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Sample records for clinch river

  1. Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mr. Baron says the administration's effort to terminate the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) project is symptomatic; they have also placed restrictions on fusion, coal, solar, and other areas of energy development in which technological advances are held back in order to force conservation. Because the breeder reactor, unlike solar and fusion energy, is both economically and technically feasible, a demonstration plant is needed. The contentions that the CRBR design is obsolete, that its proposed size is inappropriate, or that plutonium can be diverted for weapons proliferation are argued to be invalid. Failure to complete the CRBR will have both economic and national security repercussions

  2. Saga of Clinch River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An epic struggle in the US Congress between what the author calls the forces of transcendence and the forces of experience over development of a breeder reactor for electric power generation is described in this article. The project was started by President Nixon, survived repeated attacks under President Carter, and ironically succumbed under a strong supporter, President Reagan, as a result of an unlikely coalition of conservative organizations and Republican politicians. The broader meanings of the demise of the Clinch River project are examined on several levels, examining the significance for the nation's energy future and for the nation's political future

  3. Clinch River project: Sediment contaminants in the Lower Clinch River

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment samples from three mainstem and seven tributary sites in the Clinch River Basin were analyzed for 21 organochlorine compounds, 19 metals, total volatile...

  4. Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of tables and listings from the results of the Phase I data gathering activities of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The table of contents outlines the presentation of the material and has been annotated to indicate the key fields used to order the printing of each data table. Definitions of selected column headings are provided. Sample collection information is shown first and then more specific information for each matrix type is presented. The analytical results have been reviewed by independent validators and the qualifiers shown are the results of their efforts. No data that were rejected by the validation process are included in this listing. Only results of routine samples are listed; quality control sample results were excluded. All data, both detected and nondetected values, were used to calculated the summary table values. However, only Detected values are given on the analyte specific listings

  5. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project: construction schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction schedule for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant and its evolution are described. The initial schedule basis, changes necessitated by the evaluation of the overall plant design, and constructability improvements that have been effected to assure adherence to the schedule are presented. The schedule structure and hierarchy are discussed, as are tools used to define, develop, and evaluate the schedule

  6. Health risks from radionuclides released into the Clinch River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to estimate off-site radiation doses and health risks (with uncertainties) associated with the release of radionuclides from the X-10 site. Following an initial screening analysis, the exposure pathways of interest included fish ingestion, drinking water ingestion, the ingestion of milk and meat, and external exposure from shoreline sediment. Four representative locations along the Clinch River, from the White Oak Creek Embayment to the city of Kingston, were chosen. The demography of the lower Clinch River supplied information dealing with land use that aided in the determination of sites on which to focus efforts. The locations that proved to be the most significant included Jones Island at Clinch River Mile (CRM) 20.5, Grassy Creek and K-25 (CRM 14), Kingston Steam Plant (CRM 3.5), and the city of Kingston (CRM 0). These areas of interest have historically been and are still primarily agricultural and residential areas. Reference individuals were determined with respect to the pathways involved. The primary radionuclides of interest released from the X-10 facility into the Clinch River via White Oak Creek were identified in the initial screening analysis as 137Cs, 90Sr, 60Co, 106Ru, 144Ce, 131I, 95Zr, and 95Nb. Of these radionuclides, 137Cs, 60Co, 106Ru, 90Sr, 144Ce, 95Zr, and 95Nb were evaluated for their contribution to the external exposure pathway. This study utilized an object-oriented modeling software package that provides an alternative to the spreadsheet, providing graphical influence diagrams to show qualitative structure of models, hierarchical models to organize complicated models into manageable modules, and intelligent arrays with the power to scale up simple models to handle large problems. The doses and risks estimated in this study are not significant enough to cause a detectable increase in health effects in the population. In most cases, the organ does are well below the limits of epidemiological detection (1 to 30

  7. Clinch River Breeder Reactor secondary control rod system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shutdown system for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) includes two independent systems--a primary and a secondary system. The Secondary Control Rod System (SCRS) is a new design which is being developed by General Electric to be independent from the primary system in order to improve overall shutdown reliability by eliminating potential common-mode failures. The paper describes the status of the SCRS design and fabrication and testing activities. Design verification testing on the component level is largely complete. These component tests are covered with emphasis on design impact results. A prototype unit has been manufactured and system level tests in sodium have been initiated

  8. Reliability modeling of Clinch River breeder reactor electrical shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial simulation of the probabilistic properties of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) electrical shutdown systems is described. A model of the reliability (and availability) of the systems is presented utilizing Success State and continuous-time, discrete state Markov modeling techniques as significant elements of an overall reliability assessment process capable of demonstrating the achievement of program goals. This model is examined for its sensitivity to safe/unsafe failure rates, sybsystem redundant configurations, test and repair intervals, monitoring by reactor operators; and the control exercised over system reliability by design modifications and the selection of system operating characteristics. (U.S.)

  9. Seasonal movement of brown trout in the Clinch River, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, J.M.; Bettoli, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    We used radiotelemetry to monitor the seasonal movements of trophy-size brown trout Salmo trutta in the Clinch River below Norris Dam, Tennessee, to determine whether establishing a special-regulation reach to reduce fishing mortality was a viable management option. Fifteen brown trout (size range, 430-573 mm total length) collected from the river were implanted with radio transmitters between November 1997 and May 1998. Forty-seven percent of these fish died or expelled their transmitters within 50 d postsurgery. The range of movement for surviving brown trout was significantly larger in fall (geometric mean range = 5,111 m) than in any other season. Four brown trout that were monitored for more than 1 year exhibited a limited range of movement (5 km) during the fall season, presumably to spawn. Brown trout also moved more during the fall than in any other season. Harvest restrictions applied to a specific reach of the Clinch River would reduce the exploitation of brown trout in that reach for most of the year but not during the fall, when many fish undertake extensive spawning migrations.

  10. An Evaluation of liquid metal leak detection methods for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.J.; Doctor, S.R.

    1977-12-01

    This report documents an independent review and evaluation of sodium leak detection methods described in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Only information in publicly available documents was used in making the assessments.

  11. A large scale environmental assessment: The Clinch River Remedial Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The USEPA identified the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in east Tennessee as a Superfund National Priorities List site in 1989. Facilities at the ORR have released a variety of radiological, organic, and inorganic contaminants to the local aquatic environment as a result of nuclear weapons production, uranium enrichment, and energy research and development activities from the mid 1940s to the present. The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) was initiated to meet the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements to determine the nature and extent of hazardous releases to the aquatic environment. Phase 1 of the CRRI consisted of sampling and analysis of selected sites representing differing levels of contamination to determine the range of contaminant concentrations present in off-site water, sediment, and fish. Sampling activities in support of Phase 2 of the remedial investigation were designed to assist in defining the nature and extent of the contaminants of concern in sediment, water and biota, and to provide information for assessing the potential risks to human health and the environment associated with those contaminants. A concurrent study evaluated potential remedial alternatives and identified effective and acceptable corrective measures. An overview of the CRRI, including a history of the facilities and their contaminant releases, and the regulatory context in which the remedial investigation occurred is presented

  12. Addendum to the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is an addendum to the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (DOE 1993). The Department of Energy--Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) is proposing this addendum to the US Envianmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA-IV), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) as a reduced sampling program on the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir and on Poplar Creek. DOE-ORO is proposing to maximize the use of existing data and minimize the collection of new data for water, sediment, and biota during Phase 2 of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation. The existing data along with the additional data collected in Phase 2 would be used to perform a baseline risk assessment and make remedial decisions. DOE-ORO considers that the existing data, the additional data collected in Phase 2, and on-site remedial investigation data would be sufficient to understand the nature and extent of the contamination problem in the Clinch River, perform a baseline risk assessment,and make remedial decisions. This addendum is organized in three sections. The first section provides background information and describes a rationale for modifying the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan. Section 2 presents a summary of the existing data for the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir and an evaluation of the sufficiency of this data for a baseline human health and ecological risk assessment. Section 3 describes the revised Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for surface water, sediment, and biota in the Clinch River OU and in the Poplar Creek OU

  13. Atoms in Appalachia. Historical report on the Clinch River Breeder Reactor site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, D

    1982-01-01

    The background information concerning the acquisition of the land for siting the Clinch River Breeder Reactor is presented. Historical information is also presented concerning the land acquisition for the Oak Ridge facilities known as the Manhattan Project during World War II.

  14. Technical background information for the environmental and safety report, Volume 5: the 1977 Clinch River sediment survey - data presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakes, T.W.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Eldridge, J.S.; Scott, T.G.; Parsons, D.W.; Hubbard, H.M.; Sealand, O.M.; Shank, K.E.; Eyman, L.D.

    1982-11-01

    This study determined the fate and distribution of nuclides in the Clinch River by analyzing selected cores for transuranic radionuclide activity and examined the effect of the altered flow regime in the Clinch River on the distribution of the fission product activity. Cores were collected along the full length of the Clinch River from the WOC outfall (CRM 20.8) to locations in the Tennessee River on either side of the junction of the two rivers. The sampling was concentrated around CRM 20.8 and the proposed CRBR site. An inventory of alpha-emitting radionuclides and gamma-emitting fission products and their lateral and vertical distribution patterns in the Clinch River was established.

  15. Technical background information for the environmental and safety report, Volume 5: the 1977 Clinch River sediment survey - data presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study determined the fate and distribution of nuclides in the Clinch River by analyzing selected cores for transuranic radionuclide activity and examined the effect of the altered flow regime in the Clinch River on the distribution of the fission product activity. Cores were collected along the full length of the Clinch River from the WOC outfall (CRM 20.8) to locations in the Tennessee River on either side of the junction of the two rivers. The sampling was concentrated around CRM 20.8 and the proposed CRBR site. An inventory of alpha-emitting radionuclides and gamma-emitting fission products and their lateral and vertical distribution patterns in the Clinch River was established

  16. Phase 2 sampling and analysis plan, Quality Assurance Project Plan, and environmental health and safety plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: An addendum to the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains a three-part addendum to the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Plan. The Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation began in 1989, as part of the comprehensive remediation of facilities on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The ORR was added to the National Priorities List in December 1989. The regulatory agencies have encouraged the adoption of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) terminology; therefore, the Clinch River activity is now referred to as the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI), not the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. Part 1 of this document is the plan for sampling and analysis (S ampersand A) during Phase 2 of the CRRI. Part 2 is a revision of the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the CRRI, and Part 3 is a revision of the Environmental Health and Safety Plan for the CRRI. The Clinch River RI (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. The contaminants identified in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) downstream of the ORR are those associated with the water, suspended particles, deposited sediments, aquatic organisms, and wildlife feeding on aquatic organisms. The purpose of the Phase 2 S ampersand A Plan is to describe the proposed tasks and subtasks developed to meet the primary objectives of the CRRI

  17. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, C.L.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of July 22-29, 1993, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 19.0 and Mile 22.0 on July 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA.

  18. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22-29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase II Sampling and Analysis activities as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA.

  19. DOE's environmental restoration program for the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operations and waste disposal activities at the Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site,and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) into off-site surface waters since the early 1940s, The Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir are located downstream from the ORR. A comprehensive remedial investigation (the Clinch River Remedial Investigation) of off-site surface water contamination at Oak Ridge is now being conducted in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act requirements. The objectives of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) are to: (1) define the nature and extent of off-site surface water contamination, (2) quantify the potential risks to human health and the environment associated with off-site contamination, and (3) identify and preliminarily evaluate potential remediation alternatives. The CRRI is being conducted in three phases: (1) scoping studies, in which preassessment studies based on existing data and limited sampling were conducted to preliminarily estimate the nature and extent of the problem; (2) Phase 1, in which limited sampling and risk analyses are conducted to define specifically the distributions of the contaminants of concern and the environmental and human health risks associated with the contamination. These phases allow a progressive focusing of assessment efforts on specific contaminants, pathways, and sites contributing to risk and on the evaluation of potential remediation alternatives. A brief overview of the Clinch River RI is presented, followed by a description of on going efforts to achieve control of contaminated sediments located in the White Oak Creek Embayment

  20. Conceptual design of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor spent-fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Details of a baseline conceptual design of a spent fuel shipping cask for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) are presented including an assessment of shielding, structural, thermal, fabrication and cask/plant interfacing problems. A basis for continued cask development and for new technological development is established. Alternates to the baseline design are briefly presented. Estimates of development schedules, cask utilization and cost schedules, and of personnel dose commitments during CRBR in-plant handling of the cask are also presented

  1. Conceptual design of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor spent-fuel shipping cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, R B; Diggs, J M [eds.

    1982-04-01

    Details of a baseline conceptual design of a spent fuel shipping cask for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) are presented including an assessment of shielding, structural, thermal, fabrication and cask/plant interfacing problems. A basis for continued cask development and for new technological development is established. Alternates to the baseline design are briefly presented. Estimates of development schedules, cask utilization and cost schedules, and of personnel dose commitments during CRBR in-plant handling of the cask are also presented.

  2. Present day design challenges exemplified by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present day design challenges faced by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant engineer result from two causes. The first cause is aspiration to achieve a design that will operate at conditions which are desirable for future LMFBRs in order for them to achieve low power costs and good breeding. The second cause is the licensing impact. Although licensing the CRBRP won't eliminate future licensing effort, many licensing questions will have been resolved and precedents set for the future LMFBR industry

  3. Thermal insulation system design and fabrication specification (nuclear) for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This specification defines the design, analysis, fabrication, testing, shipping, and quality requirements of the Insulation System for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Insulation System includes all supports, convection barriers, jacketing, insulation, penetrations, fasteners, or other insulation support material or devices required to insulate the piping and equipment cryogenic and other special applications excluded. Site storage, handling and installation of the Insulation System are under the cognizance of the Purchaser

  4. Update of preconstruction radioactivity levels in the vicinity of the proposed Clinch River breeder reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine samples of ground water, river water, and bottom sediment were collected from the Clinch River in 1977 in the preconstruction-construction phase of the CRBRP environmental radiological monitoring program. The results obtained from the analysis of these samples are similar to those reported earlier. The only significant radioisotopes identified in sediment samples were 137Cs, 60Co, and the naturally occurring 40K. Other than for samples collected in November 1976, the results vary from 0.1 to 13.0 pCi/g (dry weight), with concentration generally increasing with distance downstream from CRM 24.0 to CRM 14.4. The extent to which this relationship may or may not hold below CRM 14.4 is beyond the intended scope of this program. No explanation can be given at this time for the elevated levels of 137Cs detected in November 1976. These values ranged from 28.0 to 82.6 pCi/g (dry weight), with similar values found at CRM 24.0 above Melton Hill Dam. With the exception of tritium, no significant radioactivity was detected in ground or surface water at the CRBRP site. Tritium concentrations ranging from 368 to 5882 pCi/l were found in samples of surface water taken from the Clinch River below Melton Hill Dam while samples taken above the dam exhibited tritium levels from 56 to 368 pCi/l. These elevated tritium levels in the Clinch River below Melton Hill Dam are attributable to DOE operations at Oak Ridge

  5. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant steam generator: FEW tube test model post test examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Steam Generator Few Tube Test (FTT) is part of an extensive testing program being carried out in support of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) steam generator design. The testing of full-length seven-tube evaporator and three-tube superheater models of the CRBRP design was conducted to provide steady-state thermal/hydraulic performance data to full power per tube and to verify the absence of multi-year endurance problems. The problems encountered with the mechanical features of the FTT model design which led to premature test termination and the results of the post-test examination are described

  6. Anodonta imbecillis QA Test 3, Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected May 5 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 2.9 was conducted from May 10-19, 1994. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments.

  7. Anodonta imbecillis QA Test 2, Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Atiodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected August 14 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 4.3 was conducted from August 24-September 2, 1993. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh--water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments.

  8. Anodonta imbecillis QA Test 4, Clinch River - Environmental restoration program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected September 8 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 1.0 was conducted September 13-22, 1994. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments.

  9. Quality assurance in technology development for The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project is the nation's first large-scale demonstration of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) concept. The Project has established an overall program of plans and actions to assure that the plant will perform as required. The program has been established and is being implemented in accordance with Department of Energy Standard RDT F 2-2. It is being applied to all parts of the plant, including the development of technology supporting its design and licensing activity. A discussion of the program as it is applied to development is presented

  10. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This volume is in support of the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the Oak Ridge Reservation (for more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities there). It addresses the quality assurance objectives for measuring the data, presents selected historical data, contains data from several discrete water characterization studies, provides data supporting the sediment characterization, and contains data related to several biota characterization studies.

  11. Data Summary for the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) was to quantify potential human health risks associated with Department of Energy (DOE)-related contamination of surface sediments in Watts Bar Reservoir (WBR). An estimated 700 Ci of {sup 137}Cs and 325 Ci of {sup 60}Co were released from White Oak Lake into the Clinch River between 1949 and 1992 (DOE, 1988). A number of previous studies have documented sediment contamination in the deep-water sediments but no study specifically targeted the near-shore environment, which has the most potential for exposure to humans.

