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction with clicking symptom is sound “click” when open and close the mouth. The purpose of this study was to obtain the description of the frequency of temporomandibular joint dysfunction with clicking symptom caused by premature loss of primary molar teeth in children aged 6-12 years old at SDIT Imam Bukhari. The study was a descriptive survey, 136 students as samples were taken by purposive sampling technique. Premature loss of primary molar teeth examined by checking up the first and second primary molars upper and lower jaw using the hand mirror and explorer. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction examined by palpation and using a stethoscope. The result of this study showed that from 136 students having premature loss there are 49 students (36,03% had temporomandibular joint dysfunction with clicking symptom. The conclusion of this study indicates that more than one-fourth students at SDIT Imam Bukhari with premature loss of primary molar teeth had temporomandibular joint dysfunction with clicking symptom.

  11. Managing social difficulties: roles and responsibilities of patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Penny; Bingham, Laura; Taylor, Sally; Hanif, Naheed; Podmore, Emma; Velikova, Galina

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of guidance on assessment and management of psychosocial and supportive-care problems or needs will be successful only if consideration is given to existing skills, experience and expectations of staff and patients. This study examines the roles and responsibilities of staff, patients and families in relation to management of social difficulties and proposes a pathway for response. A qualitative study was performed using staff and patient interviews. Seventeen doctors and 16 nurses were interviewed using patient scenarios and a support service questionnaire. Patients (n = 41) completed a screening questionnaire (the Social Difficulties Inventory) and were interviewed. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and subjected to a Framework analysis. Analysis examined (1) actions taken by staff and patients in response to social difficulties, (2) reasons given for action taken and (3) perceptions of staff and patients of who was responsible for taking action. Staff were confident concerning clinically related issues (i.e. mobility) but more hesitant concerning difficulties related to money, work and family concerns. Patients liked to cope with problems on their own where possible, would have liked information or support from staff but were uncertain how to access this. Results led to development of a hierarchy of interventions in response to detected social difficulties. For routine assessment of social difficulties, patients, nurses and doctors will have to work collaboratively, with nurses taking a lead in discussion. For specific clinically related problems doctors would play a more primary role. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Investigation of zoonotic infections among Auckland Zoo staff: 1991-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, M B; Morris, A J; Sinclair, D A; Pritchard, C P

    2012-12-01

    Investigation was undertaken to assess the occurrence of zoonotic infection among staff at Auckland Zoological Park, New Zealand, in 1991, 2002 and 2010. Serial cross-sectional health surveys in 1991, 2002 and 2010 comprising a health questionnaire, and serological, immunological and microbiological analysis for a range of potential zoonotic infections were performed. Laboratory results for zoo animals were also reviewed for 2004-2010 to assess the occurrence of potential zoonotic infections. Veterinary clinic, animal handler, grounds, maintenance and administrative staff participated in the surveys, with 49, 42 and 46 participants in the 1991, 2002 and 2010 surveys, respectively (29% of total zoo staff in 2010). A small number of staff reported work-related infections, including erysipelas (1), giardiasis (1) and campylobacteriosis (1). The seroprevalence of antibodies to hepatitis A virus and Toxoplasma gondii closely reflected those in the Auckland community. No carriage of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was detected, and most of those with anti-HBV antibodies had been vaccinated. Few staff had serological evidence of past leptospiral infection. Three veterinary clinic staff had raised Chlamydophila psittaci antibodies, all Auckland Zoo, this was uncommon and risks appear to be adequately managed under current policies and procedures. Nevertheless, ongoing assessment of risk factors is needed as environmental, human and animal disease and management factors change. Policies and procedures should be reviewed periodically in conjunction with disease monitoring results for both animals and staff to minimise zoonotic transmission. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  14. Click chemistry for [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}] labeling of Lys{sup 3}-bombesin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro-Flores, G., E-mail: ferro_flores@yahoo.com.m [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Rivero, I.A. [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, Baja California (Mexico); Santos-Cuevas, C.L. [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Sarmiento, J.I. [Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, Baja California (Mexico); Arteaga de Murphy, C. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran (Mexico); Ocampo-Garcia, B.E. [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Garcia-Becerra, R.; Ordaz-Rosado, D. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC labeled Lys{sup 3}-bombesin has shown specific binding to gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRP-r) over-expressed in cancer cells. Click chemistry offers an innovative functionalization strategy for biomolecules such as bombesin. The aim of this research was to apply a click chemistry approach for [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}] labeling of Lys{sup 3}-bombesin and to compare the in vitro MCF7 breast cancer cell uptake and biodistribution profile in mice with that of {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin. The results suggest a higher lipophilicity for {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-triazole-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin which explains its higher in vivo hepatobiliary elimination. Pancreas-to-blood ratio for {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-triazole-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin was 4.46 at 3 h and both bombesin radiopharmaceuticals showed specific recognition for GRP receptors in MCF7 cancer cells. Click chemistry is a reliable approach for [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}] labeling of Lys{sup 3}-bombesin.

  15. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials with the use of acoustic clicks and complex verbal sounds in young adults with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouni, Sophia N; Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Ziavra, Nausika; Koutsojannis, Constantinos

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic signals are transmitted through the external and middle ear mechanically to the cochlea where they are transduced into electrical impulse for further transmission via the auditory nerve. The auditory nerve encodes the acoustic sounds that are conveyed to the auditory brainstem. Multiple brainstem nuclei, the cochlea, the midbrain, the thalamus, and the cortex constitute the central auditory system. In clinical practice, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to simple stimuli such as click or tones are widely used. Recently, complex stimuli or complex auditory brain responses (cABRs), such as monosyllabic speech stimuli and music, are being used as a tool to study the brainstem processing of speech sounds. We have used the classic 'click' as well as, for the first time, the artificial successive complex stimuli 'ba', which constitutes the Greek word 'baba' corresponding to the English 'daddy'. Twenty young adults institutionally diagnosed as dyslexic (10 subjects) or light dyslexic (10 subjects) comprised the diseased group. Twenty sex-, age-, education-, hearing sensitivity-, and IQ-matched normal subjects comprised the control group. Measurements included the absolute latencies of waves I through V, the interpeak latencies elicited by the classical acoustic click, the negative peak latencies of A and C waves, as well as the interpeak latencies of A-C elicited by the verbal stimulus 'baba' created on a digital speech synthesizer. The absolute peak latencies of waves I, III, and V in response to monoaural rarefaction clicks as well as the interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, and I-V in the dyslexic subjects, although increased in comparison with normal subjects, did not reach the level of a significant difference (pwave C and the interpeak latencies of A-C elicited by verbal stimuli were found to be increased in the dyslexic group in comparison with the control group (p=0.0004 and p=0.045, respectively). In the subgroup consisting of 10 patients suffering from

  16. The 2007 click it or ticket high-visibility seat belt mobilization : traffic tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    In May 2007 the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration : sponsored the fifth national Click It or Ticket (CIOT) : high-visibility seat belt enforcement mobilization, which followed : the CIOT program model of earned and paid media : publicizi...

  17. Nursing staffs' emotional well-being and caring behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chana, Navtej; Kennedy, Paul; Chessell, Zoë J

    2015-10-01

    To examine the relationships between structural factors (work stressors), individual factors (demographics and the personal resources of resilience and social support) and transactional factors (appraisals and coping), and nursing staffs' levels of burnout, psychological distress and caring behaviours. A further aim was to examine the relationships between nursing staffs' levels of burnout and psychological distress and their caring behaviours. Burnout and psychological distress levels have been found to be high in National Health Service nursing staff and furthermore this emotional distress has been found to affect patient care. In a National Health Service striving to provide high-quality patient-centred care, it is essential that factors affecting nursing staffs' well-being and their caring behaviours are examined. A cross-sectional correlation-based survey design. A sample of 102 nursing staff from an Acute National Health Service Trust were recruited in 2010. Participants completed the questionnaires: Nursing Stress Scale, Social Support Questionnaire-Short Form, Connor and Davidson Resilience Scale-2, Occupational Coping Self-Efficacy Scale for Nurses, PsychNurse Scale, Maslach Burnout Inventory, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Caring Behaviours Inventory-revised. Due to the nonparametric nature of part of the data, Spearman's Rho correlations were used for analysis. Demographics were not found to be regularly correlated with nursing staffs' burnout, psychological distress or caring behaviours. Work stressors, coping strategies and self-efficacy were found to be significantly correlated with nursing staffs' burnout and psychological distress. Caring behaviours were also correlated with coping strategies and self-efficacy. Importantly, correlations were found between caring behaviours and nursing staffs' burnout and psychological distress. It is extremely important that the emotional well-being of nursing staff is supported, both for them, and

  18. Understanding Mircrobial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    chemistry , microbiology and worked with the second fellow from von Andrian lab on the immunology and microscopy. Teaching has come from several...to follow essentially any bacteria using fluorescent techniques into the host or other environments. This chemistry is also a potential method for...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0367 TITLE: Understanding Microbial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click Chemistry PRINCIPAL

  19. A study on job satisfaction among clinical and non-clinical hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Two hundred clinical and non-clinical hospital staff were invited to take part in the study. They completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Job Descriptive Index (JDI). Results: The results indicated that majority clinical and non-clinical staff were satisfied with their jobs as regards the parameters of the ...

  20. Perinatal staff perceptions of safety and quality in their service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinni, Suzanne V; Wallace, Euan M; Cross, Wendy M

    2014-11-28

    Ensuring safe and appropriate service delivery is central to a high quality maternity service. With this in mind, over recent years much attention has been given to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, staff education and risk reporting systems. Less attention has been given to assessing staff perceptions of a service's safety and quality and what factors may influence that. In this study we set out to assess staff perceptions of safety and quality of a maternity service and to explore potential influences on service safety. The study was undertaken within a new low risk metropolitan maternity service in Victoria, Australia with a staffing profile comprising midwives (including students), neonatal nurses, specialist obstetricians, junior medical staff and clerical staff. In depth open-ended interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted with 23 staff involved in the delivery of perinatal care, including doctors, midwives, nurses, nursing and midwifery students, and clerical staff. Data were analyzed using naturalistic interpretive inquiry to identify emergent themes. Staff unanimously reported that there were robust systems and processes in place to maintain safety and quality. Three major themes were apparent: (1) clinical governance, (2) dominance of midwives, (3) inter-professional relationships. Overall, there was a strong sense that, at least in this midwifery-led service, midwives had the greatest opportunity to be an influence, both positively and negatively, on the safe delivery of perinatal care. The importance of understanding team dynamics, particularly mutual respect, trust and staff cohesion, were identified as key issues for potential future service improvement. Senior staff, particularly midwives and neonatal nurses, play central roles in shaping team behaviors and attitudes that may affect the safety and quality of service delivery. We suggest that strategies targeting senior staff to enhance their performance in

  1. Synthesis and Catalytic Applications of Ruthenium(0) Nanoparticles in Click Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avvaru Praveen; Baek, Minwook; Sridhar, Chirumarry; Kumar, Begari Prem; Lee, Yongill [Changwon National Univ., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Here we report a facile synthesis of ruthenium (Ru) Nanoparticles (NPs) by chemical co-precipitation method. The calcination of ruthenium hydroxide samples at 500 .deg. C under hydrogen atmosphere lead to the formation of Ru{sup 0} NPs. The size and aggregation of Ru NPs depends on the pH of the medium, and type of surfactant and its concentration. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope image (TEM) analyses of particles indicated the formation of Ru{sup 0} NPs, and have 10 to 20 nm sizes. As-synthesized Ru{sup 0} NPs are characterized and investigated their catalytic ability in click chemistry (azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions), showing good results in terms of reactivity. Interestingly, small structural differences in triazines influence the catalytic activity of Ru{sup 0} nanocatalysts. Click chemistry has recently emerged to become one of the most powerful tools in drug discovery, chemical biology, proteomics, medical sciences and nanotechnology/nanomedicine. In addition, preliminary tests of recycling showed good results with neither loss of activity or significant precipitation.

  2. Conjugating folate on superparamagnetic Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles using click chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Xiaofang; Ge, Zhaoqiang; Pang, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Gold-coated magnetic core@shell nanoparticles, which exhibit magneto-optical properties, not only enhance the chemical stability of core and biocompatibility of surface, but also provide a combination of multimodal imaging and therapeutics. The conjugation of these tiny nanoparticles with specific biomolecules allows researchers to target the desired location. In this paper, superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 @Au nanoparticles were synthesized and functionalized with the azide group on the surface by formation of self-assembled monolayers. Folate (FA) molecules, non-immunogenic target ligands for cancer cells, are conjugated with alkyne and then immobilized on the azide-terminated Fe 3 O 4 @Au nanoparticles through copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click reaction). Myelogenous leukemia K562 cells were used as a folate receptor (FR) model, which can be targeted and extracted by magnetic field after interaction with the Fe 3 O 4 @Au–FA nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Self-assembled azide-terminated group on superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 @Au nanoparticles followed by click reaction with alkyne-functionalized folate, allowing the nanoparticles target folate receptor of cancer cells. - Highlights: • Azidoundecanethiol was coated on the superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 @Au nanoparticles by forming self-assembled monolayers. • Alkyne-terminated folate was synthesized from a reaction between the amine and the carboxylic acid. • Conjugation of Fe 3 O 4 @Au nanoparticles with folate was made by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry

  3. Predictors of job satisfaction among academic faculty members: do instructional and clinical staff differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin C; Song, Jae W; Kim, H Myra; Woolliscroft, James O; Quint, Elisabeth H; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Gyetko, Margaret R

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare predictors of job satisfaction between instructional and clinical faculty members. A 61-item faculty job satisfaction survey was distributed to 1898 academic faculty members at the University of Michigan Medical School. The anonymous survey was web-based. Questions covered topics on departmental organisation, research, clinical and teaching support, compensation, mentorship, and promotion. Levels of satisfaction were contrasted between faculty members on the two tracks, and predictors of job satisfaction were identified using linear regression models. Response rates for the instructional and clinical faculty groups were 43.1% and 46.7%, respectively. Clinical faculty members reported being less satisfied with how they were mentored and fewer reported understanding the process for promotion. There was no significant difference in overall job satisfaction between the two faculty groups. Surprisingly, clinical faculty members with mentors were significantly less satisfied with how they were mentored and with career advancement, and were significantly less likely to choose an academic career if they had to do it all over again compared with instructional faculty mentees. Additionally, senior-level clinical faculty members were significantly less satisfied with their opportunities to mentor junior faculty members compared with senior-level instructional faculty staff. Significant predictors of job satisfaction for both groups included areas of autonomy, meeting career expectations, work-life balance, and departmental leadership. In the clinical track only, compensation and career advancement variables also emerged as significant predictors of overall job satisfaction. Greater emphasis must be placed on faculty members' well-being at both the institutional level and the level of departmental leadership. Efforts to enhance job satisfaction and improve retention are more likely to succeed if they are directed by locally designed

  4. The validity of clinical findings for diagnosing temporomandibular disorders in patients from different age and gender groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Chinami

    2008-01-01

    This study was to clarify the diagnostic accuracy of clinical findings for internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) compared with that of magnetic resonance imaging. A series of 4559 patients (879 male and 3680 female, mean age 32.7 years; range 8-85 years;) with temporomandibular disorders were clinically examined by un unspecified number of dentists. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The clinical findings that characterize disc displacement, anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) are pain, clicking sound and limitation of maximum mouth opening. These clinical findings were compared to the MRI interpretation, which was used as the gold standard for diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders to define the diagnostic accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of clinical findings. The prevalence of clinical finding was 3990 joints (43%) with pain, 2775 joints (30%) with clicking sound and 1731 patients (38%) with limitation of opening. Three thousands forty seven joints were diagnosed as having a normal disc position, 510 joints with sideways disc displacement, 2312 joints with ADDwR, 3239 joints with ADDwoR on MR image. The sensitivity of clinical findings was considerably low: sensitivity was 0.48 for pain versus internal derangement, 0.51 for clicking sound versus ADDwR, 0.62 for limitation of opening versus ADDwoR. The sensitivity was higher in the younger group for clicking sound versus ADDwR, but sensitivity was higher in the older group for limitation of opening versus ADDwoR. The diagnostic accuracy based on clinical findings of internal derangement of TMJ was found to be correlated with age. This study has been that the overall diagnostic accuracy of the clinical findings to determine the status of the joint is about 50-60%. The status of the joint could not be accurately determined by clinical findings

  5. Ultramild protein-mediated click chemistry creates efficient oligonucleotide probes for targeting and detecting nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåbo, Lina J.; Madsen, Charlotte S.; Jensen, Knud J.

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized synthetic oligonucleotides are finding growing applications in research, clinical studies, and therapy. However, it is not easy to prepare them in a biocompatible and highly efficient manner. We report a new strategy to synthesize oligonucleotides with promising nucleic acid...... targeting and detection properties. We focus in particular on the pH sensitivity of these new probes and their high target specificity. For the first time, human copper(I)-binding chaperon Cox17 was applied to effectively catalyze click labeling of oligonucleotides. This was performed under ultramild...... conditions with fluorophore, peptide, and carbohydrate azide derivatives. In thermal denaturation studies, the modified probes showed specific binding to complementary DNA and RNA targets. Finally, we demonstrated the pH sensitivity of the new rhodamine-based fluorescent probes in vitro and rationalize our...

  6. Irreversible bonding of polyimide and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based on a thiol-epoxy click reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Michelle V; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Elias, Anastasia L

    2016-01-01

    Polyimide is one of the most popular substrate materials for the microfabrication of flexible electronics, while polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the most widely used stretchable substrate/encapsulant material. These two polymers are essential in fabricating devices for microfluidics, bioelectronics, and the internet of things; bonding these materials together is a crucial challenge. In this work, we employ click chemistry at room temperature to irreversibly bond polyimide and PDMS through thiol-epoxy bonds using two different methods. In the first method, we functionalize the surfaces of the PDMS and polyimide substrates with mercaptosilanes and epoxysilanes, respectively, for the formation of a thiol-epoxy bond in the click reaction. In the second method, we functionalize one or both surfaces with mercaptosilane and introduce an epoxy adhesive layer between the two surfaces. When the surfaces are bonded using the epoxy adhesive without any surface functionalization, an extremely small peel strength (<0.01 N mm −1 ) is measured with a peel test, and adhesive failure occurs at the PDMS surface. With surface functionalization, however, remarkably higher peel strengths of ∼0.2 N mm −1 (method 1) and  >0.3 N mm −1 (method 2) are observed, and failure occurs by tearing of the PDMS layer. We envision that the novel processing route employing click chemistry can be utilized in various cases of stretchable and flexible device fabrication. (paper)

  7. Covalently {beta}-cyclodextrin modified single-walled carbon nanotubes: a novel artificial receptor synthesized by 'click' chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Zhen; Liang Li [Nankai University, State Key Laboratory and Institute of Elemento-Organic Chemistry (China); Liang Jiajie; Ma Yanfeng; Yang Xiaoying [Nankai University, Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology and Institute of Polymer Chemistry, College of Chemistry (China); Ren Dongmei [Nankai University, State Key Laboratory and Institute of Elemento-Organic Chemistry (China); Chen Yongsheng [Nankai University, Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology and Institute of Polymer Chemistry, College of Chemistry (China); Zheng Jianyu, E-mail: jyzheng@nankai.edu.c [Nankai University, State Key Laboratory and Institute of Elemento-Organic Chemistry (China)

    2008-08-15

    Novel {beta}-cyclodextrin covalently modified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been synthesized via a 'click' coupling reaction. The product was fully characterized with Raman, FTIR, XRD, UV-Vis-NIR spectra as well as TEM and TGA measurements. The effective functionalization via 'click' coupling has set up a facile and versatile route for modular preparation of SWNTs based functional materials. The inclusion complexation behavior of this artificial receptor with quinine has been investigated in aqueous solution by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  8. Characterization of Yellow Seahorse Hippocampus kuda feeding click sound signals in a laboratory environment: an application of probability density function and power spectral density analyses

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Saran, A.K.; Kuncolienker, D.S.; Sreepada, R.A.; Haris, K.; Fernandes, W.A

    based on the assumption of combinations of normal / Gaussian distributions indicate well fitted multimodal curves generated using MATLAB (Math Works Inc 2005) programs. Out of the twenty three clicks, four clicks (two clicks of 16 and 18cm male... Society of America 115: 2331-2333. Malamud BD, Turcotte DL. 1999. Self affine time series: measures of weak and strong persistence. Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference 80:173-196. MATLAB, Curve Fitting toolbox, Math Works Inc 2005. Available...

  9. Efficient One-click Browsing of Large Trajectory Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    presents a novel query type called sheaf, where users can browse trajectory data sets using a single mouse click. Sheaves are very versatile and can be used for location-based advertising, travel-time analysis, intersection analysis, and reachability analysis (isochrones). A novel in-memory trajectory...... index compresses the data by a factor of 12.4 and enables execution of sheaf queries in 40 ms. This is up to 2 orders of magnitude faster than existing work. We demonstrate the simplicity, versatility, and efficiency of sheaf queries using a real-world trajectory set consisting of 2.7 million...

  10. 'Click' dendritic phosphines: design, synthesis, application in Suzuki coupling, and recycling by nanofiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.C.C.; Vogt, D.; Müller, C.

    2009-01-01

    A new synthetic route towards stable molecular-weight enlarged monodentate phosphine ligands via click chemistry was developed. These ligands were applied in the Pd-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of aryl halides and phenyl boronic acid. The supported systems show very similar activities compared

  11. Awareness of biomedical waste management among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in Amritsar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ramandeep S; Manchanda, Adesh; Singh, Simarpreet; Verma, Nitin; Padda, Sarfaraz

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine awareness of biomedical waste (BMW) management policies and practices among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in a dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar, India, to inform the development of future policies for effective implementation of BMW rules. The study involved 160 staff members at the Amritsar hospital/clinics (80 dentists and 80 auxiliary staff) to whom a questionnaire was distributed regarding policies, practices and awareness relating to BMW. The questionnaire was first piloted. Completed questionnaires were returned anonymously. The resulting data were statistically tested using the chi-square test for differences between the dentists and auxiliary staff. In respect of BMW management policies, there was a highly significant difference in the responses of the dentists, whose answers suggested far greater knowledge than that of the auxiliaries (Pmanagement practices, the dentists were significantly more aware (Pwaste collection in the hospital and the disposal of various items into different colour-coded bags. As for employee education/awareness, there was a significant difference (Pmanagement among dental auxiliary staff in the dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar and a lack of awareness of some aspects among dentists who work in the hospital/clinics. The results provide the hospital authorities with data upon which they can develop a strategy for improving BMW management.

  12. Click & seed” approach to the biomimetic modification of material surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proks, Vladimír; Jaroš, J.; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Kučka, Jan; Popelka, Štěpán; Dvořák, P.; Hampl, A.; Rypáček, František

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 9 (2012), s. 1232-1242 ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400500904; GA ČR GAP108/11/1857; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biomimetic modifications * click chemistry * peptide radiolabeling Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.742, year: 2012

  13. Special Staff - Joint Staff - Leadership - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  14. A cross-sectional survey of cardiovascular health and lifestyle habits of hospital staff in the UK: Do we look after ourselves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Tarun K; Cleghorn, Christine L; Cade, Janet E; Barr, Suzanne; Grove, Tim; Bassett, Paul; Wood, David A; Kotseva, Kornelia

    2018-03-01

    Background A high prevalence of stress-related disorders is well known among healthcare professionals. We set out to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and compliance with national dietary and physical activity recommendations in NHS staff in the UK with comparison between clinical and non-clinical staff, and national surveys. Design A multi-centre cross-sectional study. Methods A web-based questionnaire was developed to include anonymised data on demographics, job role, cardiovascular risk factors and diseases, dietary habits, physical activity and barriers towards healthy lifestyle. This was distributed to staff in four NHS hospitals via emails. Results A total of 1158 staff completed the survey (response rate 13%) with equal distribution between the clinical and non-clinical groups. Most staff were aged 26-60 years and 79% were women. Half of the staff were either overweight or obese (51%) with no difference between the groups ( P = 0.176), but there was a lower prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors compared to the general population. The survey revealed a low compliance (17%) with the recommended intake of five-a-day portions of fruit and vegetables, and that of moderate or vigorous physical activity (56%), with no difference between the clinical and non-clinical staff ( P = 0.6). However, more clinical staff were exceeding the alcohol recommendations ( P = 0.02). Lack of fitness facilities and managerial support, coupled with long working hours, were the main reported barriers to a healthy lifestyle. Conclusions In this survey of UK NHS staff, half were found to be overweight or obese with a lower prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors compared to the general population. There was a low compliance with the five-a-day fruit and vegetables recommendation and physical activity guidelines, with no difference between the clinical and non-clinical staff.

  15. Evaluating and Optimizing Online Advertising: Forget the Click, but There Are Good Proxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessandro, Brian; Hook, Rod; Perlich, Claudia; Provost, Foster

    2015-06-01

    Online systems promise to improve advertisement targeting via the massive and detailed data available. However, there often is too few data on exactly the outcome of interest, such as purchases, for accurate campaign evaluation and optimization (due to low conversion rates, cold start periods, lack of instrumentation of offline purchases, and long purchase cycles). This paper presents a detailed treatment of proxy modeling, which is based on the identification of a suitable alternative (proxy) target variable when data on the true objective is in short supply (or even completely nonexistent). The paper has a two-fold contribution. First, the potential of proxy modeling is demonstrated clearly, based on a massive-scale experiment across 58 real online advertising campaigns. Second, we assess the value of different specific proxies for evaluating and optimizing online display advertising, showing striking results. The results include bad news and good news. The most commonly cited and used proxy is a click on an ad. The bad news is that across a large number of campaigns, clicks are not good proxies for evaluation or for optimization: clickers do not resemble buyers. The good news is that an alternative sort of proxy performs remarkably well: observed visits to the brand's website. Specifically, predictive models built based on brand site visits-which are much more common than purchases-do a remarkably good job of predicting which browsers will make a purchase. The practical bottom line: evaluating and optimizing campaigns using clicks seems wrongheaded; however, there is an easy and attractive alternative-use a well-chosen site-visit proxy instead.

  16. Developing Mobile Clinical Decision Support for Nursing Home Staff Assessment of Urinary Tract Infection using Goal-Directed Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Wallace; Drake, Cynthia; Mack, David; Reeder, Blaine; Trautner, Barbara; Wald, Heidi

    2017-06-20

    Unique characteristics of nursing homes (NHs) contribute to high rates of inappropriate antibiotic use for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a benign condition. A mobile clinical decision support system (CDSS) may support NH staff in differentiating urinary tract infections (UTI) from ASB and reducing antibiotic days. We used Goal-Directed Design to: 1) Characterize information needs for UTI identification and management in NHs; 2) Develop UTI Decide, a mobile CDSS prototype informed by personas and scenarios of use constructed from Aim 1 findings; 3) Evaluate the UTI Decide prototype with NH staff. Focus groups were conducted with providers and nurses in NHs in Denver, Colorado (n= 24). Qualitative descriptive analysis was applied to focus group transcripts to identify information needs and themes related to mobile clinical decision support for UTI identification and management. Personas representing typical end users were developed; typical clinical context scenarios were constructed using information needs as goals. Usability testing was performed using cognitive walk-throughs and a think-aloud protocol. Four information needs were identified including guidance regarding resident assessment; communication with providers; care planning; and urine culture interpretation. Design of a web-based application incorporating a published decision support algorithm for evidence-based UTI diagnoses proceeded with a focus on nursing information needs during resident assessment and communication with providers. Certified nursing assistant (CNA) and registered nurse (RN) personas were constructed in 4 context scenarios with associated key path scenarios. After field testing, a high fidelity prototype of UTI Decide was completed and evaluated by potential end users. Design recommendations and content recommendations were elicited. Goal-Directed Design informed the development of a mobile CDSS supporting participant-identified information needs for UTI assessment and communication

  17. Ultra-Fast RAFT-HDA Click Conjugation: An Efficient Route to High Molecular Weight Block Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Andrew J; Stenzel, Martina H; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2009-11-02

    The use of the reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer-hetero Diels-Alder (RAFT-HDA) click reaction for the modular construction of block copolymers is extended to the generation of high molecular weight materials. Cyclopentadienyl end-functionalized polystyrene (PS-Cp) prepared via both atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and the RAFT process are conjugated to poly(isobornyl acrylate) (PiBoA) (also prepared via RAFT polymerization) to achieve well-defined block copolymers with molecular weights ranging from 34 000 to over 100 000 g · mol(-1) and with small polydispersities (PDI HDA click chemistry can provide access to high molecular weight block copolymers in a simple and straight-forward fashion. Copyright © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Automatic Classification of Users' Health Information Need Context: Logistic Regression Analysis of Mouse-Click and Eye-Tracker Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Wenjing; Khoo, Christopher Sg; Chi, Jianxing

    2017-12-21

    Users searching for health information on the Internet may be searching for their own health issue, searching for someone else's health issue, or browsing with no particular health issue in mind. Previous research has found that these three categories of users focus on different types of health information. However, most health information websites provide static content for all users. If the three types of user health information need contexts can be identified by the Web application, the search results or information offered to the user can be customized to increase its relevance or usefulness to the user. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of identifying the three user health information contexts (searching for self, searching for others, or browsing with no particular health issue in mind) using just hyperlink clicking behavior; using eye-tracking information; and using a combination of eye-tracking, demographic, and urgency information. Predictive models are developed using multinomial logistic regression. A total of 74 participants (39 females and 35 males) who were mainly staff and students of a university were asked to browse a health discussion forum, Healthboards.com. An eye tracker recorded their examining (eye fixation) and skimming (quick eye movement) behaviors on 2 types of screens: summary result screen displaying a list of post headers, and detailed post screen. The following three types of predictive models were developed using logistic regression analysis: model 1 used only the time spent in scanning the summary result screen and reading the detailed post screen, which can be determined from the user's mouse clicks; model 2 used the examining and skimming durations on each screen, recorded by an eye tracker; and model 3 added user demographic and urgency information to model 2. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) analysis found that users' browsing durations were significantly different for the three health information contexts

  19. 'It's complicated': Staff nurse perceptions of their influence on nursing students' learning. A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Sarah E; MacLeod, Martha L; Schiller, Catharine J

    2018-04-01

    During both teacher-led clinical practica and precepted practica, students interact with, and learn from, staff nurses who work on the clinical units. It is understood that learning in clinical practice is enhanced by positive interactions between staff nurses and nursing students. While much is known about preceptors' experiences of working with nursing students, there is little evidence to date about staff nurses' perspectives of their interactions with students in teacher-led practica. To understand teacher-led clinical practica from the perspective of staff nurses. A qualitative descriptive approach answers the question: How do staff nurses perceive their contributions to nursing students' learning during teacher-led practica? Nine staff Registered Nurses (RNs) working within a regional acute care hospital in western Canada were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed using cross case analysis to discover themes and findings were checked by several experienced RNs. Analysis showed that nurses' interactions with nursing students are complicated. Nurses want to "train up" their future colleagues but feel a heavy burden of responsibility for students on the wards. This sense of burden for the staff nurses is influenced by several factors: the practice environment, the clinical instructor, the students themselves, and the nurses' understanding of their own contributions to student learning. Staff nurses remain willing to support student learning despite multiple factors that contribute to a sense of burden during teacher-led practica. Workplace environment, nursing program, and personal supports are needed to support their continuing engagement in student learning. Nurses need to know how important they are as role models, and the impact their casual interactions have on student nurses' socialization into the profession. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. One-step fabrication of PEGylated fluorescent nanodiamonds through the thiol-ene click reaction and their potential for biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongye; Liu, Meiying; Tuo, Xun; Chen, Junyu; Mao, Liucheng; Wen, Yuanqing; Tian, Jianwen; Zhou, Naigen; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2018-05-01

    Over the past years, fluorescent carbon nanoparticles have got growing interest for biological imaging. Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are novel fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with multitudinous useful properties, including remarkable fluorescence properties, extremely low toxicity and high refractive index. However, facile preparation of FNDs with designable properties and functions from non-fluorescent detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) has demonstrated to be challengeable. In this work, we reported for the first time that preparation of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized FNDs through a one-step thiol-ene click reaction using thiol containing PEG (PEG-SH) as the coating agent. Based on the characterization results, we demonstrated that PEG-SH could be efficiently introduced on DNDs to obtain FNDs through the thiol-ene click chemistry. The resultant FND-PEG composites showed high water dispersibility, strong fluorescence and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, FND-PEG composites could be internalized by cells and displayed good cell dyeing performance. All of these features implied that FND-PEG composites are of great potential for biological imaging. Taken together, a facile one-step strategy based on the one-step thiol-ene click reaction has been developed for efficient preparation of FND-PEG composites from non-fluorescent DNDs. The strategy should be also useful for fabrication of many other functional FNDs via using different thiol containing compounds for the universality of thiol-ene click reaction.