  12. Data Summary for the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) was to quantify potential human health risks associated with Department of Energy (DOE)-related contamination of surface sediments in Watts Bar Reservoir (WBR). An estimated 700 Ci of 137Cs and 325 Ci of 60Co were released from White Oak Lake into the Clinch River between 1949 and 1992 (DOE, 1988). A number of previous studies have documented sediment contamination in the deep-water sediments but no study specifically targeted the near-shore environment, which has the most potential for exposure to humans

  13. Safety-Evaluation Report related to the construction of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. Docket No. 50-537

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety-Evaluation Report for the application by the United States Department of Energy, Tennessee Valley Authority, and the Project Management Corporation, as applicants and owners, for a license to construct the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (docket No. 50-537) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility will be located on the Clinch River approximately 12 miles southwest of downtown Oak Ridge and 25 miles west of Knoxville, Tennessee. Subject to resolution of the items discussed in this report, the staff concludes that the construction permit requested by the applicants should be issued

  14. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

  15. Transport and accumulation of cesium-137 and mercury in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operations and waste disposal activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes into the surrounding environment. Some of these wastes may affect off-site areas by entering local streams, which ultimately drain into the Clinch and Tennessee river system. Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides, metals and organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir suggest the presence of a variety of contaminants of possible concern to the protection of human health and the environment. The work reported here represents part of the initial scoping phase for the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. In this work, the distribution of 137Cs is used to identify contaminant accumulation patterns and potential problem, or ''hot-spot,'' areas with regard to environmental hazard or human health. Radiocesium was chosen for this scoping effort because (1) its history of release into the Clinch River is reasonably well documented, (2) it is easy and inexpensive to measure by gamma spectrometry, and (3) it is rapidly sorbed to particulate matter and thus serves as a cost-effective tracer for identifying the transport and accumulation patterns of many other particle-reactive contaminants, such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and plutonium (Pu), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

  16. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Steam Generator Few Tube Test model post-test examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Steam Generator Few Tube Test (FTT) was part of an extensive testing program carried out in support of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) steam generator design. The testing of full-length seven-tube evaporator and three-tube superheater models of the CRBRP design was conducted to provide steady-state thermal/hydraulic performance data to full power per tube and to verify the absence of multi-year endurance problems. This paper describes the problems encountered with the mechanical features of the FTT model design which led to premature test termination, and the results of the post-test examination. Conditions of tube bowing and significant tube and tube support gouging was observed. An interpretation of the visual and metallurgical observations is also presented. The CRBRP steam generator has undergone design evaluations to resolve observed deficiences found in the FFTM

  17. Anodonta imbecillis QA Test 1, Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA and CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test. In addition, testing included procedures comparing daily renewal versus non-renewal of test sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected July 15 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 5.1 was conducted from July 21-30, 1993. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments. Side by side testing of sediments with daily sediment renewal and no sediment renewal showed no differences between methods. This may be due to the absence of toxicity in both samples and may not reflect true differences between the two methods for toxic sediment.

  18. Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant test, Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from May 12-21, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed an LC{sub 50} value of 1.12 mg Cu/L which is lower than the value of 2.02 mg Cu/L obtained in a previous test. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values.

  19. Clinch River Breeder Reactor: an assessment of need for power and regulatory issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamblin, D M; Tepel, R C; Bjornstad, D J; Hill, L J; Cantor, R A; Carroll, P J; Cohn, S M; Hadder, G R; Holcomb, B D; Johnson, K E

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a research effort designed to assist the US Department of Energy in: (1) reviewing the need for power from the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) in the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) region, not including Florida, and (2) isolating specific regulatory and institutional issues and physical transmission capacities that may constrain the market for CRBR power. A review of existing electric power wheeling arrangements in the Southeast and specific federal and state regulatory obstacles that may affect power sales from the CRBR was undertaken. This review was a contributing factor to a decision to target the service territory to SERC-less Florida.

  20. Lessons learned from the licensing process for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the experience of licensing a specific liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), the Clinch River Breader Reactor Plant (CRBRP). It was a success story in that the licensing process was accomplished in a very short time span. The actions of the applicant and the actions of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in response are presented and discussed to provide guidance to future efforts to license unconventional reactors. The history is told from the perspective of the authors. As such, some of the reasons given for success or lack of success are subjective interpretations. Nevertheless, the authors' positions provided them an excellent viewpoint to make these judgements. During the second phase of the licensing process, they were the CRBRP Technical Director and the Licensing Manager, respectively, for the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, the prime contractor for the reactor plant

  1. ORIGEN2 model and results for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A G; Bjerke, M A

    1982-06-01

    Reactor physics calculations and literature information acquisition have led to the development of a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) model for the ORIGEN2 computer code. The model is based on cross sections taken directly from physics codes. Details are presented concerning the physical description of the fuel assemblies, the fuel management scheme, irradiation parameters, and initial material compositions. The ORIGEN2 model for the CRBR has been implemented, resulting in the production of graphical and tabular characteristics (radioactivity, thermal power, and toxicity) of CRBR spent fuel, high-level waste, and fuel-assembly structural material waste as a function of decay time. Characteristics for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), commercial liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) have also been included in this report for comparison with the CRBR data.

  2. Internal fluid flow management analysis for Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant sodium pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) sodium pumps are currently being designed and the prototype unit is being fabricated. In the design of these large-scale pumps for elevated temperature Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) service, one major design consideration is the response of the critical parts to severe thermal transients. A detailed internal fluid flow distribution analysis has been performed using a computer code HAFMAT, which solves a network of fluid flow paths. The results of the analytical approach are then compared to the test data obtained on a half-scale pump model which was tested in water. The details are presented of pump internal hydraulic analysis, and test and evaluation of the half-scale model test results

  3. An Ecotoxicological Recovery Assessment of the Clinch River Following Coal Industry-related Disturbances in Carbo, Virginia (USA): 1967-2002

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, Matthew Scott

    2002-01-01

    American Electric Powerà ­s (AEP) coal-fired Clinch River Plant, a power-generating facility in Carbo, Russell County, Virginia (USA), has impaired Clinch River biota through toxic spills in 1967 and 1970, and effluent copper (Cu) concentrations that were reported to have exceeded water quality criteria from 1985-1989. These impacts have provided impetus for many research projects addressing the absence of bivalves, including federally protected species of native mussels (Unionoidea), from ...

  4. Data summary for the near-shore sediment characterization task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, D.A.; Hargrove, W.W.; Campbell, K.R.; Wood, M.A.; Rash, C.D.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents the results of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The goals of the task were to (1) determine the extent to which near-shore surface sediments are contaminated by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and (2) provide data for the Watts Bar Reservoir Interagency Permitting Group (WBRIPG) to evaluate the human health risks from exposure to sediments during and following dredging operations. The data collected for this task are also to be used in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RLTS) for the CR-ERP operable units (Lower Watts Bar and Clinch River) to characterize the human health risk associated with exposure to near-shore sediments throughout the Watts Bar Reservoir.

  5. Data summary for the near-shore sediment characterization task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The goals of the task were to (1) determine the extent to which near-shore surface sediments are contaminated by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and (2) provide data for the Watts Bar Reservoir Interagency Permitting Group (WBRIPG) to evaluate the human health risks from exposure to sediments during and following dredging operations. The data collected for this task are also to be used in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RLTS) for the CR-ERP operable units (Lower Watts Bar and Clinch River) to characterize the human health risk associated with exposure to near-shore sediments throughout the Watts Bar Reservoir

  6. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  7. Data management for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project by use of document status and hold systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development, framework, and scope of the Document Status System and the Document Hold System for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project. It shows how data are generated at five locations and transmitted to a central computer for processing and storage. The resulting computerized data bank provides reports needed to perform day-to-day management and engineering planning. Those reports also partially satisfy the requirements of the Project's Quality Assurance Program

  8. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 3. Appendix E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document contains Appendix E: Toxicity Information and Uncertainty Analysis, description of methods, from the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 4. Appendix F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section contains ecotoxicological profiles for the COPECs for the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The ecotoxicological information is presented for only those endpoints for which the chemicals are COPECs. The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include 137Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and 137Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River

  10. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include 137Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and 137Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River

  11. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 3. Appendix E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains Appendix E: Toxicity Information and Uncertainty Analysis, description of methods, from the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include 137Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and 137Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River

  12. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 4. Appendix F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This section contains ecotoxicological profiles for the COPECs for the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The ecotoxicological information is presented for only those endpoints for which the chemicals are COPECs. The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  13. Clinch River Breeder Reactor environmental effects: general water-side corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are described of the general corrosion of 21/4 Cr--1 Mo steel in pure superheated steam, in impure superheated and saturated steam, and under nucleate boiling conditions. The test parameters were selected to provide information relevant to the use of this steel for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor superheaters and evaporators. The oxidation rate of 21/4 Cr--1 Mo steel in superheated steam was measured under heat transfer conditions at 510 to 5400C (950 to 10050F), and was approximately 11/2 times that measured under isothermal conditions. Extensive general attack of stressed 21/4 Cr--1 Mo steel specimens occurred in cyclic tests in superheated and saturated steam with chloride and oxygen additions, although no cracking or localized attack was observed. Considerably less attack occurred under superheat conditions or in the absence of oxygen. Tests under nucleate boiling conditions were operated to evaluate crevice effects associated with porous films on heat transfer surfaces. Significant crevice corrosion was produced in water containing 10 ppm chloride; a heavier but more general attack occurred in treated cooling tower water

  14. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of April 14-21, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 4.3, Poplar Creek Mile 5.1, and Poplar Creek Mile 6.0 on April 13, 15, and 18. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to daphnids in undiluted samples; however, toxicity to fathead minnows (significantly reduced survival) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Daphnid reproduction was significantly less than controls in 50 percent dilutions of samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0, while no toxicity to fathead minnows was shown in diluted (50 percent) samples.

  15. Quality assurance/quality control summary report for Phase 1 of the Clinch River remedial investigation. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, S.K.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Brandt, C.C. [and others

    1994-07-01

    The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. Phase 1 of the CRRI was a preliminary study in selected areas of the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir. Fish, sediment, and water samples were collected and analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radiological parameters. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels; (2) determine the range of contaminant concentrations present in the river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants. Quality assurance (QA) objectives for Phase I were that (1) scientific data generated would withstand scientific scrutiny; (2) data would be gathered using appropriate procedures for field sampling, chain-of-custody, laboratory analyses, and data reporting; and (3) data would be of known precision and accuracy. These objectives were met through the development and implementation of (1) a QA oversight program of audits and surveillances; (2) standard operating procedures accompanied by a training program; (3) field sampling and analytical laboratory quality control requirements; (4) data and records management systems; and (5) validation of the data by an independent reviewer. Approximately 1700 inorganic samples, 1500 organic samples, and 2200 radiological samples were analyzed and validated. The QA completeness objective for the project was to obtain valid analytical results for at least 95% of the samples collected.

  16. Quality assurance/quality control summary report for Phase 1 of the Clinch River remedial investigation. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. Phase 1 of the CRRI was a preliminary study in selected areas of the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir. Fish, sediment, and water samples were collected and analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radiological parameters. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels; (2) determine the range of contaminant concentrations present in the river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants. Quality assurance (QA) objectives for Phase I were that (1) scientific data generated would withstand scientific scrutiny; (2) data would be gathered using appropriate procedures for field sampling, chain-of-custody, laboratory analyses, and data reporting; and (3) data would be of known precision and accuracy. These objectives were met through the development and implementation of (1) a QA oversight program of audits and surveillances; (2) standard operating procedures accompanied by a training program; (3) field sampling and analytical laboratory quality control requirements; (4) data and records management systems; and (5) validation of the data by an independent reviewer. Approximately 1700 inorganic samples, 1500 organic samples, and 2200 radiological samples were analyzed and validated. The QA completeness objective for the project was to obtain valid analytical results for at least 95% of the samples collected

  17. A survey of the indigenous microbiota (bacteria) in three species of mussels from the Clinch and Holston Rivers, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starliper, Clifford E.; Neves, Richard J.; Hanlon, Shane; Whittington, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    Freshwater mussel conservation efforts by many federal and state agencies have increased in recent years. This has led to a greater number of stream surveys, in which mussel die-offs involving high numbers of dead and moribund animals are being observed and reported with greater frequency. Typically, die-offs have been incidentally observed while research was being done for other purposes, therefore, accurate mortality data have been difficult to obtain. Specifically, seasonal die-offs were noted in localized areas of the Clinch and Holston Rivers, Virginia, and to lesser degrees, in neighboring rivers in this geographic region, including southeast Virginia. The observed mussel species affected were primarily the slabside pearlymussel (Lexingtonia dolabelloides) and to lesser extents, the pheasantshell (Actinonaias pectorosa), rainbow mussel (Villosa iris), and the endangered shiny pigtoe (Fusconaia cor). To determine if a bacterial pathogen might be involved in these recurring mussel die-offs, this study examined characteristics of the indigenous microbiota (bacteria) from healthy mussels from sites on the Clinch and Holston Rivers where die-offs were previously observed. These baseline data will allow for recognition of bacterial pathogens in future mussel die-offs. Means for total bacteria from soft tissues ranged from 1.77 × 105 to 3.55 × 106 cfu/g; whereas, the range in means from fluids was 2.92 × 104 to 8.60 × 105 cfu/mL. A diverse microbiota were recovered, including species that are common in freshwater aquatic environments. The most common bacterial groups recovered were motile Aeromonas spp. and nonfermenting bacteria. Flavobacterium columnare, a pathogen to cool- and warm-water fishes was recovered from one specimen, a Villosa iris from the Clinch River.

  18. Converging on the Clinch River: the politics of the US breeder reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For decades the development of nuclear technologies, including the fast breeder, was controlled by the Atomic Energy Commission, the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, and the nuclear industry, the three pillars of the nuclear technoscience network, the analysis of the formation, culture, growth, and disruption of the network sets the stage for the study of the fast breeder, a program conceived by the scientific estate and carried along and nurtured by the administrative and political estates of the nuclear technoscience network, the early chapters delineate the dimensions of the network. The relationships and influence of its actors, and its unique and secretive culture. The cooperative-client politics of the breeder's deployment ended when the program, for years protected within the interstices of the network, emerged from this protected environment into the larger political system, where it became the subject of Washington's entrepreneurial politics. Under these changed circumstances progress on the LMFBR came to a virtual standstill. Nevertheless, the LMFBR survived the turbulent seventies, when energy and the environment dominate the political agenda, because remnants of the nuclear technoscience network in the executive branch, in Congress, and in the private sector retained sufficient power to prevent the breeder's death. This case study of the politics of the breeder's deployment addresses the dilemma of the experts, their role in the decision-making process as well as the problem of uncertainty within the framework of network theory. This perspective allows for the examination of the multifaceted controversy over the deployment of the fast breeder in the United States, a national debate that eventually converged on the Clinch River

  19. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 2, Quality assurance/quality control summary report for arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, K.A.; Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.

    1995-04-01

    Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study dffers from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L or 0.0015 to 0.003 {mu}g/L.

  20. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1: Main text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  1. Technical management plan for sample generation, analysis, and data review for Phase 2 of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The remedial investigation is entering Phase 2, which has the following items as its objectives: define the nature and extent of the contamination in areas downstream from the DOE ORR, evaluate the human health and ecological risks posed by these contaminants, and perform preliminary identification and evaluation of potential remediation alternatives. This plan describes the requirements, responsibilities, and roles of personnel during sampling, analysis, and data review for the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The purpose of the plan is to formalize the process for obtaining analytical services, tracking sampling and analysis documentation, and assessing the overall quality of the CR-ERP data collection program to ensure that it will provide the necessary building blocks for the program decision-making process

  2. Technical management plan for sample generation, analysis, and data review for Phase 2 of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C.C.; Benson, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Beeler, D.A. [Peer Consultants, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds) released from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The remedial investigation is entering Phase 2, which has the following items as its objectives: define the nature and extent of the contamination in areas downstream from the DOE ORR, evaluate the human health and ecological risks posed by these contaminants, and perform preliminary identification and evaluation of potential remediation alternatives. This plan describes the requirements, responsibilities, and roles of personnel during sampling, analysis, and data review for the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The purpose of the plan is to formalize the process for obtaining analytical services, tracking sampling and analysis documentation, and assessing the overall quality of the CR-ERP data collection program to ensure that it will provide the necessary building blocks for the program decision-making process.