  1. Hydrophobic Coatings by Thiol-Ene Click Functionalization of Silsesquioxanes with Tunable Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirè, Sandra; Bottone, Davide; Callone, Emanuela; Maniglio, Devid; Génois, Isabelle; Ribot, François

    2017-08-08

    The hydrolysis-condensation of trialkoxysilanes under strictly controlled conditions allows the production of silsesquioxanes (SSQs) with tunable size and architecture ranging from ladder to cage-like structures. These nano-objects can serve as building blocks for the preparation of hybrid organic/inorganic materials with selected properties. The SSQs growth can be tuned by simply controlling the reaction duration in the in situ water production route (ISWP), where the kinetics of the esterification reaction between carboxylic acids and alcohols rules out the extent of organosilane hydrolysis-condensation. Tunable SSQs with thiol functionalities (SH-NBBs) are suitable for further modification by exploiting the simple thiol-ene click reaction, thus allowing for modifying the wettability properties of derived coatings. In this paper, coatings were prepared from SH-NBBs with different architecture onto cotton fabrics and paper, and further functionalized with long alkyl chains by means of initiator-free UV-induced thiol-ene coupling with 1-decene (C10) and 1-tetradecene (C14). The coatings appeared to homogeneously cover the natural fibers and imparted a multi-scale roughness that was not affected by the click functionalization step. The two-step functionalization of cotton and paper warrants a stable highly hydrophobic character to the surface of natural materials that, in perspective, suggests a possible application in filtration devices for oil-water separation. Furthermore, the purification of SH-NBBs from ISWP by-products was possible during the coating process, and this step allowed for the fast, initiator-free, click-coupling of purified NBBs with C10 and C14 in solution with a nearly quantitative yield. Therefore, this approach is an alternative route to get sol-gel-derived, ladder-like, and cage-like SSQs functionalized with long alkyl chains.

  2. Analysis of internet advertisement type PPC (Pay-Per-Click) in concrete firm (Cedar home)

    OpenAIRE

    Krausová, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to present the features of internet advertising. The main type of advertisement in this thesis is called PPC (Pay-Per-Click). There are created and advertised advertising campaigns on concrete project.

  3. Comparative case study on website traffic generated by search engine optimisation and a pay-per-click campaign, versus marketing expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter T. Kritzinger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: No empirical work was found on how marketing expenses compare when used solely for either the one or the other of the two main types of search engine marketing. Objectives: This research set out to determine how the results of the implementation of a pay-per-click campaign compared to those of a search engine optimisation campaign, given the same website and environment. At the same time, the expenses incurred on both these marketing methods were recorded and compared. Method: The active website of an existing, successful e-commerce concern was used as platform. The company had been using pay-per-click only for a period, whilst traffic was monitored. This system was decommissioned on a particular date and time, and an alternative search engine optimisation system was started at the same time. Again, both traffic and expenses were monitored. Results: The results indicate that the pay-per-click system did produce favourable results, but on the condition that a monthly fee has to be set aside to guarantee consistent traffic. The implementation of search engine optimisation required a relatively large investment at the outset, but it was once-off. After a drop in traffic owing to crawler visitation delays, the website traffic bypassed the average figure achieved during the pay-per-click period after a little over three months, whilst the expenditure crossed over after just six months. Conclusion: Whilst considering the specific parameters of this study, an investment in search engine optimisation rather than a pay-per-click campaign appears to produce better results at a lower cost, after a given period of time. [PDF to follow

  4. Sources of Social Support After Patient Assault as Related to Staff Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Erin L; Fenwick, Karissa M; Brekke, John S; Novaco, Raymond W

    2017-10-01

    Patient assault is a serious issue for the well-being of staff in psychiatric hospitals. To guide workplace responses to patient assault, more information is needed about social support from different sources and whether those supports are associated with staff well-being. The present study examines social support after patient assault from work-based and nonwork-based sources, and whether inpatient psychiatric staff desires support from them and perceive the support received as being effective. Received support across sources was examined in relations to staff well-being (physical health, mental health, anger, sleep quality) and perceptions of safety. Survey data was collected from 348 clinical staff in a large public forensic mental hospital. Among the 242 staff who reported an assault in the last year, 71% wanted support and 72% found effective support from at least one source. Generally, effective support from supervisors, coworkers, and their combination was associated with better well-being. Support from nonwork sources was related to less concerns about safety, but not to other well-being measures. However, 28% of staff did not receive effective support from any source postassault. Gaps in support as reported in this study and as found by other investigators call for systematic programming by hospital organizations to enhance the well-being of clinical staff, which in turn has implications for patient care.

  5. Synthesis of a hexasaccharide partial sequence of hyaluronan for click chemistry and more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bantzi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the synthesis of a hexasaccharide partial sequence of hyaluronan equipped with a terminal azido moiety is reported. This hexasaccharide can be used for the attachment on surfaces by means of click chemistry and after suitable deprotection for biophysical studies.

  6. Implementing cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) in a mental health service: staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Frances; Newman, Ellie; Harris, Meredith; Cairns, Alice; Simpson, Michael; Gore-Jones, Victoria; Whiteford, Harvey; Harvey, Carol; Crompton, David

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the establishment of training in cognitive remediation for psychosis within a community mental health service. Clinical staff working in the community of a mental health service were surveyed to ascertain their interest in cognitive aspects of psychosis and skills training in cognitive remediation (CR). Based on the results of the survey a tiered training programme was established with attendance figures reported for each level of training. Fidelity assessment was conducted on the five CR programmes operating. Of 106 clinical staff working in the community with people diagnosed with a psychotic illness 51 completed the survey (48% response rate). The training needs varied with all 106 staff receiving the fundamental (mandatory) training and 51 staff receiving CR facilitator training. Thirty three percent of staff trained as facilitators were delivering CR. Up skilling the mental health workforce to incorporate an understanding of the cognitive aspects of psychosis into care delivery can be facilitated by a tiered training structure. Fundamental training on the psychosocial aspects of psychosis can act as a platform for focussed CR skills based training. There is also a need for accessible therapy based supervision for staff wishing to develop competencies as CR therapists. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  7. MO-DE-BRA-04: Hands-On Fluoroscopy Safety Training with Real-Time Patient and Staff Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderhoek, M; Bevins, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) are routinely performed across many different hospital departments. However, many involved staff members have minimal training regarding safe and optimal use of fluoroscopy systems. We developed and taught a hands-on fluoroscopy safety class incorporating real-time patient and staff dosimetry in order to promote safer and more optimal use of fluoroscopy during FGI. Methods: The hands-on fluoroscopy safety class is taught in an FGI suite, unique to each department. A patient equivalent phantom is set on the patient table with an ion chamber positioned at the x-ray beam entrance to the phantom. This provides a surrogate measure of patient entrance dose. Multiple solid state dosimeters (RaySafe i2 dosimetry systemTM) are deployed at different distances from the phantom (0.1, 1, 3 meters), which provide surrogate measures of staff dose. Instructors direct participating clinical staff to operate the fluoroscopy system as they view live fluoroscopic images, patient entrance dose, and staff doses in real-time. During class, instructors work with clinical staff to investigate how patient entrance dose, staff doses, and image quality are affected by different parameters, including pulse rate, magnification, collimation, beam angulation, imaging mode, system geometry, distance, and shielding. Results: Real-time dose visualization enables clinical staff to directly see and learn how to optimize their use of their own fluoroscopy system to minimize patient and staff dose, yet maintain sufficient image quality for FGI. As a direct result of the class, multiple hospital departments have implemented changes to their imaging protocols, including reduction of the default fluoroscopy pulse rate and increased use of collimation and lower dose fluoroscopy modes. Conclusion: Hands-on fluoroscopy safety training substantially benefits from real-time patient and staff dosimetry incorporated into the class. Real-time dose display helps

  8. MO-DE-BRA-04: Hands-On Fluoroscopy Safety Training with Real-Time Patient and Staff Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderhoek, M; Bevins, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) are routinely performed across many different hospital departments. However, many involved staff members have minimal training regarding safe and optimal use of fluoroscopy systems. We developed and taught a hands-on fluoroscopy safety class incorporating real-time patient and staff dosimetry in order to promote safer and more optimal use of fluoroscopy during FGI. Methods: The hands-on fluoroscopy safety class is taught in an FGI suite, unique to each department. A patient equivalent phantom is set on the patient table with an ion chamber positioned at the x-ray beam entrance to the phantom. This provides a surrogate measure of patient entrance dose. Multiple solid state dosimeters (RaySafe i2 dosimetry systemTM) are deployed at different distances from the phantom (0.1, 1, 3 meters), which provide surrogate measures of staff dose. Instructors direct participating clinical staff to operate the fluoroscopy system as they view live fluoroscopic images, patient entrance dose, and staff doses in real-time. During class, instructors work with clinical staff to investigate how patient entrance dose, staff doses, and image quality are affected by different parameters, including pulse rate, magnification, collimation, beam angulation, imaging mode, system geometry, distance, and shielding. Results: Real-time dose visualization enables clinical staff to directly see and learn how to optimize their use of their own fluoroscopy system to minimize patient and staff dose, yet maintain sufficient image quality for FGI. As a direct result of the class, multiple hospital departments have implemented changes to their imaging protocols, including reduction of the default fluoroscopy pulse rate and increased use of collimation and lower dose fluoroscopy modes. Conclusion: Hands-on fluoroscopy safety training substantially benefits from real-time patient and staff dosimetry incorporated into the class. Real-time dose display helps

  9. Following patient pathways to psycho-oncological treatment: Identification of treatment needs by clinical staff and electronic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Fanny L; Meraner, Verena; Holzner, Bernhard; Singer, Susanne; Virgolini, Irene; Gamper, Eva M

    2018-04-01

    In this retrospective investigation of patient pathways to psycho-oncological treatment (POT), we compared the number of POT referrals before and after implementation of electronic screening for POT needs and investigated psychosocial predictors for POT wish at a nuclear medicine department. We extracted medical chart information about number of referrals and extent of follow-up contacts. During standard referral (November 2014 to October 2015), POT needs were identified by clinical staff only. In the screening-assisted referral period (November 2015 to October 2016), identification was supported by electronic screening for POT needs. Psychosocial predictors for POT wish were examined using logistic regression. We analysed data from 487 patients during standard referral (mean age 56.4 years; 60.2% female, 88.7% thyroid carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumours) of which 28 patients (5.7%) were referred for POT. Of 502 patients in the screening-assisted referral period (mean age 57.0 years; 55.8% female, 86.6% thyroid carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumours), 69 (13.7%) were referred for POT. Of these, 36 were identified by psycho-oncological (PO) screening and 33 by clinical staff. After PO-screening implementation, referrals increased by a factor of 2.4. The strongest predictor of POT wish was depressive mood (P patients visited the PO outpatient unit additionally to inpatient PO consultations. Our results provide evidence from a real-life setting that PO screening can foster POT referrals, reduce barriers to express the POT wish, and hence help to meet psychosocial needs of this specific patient group. Differences between patients' needs, wish, and POT uptake should be further investigated. © 2018 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses’ Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga E. Larsson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses’ perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n=15. Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients’ best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers’ professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  11. Hearing impairment in children with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection based on distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) and brain evoked response audiometry stimulus click (BERA Click) examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airlangga, T. J.; Mangunatmadja, I.; Prihartono, J.; Zizlavsky, S.

    2017-08-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (congenital CMV) infection is a leading factor of nongenetic sensorineural hearing loss in children. Hearing loss caused by CMV infection does not have a pathognomonic configuration hence further research is needed. The development of knowledge on hearing loss caused by congenital CMV infection is progressing in many countries. Due to a lack of research in the context of Indonesia, this study assesses hearing impairment in children with congenital CMV infection in Indonesia, more specifically in the Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Our objective was to profile hearing impairment in children 0-5 years of age with congenital CMV infection using Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAE) and Brain Evoked Response Audiometry Stimulus Click (BERA Click) examinations. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Cipto Mangunkusum Hospital from November, 2015 to May 2016 with 27 children 0-5 years of age with congenital CMV infection. Of individual ears studied, 58.0% exhibited sensorineural hearing loss. There was a significant relationship between developmental delay and incidence of sensorineural hearing loss. Subjects with a developmental delay were 6.57 times more likely (CI 95%; 1.88-22.87) to experience sensorineural hearing loss. Congenital CMV infection has an important role in causing sensorineural hearing loss in children.

  12. In Situ Forming, Cytocompatible, and Self-Recoverable Tough Hydrogels Based on Dual Ionic and Click Cross-Linked Alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanian, Mohammad Hossein; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein

    2018-05-14

    A dual cross-linking strategy was developed to answer the urgent need for fatigue-resistant, cytocompatible, and in situ forming tough hydrogels. Clickable, yet calcium-binding derivatives of alginate were synthesized by partial substitution of its carboxyl functionalities with furan, which could come into Diels-Alder click reaction with maleimide end groups of a four arm poly(ethylene glycol) cross-linker. Tuning the cooperative viscoelastic action of transient ionic and permanent click cross-links within the single network of alginate provided a soft tough hydrogel with a set of interesting features: (i) immediate self-recovery under cyclic loading, (ii) highly efficient and autonomous self-healing upon fracture, (iii) in situ forming ability for molding and minimally invasive injection, (iv) capability for viable cell encapsulation, and (v) reactivity for on-demand biomolecule conjugation. The facile strategy is applicable to a wide range of natural and synthetic polymers by introducing the calcium binding and click reacting functional groups and can broaden the use of tough hydrogels in load-bearing, cell-laden applications such as soft tissue engineering and bioactuators.

  13. Directorate of Management - Special Staff - Joint Staff - Leadership - The

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGB Official March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J-7 J-8 Personal Staff Inspector General Judge Advocate General Officer Management Public Affairs Executive Support Services Legislative Liaison Special Staff Directorate of Management

  14. Ethical challenges related to next of kin - nursing staffs' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnessen, Siri; Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2016-11-01

    Patients in clinical settings are not lonely islands; they have relatives who play a more or less active role in their lives. The purpose of this article is to elucidate the ethical challenges nursing staff encounter with patients' next of kin and to discuss how these challenges affect clinical practice. The study is based on data collected from ethical group discussions among nursing staff in a nursing home. The discussions took place in 2011 and 2012. The data were analysed and interpreted by using hermeneutic methodology. All the data have been anonymised and handled with confidentiality. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Ethical challenges relating to patients' next of kin were found to be an issue frequently discussed in the groups. Our findings indicate that next of kin have different characteristics, categorised as 'the professionals' and 'the shadows'. In this article, we will describe the next of kin's characteristics and the ethical challenges and practical implications that nursing staff experience in this connection. We will discuss the findings in the light of the four basic principles of medical ethics and propose interventions to help nurses manage ethical challenges related to next of kin. The study reveals the need to enhance nursing staffs' communicative and ethical skills on an individual level, but most importantly, to establish routines in clinical settings for informing and following up next of kin in a systematic and structured way. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Joint Chiefs of Staff > About > The Joint Staff > Senior Enlisted Advisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Blog Instagram Search JCS: Search Search Search JCS: Search Home Media News Photos Videos Publications About The Joint Staff Chairman Vice Chairman

  16. A New Modular Approach to Nanoassembly: Stable and Addressable DNA Nanoconstructs via Orthogonal Click Chemistries

    KAUST Repository

    Gerrard, Simon R.

    2012-10-23

    Thermodynamic instability is a problem when assembling and purifying complex DNA nanostructures formed by hybridization alone. To address this issue, we have used photochemical fixation and orthogonal copper-free, ring-strain-promoted, click chemistry for the synthesis of dimeric, trimeric, and oligomeric modular DNA scaffolds from cyclic, double-stranded, 80-mer DNA nanoconstructs. This particular combination of orthogonal click reactions was more effective for nanoassembly than others explored. The complex nanostructures are stable to heat and denaturation agents and can therefore be purified and characterized. They are addressable in a sequence-specific manner by triplex formation, and they can be reversibly and selectively deconstructed. Nanostructures utilizing this orthogonal, chemical fixation methodology can be used as building blocks for nanomachines and functional DNA nanoarchitectures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  17. Understanding the working relationships between National Health Service clinicians and finance staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Virginia; McCaffry, Rebecca

    2017-03-13

    Purpose The Department of Health and the National Health Service (NHS) Future Focused Finance (FFF) programme promotes effective engagement between clinical and finance staff. Surveys undertaken by the Department of Health between 2013 and 2015 found few NHS Trusts reported high levels of engagement. The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of current working relationships between NHS clinical and finance professionals and how they might be supported to become more effective. Design/methodology/approach Ipsos MORI were commissioned by the NHS FFF programme to undertake an online survey of NHS clinical and finance staff between June and August 2015. Findings The majority of clinicians had a member of a finance team linked to their speciality or directorate. Clinical and finance professionals have a positive view of joint working preferring face-to-face contact. Clinician's confidence in their understanding of finance was generally good and finance staff felt they had a good understanding of clinical issues. Effective working relationships were facilitated by face-to-face contact, a professional relationship, and the availability of clear, well presented finance and activity data. Research limitations/implications Data protection issues limited the accessibility of the survey team to NHS staff resulting in a relatively low-response rate. Other forms of communication, including social media, were utilised to increase access to the survey. Originality/value The FFF programme is a unique programme aimed at making the NHS finance profession fit for the future. The close partnering work stream brings together the finance and clinical perspective to share knowledge, evidence, training, and to develop good practice and engagement.

  18. A New Modular Approach to Nanoassembly: Stable and Addressable DNA Nanoconstructs via Orthogonal Click Chemistries

    KAUST Repository

    Gerrard, Simon R.; Hardiman, Claire; Shelbourne, Montserrat; Nandhakumar, Iris; Nordé n, Bengt; Brown, Tom

    2012-01-01

    chemistry for the synthesis of dimeric, trimeric, and oligomeric modular DNA scaffolds from cyclic, double-stranded, 80-mer DNA nanoconstructs. This particular combination of orthogonal click reactions was more effective for nanoassembly than others explored

  19. C,N-Chelated Organotin(IV) Azides: Synthesis, Structure and Use within the Click Chemistry.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švec, P.; Bartoš, K.; Růžičková, Z.; Cuřínová, Petra; Dušek, L.; Turek, J.; de Proft, F.; Růžička, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 7 (2016), s. 5808-5817 ISSN 1144-0546 Grant - others:FWO(BE) 12T6615N Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : organotin(IV)azides * click chemistry * chelation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.269, year: 2016

  20. Synthesis and Relaxivity Studies of a DOTA-Based Nanomolecular Chelator Assembly Supported by an Icosahedral Closo-B122− -Core for MRI: A Click Chemistry Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish S. Jalisatgi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An icosahedral closo-B122− scaffold based nano-sized assembly capable of carrying a high payload of Gd3+-chelates in a sterically crowded configuration is developed by employing the azide-alkyne click reaction. The twelve copies of DO3A-t-Bu-ester ligands were covalently attached to an icosahedral closo-B122− core via suitable linkers through click reaction. This nanomolecular structure supporting a high payload of Gd3+-chelate is a new member of the closomer MRI contrast agents that we are currently developing in our laboratory. The per Gd ion relaxivity (r1 of the newly synthesized MRI contrast agent was obtained in PBS, 2% tween/PBS and bovine calf serum using a 7 Tesla micro MRI instrument and was found to be slightly higher (r1 = 4.7 in PBS at 25 °C compared to the clinically used MRI contrast agents Omniscan (r1 = 4.2 in PBS at 25 °C and ProHance (r1 = 3.1 in PBS at 25 °C.

  1. Innovative public library services - staff-less or staff-intensive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – Several recent library innovations seem to make professional and clerical staff superfluous such as automated loan and delivery equipment, staff-less libraries open in 80 hours a week, and virtual services, enabling users to search the library catalogue and make reservations of library...... materials from their home address. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether such developments will necessarily lead to a situation where public libraries become self-service institutions or to what extent self-service and innovative staff-intensive library services can develop and co......-exist. Furthermore, the paper will examine what challenges library leaders face and what they can do, and actually have done, to handle staff resistance and other related problems to the benefit of both the users, the local communities, and also, the staff, in particular, when introducing new and innovative services...

  2. pH responsive label-assisted click chemistry triggered sensitivity amplification for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of carbohydrate antigen 24-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yun; Zhao, Lihua; Ma, Zhanfang

    2018-05-15

    Sensitivity amplification strategy by implementing click chemistry in the construction of biosensing interface can efficiently improve the performance of immunosensor. Herein, we developed a sandwich-type amperometric immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 24-2 (CA 242) based on pH responsive label-assisted click chemistry triggered sensitivity amplification strategy. The sensitivity of amperometric immunosensor relies on the current response differences (ΔI) caused by per unit concentration target analyte. The pH responsive Cu 2+ -loaded polydopamine (CuPDA) particles conjugated with detection antibodies were employed as labels, which can release Cu(II) ions by regulating pH. In the presence of ascorbic acid (reductant), Cu(II) ions were reduced to Cu(I) ions. Azide-functionalized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) as signal enhancer was immobilized on the substrate through Cu + -catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition reaction. With the help of the click reaction, the ΔI caused by target was elevated prominently, resulting in sensitivity amplification of the immunosensor. Under optimal condition, the proposed immunosensor exhibited excellent performance with linear range from 0.0001 to 100 U mL -1 and ultralow detection limit of 20.74 μU mL -1 . This work successfully combines click chemistry with pH-responsive labels in sandwich-type amperometric immunosensor, providing a promising sensitivity amplification strategy to construct immunosensing platform for analysis of other tumor marker. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychological impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on university staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Caroline; Carter, Frances; Boden, Joseph; Wilkinson, Tim; McKenzie, Jan; Ali, Anthony

    2016-02-19

    To assess the impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on the psychological functioning of university staff, to identify predictors of adverse psychological functioning and to survey how different aspects of work roles (academic, teaching, clinical, administrative) were affected. Eighteen months following the most severe earthquake, 119 staff from the University of Otago based in Christchurch completed a retrospective survey. This included demographic information, a measure of earthquake exposure, standardised and self-rated measures to identify psychological distress and measures of how people perceived different aspects of their work roles were impacted. A substantial minority of staff reported moderate-extreme difficulties on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) subscales 18 months following the most severe earthquake (Depression=9%; Anxiety=3%; Stress =13%). Predictors of distress were higher levels of exposure to earthquake-related stressors, neuroticism and prior mental health disorders. There was an association between impact and work roles that was hierarchical; academic and administrative roles were most affected, followed by teaching with the least impact on clinical roles. This study shows that psychological symptoms following a disaster are common, but in a retrospective survey most people report that these improve with time. A minority however, continue to report difficulties which persist even 18 months post disaster. It also gives insights into how different work roles were impacted and from this makes suggestions for how organisations can support staff over difficult times.

  4. Why are there no long distance jumpers among click-beetles (Elateridae)?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribak, Gal; Mordechay, Oded; Weihs, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Click-beetles jump from an inverted position without using their legs. This unique mechanism results in high vertical jumps with the jump angle restricted by the rigid morphology of the exoskeleton. We explored the option to exploit this jumping mechanism for application to small mechanical devices having to extricate themselves from rough terrain. We combined experiments on a biomimetic jumping device with a physical–mathematical model of the jump to assess the effect of morphological variation on the jumping performance. We found that through morphological change of two non-dimensional (size independent) parameters, the propulsive force powering the jump can be directed at angles as small as 40°. However, in practice jumping at such angles is precluded by loss of traction with the ground during the push-off phase. This limitation to steep jump angles is inherent to the jumping mechanism which is based on rotation of body parts about a single hinge. Such a rotation dictates a curvilinear trajectory for the center of mass during takeoff so that the vertical and horizontal accelerations occur out of phase, implying loss of traction with the ground before substantial horizontal acceleration can be reached. Thus click-beetle inspired jumping is effective mainly for making steep-angle righting jumps. (paper)

  5. Purification and identification of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides using phosphate-based alkyne CLICK chemistry in combination with titanium dioxide chromatography and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Benjamin L; Gupta, Pankaj; Cordwell, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    A selective method for the enrichment of O-GlcNAcylated peptides using a novel CLICK chemistry reagent is described. Peptides modified by O-GlcNAc were enzymatically labeled with N-azidoacetylgalactosamine. The azide was then reacted with a phospho-alkyne using CLICK chemistry and O-GlcNAcGalNAzPO4...

  6. Evaluation of the May 2005 Click It or Ticket mobilization to increase seat belt use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Click It or Ticket (CIOT) is an intense, short-duration, seat belt publicity and enforcement program. The CIOT May 2005 Mobilization involved approximately $33 million of purchased media. Law enforcement agencies across the Nation reported issuing mo...

  7. Gatekeepers as Care Providers: The Care Work of Patient-centered Medical Home Clerical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Ono, Sarah S; Stewart, Kenda R; Lampman, Michelle A; Rosenthal, Gary E; Stewart, Greg L

    2017-03-01

    International implementation of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model for delivering primary care has dramatically increased in the last decade. A majority of research on PCMH's impact has emphasized the care provided by clinically trained staff. In this article, we report our ethnographic analysis of data collected from Department of Veterans Affairs staff implementing PACT, the VA version of PCMH. Teams were trained to use within-team delegation, largely accomplished through attention to clinical licensure, to differentiate staff in providing efficient, patient-centered care. In doing so, PACT may reinforce a clinically defined culture of care that countermands PCMH ideals. Such competing rubrics for care are brought into relief through a focus on the care work performed by clerks. Ethnographic analysis identifies clerks' care as a kind of emotional dirty work, signaling important areas for future anthropological study of the relationships among patient-centered care, stigma, and clinical authority. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  8. Eye dose to staff involved in interventional and procedural fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, D; Hadaya, D; Tse, J

    2016-01-01

    In 2011 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) lowered the occupational eye dose limit from 150 to 20 mSv/yr [1]. While international jurisdictions are in a process of adopting these substantial changes, medical physicists at the clinical level have been advising medical colleagues on specific situations based on dose measurements. Commissioned and calibrated TLDs mounted in commercially available holders designed to simulate the measurement of Hp(3), were applied to staff involved in x-ray procedures for a one month period. During this period clinical procedure data was concurrently collected and subject to audit. The use or not of eye personal protective equipment (PPE) was noted for all staff. Audits were conducted in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory, the interventional angiography rooms and the procedural room where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures are performed. Significant levels of occupational dose were recorded in the cardiac and interventional procedures, with maximum reading exceeding the new limit for some interventional radiologists. No significant eye doses were measured for staff performing ERCP procedures. One outcome of the studies was increased use of eye PPE for operators of interventional equipment with increased availability also to nursing staff, when standing in close proximity to the patient during procedures. (paper)

  9. Detection of Alkynes via Click Chemistry with a Brominated Coumarin Azide by Simultaneous Fluorescence and Isotopic Signatures in Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Chumsae, Chris; Kaplan, Jenifer B; Moulton, Kevin Ryan; Wang, Dongdong; Lee, David H; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2017-09-20

    Alkynes are a key component of click chemistry and used for a wide variety of applications including bioconjugation, selective tagging of protein modifications, and labeling of metabolites and drug targets. However, challenges still exist for detecting alkynes because most 1,2,3-triazole products from alkynes and azides do not possess distinct intrinsic properties that can be used for their facile detection by either fluorescence or mass spectrometry. To address this critical need, a novel brominated coumarin azide was used to tag alkynes and detect alkyne-conjugated biomolecules. This tag has several useful properties: first, it is fluorogenic and the click-chemistry products are highly fluorescent and quantifiable; second, its distinct isotopic pattern facilitates identification by mass spectrometry; and third, its click-chemistry products form a unique pair of reporter ions upon fragmentation that can be used for the quick screening of data. Using a monoclonal antibody conjugated with alkynes, a general workflow has been developed and examined comprehensively.

  10. Predicting Click-Through Rates of New Advertisements Based on the Bayesian Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most classical search engines choose and rank advertisements (ads based on their click-through rates (CTRs. To predict an ad’s CTR, historical click information is frequently concerned. To accurately predict the CTR of the new ads is challenging and critical for real world applications, since we do not have plentiful historical data about these ads. Adopting Bayesian network (BN as the effective framework for representing and inferring dependencies and uncertainties among variables, in this paper, we establish a BN-based model to predict the CTRs of new ads. First, we built a Bayesian network of the keywords that are used to describe the ads in a certain domain, called keyword BN and abbreviated as KBN. Second, we proposed an algorithm for approximate inferences of the KBN to find similar keywords with those that describe the new ads. Finally based on the similar keywords, we obtain the similar ads and then calculate the CTR of the new ad by using the CTRs of the ads that are similar with the new ad. Experimental results show the efficiency and accuracy of our method.

  11. Student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Richard P; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the widespread introduction of active learning strategies to engage students across modern medical curricula, student attendance and attendance monitoring remain a challenging issue for medical educators. In addition, there is little published evidence available to medical educators regarding the use of attendance monitoring systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the opinions of students and staff about the use of a paper-based student logbook to record student attendance across all clinical and classroom-based learning activities within an undergraduate clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN). Each student undertaking the clinical rotation in OBGYN was required to complete a paper-based logbook in a booklet format that listed every clinical and classroom-based activity that the student was expected to attend. A cross-sectional survey evaluating the acceptability, practicality, and effect on access to learning opportunities of using the logbook was undertaken. The survey was conducted among all medical students who completed their OBGYN rotation over a full academic year and staff who taught on the program. The response rate was 87% (n=128/147) among students and 80% (n=8/10) among staff. Monitoring attendance was widely acceptable to students (n=107/128, 84%) and staff (n=8/8, 100%). Most students (n=95/128, 74%) and staff (n=7/8, 88%) recommended that attendance should be mandatory during rotations. Almost all staff felt that attendance should contribute toward academic credit (n=7/8, 88%), but students were divided (n=73/128, 57%). Students (n=94/128, 73%) and staff (n=6/8, 75%) reported that the use of the logbook to record attendance with tutor signatures was a satisfactory system, although students questioned the need for recording attendance at every classroom-based activity. Most students felt that the logbook facilitated access to learning experiences during the rotation (n=90/128, 71%). Staff felt that the process of signing

  12. [Value of condensation and rarefaction click evoked action potential latency difference in the diagnosis of Meniere's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Shao, X; Yan, W; Lin, H

    2000-06-01

    To study the value of condensation and rarefaction clicks evoked action potential (AP) latency difference (LD) in diagnosis of Meniere's disease. AP was recorded with ECochG in controls (50 ears) and patients with Meniere's disease(90 ears) and sensorineural hearing loss(SNHL) of other origins(60 ears). LD was calculated and analyzed. LD in patients with Meniere's disease was (0.30 +/- 0.15) ms, which was significantly larger than that of controls(0.18 +/- 0.07) ms and of patients with SNHL of other origins(0.20 +/- 0.10) ms (P curve was larger than those with flat auditory sensation curve(P rarefaction click evoked AP latency difference can be an objective parameter in diagnosis of Meniere's disease.