  3. Assessment of potential impact of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant thermal effluent on the Watts Bar Reservoir striped bass population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an assessment of potential adverse impact to striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Watts Bar Reservoir caused by thermal effluent from operation of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). The Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir is occupied by adult striped bass during the warmest months of the year. Concern was raised that operation of the CRBRP, specifically thermal discharges, could conflict with management of striped bass. In all cases examined the thermal plume becomes nearly imperceptible within a short distance from the discharge pipe (about 30 ft [10 m]) compared to river width (about 630 ft [190 m]). Under worst case conditions any presence of the plume in the main channel (opposite side of the river from the discharge) will be confined to the surface layer of the water. An ample portion of river cross sections containing ambient temperature water for passage or residence of adult striped bass will always be available in the vicinity of this thermal effluent. Although a small portion of river cross section would exceed the thermal tolerance of striped bass, the fish would naturally avoid this area and seek out adjacent cooler water. Therefore, it is concluded the CRBRP thermal effluent will not significantly affect the integrity of the striped bass thermal refuge in the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir. At this time there is no need to consider alternative diffuser designs and thermal modeling. 8 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  4. Markovian reliability analysis under uncertainty with an application on the shutdown system of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papazoglou, I A; Gyftopoulos, E P

    1978-09-01

    A methodology for the assessment of the uncertainties about the reliability of nuclear reactor systems described by Markov models is developed, and the uncertainties about the probability of loss of coolable core geometry (LCG) of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) due to shutdown system failures, are assessed. Uncertainties are expressed by assuming the failure rates, the repair rates and all other input variables of reliability analysis as random variables, distributed according to known probability density functions (pdf). The pdf of the reliability is then calculated by the moment matching technique. Two methods have been employed for the determination of the moments of the reliability: the Monte Carlo simulation; and the Taylor-series expansion. These methods are adopted to Markovian problems and compared for accuracy and efficiency.

  5. Modeling and analysis of the unprotected loss-of-flow accident in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, E.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Simms, R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of fission-gas-driven fuel compaction on the energetics resulting from a loss-of-flow accident was estimated with the aid of the SAS3D accident analysis code. The analysis was carried out as part of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor licensing process. The TREAT tests L6, L7, and R8 were analyzed to assist in the modeling of fuel motion and the effects of plenum fission-gas release on coolant and clad dynamics. Special, conservative modeling was introduced to evaluate the effect of fission-gas pressure on the motion of the upper fuel pin segment following disruption. For the nominal sodium-void worth, fission-gas-driven fuel compaction did not adversely affect the outcome of the transient. When uncertainties in the sodium-void worth were considered, however, it was found that if fuel compaction occurs, loss-of-flow driven transient overpower phenomenology could not be precluded.

  6. TVA sediment-disturbing activities within the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of Task 5 were to review: (1) the extent of dredging, construction, and other sediment-disturbing activities conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in potentially contaminated areas of Watts Bar Reservoir; and (2) the disposition of the materials from these activities. This memorandum is the final report for Task 5. This memorandum describes major activities in the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River that possibly resulted in significant disturbance of potentially contaminated sediments. TVA records from the construction of Watts Bar Dam, Kingston Fossil Plant, and Melton Hill Dam were reviewed to facilitate qualitative description of the effect of these activities in disturbing potentially contaminated sediments. The critical period for these activities in disturbing contaminated sediments was during or after 1956 when the peak releases of radioactive contaminants occurred from the Oak Ridge Reservation

  7. Markovian reliability analysis under uncertainty with an application on the shutdown system of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for the assessment of the uncertainties about the reliability of nuclear reactor systems described by Markov models is developed, and the uncertainties about the probability of loss of coolable core geometry (LCG) of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) due to shutdown system failures, are assessed. Uncertainties are expressed by assuming the failure rates, the repair rates and all other input variables of reliability analysis as random variables, distributed according to known probability density functions (pdf). The pdf of the reliability is then calculated by the moment matching technique. Two methods have been employed for the determination of the moments of the reliability: the Monte Carlo simulation; and the Taylor-series expansion. These methods are adopted to Markovian problems and compared for accuracy and efficiency

  8. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) Study, ambient water toxicity. Final report, October 21, 1993--October 28, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of October 21-28, 1993, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Due to serious reproduction/embryo abortion problems with the TVA daphnid cultures, TVA conducted tests during this study period using only fathead minnows. A split sample test using daphnids only will be scheduled during 1994 as a substitute for this study period. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 2.9, Mile 4.3, and Mile 5.1 on October 20, 22, and 25. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) in testing conducted by TVA.

  9. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Harris, R.A.; Moore, R.C.; Madix, S.E.; Newman, K.A.; Rash, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    This document reports on the study of arsenic contamination in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system, downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products, such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal; it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency; and disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Four main sites were sampled quarterly over a 3-year period. Sites investigated included lower Watts Bar Reservoir near Watts Bar Dam [Tennessee River kilometer (TRK) 849.6], the Kingston area [Clinch River kilometer (CRK) 1.6], Poplar Creek, and the McCoy Branch Embayment. Additional sites were investigated in the vicinity of these main stations to determine the distribution of contamination and to identify possible alternative or additional sources of arsenic.

  10. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22--29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis activities. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Reference toxicant test information; and Personnel training documentation.

  11. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of July 22--29, 1993. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 19.0 and Mile 22.0 on July 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Reference toxicant test information.

  12. Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987

  13. Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D. [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico); Huq, M.V. [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States); Meyers-Schone, L.J. [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany); Mohrbacher, D.A. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olsen, C.R. [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Stout, J.G. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

    1992-12-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

  14. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 2. Appendixes A, B, C, D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains appendices A (water characterization), B (sediment characterization), C (biota Characterization), D (applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements) from the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include 137Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and 137Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River

  15. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 2. Appendixes A, B, C, D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document contains appendices A (water characterization), B (sediment characterization), C (biota Characterization), D (applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements) from the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  16. Third report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. The BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs at ORNL. These are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL). The investigation of contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system was originally a task of the BMAP but, in 1988, was incorporated into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation for the Clinch River, a separate study to assess offsite contamination from all three Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge

  17. Third report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D. [and others

    1994-03-01

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. The BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs at ORNL. These are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL). The investigation of contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system was originally a task of the BMAP but, in 1988, was incorporated into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation for the Clinch River, a separate study to assess offsite contamination from all three Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge.

  18. Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant/food test, Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Two different foods, phytoplankton and YCT-Selenastrum (YCT-S), were tested in side by side tests to compare food quality. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from July 6-15, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed LC{sub 50} values of 0.97 and 0.84 mg Cu/L for phytoplankton and YCT-S, respectively. Previously obtained values for phytoplankton tests are 2.02 and 1.12 mg Cu/L. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values. Although significant reduction in growth, compared to the phytoplankton control, was seen in all treatments, including the YCT-S Control, the consequence of this observation has not been established. Ninety-day testing of juvenile mussels exhibited large variations in growth within treatment and replicate groups.

  19. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Markovian reliability analysis under uncertainty with an application on the shutdown system of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for the assessment of uncertainties about reliability of nuclear reactor systems described by markov models is developed, and the uncertainties about the failure probability of the shutdown system of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) are assessed. Failure and repair rates and all other inputs of reliability analysis are taken as random variables with known probability distribution functions (pdf's). The pdf of reliability is calculated by both a Monte Carlo simulation and a Taylor series expansion approximation. Three techniques are developed to reduce the computational effort: ordering of system states, merging of Markov processes, and judicious choice of time steps. A Markov model has been used for reliability analysis under uncertainty of the shutdown system of the CRBR. It accounts for common-cause failures, interdependences between unavailability of the system and occurrence of transients, and inspection and maintenance procedures that depend on the state of the system and that include possibility of human errors. Under these conditions, the failure probability of the shutdown system differs significantly from that computed without common-cause failures, human errors, and input uncertainties

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Kitchings, J.T.; Olsen, C.R.

    1991-09-01

    On April 1, 1986, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (EPA 1986). As specified in Part 3: Special Conditions (Item H) of the permit, a plan for biological monitoring of the Clinch River, White Oak Creek (WOC), Northwest Tributary (NWT) of WOC, Melton Branch (MB), Fifth Creek, and First Creek shall be submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) within 90 days of the effective date of the permit. The plan, which is referred to in Part 3 (H) of the permit as the Biological Monitoring Plan and Abatement Program (BMPAP), describes characterization monitoring studies to be conducted for the duration of the permit (5 years). In order to be consistent with the terminology used for the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Programs for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plan and the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant, BMPAP will subsequently be referred to as the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The proposed BMAP outlined in this document is based on preliminary discussions held on December 9, 1985, between staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (ORNL and Central Management), the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPA, and TDHE. 232 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1, main text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit (CR/PC OU), an off-site OU associated with environmental restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). As a result of past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances into the environment, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 (54 FR 48184). Sites on this list must be investigated for possible remedial action, as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.). This report documents the findings of the remedial investigation of this OU and the feasibility of potential remedial action alternatives. These studies are authorized by Sect. 117 of CERCLA and were conducted in accordance with the requirements of the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300). DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have entered into a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), as authorized by Sect. 120 of CERCLA and Sects. 3008(h) and 6001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.). The purpose of this agreement is to ensure a coordinated and effective response for all environmental restoration activities occurring at the ORR. In addition to other responsibilities, the FFA parties mutually define the OU boundaries, set remediation priorities, establish remedial investigation priorities and strategies, and identify and select remedial actions. A copy of this FFA is available from the DOE Information Resource Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  3. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1, main text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit (CR/PC OU), an off-site OU associated with environmental restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). As a result of past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances into the environment, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 (54 FR 48184). Sites on this list must be investigated for possible remedial action, as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.). This report documents the findings of the remedial investigation of this OU and the feasibility of potential remedial action alternatives. These studies are authorized by Sect. 117 of CERCLA and were conducted in accordance with the requirements of the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300). DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have entered into a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), as authorized by Sect. 120 of CERCLA and Sects. 3008(h) and 6001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.). The purpose of this agreement is to ensure a coordinated and effective response for all environmental restoration activities occurring at the ORR. In addition to other responsibilities, the FFA parties mutually define the OU boundaries, set remediation priorities, establish remedial investigation priorities and strategies, and identify and select remedial actions. A copy of this FFA is available from the DOE Information Resource Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  4. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 2. Biota and representative concentrations of contaminants. Appendixes A, B, C, D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OU`s). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  5. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 4. Information related to the feasibility study and ARARs. Appendixes G, H, I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  6. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 3: Appendixes E and F -- Risk assessment information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  7. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 3. Risk assessment information. Appendixes E, F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 3 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  8. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25--February 1, 1994. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Meter calibrations; and Reference toxicant test information.

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 5. Appendixes J, K, L, M, and N-other supporting information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 5 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  10. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillis (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis QA test 2, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected August 14 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 4.3 was conducted from August 24--September 2, 1993. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody form -- original; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Ammonia analysis request and results.

  11. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillis (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis QA test 3, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected May 5 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 2.9 was conducted from May 10--19, 1994. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody form -- original; Toxicity test bench sheets; Ammonia analysis request and results; Meter calibration log sheets; and Training documentation forms.

  12. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillis (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis QA test 4, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organisms quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected September 8 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 1.0 was conducted September 13--22, 1994. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody form -- original; Toxicity test bench sheets; Ammonia analysis request and results; and Meter calibration log sheets.

  13. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 5. Appendixes G, H, I, J

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Program for Phase 2 of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) was designed to comply with both Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) QAMS-005/80 (EPA 1980a) guidelines. QA requirements and the general QA objectives for Phase 2 data were defined in the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP)-Quality Assurance Project Plan, and scope changes noted in the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan Addendum. The QA objectives for Phase 2 data were the following: (1) Scientific data generated will withstand scientific and legal scrutiny. (2) Data will be gathered using appropriate procedures for sample collection, sample handling and security, chain of custody (COC), laboratory analyses, and data reporting. (3) Data will be of known precision and accuracy. (4) Data will meet data quality objectives (DQOs) defined in the Phase 2 SAP.

  14. Clinch River: an alternate financing plan. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, first session, 20 Sep 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Representatives of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) project, the nuclear industry, taxpayers, the financial community, and legislators testified at a hearing held to review administration plans for completing the CRBR by attaching its financing to a continuing resolution and avoiding the legislative process. A Congressional Budget Office report noted that the administration's financing proposal will generate up to 37% return on investment from tax relief alone, which is more appropriate for high-risk than government-backed investment. The Congressional Research Service challenged that the plant's power production capacity was overstated and its price overvalued. Of concern to the committee was the fairness of asking taxpayers to share in the $2.5 billion needed to complete the project. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 20 witnesses

  15. Safety evaluation report related to the construction of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. Docket No. 50-537. Suppl. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the preparation of the Safety Evaluation Report the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards considered the Clinch River construction permit license application at its 276th meeting and subsequently issued a favorable report, dated April 19, 1983 to the Commission (See Appendix I of this report). Additional documents associated with the application have been reviewed and a number of meetings have been held with the applicants. These events and documents are identified in Appendix E to this supplement. This supplement, SSER-1, to the Safety Evaluation Report, provides an evaluation of additional information received from the applicants since preparation of the SER regarding previously identified outstanding review items, and our response to the comments made by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in its report

  16. Supplement to Final Environmental Statement related to construction and operation of Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant, Docket No. 50-537

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In February 1977, the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation issued a Final Environmental Statement (FES) (NUREG-0139) related to the construction and operation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). Since the FES was issued, additional data relative to the site and its environs have been collected, several modifications have been made to the CRBRP design, and its fuel cycle, and the timing of the plant construction and operation has been affected in accordance with deferments under the DOE Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. These changes are summarized and their environmental significance is assessed in this document. The reader should note that this document generally does not repeat the substantial amount of information in the FES which is still current; hence, the FES should be consulted for a comprehensive understanding of the staff's environmental review of the CRBRP project

  17. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of October 21--28, 1993. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Due to serious reproduction/embryo abortion problems with the TVA daphnid cultures, TVA conducted tests during this study period using only fathead minnows. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 2.9, Mile 4.3, and Mile 5.1 on October 20, 22, and 25. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Reference toxicant test information.

  18. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillus (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant test, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from May 12--21, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed an LC{sub 50} value of 1.12 mg Cu/L which is lower than the value of 2.02 mg Cu/L obtained in a previous test. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values. Attachments to this report include: Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Copper analysis request and results; and Personnel training documentation.

  19. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillis (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis QA test 1, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA and CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test. In addition, testing included procedures comparing daily renewal versus non-renewal of test sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected July 15 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 5.1 was conducted from July 21--30, 1993. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments. Side by side testing of sediments with daily sediment renewal and no sediment renewal showed no differences between methods. This may be due to the absence of toxicity in both samples and may not reflect true differences between the two methods for toxic sediment. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Ammonia analysis request and results.

  20. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillis (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant/food test, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Two different foods, phytoplankton and YCT-Selenastrum (YCT-S), were tested in side by side tests to compare food quality. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from July 6--15, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Although significant reduction in growth, compared to the phytoplankton control, was seen in all treatments, including the YCT-S Control, the consequence of this observation has not been established. Ninety-day testing of juvenile mussels exhibited large variations in growth within treatment and replicate groups. Attachments to this report include: Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Copper analysis request and results.

  1. Site suitability report in the matter of Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. Docket No. 50-537. Revision to March 4, 1977 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 1977, the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation issued its Site Suitability Report (SSR) for the proposed Clinch River Breeder Plant (CRBRP). That SSR documents the result of the staff's evaluation of the suitability of the proposed CRBRP site for a facility of the general size and type as the CRBRP from the standpoint of radiological health and safety considerations. The staff concluded in that SSR that the proposed CRBRP site is suitable for such a facility. Since the SSR was issued, several modifications have been made to the CRBRP design, additional data related to the site and its environs have been collected, and the Fast Flux Test Facility, a technological precursor to the CRBRP, has been completed and has commenced operation. In addition, new emergency planning requirements have been promulgated by the staff. This report is an update of the March 1977 SSR that reflects these matters and discusses them in terms of the previous staff conclusion regarding the suitability of the proposed CRBRP site

  2. An investigation of degradation to the Clinch River Basin in Virginia coupling individual, biochemical and community level indicators of stress in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biochemical and organismic indicators of pollution were used to assess stress to fish in the Clinch River Basin. These data were gathered in parallel with an independent study of a community level assessment of the basin, the index of biotic integrity (IBI). Hence, site condition had been previously established with the IBI data. Contaminants were suspected to originate from sources such as coal mining, agricultural development and urbanization. Induction of pollution sensitive proteins in fish in the field was investigated. Sites were selected along an IBI gradient in the Basin. Fish from relatively pristine sites (high IBI) were used as references, while those from polluted sites (low IBI) were used as sampling sites suspected of contamination. The enzyme ethoxyresorufin deethylase and the protein metallothionein were used as indicators of fish stress from organic and heavy metal contamination respectively. Relatively abundant species were selected from three trophic levels. Organismic indices of pollution stress indicated that fish from the most uncontaminated sites had higher values of hepatosomatic index (HSI) than those from the more pristine sites. The biochemical indicators of stress showed a good relationship with the IBI data, showing that it may be possible to link biochemical and community level indicators of stress in the fish that were studied

  3. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 2. Appendixes A, B, C, and D-Biota and representative concentrations of contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 2 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  4. Evaluation of Invertebrate Bioaccumulation of Fly Ash Contaminants in the Emory, Clinch, and Tennessee Rivers, 2009 - 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, John G [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    This report provides a summary of results from studies on invertebrate bioaccumulation of potential contaminants associated with a major fly ash spill into the Emory River following the failure of a dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant (KIF) in Kingston, Tennessee, in late December 2008. Data included in this report cover samples collected in calendar years 2009 and 2010. Samples collected from most sites in 2009 were processed by two different laboratories using different approved U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical methods: ALS Laboratory Group in Ft. Collins, CO, processed sampling using EPA method 6010 (but method 6020 for uranium and SW7470 for mercury), and PACE Analytical in Minneapolis, MN, used EPA method 6020. A preliminary evaluation of results from both laboratories indicated that some differences exited in measured concentrations of several elements, either because of specific differences of the two methods or inter-laboratory differences. While concentration differences between the laboratories were noted for many elements, spatial trends depicted from the results of both methods appeared to be similar. However, because samples collected in the future will be analyzed by Method 6020, only the results from PACE were included in this report to reduce data variation potentially associated with inter-laboratory and analytical method differences.

  5. Predicting the quality of clinch joints using FEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, Bert; Goretti Doig, Maria; Weiher, Jochen

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade clinch joining has become established as a cost-effective alternative to spot welding. Its develompent was brought on by the ongoing trend towards lightweight structures especially in the automotive insdustry. Choosing the tool which gives the best performance for a newly develope

  6. Physics calculations for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalimullah; Kier, P.H.; Hummel, H.H.

    1977-06-01

    Calculations of distributions of power and sodium void reactivity, unvoided and voided Doppler coefficients and steel and fuel worths have been performed using diffusion theory and first-order perturbation theory for the LWR discharge Pu-fueled CRBR at BOL, the FFTF-grade Pu-fueled CRBR at BOL and for the beginning and end of equilibrium cycle of the LWR-Pu-fueled CRBR. The results of the burnup and breeding ratio calculations performed for obtaining the reactor compositions during the equilibrium cycle are also reported. Effects of sodium and steel contents on the distributions of sodium void reactivity and steel worth have also been studied. Errors and uncertainties in the reactivity coefficients due to cross-sections and the two-dimensional geometric representations of the reactor used in the calculations have also been estimated. Comparisons of the results with those in the CRBR PSAR are also discussed.

  7. Technological aspects of manufacturing and numerical modelling of clinch-adhesive joints

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Tomasz; Golewski, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    This short book describes the basic technological aspects involved in the creation of purely clinch and clinch-adhesive joints made of different types of adherent materials and employing different joining technologies. Basic parameters that need to be taken into account in the design process are also presented, while a comparison of experimental testing of the hybrid joint with simple clinching for a combination of different joining materials underlines the advantages of opting for hybrid joints. The book’s conclusions will facilitate the practical application of this new fastening technology.

  8. Model improvement by model validation - lesson learned by model validation exercise for a deterministic river model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A deterministic model for transport of radionuclides in rivers was used for prediction of the activity concentration of radionuclides in scenarios as Clinch-Tennessee rivers and Dnjepr river, as experimental data were provided in a VAMP subgroup. Different runs of the calculation with data fitting and adaption of parameter lead to improved results. The model gives reasonable agreement with experimental data

  9. Mechanical Properties Prediction of the Mechanical Clinching Joints Based on Genetic Algorithm and BP Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Jiangqi; LAN Fengchong; CHEN Jiqing; YU Ping

    2009-01-01

    For optimal design of mechanical clinching steel-aluminum joints, the back propagation (BP) neural network is used to research the mapping relationship between joining technique parameters including sheet thickness, sheet hardness, joint bottom diameter etc., and mechanical properties of shearing and peeling in order to investigate joining technology between various material plates in the steel-aluminum hybrid structure car body. Genetic algorithm (GA) is adopted to optimize the back-propagation neural network connection weights. The training and validating samples are made by the BTM(R) Tog-L-Loc system with different technologic parameters. The training samples' parameters and the corresponding joints' mechanical properties are supplied to the artificial neural network (ANN) for training. The validating samples' experimental data is used for checking up the prediction outputs. The calculation results show that GA can improve the model's prediction precision and generalization ability of BP neural network. The comparative analysis between the experimental data and the prediction outputs shows that ANN prediction models after training can effectively predict the mechanical properties of mechanical clinching joints and prove the feasibility and reliability of the intelligent neural networks system when used in the mechanical properties prediction of mechanical clinching joints. The prediction results can be used for a reference in the design of mechanical clinching steel-aluminum joints.

  10. Properties of deterministic models for prediction of radionuclide concentrations in river systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A deterministic model was used for predicting the activity concentration of radionuclides in rivers. The model was validated in the framework of VAMP, aquatic working group, river subgroup, where scenarios as Clinch-Tennessee rivers as well as Dnjepr river were provided. This was a good chance to test the predictive power of the model. Some of the results of this exercise are presented. (author)

  11. Ecological risk assessment in a large river-reservoir. 4: Piscivorous wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1999-04-01

    Over 50 years of operations of facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Tennessee, has resulted in the release of contaminants into the water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek, downstream of the ORR. An iterative, weight-of-evidence approach was employed to assess risks these contaminants present to four piscivorous wildlife species (osprey [Pandion haliatus], great blue heron [Ardea herodias], mink [Mustela vison], and river otter [Lutra canadensis]) in the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC) watershed. Available data consisted of literature-derived NOAELs and LOAELs, field surveys, and toxicity tests. Contaminants of potential ecological concern (COPECs) were identified by comparing point estimates of exposure to NOAELs and included mercury and PCBs. Exposure to COPECs was reestimated using Monte Carlo methods, first at individual locations, then over ecologically relevant spatial scales. These exposure distributions were compared to LOAELs. Estimated exposure for mink was not sufficient to present a risk from any COPEC. Mercury and PCBs presented a significant risk to river otter at one location each. Exposure of osprey and great blue herons to mercury represented a significant risk at one and two locations, respectively. Field surveys of heron rookeries and osprey nests indicated no adverse effects on reproduction. Mink red fish from the Clinch River displayed reduced reproduction only in the most contaminated of five toxicity test diets; this reduction was not statistically significant, however. The maximum mercury and PCB exposures estimated for mink along the Clinch River were significantly lower than the toxicity test exposures associated with adverse effects. The weight of evidence indicates that contaminants from the ORR do not present a risk to mink, great blue heron, or osprey along the Clinch River; river otter, however, may be at risk from mercury and PCBs.

  12. Report to the Congress on alternative financing of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Utility Task Force report found that there is a wide range of possible alternatives for funding a portion of the CRBRP costs which could reduce Federal outlay requirements and attract significant private sector participation. These alternatives range from off-budget Federal guaranteed project financing, to traditional financing of the market value of the plant. The Task Force report considers the family of concepts that are based on seeking private investment commensurate with the market value of the CRBRP as the most viable alternative funding approach although it may be necessary to augment this concept with others of the discussed alternatives depending on the amount of private funding required

  13. Clinch River breeder reactor sodium fire protection system design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assure the protection of the public and plant equipment, improbable accidents were hypothesized to form the basis for the design of safety systems. One such accident is the postulated failure of the Intermediate Heat Transfer System (IHTS) piping within the Steam Generator Building (SGB), resulting in a large-scale sodium fire. This paper discusses the design and development of plant features to reduce the consequences of the accident to acceptable levels. Additional design solutions were made to mitigate the sodium spray contribution to the accident scenario. Sodium spill tests demonstrated that large sodium leaks can be safely controlled in a sodium-cooled nuclear power plant

  14. Design of the upper internals structure for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Upper Internals Structure (UIS) is located above the core and is supported from the head at four locations. It is designed to perform the following primary functions: provide secondary core holddown in the event of a malfunction of the core hydraulic holddown system; provide support for routing all in-vessel instrumentation to core assemblies; maintain alignment between the core assemblies, the UIS and the closure head; provide guidance and crossflow protection for the control rod drivelines; and mix/duct flow to the upper region of the vessel outlet plenum to minimize rapid temperature changes to components during a reactor trip transient. In accomplishing these functions, the UIS will experience a sodium environment with temperatures up to 12000F (6490C), and as many as 7 x 108 cycles of fluid temperature fluctuations up to 2500F (1210C) at full power operation. It must be designed to survive these conditions in combination with seismic and flow-induced vibration loadings for its 30 year design life. The design program of designing to controlled functional requirements and design conditions is discussed. Included is a description of the significant parts of the design and the approach used to balance the requirement of tight joints. The thermal and hydraulic environment including the results of a comprehensive test program are discussed. The test program results establish the basis of the thermal boundary used in the structural evaluation, and the UIS vibration characteristics. A summary of the areas which have required design changes is included with a summary of the structural evaluation of these changes

  15. Primary pipe rupture accident analysis for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the thermal transient response of the CRBR to a severe primary coolant flow perturbation, initiated by a rupture of the primary heat transport system piping, is analyzed. This hypothetical accident is studied under the further assumption that the plant protection system does function according to current design descriptions for the CRBR. Although a brief discussion of an unprotected (no scram) pipe rupture accident is presented, the major emphasis of the present report is on the protected accident

  16. Primary pipe rupture accident analysis for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, D.C.; Bari, R.A.

    1976-04-01

    In this report, the thermal transient response of the CRBR to a severe primary coolant flow perturbation, initiated by a rupture of the primary heat transport system piping, is analyzed. This hypothetical accident is studied under the further assumption that the plant protection system does function according to current design descriptions for the CRBR. Although a brief discussion of an unprotected (no scram) pipe rupture accident is presented, the major emphasis of the present report is on the protected accident.

  17. Summary of preliminary contaminant impacts investigations in the Clinch River Basin, Virginia, using multiple bioassessment techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1992 multiple investigations were performed to collect preliminary information to direct future studies aimed at characterizing contaminant problems in the...

  18. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. License application, statement of general information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application is made for a reactor facility consisting of a liquid metal cooled reactor and steam generator system, a steam turbine driven electric generating system, electrical switchyard, and related auxiliaries and supporting structures. The primary system is located in an inert atmosphere in shielded vaults within a containment structure. Sodium coolant is used to remove heat from the core and radial blanket. Heat from the primary sodium is transferred in heat exchangers to non radioactive sodium which is used to convert feed-water into steam which is superheated to drive a tandem-compound generator. A single shaft multi-stage turbine generator produces 380 MW(e) with steam conditions of 1450 psig at 9000F. Fuel is sintered ceramic pellets of mixed uranium-plutonium oxides encapsulated in stainless steel. There are 198 fuel assemblies with each assembly consisting of 217 fuel rods placed in a hexagonal channel. Plutonium enrichment ranges from 1817 to 32.0 percent by weight. Axial blanket sections contain depleted UO2 with 99.8 percent 238U and 0.2 percent 235U by weight. The proposed location of the plant is within the corporate limits of the city of Oak Ridge in Roane County, Tennessee. (U.S.)

  19. Road and Street Centerlines, Roads in Clinch County, GA, Published in 2010, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, Southern Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2010. It is described as 'Roads in Clinch County, GA'....

  20. Friction-based injection clinching joining (F-ICJ): a new joining method for hybrid lightweight structures

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos Abibe, André

    2015-01-01

    Friction-based Injection Clinching Joining (F-ICJ) is a new advanced staking joining technology for lightweight hybrid structures. This PhD work was devised to understand the fundamental scientific and engineering aspects of F-ICJ. The joint formation mechanisms, process-related changes in the joined materials, and quasi-static mechanical behavior were clarified. This knowledge was used to establish relationships between processing conditions, microstructure, and global joint properties. A pr...

  1. THE SHEAR STRENGTH OF THE ROUND CLINCHING JOINTS FORMED BY USING EXTENSIBLE DIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Witkowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The clinching joining technology is one of the most popular joining technologies by redrawing sheet material. The joining process parameters, the sheet material and its arrangements influences joints’ strength. Cylindrical axial-symmetrical joints formed by using rigid die and punch are still developed. The change of the rigid die on the die with movable segments affect the forming process and joint strength parameters. So there is a need to do experimental researches of the possibilities of joint formation by unchanged punch geometry and different die shape. In this article the forming process parameters (forming force, process energy consumption and its standard deviations and joints strength parameters (maximum shearing force, total dissipated energy and dissipated energy up to 0.3 maximum force, according to the ISO 12996 standard, for the joints formed with using die with 2, 3 and 4 movable segments were presented. The punch geometry was unchanged and the minimum thickness of the embossment was also unchanged. For the die with 2 and 4 segments the load force direction influence on the joints strength was also presented.

  2. Land-use changes on the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor demonstration. Project site: 1924 to 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is presented which documents the use history of the CRBRDP site and is also the first in a series to describe ecological areas on the ERDA Oak Ridge Reservation meeting criteria for scientific study sites or natural areas worthy of preservation. The CRBRDP area under discussion is located in Roane County, Tennessee and is a part of the land purchased in 1942 by the United States Government for the Manhattan Project, now known as the ERDA Oak Ridge Reservation

  3. Safety-Evaluation Report related to the construction of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. Docket No. 50-537

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this appendix is to describe the staff's evaluation of hypothetical core disruptive accidents which, for analytical purposes, have been postulated to occur in the CRBR. This introduction is divided into three major parts. The first background information. The second provides an overview of potential CDA initiating events and consequences considered for the CRBR. The third describes the guidelines used in evaluating CDAs for the CRBR. A schematic view of major components of the reactor systems is provided. The staff's evaluation of the major areas associated with the assessment of CDAs is presented

  4. Ecological risk assessment in a large river-reservoir. 1: Introduction and background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy initiated a remedial investigation of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek system Superfund Site in 1989. This site, located in eastern Tennessee near Oak Ridge, consists of 70 river kilometers and 40 km2 of surface area. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nature and extent of contamination, perform an ecological and human health risk assessment, and evaluate possible remedial alternatives. This introductory article summarizes the environmental setting, the contamination history, and the study approach and provides some general results of the site characterization. Subsequent papers in this series describe the ecological risks to fish, piscivorous and insectivorous wildlife, and benthic invertebrates

  5. Ecological risk assessment in a large river-reservoir. 8: Experimental study of the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls on reproductive success in mink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a component of an ecological risk assessment of Poplar Creek (located on the Oak Ridge Reservation [ORR]) and the Clinch River (a large river-reservoir system), fish from Poplar Creek, the Clinch River, and Atlantic Ocean were fed to ranch mink to evaluate reproductive success. Five diets, each composed of 75% fish and 25% normal ranch mink chow, were prepared. Two diets served as reference diets and contained 75% Atlantic Ocean fish or 75% Clinch River fish collected above the ORR. The fish portion of the remaining three diets contained 25, 50, and 75% fish collected from Poplar Creek and 50, 25, and 0% ocean fish, respectively. Five mink groups (eight females and two males each) were each fed one of the prepared diets for 196 days. Polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations were determined in diets and various mink tissues, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity was determined in liver tissue, and reproductive success was evaluated. Concentrations of PCB were greatest in the diet composed of 75% Poplar Creek fish and in tissues from mink fed this diet and their offspring. There was a trend toward decreased adult female and kit weights and reduced mean litter size in mink fed diets containing 75% Poplar Creek fish; however, at 6 weeks of age, kit survival was similar among diet groups. Liver EROD activity significantly increased in adult female mink fed 50 and 75% Poplar Creek fish diets. Estimated dietary concentrations of PCBs were similar to or slightly lower than concentrations associated with adverse effects in experimentally dosed mink. Mercury (Hg) concentrations previously reported in these same mink were below that associated with adverse effects, and there was no indication of additive or synergistic effects from exposure to PCBs plus Hg. It is unlikely that population-level reproductive effects would be observed in mink consuming fish from Poplar Creek on the ORR

  6. Tennessee's oversight, environmental restoration and environmental programs for DOE's Oak Ridge reservation (ORR) including tributaries to the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture includes the following: (1) a historical review of Oak Ridge Reservation's compliance with State and Federal Environmental Laws; (2) an assessment of the benefits and problems relating to the management and coordination of overlapping environmental laws; (3) regulatory and non-regulatory drivers including the 'Oversight Agreement,' between DOE and Tennessee. The Federal Facilities Agreement between Tennessee, DOE and EPA, Clean Water Act (CWA), Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Atomic Energy Act are reviewed

  7. Quality assurance/quality control summary report on phase 2 of the Clinch River remedial investigation at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, S.K.; Anderson, H.M.; Benson, S.B.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Brandt, C.C.; Chavannes, C.M.; Cook, R.B.; Evans, D.A.; Ford, C.J.; Harris, R.A.; Horwedel, B.M.; Jackson, B.L.