  13. Effective ascorbate-free and photolatent click reactions in water using a photoreducible copper(II-ethylenediamine precatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redouane Beniazza

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for copper catalysts able to perform effectively click reactions in water in the absence of sodium ascorbate is an active area of current research with strong potential for applications in bioconjugation. The water-soluble and photoreducible copper(II–EDA (EDA = ethylenediamine complex 1, which has two 4-benzoylbenzoates acting as both counterion and photosensitizer, has been synthesized and characterized by different techniques including single crystal X-ray diffraction. Highly efficient photoreduction was demonstrated when solutions of 1 in hydrogen atom donating solvents, such as THF or MeOH, were exposed to UVA radiation (350–400 nm provided by a low pressure mercury lamp (type TLC = thin-layer chromatography, 365 nm, or by a 23 W fluorescent bulb, or by ambient/sunlight. In water, a much poorer hydrogen atom donating solvent, the photoreduction of 1 proved inefficient. Interestingly, EPR studies revealed that complex 1 could nonetheless be effectively photoreduced in water when alkynes were present in solution. The catalytic activity of 1 for click reactions involving a range of water-soluble alkynes and azides, in particular saccharides, was tested under various illumination conditions. Complex 1 was found to exhibit a photolatent character, the photogenerated copper(I being very reactive. On irradiating aqueous reaction mixtures containing 1 mol % of 1 at 365 nm (TLC lamp for 1 h, click reactions were shown to proceed to full conversion.

  14. Emergency staff reactions to suicidal and self-harming patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Girardi, Paolo; Ruberto, Amedeo; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Tatarelli, Roberto

    2005-08-01

    Staff in the emergency departments of hospitals are reported as being negative or ambivalent toward suicidal or self-harming individuals. According to the literature, these patients are subjected to stigmatization and lack of empathy. This phenomenon has been linked to a decreased quality of care offered to these individuals and to missing an important opportunity to prevent further suicidal behavior or repetition of deliberate self-harm. Also, protocols, proper guidelines and education for the emergency staff call for a revision and an implementation. In this paper, evidence suggesting staff attitudes toward suicidal and self-harming patients is reviewed. An overview of related issues such as clinical judgment, the use of scales and nurses' role is also included in this report.

  15. Nurse managers' perceptions and experiences regarding staff nurse empowerment: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Peremans, Lieve; de Wit, Marlinde; Van Heusden, Danny; Franck, Erik; Timmermans, Olaf; Havens, Donna S

    2015-01-01

    To study nurse managers' perceptions and experiences of staff nurse structural empowerment and its impact on the nurse manager leadership role and style. Nurse managers' leadership roles may be viewed as challenging given the complex needs of patients and staff nurses' involvement in both clinical and organizational decision-making processes in interdisciplinary care settings. Qualitative phenomenological study. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 8 medical or surgical nurse managers in a 600-bed Belgian university hospital between December 2013 and June 2014. This hospital was undergoing conversion from a classical hierarchical, departmental structure to a flat, interdisciplinary model. Nurse managers were found to be familiar with the structural empowerment of clinical nurses in the hospital and to hold positive attitudes toward it. They confirmed the positive impact of empowerment on their staff nurses, as evidenced by increased responsibility, autonomy, critical reflection and enhanced communication skills that in turn improved the quality and safety of patient care. Structural empowerment was being supported by several change initiatives at both the unit and hospital levels. Nurse managers' experiences with these initiatives were mixed, however, because of the changing demands with regard to their manager role and leadership style. In addition, pressure was being experienced by both staff nurses and nurse managers as a result of direct patient care priorities, tightly scheduled projects and miscommunication. Nurse managers reported that structural empowerment was having a favorable impact on staff nurses' professional attitudes and the safety and quality of care in their units. However, they also reported that the empowerment process had led to changes in the managers' roles as well as daily practice dilemmas related to the leadership styles needed. Clear organizational goals and dedicated support for both clinical nurses and nursing unit

  16. Assembly of a biocompatible triazole-linked gene by one-pot click-DNA ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Gale, Nittaya; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom; Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-11-01

    The chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides and their enzyme-mediated assembly into genes and genomes has significantly advanced multiple scientific disciplines. However, these approaches are not without their shortcomings; enzymatic amplification and ligation of oligonucleotides into genes and genomes makes automation challenging, and site-specific incorporation of epigenetic information and/or modified bases into large constructs is not feasible. Here we present a fully chemical one-pot method for the assembly of oligonucleotides into a gene by click-DNA ligation. We synthesize the 335 base-pair gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein iLOV from ten functionalized oligonucleotides that contain 5ʹ-azide and 3ʹ-alkyne units. The resulting click-linked iLOV gene contains eight triazoles at the sites of chemical ligation, and yet is fully biocompatible; it is replicated by DNA polymerases in vitro and encodes a functional iLOV protein in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate the power and potential of our one-pot gene-assembly method by preparing an epigenetically modified variant of the iLOV gene.

  17. Student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deane RP

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Richard P Deane, Deirdre J Murphy Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin, Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland  Background: Despite the widespread introduction of active learning strategies to engage students across modern medical curricula, student attendance and attendance monitoring remain a challenging issue for medical educators. In addition, there is little published evidence available to medical educators regarding the use of attendance monitoring systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the opinions of students and staff about the use of a paper-based student logbook to record student attendance across all clinical and classroom-based learning activities within an undergraduate clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN. Methods: Each student undertaking the clinical rotation in OBGYN was required to complete a paper-based logbook in a booklet format that listed every clinical and classroom-based activity that the student was expected to attend. A cross-sectional survey evaluating the acceptability, practicality, and effect on access to learning opportunities of using the logbook was undertaken. The survey was conducted among all medical students who completed their OBGYN rotation over a full academic year and staff who taught on the program. Results: The response rate was 87% (n=128/147 among students and 80% (n=8/10 among staff. Monitoring attendance was widely acceptable to students (n=107/128, 84% and staff (n=8/8, 100%. Most students (n=95/128, 74% and staff (n=7/8, 88% recommended that attendance should be mandatory during rotations. Almost all staff felt that attendance should contribute toward academic credit (n=7/8, 88%, but students were divided (n=73/128, 57%. Students (n=94/128, 73% and staff (n=6/8, 75% reported that the use of the logbook to record attendance with tutor signatures was a satisfactory system, although

  18. Chronological changes in the eighth cranial nerve compound action potential (CAP) in experimental endolymphatic hydrops: the effects of altering the polarity of click sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizono, Tetsuo; Kondo, Tsuyoshi; Yamano, Takafumi; Miyagi, Morimichi; Shiraishi, Kimio

    2009-02-01

    Using a guinea pig model of experimental endolymphatic hydrops, click sounds of altered polarity showed different latencies and amplitudes in hydropic compared with normal cochleae. Latency changes appeared as early as 1 week after endolymphatic obstruction. This method can help diagnose endolymphatic hydrops. The goal of the study was to develop an objective electrophysiological diagnosis of endolymphatic hydrops. Endolymphatic hydrops were created surgically in guinea pigs. The latency and the amplitude of the eighth cranial nerve compound action potential (CAP) for click sounds of altered polarity were measured up to 8 weeks after the surgery. At early stages after surgery, the latency for condensation clicks became longer, and at later stages the latencies for both condensation and rarefaction became longer. The discrepancy in the latencies for rarefaction and condensation click sounds (rarefaction minus condensation) became larger by the first week after surgery, but no further discrepancy occurred thereafter. Compared with latency changes, amplitude changes in the CAP were rapid and progressive following surgery, suggesting ongoing damage to hair cells.

  19. Staff views on wellbeing for themselves and for service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrank, Beate; Brownell, Tamsin; Riches, Simon; Chevalier, Agnes; Jakaite, Zivile; Larkin, Charley; Lawrence, Vanessa; Slade, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Wellbeing is an important outcome in the context of recovery from mental illness. The views of mental health professionals on wellbeing may influence their approach to supporting recovery. This study aims to explore views held by mental health staff about factors influencing their own wellbeing and that of service users with psychosis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 mental health staff in South London who had worked with people with psychosis. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data and comparisons were made between staff views of wellbeing for themselves and service users. Staff participants held similar conceptualisations of wellbeing for themselves and for service users. However, they suggested a differential impact on wellbeing for a number of factors, such as balance, goals and achievement, and work. Staff employed a more deficit-based perspective on wellbeing for service users and a more strengths-based view for themselves. Staff stated a recovery orientation in principle, but struggled to focus on service user strengths in practice. A stronger emphasis in clinical practice on amplifying strengths to foster self-management is indicated, and staff may need support to achieve this emphasis, e.g. through specific interventions and involvement of peer support workers.

  20. Morale, stress and coping strategies of staff working in the emergency department: A comparison of two different-sized departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Louisa J; Thom, Ogilvie; Greenslade, Jaimi H; Wallis, Marianne; Johnston, Amy Nb; Carlström, Eric; Mills, Donna; Crilly, Julia

    2018-06-01

    Clinical staff in EDs are subject to a range of stressors. The objective of this study was to describe and compare clinical staff perceptions of their ED's working environment across two different Australian EDs. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive, research design that included distribution of three survey tools to clinical staff in two Australian EDs in 2016. Descriptive statistics were reported to characterise workplace stressors, coping styles and the ED environment. These data were compared by hospital and the employee's clinical role (nurse or physician). In total, 146 ED nurses and doctors completed the survey (response rate: 67%). Despite geographical variation, the staff at the two locations had similar demographic profiles in terms of age, sex and years of experience. Staff reported moderate levels of workload and self-realisation but low levels of conflict or nervousness in the workplace. Nurses and physicians reported similar perceptions of the work environment, although nurses reported slightly higher median levels of workload. Staff rated the death or sexual abuse of a child as most stressful, followed by workplace violence and heavy workload. Staff used a large range of coping strategies, and these were similar across both sites. These findings are the first multi-site and multidisciplinary examinations of Australian ED staff perceptions, improving our understanding of staff stressors and coping strategies and highlighting similarities across different EDs. These data support the development and implementation of strategies to improve ED working environments to help ensure professional longevity of ED staff. © 2018 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  1. Phylogenetic relationships of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae) inferred from 28S ribosomal DNA: insights into the evolution of bioluminescence in Elateridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagegami-Oba, Reiko; Oba, Yuichi; Ohira, Hitoo

    2007-02-01

    Although the taxonomy of click beetles (family Elateridae) has been studied extensively, inconsistencies remain. We examine here the relationships between species of Elateridae based on partial sequences of nuclear 28S ribosomal DNA. Specimens were collected primarily from Japan, while luminous click beetles were also sampled from Central and South America to investigate the origins of bioluminescence in Elateridae. Neighbor-joining, maximum-parsimony, and maximum-likelihood analyses produced a consistent basal topology with high statistical support that is partially congruent with the results of previous investigations based on the morphological characteristics of larvae and adults. The most parsimonious reconstruction of the "luminous" and "nonluminous" states, based on the present molecular phylogeny, indicates that the ancestral state of Elateridae was nonluminous. This suggests that the bioluminescence in click beetle evolved independent of that of other luminous beetles, such as Lampyridae, despite their common mechanisms of bioluminescence.

  2. An Efficient and Straightforward Method for Radiolabeling of Nanoparticles with {sup 64}Cu via Click Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Eun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwangmeyung [Center for Theragnosis, Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Hyun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiobiotechnology and Applied Radioisotope Science, Korea University of Science and Technology, Deajeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Recently, nanoparticles have received a great deal of interest in diagnosis and therapy applications. Since nanoparticles possess intrinsic features that are often required for a drug delivery system and diagnosis, they have potential to be used as platforms for integrating imaging and therapeutic functions, simultaneously. Intrinsic issues that are associated with theranostic nanoparticles, particularly in cancer treatment, include an efficient and straightforward radiolabeling method for understanding the in vivo biodistribution of nanoparticles to reach the tumor region, and monitoring therapeutic responses. Herein, we investigated a facile and highly efficient strategy to prepare radiolabeled nanoparticles with {sup 64}Cu via a strain-promoted azide, i.e., an alkyne cycloaddition strategy, which is often referred to as click chemistry. First, the azide (N3) group, which allows for the preparation of radiolabeled nanoparticles by copper-free click chemistry, was incorporated into glycol chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs). Second, the strained cyclooctyne derivative, dibenzyl cyclooctyne (DBCO) conjugated with a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane- 1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelator, was synthesized for preparing the pre-radiolabeled alkyne complex with {sup 64}Cu radionuclide. Following incubation with the {sup 64}Cu-radiolabeled DBCO complex (DBCO-PEG4-Lys-DOTA-{sup 64}Cu with high specific activity, 18.5 GBq/μ mol), the azide-functionalized CNPs were radiolabeled successfully with {sup 64}Cu, with a high radiolabeling efficiency and a high radiolabeling yield (>98%). Importantly, the radiolabeling of CNPs by copper-free click chemistry was accomplished within 30 min, with great efficiency in aqueous conditions. After {sup 64}Cu-CNPs were intravenously administered to tumor-bearing mice, the real time, in vivo biodistribution and tumor-targeting ability of {sup 64}Cu-CNPs were quantitatively evaluated by micro-PET images of tumor-bearing mice. These results

  3. Experiences of primary care physicians and staff following lean workflow redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy Y; Harrison, Michael I; Truong, Quan; Du, Xue

    2018-04-10

    In response to growing pressures on primary care, leaders have introduced a wide range of workforce and practice innovations, including team redesigns that delegate some physician tasks to nonphysicians. One important question is how such innovations affect care team members, particularly in view of growing dissatisfaction and burnout among healthcare professionals. We examine the work experiences of primary care physicians and staff after implementing Lean-based workflow redesigns. This included co-locating physician and medical assistant dyads, delegating significant responsibilities to nonphysician staff, and mandating greater coordination and communication among all care team members. The redesigns were implemented and scaled in three phases across 46 primary care departments in a large ambulatory care delivery system. We fielded 1164 baseline and 1333 follow-up surveys to physicians and other nonphysician staff (average 73% response rate) to assess workforce engagement (e.g., job satisfaction, motivation), perceptions of the work environment, and job-related burnout. We conducted multivariate regressions to detect changes in experiences after the redesign, adjusting for respondent characteristics and clustering of within-clinic responses. We found that both physicians and nonphysician staff reported higher levels of engagement and teamwork after implementing redesigns. However, they also experienced higher levels of burnout and perceptions of the workplace as stressful. Trends were the same for both occupational groups, but the increased reports of stress were greater among physicians. Additionally, members of all clinics, except for the pilot site that developed the new workflows, reported higher burnout, while perceptions of workplace stress increased in all clinics after the redesign. Our findings partially align with expectations of work redesign as a route to improving physician and staff experiences in delivering care. Although teamwork and engagement

  4. General method for labeling siRNA by click chemistry with fluorine-18 for the purpose of PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Frédéric; Paris, Jérôme; Kaisin, Geoffroy; Thonon, David; Flagothier, Jessica; Teller, Nathalie; Lemaire, Christian; Luxen, André

    2011-01-19

    The alkyne-azide Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition, a click-type reaction, was used to label a double-stranded oligonucleotide (siRNA) with fluorine-18. An alkyne solid support CPG for the preparation of monostranded oligonucleotides functionalized with alkyne has been developed. Two complementary azide labeling agents (1-(azidomethyl)-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzene) and 1-azido-4-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropoxy)benzene have been produced with 41% and 35% radiochemical yields (decay-corrected), respectively. After annealing with the complementary strand, the siRNA was directly labeled by click chemistry with [(18)F]fluoroazide to produce the [(18)F]-radiolabeled siRNA with excellent radiochemical yield and purity.

  5. Clicking in shallow rivers: short-range echolocation of Irrawaddy and Ganges River dolphins in a shallow, acoustically complex habitat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frants H Jensen

    Full Text Available Toothed whales (Cetacea, odontoceti use biosonar to navigate their environment and to find and catch prey. All studied toothed whale species have evolved highly directional, high-amplitude ultrasonic clicks suited for long-range echolocation of prey in open water. Little is known about the biosonar signals of toothed whale species inhabiting freshwater habitats such as endangered river dolphins. To address the evolutionary pressures shaping the echolocation signal parameters of non-marine toothed whales, we investigated the biosonar source parameters of Ganges river dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica and Irrawaddy dolphins (Orcaella brevirostris within the river systems of the Sundarban mangrove forest. Both Ganges and Irrawaddy dolphins produced echolocation clicks with a high repetition rate and low source level compared to marine species. Irrawaddy dolphins, inhabiting coastal and riverine habitats, produced a mean source level of 195 dB (max 203 dB re 1 µPapp whereas Ganges river dolphins, living exclusively upriver, produced a mean source level of 184 dB (max 191 re 1 µPapp. These source levels are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than those of similar sized marine delphinids and may reflect an adaptation to a shallow, acoustically complex freshwater habitat with high reverberation and acoustic clutter. The centroid frequency of Ganges river dolphin clicks are an octave lower than predicted from scaling, but with an estimated beamwidth comparable to that of porpoises. The unique bony maxillary crests found in the Platanista forehead may help achieve a higher directionality than expected using clicks nearly an octave lower than similar sized odontocetes.

  6. Functionalization of multilayer fullerenes (carbon nano-onions) using diazonium compounds and "click" chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Kevin; Chaur, Manuel N; Echegoyen, Luis; Giordani, Silvia

    2010-02-19

    A novel versatile approach for the functionalization of multilayer fullerenes (carbon nano-onions) has been developed, which involves the facile introduction of a variety of simple functionalities onto their surface by treatment with in situ generated diazonium compounds. This approach is complemented by use of "click" chemistry which was used for the covalent introduction of more complex porphyrin molecules.

  7. Preventing work-related stress among staff working in children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres in the UK: a brief survey of staff support systems and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, B; Gibson, F; Bayliss, J; Mukherjee, S

    2018-03-01

    Growing evidence of the association between health professionals' well-being and patient and organisational outcomes points to the need for effective staff support. This paper reports a brief survey of the UK's children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres (PTCs) regarding staff support systems and practices. A short on-line questionnaire, administered in 2012-2013, collected information about the availability of staff support interventions which seek to prevent work-related stress among different members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). It was completed by a member of staff with, where required, assistance from colleagues. All PTCs (n = 19) participated. Debriefs following a patient death was the most frequently reported staff support practice. Support groups were infrequently mentioned. There was wide variability between PTCs, and between professional groups, regarding the number and type of interventions available. Doctors appear to be least likely to have access to support. A few Centres routinely addressed work-related stress in wider staff management strategies. Two Centres had developed a bespoke intervention. Very few Centres were reported to actively raise awareness of support available from their hospital's Occupational Health department. A minority of PTCs had expert input regarding staff support from clinical psychology/liaison psychiatry. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Click synthesis of 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazoles catalysed by CuO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Click synthesis of 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazoles catalysed by. CuO–CeO2 nanocomposite in the presence of amberlite-supported azide. JALAL ALBADIa,∗, JAFAR ABBASI SHIRANb and AZAM MANSOURNEZHADc. aBehbahan Khatam Alanbia University of Technology, Behbahan 6361647189, Iran. bFaculty of Science ...

  9. [What and how to evaluate clinical-surgical competence. The resident and staff surgeon perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Sánchez, Carlos Roberto; Chávez-Vizcarra, Paola; Barragán-Ávila, María Cristina; Parra-Acosta, Haydee; Herrera-Mendoza, Renzo Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation is a means for significant and rigorous improvement of the educational process. Therefore, competence evaluation should allow assessing the complex activity of medical care, as well as improving the training process. This is the case in the evaluation process of clinical-surgical competences. A cross-sectional study was designed to measure knowledge about the evaluation of clinical-surgical competences for the General Surgery residency program at the Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua (UACH). A 55-item questionnaire divided into six sections was used (perception, planning, practice, function, instruments and strategies, and overall evaluation), with a six level Likert scale, performing a descriptive, correlation and comparative analysis, with a significance level of 0.001. In both groups perception of evaluation was considered as a further qualification. As regards tools, the best known was the written examination. As regards function, evaluation was considered as a further administrative requirement. In the correlation analysis, evaluation was perceived as qualification and was significantly associated with measurement, assessment and accreditation. In the comparative analysis between residents and staff surgeons, a significant difference was found as regards the perception of the evaluation as a measurement of knowledge (Student t test: p=0.04). The results provide information about the concept we have about the evaluation of clinical-surgical competences, considering it as a measure of learning achievement for a socially required certification. There is confusion as regards the perception of evaluation, its function, goals and scopes as benefit for those evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... questions to ask your doctor and the research staff, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" ... in Bethesda, Maryland. The physicians, nurses, scientists and staff of the NHLBI encourage you to explore NIH ...

  11. Patient, staff, and clinician perspectives on implementing electronic communications in an interdisciplinary rural family health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng; Paramsothy, Thivaher; Roche, Matthew; Gupta, Nishi S

    2017-03-01

    Aim To conduct an environmental scan of a rural primary care clinic to assess the feasibility of implementing an e-communications system between patients and clinic staff. Increasing demands on healthcare require greater efficiencies in communications and services, particularly in rural areas. E-communications may improve clinic efficiency and delivery of healthcare but raises concerns about patient privacy and data security. We conducted an environmental scan at one family health team clinic, a high-volume interdisciplinary primary care practice in rural southwestern Ontario, Canada, to determine the feasibility of implementing an e-communications system between its patients and staff. A total of 28 qualitative interviews were conducted (with six physicians, four phone nurses, four physicians' nurses, five receptionists, one business office attendant, five patients, and three pharmacists who provide care to the clinic's patients) along with quantitative surveys of 131 clinic patients. Findings Patients reported using the internet regularly for multiple purposes. Patients indicated they would use email to communicate with their family doctor for prescription refills (65% of respondents), appointment booking (63%), obtaining lab results (60%), and education (50%). Clinic staff expressed concerns about patient confidentiality and data security, the timeliness, complexity and responsibility of responses, and increased workload. Clinic staff members are willing to use an e-communications system but clear guidelines are needed for successful adoption and to maintain privacy of patient health data. E-communications might improve access to and quality of care in rural primary care practices.

  12. Direct imaging of glycans in Arabidopsis roots via click labeling of metabolically incorporated azido-monosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Jorin; Berghuis, Nathalja; Cramer, Dario; Geurts, Rene; Zuilhof, Han; Wennekes, Tom

    2016-10-10

    Carbohydrates, also called glycans, play a crucial but not fully understood role in plant health and development. The non-template driven formation of glycans makes it impossible to image them in vivo with genetically encoded fluorescent tags and related molecular biology approaches. A solution to this problem is the use of tailor-made glycan analogs that are metabolically incorporated by the plant into its glycans. These metabolically incorporated probes can be visualized, but techniques documented so far use toxic copper-catalyzed labeling. To further expand our knowledge of plant glycobiology by direct imaging of its glycans via this method, there is need for novel click-compatible glycan analogs for plants that can be bioorthogonally labelled via copper-free techniques. Arabidopsis seedlings were incubated with azido-containing monosaccharide analogs of N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, L-fucose, and L-arabinofuranose. These azido-monosaccharides were metabolically incorporated in plant cell wall glycans of Arabidopsis seedlings. Control experiments indicated active metabolic incorporation of the azido-monosaccharide analogs into glycans rather than through non-specific absorption of the glycan analogs onto the plant cell wall. Successful copper-free labeling reactions were performed, namely an inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction using an incorporated N-acetylglucosamine analog, and a strain-promoted azide-alkyne click reaction. All evaluated azido-monosaccharide analogs were observed to be non-toxic at the used concentrations under normal growth conditions. Our results for the metabolic incorporation and fluorescent labeling of these azido-monosaccharide analogs expand the possibilities for studying plant glycans by direct imaging. Overall we successfully evaluated five azido-monosaccharide analogs for their ability to be metabolically incorporated in Arabidopsis roots and their imaging after fluorescent labeling. This expands

  13. Workplace violence against medical staff in healthcare facilities in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, M; Morris, E; Sobers-Grannum, N

    2016-10-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests increasing workplace violence against healthcare workers in the Caribbean, but the prevalence is largely undocumented. To determine the prevalence of workplace violence reported by medical staff at primary care clinics in Barbados. A study utilizing a modified version of the standard World Health Organization Workplace Violence Questionnaire, designed to assess the incidence, types and features of workplace violence. All nursing and physician staff on duty at the island's eight primary care clinics during the study period were invited to participate. Of the 102 respondents (72% response rate), 63% of nursing and physician staff at the polyclinics in Barbados reported at least one episode of violence in the past year. The majority reported being exposed to verbal abuse (60%) and 19% reported being exposed to bullying. Seven percent of the staff reported incidents of sexual harassment, 3% physical violence and another 3% reported racial harassment. Patients emerged as the main perpetrators of violence (64%). Logistic regression showed statistically significant associations between gender and workplace violence. Females and nurses were more predisposed to experience violent incidents than males and physicians. Over a half of medical staff surveyed reported experiencing some type of violence in the past year, female gender being a significant predictor of abuse. Adequate documentation and implementing clear policies and violence prevention programmes in health institutions are crucial steps towards addressing this issue. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Pressurized transient otoacoustic emissions measured using click and chirp stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H; Patrick Feeney, M; Hunter, Lisa L; Fitzpatrick, Denis F; Sanford, Chris A

    2018-01-01

    Transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) responses were measured in normal-hearing adult ears over frequencies from 0.7 to 8 kHz, and analyzed with reflectance/admittance data to measure absorbed sound power and the tympanometric peak pressure (TPP). The mean TPP was close to ambient. TEOAEs were measured in the ear canal at ambient pressure, TPP, and fixed air pressures from 150 to -200 daPa. Both click and chirp stimuli were used to elicit TEOAEs, in which the incident sound pressure level was constant across frequency. TEOAE levels were similar at ambient and TPP, and for frequencies from 0.7 to 2.8 kHz decreased with increasing positive and negative pressures. At 4-8 kHz, TEOAE levels were larger at positive pressures. This asymmetry is possibly related to changes in mechanical transmission through the ossicular chain. The mean TEOAE group delay did not change with pressure, although small changes were observed in the mean instantaneous frequency and group spread. Chirp TEOAEs measured in an adult ear with Eustachian tube dysfunction and TPP of -165 daPa were more robust at TPP than at ambient. Overall, results demonstrate the feasibility and clinical potential of measuring TEOAEs at fixed pressures in the ear canal, which provide additional information relative to TEOAEs measured at ambient pressure.

  15. Incidence of mitral valve prolapse in one hundred clinically stable newborn baby girls: an echocardiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandraratna, P A; Vlahovich, G; Kong, Y; Wilson, D

    1979-09-01

    Clinical and echocardiographic examinations were performed on 100 clinically stable, newborn baby girls. Mitral valve prolapse was noted on the echocardiograms of seven babies. Three subjects had systolic clicks, two of whom had systolic murmurs following the click. The four other babies who had echocardiographic evidence of mitral valve prolapse had no abnormal auscultatory signs. Of the 93 babies without evidence of mitral prolapse, 91 had normal echocardiograms and auscultatory features; one was noted to have a murmur consistent with a ventricular septal defect, and another had an eccentric aortic valve on the echocardiogram which was suggestive of a bicuspid aortic valve. Serial studies on our group of subjects will yield useful information regarding the natural history of mitral valve prolapse.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes/Poly(HEMA-co-MMA) by Utilizing Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Long Giang; Cao, Xuan Thang; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Jeong, Yeon Tae; Kim, Jong Su; Lim, Kwon Taek

    2016-03-01

    The hybrid material consisting of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate-co-methylmethacrylate) [poly(HEMA-co-MMA)] was synthesized by a combination of RAFT and Click chemistry. In the primary stage, the copolymer poly(HEMA-co-MMA) was prepared by applying RAFT technique. Alkynyl side groups were incorporated onto the poly(HEMA-co-MMA) backbone by esterification reaction. Then, MWNTs-N3 was prepared by treating MWNTs with 4-azidobutylamine. The click coupling reaction between azide-functionalized MWNTs (MWNTs-N3) and the alkyne-functionalized random copolymer ((HEMA-co-MMA)-Alkyne) with the Cu(I)-catalyzed [3+2] Huisgen cycloaddition afforded the hybrid compound. The structure and properties of poly(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-MWNTs were investigated by FT-IR, EDX and TGA measurements. The copolymer brushes were observed to be immobilized onto the functionalized MWNTs by SEM and TEM analysis.

  17. Assessing Clinical Trial-Associated Workload in Community-Based Research Programs Using the ASCO Clinical Trial Workload Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Marjorie J; Hurley, Patricia; Woo, Kaitlin M; Szczepanek, Connie; Stewart, Teresa; Robert, Nicholas; Lyss, Alan; Gönen, Mithat; Lilenbaum, Rogerio

    2016-05-01

    Clinical research program managers are regularly faced with the quandary of determining how much of a workload research staff members can manage while they balance clinical practice and still achieve clinical trial accrual goals, maintain data quality and protocol compliance, and stay within budget. A tool was developed to measure clinical trial-associated workload, to apply objective metrics toward documentation of work, and to provide clearer insight to better meet clinical research program challenges and aid in balancing staff workloads. A project was conducted to assess the feasibility and utility of using this tool in diverse research settings. Community-based research programs were recruited to collect and enter clinical trial-associated monthly workload data into a web-based tool for 6 consecutive months. Descriptive statistics were computed for self-reported program characteristics and workload data, including staff acuity scores and number of patient encounters. Fifty-one research programs that represented 30 states participated. Median staff acuity scores were highest for staff with patients enrolled in studies and receiving treatment, relative to staff with patients in follow-up status. Treatment trials typically resulted in higher median staff acuity, relative to cancer control, observational/registry, and prevention trials. Industry trials exhibited higher median staff acuity scores than trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, academic institutions, or others. The results from this project demonstrate that trial-specific acuity measurement is a better measure of workload than simply counting the number of patients. The tool was shown to be feasible and useable in diverse community-based research settings. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  19. Smoking behavior among hospital staff still influences attitudes and counseling on smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    individual smoking behavior among hospital staff and (a). smoking-related knowledge, (b). attitudes toward counseling on smoking, and (c). self-reported smoking-related counseling provided by the staff. The study was based on a survey using self-administered questionnaires given to all hospital staff...... in a large university hospital in Denmark. Altogether, 82% of staff (2561) returned a completed questionnaire. Analyses focused on a subsample consisting of health professionals in the clinical wards (1429). Multivariate analyses were performed in which smoking-related knowledge, attitudes toward smoking...... qualified to counsel patients about smoking than did never-smokers (ex-smokers, OR=1.8, 95% CI=1.3-2.5; smokers, OR=1.4, 95% CI=1.0-1.9). Individual smoking behavior among hospital staff was strongly associated with smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and counseling practices. Lack of self...

  20. Construct validity and inter-rater reliability of the Dutch activity measure for post-acute care "6-clicks" basic mobility form to assess the mobility of hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, Sven Jacobus Gertruda; Valkenet, Karin; Veenhof, Cindy

    2018-05-12

    To evaluate the construct validity and the inter-rater reliability of the Dutch Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care "6-clicks" Basic Mobility short form measuring the patient's mobility in Dutch hospital care. First, the "6-clicks" was translated by using a forward-backward translation protocol. Next, 64 patients were assessed by the physiotherapist to determine the validity while being admitted to the Internal Medicine wards of a university medical center. Six hypotheses were tested regarding the construct "mobility" which showed that: Better "6-clicks" scores were related to less restrictive pre-admission living situations (p = 0.011), less restrictive discharge locations (p = 0.001), more independence in activities of daily living (p = 0.001) and less physiotherapy visits (p Dutch "6-clicks" shows a good construct validity and moderate-to-excellent inter-rater reliability when used to assess the mobility of hospitalized patients. Implications for Rehabilitation Even though various measurement tools have been developed, it appears the majority of physiotherapists working in a hospital currently do not use these tools as a standard part of their care. The Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care "6-clicks" Basic Mobility is the only tool which is designed to be short, easy to use within usual care and has been validated in the entire hospital population. This study shows that the Dutch version of the Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care "6-clicks" Basic Mobility form is a valid, easy to use, quick tool to assess the basic mobility of Dutch hospitalized patients.