    1996-12-01

    Quality assurance (QA) objectives for Phase 2 were that (1) scientific data generated would withstand scientific and legal scrutiny; (2) data would be gathered using appropriate procedures for sample collection, sample handling and security, chain of custody, laboratory analyses, and data reporting; (3) data would be of known precision and accuracy; and (4) data would meet data quality objectives defined in the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan. A review of the QA systems and quality control (QC) data associated with the Phase 2 investigation is presented to evaluate whether the data were of sufficient quality to satisfy Phase 2 objectives. The data quality indicators of precision, accuracy, representativeness, comparability, completeness, and sensitivity were evaluated to determine any limitations associated with the data. Data were flagged with qualifiers that were associated with appropriate reason codes and documentation relating the qualifiers to the reviewer of the data. These qualifiers were then consolidated into an overall final qualifier to represent the quality of the data to the end user. In summary, reproducible, precise, and accurate measurements consistent with CRRI objectives and the limitations of the sampling and analytical procedures used were obtained for the data collected in support of the Phase 2 Remedial Investigation.

  8. Draft supplement to final environmental statement related to construction and operation of Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. Docket No. 50-537

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning the site and environs; facility description; environmental impacts due to construction; environmental impacts of plant operation; environmental measurement and monitoring programs; environmental impacts of postulated accidents; need for the proposed facility; alternatives; evaluation of the proposed action; and discussion of comments received on the draft environmental statement

  9. Design of a redundant-load-path lifting fixture for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant spent-fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A newly developed concept for a redundant-load-path lifting fixture for spent fuel shipping casks is presented. The concept addresses remote attachment of the crane hook to the lifting fixture and remote attachment of the lifting fixture to this cask, and also allows the cask to be rotated from its shipping position to the vertical and lifted from its transport vehicle without requiring hands-on action

  10. Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

  11. Quality assurance/quality control summary report on phase 2 of the Clinch River remedial investigation at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality assurance (QA) objectives for Phase 2 were that (1) scientific data generated would withstand scientific and legal scrutiny; (2) data would be gathered using appropriate procedures for sample collection, sample handling and security, chain of custody, laboratory analyses, and data reporting; (3) data would be of known precision and accuracy; and (4) data would meet data quality objectives defined in the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan. A review of the QA systems and quality control (QC) data associated with the Phase 2 investigation is presented to evaluate whether the data were of sufficient quality to satisfy Phase 2 objectives. The data quality indicators of precision, accuracy, representativeness, comparability, completeness, and sensitivity were evaluated to determine any limitations associated with the data. Data were flagged with qualifiers that were associated with appropriate reason codes and documentation relating the qualifiers to the reviewer of the data. These qualifiers were then consolidated into an overall final qualifier to represent the quality of the data to the end user. In summary, reproducible, precise, and accurate measurements consistent with CRRI objectives and the limitations of the sampling and analytical procedures used were obtained for the data collected in support of the Phase 2 Remedial Investigation

  12. River engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, M.

    1993-01-01

    One dimension models - basic eauations, analytical models, numberical models. One dimensional models -suspended load, roughness and resistance of river beds. Solving river problems - tools, flood mitigation, bank protection.

  13. Ecological risk assessment in a large river-reservoir. 6: Bioindicators of fish population health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial distribution of contaminants in the sediments and biota of a large reservoir ecosystem were related to a variety of biological responses in fish populations and communities to determine possible relationships between contaminant loading in the environment and fish health. Much of the contaminant inventory in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system has originated from three US Department of Energy facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, which borders this system in its upper reaches. Fish sampled from areas of the CR/WBR system with the highest levels of contaminants in the sediments and biota, primarily mercury and PCBs, had the most dramatic bioindicator responses. The major changes observed were induction of detoxification enzymes, organ dysfunction, increased frequency of histopathological lesions, impaired reproduction, and reduced fish community integrity. Mercury, the dominant contaminant, displayed a decreasing concentration gradient from the upper reaches of Poplar Creek to the lower Clinch River, which was consistent with a downstream gradient in several of the biological responses. A multivariate analysis using all of the individual fish health responses at each site in a discriminant analysis procedure also revealed a downstream gradient in integrated fish health. In Poplar Creek where contaminant concentrations were the highest, statistical correlations were observed between individual bioindicator responses such as contaminant exposure indicators, organ dysfunction, histopathological damage, and reproductive impairment. Relationships between contaminant loading and fish community indices such as species richness and relative abundance, however, were more difficult to establish in Poplar Creek because of the possible dominating influence of food and habitat availability on fish community dynamics. Using a suite of bioindicators that encompass a range of levels of biological organization and response-sensitivity scales improves the

  14. On Rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Gleason, Colin Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of rivers to industry, agriculture, the climate system, and global ecosystems, our current knowledge of river discharge (volume of available water per unit time) is surprisingly poor for many regions of the world as political cloistering, aging infrastructure, and rapid human changes limit our ability to understand global surface waters holistically. Closing this knowledge gap is critical for better management of surface water in light of drought and increasing human de...

  15. YELLOWSTONE RIVER WATCH (YRW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellowstone River Watch seeks to expand its monitoring and education efforts throughout the Yellowstone River Basin by actively recruiting and training new teacher members. Yellowstone River Watch also seeks to advance existing school programs by offering quality assurance/quali...

  16. Construction and operation of Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant: Project Management Corporation, Tennessee Valley Authority, and Energy Research and Development Administration. Final environment statement. Docket No. 50-537

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapters are included on the site and environs, facility description, environmental impacts due to construction, environmental impact of plant operation environmental measurement and monitoring programs, environmental impacts of postulated accidents, need for the proposed facility, alternatives, and evaluation of the proposed action

  17. River Morphology and River Channel Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Howard H

    2008-01-01

    River morphology has been a subject of great challenge to scientists and engineers who recognize that any effort with regard to river engineering must be based on a proper understanding of the morphological features involved and the responses to the imposed changes. In this paper,an overview of river morphology is presented from the geomorphic viewpoint. Included in the scope are the regime concept, river channel classification, thresholds in river morphology, and geomor-phic analysis of river responses. Analytical approach to river morphology based on the physical principles for the hydraulics of flow and sediment transport processes is also presented. The appli-cation of analytical river morphology is demonstrated by an example. Modeling is the modern tech-nique to determine both short-term and long-term river channel responses to any change in the en-vironment. The physical foundation of fluvial process-response must be applied in formatting a mathematical model. A brief introduction of the mathematical model FLUVIAL-12 is described.

  18. Onchocerciasis (River Blindness) FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Parasites - Onchocerciasis (also known as River Blindness) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... infected Simulium blackfly. It is also called River Blindness because the fly that transmits infection breeds in ...

  19. Allegheny County Major Rivers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains locations of major rivers that flow through Allegheny County. These shapes have been taken from the Hydrology dataset. The Ohio River,...

  20. Iowa's Sovereign Meandered Rivers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This data set depicts Iowa's Meandered Rivers. These rivers are deemed sovereign land & therefore require any person wishing to conduct construction activities...

  1. Qingjiang River Developer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    THE 400-kilometer Qingjiang River, second tributary of the Yangtze River in Hubei Province, has a drainage area of 17,000 square kilometers. Its advantageous natural conditions have made it a key water power development project.

  2. River and Stream Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU River and Stream Pollution Kids Homepage Topics Pollution River and Stream Pollution ... stream in the first place by disturbing the land as little as possible. Farmers and construction workers ...

  3. Mithi River Restoration Project

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghani, Himanshu

    2009-01-01

    It took only few years to turn a naturally owing river into a drain. 17.84 k.m stretch of MithiNadi (river), an arterial river, running along north-south axis of Bombay (Mumbai) is facing the grimproblems of backyard atrocities. Finding its way through the odds of household garbage, industrialsewage, other pollutants and encroachments, Mithi river originates from the conuence of two essentialreservoirs; Vihar Lake and Powai Lake and merging with Arabian Sea at Mahim creek. The stategovernment...

  4. 76 FR 51887 - Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ...) entitled ``Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD'' in the Federal Register (76 FR 36447). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD AGENCY... safety zone during the ``NAS Patuxent River Air Expo '11,'' which consists of aerial...

  5. River Restoration and Meanders

    OpenAIRE

    G. Mathias Kondolf

    2006-01-01

    Among the most visually striking river restoration projects are those that involve the creation of a new channel, often in a new alignment and generally with a form and dimensions that are different from those of the preproject channel. These channel reconstruction projects often have the objective of creating a stable, single-thread, meandering channel, even on rivers that were not historically meandering, on rivers whose sediment load and flow regime would not be consistent with such stable...

  6. Dispersion in Alluvial River

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdousi, Amena

    2014-01-01

    River pollution is the contamination of river water by pollutant being discharged directly or indirectly on it. Depending on the degree of pollutant concentration, subsequent negative environmental effects such as oxygen depletion and severe reductions in water quality may occur which affect the whole environment. River pollution can then cause a serious threat for fresh water and as well as the entire living creatures. Dispersion in natural stream is the ability of a stream to dilute soluble...

  7. Evolution of river dolphins.

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, H; Caballero, S.; Collins, A. G.; Brownell, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    The world's river dolphins (Inia, Pontoporia, Lipotes and Platanista) are among the least known and most endangered of all cetaceans. The four extant genera inhabit geographically disjunct river systems and exhibit highly modified morphologies, leading many cetologists to regard river dolphins as an unnatural group. Numerous arrangements have been proposed for their phylogenetic relationships to one another and to other odontocete cetaceans. These alternative views strongly affect the biogeog...

  8. Down to the River

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessels, Josepha Ivanka

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is no coherent or sustainable water cooperation among the five states—Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestinian territories and Syria—that share the Jordan River. Why do people not cooperate on sustainable river basin management, even if it seems the most rational course from the...... illustrate hydropolitics in praxis, because the political future of this particular area in many respects affects the sustainable future of the Jordan River Basin and the entire Levant....

  9. The Ebro river basin

    OpenAIRE

    Darbra Roman, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    River basins worldwide are under pressure from economic activities. In Europe, the two main factors hindering the achievement of good chemical and ecological status of European river basins are pollution, mainly coming from agriculture, and hydromorphology (e.g. for navigation, hydroelectricity and flood control). The economic activities affect the chemical and ecological status of rivers, lakes and groundwater and deplete available soil, sediments and water resources. The w...

  10. RIVER FLOW CONDITIONS AND DYNAMIC STATE ANALYSIS OF PAHANG RIVER

    OpenAIRE

    Muhamad Barzani Gasim; M. E. Toriman; Mushrifah Idris; Pan Ian Lun; M. K.A. Kamarudin; A. A. Nor Azlina; Mazlin Mokhtar; S.A. Sharifah Mastura

    2013-01-01

    Pahang River (Sg. Pahang) is the longest river in Peninsular Malaysia. Flood is a common event in Pahang River Basin during wet season which triggered by monsoon season. The hydrodynamic study of Pahang River should be well understood especially when it is a target of northeast monsoon which influenced the Pahang River Basin every year (from November to March). 17 river cross section stations were selected and used to measure its drainage capacity, hydraulic parameters and estimation of flow ...

  11. Glueing instead of clinching; Kleben statt Clinchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Jens-Peter

    2011-08-31

    Increasingly, silicon is used as a glue in solar collector casings as manufacturers are opting for a fully automatic glueing process. Further, the ratio of copper to aluminium has turned upside down in solar absorbers.

  12. Poetry in the clinch of understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kozicka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents polemic discussions of poetry referred to as hermetic or obscure; the discussion has been ongoing for the past twenty five years. In more general terms, the dispute is over the issue of the incomprehensible nature of poetry. The most heated stages of the discussion reveal the basic and repeated arguments put forward by both parties, as well as  the differences in the perspectives and points of reference, indicating the changes which occurred in literature in the meantime.

  13. Reining the River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Concerned about the effects of increasing water scarcity on economic development, China hopes a new law will save the Yellow River The first day of August marked what could be a new page in the history of China's long-suffering "mother river." That day, a regulation took effect that for the first time in histo-

  14. 33 CFR 117.734 - Navesink River (Swimming River).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navesink River (Swimming River... BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.734 Navesink River (Swimming River). The Oceanic Bridge, mile 4.5, shall open on signal; except that, from December 1...

  15. Uranium in river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of dissolved uranium has been determined in over 250 river waters from the Orinoco, Amazon, and Ganges basins. Uranium concentrations are largely determined by dissolution of limestones, although weathering of black shales represents an important additional source in some basins. In shield terrains the level of dissolved U is transport limited. Data from the Amazon indicate that floodplains do not represent a significant source of U in river waters. In addition, the authors have determined dissolved U levels in forty rivers from around the world and coupled these data with previous measurements to obtain an estimate for the global flux of dissolved U to the oceans. The average concentration of U in river waters is 1.3 nmol/kg, but this value is biased by very high levels observed in the Ganges-Brahmaputra and Yellow rivers. When these river systems are excluded from the budget, the global average falls to 0.78 nmol/kg. The global riverine U flux lies in the range of 3-6 x 107 mol/yr. The major uncertainty that restricts the accuracy of this estimate (and that of all other dissolved riverine fluxes) is the difficulty in obtaining representative samples from rivers which show large seasonal and annual variations in runoff and dissolved load

  16. Modeling river delta formation

    CERN Document Server

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-01-01

    A new model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/ erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore our model is capable to simulate the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi river.

  17. Modeling river delta formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  18. Wild and Scenic Rivers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This map layer portrays the linear federally-owned land features (i.e., national parkways, wild and scenic rivers, etc.) of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the...

  19. The Carmans River Story

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In this study, undertaken as an independent project at Bellport High School, the authors have attempted to provide a historical description of the Carmans River...

  20. Management recommendations: Bear River

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and additional...

  1. Dulbi River goose survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) and Canada goose (Branta canadensis) broods was conducted on 58 3/8 miles of the Dulbi River in Alaska. Four...

  2. Geomorphology: Undersea river patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peakall, Jeff

    2015-09-01

    Braided channels are rare on ocean floors, but abundant on land. Experiments and theory suggest that deeper flows and rapid overbank deposition restrict braiding in underwater rivers relative to their terrestrial counterparts.

  3. Russian River Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is an analysis and summary of progress toward achieving the interim management objectives for the Russian River during the 1979 season. Additionally,...

  4. Mackenzie River Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada, with its headstreams the Peace and Finley, is the longest river in North America at 4241 km, and drains an area of 1,805,000 square km. The large marshy delta provides habitat for migrating Snow Geese, Tundra Swans, Brant, and other waterfowl. The estuary is a calving area for Beluga whales. The Mackenzie (previously the Disappointment River) was named after Alexander Mackenzie who travelled the river while trying to reach the Pacific in 1789. The image was acquired on August 4, 2005, covers an area of 55.8 x 55.8 km, and is located at 68.6 degrees north latitude, 134.7 degrees west longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  5. The rivers of civilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Mark G.; Lewin, John

    2015-04-01

    The hydromorphic regimes that underpinned Old World river-based civilizations are reviewed in light of recent research. Notable Holocene climatic changes varied from region to region, whilst the dynamics of floodplain environments were equally diverse, with river channel changes significantly affecting human settlement. There were longer-term trends in Holocene hydroclimate and multi-centennial length 'flood-rich' and 'flood-poor' episodes. These impacted on five identified flooding and settlement scenarios: (i) alluvial fans and aprons; (ii) laterally mobile rivers; (iii) rivers with well-developed levees and flood basins; (iv) river systems characterised by avulsions and floodouts; and (v) large river-fed wetlands. This gave a range of changes that were either more or less regular or incremental from year-to-year (and thus potentially manageable) or catastrophic. The latter might be sudden during a flood event or a few seasons (acute), or over longer periods extending over many decades or even centuries (chronic). The geomorphic and environmental impacts of these events on riparian societies were very often irreversible. Contrasts are made between allogenic and autogenic mechanism for imposing environmental stress on riverine communities and a distinction is made between channel avulsion and contraction responses. Floods, droughts and river channel changes can precondition as well as trigger environmental crises and societal collapse. The Nile system currently offers the best set of independently dated Holocene fluvial and archaeological records, and the contrasted effects of changing hydromorphological regimes on floodwater farming are examined. The persistence of civilizations depended essentially on the societies that maintained them, but they were also understandably resilient in some environments (Pharaonic Egypt in the Egyptian Nile), appear to have had more limited windows of opportunity in others (the Kerma Kingdom in the Nubian Nile), or required

  6. Synthetic River Valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    The description of fluvial form has evolved from anecdotal descriptions to artistic renderings to 2D plots of cross section or longitudinal profiles and more recently 3D digital models. Synthetic river valleys, artificial 3D topographic models of river topography, have a plethora of potential applications in fluvial geomorphology, and the earth sciences in general, as well as in computer science and ecology. Synthetic river channels have existed implicitly since approximately the 1970s and can be simulated from a variety of approaches spanning the artistic and numerical. An objective method of synthesizing 3D stream topography based on reach scale attributes would be valuable for sizing 3D flumes in the physical and numerical realms, as initial input topography for morphodynamic models, stream restoration design, historical reconstruction, and mechanistic testing of interactions of channel geometric elements. Quite simply - simulation of synthetic channel geometry of prescribed conditions can allow systematic evaluation of the dominant relationships between river flow and geometry. A new model, the control curve method, is presented that uses hierarchically scaled parametric curves in over-lapping 2D planes to create synthetic river valleys. The approach is able to simulate 3D stream geometry from paired 2D descriptions and can allow experimental insight into form-process relationships in addition to visualizing past measurements of channel form that are limited to two dimension descriptions. Results are presented that illustrate the models ability to simulate fluvial topography representative of real world rivers as well as how channel geometric elements can be adjusted. The testing of synthetic river valleys would open up a wealth of knowledge as to why some 3D attributes of river channels are more prevalent than others as well as bridging the gap between the 2D descriptions that have dominated fluvial geomorphology the past century and modern, more complete, 3D

  7. Wind River: A Wild and Scenic River Analysis: Preliminary draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Wind River meets the criteria for inclusion in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Subject to valid existing rights, the minerals in Federal lands which...