  1. Synthesis of two new alkyne-bearing linkers used for the preparation of siRNA for labeling by click chemistry with fluorine-18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flagothier, Jessica; Kaisin, Geoffroy; Mercier, Frederic; Thonon, David; Teller, Nathalie; Wouters, Johan; Luxen, André

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotides (ONs) and more particularly siRNAs are promising drugs but their pharmacokinetics and biodistribution are widely unknown. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using fluorine-18 is a suitable technique to quantify these biological processes. Click chemistry (Huisgen cycloaddition) is the current method for labeling siRNA. In order to study the influence of a linker bearing by [ 18 F] labeled ONs, on the in vivo pharmacokinetic and metabolism, we have developed two modified ONs by two new linkers. Here we report the synthesis of two alkyne-bearing linkers, the incorporation onto a ONs and the conjugation by click chemistry with a [ 18 F] prosthetic group. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of two new alkyne linkers. ► Functionalization at the 3′-end siRNA by alkyne linker derived of proline. ► Click chemistry between alkyne modified siRNA and [ 18 F] prosthetic group.

  2. Cytocompatible in situ forming chitosan/hyaluronan hydrogels via a metal-free click chemistry for soft tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Mao, Jiahui; Zhang, Ziwei; Tan, Huaping

    2015-07-01

    Injectable hydrogels are important cell scaffolding materials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we report a new class of biocompatible and biodegradable polysaccharide hydrogels derived from chitosan and hyaluronan via a metal-free click chemistry, without the addition of copper catalyst. For the metal-free click reaction, chitosan and hyaluronan were modified with oxanorbornadiene (OB) and 11-azido-3,6,9-trioxaundecan-1-amine (AA), respectively. The gelation is attributed to the triazole ring formation between OB and azido groups of polysaccharide derivatives. The molecular structures were verified by FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis, giving substitution degrees of 58% and 47% for chitosan-OB and hyaluronan-AA, respectively. The in vitro gelation, morphologies, equilibrium swelling, compressive modulus and degradation of the composite hydrogels were examined. The potential of the metal-free hydrogel as a cell scaffold was demonstrated by encapsulation of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) within the gel matrix in vitro. Cell culture showed that this metal-free hydrogel could support survival and proliferation of ASCs. A preliminary in vivo study demonstrated the usefulness of the hydrogel as an injectable scaffold for adipose tissue engineering. These characteristics provide a potential opportunity to use the metal-free click chemistry in preparation of biocompatible hydrogels for soft tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A qualitative evaluation of the Scottish Staff and Associate Specialist Development Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Burr, Jacqueline; Johnston, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The continued professional development of staff and associate specialist doctors in the UK was ill served prior to the introduction of the new staff and associate specialist doctor's contract in 2008. The aim of this study was to independently evaluate NHS Education for Scotland's approach to improving professional development for staff and associate specialist doctors, the staff and associate specialist Professional Development Fund. Semi-structured telephone interviews with key stakeholders, framed by a realistic approach to evaluate what works, for whom and in how and under what circumstances. An inductive and data-driven thematic analysis was carried out and then the realist framework was applied to the data. We interviewed 22 key stakeholders: staff and associate specialist doctors, staff and associate specialist educational advisors, programme architects and clinical directors, between end February and May 2014. The resultant data indicated five broad themes: organisational barriers to continued professional development for staff and associate specialist doctors, the purpose of funding, gains from funding, the need for better communication about the staff and associate specialist Programme Development Fund, and the interplay between individual and systems factors. The staff and associate specialist Programme Development Fund has changed the opportunities available to staff and associate specialist doctors in Scotland and, in that sense, has changed the context for this group - or at least those who have realised the opportunities. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Occupational Accidents among Clinical Staff of Tabriz University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Sahebi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and Objectives : Occupational health and safety is one of the most important issues in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to explore the one –year prevalence of occupational accidents in Tabriz University hospitals. Materials and Methods : A cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 patients of seven university hospitals using researcher made questionnaire. The hospitals were selected based on their specialty of the service. Then, one hospital was selected from each specialty using random selection method. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were employed. The SPSS version 19 was used for data analysis. Results : The one-year prevalence of workplace accident was %21. Women were encountered in workplace accidents more than men (%31.1 vs. % 26.8. The youngest age group (20-30 years experienced the most workplace accidents (%41.5. Carelessness was the main cause of the workplace accidents (%49.3. Reporting rate of the occupational accidents was% 48.3 and the most common cause for not reporting was the fear of being recognized as a less competent individual. Sick leaves due to the severity of the accident was reported %23 (median: 5 days. Over %90 of the accident victims had experienced severe stress and job pressure within the previous year. In multiple regression models, the young staff (20-30 years with severe stress, job pressure and verbal violence victim had more chance of workplace accident.   Conclusion : In addition to the high prevalence of workplace accidents, intensity and consequences of workplace accidents should be considered as well. Providing appropriate methods including prevention of accidents and education of safety along with the assistance of technical staff, managers and attendants would be helpful.

  5. What influences the job satisfaction of staff and associate specialist hospital doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Fiona; Ikenwilo, Divine; Scott, Anthony

    2007-08-01

    Despite their rising numbers in the National Health Service (NHS), the recruitment, retention, morale and educational needs of staff and associate specialist hospital doctors have traditionally not been the focus of attention. A postal survey of all staff grades and associate specialists in NHS Scotland was conducted to investigate the determinants of their job satisfaction. Doctors in both grades were least satisfied with their pay. They were more satisfied if they were treated as equal members of the clinical team, but less satisfied if their workload adversely affected the quality of patient care. With the exception of female associate specialists, respondents who wished to become a consultant were less satisfied with all aspects of their jobs. Associate specialists who worked more sessions also had lower job satisfaction. Non-white staff grades were less satisfied with their job compared with their white counterparts. It is important that associate specialists and staff grades are promoted to consultant posts, where this is desired. It is also important that job satisfaction is enhanced for doctors who do not desire promotion, thereby improving retention. This could be achieved through improved pay, additional clinical training, more flexible working hours and improved status.

  6. Staff Performance Analysis: A Method for Identifying Brigade Staff Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ford, Laura

    1997-01-01

    ... members of conventional mounted brigade staff. Initial analysis of performance requirements in existing documentation revealed that the performance specifications were not sufficiently detailed for brigade battle staffs...

  7. Versatile post-functionalization of the external shell of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus by using click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommersom, C.A.; Matt, B.D.; van der Ham, A.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Katsonis, Nathalie Hélène

    2014-01-01

    We present the modification of the outer protein shell of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) with linear and strained alkyne groups. These functionalized protein capsids constitute valuable platforms for post-functionalization via click chemistry. After modification, the integrity of the capsid

  8. Click-coated, heparinized, decellularized vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrievska, Sashka; Cai, Chao; Weyers, Amanda; Balestrini, Jenna L; Lin, Tylee; Sundaram, Sumati; Hatachi, Go; Spiegel, David A; Kyriakides, Themis R; Miao, Jianjun; Li, Guoyun; Niklason, Laura E; Linhardt, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    A novel method enabling the engineering of a dense and appropriately oriented heparin-containing layer on decellularized aortas has been developed. Amino groups of decellularized aortas were first modified to azido groups using 3-azidobenzoic acid. Azide-clickable dendrons were attached onto the azido groups through "alkyne-azide" click chemistry, affording a tenfold amplification of adhesions sites. Dendron end groups were finally decorated with end-on modified heparin chains. Heparin chains were oriented like heparan sulfate groups on native endothelial cells surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared FTIR spectroscopy were used to characterize the synthesis steps, building the final heparin layered coatings. The continuity of the heparin coating was verified using fluorescent microscopy and histological analysis. The efficacy of heparin linkage was demonstrated with factor Xa anti-thrombogenic assay and platelet adhesion studies. The results suggest that oriented heparin immobilization to decellularized aortas may improve the in vivo blood compatibility of decellularized aortas and vessels. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  10. Clinical study of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint with closed lock, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Ken-ichiro; Fujimura, Kazuma; Yokoyama, Tadaaki; Nose, Masahiro; Miyaki, Katsuaki; Segami, Natsuki; Iizuka, Tadahiko

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-three closed lock cases of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were studied on the correlation between disk configuration at MR imaging and nine clinical parameters composed of opening degree, age, clicking and locking duration, visual analogue scale of pain (VAS), pain score, jaw dysfunction score, life activity limited score, and TMJ X-ray photo findings. Disk configuration and degree of anterior disk displacement were assessed on MR imaging in closed mouth position: the antero-posterior length of disk and the distance from condyle to anterior and posterior portion of disk were measured, respectively. Duration of clicking and locking were not correlated with MR index except that there was a strong correlation between clicking duration and the distance from condyle to anterior portion of the disk at MR imaging. Opening degree was related to the disk deformity and the access of posterior portion of the disk to condyle. Disk configuration and degree of anterior disk displacement were not correlated with TMJ pain, but jaw dysfunction was related to the disk deformity and the distance from posterior portion of the disk to condyle. TMJ X-ray photo findings were not correlated with clicking duration (below 3 years), locking duration (below 30 weeks), opening degree and disk configuration at MR imaging. In evaluation of factors related to opening degree in 53 patients with closed lock by means of multiple regression analysis, age, locking and clicking duration, TMJ pain, life activity limited score were more strongly correlated to opening degree than the others. (author)

  11. [Support Team for Investigator-Initiated Clinical Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hisako

    2017-07-01

    Investigator-initiated clinical research is that in which investigators plan and carry out their own clinical research in academia. For large-scale clinical research, a team should be organized and implemented. This team should include investigators and supporting staff, who will promote smooth research performance by fulfilling their respective roles. The supporting staff should include project managers, administrative personnel, billing personnel, data managers, and clinical research coordinators. In this article, I will present the current status of clinical research support and introduce the research organization of the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) study, an investigator-initiated international clinical research study, with particular emphasis on the role of the project management staff and clinical research coordinators.

  12. Behavioral Emergency Response Team: Implementation Improves Patient Safety, Staff Safety, and Staff Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicko, Cdr Jennifer M; Schroeder, Lcdr Rebecca A; Byers, Cdr William S; Taylor, Lt Adam M; Spence, Cdr Dennis L

    2017-10-01

    Staff members working on our nonmental health (non-MH) units (i.e., medical-surgical [MS] units) were not educated in recognizing or deescalating behavioral emergencies. Published evidence suggests a behavioral emergency response team (BERT) composed of MH experts who assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies may be beneficial in these situations. Therefore, we sought to implement a BERT on the inpatient non-MH units at our military treatment facility. The objectives of this evidence-based practice process improvement project were to determine how implementation of a BERT affects staff and patient safety and to examine nursing staffs' level of knowledge, confidence, and support in caring for psychiatric patients and patients exhibiting behavioral emergencies. A BERT was piloted on one MS unit for 5 months and expanded to two additional units for 3 months. Pre- and postimplementation staff surveys were conducted, and the number of staff assaults and injuries, restraint usage, and security intervention were compared. The BERT responded to 17 behavioral emergencies. The number of assaults decreased from 10 (pre) to 1 (post); security intervention decreased from 14 to 1; and restraint use decreased from 8 to 1. MS staffs' level of BERT knowledge and rating of support between MH staff and their staff significantly increased. Both MS and MH nurses rated the BERT as supportive and effective. A BERT can assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies, and improve staff collaboration and patient and staff safety. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. A qualitative meta-synthesis of emergency department staff experiences of violence and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Rebecca Angharad; Morris, Lucy; Smith, Ian

    2018-01-08

    Patient and visitor violence or aggression against healthcare workers in the Emergency Department (ED) is a significant issue worldwide. This review synthesises existing qualitative studies exploring the first-hand experiences of staff working in the ED to provide insight into preventing this issue. A meta-ethnographic approach was used to review papers. Four concepts were identified: 'The inevitability of violence and aggression'; 'Staff judgments about why they face violence and aggression'; 'Managing in isolation'; and 'Wounded heroes'. Staff resigned themselves to the inevitability of violence and aggression, doing this due to a perceived lack of support from the organisation. Staff made judgements about the reasons for violent incidents which impacted on how they coped and subsequently tolerated the aggressor. Staff often felt isolated when managing violence and aggression. Key recommendations included: Staff training in understanding violence and aggression and clinical supervision. Violence and aggression in the ED can often be an overwhelming yet inevitable experience for staff. A strong organisational commitment to reducing violence and aggression is imperative. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating the opinions of staff and health care service provision of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Zimbabwe has an incidence of STD/HIV infection and measures are needed to explore the efficiency of clinics in providing adequate patient care. To explore the views or opinions of the currently employed staff of an STD/HIV clinic, and suggest a means for improvement thereof. Methods: A current position ...

  15. Surface Modification of Nanoporous 1,2-Polybutadiene by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization or Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Schulte, Lars

    2010-01-01

    ATRP-grafting of hydrophilic polyacrylates and click of MPEG, the originally hydrophobic samples transformed into hydrophilic nanoporous materials. The successful modification was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and measurements of spontaneous water uptake, while...... the morphology was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy....

  16. Feasibility of a web-based dementia feeding skills training program for nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Amella, Elaine J; Zapka, Jane; Mueller, Martina; Beck, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Nursing home (NH) staff do not receive adequate training for providing feeding assistance to residents with dementia who exhibit aversive feeding behaviors (e.g., clamping mouth shut). The result is often low meal intake for these residents. This feasibility study tested a web-based dementia feeding skills program for staff in two United States NHs. Randomly assigned, the intervention staff received web-based dementia feeding skills training with coaching. Both groups participated in web-based pre-/post-tests assessing staff knowledge and self-efficacy; and meal observations measured NH staff and resident feeding behaviors, time for meal assistance, and meal intake. Aversive feeding behaviors increased in both groups of residents; however, the intervention NH staff increased the amount of time spent providing assistance and meal intake doubled. In the control group, less time was spent providing assistance and meal intake decreased. This study suggests that training staff to use current clinical practice guidelines improves meal intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  18. Developing a web page: bringing clinics online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronnie; Berns, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Introducing clinical staff education, along with new policies and procedures, to over 50 different clinical sites can be a challenge. As any staff educator will confess, getting people to attend an educational inservice session can be difficult. Clinical staff request training, but no one has time to attend training sessions. Putting the training along with the policies and other information into "neat" concise packages via the computer and over the company's intranet was the way to go. However, how do you bring the clinics online when some of the clinical staff may still be reluctant to turn on their computers for anything other than to gather laboratory results? Developing an easy, fun, and accessible Web page was the answer. This article outlines the development of the first training Web page at the University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation, Madison, WI.

  19. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  20. Staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in South African public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all ...

  1. Shared governance in a clinic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Michelle M; Costanzo, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Shared governance in health care empowers nurses to share in the decision-making process, which results in decentralized management and collective accountability. Share governance practices have been present in hospitals since the late 1970s. However, shared governance in ambulatory care clinics has not been well established. The subjects of this quality project included staff and administrative nurses in a clinic system. The stakeholder committee chose what model of shared governance to implement and educated clinic staff. The Index of Professional Nursing Governance measured a shared governance score pre- and postimplementation of the Clinic Nursing Council. The Clinic Nursing Council met bimonthly for 3 months during this project to discuss issues and make decisions related to nursing staff. The Index of Professional Nursing Governance scores indicated traditional governance pre- and postimplementation of the Clinic Nursing Council, which is to be expected. The stakeholder committee was beneficial to the initial implementation process and facilitated staff nurse involvement. Shared governance is an evolutionary process that develops empowered nurses and nurse leaders.

  2. College clinic service quality and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshwal, Pankaj; Ranjan, Vini; Mittal, Geetika

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the service quality dimensions that play an important role in patient satisfaction in campus clinics in Delhi; assess student satisfaction with service; and suggests ways to improve areas of dissatisfaction. A questionnaire was distributed to students who had completed at least two consultations at the college clinic. Convenience sampling was used to approach respondents. The questionnaire uses modified SERVQUAL and other instruments, including original dimensions and those constructed through detailed discussions. Factor analyses, reliability tests and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy were conducted. The final sample had a total of 445 respondents. After factor analysis, the authors found that the dimensions affecting patient satisfaction are: staff professionalism; clinic staff reliability; clinic accessibility and basic facilities; tangibles; cleanliness; awareness of the clinic/diseases and how clinic staff deals with emergencies. Most students were satisfied with the professionalism of the clinic staff. More than 70 percent of the respondents reported that the clinic staff paid good attention to them. The campus clinic was deemed reliable by more than 50 percent of respondents. The students found the clinic's location convenient, with more than 50 percent supporting its location. However, there was dissatisfaction among the students regarding the tangibles of the clinic, with more than 50 percent favoring upgrading. There was satisfaction among the respondents regarding the availability of the doctor after clinic hours, but contact details for the clinic staff were not easily accessible on campus. More than 60 percent of respondents were satisfied with the cleanliness of the campus clinic. More than 50 percent felt that the campus clinic was not equipped to deal with emergencies efficiently. At the same time, 90 percent of respondents reported the availability of referral facilities in case of

  3. Improvement of Clinical Skills through Pharmaceutical Education and Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Professors and teaching staff in the field of pharmaceutical sciences should devote themselves to staying abreast of relevant education and research. Similarly those in clinical pharmacies should contribute to the advancement of pharmaceutical research and the development of next generation pharmacists and pharmaceuticals. It is thought that those who work in clinical pharmacies should improve their own skills and expertise in problem-finding and -solving, i.e., "clinical skills". They should be keen to learn new standard treatments based on the latest drug information, and should try to be in a position where collecting clinical information is readily possible. In the case of pharmacists in hospitals and pharmacies, they are able to aim at improving their clinical skills simply through performing their pharmaceutical duties. On the other hand, when a pharmaceutical educator aims to improve clinical skills at a level comparable to those of clinical pharmacists, it is necessary to devote or set aside considerable time for pharmacist duties, in addition to teaching, which may result in a shortage of time for hands-on clinical practice and/or in a decline in the quality of education and research. This could be a nightmare for teaching staff in clinical pharmacy who aim to take part in such activities. Nonetheless, I believe that teaching staff in the clinical pharmacy area could improve his/her clinical skills through actively engaging in education and research. In this review, I would like to introduce topics on such possibilities from my own experiences.

  4. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  5. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  6. Alkyne- and 1,6-elimination- succinimidyl carbonate - terminated heterobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) for reversible "Click" PEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yumei; Duan, Shaofeng; Forrest, M Laird

    2010-01-01

    A new heterobifunctional (succinimidyl carbonate, SC)-activated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with a reversible 1,6-elimination linker and a terminal alkyne for "click" chemistry was synthesized with high efficiency and low polydispersity. The α-alkyne-ω-hydroxyl PEG was first prepared using trimethylsilyl-2-propargyl alcohol as an initiator for ring-opening polymerization of ethylene oxide followed by mild deprotection with tetrabutylammonium fluoride. The hydroxy end was then modified with diglycolic anhydride to generate α-alkyne-ω-carboxylic acid PEG. The reversible 1, 6-elimination linker was introduced by conjugation of a hydroxymethyl phenol followed by activation with N,N'-disuccinimidyl carbonate to generate the heterobifunctional α-alkyne-ω-SC PEG. The terminal alkyne is available for "click" conjugation to azido ligands via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, and the succinimidyl carbonate will form a reversible conjugate to amines (e.g. in proteins) that can release the unaltered amine after base or enzyme catalyzed cleavage of the 1,6-linker.

  7. Production of unnaturally linked chimeric proteins using a combination of sortase-catalyzed transpeptidation and click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Martin D; Theile, Christopher S; Wu, Tongfei; Guimaraes, Carla P; Blom, Annet E M; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2013-09-01

    Chimeric proteins, including bispecific antibodies, are biological tools with therapeutic applications. Genetic fusion and ligation methods allow the creation of N-to-C and C-to-N fused recombinant proteins, but not unnaturally linked N-to-N and C-to-C fusion proteins. This protocol describes a simple procedure for the production of such chimeric proteins, starting from correctly folded proteins and readily available peptides. By equipping the N terminus or C terminus of the proteins of interest with a set of click handles using sortase A, followed by a strain-promoted click reaction, unnatural N-to-N and C-to-C linked (hetero) fusion proteins are established. Examples of proteins that have been conjugated via this method include interleukin-2, interferon-α, ubiquitin, antibodies and several single-domain antibodies. If the peptides, sortase A and the proteins of interest are in hand, the unnaturally N-to-N and C-to-C fused proteins can be obtained in 3-4 d.

  8. Cyclodextrin-Triazole Derivative Functionalized on Ag-SiO{sub 2} Core-Shell Nanoparticles via Click Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gun Bae; Singu, Bal Sydulu; Hong, Sang Eun; Yoon, Kuk Ro [Hannam Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Click chemistry has provided a versatile strategy for functionalization in solution chemistry under mild reaction conditions with a high degree of functional group compatibility. Initially, silver (Ag) nanoparticles were prepared by the chemical reduction method, followed by the synthesis of silver–silica (Ag–SiO{sub 2}) core–shell nanoparticles by the Stöber method. The Ag–SiO2 core shell nanoparticles were functionalized with the alkyne derivative. The cycloaddition reaction between the azide-functionalized cyclodextrin and the alkyne-functionalized Ag–SiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles was carried out via the copper-catalyzed click reaction, leading to the formation of the cyclodextrin-triazole derivative on the Ag–SiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles. The presence of the resulting cyclodextrin-triazole derivative on the silver–silica core–shell nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  9. An interpenetrating HA/G/CS biomimic hydrogel via Diels-Alder click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Zeng, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2013-08-14

    In order to mimic the natural cartilage extracellular matrix, a novel biological degradable interpenetrating network hydrogel was synthesized from the gelatin (G), hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) by Diels-Alder "click" chemistry. HA was modified with furylamine and G was modified with furancarboxylic acid respectively. (1)H NMR spectra and elemental analysis showed that the substitution degrees of HA-furan and G-furan were 71.5% and 44.5%. Then the hydrogels were finally synthesized by cross-linking furan-modified HA and G derivatives with dimaleimide poly(ethylene glycol) (MAL-PEG-MAL). The mechanical and degradation properties of the hydrogels could be tuned simply through varying the molar ratio between furan and maleimide. Rheological, mechanical and degradation studies demonstrated that the Diels-Alder "click" chemistry is an efficient method for preparing high performance biological interpenetrating hydrogels. This biomimic hydrogel with improved mechanical properties could have great potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Physician and staff turnover in community primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Mary; Gotler, Robin S; Goodwin, Meredith A; Stange, Kurt C

    2004-01-01

    The effect of a rapidly changing healthcare system on personnel turnover in community family practices has not been analyzed. We describe physician and staff turnover and examine its association with practice characteristics and patient outcomes. A cross-sectional evaluation of length of employment of 150 physicians and 762 staff in 77 community family practices in northeast Ohio was conducted. Research nurses collected data using practice genograms, key informant interviews, staff lists, practice environment checklists, medical record reviews, and patient questionnaires. The association of physician and staff turnover with practice characteristics, patient satisfaction, and preventive service data was tested. During a 2-year period, practices averaged a 53% turnover rate of staff. The mean length of duration of work at the current practice location was 9.1 years for physicians and 4.1 years for staff. Longevity varied by position, with a mean of 3.4 years for business employees, 4.0 years for clinical employees, and 7.8 years for office managers. Network-affiliated practices experienced higher turnover than did independent practices. Physician longevity was associated with a practice focus on managing chronic illness, keeping on schedule, and responding to insurers' requests. No association was found between turnover and patient satisfaction or preventive service delivery rates. Personnel turnover is pervasive in community primary care practices and is associated with employee role, practice network affiliation, and practice focus. The potentially disruptive effect of personnel turnover on practice functioning, finances, and longitudinal relationships with patients deserves further study despite the reassuring lack of association with patient satisfaction and preventive service delivery rates.

  11. Freedom of Contract in Click Wrap Agreements in Malaysia and the United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rafiei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Technological advancement in the communications industry, particularly over the last decade, has given rise to consumers and commercial providers who want to form their own business or contractual agreements via the Internet. The mark of such technology can be seen in a new form of contract called “click wrap.”

  12. Synthesis of [64Cu]DOTA-ADIBON3-Ala-PEG28-A20FMDV2 via copper-free click chemistry for PET imaging of integrin αvβ6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drishty Satpati; Nadine Bauer; Hausner, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    Catalyst-free click reactions are effective chemical tools for synthesis of radiometal-based radiopharmaceuticals offering advantages towards preparation of non-toxic agents with high specific activity. In the present study the radiotracer [ 64 Cu]DOTA-ADIBON 3 -Ala-PEG 28 -A20FMDV2, [ 64 Cu]3, was synthesized for positron emission tomography imaging of integrin α v β 6 expressing tumors via a strain-promoted click reaction using both a 'pre-click' and 'post-click' approaches. The radiotracer, prepared in >99 % radiochemical yield, was evaluated in vitro (64.6 ± 2.8 % binding to α v β 6 -positive cells vs. v β 6 -negative cells) and in vivo (α v β 6 -positive tumor uptake: 1.52 ± 0.16 % ID/g, 24 h p.i.). While the high initial renal uptake (76.2 ± 10.7 % ID/g at 1 h p.i.) was comparable to a previously reported radiotracer, [ 64 Cu]DOTA-PEG 28 -A20FMDV2, [ 64 Cu]3 showed notably improved renal clearance (11.3 ± 2.5 % ID/g at 24 h p.i.). Thus, the introduction of a chelator-strained alkyne system resulted in improved pharmacokinetics for the present radiotracer, highlighting the attractive prospects of strain-promoted click-based preparations in the construction of radiometalated bioconjugates for targeted molecular imaging and therapy. (author)

  13. Well-Being and Safety among Inpatient Psychiatric Staff: The Impact of Conflict, Assault, and Stress Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Erin L.; Fenwick, Karissa; Brekke, John S.; Novaco, Raymond W.

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric staff are faced with multiple forms of hostility, aggression, and assault at work, collectively referred to as workplace violence, which typically is activated by patients but can also come from coworkers and supervisors. Whether workplace violence adversely affects staff well-being may be related not only to its presence, but also to an individual’s stress reactivity. At a large public psychiatric hospital, an online survey was completed by 323 clinical care staff, of whom 69.5% had experienced physical assault in the previous 12 months. Staff well-being (depression, anger, and physical health) and staff safety concerns were adversely affected by conflicts with other staff members and by individual reactivity to social conflict and to assault. To improve staff well-being, in addition to safety protocols, interventions should target staff relationships, personal health maintenance practices, and individual coping skills for dealing with adverse workplace experiences. PMID:26377816

  14. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  15. Staff perceptions of community health centre team function in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Jennifer; Muldoon, Laura

    2017-07-01

    To examine perceptions of different staff groups about team functioning in mature, community-governed, interprofessional primary health care practices. Cross-sectional online survey. The 75 community health centres (CHCs) in Ontario at the time of the study, which have cared for people with barriers to access to traditional health services in community-governed, interprofessional settings, providing medical, social, and community services since the 1970s. Managers and staff of primary care teams in the CHCs. Scores on the short version of the Team Climate Inventory (with subscales addressing vision, task orientation, support for innovation, and participative safety), the Organizational Justice Scale (with subscales addressing procedural justice and interactional justice), and the Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale, stratified by staff group (clinical manager, FP, nurse practitioner [NP], registered nurse, medical secretary, social worker, allied health provider, counselor, outreach worker, and administrative assistant). A total of 674 staff members in 58 of 75 (77%) CHCs completed surveys. All staff groups generally reported positive perceptions of team function. The procedural justice subscale showed the greatest variation between groups. Family physicians and NPs rated procedural justice much lower than nurses and administrators did. This study provides a unique view of the perceptions of different groups of staff in a long-standing interprofessional practice model. Future research is needed to understand why FPs and NPs perceive procedural justice more negatively than other team members do, and whether such perceptions affect outcomes such as staff turnover and health outcomes for patients. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  16. Improving Kinetics of “Click-Crosslinking” for Self-Healing Nanocomposites by Graphene-Supported Cu-Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Kargarfard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the curing kinetics of crosslinking reactions and the development of optimized catalyst systems is of importance for the preparation of self-healing nanocomposites, able to significantly extend their service lifetimes. Here we study different modified low molecular weight multivalent azides for a capsule-based self-healing approach, where self-healing is mediated by graphene-supported copper-nanoparticles, able to trigger “click”-based crosslinking of trivalent azides and alkynes. When monitoring the reaction kinetics of the curing reaction via reactive dynamic scanning calorimetry (DSC, it was found that the “click-crosslinking” reactivity decreased with increasing chain length of the according azide. Additionally, we could show a remarkable “click” reactivity already at 0 °C, highlighting the potential of click-based self-healing approaches. Furthermore, we varied the reaction temperature during the preparation of our tailor-made graphene-based copper(I catalyst to further optimize its catalytic activity. With the most active catalyst prepared at 700 °C and the optimized set-up of reactants on hand, we prepared capsule-based self-healing epoxy nanocomposites.

  17. 'Everything contradicts in your mind': a qualitative study of experiences of forensic mental health staff in two contrasting services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Arabella; Jeffcote, Nikki

    2011-10-01

     In the theoretical literature, there is growing recognition of the psychological impact on staff of working in challenging healthcare settings. In forensic mental health (FMH) services, powerful transference and counter-transference reactions in staff-patient relationships may emerge and may even play a role in contributing to incidents of malpractice, but there is little empirical research here.  The exploration of the experiences of FMH staff in two contrasting services.  Thirteen in-depth interviews were carried out with staff from a range of clinical disciplines in a mainstream National Health Service (NHS) medium secure unit (MSU), and 12 interviews were undertaken with such staff from a Personality Disorder Unit (PDU) in an MSU. All interview data were analysed independently using the grounded theory method. To synthesise the two separate analyses, a thematic analysis of both data sets was carried out, in which 'thematic units' were defined as significant points of comparison between the analyses of the two sets of interviews.  The combined analysis yielded six main themes under two main headings. Themes under the first heading Experience of the Clinical Task were: 'difficulty in achieving task integration'; 'motivation to build relationships, work through difficulty and bring about change'; and 'minimal sense of risk and anxiety at the centre'. Themes under the second heading Experience of the Organisation were: 'a distant and difficult relationship with outside'; 'preoccupation with staff relationships'; and 'feeling unsafe'. The overarching concept of the combined analysis was encapsulated in the quotation: 'Everything contradicts in your mind'.  Clinical and organisational aspects of work seemed separate in the minds of staff, with the latter reported to be more stressful; staff support came in the form of close relationships with colleagues, who saw themselves as isolated in the context of the wider environment. Promotion of the well-being and

  18. Research Staff | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the wind power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer/Editor /Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  19. Ethics rounds do not improve the handling of ethical issues by psychiatric staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silén, Marit; Haglund, Kristina; Hansson, Mats G; Ramklint, Mia

    2015-08-01

    One way to support healthcare staff in handling ethically difficult situations is through ethics rounds that consist of discussions based on clinical cases and are moderated by an ethicist. Previous research indicates that the handling of ethically difficult situations in the workplace might have changed after ethics rounds. This, in turn, would mean that the "ethical climate", i.e. perceptions of how ethical issues are handled, would have changed. To investigate whether ethics rounds could improve the ethical climate perceived by staff working in psychiatry outpatient clinics. In this quasi-experimental study, six inter-professional ethics rounds led by a philosopher/ethicist were conducted at two psychiatry outpatient clinics. Changes in ethical climate were measured at these clinics as well as at two control clinics at baseline and after the intervention period using the instrument Hospital Ethical Climate Survey. Within-groups comparisons of median sum scores of ethical climate showed that no statistically significant differences were found in the intervention group before or after the intervention period. The median sum scores for ethical climate were significantly higher, both at baseline and after the intervention period (P ≤ 0.001; P = 0.046), in the intervention group. Ethics rounds in psychiatric outpatient clinics did not result in significant changes in ethical climate. Outcomes of ethics rounds might, to a higher degree, be directed towards patient-related outcomes rather than towards the staff's working environment, as the questions brought up for discussion during the ethics rounds concerned patient-related issues.

  20. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  1. Human resource assignment and role representation mechanism with the "cascading staff-group authoring" and "relation/situation" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Y; Sasaki, Y; Kinoshita, A

    2001-01-01

    We have previously reported the access control mechanism and audit strategy of the "patient-doctor relation and clinical situation at the point-of-care" model with multi-axial access control matrix (ACM). This mechanism overcomes the deficit of ACM in the aspect of data accessibility but does not resolve the representation of the staff's affiliate and/or plural membership in the complex real world. Care groups inside a department or inter-department clinical team plays significant clinical role but also spend great amount of time and money in the hospital. Therefore the impact of human resource assignment and cost of such stakeholders to the hospital management is huge, so that they should be accurately treated in the hospital information system. However multi-axial ACM has problems with the representation of staff groups due to static parameters such as department/license because staffs belong to a group rather temporarily and/or a medical staff may belong to plural groups. As a solution, we have designed and implemented "cascading staff-group authoring" method with "relation and situation" model and multi-axial ACM. In this mechanism, (i) a system administrator certifies "group chief certifying person" according to the request and authorization by the department director, (ii) the "group chief certifying person" certifies "group chief(s)", (iii) the "group chief" recruits its members from the medical staffs, and at the same time the "group chief" decides the profit distribution policy of this group. This will enable medical staff to access EMR according to the role he/she plays whether it is as a department staff or as a group member. This solution has worked successfully over the past few years. It provides end-users with a flexible and time-to-time staff-group authoring environment using a simple human-interfaced tool without security breach and without system administration cost. In addition, profit and cost distribution is clarified among departments and

  2. Knee-clicks and visual traits indicate fighting ability in eland antelopes: multiple messages and back-up signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabelsteen Torben

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the costs of signalling, why do males often advertise their fighting ability to rivals using several signals rather than just one? Multiple signalling theories have developed largely in studies of sexual signals, and less is known about their applicability to intra-sexual communication. We here investigate the evolutionary basis for the intricate agonistic signalling system in eland antelopes, paying particular attention to the evolutionary phenomenon of loud knee-clicking. Results A principal components analysis separated seven male traits into three groups. The dominant frequency of the knee-clicking sound honestly indicated body size, a main determinant of fighting ability. In contrast, the dewlap size increased with estimated age rather than body size, suggesting that, by magnifying the silhouette of older bulls disproportionately, the dewlap acts as an indicator of age-related traits such as fighting experience. Facemask darkness, frontal hairbrush size and body greyness aligned with a third underlying variable, presumed to be androgen-related aggression. A longitudinal study provided independent support of these findings. Conclusion The results show that the multiple agonistic signals in eland reflect three separate components of fighting ability: (1 body size, (2 age and (3 presumably androgen-related aggression, which is reflected in three backup signals. The study highlights how complex agonistic signalling systems can evolve through the simultaneous action of several selective forces, each of which favours multiple signals. Specifically, loud knee-clicking is discovered to be an honest signal of body size, providing an exceptional example of the potential for non-vocal acoustic communication in mammals.

  3. Research Staff | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff desc Greg Wilson Center Director Dr. Greg Wilson is the Director of @nrel.gov 303-384-6649 Bosco, Nicholas Staff Scientist Nick.Bosco@nrel.gov 303-384-6337 Braunecker, Wade IV-Physics Michael.Deceglie@nrel.gov 303-384-6104 Deline, Chris Staff Engineer Chris.Deline@nrel.gov

  4. Supplemental nursing staff´s experiences at a Spanish hospital: Qualitative phenomenology research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Raquel Lapeña-Moñux

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the Supplemental Nursing Staff´s experiences at different hospital units. A qualitative phenomenological approach was conducted; a purposeful and theoretical sampling was implemented with supplemental nursing staff at Santa Barbara Hospital of Soria (Spain, to gain a more in-depth understanding of the Supplemental Nursing Staff ´s experience. Data were collected by in-depth interviews and through a field notebook. Data were analyzed using the Giorgi proposal. Twenty-one nurses with a mean age of 46 years were included. Three main topics emerged from the data analysis: building the first contact, carving out a niche and establishing interprofessional/interpersonal relationships. We conclude that the experience of hosting the supplemental nursing staff in changing clinical environments is conditioned by various factors. It is necessary for nurses and hospital managers to establish clear objectives with regard to the supplemental nursing staff´s role in the units.

  5. Supplemental nursing staff´s experiences at a Spanish hospital: Qualitative phenomenology research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Raquel Lapeña-Moñux

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the Supplemental Nursing Staff´s experiences at different hospital units. A qualitative phenomenological approach was conducted; a purposeful and theoretical sampling was implemented with supplemental nursing staff at Santa Barbara Hospital of Soria (Spain, to gain a more in-depth understanding of the Supplemental Nursing Staff ´s experience. Data were collected by in-depth interviews and through a field notebook. Data were analyzed using the Giorgi proposal. Twenty-one nurses with a mean age of 46 years were included. Three main topics emerged from the data analysis: building the first contact, carving out a niche and establishing interprofessional/interpersonal relationships. We conclude that the experience of hosting the supplemental nursing staff in changing clinical environments is conditioned by various factors. It is necessary for nurses and hospital managers to establish clear objectives with regard to the supplemental nursing staff´s role in the units.

  6. Using line acceleration to measure false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) click and whistle source levels during pelagic longline depredation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thode, Aaron; Wild, Lauren; Straley, Janice; Barnes, Dustin; Bayless, Ali; O'Connell, Victoria; Oleson, Erin; Sarkar, Jit; Falvey, Dan; Behnken, Linda; Martin, Sean

    2016-11-01

    False killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) depredate pelagic longlines in offshore Hawaiian waters. On January 28, 2015 a depredation event was recorded 14 m from an integrated GoPro camera, hydrophone, and accelerometer, revealing that false killer whales depredate bait and generate clicks and whistles under good visibility conditions. The act of plucking bait off a hook generated a distinctive 15 Hz line vibration. Two similar line vibrations detected at earlier times permitted the animal's range and thus signal source levels to be estimated over a 25-min window. Peak power spectral density source levels for whistles (4-8 kHz) were estimated to be between 115 and 130 dB re 1 μPa 2 /Hz @ 1 m. Echolocation click source levels over 17-32 kHz bandwidth reached 205 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m pk-pk, or 190 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m (root-mean-square). Predicted detection ranges of the most intense whistles are 10 to 25 km at respective sea states of 4 and 1, with click detection ranges being 5 times smaller than whistles. These detection range analyses provide insight into how passive acoustic monitoring might be used to both quantify and avoid depredation encounters.

  7. The inverse electron demand Diels-Alder click reaction in radiochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Thomas; Zeglis, Brian M

    2014-04-01

    The inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) cycloaddition between 1,2,4,5-tetrazines and strained alkene dienophiles is an emergent variety of catalyst-free 'click' chemistry that has the potential to have a transformational impact on the synthesis and development of radiopharmaceuticals. The ligation is selective, rapid, high-yielding, clean, and bioorthogonal and, since its advent in 2008, has been employed in a wide variety of chemical settings. In radiochemistry, the reaction has proven particularly useful with (18)  F and has already been utilized to create a number of (18)  F-labeled agents, including the PARP1-targeting small molecule (18)  F-AZD2281, the αv β3 integrin-targeting peptide (18)  F-RGD, and the GLP-1-targeting peptide (18)  F-exendin. The inherent flexibility of the ligation has also been applied to the construction of radiometal-based probes, specifically the development of a modular strategy for the synthesis of radioimmunoconjugates that effectively eliminates variability in the construction of these agents. Further, the exceptional speed and biorthogonality of the reaction have made it especially promising in the realm of in vivo pretargeted imaging and therapy, and pretargeted imaging strategies based on the isotopes (111) In, (18)  F, and (64) Cu have already proven capable of producing images with high tumor contrast and low levels of uptake in background, nontarget organs. Ultimately, the characteristics of inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder click chemistry make it almost uniquely well-suited for radiochemistry, and although the field is young, this ligation has the potential to make a tremendous impact on the synthesis, development, and study of novel radiopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Study of the Effect of Grafting Method on Surface Polarity of Tempo-Oxidized Nanocellulose Using Polycaprolactone as the Modifying Compound: Esterification versus Click-Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhaq Benkaddour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Esterification and click-chemistry were evaluated as surface modification treatments for TEMPO-oxidized nanocelluloses (TONC using Polycaprolactone-diol (PCL as modifying compound in order to improve the dispersion of nanofibers in organic media. These two grafting strategies were analyzed and compared. The first consists of grafting directly the PCL onto TONC, and was carried out by esterification between hydroxyl groups of PCL and carboxyl groups of TONC. The second strategy known as click-chemistry is based on the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between azides and alkyne terminated moieties to form the triazole ring between PCL and TONC. The grafted samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA. Further, the effects of the two treatments on the surface hydrophobization of TONC were investigated by contact angle measurements. The results show that both methods confirm the success of such a modification and the click reaction was significantly more effective than esterification.

  9. Staff nurses and students: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Angela M; Mallory, Judy L; Burns, Jane A; Chapman, Shelia

    2010-01-01

    Elements identified by student nurses as impacting learning in the clinical learning environment were explored. A significant element identified by participants was the staff nurse. Strategies for improvement and increasing learning opportunities are included in the discussion.

  10. Leadership behaviors of frontline staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardellone, Christine; Musil, Carol M; Smith, Elaine; Click, Elizabeth R

    2014-11-01

    A recommendation in the Institute of Medicine's report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, challenges the nursing profession to enhance nursing's leadership role in health care redesign. This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study examined the self-perceived leadership behaviors of RNs enrolled in a clinical ladder career pathway. A self-report survey was conducted using the Leadership Practice Inventory and a demographic questionnaire. Significant associations between continuous and categorical demographic factors and ladder levels were reported. Nurses with more experience showed fewer leadership behaviors. Leadership development is necessary for nurses in all areas of practice. The findings from this study provide evidence of the strengths and weaknesses in leadership behaviors of staff clinical RNs who often make frontline decisions for patients. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Male preventive health behaviors: perceptions from men, women, and clinical staff along the U.S. Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jennifer B; Fernandez, Maria Lourdes; Lacy-Martinez, Charles R; Dunne-Sosa, Andrea M; Coe, M Kathryn

    2007-12-01

    Mexican American males have higher levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides, higher body mass indexes, and a higher prevalence of diabetes than do non-Hispanic White males. They are the least likely Hispanic subgroup to be insured, to have recently visited a physician, or to have preventive exams. To explore factors related to the use of preventive exams among mature men, and specifically among Mexican American men residing along the Arizona, United States/Sonora, Mexico border, information on barriers and motivating factors to male participation in preventive screening exams was collected. Interviews were conducted with mature men and women from a single border community and with clinical staff from three different border communities who deliver services to similar populations. Responses were triangulated. Common themes identified include health education/information/advertisement and female/family support as motivating factors and machismo/denial/fatalism as a barrier to male health-seeking behavior.

  12. Research awareness, attitudes and barriers among clinical staff in a regional cancer centre. Part 1: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, B; Coltart, K; Hutchison, C; McJury, M; Morrison, A; Paterson, C; Thomson, M

    2017-09-01

    Research is of key importance in delivering high-quality patient care through evidence-based practice. Attitude towards research and barriers to research can have an impact on research activity. A survey was conducted to establish the levels of research awareness and attitudes among clinical staff groups in this regional cancer centre and identify any barriers to participation in research. The survey consisted of 26 questions and was distributed electronically and completed online. The response rate was 22.3% (n = 123). All participants felt that clinical research will help the regional cancer centre develop and progress treatments in the future. A positive attitude towards research was evident and consistent across professional groups. The main identified barriers to research included lacking the required knowledge, skills and training, lacking support from managers, and lack of opportunity or time to be involved in research, in particular for allied health professionals. However, there appears to be the foundation of a healthy research culture for nurses supported by management. The results of the survey support the implementation of an action plan based on the recommendations of this journal article. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Magnetic poly(N-propargylacrylamide) microspheres: preparation by precipitation polymerization and use in model click reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Hana; Proks, Vladimír; Horák, Daniel; Kučka, Jan; Trchová, Miroslava

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 22 (2011), s. 4820-4829 ISSN 0887-624X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400500904; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN401220801; GA ČR GAP503/10/0664 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : click chemistry * magnetic * microspheres Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.919, year: 2011

  14. Synthesis of Donor-Acceptor Conjugated Polymers by "CLICK" Polymerization for OPV applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Rasmus Guldbæk; Yu, Donghong

    The intent of this study was to utilize the Copper(I)-catalyzed Azide Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) as a polymerization technique (“Click” Polymerization) for synthesizing novel π-conjugated low band gap polymers for organic photovoltaic applications (OPV). The chosen approach was to synthesize...... an alternating electron donating (donor, D) and electron withdrawing (acceptor, A) co-polymer. The chosen monomers were well known units, and the novelty lies in using the monomer units with the click methodology. An insoluble alternating copolymer consisting of 2,7-diazido-9,9-dioctyl-9Hflourene and 1...

  15. Catalyst-Free Conjugation and In Situ Quantification of Nanoparticle Ligand Surface Density Using Fluorogenic Cu-Free Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Sun, Honghao; Berg, Rolf Henrik

    2011-01-01

    A highly efficient method for functionalizing nanoparticles and directly quantifying conjugation efficiency and ligand surface density has been developed. Attachment of 3-azido-modifed RGD-peptides to PEGylated liposomes was achieved by using Cu-free click conditions. Upon coupling a fluorophore ...

  16. Efficient Homodifunctional Bimolecular Ring-Closure Method for Cyclic Polymers by Combining RAFT and Self-Accelerating Click Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lin; Sun, Peng; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Zhengping

    2017-08-01

    An efficient metal-free homodifunctional bimolecular ring-closure method is developed for the formation of cyclic polymers by combining reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and self-accelerating click reaction. In this approach, α,ω-homodifunctional linear polymers with azide terminals are prepared by RAFT polymerization and postmodification of polymer chain end groups. By virtue of sym-dibenzo-1,5-cyclooctadiene-3,7-diyne (DBA) as small linkers, well-defined cyclic polymers are then prepared using the self-accelerating double strain-promoted azide-alkyne click (DSPAAC) reaction to ring-close the azide end-functionalized homodifunctional linear polymer precursors. Due to the self-accelerating property of DSPAAC ring-closing reaction, this novel method eliminates the requirement of equimolar amounts of telechelic polymers and small linkers in traditional bimolecular ring-closure methods. It facilitates this method to efficiently and conveniently produce varied pure cyclic polymers by employing an excess molar amount of DBA small linkers. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  18. Engaging Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) clinical staff to lead practice improvement: the PICU Participatory Action Research Project (PICU-PAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite considerable efforts, engaging staff to lead quality improvement activities in practice settings is a persistent challenge. At British Columbia Children’s Hospital (BCCH), the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) undertook a new phase of quality improvement actions based on the Community of Practice (CoP) model with Participatory Action Research (PAR). This approach aims to mobilize the PICU ‘community’ as a whole with a focus on practice; namely, to create a ‘community of practice’ to support reflection, learning, and innovation in everyday work. Methodology An iterative two-stage PAR process using mixed methods has been developed among the PICU CoP to describe the environment (stage 1) and implement specific interventions (stage 2). Stage 1 is ethnographic description of the unit’s care practice. Surveys, interviews, focus groups, and direct observations describe the clinical staff’s experiences and perspectives around bedside care and quality endeavors in the PICU. Contrasts and comparisons across participants, time and activities help understanding the PICU culture and experience. Stage 2 is a succession of PAR spirals, using results from phase 1 to set up specific interventions aimed at building the staff’s capability to conduct QI projects while acquiring appropriate technical skills and leadership capacity (primary outcome). Team communication, information, and interaction will be enhanced through a knowledge exchange (KE) and a wireless network of iPADs. Relevance Lack of leadership at the staff level in order to improve daily practice is a recognized challenge that faces many hospitals. We believe that the PAR approach within a highly motivated CoP is a sound method to create the social dynamic and cultural context within which clinical teams can grow, reflect, innovate and feel proud to better serve patients. PMID:24401288

  19. Perspectives on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment for clinical trials among cancer center leaders, investigators, research staff, and referring clinicians: enhancing minority participation in clinical trials (EMPaCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Raegan W; Wenzel, Jennifer A; Scarinci, Isabel C; Paterniti, Debora A; Fouad, Mona N; Hurd, Thelma C; Martin, Michelle Y

    2014-04-01

    The study of disparities in minority recruitment to cancer clinical trials has focused primarily on inquiries among minority populations. Yet very little is known about the perceptions of individuals actively involved in minority recruitment to clinical trials within cancer centers. Therefore, the authors assessed the perspectives of cancer center clinical and research personnel on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment. In total, 91 qualitative interviews were conducted at 5 US cancer centers among 4 stakeholder groups: cancer center leaders, principal investigators, research staff, and referring clinicians. All interviews were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative analyses of response data was focused on identifying prominent themes related to barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment. The perspectives of the 4 stakeholder groups were largely overlapping with some variations based on their unique roles in minority recruitment. Four prominent themes were identified: 1) racial and ethnic minorities are influenced by varying degrees of skepticism related to trial participation, 2) potential minority participants often face multilevel barriers that preclude them from being offered an opportunity to participate in a clinical trial, 3) facilitators at both the institutional and participant level potentially encourage minority recruitment, and 4) variation between internal and external trial referral procedures may limit clinical trial opportunities for racial and ethnic minorities. Multilevel approaches are needed to address barriers and optimize facilitators within cancer centers to enhance minority recruitment for cancer clinical trials. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  20. Disseminating contingency management: impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T Ron; Jones, Brinn E; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A

    2014-04-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability) were assessed at study conclusion in a qualitative interview with OTP management. Intervention effectiveness was also assessed via independent chart review of trial CM implementation vs. a historical control period. Results included: 1) robust, durable increases in delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness among trained staff; 2) positive managerial perspectives of intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability; and 3) significant clinical impacts on targeted patient indices. Collective results offer support for the study's collaborative intervention design and the applied, skills-based focus of staff training processes. Implications for CM dissemination are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on electrografted 4-ethynylphenyl film via click chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Qin; Peng Ru; Liang Cong; Ye Siqiu; Xian Yuezhong; Zhang Wenjing; Jin Litong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Hydrogen peroxide biosensor was developed based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and click chemistry. Highlights: → A simple, versatile two-step approach, which is based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has been developed for covalent redox proteins immobilization and biosensing for the first time. In this work, azido group modified HRP was covalently grafted on 4-ethylnylphenyl diazonium compound via CuAAC reaction and a novel electrochemical hydrogen peroxide biosensor was successfully fabricated. - Abstract: In this paper, a simple two-step approach for redox protein immobilization was introduced. Firstly, alkynyl-terminated film was formed on electrode surface by electrochemical reduction of 4-ethylnylphenyl (4-EP) diazonium compound. Then, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) modified with azido group was covalently immobilized onto the electrografted film via click reaction. Reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the modification process. The results indicate that HRP retains its native structure and shows fast direct electron transfer. Moreover, the immobilized HRP shows excellent electrocatalytic reduction activity toward H 2 O 2 with a linear range of 5.0 x 10 -6 to 9.3 x 10 -4 mol L -1 .

  2. Direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on electrografted 4-ethynylphenyl film via click chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran Qin; Peng Ru; Liang Cong; Ye Siqiu [Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xian Yuezhong, E-mail: yzxian@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Zhang Wenjing; Jin Litong [Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2011-07-04

    Graphical abstract: Hydrogen peroxide biosensor was developed based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and click chemistry. Highlights: > A simple, versatile two-step approach, which is based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has been developed for covalent redox proteins immobilization and biosensing for the first time. In this work, azido group modified HRP was covalently grafted on 4-ethylnylphenyl diazonium compound via CuAAC reaction and a novel electrochemical hydrogen peroxide biosensor was successfully fabricated. - Abstract: In this paper, a simple two-step approach for redox protein immobilization was introduced. Firstly, alkynyl-terminated film was formed on electrode surface by electrochemical reduction of 4-ethylnylphenyl (4-EP) diazonium compound. Then, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) modified with azido group was covalently immobilized onto the electrografted film via click reaction. Reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the modification process. The results indicate that HRP retains its native structure and shows fast direct electron transfer. Moreover, the immobilized HRP shows excellent electrocatalytic reduction activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with a linear range of 5.0 x 10{sup -6} to 9.3 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}.

  3. On doing two things at once: dolphin brain and nose coordinate sonar clicks, buzzes and emotional squeals with social sounds during fish capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Sam; Samuelson Dibble, Dianna; Van Alstyne, Kaitlin; Price, DruAnn

    2015-12-01

    Dolphins fishing alone in open waters may whistle without interrupting their sonar clicks as they find and eat or reject fish. Our study is the first to match sound and video from the dolphin with sound and video from near the fish. During search and capture of fish, free-swimming dolphins carried cameras to record video and sound. A hydrophone in the far field near the fish also recorded sound. From these two perspectives, we studied the time course of dolphin sound production during fish capture. Our observations identify the instant of fish capture. There are three consistent acoustic phases: sonar clicks locate the fish; about 0.4 s before capture, the dolphin clicks become more rapid to form a second phase, the terminal buzz; at or just before capture, the buzz turns to an emotional squeal (the victory squeal), which may last 0.2 to 20 s after capture. The squeals are pulse bursts that vary in duration, peak frequency and amplitude. The victory squeal may be a reflection of emotion triggered by brain dopamine release. It may also affect prey to ease capture and/or it may be a way to communicate the presence of food to other dolphins. Dolphins also use whistles as communication or social sounds. Whistling during sonar clicking suggests that dolphins may be adept at doing two things at once. We know that dolphin brain hemispheres may sleep independently. Our results suggest that the two dolphin brain hemispheres may also act independently in communication. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. One-pot synthesis of Au@SiO2 catalysts: A click chemistry approach

    KAUST Repository

    Solovyeva, Vera A.

    2014-10-13

    Using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition "click" reaction, a library of triazole amphiphiles with a variety of functional polar "heads" and hydrophobic or superhydrophobic "tails" was synthesized. The amphiphiles were evaluated for their ability to stabilize small Au nanoparticles, and, at the same time, serve as templates for nanocasting porous SiO2. One of the Au@SiO2 materials thus prepared was found to be a highly active catalyst for the Au nanoparticle-catalyzed regioselective hydroamination of alkynes.

  5. One-pot synthesis of Au@SiO2 catalysts: A click chemistry approach

    KAUST Repository

    Solovyeva, Vera A.; Vu, Khanh B.; Merican, Zulkifli; Sougrat, Rachid; Rodionov, Valentin O.

    2014-01-01

    Using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition "click" reaction, a library of triazole amphiphiles with a variety of functional polar "heads" and hydrophobic or superhydrophobic "tails" was synthesized. The amphiphiles were evaluated for their ability to stabilize small Au nanoparticles, and, at the same time, serve as templates for nanocasting porous SiO2. One of the Au@SiO2 materials thus prepared was found to be a highly active catalyst for the Au nanoparticle-catalyzed regioselective hydroamination of alkynes.

  6. Prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning in seven mouse clicks: Development of a class solution for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Maree; Fonseca, Amara; Sampson, David; Kovendy, Andrew; Westhuyzen, Justin; Shakespeare, Thomas; Turnbull, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the retrospective study was to develop a planning class solution for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) that achieved target and organs-at-risk (OAR) doses within acceptable departmental protocol criteria using the Monaco treatment planning system (Elekta-CMS Software, MO, USA). Advances in radiation therapy technology have led to a re-evaluation of work practices. Class solutions have the potential to produce highly conformal plans in a time-efficient manner. Using data from intermediate and high risk prostate cancer patients, a stepwise quality improvement model was employed. Stage 1 involved the development of a broadly based treatment template developed across 10 patients. Stage 2 involved template refinement and clinical audit ( n  = 20); Stage 3, template review ( n  = 50) and Stage 4 an assessment of a revised template against the actual treatment plan involving 72 patients. The computer algorithm that comprised the Stage 4 template met clinical treatment criteria for 82% of patients. Minor template changes were required for a further 13% of patients. Major changes were required in 4%; one patient could not be assessed. The average calculation time was 13 min and involved seven mouse clicks by the planner. Thus, the new template met treatment criteria or required only minor changes in 95% of prostate patients; this is an encouraging result suggesting improvements in planning efficiency and consistency. It is feasible to develop a class solution for prostate IMRT using a stepwise quality improvement model which delivers clinically acceptable plans in the great majority of prostate cases.

  7. Staff Group Trainer: Development of a Computer-Driven, Structured, Staff Training Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koger, Milton

    1998-01-01

    .... The project produced two training support packages (TSP)--battalion and brigade--designed to train these staffs to more effectively and efficiently communicate within and between staff sections, command post, and the unit commander...

  8. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...... depends on the actual stand allocation but also on the number of zones and the layout of these. A mathematical model of the problem is proposed, which integrates the stand allocation and the staff scheduling. A heuristic solution method is developed and applied on a real case from British Airways, London...

  9. New staff contract policy

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  10. The difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare staff involved in the process of breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare; Buchanan, Jean; Tod, Angela Mary

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare professionals when engaging in the process of breaking bad news. The challenges faced by staff when breaking bad news have previously been researched in relation to particular settings or participants. This study involved staff from diverse settings and roles to develop broader insights into the range of difficulties experienced in clinical practice. The study used a descriptive survey design involving self-reported written accounts and framework analysis. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire containing a free text section that asked participants to describe a difficult experience they had encountered when involved in the process of breaking bad news. Data were collected from healthcare staff from hospital, community, hospice and care home settings attending training days on breaking bad news between April 2011 and April 2014. Multiple inter-related factors presented challenges to staff engaging in activities associated with breaking bad news. Traditional subjects such as diagnostic and treatment information were described but additional topics were identified such as the impact of illness and care at the end of life. A descriptive framework was developed that summarizes the factors that contribute to creating difficult experiences for staff when breaking bad news. The framework provides insights into the scope of the challenges faced by staff when they engage in the process of breaking bad news. This provides the foundation for developing interventions to support staff that more closely matches their experiences in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Substance abusers' personality disorders and staff members' emotional reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesse Morten

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has indicated that aggressive behaviour and DSM-IV cluster B personality disorders (PD may be associated with professionals' emotional reactions to clients, and that cluster C PD may be associated with positive emotional reactions. Methods Staff members recruited from workshops completed a self-report inventory of emotional reactions to patients, the Feeling Word Checklist-58, and substance abusers completed a self-report of DSM-IV personality disorder, the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Disorder Questionnaire. Correlational analysis and multiple regression analysis was used to assess the associations between personality disorders and emotional reations. Results Cluster B disorder features were associated with feeling distance to patients, and cluster C disorder features were associated with feeling helpful towards patients. Cluster A disorders had no significant impact on emotional reactions. Conclusion The findings confirm clinical experiences that personality disorder features in patients with substance abuse have an impact on staff members reactions to them. These reactions should be considered in supervision of staff, and in treatment models for patients with co-morbid personality disorders and substance abuse.

  12. Applying Bureaucratic Caring Theory and the Chronic Care Model to Improve Staff and Patient Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Marcia A; Wilson, Candy

    Patient activation and engagement can be powerful enablers for health outcomes that are just as important as staff engagement and satisfaction. The authors applied the Bureaucratic Caring Theory and the Chronic Care Model to a process improvement project designed to link activation, engagement, satisfaction, and health outcomes. Twenty-two adults with diabetes and 7 staff members caring for them participated in a 12-week process improvement project that incorporated a time-based element of longitudinal care with skill-based competencies to provide collaborative, team-based care to patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients completed satisfaction surveys at the end of their clinical encounters. Staff members completed satisfaction surveys pre- and postimplementation. The authors analyzed hemoglobin A1C levels pre- and postimplementation. As engagement and activation increased for both staff and patients, hemoglobin A1C levels decreased. The clinical implication is that the use of Bureaucratic Caring Theory may foster caring while broad application of the Chronic Care Model may improve self-efficacy, create healthier populations, and reduce health care costs.

  13. Are all pharmacy staff interested in potential future roles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braund, Rhiannon; Chesney, Kate Marie; Keast, Emilia Paulina; Ng, Lye Jinn; Qi, Sarah; Samaranayaka, Sashika; Wang, Eddie

    2012-12-01

    To determine the current perceived roles and responsibilities of pharmacy staff in community pharmacies in New Zealand, and attitudes to proposed new advanced roles for pharmacy staff. Structured interviews were conducted within five community pharmacies, including at least two pharmacists, two dispensary staff and two pharmacy assistants. The interviews were structured to determine previous experience, current roles and responsibilities and the perceived future roles of pharmacy staff within a community pharmacy setting. Thematic analysis from 27 interviews identified key findings. Current roles appeared to be fairly well defined. Pharmacy assistants listed key roles as customer interactions and sales focus, noting that the dispensary was outside their area of responsibility. Technicians identified their role as being dispensary focused while pharmacists saw their role as the 'final check' to ensure accuracy as well as providing dispensing, counselling and managerial roles. With potential future roles, the assistants were less interested than the other groups, citing contentment with current situation and training as a barrier. Some technicians indicated an interest in furthering their roles, but many were reluctant and saw that additional training was too time consuming. Whilst pharmacists appeared to be interested in further scopes of practice, they appeared more reluctant to do this at the expense of handing dispensing responsibility to a non-pharmacist. Whilst there is a push for pharmacists to provide advanced clinical services, it is important to acknowledge that many staff working within community pharmacies are satisfied with their current role. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Treatment staff turnover in organizations implementing evidence-based practices: Turnover rates and their association with client outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.; Modisette, Kathryn C.; Ihnes, Pamela C.; Godley, Susan H.

    2011-01-01

    High staff turnover has been described as a problem for the substance use disorder treatment field. This assertion is based primarily on the assumption that staff turnover adversely impacts treatment delivery and effectiveness. This assumption, however, has not been empirically tested. In this study, we computed annualized rates of turnover for treatment staff (n=249) participating in an evidence-based practice implementation initiative and examined the association between organizational-level rates of staff turnover and client-level outcomes. Annualized rates of staff turnover were 31% for clinicians and 19% for clinical supervisors. Additionally, multilevel analyses did not reveal the expected relationship between staff turnover and poorer client-level outcomes. Rather, organizational-level rates of staff turnover were found to have a significant positive association with two measures of treatment effectiveness: less involvement in illegal activity and lower social risk. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:22154040

  15. Prospective Trial of House Staff Time to Response and Intervention in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Pager vs. Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, James M; White, Terris; Kang, Christopher; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Bloom, Matthew; Alban, Rodrigo F

    The objective of the study was to characterize house staff time to response and intervention when notified of a patient care issue by pager vs. smartphone. We hypothesized that smartphones would reduce house staff time to response and intervention. Prospective study of all electronic communications was conducted between nurses and house staff between September 2015 and October 2015. The 4-week study period was randomly divided into two 2-week study periods where all electronic communications between intensive care unit nurses and intensive care unit house staff were exclusively by smartphone or by pager, respectively. Time of communication initiation, time of house staff response, and time from response to clinical intervention for each communication were recorded. Outcomes are time from nurse contact to house staff response and intervention. Single-center surgical intensive care unit of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, an academic tertiary care and level I trauma center. All electronic communications occurring between nurses and house staff in the study unit during the study period were considered. During the study period, 205 nurse-house staff electronic communications occurred, 100 in the phone group and 105 in the pager group. House staff response to communication time was significantly shorter in the phone group (0.5 [interquartile range = 1.7] vs. 2 [3]min, p house staff intervention after response was also significantly more rapid in the phone group (0.8 [1.7] vs. 1 [2]min, p = 0.003). Dedicated clinical smartphones significantly decrease time to house staff response after electronic nursing communications compared with pagers. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Staff-family relationships in nursing home care: a typology of challenging behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Aim.  This paper draws on data from a study which investigated how Australian nursing home staff constructed staff-family relationships. Background.  Working with the family in aged care to provide the best care possible is consistent with modern nursing philosophy which espouses holistic care. The quality and enjoyment of the experience however, is frequently fraught with problems and challenges for both the staff and the family involved. Design.  A qualitative constructivist design as described by Guba and Lincoln [Fourth Generation Evaluation. Sage Publications, London.] was used. Method.  Thirty paid caregivers drawn from eight nursing homes were interviewed about their experiences of working with residents' families. A constant comparative method of data analysis was used to arrive at the findings. Results.  This paper reports on seven themes under the category of 'unacceptable behaviours'. These themes describe a range of attitudes and behaviours exhibited by families which staff members found undesirable. Conclusions.  Staff members found a number of family behaviours challenging. Nursing home staff perceives the family as subordinate to their needs and want to retain control of the work environment. Relevance to clinical practice.  Nursing home staff need to move away from custodial models of care focused on 'getting the work done' and develop more family friendly work practices that are inclusive of the needs of the family and view them as equal partners in care.