  8. Kisaralik River: A wild and scenic river analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Kisaralik River from and including Kisaralik Lake to the west boundary of TSN, R65W meets the criteria established by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act for...

  9. 33 CFR 207.380 - Red Lake River, Minn.; logging regulations for portion of river above Thief River Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red Lake River, Minn.; logging... Red Lake River, Minn.; logging regulations for portion of river above Thief River Falls. (a) Parties wishing to run logs on Red Lake River must provide storage booms near the head of the river to take...

  10. RIVER FLOW CONDITIONS AND DYNAMIC STATE ANALYSIS OF PAHANG RIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Barzani Gasim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pahang River (Sg. Pahang is the longest river in Peninsular Malaysia. Flood is a common event in Pahang River Basin during wet season which triggered by monsoon season. The hydrodynamic study of Pahang River should be well understood especially when it is a target of northeast monsoon which influenced the Pahang River Basin every year (from November to March. 17 river cross section stations were selected and used to measure its drainage capacity, hydraulic parameters and estimation of flow discharge. Long term (1980 to 2009 variation of hydrologic data series comprised of river flow, river stage and rainfall data were analyzed based on the Department of Irrigation and Drainage (DID Malaysia record. Monthly rainfall was recorded from Sg. Yap, Temerloh and Lubuk Paku Rainfall Stations. Two hydrologic sampling trips had been carried out; first sampling on January 2010 and second sampling on February 2010. The study indicates that velocity and river flow measurement during first sampling ranged from 0.308 to 0.582 m sec-1 and 153.282 to 439.684 m3 sec-1. Meanwhile, during second sampling, the velocity and river flow ranged from 0.217 to 0.484 and 52.071 to 304.485 m3 sec-1, respectively. Floods were occurred annually at Pahang River especially during northeast monsoon, these events are expected to be stimulated by the inconsistent condition of width and depth along Pahang River which finally create sedimentation and meandering characteristic.

  11. 76 FR 36447 - Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD AGENCY... a temporary safety zone during the ``NAS Patuxent River Air Expo '11'', which consists of...

  12. Sprague River Oregon Water 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  13. Sprague River Oregon Vegetation 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  14. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  15. Sprague River Oregon Bars 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  16. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  17. Sprague River Oregon Water 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  18. Missouri River 1943 Compact Line

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Flood Control, Bank Stabilization and development of a navigational channel on the Missouri River had a great impact on the river and adjacent lands. The new...

  19. The River Lune fact file

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    This document provides a brief introduction to the River Lune catchment and the role that the National Rivers Authority plays in catchment management. Included are a map of the catchment and short introductions to fisheries and characteristics of the catchment.

  20. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  1. Sprague River Oregon Bars 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  2. Sprague River Oregon Bars 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  3. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain Centerline

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  4. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  5. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  6. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  7. Two Pontic rivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Nielsen, Tønnes; Jensen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    The accounts of the landscape around the Iris (Yeşilirmak) and the Thermodon (Terme) given by ancient authors are diverse and often contradictory. The Periegesis of the World by Dionysius of Alexandria, a didactic poem written in the early IInd c. A.D., established an image of the two rivers that...... does not correspond to their actual characteristics. A closer study reveals that Dionysius, or possibly his source, has confused the two: the river which he describes as the Thermodon is in fact the Iris, and vice versa. This mistake was not realized by later translators (Avienus, late IVth c. A...

  8. Stochastic modelling of river morphodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Van Vuren, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    Modern river management has to reconcile a number of functions, such as protection against floods and provision of safe and efficient navigation, floodplain agriculture, ecology and recreation. Knowledge on uncertainty in fluvial processes is important to make this possible, to design effective river engineering works, for operational forecasting and for the maintenance of the river system. In this research the focus is in particular on the quantification of uncertainty in river morphodynamic...

  9. Stochastic Modelling of River Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Schaarup-Jensen, K.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic river models are used in a large number of applications to estimate critical events for rivers. These estimates are subject to a number of uncertainties. In this paper, the problem to evaluate these estimates using probabilistic methods is considered. Stochastic models for...... river geometries are formulated and a coupling between hydraulic computational methods and numerical reliability methods is presented....

  10. Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introduction to the Alligator Rivers Region is presented. It contains general information regarding the physiography, climate, hydrology and mining of the region. The Alligator Rivers Region is within an ancient basin, the Pine Creek Geosyncline, which has an area of approximately 66000 km2. The Geosyncline has a history of mineral exploitation dating back to 1865, during which time 16 metals have been extracted (silver, arsenic, gold, bismuth, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, lead, tin, tantalum, uranium, tungsten, zinc). Uranium exploration in the Pine Creek Geosyncline was stimulated by the discovery in 1949 of secondary uranium mineralisation near Rum June, 70 km south-east of Darwin. This was followed by a decade of intense exploration activity resulting in the discoveries of economic uranium ore bodies at Rum Jungle and in the upper reaches of the South Alligator River Valley. All the known major uranium deposits of the East Alligator River uranium field have been discovered since 1969. The present known resources of the Geosyncline are approximately 360 000 tonnes of contained U3O8. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Discover the Nile River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Bordering on the Fantastic. As the longest river on earth, the Nile passes through 10 countries. Presented through a wide range of activities and a winning array of games, it's also unsurpassed at taking young minds into exploring the world of water, as well as natural and man made wonders.

  12. Ecological River Basin Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anthony Wayne

    Addressing the Seventh American Water Resources Conference, Washington, D. C., October, 1971, Anthony Wayne Smith, President, National Parks and Conservation Association, presents an expose on how rivers should be managed by methods which restores and preserve the natural life balances of the localities and regions through which they flow. The…

  13. River Pollution: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Describes a unit on river pollution and analytical methods to use in assessing temperature, pH, flow, calcium, chloride, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, dissolved nitrogen, detergents, heavy metals, sewage pollution, conductivity, and sediment cores. Suggests tests to be carried out and discusses significance of results. (JM)

  14. Hood River Production Master Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Toole, Patty

    1991-07-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program authorizes the development of artificial production facilities to raise chinook salmon and steelhead for enhancement in the Hood, Umatilla, Walla Walla, Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers and elsewhere. On February 26, 1991 the Council agreed to disaggregate Hood River from the Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, and instead, link the Hood River Master Plan (now the Hood River Production Plan) to the Pelton Ladder Project (Pelton Ladder Master Plan 1991).

  15. Re: Soviet river diversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jas O.

    The paper on ‘Soviet River Diversions’ by Phil Micklin (Eos, 62(19), May 12, 1981) has just come to hand.Referring to the map on page 489, I was interested to see the estimates of river flows for the Amu and Syr Darya, which clearly show the effect of irrigation on inflows to the Aral Sea. Recently, I was passing over the northeast corner of the sea on a flight from Tashkent to Moscow when I got the impression that increasing irrigation development on the Syr Darya is likely to decrease the annual inflow even more than in the recent past. The same state of affairs has been going on in the Caspian Sea for years, as a result of irrigation development on the Volga. My impression was that the Aral Sea had shrunk considerably from the 26,000 odd square miles (67,304 km2) area quoted (from memory) in Encyclopaedia Britannica (edition circa 1970).

  16. Modeling river delta formation

    OpenAIRE

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-01-01

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the...

  17. River and Human Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE WUGANG; MENG JIA

    2011-01-01

    @@ Nothing is like a river.It seems coming from nowhere, far back into antiquity.It is originated from drops of water and converged into a long stream that flows ceaselessly.It benefits the vast expanse of land and nourishes all the living on it.It stretches and undulates,forming ponds and lakes of different depths.It is moving or motionless,overflowing with vigor and vitality.

  18. Onilahy River, Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Near the southern tip of Madagascar, the Onilahy River (23.5S, 44E) drains a near barren landscape, the result of rapid deforestation for quick profits from the lumber industry with no regard to the environmental impact. At the turn of the century, the island was a lush tropical paradise with about 90 percent of the surface forested. Now, at the close of the century, only about 10 percent of the forests remain in inaccessible rugged terrain.

  19. Comparative Study of Flood Risk Management and Land Use in the Deltas of Rhine River, Yellow River and Mississippi River

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang B; Guangzhou, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Rhine River in the Netherlands, the Yellow River in China and the Mississippi River in the U.S. are three great rivers in the world. Each of them is performing a significant role in the country. The delta area for each river, in particular, is served as the centre in importance and commonly the

  20. Columbia River pathway report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the river-pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project is estimating radiation doses that could have been received by the public from the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the river-pathway dose reconstruction effort sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the area from above the Hanford Site at Priest Rapids Dam to below the site at McNary Dam from January 1964 to December 1966. Of the potential sources of radionuclides from the river, fish consumption was the most important. Doses from drinking water were lower at Pasco than at Richland and lower at Kennewick than at Pasco. The median values of preliminary dose estimates calculated by HEDR are similar to independent, previously published estimates of average doses to Richland residents. Later phases of the HEDR Project will address dose estimates for periods other than 1964--1966 and for populations downstream of McNary Dam. 17 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  1. River habitats for salmonids on the River Lune catchment

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    An extensive survey of the River Lune using River Habitat Survey (RHS) was commissioned to assess the habitat quality of the Lune for salmonid fish. The main river on the Lune and tributaries were divided into 500m sections. A sample of 103 sections (25% of the total classified length) was randomly selected and surveyed in February/March 99. A Habitat Modification Score (HMS) describing the level of habitat modification was derived for each site and compared to the whole reference net...

  2. Tsunami Impacts in River Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkova, E.; Tanaka, H.; Roh, M.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 Chilean and the 2011 Tohoku tsunami events demonstrated the tsunami's ability to penetrate much farther along rivers than the ground inundation. At the same time, while tsunami impacts to the coastal areas have been subject to countless studies, little is known about tsunami propagation in rivers. Here we examine the field data and conduct numerical simulations to gain better understanding of the tsunami impacts in rivers.The evidence which motivated our study is comprised of water level measurements of the aforementioned tsunamis in multiple rivers in Japan, and the 2011 Tohoku and some other tsunamis in the Columbia River in the US. When the available tsunami observations in these very different rivers are brought together, they display remarkably similar patterns not observed on the open coast. Two phenomena were discovered in the field data. First, the phase of the river tide determines the tsunami penetration distance in a very specific way common to all rivers. Tsunami wave progressively disappears on receding tide, whereas high tide greatly facilitates the tsunami intrusion, as seen in the Figure. Second, a strong near-field tsunami causes substantial and prolonged water accumulation in lower river reaches. As the 2011 tsunami intruded rivers in Japan, the water level along rivers rose 1-2 m and stayed high for many hours, with the maximum rise occurring several km from the river mouth. The rise in the water level at some upstream gaging stations even exceeded the tsunami amplitude there.Using the numerical experiments, we attempt to identify the physics behind these effects. We will demonstrate that the nonlinear interactions among the flow components (tsunami, tide, and riverine flow) are an essential condition governing wave dynamics in tidal rivers. Understanding these interactions might explain some previous surprising observations of waves in river environments. Figure: Measurements of the 2010/02/27 tsunami along Naruse and Yoshida rivers

  3. Investigation on Water Pollution of Four Rivers in Coastal Wetland of Yellow River Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The study aimed at analysing water pollution of four rivers in coastal wetland of Yellow River estuary. [Method] Taking four seriously polluted rivers (Guangli River, Shenxian Ditch, Tiao River and Chao River) in coastal wetland of Yellow River estuary as study objects, water samples were collected from the four rivers in May (dry period), August (wet period) and November (normal period) in 2009 and 2010 respectively, then pollution indices like nutritive salts, COD, chlorophyll-a, petroleum, et...

  4. Rehabilitating China's largest inland river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiqing; Chen, Yaning; Zhang, Yaoqi; Xia, Yang

    2009-06-01

    Wetlands are particularly important for conserving China's biodiversity but riparian wetlands in the Tarim River basin in western China have been reduced by 46% during the last 3 decades. The world's largest habitat for Populus euphratica, which is in the Tarim River basin, significantly shrank. To protect and restore the deteriorated ecosystems along the Tarim River and its associated wetlands, China's government initiated a multimillion dollar river restoration project to release water from upper dams to the dried-up lower reaches of the Tarim River starting in 2000. We monitored the responses of groundwater and vegetation to water recharge in the lower reaches of the river from 2000 to 2006 by establishing nine 1000-m-long transects perpendicular to the river at intervals of 20-45 km along the 320-km river course below the Daxihaizi Reservoir, the source of water conveyance, to Lake Taitema, the terminus of the Tarim River. Water recharges from the Daxihaizi Reservoir to the lower reaches of the Tarim River significantly increased groundwater levels and vegetation coverage at all monitoring sites along the river. The mean canopy size of the endangered plant species P. euphratica doubled after 6 years of water recharge. Some rare migrating birds returned to rest on the restored wetlands in summer along the lower reaches of the Tarim River. The biggest challenge facing decision makers, however, is to balance water allocation and water rights between agricultural and natural ecosystems in a sustainable way. A large number of inhabitants in the Tarim Basin depend on these limited water resources for a living. At the same time, the endangered ecosystems need to be protected. Given the ecological, socioeconomic, and sociopolitical realities in the Tarim Basin, adaptive water policies and strategies are needed for water allocation in these areas of limited water resources. PMID:22748091

  5. River Restoration and Meanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mathias Kondolf

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the most visually striking river restoration projects are those that involve the creation of a new channel, often in a new alignment and generally with a form and dimensions that are different from those of the preproject channel. These channel reconstruction projects often have the objective of creating a stable, single-thread, meandering channel, even on rivers that were not historically meandering, on rivers whose sediment load and flow regime would not be consistent with such stable channels, or on already sinuous channels whose bends are not symmetrical. Such meandering channels are often specified by the Rosgen classification system, a popular restoration design approach. Although most projects of this type have not been subject to objective evaluation, completed postproject appraisals show that many of these projects failed within months or years of construction. Despite its, at best, mixed results, this classification and form-based approach continues to be popular because it is easy to apply, because it is accessible to those without formal training in fluvial geomorphology, and probably because it satisfies a deep-seated, although unrecognized, cultural preference for single-thread meandering channels. This preference is consistent with 18th-century English landscape theories, which held the serpentine form to be ideal and led to widespread construction of meandering channels on the country estates of the era. The preference for stability in restored channels seems to be widely accepted by practitioners and funders despite the fact that it is antithetical to research showing that dynamically migrating channels have the greatest ecological richness.

  6. Skjern River Restoration Counterfactual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    In 2003 the Skjern River Restoration Project in Denmark was awarded the prestigious Europa Nostra Prize for ‘conserving the European cultural heritage’ (Danish Nature Agency 2005). In this case, however, it seems that the conservation of one cultural heritage came at the expense of another cultural...... the 1960s is perceived as a catalyst for the development of nature. As such the idea of the palimpsest might bring a valuable openness into the field of nature restoration rendering sites of nature restoration less like museums and more like laboratories. References: Clemmensen, T. J. (2014), ‘The...

  7. Quality of river Krka in middle stream

    OpenAIRE

    Nučič, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Since beginning of the mankind people tend to settle near rivers. The rivers represent source of drinkable water, possibility for farming, industry and other branches. Overall the rivers are ideal solution to eliminate waste waters. Rivers have the ability to decompose organic material to anorganic with the help of microorganisms. We call this self-cleaning river ability. Rough measurement for self-cleaning river ability is biochemical oxygen demand, which is increased by organic pollution. T...