  17. Non-Catalyzed Click Reactions of ADIBO Derivatives with 5-Methyluridine Azides and Conformational Study of the Resulting Triazoles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smyslová, P.; Popa, I.; Lyčka, A.; Tejral, Gracian; Havlač, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2015), e0144613 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : copper-free click * alkyne cycloaddition * chemistry Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a novel double cross-linked hydrogel based on Diels-Alder click reaction and coordination bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shubin; Wang, Lu; Yu, Xuemei; Wang, Chengli; Wang, Zhenyu

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogels, promising biological materials, need to have both strong mechanical properties and also inherent self-healing properties. In this work a double cross-linked network (DN) hydrogel was designed and prepared by combining a Diels-Alder click reaction and coordination effects. This DN hydrogel had good thermodynamic properties, anti-EDTA performance and self-healing properties. In addition, the mechanical properties, swelling properties and surface morphology of DN hydrogels can be controlled by adjusting the ratio of Fe 3+ -catechol. The adjustment of pH value can change the color, crosslinking mode and mechanical properties of the DN hydrogel. This smart hydrogel created from DA click chemistry and coordination effects has significance for guiding the design of new hydrogels with good mechanical properties, self-healing properties and controlled cross-link density. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The impact of staff training on staff outcomes in dementia care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Aimee; Revolta, Catherine; Orrell, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Caring for people with dementia can be emotionally challenging and is often linked to low job satisfaction and burnout in care staff. Staff training within care settings is potentially valuable in improving well-being and quality of care. This review aimed to (i) establish the impact of training on staff outcomes; (ii) compare the impact of different training approaches; (iii) explore the influence of training intensity; and (iv) explore potential barriers to success. A database search of staff training interventions revealed 207 papers, 188 of which were excluded based on prespecified criteria. Nineteen studies were included and appraised using a quality rating tool. Overall, the studies were found to be of variable quality; however, 16 studies found a significant change following training in at least one staff domain, with knowledge improving most frequently. Approaches focusing on managing challenging behaviours appeared to be the most effective. Training staff can be an effective method of improving well-being, and programmes helping staff to manage challenging behaviour appear to be the most beneficial. There is no clear relationship between training intensity and outcome. Most studies point to the importance of addressing organisational factors as a barrier to change. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions in children and adolescents with gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sarah M; Menks, Willeke M; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Klink, Daniel T; Bakker, Julie

    2014-11-01

    Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are echo-like sounds that are produced by the inner ear in response to click-stimuli. CEOAEs generally have a higher amplitude in women compared to men and neonates already show a similar sex difference in CEOAEs. Weaker responses in males are proposed to originate from elevated levels of testosterone during perinatal sexual differentiation. Therefore, CEOAEs may be used as a retrospective indicator of someone's perinatal androgen environment. Individuals diagnosed with Gender Identity Disorder (GID), according to DSM-IV-TR, are characterized by a strong identification with the other gender and discomfort about their natal sex. Although the etiology of GID is far from established, it is hypothesized that atypical levels of sex steroids during a critical period of sexual differentiation of the brain might play a role. In the present study, we compared CEOAEs in treatment-naïve children and adolescents with early-onset GID (24 natal boys, 23 natal girls) and control subjects (65 boys, 62 girls). We replicated the sex difference in CEOAE response amplitude in the control group. This sex difference, however, was not present in the GID groups. Boys with GID showed stronger, more female-typical CEOAEs whereas girls with GID did not differ in emission strength compared to control girls. Based on the assumption that CEOAE amplitude can be seen as an index of relative androgen exposure, our results provide some evidence for the idea that boys with GID may have been exposed to lower amounts of androgen during early development in comparison to control boys.

  1. The ethics of clinical photography and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-González, César

    2015-02-01

    Clinical photography is an important tool for medical practice, training and research. While in the past clinical pictures were confined to the stringent controls of surgeries and hospitals technological advances have made possible to take pictures and share them through the internet with only a few clicks. Confronted with this possibility I explore if a case could be made for using clinical photography in tandem with social media. In order to do this I explore: (1) if patient's informed consent is required for the publication of any clinical images that depicts her, irrespective of whether the patient can be identified from the image or not, (2) if social media is an adequate place for clinical images to be displayed, and finally (3) if there are special considerations that should be taken into account when publishing clinical images on social media.

  2. Productivity and turnover in PCPs: the role of staff participation in decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy Y; Rundall, Thomas G; Cohen, Deborah J; Tallia, Alfred F; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2006-10-01

    Efforts to redesign primary care practices are beginning to address how decisions are made in the practice setting. This study contributes to these efforts by examining associations between staff participation in decision-making, productivity, and turnover in primary care practices. The study is informed by organizational theories of participation that emphasize cognitive and affective influences on employee output and behavior. This research used data collected from primary care practices involved in a national initiative sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Cross-sectional survey data on organizational structures and attributes among 49 practices were analyzed. Regression analysis was used to examine associations among practice productivity, staff participation in decision-making, and formal structures such as staff meetings. Associations between staff turnover and participative decision-making were also examined. Staff participation in decisions regarding quality improvement, practice change, and clinical operations was positively associated with practice productivity, whereas formal structures such as staff meetings were not. In addition, higher levels of participation in decision-making were associated with reduced turnover among nonclinicians and administrative staff. Examination of organizational features is increasingly recognized as a key to improving primary care performance. Study findings suggest that one important strategy may be implementation of a participative model emphasizing greater staff involvement in practice decisions. This may enhance information-sharing, work satisfaction, and commitment to organizational decisions, all of which can lead to beneficial outcomes such as increased productivity and stability in primary care practices.

  3. The digital laser: on-demand laser modes with the click of a button

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Forbes_2014_ABSTRACT ONLY.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 729 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Forbes_2014_ABSTRACT ONLY.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 The digital... laser: on-demand laser modes with the click of a button Forbes A, Ngcobo S, Burger L and Litvin IA ABSTRACT In this paper we will outline our recent advances in all-digital control of light. Importantly, we will outline how to create a so...

  4. A 'Communication and Patient Safety' training programme for all healthcare staff: can it make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter; Allen, Kellie; Daly, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Communication breakdown is a factor contributing to most cases of patient harm, and this harm continues to occur at unacceptable levels. Responding to this evidence, the Metro South District of Queensland Health (Australia) has developed a communication skills training programme titled 'Communication and Patient Safety'. The three modules, each lasting 3½ h, cover both staff-to-patient and staff-to-staff communication issues, and an unusual feature is that clinical and non-clinical staff attend together. Following positive evaluation data from our initial pilot programme (involving 350 staff in a single hospital), the programme was expanded to all five hospitals in the district, and has now been completed by over 3000 staff. The results show that despite the significant time commitment, participants find the courses useful and relevant (Kirkpatrick level 1), they learn and retain new material (level 2), and they report changes in behaviour at individual, team and facility levels (level 3). Although it remains a challenge to obtain quantitative data showing that training such as this directly improves patient safety (level 4), our qualitative and informal feedback indicates that participants and their managers perceive clear improvements in the 'communication culture' after a workplace team has attended the courses. Improving 'communication for safety' in healthcare is a worldwide imperative, and other healthcare jurisdictions should be able to obtain similar results to ours if they develop and support interactive, non-didactic training in communication skills.

  5. What do surgical oncology staff nurses know about colorectal cancer ostomy care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Robin; Kravits, Kathy; Ortiz, Mildred; Anderson, Casandra; Lai, Lily; Grant, Marcia

    2011-02-01

    For most patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, dealing with the adjustment and rehabilitation after treatment can be overwhelming. There is a significant need for expert educational and counseling support, especially for the patient with a new ostomy. This pilot study describes acute care oncology staff nurses' knowledge about and attitudes toward providing direct ostomy care support and education. This study is part of a larger project assessing gaps in education and services in support of patients with colorectal cancer. The Survey on Ostomy Care questionnaire designed to assess nurses' knowledge about and attitudes toward ostomy care was administered to oncology staff nurses at a comprehensive cancer center. Only 30% of staff nurses surveyed strongly agreed or agreed with the statement, "I care for ostomy patients often enough to keep up my skills in ostomy care." Maintaining staff nurses' ability to teach and demonstrate to patients complex care such as ostomy care depends on the ability to practice both education and hands-on skills. Staff nurses identify that lack of opportunity to care for the new ostomy patient influences their ability to maintain skill expertise. The results show the need to explore the provision of ongoing staff education for low-volume patient populations using creative teaching strategies, such as clinical simulation and short videos. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Research Staff | Water Power | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the water power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer /Editor/Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  7. The use of the truth and deception in dementia care amongst general hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Alex; Eccles, Fiona; Keady, John; Simpson, Jane; Elvish, Ruth

    2017-08-01

    Deceptive practice has been shown to be endemic in long-term care settings. However, little is known about the use of deception in dementia care within general hospitals and staff attitudes towards this practice. This study aimed to develop understanding of the experiences of general hospital staff and explore their decision-making processes when choosing whether to tell the truth or deceive a patient with dementia. This qualitative study drew upon a constructivist grounded theory approach to analyse data gathered from semi-structured interviews with a range of hospital staff. A model, grounded in participant experiences, was developed to describe their decision-making processes. Participants identified particular triggers that set in motion the need for a response. Various mediating factors influenced how staff chose to respond to these triggers. Overall, hospital staff were reluctant to either tell the truth or to lie to patients. Instead, 'distracting' or 'passing the buck' to another member of staff were preferred strategies. The issue of how truth and deception are defined was identified. The study adds to the growing research regarding the use of lies in dementia care by considering the decision-making processes for staff in general hospitals. Various factors influence how staff choose to respond to patients with dementia and whether deception is used. Similarities and differences with long-term dementia care settings are discussed. Clinical and research implications include: opening up the topic for further debate, implementing staff training about communication and evaluating the impact of these processes.

  8. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  9. About the Joint Chiefs of Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Blog Instagram Search JCS: Search Search Search JCS: Search Home Media News Photos Videos Publications About The Joint Staff Chairman Vice Chairman

  10. The effectiveness of a multidisciplinary QI activity for accidental fall prevention: Staff compliance is critical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohde Sachiko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accidental falls among inpatients are a substantial cause of hospital injury. A number of successful experimental studies on fall prevention have shown the importance and efficacy of multifactorial intervention, though success rates vary. However, the importance of staff compliance with these effective, but often time-consuming, multifactorial interventions has not been fully investigated in a routine clinical setting. The purpose of this observational study was to describe the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary quality improvement (QI activity for accidental fall prevention, with particular focus on staff compliance in a non-experimental clinical setting. Methods This observational study was conducted from July 2004 through December 2010 at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. The QI activity for in-patient falls prevention consisted of: 1 the fall risk assessment tool, 2 an intervention protocol to prevent in-patient falls, 3 specific environmental safety interventions, 4 staff education, and 5 multidisciplinary healthcare staff compliance monitoring and feedback mechanisms. Results The overall fall rate was 2.13 falls per 1000 patient days (350/164331 in 2004 versus 1.53 falls per 1000 patient days (263/172325 in 2010, representing a significant decrease (p = 0.039. In the first 6 months, compliance with use of the falling risk assessment tool at admission was 91.5% in 2007 (3998/4368, increasing to 97.6% in 2010 (10564/10828. The staff compliance rate of implementing an appropriate intervention plan was 85.9% in 2007, increasing to 95.3% in 2010. Conclusion In our study we observed a substantial decrease in patient fall rates and an increase of staff compliance with a newly implemented falls prevention program. A systematized QI approach that closely involves, encourages, and educates healthcare staff at multiple levels is effective.

  11. Is it acceptable to video-record palliative care consultations for research and training purposes? A qualitative interview study exploring the views of hospice patients, carers and clinical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Marco; Parry, Ruth; Feathers, Luke; Faull, Christina

    2017-09-01

    Research using video recordings can advance understanding of healthcare communication and improve care, but making and using video recordings carries risks. To explore views of hospice patients, carers and clinical staff about whether videoing patient-doctor consultations is acceptable for research and training purposes. We used semi-structured group and individual interviews to gather hospice patients, carers and clinical staff views. We used Braun and Clark's thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted at one English hospice to inform the development of a larger video-based study. We invited patients with capacity to consent and whom the care team judged were neither acutely unwell nor severely distressed (11), carers of current or past patients (5), palliative medicine doctors (7), senior nurses (4) and communication skills educators (5). Participants viewed video-based research on communication as valuable because of its potential to improve communication, care and staff training. Video-based research raised concerns including its potential to affect the nature and content of the consultation and threats to confidentiality; however, these were not seen as sufficient grounds for rejecting video-based research. Video-based research was seen as acceptable and useful providing that measures are taken to reduce possible risks across the recruitment, recording and dissemination phases of the research process. Video-based research is an acceptable and worthwhile way of investigating communication in palliative medicine. Situated judgements should be made about when it is appropriate to involve individual patients and carers in video-based research on the basis of their level of vulnerability and ability to freely consent.

  12. SureClick® (Darbepoetin alfa) can improve perceived satisfaction and competence for anemia treatment and increase self-administration in non-dialyzed patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafont, Xavier; Romero, Ramón; Martínez, Isabel; del Pino, María D; Gil, José M; Aranda, Pedro; Roca, Ramón; Claverol, Joana; Cucala, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    SureClick® is a prefilled pen for administration of darbepoetin alfa (DA) that is ready-to-use. We explored patient satisfaction with SureClick® compared with prefilled syringes (PFS). Multicenter, prospective, 6-months, observational study in non-dialyzed patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with DA in PFS who switched to SureClick® at baseline. Main outcomes were: change in Anemia Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (ATSQ-S), Perceived Competence for Anemia Scale (PCAS) and self-administration rate. We enrolled 132 patients with a mean(SD) age of 71.3 (14.6) years, 57.6% women. Mean(SD) ATSQ-S scores at baseline and final records were 25.5 (7.9) and 31.6 (4.9) (on a scale from 0 to 36 maximum satisfaction-, mean change: 6.2, 95%CI: 4.6-7.8, pscale from 1 to 7 maximum competence, pperceived competence in anemia management in non-dialyzed CKD patients, and could increase the self-administration rate, thereby reducing use of health resources.

  13. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  14. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and staff...

  15. 13 CFR 500.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 500.105 Section 500.105... LOAN PROGRAM Board Procedures § 500.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the... direction with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff...

  16. 13 CFR 400.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 400.105 Section 400.105... Board Procedures § 400.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the Board advises... with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and...

  17. Concussion knowledge and management practices among coaches and medical staff in Irish professional rugby teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, M R; Coughlan, G F; Hart, E C; McCarthy, C

    2015-06-01

    Self-reported concussion rates among U-20 and elite rugby union players in Ireland are 45-48%. Half of these injuries go unreported. Accurate knowledge of concussion signs and symptoms and appropriate management practices among coaches and medical staff is important to improve the welfare of players. Examine concussion knowledge among coaches, and management techniques among medical staff of professional Irish rugby teams. Surveys were administered to 11 coaches and 12 medical staff at the end of the 2010-2011 season. Coaches demonstrated an accurate knowledge of concussion with a good understanding of concussion-related symptoms. Medical staff reported using a variety of methods for assessing concussion and making return-to-play decisions. Reliance on subjective clinical methods was evident, with less reliance on objective postural stability performance. Overall, the coaches in this investigation have accurate knowledge of concussion and medical staff use effective techniques for managing this injury. On-going education is needed to assist coaches in identifying concussion signs and symptoms. It is recommended that medical staff increase their reliance on objective methods for assessment and return-to-play decision making.

  18. Towards enhancing click-draw based graphical passwords using multi-touch behaviours on smartphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Weizhi; Li, Wenjuan; Kwok, Lam For

    2017-01-01

    Graphical passwords (GPs) are recognised as one of the potential alternatives in addressing the limitations in conventional text-based password authentication. With the rapid development of mobile devices (i.e., the increase of computing power), GP-based systems have already been implemented...... and its impact on graphical password creation is an important topic in the literature. In this paper, our interest is to investigate the influence of multi-touch behaviours on users’ habit in creating graphical passwords, especially on click-draw based GPs (shortly CD-GPS) on mobile devices...

  19. Synthesis of click-reactive HPMA copolymers using RAFT polymerization for drug delivery applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Morten F; Schaffert, D.H.; Crowley, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a versatile strategy combining reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization and click chemistry to synthesize well-defined, reactive copolymers of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) for drug delivery applications. A novel azide containing monomer N-(3......-azidopropyl)methacrylamide (AzMA) was synthesized and copolymerized with HPMA using RAFT polymerization to provide p(HPMA-co-AzMA) copolymers with high control of molecular weight (∼10–54 kDa) and polydispersity (≤1.06). The utility of the side-chain azide functionality by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide...

  20. Patterns of health service utilization at a medical school clinic in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawson, A E; Malm, K L; Adu, A A; Wontumi, G-M; Biritwum, R B

    2012-09-01

    The University of Ghana Medical School (UGMS) Clinic provides healthcare service which is free at point of service to students, staff, retired staff and dependents of staff of the College of Health Sciences. However, since 1983, no in-depth review of health service provision or utilization has been undertaken. This study reviewed client characteristics, utilization and disease patterns at the clinic and also compared the disease patterns to that of other primary health facilities nationwide. This was an analytical cross-sectional study undertaken at the UGMS clinic in Korle-Bu. It was a retrospective review of records of all clients attending the facility from January 2002 to December, 2004. More males than females attended the clinic and majority (63.9%) of clients were between 15-44 years (median age was 26 years). Dependents of staff constituted the highest attendants (41%) to the clinic. Among staff, junior staffs were in the majority. Malaria, respiratory tract infection and musculoskeletal pain were the most common conditions seen. Overall, 83% of clients were treated and discharged per visit without the need for review visits. Dependents of staff used the facility the most and they live in many different part of the city of Accra, and to ask them to attend the clinic for care is not efficient. It will be better to provide or supplement their securing of insurance so that they could access health care close to their homes and save time and attention to students and staff.

  1. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff. 8.05... staff. (a) Each exchange shall establish an adequate enforcement staff which shall be authorized by the... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not...

  2. Staff awareness of the application of Mental Health and Guardianship Legislation in the care of hospitalised older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Narinder; Valachova, Iveta; Schmidtman, Robert; Chan, Daniel Kam Yin

    2018-02-01

    The study aimed to survey hospital staff knowledge of the application of the Mental Health Act 2007 (NSW) (MHA) and the Guardianship Act 1987 (NSW) (GA) in the care and treatment of older persons in a teaching hospital in Sydney. Method Over a two-month period in 2017, a survey questionnaire was distributed to staff involved in older persons' care across the hospital. The majority of the hospital staff demonstrated basic theoretical knowledge of both the GA (76%) and of the MHA (84.5%). Fewer (64.5%) appeared to understand the practical application of the MHA in the hypothetical clinical situations. An even lower proportion of staff appeared to understand the application of the GA either to obtain consent for medical treatment or to appoint a guardian through the Guardianship Division of the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal (NCAT). Although clinical staff of the hospital displayed fair knowledge and awareness about the application of the MHA and the GA to inpatient care of older adults, further education is necessary, particularly about the application of the GA. The authors suggest similar findings may occur at other New South Wales hospitals, which may raise concern and need for education.

  3. On the hidden curriculum of the mouse click: An anthropologically drama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Werler

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Any process of education is media based. But the advent of computer based media in the classroom caused a qualitative change. This new type of media serves as a bodily and cognitive extension of man. The aim of the article is to demonstrate educational consequences of these new anthropologically premises. The article discusses the structure and concept of digital communication culture as it denies the existence of spatial distance. The click option of the mouse will be framed as digital communications hidden curriculum. In order to navigate in the digital world of education the texts concludes with that man has to develop sign-literacy to be able to master the iconic turn in education.

  4. Oral Health Knowledge and Practices of WIC Staff at Florida WIC Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jaana T; Tomar, Scott

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the oral health knowledge, practices and confidence of staff in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infant and Children (WIC) by administering an anonymous self-completed survey to 39 WIC Clinic staff in Northern Florida. The survey instrument was a 28-item questionnaire adapted from previous validated surveys and covered questions on oral health knowledge, confidence and general practices related to oral health. Survey data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. The majority of WIC staff is knowledgeable about the role of the caregiver in cleaning the child's teeth and the role of bottle use in dental caries. Only 7 (25 %) of total 28 WIC staff indicated that fluoridated toothpaste could be used for children younger than 2 years of age. Only 18 (64 %) agreed that the cariogenic bacteria could be transmitted from mother to child. Nutritionists reported greater confidence compared to others in oral health tasks. Only 6 (67 %) of the nutritionists reported to counsel caregivers on the importance of regular tooth brushing. Only 4 (44 %) nutritionists reported to refer WIC clients to dental care. These results indicate that WIC staff has a limited knowledge on the age recommendations for the fluoride toothpaste use and on the transmission of the cariogenic bacteria. Many do not provide oral health counseling to caregivers. WIC staff with more education is more likely to discuss oral health issues. WIC staff is in need for oral health training and education to provide oral health counseling for at risk WIC population.

  5. Facile approach to prepare pH and redox-responsive nanogels via Diels-Alder click reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Q. Le

    2018-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel pH and redox responsive system of sub-100 nm nanogels was prepared by arm-first approach via Diels-Alder click reaction. First, well-defined poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride (PEG-b-PSM was synthesized and subsequently functionalized with furfuryl amine, leading to the formation of the dual-functional block copolymer of PEG-b-PSMf. The furfuryl groups in the PSMf block were employed to incorporate a redox-responsive linkage and the carboxylic acid moieties generated through functionalization acted as a pH-responsive part. The Diels-Alder click reaction between a bismaleimide crosslinker and PEG-b-PSMf was conducted at 60 °C, affording star-like nanogel structures. Doxorubicin, a model anticancer drug, was loaded into to the core of the nanogels primarily by the ionic interaction with carboxylates of core blocks and a highest drug loading capacity of 38.1% was obtained. Furthermore, the in vitro profile showed a low release percentage (11.2% of DOX at PBS pH 7.4, whereas a burst release (62% at pH 5.0 in the presence of 10 mM glutathione, indicating the effective pH and redox responsive characteristic of the PEG-b-PSMf nanogels.

  6. In vivo click reaction between Tc-99m-labeled azadibenzocyclooctyne-MAMA and 2-nitroimidazole-azide for tumor hypoxia targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjing; Chu, Taiwei

    2015-10-15

    The bioactivity of nitroimidazole in Tc-99m-labeled 2-nitroimidazole, a traditional solid tumor hypoxia-imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is reduced by the presence of large ligand and metallic radionuclide, exhibiting lower tumor-to-nontumor ratios. In an effort to solve this general problem, a pretargeting strategy based on click chemistry (strain-promoted cyclooctyne-azide cycloaddition) was applied. The functional click synthons were synthesized as pretargeting components: an azide group linked to 2-nitroimidazole (2NIM-Az) serves for tumor hypoxia-targeting and azadibenzocyclooctyne conjugated with monoamine monoamide dithiol ligand (AM) functions as radiolabeling and binding group to azides in vivo. 2NIM-triazole-MAMA was obtained from in vitro click reaction with a reaction rate constant of 0.98M(-1)s(-1). AM and 2NIM-triazole-MAMA were radiolabeled with Tc-99m. The hypoxia-pretargeting biodistribution was studied in Kunming mice bearing S180 tumor; (99m)Tc-AM and (99m)Tc-triazole-2NIM were used as blank control and conventional control. Compared to the control groups, the pretargeting experiment exhibits the best radio-uptake and retention in tumor, with higher tumor-to-muscle and tumor-to-blood ratios (up to 8.55 and 1.44 at 8h post-(99m)Tc-complex-injection, respectively). To some extent, the pretargeting strategy protects the bioactivity of nitroimidazole and therefore provides an innovative approach for the development of tumor hypoxia-SPECT imaging agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The... the Act and performs such other functions as the Board may delegate to him. (b) Members of the staffs...

  8. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as the...

  9. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L J M; Embregts, P J C M; Gerits, L; Bosman, A M T; Derksen, J J L

    2015-07-01

    Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions between staff and clients. The effects of the training on emotional intelligence, coping style and emotions of support staff were investigated. Participants were 214 support staff working within residential settings for individuals with ID and challenging behaviour. The experimental group consisted of 76 staff members, 138 staff members participated in two different control groups. A pre-test, post-test, follow-up control group design was used. Effectiveness was assessed using questionnaires addressing emotional intelligence, coping and emotions. Emotional intelligence of the experimental group changed significantly more than that of the two control groups. The experimental group showed an increase in task-oriented coping, whereas one control group did not. The results with regard to emotions were mixed. Follow-up data revealed that effects within the experimental group were still present four months after the training ended. A staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and staff-client interactions is effective in improving emotional intelligence and coping styles of support staff. However, the need for more research aiming at the relationship between staff characteristics, organisational factors and their mediating role in the effectiveness of staff training is emphasised. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Target and identify: triazene linker helps identify azidation sites of labelled proteins via click and cleave strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Jonas; Schindl, Alexandra; Danda, Natasha; Williams, Chris P; Kramer, Karl; Kuster, Bernhard; Witte, Martin D; Médard, Guillaume

    2017-10-31

    A method for identifying probe modification of proteins via tandem mass spectrometry was developed. Azide bearing molecules are immobilized on functionalised sepharose beads via copper catalysed Huisgen-type click chemistry and selectively released under acidic conditions by chemical cleavage of the triazene linkage. We applied this method to identify the modification site of targeted-diazotransfer on BirA.

  11. Click chemistry as a powerful and chemoselective tool for the attachment of targeting ligands to polymer drug carriers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Robert; Braunová, Alena; Laga, Richard; Pechar, Michal; Ulbrich, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2014), s. 1340-1350 ISSN 1759-9954 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0802 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : click chemistry * RAFT polymerization * hydrophilic polymers Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.520, year: 2014

  12. PBODL : Parallel Bayesian Online Deep Learning for Click-Through Rate Prediction in Tencent Advertising System

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xun; Xue, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    We describe a parallel bayesian online deep learning framework (PBODL) for click-through rate (CTR) prediction within today's Tencent advertising system, which provides quick and accurate learning of user preferences. We first explain the framework with a deep probit regression model, which is trained with probabilistic back-propagation in the mode of assumed Gaussian density filtering. Then we extend the model family to a variety of bayesian online models with increasing feature embedding ca...

  13. Research Staff | Buildings | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Roderick Jackson Roderick Jackson Laboratory Program Manager -related research at NREL. He works closely with senior laboratory management to set the strategic agenda for NREL's buildings portfolio, including all research, development, and market implementation

  14. The nature of conflict in palliative care: A qualitative exploration of the experiences of staff and family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Karemah; Lobb, Elizabeth; Barclay, Sarah; Forbat, Liz

    2017-08-01

    Conflict is a significant and recurring problem in healthcare. This study aimed to understand staff and relatives' perspectives on the characteristics of conflict and serious disagreement in adult palliative care, including triggers, risk factors and the impact on themselves and clinical care. Qualitative study of 25 staff and seven bereaved relatives using individual interviews, recruited from a multidisciplinary specialist palliative care setting in Australia. Data were analysed thematically. Communication was frequently cited as a cause of conflict. Further, different understandings regarding disease process, syringe drivers and providing nutrition/hydration caused conflict. Staff applied empathy to moderate their responses to conflict. Relatives' reactions to conflict followed a trend of anger/frustration followed by explanations or justifications of the conflict. Relatives identified systemic rather than interpersonal issues as triggering conflict. The data illustrate connections with conflict literature in other clinical areas, but also points of convergence such as the compassion shown by both families and staff, and the identification of systemic rather than always individual causes. Family meetings may fruitfully be applied to prevent and de-escalate conflict. Clinical audits may be useful to identify and provide support to families where there may be unresolved conflict impacting grief process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of chromosomal aberration in seven medical staffs suspected with exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lin; Zhao Fengling; Wang Xi'ai; Wang Ping; Jiang Feng; Lu Yumin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the chromosomal aberrations in seven medical staffs suspected with exposure to ionizing radiation and to speculate its possible causation. Methods: The hospital staffs, including 6 females and 1 male,worked in a clinical laboratory where a CT room was located downstairs. The thickness of precast slab between these two rooms was 6 cm. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of seven staffs were examined for conventional chromosomal aberrations. Results: The frequencies of dicentrics in the peripheral lymphocytes of 4 females were from 0.40% to 1.60% that was significantly higher than the spontaneous frequency of dicentrics (0.03%, χ 2 =36.79, P<0.05). The translocation was observed in the lymphocytes from all subjects with frequencies from 0.33% to 1.20%, obviously higher than its spontaneous frequency of 0.01% (χ 2 =42.90, P<0.05). Conclusion: These staffs suffer from ionizing radiation. (authors)

  16. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  17. The Staff Association and its history

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Association will celebrate its 60th birthday in the spring of 2015. We are collecting all information about the sixty years of the Staff Association. In particular, we are looking at publications of the Staff Association, which started with the “Staff Association Journal”, in 1955, which later became “Le Proton déchainé”, then, more simply, “Proton” in 1982 (the figure on the left shows the different mutations of our magazine). In our collection we are missing a few issues, in particular № 1 (dated mid-1955).     Dear reader, if have any old issues of this magazine, or of Graviton (figure on the right), another magazine edited by the Staff Association, or any other material or information that might help us document the history of the Staff Association, we would very much like to have a copy of the material or your contribution (written or oral). Please contact the Staff Association Sec...

  18. Staff Nurses' Perceptions and Experiences about Structural Empowerment: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Peremans, Lieve; Diltour, Nadine; Van heusden, Danny; Dilles, Tinne; Van Rompaey, Bart; Havens, Donna Sullivan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study reported in this article was to investigate staff nurses' perceptions and experiences about structural empowerment and perceptions regarding the extent to which structural empowerment supports safe quality patient care. To address the complex needs of patients, staff nurse involvement in clinical and organizational decision-making processes within interdisciplinary care settings is crucial. A qualitative study was conducted using individual semi-structured interviews of 11 staff nurses assigned to medical or surgical units in a 600-bed university hospital in Belgium. During the study period, the hospital was going through an organizational transformation process to move from a classic hierarchical and departmental organizational structure to one that was flat and interdisciplinary. Staff nurses reported experiencing structural empowerment and they were willing to be involved in decision-making processes primarily about patient care within the context of their practice unit. However, participants were not always fully aware of the challenges and the effect of empowerment on their daily practice, the quality of care and patient safety. Ongoing hospital change initiatives supported staff nurses' involvement in decision-making processes for certain matters but for some decisions, a classic hierarchical and departmental process still remained. Nurses perceived relatively high work demands and at times viewed empowerment as presenting additional. Staff nurses recognized the opportunities structural empowerment provided within their daily practice. Nurse managers and unit climate were seen as crucial for success while lack of time and perceived work demands were viewed as barriers to empowerment.