  8. Lowland river systems - processes, form and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M. L.; Kronvang, B.; Sand-Jensen, K.;

    2006-01-01

    Present day river valleys and rivers are not as dynamic and variable as they used to be. We will here describe the development and characteristics of rivers and their valleys and explain the background to the physical changes in river networks and channel forms from spring to the sea. We seek to...... answer two fundamental questions: How has anthropogenic disturbance of rivers changed the fundamental form and physical processes in river valleys? Can we use our understanding of fl uvial patterns to restore the dynamic nature of channelised rivers and drained fl oodplains in river valleys?...

  9. Concluding Remarks on River Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Elosegi, Arturo; Sabater, Sergi; Boulton, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We have pragmatic and ethical obligations to conserve rivers and their biodiversity. This chapter outlines how and why river conservation is important. To make a difference, we must act as individuals and groups, using water wisely and protecting vulnerable assets such as water quality, riparian zones and aquatic biodiversity

  10. Energy from rivers and oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discusses the role energy from rivers and oceans may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of using energy from rivers and oceans, hydropower assessment including resources, technology and costs, and environmental and regulatory issues, ocean thermal energy conversion including technology and costs and environmental issues, tidal power, and wave power

  11. Treasure Along the Parker River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Ann-Marie; And Others

    Designed so that 100 to 125 heterogeneously grouped 7th and 8th grade students and a team of 5 core teachers might experience and discover the natural and historical "treasure" in the Parker River area of Massachusetts, this interdisciplinary unit centers on a hike to Parker River (6.7 miles) and visits to a cemetery, a monument, and Old Town…

  12. Hood River Passive House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, David [BA-PIRC, Spokane, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  13. Hood River Passive House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  14. Columbia River water quality monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste water from Hanford activities is discharged at eight points along the Hanford reach of the Columbia River. These discharges consist of backwash water from water intake screens, cooling water, river bank springs, water storage tank overflow, and fish laboratory waste water. Each discharge point is identified in an existing National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued by the EPA. Effluents from each of these outfalls are routinely monitored and reported by the operating contractors as required by their NPDES permits. Measurements of several Columbia River water quality parameters were conducted routinely during 1982 both upstream and downstream of the Hanford Site to monitor any effects on the river that may be attributable to Hanford discharges and to determine compliance with the Class A designation requirements. The measurements indicated that Hanford operations had a minimal, if any, impact on the quality of the Columbia River water

  15. River network routing in all rivers of the Texas Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C. H.; Maidment, D. R.; Hong, S.; Niu, G.; Yang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The mapped rivers and streams of the contiguous United States are available in a high resolution geographic information system (GIS) dataset called NHDPlus. This hydrographic dataset has about 3 million river and water body reaches along with information on how they are connected into networks. A river network model called RAPID is developed for the NHDPlus river network and applied to the 68,143 river reaches of the entire Texas Gulf, whose lateral inflow to the river network is calculated by a land surface model. RAPID allows for a matrix-based calculation of flow and volume of water in all reaches of a river network, with many thousands of reaches. Gages from the USGS National Water Information System are used to assess the quality of model calculations and to automatically determine optimal model parameters with about 1 gage available for each 160 reaches simulated. RAPID is adapted for parallel computing and has been tested on the Lonestar supercomputer (http://www.tacc.utexas.edu/resources/hpcsystems/) although challenges related to parallel computing are significant. The first author was awarded the 2008 Horton (Hydrology) Research Grant for this work.

  16. River-Based Experiential Learning: the Bear River Fellows Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, D. E.; Shirley, B.; Roark, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Outdoor Recreation, and Parks and Recreation programs at Utah State University (USU) have partnered to offer a new, unique river-based experiential learning opportunity for undergraduates called the Bear River Fellows Program. The program allows incoming freshmen Fellows to experience a river first hand during a 5-day/4-night river trip on the nearby Bear River two weeks before the start of their first Fall semester. As part of the program, Fellows will navigate the Bear River in canoes, camp along the banks, interact with local water and environmental managers, collect channel cross section, stream flow, vegetation cover, and topological complexity data, meet other incoming freshmen, interact with faculty and graduate students, develop boating and leadership skills, problem solve, and participate as full members of the trip team. Subsequently, Fellows will get paid as undergraduate researchers during their Fall and Spring Freshman semesters to analyze, synthesize, and present the field data they collect. The program is a collaborative effort between two USU academic units and the (non-academic) division of Student Services and supports a larger National Science Foundation funded environmental modelling and management project for the lower Bear River, Utah watershed. We have advertised the program via Facebook and emails to incoming USU freshmen, received 35 applications (60% women), and accepted 5 Fellows into the program (3 female and 2 male). The river trip departs August 14, 2012. The poster will overview the Bear River Fellows Program and present qualitative and preliminary outcomes emerging from the trip and Fellows' work through the Fall semester with the field data they collect. We will also undertake more rigorous and longer longitudinal quantitative evaluation of Program outcomes (for example, in problem-solving and leadership) both in Spring 2013 and in subsequent 2013 and 2014 offerings of the

  17. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 1985, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Clinch River site as its preferred site for the construction and operation of the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility (USDOE, 1985). In support of the DOE MRS conceptual design activity, available data describing the site have been gathered and analyzed. A composite geotechnical description of the Clinch River site has been developed and is presented herein. This report presents Clinch River site description data in the following sections: general site description, surface hydrologic characteristics, groundwater characteristics, geologic characteristics, vibratory ground motion, surface faulting, stability of subsurface materials, slope stability, and references. 48 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Alligator Rivers analogue project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization has extensively evaluated uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Province in Australia as analogues of radioactive waste repositories. The work was extended for a three-year program as an international project based on the Koongarra uranium deposit and sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The technical program comprises six major sub-projects involving modelling and experimental work: modelling of radionuclide migration; hydrogeology of the Koongarra uranium deposit; uranium/thorium series disequilibria studies; groundwater and colloid studies; fission product studies; transuranic nuclide studies; an outline of the technical programs and a summary of progress in the technical sub-projects is given. This is followed by a series of technical reports which briefly describe current research tasks, and which have been separately indexed

  19. Robotics at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Robotics Technology Group was organized at the Savannah River Laboratory in August 1982. Many potential applications have been identified that will improve personnel safety, reduce operating costs, and increase productivity using modern robotics and automation. Several active projects are under way to procure robots, to develop unique techniques and systems for the site's processes, and to install the systems in the actual work environments. The projects and development programs are involved in the following general application areas: (1) glove boxes and shielded cell facilities, (2) laboratory chemical processes, (3) fabrication processes for reactor fuel assemblies, (4) sampling processes for separation areas, (5) emergency response in reactor areas, (6) fuel handling in reactor areas, and (7) remote radiation monitoring systems. A Robotics Development Laboratory has been set up for experimental and development work and for demonstration of robotic systems

  20. Uplift histories from river profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, D.; Roberts, G. G.; White, N. J.; Richardson, C. N.

    2009-12-01

    Longitudinal river profiles, where elevation of a river bed is plotted as a function of distance along the river bed, contain information about uplift rate. When a region adjacent to a reference level (e.g., sea level) is uplifted, a rapid change in gradient occurs near the river mouth. The erosional process causes this change in gradient to migrate upstream. Thus a river profile is effectively a ‘tape recording’ of the uplift rate history, provided that the erosional process can be adequately parameterized. Here, we use a non-linear equation to relate the shape of a river profile, z(x), to uplift rate history, U(t). If erosion is assumed to be dominated by knickpoint retreat, an inverse model can be formulated and used to calculate uplift rate histories. Our model builds upon standard stream profile analysis, which focuses on the relationship between profile slope and drainage area. We have applied this analytical approach to river profiles from the Bié Dome, Angola. Calculated uplift rate histories agree with independent geologic estimates.

  1. PCBs in the Harlem River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent, toxic and bioaccumulated contaminants of great environmental concern. PCB is a tracer of wastewater, stormwater and CSOs inputs; PCBs contamination of fish is a main environmental concern for the Harlem River. PCBs in the Harlem River are from combined sewer overflows (CSOs), stormwater runoff, wastewater, as well as upper Hudson GE (General Electric at Fort Edward)'s release. PCBs affect human health mostly from contaminated fish consumption. Many research focused on PCBs in the Hudson River and New York/New Jersey Harbor. However, PCBs source, transport and environmental impact in the Harlem River-a natural straight that connects the Hudson River and the East River, had not been well studied. In this research, water sample were collected from the Harlem River and analyzed PCBs by HR GC/MS (High resolution gas chromatography mass spectrophotometer). Preliminary results showed that certain PCBs congeners in the water column. Results also indicated that nutrients (phosphorus and ammonia) as well as bacteria levels exceeded EPA standards: Total phosphorus-10μg/L, total nitrogen-0.38mg/L; E.Coli-126 MPN/100ml, Enterococcus- 104MPN/100ml, Fecal Coliform-200 MPN/100ml. This research is under process, and more results could give further detail in near future. This research will help improve water quality of the Harlem River, improve environmental health and raise environmental awareness.SO tank Nutrient and bacterial levels of selected sites in the Harlem RiverCSO: Combined Sewer OverflowWWTP: Waste Water Treatment Plant

  2. Where rivers and oceans collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, J. S.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Ogston, A. S.; Sternberg, R. W.; Driscoll, N. W.; Babcock, J.; Milliman, J. D.; Slingerland, R.; Naar, D. F.; Donahue, B.; Walsh, J. P.; Dietrich, W.; Parker, G.; Bera, M.; Davies, H.; Harris, P.; Goni, M.; Aller, R.; Aller, J.

    Fluvial sediment fills the coastal ocean, and sea level rise floods river valleys. This epic battle of terrestrial and marine processes occurs along all shorelines, and the complexities are especially well revealed in the Gulf of Papua, a foreland basin on the southern coast of New Guinea. Two hundred to four hundred million tons of sediment are supplied each year by the Fly and other rivers to a continental shelf that has been dissected by ancestors of these same rivers. The new sediment builds a large depositional feature known as a clinoform, which grows seaward and buries the record of earlier environments.

  3. Theory and application of nonlinear river dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-chuan BAI; Zhao-yin WANG

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical model for river evolution including riverbed formation and meandering pattern formation is presented in this paper. Based on nonlinear mathematic theory, the nonlinear river dynamic theory is set up for river dynamic process. Its core content includes the stability and tropism characteristics of flow motion in river and river selves’ evolution. The stability of river dynamic process depends on the response of river selves to the external disturbance, if the disturbance and the resulting response will eventually attenuate, and the river dynamics process can be restored to new equilibrium state, the river dynamic process is known as stable;otherwise, the river dynamic process is unstable. The river dynamic process tropism refers to that the evolution tendency of river morphology after the disturbance. As an application of this theory, the dynamical stability of the constant curvature river bend is calculated for its coherent vortex disturbance and response. In addition, this paper discusses the nonlinear evolution of the river peristaltic process under a large-scale disturbance, showing the nonlinear tendency of river dynamic processes, such as river filtering and butterfly effect.

  4. 76 FR 23485 - Safety Zone; Red River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Red River AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... Red River in the State of North Dakota, including those portions of the river bordered by Richland... across latitude 46 20'00'' N, extending the entire width of the river. This safety zone is needed...

  5. 33 CFR 117.237 - Christina River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Christina River. 117.237 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Delaware § 117.237 Christina River. (a) The owners of... Bridge over Christina River at milepost 1.4 will be closing to river traffic.” Five short blasts of...

  6. Making rivers modular : emerging river science 1980-2005

    OpenAIRE

    Hemert, van, J.I.

    2008-01-01

    Conceptual, instrumentational and institutional dimensions of river science evolved interdependently between 1980 and 2005. The analysis is informed by an approach of science as cultural practice, co-production as the shaping and working of knowledge in society in terms of interdependent discursive, social and material orderings, and contextual history of science. River science then serves as a case to evaluate claims made in three diagnoses of recent science (mode 2 science, strategic scienc...

  7. Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in the states of Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and...

  8. Umpqua River Oregon Geologic Floodplain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  9. Arkansas River Water Needs Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the legal elements, hydrologic analysis, objectives, and water levels related to the Arkansas River and the management of it.

  10. Haw River sediment quality assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents an evaluation of chemical contaminants in, and toxicity of, sediments collected from impoundments created by dams on the Haw River in Alamance...

  11. Upper Kenai River Cooperative Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Upper Kenai River Cooperative Plan is the product of a joint effort of the Chugach National Forest, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska Division of Parks and...

  12. Riparian Habitat - San Joaquin River

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The immediate focus of this study is to identify, describe and map the extent and diversity of riparian habitats found along the main stem of the San Joaquin River,...

  13. Humboldt River main stem, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the main stem of the Humboldt River as defined by Humboldt Project personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey Nevada District, 2001. The data...

  14. Togiak River sportfishing studies, 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Nearly three thousand angler days of effort was estimated to have been spent on the Togiak River in 1984. Effort was clearly dominated by the professional guiding...

  15. The Scientific Challenges of Yellow River Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaoyan; Sun Yangbo

    2005-01-01

    @@ The Yellow River is famous for its complex and unique physical conditions which give great challenges to the river management. Based on the study and analysis of the existing problems and research progress, this paper indicated that the most significant challenges of Yellow River studies are: long term hydrological and morphological changes; the optimized hydrology and sediment conditions to maintain the healthy life of the River; and simulation of Yellow River through mathematical model and physical models.

  16. River patterns and their meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twidale, C. R.

    2004-10-01

    Rivers are largely responsible for shaping the Earth's continental landscapes. River patterns, the spatial arrangements of channels in the landscape, are determined by slope and structure. At site and sector scale, channel morphology varies spatially and in time, but river patterns and drainage texture, or the frequency of stream lines per unit area, together determine the intricacy, or otherwise, of topography. Most river patterns evolve through natural selection. Slope induces the formation of such patterns as parallel, radial and distributary, while structure produces straight, angular, trellis and annular arrangements. Once established, patterns tend to persist. Nevertheless, at many sites the usual patterns have been disturbed and patterns that are anomalous in terms of slope and structure have been produced by diversion, tectonism, volcanism, glaciation, mass movements, and human activities; by antecedence, superimposition, inheritance or underprinting; by the persistence of deeply eroding rivers which encounter alien structures; and by climatic change. River patterns provide clues to underlying structure and to the chronology of events. They have also proved significant in the search for minerals.

  17. Recent Record of the Neotropical River Otter (Lontra longicaudis) in the Choluteca River Tegucigalpa, Honduras

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Aceituno; Carmen Nuñez; Francisco Aceituno1,Delmy Trochez2 andCarmen Nuñez3

    2015-01-01

    We report the presence of the Neotropical river otter (Lontra longicaudis) in the Choluteca River, Tegucigalpa, Honduras. To date the information is the second record verifiable of the species in the Choluteca River since one in the 1940s.

  18. Valley evolution by meandering rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ajay Brian Sanjay

    Fluvial systems form landscapes and sedimentary deposits with a rich hierarchy of structures that extend from grain- to valley scale. Large-scale pattern formation in fluvial systems is commonly attributed to forcing by external factors, including climate change, tectonic uplift, and sea-level change. Yet over geologic timescales, rivers may also develop large-scale erosional and depositional patterns that do not bear on environmental history. This dissertation uses a combination of numerical modeling and topographic analysis to identify and quantify patterns in river valleys that form as a consequence of river meandering alone, under constant external forcing. Chapter 2 identifies a numerical artifact in existing, grid-based models that represent the co-evolution of river channel migration and bank strength over geologic timescales. A new, vector-based technique for bank-material tracking is shown to improve predictions for the evolution of meander belts, floodplains, sedimentary deposits formed by aggrading channels, and bedrock river valleys, particularly when spatial contrasts in bank strength are strong. Chapters 3 and 4 apply this numerical technique to establishing valley topography formed by a vertically incising, meandering river subject to constant external forcing---which should serve as the null hypothesis for valley evolution. In Chapter 3, this scenario is shown to explain a variety of common bedrock river valley types and smaller-scale features within them---including entrenched channels, long-wavelength, arcuate scars in valley walls, and bedrock-cored river terraces. Chapter 4 describes the age and geometric statistics of river terraces formed by meandering with constant external forcing, and compares them to terraces in natural river valleys. The frequency of intrinsic terrace formation by meandering is shown to reflect a characteristic relief-generation timescale, and terrace length is identified as a key criterion for distinguishing these

  19. Analysis on River Sediment Changes of the Upper Reaches of Yangtze River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Xiang-hao; SHI Guo-yu; XU Quan-xi; CHEN Ze-fang; LIU Shu-zhen

    2005-01-01

    The sediment load and river sedimentation of the upper reaches of Yangtze River has been undergoing constant changes as complex landform, large mountain area and plentiful precipitation make the drainage area of Yangtze River very vulnerable to water erosion and gravity erosion. Through analyzing the hydrological and sediment load statistics recorded by major hydrological stations along Yangtze River since 1950s, and editing the accumulation graph of annual runoff volume and annual sediment load, we find out that the suspended-sediment of Yangtze river has been decreasing year by year in Wulong Hydrological Station on Wujiang River, Beibei Hydrological Station on Jialingjiang River, Lijiawan Hydrological Station on Tuojiang River and Gaochang Hydrological Station on Minjiang River, Yichang Hydrological Station, Cuntan Hydrological Station along Yangtze River mainstream share the same experience too. But the statistics obtained at Pingshan Hydrological Station on Jinshajiang River shows the sediment load there has increased. Taking ecological construction, hydraulic engineering construction and precipitation changes into consideration, the thesis analyses the causes for the sediment load decrease of Jialingjiang River, Tuojiang River, Minjiang River and Wujiang River and provides us both scientific foundation for further study of river sediment changes of the upper reaches of Yangtze River, and measures to control river sedimentation.