  19. Nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in psychiatric in-patient care: Patient and staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salberg, Johanna; Folke, Fredrik; Ekselius, Lisa; Öster, Caisa

    2018-02-15

    A promising intervention in mental health in-patient care is behavioural activation (BA). Interventions based on BA can be used by mental health nurses and other staff members. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' and staff members' experiences of a nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in mental health in-patient care. The intervention was implemented at three adult acute general mental health in-patient wards in a public hospital setting in Sweden. A self-administrated questionnaire, completed by 84 patients and 34 nurses and nurse assistants, was administered, and nonparametric data analysed using descriptive statistics. Our findings revealed that both patients and nursing staff ranked nursing care and care environment as important aspects in the recovery process. Patients and staff members reported overall positive experiences of the group sessions. Patients with higher frequencies of attendance and patients satisfied with overall care had a more positive attitude towards the intervention. A more positive experience of being a group leader was reported by staff members who had been leading groups more than ten times. The most common impeding factor during implementation, reported by staff members, was a negative attitude to change. Conducive factors were having support from a psychologist and the perception that patients were showing interest. These positive experiences reported by patients and nursing staff, combined with previous research in this field, are taking us one step further in evaluating group sessions based on BA as a meaningful nursing intervention in mental health in-patient care. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Integrating the Visual Arts Back into the Classroom with Mobile Applications: Teaching beyond the "Click and View" Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Buonincontro, Jen; Foster, Aroutis

    2013-01-01

    Teachers can use mobile applications to integrate the visual arts back into the classroom, but how? This article generates recommendations for selecting and using well-designed mobile applications in the visual arts beyond a "click and view " approach. Using quantitative content analysis, the results show the extent to which a sample of…

  1. 42 CFR 485.631 - Condition of participation: Staffing and staff responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... care staff that includes one or more doctors of medicine or osteopathy, and may include one or more... operation of the CAH. (4) A doctor of medicine or osteopathy, nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist... osteopathy. (1) The doctor of medicine or osteopathy— (i) Provides medical direction for the CAH's health...

  2. Use of an android phone application for automated text messages in international settings: A case study in an HIV clinical trial in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Leah S; Patts, Gregory J; Coleman, Sharon M; Blokhina, Elena; Lu, John; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana; Gnatienko, Natalia; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H; Chaisson, Christine E

    2018-02-01

    Reproducible outcomes in clinical trials depend on adherence to study protocol. Short message service (also known as text message) reminders have been shown to improve clinical trial adherence in the United States and elsewhere. However, due to systematic differences in mobile data plans, languages, and technology, these systems are not easily translated to international settings. To gauge technical capabilities for international projects, we developed SMSMessenger, an automated Android application that uses a US server to send medication reminders to participants in a clinical trial in St. Petersburg, Russia (Zinc for HIV disease among alcohol users-a randomized controlled trial in the Russia Alcohol Research Collaboration on HIV/AIDS cohort). The application is downloaded once onto an Android study phone. When it is time for the text message reminders to be sent, study personnel access the application on a local phone, which in turn accesses the existing clinical trial database hosted on a US web server. The application retrieves a list of participants with the following information: phone number, whether a message should be received at that time, and the appropriate text of the message. The application is capable of storing multiple outgoing messages. With a few clicks, text messages are sent to study participants who can reply directly to the message. Study staff can check the local phone for incoming messages. The SMSMessenger application uses an existing clinical trial database and is able to receive real-time updates. All communications between the application and server are encrypted, and phone numbers are stored in a secure database behind a firewall. No sensitive data are stored on the phone, as outgoing messages are sent through the application and not by messaging features on the phone itself. Messages are sent simultaneously to study participants, which reduces the burden on local study staff. Costs and setup are minimal. The only local requirements

  3. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  4. Research Staff | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Adam Bratis, Ph.D. Adam Bratis Associate Lab Director-Bio research to accomplish the objectives of the Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office, and to serve as a spokesperson for the bioenergy research effort at NREL, both internally and externally. This

  5. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, A; Embregts, P; Hendriks, L; Bosman, A

    2016-02-01

    Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an interpersonal model. As in functional analysis, this study tests the influence of client interpersonal behaviour, three types of staff reactions to challenging behaviour, two types of staff psychological resources and staff team climate on four styles of staff interpersonal behaviour. A total of 318 support staff members completed a questionnaire on staff interpersonal behaviour for 44 clients with ID and challenging behaviour, as well as seven questionnaires on client interpersonal behaviour, staff emotions, attributions, self-efficacy, self-reflection, coping styles and team climate. The influence of these seven factors on four staff interpersonal behaviours was examined using multilevel multiple regression analysis. Friendly-warm and dominant client interpersonal behaviour had a significant positive impact on friendly and assertive control staff behaviour, respectively. Also, there was a strong influence of staff negative and positive emotions, as well as their self-efficacy, on most of the staff interpersonal behaviours. Staff self-reflection, insight and avoidance-focused coping style had an impact on some staff interpersonal behaviours. Staff team climate only predicted higher support-seeking staff behaviour. In conducting a functional analysis of staff interpersonal behaviour, the results of this study can be used both as a framework in staff-client interaction training and in clinical practice for treating challenging behaviour. The emphasis in training and practice should not only be on the bidirectional dynamics of control and affiliation between staff and clients, but also - in order of importance - on the impact of staff emotions, self-efficacy, self-reflection and insight

  6. Evaluation of job satisfaction of practice staff and general practitioners: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goetz Katja

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care teams' job satisfaction is an important issue in quality of care. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the job satisfaction of general practitioners (GPs and non-physician staff and to explore the elements that may impact on overall job satisfaction for GPs and non-physician staff separately. Methods The study was based on data from the European Practice Assessment and used an observational design. Job satisfaction was measured with the 10-items Warr-Cook-Wall questionnaire with 7-point-Likert scales. Job satisfaction of GPs and non-physician staff was compared and impact on overall job satisfaction was analysed with stepwise linear regression analyses for both samples separately. Results The study population consisted of 2878 non-physician staff (mean age: 38 years and 676 GPs (mean age: 50 years. The actual mean working time per week of GPs was 50.0 hours and of practice staff 26.0 hours. Both were satisfied with colleagues and fellow workers (mean = 5.99 and mean = 6.18 respectively and mostly dissatisfied with their income (mean = 4.40 and mean = 4.79 respectively. For GPs the opportunity to use their abilities (β = 0.638 and for non-physician staff recognition for their work (β = 0.691 showed the highest scores of explained variance (R2 = 0.406 and R2 = 0.477 respectively regarding overall job satisfaction. Conclusions Non-physician staff evaluate their job satisfaction higher than GPs except recognition for work. Job satisfaction of members of primary care teams is important because poor satisfaction is associated with suboptimal healthcare delivery, poor clinical outcomes and higher turnover of staff.

  7. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  8. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  9. "Click" synthesis of fatty acid derivatives as fast-degrading polyanhydride precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluch, Cristina; Lligadas, Gerard; Ronda, Joan C; Galià, Marina; Cadiz, Virginia

    2011-09-01

    Fast-degrading linear and branched polyanhydrides are obtained by melt-condensation of novel di- and tri-carboxylic acid monomers based on oleic and undecylenic acid synthesized using photoinitiated thiol-ene click chemistry. (1)H NMR spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and FT-IR spectroscopy have been used to fully characterize these polymers. The hydrolytic degradation of these polymers was studied by means of weight loss, anhydride bond loss, and changes in molecular weight, showing fast degrading properties. Drug release studies from the synthesized polyanhydrides have also been conducted, using rhodamine B as a hydrophobic model drug, to evaluate the potential of these polymers in biomedical applications. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Indirect photopatterning of functionalized organic monolayers via copper-catalyzed "click chemistry"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mackenzie G.; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2018-07-01

    Solution-based lithographic surface modification of an organic monolayer on a solid substrate is attained based on selective area photo-reduction of copper (II) to copper (I) to catalyze the azide-alkyne dipolar cycloaddition "click" reaction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to confirm patterning, and spectroscopic results are analyzed and supplemented with computational models to confirm the surface chemistry. It is determined that this surface modification approach requires irradiation of the solid substrate with all necessary components present in solution. This method requires only minutes of irradiation to result in spatial and temporal control of the covalent surface functionalization of a monolayer and offers the potential for wavelength tunability that may be desirable in many applications utilizing organic monolayers.

  11. A New Approach for Mobile Advertising Click-Through Rate Estimation Based on Deep Belief Nets

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jie-Hao; Zhao, Zi-Qian; Shi, Ji-Yun; Zhao, Chong

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of mobile Internet and its business applications, mobile advertising Click-Through Rate (CTR) estimation has become a hot research direction in the field of computational advertising, which is used to achieve accurate advertisement delivery for the best benefits in the three-side game between media, advertisers, and audiences. Current research on the estimation of CTR mainly uses the methods and models of machine learning, such as linear model or re...

  12. Neural responses in the primary auditory cortex of freely behaving cats while discriminating fast and slow click-trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chao; Qin, Ling; Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Xinan; Sato, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Repeated acoustic events are ubiquitous temporal features of natural sounds. To reveal the neural representation of the sound repetition rate, a number of electrophysiological studies have been conducted on various mammals and it has been proposed that both the spike-time and firing rate of primary auditory cortex (A1) neurons encode the repetition rate. However, previous studies rarely examined how the experimental animals perceive the difference in the sound repetition rate, and a caveat to these experiments is that they compared physiological data obtained from animals with psychophysical data obtained from humans. In this study, for the first time, we directly investigated acoustic perception and the underlying neural mechanisms in the same experimental animal by examining spike activities in the A1 of free-moving cats while performing a Go/No-go task to discriminate the click-trains at different repetition rates (12.5-200 Hz). As reported by previous studies on passively listening animals, A1 neurons showed both synchronized and non-synchronized responses to the click-trains. We further found that the neural performance estimated from the precise temporal information of synchronized units was good enough to distinguish all 16.7-200 Hz from the 12.5 Hz repetition rate; however, the cats showed declining behavioral performance with the decrease of the target repetition rate, indicating an increase of difficulty in discriminating two slower click-trains. Such behavioral performance was well explained by the firing rate of some synchronized and non-synchronized units. Trial-by-trial analysis indicated that A1 activity was not affected by the cat's judgment of behavioral response. Our results suggest that the main function of A1 is to effectively represent temporal signals using both spike timing and firing rate, while the cats may read out the rate-coding information to perform the task in this experiment.

  13. Neural responses in the primary auditory cortex of freely behaving cats while discriminating fast and slow click-trains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Dong

    Full Text Available Repeated acoustic events are ubiquitous temporal features of natural sounds. To reveal the neural representation of the sound repetition rate, a number of electrophysiological studies have been conducted on various mammals and it has been proposed that both the spike-time and firing rate of primary auditory cortex (A1 neurons encode the repetition rate. However, previous studies rarely examined how the experimental animals perceive the difference in the sound repetition rate, and a caveat to these experiments is that they compared physiological data obtained from animals with psychophysical data obtained from humans. In this study, for the first time, we directly investigated acoustic perception and the underlying neural mechanisms in the same experimental animal by examining spike activities in the A1 of free-moving cats while performing a Go/No-go task to discriminate the click-trains at different repetition rates (12.5-200 Hz. As reported by previous studies on passively listening animals, A1 neurons showed both synchronized and non-synchronized responses to the click-trains. We further found that the neural performance estimated from the precise temporal information of synchronized units was good enough to distinguish all 16.7-200 Hz from the 12.5 Hz repetition rate; however, the cats showed declining behavioral performance with the decrease of the target repetition rate, indicating an increase of difficulty in discriminating two slower click-trains. Such behavioral performance was well explained by the firing rate of some synchronized and non-synchronized units. Trial-by-trial analysis indicated that A1 activity was not affected by the cat's judgment of behavioral response. Our results suggest that the main function of A1 is to effectively represent temporal signals using both spike timing and firing rate, while the cats may read out the rate-coding information to perform the task in this experiment.

  14. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, Missouri, October 14, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ury, Connie Jo., Ed.; Baudino, Frank, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    These proceedings document the fifth year of the "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium", held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. Thirty five peer-reviewed papers and abstracts, written by academic librarians, and presented at the symposium are included in this volume. Many of the entries have…

  15. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  16. Radiation exposure to staff and patients during two endocrinological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristova-Popova, J.; Vassileva, J.; Saltirov, I.; Petkova, K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to obtain information about the exposure to patient and staff during percutaneous nephrolithotripsy and ureteroscopy with intracorporeal lithotripsy and to search for a correlation between these parameters. The collected data for each procedure consist of the total air kerma-area product, P KA , cumulative dose, CD, fluoroscopy time, FT, number of images acquired, as well as clinical patient data. Average, minimum, maximum and median values were calculated for 38 patients. Mean values and median in parentheses were as follows: 355 (383) cGy cm 2 (P KA for PCNL); 433 (286) cGy cm 2 (P KA for URS); 42 (37) mGy (CD for PCNL); 12 (7) mGy (CD for URS); 3.5 (3.0) min (FT for PCNL); 1.4 (1.3) min (FT for URS). The typical operator doses for PCNL and URS were assessed to be 66.1 μSv and 34.3 μSv, respectively, while the maximum doses for the same type of procedures were 152.6 μSv and 124.1 μSv. Good correlation was observed between the staff dose and P KA for both procedures, while the correlation of staff dose with CD and FT was found to be weak. While applying principles of radiation protection and normal load in the clinic, there is no possibility to exceed the new annual dose limit for eye lens of 20 mSv per year averaged over 5 years. The correlation of P KA with FT and CD was also explored and no significant interconnection was observed. (authors)

  17. Cu-Click Compatible Triazabutadienes To Expand the Scope of Aryl Diazonium Ion Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornali, Brandon M; Kimani, Flora W; Jewett, John C

    2016-10-07

    Triazabutadienes can be used to readily generate reactive aryl diazonium ions under mild, physiologically relevant conditions. These conditions are compatible with a range of functionalities that do not tolerate traditional aryl diazonium ion generation. To increase the utility of this aryl diazonium ion releasing chemistry an alkyne-containing triazabutadiene was synthesized. The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition ("Cu-click") reaction was utilized to modify the alkyne-containing triazabutadiene and shown to be compatible with the nitrogen-rich triazabutadiene. One of the triazole products was tethered to a fluorophore, thus enabling the direct fluorescent labeling of a model protein.

  18. Magnetite nanoparticles coated with alkyne-containing polyacrylates for click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socaci, Crina; Rybka, Miriam; Magerusan, Lidia; Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    New magnetic core shell nanoparticles were synthesized consisting of magnetite cores and poly-( O-propargyl acrylate) shells. Strong fixing of the shells was achieved by primary anchoring phosphates or α-dihydroxydiphosphonates containing acrylate or methacrylate functionalities. The magnetic nanoparticles are attractive as supports for a variety of function which can be easily introduced by Cu-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC, a click reaction). In this way, also the loading of the magnetic nanoparticles with propargyl units was determined by reaction with 4-azidoacetophenone and analysis of the supernatant. In order to demonstrate the attractiveness of the magnetic nanoparticles a novel azido-containing conjugate with biotin as recognition function and dansyl as fluorescence marker was introduced by CuAAC reaction. All NP show superparamagnetic behavior with high-saturation magnetization values and were further characterized by FTIR, photoelectron spectroscopy and TEM.

  19. Magnetite nanoparticles coated with alkyne-containing polyacrylates for click chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Socaci, Crina; Rybka, Miriam; Magerusan, Lidia; Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    New magnetic core shell nanoparticles were synthesized consisting of magnetite cores and poly-(O-propargyl acrylate) shells. Strong fixing of the shells was achieved by primary anchoring phosphates or α-dihydroxydiphosphonates containing acrylate or methacrylate functionalities. The magnetic nanoparticles are attractive as supports for a variety of function which can be easily introduced by Cu-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC, a click reaction). In this way, also the loading of the magnetic nanoparticles with propargyl units was determined by reaction with 4-azidoacetophenone and analysis of the supernatant. In order to demonstrate the attractiveness of the magnetic nanoparticles a novel azido-containing conjugate with biotin as recognition function and dansyl as fluorescence marker was introduced by CuAAC reaction. All NP show superparamagnetic behavior with high-saturation magnetization values and were further characterized by FTIR, photoelectron spectroscopy and TEM.

  20. Magnetite nanoparticles coated with alkyne-containing polyacrylates for click chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socaci, Crina [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies (Romania); Rybka, Miriam [Humboldt-University Berlin, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Magerusan, Lidia; Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Juergen, E-mail: liebscher@chemie.hu-berlin.de [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies (Romania)

    2013-06-15

    New magnetic core shell nanoparticles were synthesized consisting of magnetite cores and poly-(O-propargyl acrylate) shells. Strong fixing of the shells was achieved by primary anchoring phosphates or {alpha}-dihydroxydiphosphonates containing acrylate or methacrylate functionalities. The magnetic nanoparticles are attractive as supports for a variety of function which can be easily introduced by Cu-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC, a click reaction). In this way, also the loading of the magnetic nanoparticles with propargyl units was determined by reaction with 4-azidoacetophenone and analysis of the supernatant. In order to demonstrate the attractiveness of the magnetic nanoparticles a novel azido-containing conjugate with biotin as recognition function and dansyl as fluorescence marker was introduced by CuAAC reaction. All NP show superparamagnetic behavior with high-saturation magnetization values and were further characterized by FTIR, photoelectron spectroscopy and TEM.

  1. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness is one of the management concepts considered and studied always by management scientists and experts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff ...

  2. Click chemistry approach to conventional vegetable tanning process: accelerated method with improved organoleptic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Ganesan; Ramamurthy, Govindaswamy; Sadulla, Sayeed; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2014-09-01

    Click chemistry approaches are tailored to generate molecular building blocks quickly and reliably by joining small units together selectively and covalently, stably and irreversibly. The vegetable tannins such as hydrolyzable and condensed tannins are capable to produce rather stable radicals or inhibit the progress of radicals and are prone to oxidations such as photo and auto-oxidation, and their anti-oxidant nature is well known. A lot remains to be done to understand the extent of the variation of leather stability, color variation (lightening and darkening reaction of leather), and poor resistance to water uptake for prolonged periods. In the present study, we have reported click chemistry approaches to accelerated vegetable tanning processes based on periodates catalyzed formation of oxidized hydrolysable and condensed tannins for high exhaustion with improved properties. The distribution of oxidized vegetable tannin, the thermal stability such as shrinkage temperature (T s) and denaturation temperature (T d), resistance to collagenolytic activities, and organoleptic properties of tanned leather as well as the evaluations of eco-friendly characteristics were investigated. Scanning electron microscopic analysis indicates the cross section of tightness of the leather. Differential scanning calorimetric analysis shows that the T d of leather is more than that of vegetable tanned or equal to aldehyde tanned one. The leathers exhibited fullness, softness, good color, and general appearance when compared to non-oxidized vegetable tannin. The developed process benefits from significant reduction in total solids and better biodegradability in the effluent, compared to non-oxidized vegetable tannins.

  3. Nurse manager perspective of staff participation in unit level shared governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox Sullivan, Sheila; Norris, Mitzi R; Brown, Lana M; Scott, Karen J

    2017-11-01

    To examine the nurse manager perspective surrounding implementation of unit level shared governance in one Veterans Health Administration facility. Nursing shared governance is a formal model allowing nursing staff decision-making input into clinical practice, quality improvement, evidence-based practice and staff professional development. Unit level shared governance is a management process where decision authority is delegated to nursing staff at the unit level. Convenience sampling was used to recruit ten nurse managers who participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using content analysis and constant comparison techniques. Demographic data were described using descriptive statistics. The participants included seven female and three male nurse managers with seven Caucasian and three African American. Participant quotes were clustered to identify sub-themes that were then grouped into four global themes to describe unit level shared governance. The global themes were: (1) motivation, (2) demotivation, (3) recommendations for success, and (4) outcomes. These research findings resonate with previous studies that shared governance may be associated with increased nurse empowerment, self-management, engagement, and satisfaction. These findings reflect the need for nurse managers to promote and recognize staff participation in unit level shared governance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Staff perceptions of challenging parent-staff interactions and beneficial strategies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joshua; Friedman, Susan Hatters; Collin, Marc; Martin, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    To characterise neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) staff perceptions regarding factors which may lead to more challenging staff-parent interactions, and beneficial strategies for working with families with whom such interactions occur. A survey of 168 physician and nursing staff at two NICUs in American teaching hospitals inquired about their perceptions of challenging parent-staff interactions and situations in which such interactions were likely to occur. From a medical perspective, staff perceptions of challenging interactions were noted when infants had recent decompensation, high medical complexity, malformations or long duration of stay in the NICU. From a psychological/social perspective, a high likelihood of challenging interactions was noted with parents who were suspicious, interfere with equipment, or parents who hover in the NICU, express paranoid or delusional thoughts, repeat questions, perceive the staff as inaccessible, are managing addictions, or who require child protective services involvement. Frequent family meetings, grieving opportunities, education of parents, social work referrals, clearly defined rules, partnering in daily care and support groups were perceived as the most beneficial strategies for improving difficult interactions. This study delineates what staff perceive as challenging interactions and provides support for an educational and interventional role that incorporates mental health professionals. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. University staff experiences of students with mental health problems and their perceptions of staff training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Amelia; Farrer, Louise; Bennett, Kylie; Ali, Kathina; Hellsing, Annika; Katruss, Natasha; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2018-06-01

    University students experience high levels of mental health problems; however, very few seek professional help. Teaching staff within the university are well placed to assist students to seek support. To investigate university teaching staff experiences of, and training needs around, assisting students with mental health problems. A total of 224 teaching staff at the Australian National University completed an anonymous online survey (16.4% response rate from n ∼ 1370). Data on mental health training needs, and experiences of assisting students with mental health problems were described using tabulation. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Most teaching staff (70.1-82.2%) reported at least moderate confidence in their ability to provide emotional support for students. However, many staff (60.0%) felt under-equipped overall to deal with student mental health problems; almost half (49.6%) reported they did not have access to formal training. Specific actions described in assisting students included referrals, offering support, or consulting others for advice. Given the high rates of students who approach staff about mental health problems, there is a critical need to provide and promote both formal mental health response training and explicit guidelines for staff on when, how, and where to refer students for help.

  6. Casemix in the Islamic Republic of Iran: current knowledge and attitudes of health care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, S; Doran, C M; Wilson, A

    2008-01-01

    Casemix is a tool that classifies patients according to their clinical similarity and the homogeneity of resources required. A descriptive study was conducted to assess the level of knowledge and attitude toward the casemix-based funding system among staff working in the Iranian Social Security Organization in Tehran. The survey showed that knowledge of casemix and diagnosis-related groups (DRG) was poor among the study group and any attempt to implement the casemix system--which about three-quarters of high-level staff had never heard of--would be likely to fail. This highlights the necessity for creating awareness of the casemix and DRG systems among the hospital staff before any action takes place.

  7. Staff Nurses’ Perceptions and Experiences about Structural Empowerment: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Peremans, Lieve; Diltour, Nadine; Van heusden, Danny; Dilles, Tinne; Van Rompaey, Bart; Havens, Donna Sullivan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study reported in this article was to investigate staff nurses’ perceptions and experiences about structural empowerment and perceptions regarding the extent to which structural empowerment supports safe quality patient care. To address the complex needs of patients, staff nurse involvement in clinical and organizational decision-making processes within interdisciplinary care settings is crucial. A qualitative study was conducted using individual semi-structured interviews of 11 staff nurses assigned to medical or surgical units in a 600-bed university hospital in Belgium. During the study period, the hospital was going through an organizational transformation process to move from a classic hierarchical and departmental organizational structure to one that was flat and interdisciplinary. Staff nurses reported experiencing structural empowerment and they were willing to be involved in decision-making processes primarily about patient care within the context of their practice unit. However, participants were not always fully aware of the challenges and the effect of empowerment on their daily practice, the quality of care and patient safety. Ongoing hospital change initiatives supported staff nurses’ involvement in decision-making processes for certain matters but for some decisions, a classic hierarchical and departmental process still remained. Nurses perceived relatively high work demands and at times viewed empowerment as presenting additional. Staff nurses recognized the opportunities structural empowerment provided within their daily practice. Nurse managers and unit climate were seen as crucial for success while lack of time and perceived work demands were viewed as barriers to empowerment. PMID:27035457

  8. Staff Nurses' Perceptions and Experiences about Structural Empowerment: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Van Bogaert

    Full Text Available The aim of the study reported in this article was to investigate staff nurses' perceptions and experiences about structural empowerment and perceptions regarding the extent to which structural empowerment supports safe quality patient care. To address the complex needs of patients, staff nurse involvement in clinical and organizational decision-making processes within interdisciplinary care settings is crucial. A qualitative study was conducted using individual semi-structured interviews of 11 staff nurses assigned to medical or surgical units in a 600-bed university hospital in Belgium. During the study period, the hospital was going through an organizational transformation process to move from a classic hierarchical and departmental organizational structure to one that was flat and interdisciplinary. Staff nurses reported experiencing structural empowerment and they were willing to be involved in decision-making processes primarily about patient care within the context of their practice unit. However, participants were not always fully aware of the challenges and the effect of empowerment on their daily practice, the quality of care and patient safety. Ongoing hospital change initiatives supported staff nurses' involvement in decision-making processes for certain matters but for some decisions, a classic hierarchical and departmental process still remained. Nurses perceived relatively high work demands and at times viewed empowerment as presenting additional. Staff nurses recognized the opportunities structural empowerment provided within their daily practice. Nurse managers and unit climate were seen as crucial for success while lack of time and perceived work demands were viewed as barriers to empowerment.

  9. Noninstructional Staff Perceptions of the College Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Molly H.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored staff perception of organizational climate, including the impact of gender on staff interactions with faculty and students and staff perceptions of workplace satisfaction within the community college. The overarching research question guiding this study was, What are noninstructional staff perceptions of the community college…

  10. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  11. International networking and staff development EU-style: Cardiff University's library service and the Erasmus staff mobility scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Härkönen, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Staff development and international networking have always been highly valued in Cardiff University’s library service. We have a strong staff development programme and pilot new ways of training and motivating our staff, for example through job rotation and shadowing. Increasingly over the last few years, we have developed links with colleagues abroad and have had the pleasure of hosting a variety of international visitors. In response to enquiries for staff training we have recently set up t...

  12. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educator's Self Efficacy and Collective Educators' Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff: An Ethical Issue. ... staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was discussed in line with ethical principles and code of conduct of psychologists.

  13. Nursing students’ valuation on their clinical clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Rodríguez Gonzalo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To know how the nursing students evaluate the clinical-practical knowledge appraised at their clinical clerkship, measured through the satisfaction with the nursing staff Teaching Skills, the Perceived Support and their Global Satisfaction. Methodology: Cross-section, descriptive study carried out at the Ramon y Cajal Hospital. The target population were the 2008/09 nursing students at their clinical clerkship in the hospital, with a total number of 459 shifts. Questionnaire was self-designed and self-administered. Analyzed variables were the student academic year, the hospital ward and their relation with: 1. Teaching Skills, 2. Perceived Support, 3. General Satisfaction.Results: 314 questionnaires were filled out and returned, which is 69,41% of the total number of questionnaires. Students at the Operating Rooms and at the Paediatric Wards gave statistically significant lower qualifications (p=0,005 and p=0,003 than the Emergencies students to the nursing staff Teaching Skills. Regarding the Perceived Support, statistically significant higher scores were given to the Paediatrics (p=0,002 and the Surgical Wards (0,001 compared to the Operating Rooms staff. Finally, in General Satisfaction the lowest, but non statistically significant, scores were given also to the Operating Rooms (p>0,05.Conclusions: Nursing staff from the Operating Rooms and the Paediatric Wards should ameliorate their teaching skills, and those at the Operating Rooms, also the support given during the students clinical clerkship. The proposed improvement actions suggest that meetings between supervisors, nursing staff and professors in order to discuss the teaching objectives are necessary, as well as informational sessions between students and nursing staff at the wards.

  14. Clinical supervision of nurses working with patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Ann R; Rossen, Eileen K

    2005-06-01

    Some nurses describe individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) as among the most challenging and difficult patients encountered in their practice. As a result, the argument has been made for nursing staff to receive clinical supervision to enhance therapeutic effectiveness and treatment outcomes for individuals with BPD. Formal clinical supervision can focus on the stresses of working in a demanding environment within the work place and enable nurses to accept accountability for their own practice and development (Pesut & Herman, 1999). A psychiatric-mental health clinical nurse specialist can provide individual and/or group supervision for the nursing staff, including education about patient dynamics, staff responses, and treatment team decisions. A clinical nurse specialist also can provide emotional support to nursing staff, which enhances job satisfaction, as they struggle to maintain professional therapeutic behavior with these individuals.

  15. Self-Plasticization of PVC via click reaction of a monooctyl phthalate derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Puyou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Modified PVC (M-PVC material with suppressed migration and low glass transition temperature was prepared via click reaction of a monooctyl phthalate derivative. Chemical structure and composition of M-PVC were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR and element analysis. Thermal stability, glass transition temperature and migration stability of M-PVC were studied with TGA, DSC and migration tests, respectively. The study showed that M-PVC exhibited poor thermal stability, and low glass transition temperature of 66.0°C. No migration was found in distilled water, 10% (v/v ethanol, 30% (w/vacetic acid and petroleum ether. The PVC material is expected to preparing PVC products in the areas with high migration resistance requirement.

  16. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chief of Staff. 1700.27 Section 1700.27 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.27 Chief of Staff. The Chief of Staff aids and assists the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator. The Chief of Staff advises the...

  17. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  18. Association between addiction treatment staff professional and educational levels and perceptions of organizational climate and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Ivy; Lundgren, Lena; Beltrame, Clelia

    2014-01-01

    Research studies have identified addiction treatment staff who have higher levels of education as having more positive attitudes about evidence-based treatment practices, science-based training, and the usefulness of evidence-based practices. This study examined associations between addiction treatment staff level of education and their perceptions of 3 measures of organizational change: organizational stress, training resources and staffing resources in their treatment unit. The sample included 588 clinical staff from community-based substance abuse treatment organizations who received Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) funding (2003-2008) to implement evidence-based practices (EBPs). Bivariate analysis and regression modeling methods examined the relationship between staff education level (no high school education, high school education, some college, associate's degree, bachelor's degree, master's degree, doctoral degree, and other type of degree such as medical assistant, registered nurse [RN], or postdoctoral) and attitudes about organizational climate (stress), training resources, and staffing resources while controlling for staff and treatment unit characteristics. Multivariable models identified staff with lower levels of education as having significantly more positive attitudes about their unit's organizational capacity. These results contradict findings that addiction treatment staff with higher levels of education work in units with greater levels of organizational readiness for change. It cannot be inferred that higher levels of education among treatment staff is necessarily associated with high levels of organizational readiness for change.

  19. STAFF MARKETING IN MODERN RUSSIAN CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya N. Kretova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The conception of staff marketing, which was developed abroad, is effectively used in the developed countries for a long time. Its main advantage consists in the possibility of organizing some planning for the implementation of staff strategy: staff marketing provides the enterprise on the long-term basis with human resources capable of forming strategic potential, which would allow to implement the planned activities. Numerous problems of formation and development of civilized market relations in our country do not allow to fully implement the detailed models of staff marketing in domestic realities. On the basis of the analysis of theoretical developments and factors that have a practical impact on the implementation of marketing personnel in modern Russian conditions, the authors describe the essential elements of the conception. The primary purposes of staff marketing for domestic enterprises, grouped into the internal and external marketing are substantiated and disclosed. The special attention is paid to increasing the staff loyalty, which has dominant influence on business outcomes. The algorithm of events for the development of motivation system is proposed; at the stage of studying job satisfaction it is recommend to apply analytical calculations with the use of Shewhart control charts. Unlike traditional statistical tools based on the inspection of already implemented results, this approach is aimed at preventing negative tendencies and avoids losses associated with dissatisfaction with difficulty, as the individual employee and the team as a whole. Modern Russian enterprises can fully realize the conception of staff marketing only through rethinking of the consequences for all directions of work with the staff, as reflected in the definition of objectives, motivating staff and ensuring social responsibility of the enterprise.

  20. Experiences of Latinos with limited English proficiency with patient registration systems and their interactions with clinic front office staff: an exploratory study to inform community-based translational research in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, William A; Cubillos, Laura; Breen, James; Hall, Megan; Rojas, Krycya Flores; Mooneyham, Rachel; Schaal, Jennifer; Hardy, Christina Yongue; Dave, Gaurav; Jolles, Mónica Pérez; Garcia, Nacire; Reuland, Daniel S

    2015-12-23

    Health services research of Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) have largely focused on studying disparities related to patient-provider communication. Less is known about their non-provider interactions such as those with patient registration systems and clinic front office staff; these interactions precede the encounter with providers and may shape how comfortable patients feel about their overall health services experience. This study explored Latino patients with LEP experiences with, and expectations for, interactions with patient registration systems and front office staff. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with Latinos with LEP (≥ 18 years of age) who seek health services in the Piedmont Triad region, North Carolina. We analyzed participants' quotes and identified themes by using a constant comparison method. This research was conducted by a community-academic partnership; partners were engaged in study design, instrument development, recruitment, data analysis, and manuscript writing. Qualitative analysis allowed us to identify the following recurring themes: 1) inconsistent registration of multiple surnames may contribute to patient misidentification errors and delays in receiving health care; 2) lack of Spanish language services in front office medical settings negatively affect care coordination and satisfaction with health care; and 3) perceived discrimination generates patients' mistrust in front office staff and discomfort with services. Latino patients in North Carolina experience health services barriers unique to their LEP background. Participants identified ways in which the lack of cultural and linguistic competence of front office staff negatively affect their experiences seeking health services. Healthcare organizations need to support their staff to encourage patient-centered principles.

  1. Evaluating the opinions of staff and health care service provision of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating the opinions of staff and health care service provision of an std/Hiv clinic in Africa – Indications for recovery. RG Cooper ... Data were analysed according to gender, using a two-sample t-test and chi-square tests. Yates' correction was made for continuity of smaller samples. A value of p<0.05 was taken a ...

  2. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as the institution's Inmate Organization Manager (IO...

  3. Practical solutions for staff recruitment & retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Hoek, N

    2001-01-01

    There are three essential topics for radiology managers to consider in light of persistent staffing shortages: support of the profession and educational programs, perks as recruitment tools and incentives as retention tools. Some activities that can help support departments and educational programs for radiologic technologists are job shadowing, training for volunteer services, advanced placement for school applicants, sponsoring an educational program or clinical training site, creating a positive work environment and supporting outreach projects geared to local high schools. Traditional perks used in recruitment efforts have included relocation assistance, travel and lodging expenses during the interview process, loan repayment, scholarships and sign-on bonuses. Some common incentives for retaining employees are tuition reimbursement, cross training, availability of educational resources, continuing education opportunities, professional development and incremental increases in salary. There are many other tools that can be used, such as career ladders, creating an environment conducive to teamwork or a more personal atmosphere and showcasing talents of various staff members. There is much overlap among these suggestions in support of the profession and educational programs, recruitment and retention of qualified staff radiologic technologists. Radiology managers can and should be creative in developing different programs to build loyalty and commitment to a radiology department.

  4. Education and training to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Sally; Powell, Tom; Coles, Bernadette; Hale, Rachel; Gould, Dinah

    2016-09-01

    The delivery of end-of-life care in nursing homes is challenging. This situation is of concern as 20% of the population die in this setting. Commonly reported reasons include limited access to medical care, inadequate clinical leadership and poor communication between nursing home and medical staff. Education for nursing home staff is suggested as the most important way of overcoming these obstacles. To identify educational interventions to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff and to identify types of study designs and outcomes to indicate success and benchmark interventions against recent international guidelines for education for palliative and end-of-life care. Thirteen databases and reference lists of key journals were searched from the inception of each up to September 2014. Included studies were appraised for quality and data were synthesised thematically. Twenty-one studies were reviewed. Methodological quality was poor. Education was not of a standard that could be expected to alter clinical behaviour and was evaluated mainly from the perspectives of staff: self-reported increase in knowledge, skills and confidence delivering care rather than direct evidence of impact on clinical practice and patient outcomes. Follow-up was often short term, and despite sound economic arguments for delivering effective end-of-life care to reduce burden on the health service, no economic analyses were reported. There is a clear and urgent need to design educational interventions that have the potential to improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. Robust evaluation of these interventions should include impact on residents, families and staff and include economic analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Cancer Center Clinic and Research Team Perceptions of Identity and Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Torsten; Lee, Simon J Craddock; Garcia, Sandra; Gill, Mary; Duncan, Tobi; Williams, Erin L; Gerber, David E

    2017-12-01

    Conduct of cancer clinical trials requires coordination and cooperation among research and clinic teams. Diffusion of and confusion about responsibility may occur if team members' perceptions of roles and objectives do not align. These factors are critical to the success of cancer centers but are poorly studied. We developed a survey adapting components of the Adapted Team Climate Inventory, Measure of Team Identification, and Measure of In-Group Bias. Surveys were administered to research and clinic staff at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t tests, and analyses of variance. Responses were received from 105 staff (clinic, n = 55; research, n = 50; 61% response rate). Compared with clinic staff, research staff identified more strongly with their own group ( P teams, we also identified key differences, including perceptions of goal clarity and sharing, understanding and alignment with cancer center goals, and importance of outcomes. Future studies should examine how variation in perceptions and group dynamics between clinic and research teams may impact function and processes of cancer care.

  6. Predicting user click behaviour in search engine advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryaie Zanjani, Mohammad; Khadivi, Shahram

    2015-10-01

    According to the specific requirements and interests of users, search engines select and display advertisements that match user needs and have higher probability of attracting users' attention based on their previous search history. New objects such as user, advertisement or query cause a deterioration of precision in targeted advertising due to their lack of history. This article surveys this challenge. In the case of new objects, we first extract similar observed objects to the new object and then we use their history as the history of new object. Similarity between objects is measured based on correlation, which is a relation between user and advertisement when the advertisement is displayed to the user. This method is used for all objects, so it has helped us to accurately select relevant advertisements for users' queries. In our proposed model, we assume that similar users behave in a similar manner. We find that users with few queries are similar to new users. We will show that correlation between users and advertisements' keywords is high. Thus, users who pay attention to advertisements' keywords, click similar advertisements. In addition, users who pay attention to specific brand names might have similar behaviours too.

  7. Screening for depression: integrating training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Gwyneth; Holloway, Edith E; Craig, Graeme; Hepi, Niky; Coad, Samantha; Keeffe, Jill E; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2012-12-01

    To describe the integration of depression screening training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff and report on staff evaluation of this training. Pre-post intervention study, in a single population of low vision rehabilitation staff. Three hundred and thirty-six staff from Australia's largest low vision rehabilitation organization, Vision Australia. Staff completed the depression screening and referral training as part of a wider professional development programme. A pre-post-training questionnaire was administered to all staff. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to determine differences in self-reported knowledge, confidence, barriers to recognition and management of depression between baseline and post training. One hundred and seventy-two participants completed both questionnaires. Following training, participants reported an increased knowledge of depression, were more likely to respond to depression in their clients and reported to be more confident in managing depression (P training incorporating more active and 'hands-on' sessions are likely to be required. This training is a promising first step in integrating a depression screening tool into low vision rehabilitation practice. Further work is needed to determine the barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice and to assess clients' acceptability and outcomes. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  8. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  9. A crèche for CERN staff The Staff Association project

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the Staff Association has supported the demand for the creation of a crèche for the children of CERN staff. Several studies have been carried out without leading to a concrete plan. The fact that the CERN population is getting younger and the shortage of local facilities have led to a more urgent demand for this type of social service over the past few years. Furthermore, the Equal Opportunities Panel had already recommended that crèche places be made available.

  10. Staff perceptions of quality of care: an observational study of the NHS Staff Survey in hospitals in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Richard J; Greaves, Felix E; Aylin, Paul P; Jarman, Brian; Bottle, Alex

    2013-07-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that higher job satisfaction among healthcare staff in specific settings may be linked to improved patient outcomes. This study aimed to assess the potential of staff satisfaction to be used as an indicator of institutional performance across all acute National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England. Using staff responses from the NHS Staff Survey 2009, and correlating these with hospital standardised mortality ratios (HSMR), correlation analyses were conducted at institutional level with further analyses of staff subgroups. Over 60 000 respondents from 147 NHS trusts were included in the analysis. There was a weak negative correlation with HSMR where staff agreed that patient care was their trust's top priority (Kendall τ = -0.22, psatisfaction with the quality of care delivered by oneself and institutional HSMR. In the context of the continued debate about the relationship of HSMR to hospital performance, these findings of a weak correlation between staff satisfaction and HSMR are intriguing and warrant further investigation. Such measures in the future have the advantage of being intuitive for lay and specialist audiences alike, and may be useful in facilitating patient choice. Whether higher staff satisfaction drives quality or merely reflects it remains unclear.

  11. Click-PEGylation - A mobility shift approach to assess the redox state of cysteines in candidate proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Lucie A G; Hinchy, Elizabeth C; Murphy, Michael P; Robb, Ellen L; Cochemé, Helena M

    2017-07-01

    The redox state of cysteine thiols is critical for protein function. Whereas cysteines play an important role in the maintenance of protein structure through the formation of internal disulfides, their nucleophilic thiol groups can become oxidatively modified in response to diverse redox challenges and thereby function in signalling and antioxidant defences. These oxidative modifications occur in response to a range of agents and stimuli, and can lead to the existence of multiple redox states for a given protein. To assess the role(s) of a protein in redox signalling and antioxidant defence, it is thus vital to be able to assess which of the multiple thiol redox states are present and to investigate how these alter under different conditions. While this can be done by a range of mass spectrometric-based methods, these are time-consuming, costly, and best suited to study abundant proteins or to perform an unbiased proteomic screen. One approach that can facilitate a targeted assessment of candidate proteins, as well as proteins that are low in abundance or proteomically challenging, is by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Redox-modified cysteine residues are selectively tagged with a large group, such as a polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymer, and then the proteins are separated by electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting, which allows the inference of redox changes based on band shifts. However, the applicability of this method has been impaired by the difficulty of cleanly modifying protein thiols by large PEG reagents. To establish a more robust method for redox-selective PEGylation, we have utilised a Click chemistry approach, where free thiol groups are first labelled with a reagent modified to contain an alkyne moiety, which is subsequently Click-reacted with a PEG molecule containing a complementary azide function. This strategy can be adapted to study reversibly reduced or oxidised cysteines. Separation of the thiol labelling step from the PEG

  12. Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on polypropylene macroporous membranes via click chemistry to improve antibacterial and antifouling performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhen-Bei, E-mail: 1021453457@qq.com [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Wu, Jing-Jing, E-mail: 957522275@qq.com [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Su, Yu, E-mail: 819388710@qq.com [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Zhou, Jin, E-mail: zhoujin_ah@163.com [Department of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Chizhou University, Muzhi Rd. 199, Chizhou, Anhui 247000 (China); Gao, Yong, E-mail: 154682180@qq.com [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Yu, Hai-Yin, E-mail: yhy456@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China); Gu, Jia-Shan, E-mail: jiashanG@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Ministry of Education, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecular-Based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, East Beijing Rd. 1, Wuhu, Anhui 241000 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Clickable membrane prepared by photo bromination and S{sub N}2 nucleophilic substitution. • Azide graphene oxide prepared by ring-opening reaction. • Alkyne graphene oxide was prepared via esterification reaction. • Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on membrane by click chemistry. • Antibacterial and antifouling characteristics were enhanced greatly. - Abstract: Polypropylene is an extensively used membrane material; yet, polypropylene membranes exhibit extremely poor resistance to protein fouling. To ameliorate this issue, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were used to modify macroporous polypropylene membrane (MPPM) via layer-by-layer assembly technique through click reaction. First, alkyne-terminated GO was prepared through esterification between carboxyl groups in GO and amide groups in propargylamine; azide-terminated GO was synthesized by the ring-opening reaction of epoxy groups in GO with sodium azide. Second, GO was introduced to the membrane by click chemistry. Characterizations of infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the modification. The sharply decreasing of static water contact angle indicated the improvement of the surface hydrophilicity for GO modified membrane. Introducing GO to the membrane results in a dramatic increase of water flux, improvements in the antifouling characteristics and antibacterial property for the membranes. The pure water flux through the 5-layered GO modified membrane is 1.82 times that through the unmodified one. The water flux restores to 43.0% for the unmodified membrane while to 79.8% for the modified membrane. The relative flux reduction decreases by 32.1% due to GO modification. The antibacterial property was also enhanced by two-thirds. These results demonstrate that the antifouling and antibacterial characteristics can be raised by tethering GO to the membrane surface.

  13. Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on polypropylene macroporous membranes via click chemistry to improve antibacterial and antifouling performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Bei; Wu, Jing-Jing; Su, Yu; Zhou, Jin; Gao, Yong; Yu, Hai-Yin; Gu, Jia-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Clickable membrane prepared by photo bromination and S N 2 nucleophilic substitution. • Azide graphene oxide prepared by ring-opening reaction. • Alkyne graphene oxide was prepared via esterification reaction. • Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide on membrane by click chemistry. • Antibacterial and antifouling characteristics were enhanced greatly. - Abstract: Polypropylene is an extensively used membrane material; yet, polypropylene membranes exhibit extremely poor resistance to protein fouling. To ameliorate this issue, graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were used to modify macroporous polypropylene membrane (MPPM) via layer-by-layer assembly technique through click reaction. First, alkyne-terminated GO was prepared through esterification between carboxyl groups in GO and amide groups in propargylamine; azide-terminated GO was synthesized by the ring-opening reaction of epoxy groups in GO with sodium azide. Second, GO was introduced to the membrane by click chemistry. Characterizations of infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the modification. The sharply decreasing of static water contact angle indicated the improvement of the surface hydrophilicity for GO modified membrane. Introducing GO to the membrane results in a dramatic increase of water flux, improvements in the antifouling characteristics and antibacterial property for the membranes. The pure water flux through the 5-layered GO modified membrane is 1.82 times that through the unmodified one. The water flux restores to 43.0% for the unmodified membrane while to 79.8% for the modified membrane. The relative flux reduction decreases by 32.1% due to GO modification. The antibacterial property was also enhanced by two-thirds. These results demonstrate that the antifouling and antibacterial characteristics can be raised by tethering GO to the membrane surface

  14. A versatile method for the preparation of conjugates of peptides with DNA/PNA/analog by employing chemo-selective click reaction in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Khirud; Mane, Meenakshi V.; Kunte, Sunita S.; Kumar, Vaijayanti A.

    2007-01-01

    The specific 1,3 dipolar Hüisgen cycloaddition reaction known as ‘click-reaction’ between azide and alkyne groups is employed for the synthesis of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates. The peptide nucleic acids (PNA)/DNA and peptides may be appended either by azide or alkyne groups. The cycloaddition reaction between the azide and alkyne appended substrates allows the synthesis of the desired conjugates in high purity and yields irrespective of the sequence and functional groups on either of the two substrates. The versatile approach could also be employed to generate the conjugates of peptides with thioacetamido nucleic acid (TANA) analog. The click reaction is catalyzed by Cu (I) in either water or in organic medium. In water, ∼3-fold excess of the peptide-alkyne/azide drives the reaction to completion in 2 h with no side products. PMID:17981837

  15. Staff acceptance of video monitoring for coordination: a video system to support perioperative situation awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ju; Xiao, Yan; Hu, Peter; Dutton, Richard

    2009-08-01

    To understand staff acceptance of a remote video monitoring system for operating room (OR) coordination. Improved real-time remote visual access to OR may enhance situational awareness but also raises privacy concerns for patients and staff. Survey. A system was implemented in a six-room surgical suite to display OR monitoring video at an access restricted control desk area. Image quality was manipulated to improve staff acceptance. Two months after installation, interviews and a survey were conducted on staff acceptance of video monitoring. About half of all OR personnel responded (n = 63). Overall levels of concerns were low, with 53% rated no concerns and 42% little concern. Top two reported uses of the video were to see if cases are finished and to see if a room is ready. Viewing the video monitoring system as useful did not reduce levels of concern. Staff in supervisory positions perceived less concern about the system's impact on privacy than did those supervised (p < 0.03). Concerns for patient privacy correlated with concerns for staff privacy and performance monitoring. Technical means such as manipulating image quality helped staff acceptance. Manipulation of image quality resulted overall acceptance of monitoring video, with residual levels of concerns. OR nurses may express staff privacy concern in the form of concerns over patient privacy. This study provided suggestions for technological and implementation strategies of video monitoring for coordination use in OR. Deployment of communication technology and integration of clinical information will likely raise concerns over staff privacy and performance monitoring. The potential gain of increased information access may be offset by negative impact of a sense of loss of autonomy.

  16. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  17. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed

  18. How does pre-dialysis education need to change? Findings from a qualitative study with staff and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Gill; Sein, Kim; Allen, Kerry

    2017-11-23

    Pre-dialysis education (PDE) is provided to thousands of patients every year, helping them decide which renal replacement therapy (RRT) to choose. However, its effectiveness is largely unknown, with relatively little previous research into patients' views about PDE, and no research into staff views. This study reports findings relevant to PDE from a larger mixed methods study, providing insights into what staff and patients think needs to improve. Semi-structured interviews in four hospitals with 96 clinical and managerial staff and 93 dialysis patients, exploring experiences of and views about PDE, and analysed using thematic framework analysis. Most patients found PDE helpful and staff valued its role in supporting patient decision-making. However, patients wanted to see teaching methods and materials improve and biases eliminated. Staff were less aware than patients of how informal staff-patient conversations can influence patients' treatment decision-making. Many staff felt ill equipped to talk about all treatment options in a balanced and unbiased way. Patient decision-making was found to be complex and patients' abilities to make treatment decisions were adversely affected in the pre-dialysis period by emotional distress. Suggested improvements to teaching methods and educational materials are in line with previous studies and current clinical guidelines. All staff, irrespective of their role, need to be trained about all treatment options so that informal conversations with patients are not biased. The study argues for a more individualised approach to PDE which is more like counselling than education and would demand a higher level of skill and training for specialist PDE staff. The study concludes that even if these improvements are made to PDE, not all patients will benefit, because some find decision-making in the pre-dialysis period too complex or are unable to engage with education due to illness or emotional distress. It is therefore recommended that

  19. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109 at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion, and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, and organizational support could impact negatively on retention. Management should use these findings as a basis for staff consultation, developmental strategies, and interventions. Future research on other nursing populations is recommended.

  20. Site-SpecificCu Labeling of the Serine Protease, Active Site Inhibited Factor Seven Azide (FVIIai-N), Using Copper Free Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Troels E; Kristensen, Lotte K; Nielsen, Carsten H

    2018-01-01

    A method for site-specific radiolabeling of the serine protease active site inhibited factor seven (FVIIai) with64Cu has been applied using a biorthogonal click reaction. FVIIai binds to tissue factor (TF), a trans-membrane protein involved in hemostasis, angiogenesis, proliferation, cell migrati...

  1. Resistance to group clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Delgado, Cynthia; Traynor, Michael

    2018-01-01

    This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has traditiona......This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has...... traditionally been theorized as a supervisee's maladaptive coping with anxiety in the supervision process. The aim of the present study was to examine resistance to group clinical supervision by interviewing nurses who did not participate in supervision. In 2015, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24...... Danish mental health nursing staff members who had been observed not to participate in supervision in two periods of 3 months. Interviews were audio-recorded and subjected to discourse analysis. We constructed two discursive positions taken by the informants: (i) 'forced non-participation', where...

  2. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review by the staff. 385.33 Section 385.33...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS Procedure on Review of Staff Action § 385.33 Review by the staff. Where a petition for review is duly filed, the staff member may, upon...

  3. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519... by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee to pay a project staff member for time or work for which that staff member is compensated from some other...

  4. Exploring Staff Clinical Knowledge and Practice with LGBT Residents in Long-Term Care: A Grounded Theory of Cultural Competency and Training Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Weston V; Vacha-Haase, Tammi

    2016-01-01

    Existing literature shows that LGBT residents are likely to face suboptimal care in LTC facilities due to prejudice and discriminatory policies. The aim of this project was to assess the LGBT cultural competency of staff working in LTC facilities, identify their current training needs, and develop a framework for understanding LGBT cultural competency among LTC staff and providers. This grounded theory study comprised data from focus groups of interdisciplinary staff from three LTC facilities. Results suggested that LTC staff struggle with how to be sensitive to LGBT residents' needs. Tension appeared to exist between wanting to provide an equal standard of care to all LTC residents and fearing they would show "favoritism" or "special treatment," which might be viewed as unprofessional. Participants indicated training could help to address the ambivalence they experience about providing sensitive care to subpopulations of residents who face stigma and oppression. LTC staff stand to benefit from cultural competency training focused on LGBT residents. Training should be not only informational in nature, but also facilitate greater self-awareness and self-efficacy with respect to providing care to LGBT people.

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients. Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term "masking" refers to not telling ... questions to ask your doctor and the research staff, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" ...

  6. THE MANY ROLES OF THE CERN STAFF ASSOCIATION

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The Staff Association represents all staff Article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules & Regulations (SR&R) stipulates that “[…] the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary.” The role of the Staff Association delegates as representatives of all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States is demonstrated by its participation in different joint committees defined in the SR&R and by TREF. This role was particularly visible in 2009 and 2010 with demonstrations of between one and two thousand participants, first for our Pension Fund in December 2009 and March 2010, then for basic research in August 2010. The presence of the Staff Association was also evident with its public meetings, staff votes in the framework of the 2010 five-yearly review, and other actions. But the Staff Association is also The CERN Nu...

  7. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support.

  8. Radiation Dose to Patients and Medical Staff in Different Procedures of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimcheva, M.; Sergieva, S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide information on developing technologies and clinical techniques for Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging using ionizing radiation and their associated radiation dose to patients and medical staff. A thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) was used in this study to analyze the historic records of the external radiation doses to staff members working in our nuclear medicine department in 7 procedures, including elution of 99mTc from "9"9"mMo/"9"9"mTc generators, syringe preparation, radiopharmacy kit preparation, injection, accompanying patients, SPECT/CT scan, oral "1"3"1I preparation. These dosimeters was worn by the staff members at the level of the chest on the front part of the body. A retrospective review of 110 clinical studies of various nuclear medicine procedures ("9"9"mTc–MIBI–Tetrofosmin, "9"9"mTc–MDP bone scan, "9"9"mTc–Tektrotyd, "9"9"mTc–Thyroid imaging, "9"9"mTc–Nanocoll, "1"3"1I–Nal (diagnostic application 185 MBq) obtained on hybrid SPECT/CT systems was performed to calculate the effective radiation dose to patients. The results from this study showed that annual effective radiation doses to nuclear medicine department staff members were within permissible levels. The contribution of total effective radiation dose from SPECT component were calculated using the activity of the injected radiopharmaceutical and dose tables published by the conversion factors listed in ICRP 53 and ICRP 80. The radiation dose for CT was calculated by Dose Length Product method. According to the results of this study the dose in each procedure depends on different factors such as the education and experience of the staff members, usage of shielding and taking the radiation protection requirements into consideration. When SPECT–CT is being performed, all measures should be taken to reduce both the radiopharmaceutical dose and the CT effective dose following the ALARA principle. (author)

  9. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J. [Jensen Consult, Virum (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff`s responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au).

  10. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J [Jensen Consult, Virum (Denmark)

    1998-12-31

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff`s responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au).

  11. Feeding at a high pitch: Source parameters of narrow band,high-frequency clicks from echolocating off-shore hourglassdolphins and coastal Hector's dolphins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhn, Line Anker; Tougaard, Jakob; Jensen, Frants Havmand

    2009-01-01

    Toothed whales depend on echolocation for orientation and prey localization, and source parameters of echolocation clicks from free-ranging animals therefore convey valuable information about the acoustic physiology and behavioral ecology of the recorded species. Recordings of wild hourglass (Lag...

  12. The Effectiveness of Staff Training Focused on Increasing Emotional Intelligence and Improving Interaction between Support Staff and Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions…

  13. Development of a Refined Staff Group Trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quensel, Susan

    1999-01-01

    ... individual staff sections in the brigade command post. The program was designed to deliver training to newly formed, inexperienced staffs conducting the staff functions that support the military decision-making process within the execution phase...

  14. Review article: Staff perception of the emergency department working environment: Integrative review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Louisa; Greenslade, Jaimi; Thom, Ogilvie; Carlstrom, Eric; Wallis, Marianne; Crilly, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Employees in EDs report increasing role overload because of critical staff shortages, budgetary cuts and increased patient numbers and acuity. Such overload could compromise staff satisfaction with their working environment. This integrative review identifies, synthesises and evaluates current research around staff perceptions of the working conditions in EDs. A systematic search of relevant databases, using MeSH descriptors ED/EDs, Emergency room/s, ER/s, or A&E coupled with (and) working environment, working condition/s, staff perception/s, as well as reference chaining was conducted. We identified 31 key studies that were evaluated using the mixed methods assessment tool (MMAT). These comprised 24 quantitative‐descriptive studies, four mixed descriptive/comparative (non‐randomised controlled trial) studies and three qualitative studies. Studies included varied widely in quality with MMAT scores ranging from 0% to 100%. A key finding was that perceptions of working environment varied across clinical staff and study location, but that high levels of autonomy and teamwork offset stress around high pressure and high volume workloads. The large range of tools used to assess staff perception of working environment limits the comparability of the studies. A dearth of intervention studies around enhancing working environments in EDs limits the capacity to recommend evidence‐based interventions to improve staff morale. © 2016 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine PMID:26784282

  15. Patient, staff and physician satisfaction: a new model, instrument and their implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Anne S; McCarthy, Kim A

    2011-01-01

    Customer satisfaction's importance is well-documented in the marketing literature and is rapidly gaining wide acceptance in the healthcare industry. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new customer-satisfaction measuring method - Reichheld's ultimate question - and compare it with traditional techniques using data gathered from four healthcare clinics. A new survey method, called the ultimate question, was used to collect patient satisfaction data. It was subsequently compared with the data collected via an existing method. Findings suggest that the ultimate question provides similar ratings to existing models at lower costs. A relatively small sample size may affect the generalizability of the results; it is also possible that potential spill-over effects exist owing to two patient satisfaction surveys administered at the same time. This new ultimate question method greatly improves the process and ease with which hospital or clinic administrators are able to collect patient (as well as staff and physician) satisfaction data in healthcare settings. Also, the feedback gained from this method is actionable and can be used to make strategic improvements that will impact business and ultimately increase profitability. The paper's real value is pinpointing specific quality improvement areas based not just on patient ratings but also physician and staff satisfaction, which often underlie patients' clinical experiences.

  16. Nano-sized metabolic precursors for heterogeneous tumor-targeting strategy using bioorthogonal click chemistry in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmin; Jung, Seulhee; Koo, Heebeom; Na, Jin Hee; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Shim, Man Kyu; Park, Jooho; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Seulki; Pomper, Martin G; Kwon, Ick Chan; Ahn, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we developed nano-sized metabolic precursors (Nano-MPs) for new tumor-targeting strategy to overcome the intrinsic limitations of biological ligands such as the limited number of biological receptors and the heterogeneity in tumor tissues. We conjugated the azide group-containing metabolic precursors, triacetylated N-azidoacetyl-d-mannosamine to generation 4 poly(amidoamine) dendrimer backbone. The nano-sized dendrimer of Nano-MPs could generate azide groups on the surface of tumor cells homogeneously regardless of cell types via metabolic glycoengineering. Importantly, these exogenously generated 'artificial chemical receptors' containing azide groups could be used for bioorthogonal click chemistry, regardless of phenotypes of different tumor cells. Furthermore, in tumor-bearing mice models, Nano-MPs could be mainly localized at the target tumor tissues by the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect, and they successfully generated azide groups on tumor cells in vivo after an intravenous injection. Finally, we showed that these azide groups on tumor tissues could be used as 'artificial chemical receptors' that were conjugated to bioorthogonal chemical group-containing liposomes via in vivo click chemistry in heterogeneous tumor-bearing mice. Therefore, overall results demonstrated that our nano-sized metabolic precursors could be extensively applied to new alternative tumor-targeting technique for molecular imaging and drug delivery system, regardless of the phenotype of heterogeneous tumor cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Engaging Frontline Leaders and Staff in Real-Time Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer; Hebish, Linda J; Mann, Sharon; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-04-01

    The relationship of staff satisfaction and engagement to organizational success, along with the integral influence of frontline managers on this dimension, is well established in health care and other industries. To specifically address staff engagement, Virginia Mason Medical Center, an integrated, single-hospital health system, developed an approach that involved leaders, through the daily use of standard work for leaders, as well as staff, through a Lean-inspired staff idea system. Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) staff members established three guiding principles: (1) Staff engagement begins with leader engagement; (2) Integrate daily improve- ment (kaizen) as a habitual way of life not as an add-on; and (3) Create an environment in which staff feel psycho- logically safe and valued. Two design elements--Standard Work for Leaders (SWL) and Everyday Lean Ideas (ELIs) were implemented. For the emergency department (ED), an early adopter of the staff engagement work, the challenge was to apply the guiding principles to improve staff engagement while improving quality and patient and staff satisfaction, even as patient volumes were increasing. Daily huddles for the KPO staff members and weekly leader rounds are used to elicit staff ideas and foster ELIs in real time. Overall progress to date has been tracked in terms of staff satisfaction surveys, voluntary staff turnover, adoption of SWL, and testing and implementation of staff ideas. For example, voluntary turnover of ED staff decreased from 14.6% in 2011 to 7.5% in 2012, and 2.0% in 2013. Organizationwide, at least 800 staff ideas are in motion at any given time, with finished ones posted in an idea supermarket website. A leadership and staff engagement approach that focuses on SWL and on capturing staff ideas for daily problem solving and improvement can contribute to organization success and improve the quality of health care delivery.

  18. Using HL7 in hospital staff assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unluturk, Mehmet S

    2014-02-01

    Hospital staff assignments are the instructions that allocate the hospital staff members to the hospital beds. Currently, hospital administrators make the assignments without accessing the information regarding the occupancy of the hospital beds and the acuity of the patient. As a result, administrators cannot distinguish between occupied and unoccupied beds, and may therefore assign staff to unoccupied beds. This gives rise to uneven and inefficient staff assignments. In this paper, the hospital admission-discharge-transfer (ADT) system is employed both as a data source and an assignment device to create staff assignments. When the patient data is newly added or modified, the ADT system updates the assignment software client with the relevant data. Based on the relevant data, the assignment software client is able to construct staff assignments in a more efficient way. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Super-resolution optical DNA Mapping via DNA methyltransferase-directed click chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vranken, Charlotte; Deen, Jochem; Dirix, Lieve

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to optical DNA mapping, which enables near single-molecule characterization of whole bacteriophage genomes. Our approach uses a DNA methyltransferase enzyme to target labelling to specific sites and copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition to couple a fluorophore...... to the DNA. We achieve a labelling efficiency of ∼70% with an average labelling density approaching one site every 500 bp. Such labelling density bridges the gap between the output of a typical DNA sequencing experiment and the long-range information derived from traditional optical DNA mapping. We lay...... the foundations for a wider-scale adoption of DNA mapping by screening 11 methyltransferases for their ability to direct sequence-specific DNA transalkylation; the first step of the DNA labelling process and by optimizing reaction conditions for fluorophore coupling via a click reaction. Three of 11 enzymes...

  20. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de