  20. Anthropogenic radionuclides in Ottawa River sediment near Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ottawa River has received nuclear reactor effluent from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for more than 60 years, including releases from a NRX accident in 1952. Recent interest in the potential impact of these historical releases and the possible need for remediation of a small region immediately downstream from the release point has led to comprehensive studies to assess risk to people and wildlife. In this paper, the results of an extensive survey of gamma-emitting anthropogenic radionuclides in Ottawa River sediment in the vicinity of CRL are presented. Anthropogenic radionuclides detected in Ottawa River sediment include 60Co, 94Nb, 137Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu and 241Am. Concentrations of all anthropogenic radionuclides decline rapidly with distance downstream of the process outfall, reaching stable concentrations about 2 km downstream. All of these radionuclides are found at some sites within 2 km upstream of the process outfall suggesting limited upstream transport and sedimentation. Comparison of anthropogenic radionuclides with several representative primordial radionuclides shows that with the exception of sites at the process outfall and within 2 km downstream of the process outfall, primordial radionuclide concentrations greatly exceed CRL derived anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations. Thus, over 60 years of radionuclide releases from operations at CRL have had little impact on radionuclide concentrations in Ottawa River sediment, except at a few sites immediately adjacent to the process outfall. (author)

  1. GIS based quantitative morphometric analysis and its consequences: a case study from Shanur River Basin, Maharashtra India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Chaitanya B.; Moharir, Kanak

    2015-06-01

    A morphometric analysis of Shanur basin has been carried out using geoprocessing techniques in GIS. These techniques are found relevant for the extraction of river basin and its drainage networks. The extracted drainage network was classified according to Strahler's system of classification and it reveals that the terrain exhibits dendritic to sub-dendritic drainage pattern. Hence, from the study, it is concluded that remote sensing data (SRTM-DEM data of 30 m resolution) coupled with geoprocessing techniques prove to be a competent tool used in morphometric analysis and evaluation of linear, slope, areal and relief aspects of morphometric parameters. The combined outcomes have established the topographical and even recent developmental situations in basin. It will also change the setup of the region. It therefore needs to analyze high level parameters of drainage and environment for suitable planning and management of water resource developmental plan and land resource development plan. The Shanur drainage basin is sprawled over an area of 281.33 km2. The slope of the basin varies from 1 to 10 %, and the slope variation is chiefly controlled by the local geology and erosion cycles. The main stream length ratio of the basin is 14.92 indicating that the study area is elongated with moderate relief and steep slopes. The morphometric parameters of the stream have been analyzed and calculated by applying standard methods and techniques viz. Horton (Trans Am Geophys Union 13:350-361, 1945), Miller (A quantitative geomorphologic study of drainage basin characteristics in the clinch mountain area, Virginia and Tennessee Columbia University, Department of Geology, Technical Report, No. 3, Contract N6 ONR 271-300, 1953), and Strahler (Handbook of applied hydrology, McGraw Hill Book Company, New York, 1964). GIS based on analysis of all morphometric parameters and the erosional development of the area by the streams has been progressed well beyond maturity and lithology is

  2. PRINCIPLES OF RIVER TRAINING AND MANAGEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoyin WANG; Shimin TIAN; Yujun YI; Guoan YU

    2007-01-01

    River regulation and river training have been performed for various purposes and negative effects have been shown in numerous cases. In some cases the negative effects are so serious that humans have to consider to "renaturalize" the regulated rivers. Only by using the strategy of integrated river management the diverse river uses and natural fluvial processes and ecological systems may be harmonized. Based on analysis of case studies and data collected from literatures this paper presents the concept of integrated river management and four principles of river training. The integrated river management comprises: 1) taking the watershed, upper stream basin including the tributaries, middle and lower reaches and the estuary as an integrated entity in the planning, design and management; and 2) mitigating or controlling the negative impacts on hydrology, erosion and sedimentation, fluvial processes, land use and river use, environment and ecology while in achieving economic benefit from water resources development, flood safety management and hydropower exploitation. River training and management should be in accordance with the four principles: 1) extending the duration of river water flowing on the continent, which may be achieved by extending the river course or reducing the flow velocity; 2) controlling various patterns of erosions and reducing the sediment transportation in the rivers; 3) increasing the diversity of habitat and enhancing the connectivity between the river and riparian waters; and 4) restoring natural landscapes.

  3. Flood trends and river engineering on the Mississippi River system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, N.; Jemberie, A.A.; Remo, J.W.F.; Heine, R.A.; Ickes, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Along >4000 km of the Mississippi River system, we document that climate, land-use change, and river engineering have contributed to statistically significant increases in flooding over the past 100-150 years. Trends were tested using a database of >8 million hydrological measurements. A geospatial database of historical engineering construction was used to quantify the response of flood levels to each unit of engineering infrastructure. Significant climate- and/or land use-driven increases in flow were detected, but the largest and most pervasive contributors to increased flooding on the Mississippi River system were wing dikes and related navigational structures, followed by progressive levee construction. In the area of the 2008 Upper Mississippi flood, for example, about 2 m of the flood crest is linked to navigational and flood-control engineering. Systemwide, large increases in flood levels were documented at locations and at times of wing-dike and levee construction. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Towards a sociogeomorphology of rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Peter

    2015-12-01

    While human impacts on rivers and other landforms have long been a component of geomorphic research, little of this work explicitly includes insights into human agency from social science or recognises that in many cases rivers can be considered to be hybrid co-productions or 'socio-natures'. A socio-geomorphic approach proposed here has parallels with some aspects of sociohydrology and can extend and enrich existing geomorphic explanations of the morphology of, for example, urban rivers by explicitly recognising and working with the co-evolution of the human and natural systems. Examples from recent literature illustrate ways in which these relationships can be understood and analyzed, showing a range of socio-natural influences in particular contexts that have material consequences for river morphology and recognising that events in the system have many forms. The approach recognises the importance of contingency in time and place together with the role and nature of both local and global knowledge. An important element of this approach is that it provides ways for understanding the nature, position and intention of geomorphic and other scientific interventions as part of the system, for example in the case of river restoration. This also leads to the need for reflexivity by geomorphologists and reconsideration of the nature of geomorphological knowledge by those involved in such work and with respect to sociogeomorphology as a whole.

  5. The River Danube: An Examination of Navigation on the River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R. W.

    One of the definitions of Navigation that gets little attention in this Institute is (Oxford English Dictionary), and which our French friends call La Navigation. I have always found this subject fascinating, and have previously navigated the Rivers Mekong, Irrawaddy, Hooghly, Indus, Shatt-al-Arab, Savannah and RhMainKanal (RMDK) and the River Danube, a distance of approximately 4000 km. This voyage has only recently become possible with the opening of the connecting RMDK at the end of 1992, but has been made little use of because of the civil war in the former Yugoslavia.

  6. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, David R

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 The past and future implications for salmon habitat.

  7. Nelson River and Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Rivers that empty into large bodies of water can have a significant impact on the thawing of nearshore winter ice. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 18, 2001, shows the Nelson River emptying spring runoff from the Manitoba province to the south into the southwestern corner of Canada's Hudson Bay. The warmer waters from more southern latitudes hasten melting of ice near the shore, though some still remained, perhaps because in shallow coastal waters, the ice could have been anchored to the bottom. High volumes of sediment in the runoff turned the inflow brown, and the rim of the retreating ice has taken on a dirty appearance even far to the east of the river's entrance into the Bay. The sediment would have further hastened the melting of the ice because its darker color would have absorbed more solar radiation than cleaner, whiter ice. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  8. Radioactive effluents in Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1990, low-level radiometric studies of the Savannah River continued to distinguish between effluent contributions from Plant Vogtle and the Savannah River Site. Measurements of these radioactive effluents are of mutual interest to both institutions, as they can address disturbing trends before they become health and legal concerns. The Environmental Technology Section (ETS) has conducted radiometric studies of Plant Vogtle since late 1986, prior to its startup. The plant has two 1100 MWe pressurized water reactors developed by Westinghouse. Unit 1 started commercial operations in June 1987, and Unit 2 began in May 1989. During powered operations, ETS has routinely detected neutron-activated isotopes in controlled releases but all activities have been several orders of magnitude below the DOE guide values. In 1990, processing improvements for Vogtle effluents have yielded even lower activities in the river. The Vogtle release data and the ETS measurements have tracked well over the past four years

  9. Radioactive effluents in Savannah River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-11-27

    During 1990, low-level radiometric studies of the Savannah River continued to distinguish between effluent contributions from Plant Vogtle and the Savannah River Site. Measurements of these radioactive effluents are of mutual interest to both institutions, as they can address disturbing trends before they become health and legal concerns. The Environmental Technology Section (ETS) has conducted radiometric studies of Plant Vogtle since late 1986, prior to its startup. The plant has two 1100 MWe pressurized water reactors developed by Westinghouse. Unit 1 started commercial operations in June 1987, and Unit 2 began in May 1989. During powered operations, ETS has routinely detected neutron-activated isotopes in controlled releases but all activities have been several orders of magnitude below the DOE guide values. In 1990, processing improvements for Vogtle effluents have yielded even lower activities in the river. The Vogtle release data and the ETS measurements have tracked well over the past four years.

  10. Terrestrial teleconnections link global rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, F.; Howden, N. J.; Woods, R. A.; Bates, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    We present analyses of river discharge data from across the world, which we used to identify links between annual river flow regimes across different continents. Our hypothesis was that, as atmospheric processes are subject to large-scale teleconnection patterns, and because these atmospheric processes are inherently linked to precipitation regimes across the world, there should be identifiable links between river flow regimes driven by these atmospheric processes. We used discharge data from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) to identify cross-correlations (and accounted for serial dependence) between 23 of the world's largest river basins where overlapping data were available over a period of 12 years or more: two in South America; five in Africa; one in Australasia; five in North America and ten in Eurasia. The selected river basins drain approximately a third of the Earth's landmass at their furthest downstream gauging station. Where significant cross-correlations were found, we compared these to known patterns associated with the ENSO and NAO teleconnections. In total, 85 of the 253 possible correlations were deemed significant at p0). We compared these significant cross-correlations with known atmospheric teleconnection patterns, and while these were consistent for the majority of cases, we found a number of significant correlations that are inconsistent with the anticipated effects of known atmospheric teleconnections. Our results provide new insight into the inter-continental links between global river systems and the way in which these are controlled by large-scale atmospheric processes. We suggest this may be useful for global industries, such as insurers or aid agencies, who seek to understand correlations between the magnitudes of extreme events across different regions of the world. For the former, this may enable more efficient management of global liabilities, for the latter it may enable better logistical planning of disaster relief requirements

  11. River restoration - Malaysian/DID perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initially the river improvement works in Malaysia was weighted on flood control to convey a certain design flood with the lined and channelized rivers. But in late 2003 did has makes the approaches that conservation and improvement of natural function of river, i.e. river environment and eco-system should be incorporated inside the planning and design process. Generally, river restoration will focus on four approaches that will improve water quality, which is improving the quality of stormwater entering the river, maximizing the quantity of the urban river riparian corridor, stabilizing the riverbank, and improving the habitat within the river. This paper outlined the appropriate method of enhancing impairment of water quality from human activities effluent and others effluent. (Author)

  12. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan circa 1870

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  13. Sprague River Oregon Centerline South Fork 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  14. Sprague River Oregon Built Features 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  15. Sprague River Oregon Centerline South Fork 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  16. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  17. Sprague River Oregon Centerline South Fork 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  18. Russian River Ice Thickness and Duration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of river ice thickness measurements, and beginning and ending dates for river freeze-up events from fifty stations in northern Russia. The...

  19. Sprague River Oregon Centerline North Fork 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  20. Illinois River NWFR Habitat Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Illinois River National Wildlife and Fish Refuges Complex stretches along 124 miles of the Illinois River in west central Illinois. The Complex includes three...

  1. Chemical - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem...

  2. Physical - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem...

  3. Global Lake and River Ice Phenology Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Lake and River Ice Phenology Database contains freeze and thaw/breakup dates as well as other descriptive ice cover data for 865 lakes and rivers in the...

  4. Geomorphic Analysis - Trinity River Restoration Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the Trinity River project is to identify the potential positive effects of large-scale restoration actions in a 63 kilometer reach of the Trinity River...

  5. Habitat Analysis - Trinity River Restoration Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the Trinity River project is to identify the potential positive effects of large-scale restoration actions in a 63 kilometer reach of the Trinity River...

  6. Savannah River Site Environmental Implentation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the organizational responsibilities for the Savannah River Site Environmental program. Operations, Engineering and projects, Environment, safety, and health, Quality assurance, and the Savannah River Laboratory are described

  7. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  8. Sprague River Oregon Water circa 1870

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  9. Sprague River Oregon Centerline North Fork 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  10. Yellow River Delta Faces a Historic Opportunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhen

    2011-01-01

    @@ China's State Council has endorsed the Development Plan of an Efficient Eco-Economic Zone at Yellow River Delta.The plan is meant to create a more ecologically sustainable economic zone along the river delta.

  11. On the modelling of river delta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleynse, N.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents approaches to the modelling of river delta formation. In particular, it provides results of numerical stratigraphic-morphodynamic modelling of river delta formation under various environmental forcings.

  12. Minnesota Wild and Scenic River Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — District boundaries for wild, scenic, and recreational rivers designated under the Minnesota State Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. Includes portions of the Minnesota...

  13. Biological - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem...

  14. Geochemistry of some Brazilian rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of the totality of the dissolved salts and sodium, calcium, potassium, magnesium, and uranium were measured in ten rivers belonging to three hydrografic basins located in Northeastern Brazil. Activity ratios U234/U238 were also measured. A correlation was done between the results obtained and the geological and climatic context of these regions. Sodium is the most abundant element in the waters, except for rivers flowing in callcareous regions for which calcium is predominant. The concentrations of the major cations are function of the regional lithology whereas water salinity depends on climatic factors. (Author)

  15. Columbia River Impact Evaluation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary impact evaluation was conducted to assess the adequacy of existing data and proposed data collection programs for evaluating cumulative health and environmental impacts to the Columbia River due to past practices at the Hanford Site. The results of this evaluation were used to develop this plan to ensure collection of sufficient data for adequate characterization of the Columbia River along the 100 Area for CERCLA purposes. The evaluation used to develop the plan is not a risk assessment; the plan presented here is only a mechanism to collect additional data to support a future risk assessment

  16. Arctic River Mobility: A Baseline Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. C.; Wilson, C. J.; Brumby, S. P.; Pope, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    In many arctic river systems, permafrost and the presence of frozen floodplain materials provides a significant source of bank cohesion. Due to this cohesion, permafrost may play an important control of arctic river mobility and meandering dynamics. Whether changes in the rates of permafrost thawing has had or will have as significant a geomorphic impact on arctic river meandering as has already been observed for arctic coastline retreat, lake size and distribution, and hillslope stability is at present an unanswered question. The potential impact of climate driven changes in arctic river meandering has important implications for river planform morphology, floodplain dynamics, river ecology, and the export of carbon and nutrients to coastal oceans. We present results of remote sensing analysis of river mobility for the Yukon River in Alaska and sections of the Siberian Rivers including the Lena, the Kolyma and the Indigirka Rivers. Comparisons of river location at successive intervals in time were conducted using Landsat imagery archives and higher resolution aerial photographs and satellite imagery. Extraction of river channel locations was accomplished using the GeniePro automated feature extraction software. Over the period of Landsat coverage (mid-1980s to present) arctic rivers show limited to no movement at the resolution of the Landsat data (30 m per pixel). On the Yukon Flats regions of the Yukon River, the most mobile sections of the river have migration rates comparable to reach-average values reported for temperate rivers; given that large portions of the Yukon display no detectable movement, reach-averaged values are far less than observed in temperate systems. Field inspection of areas of high erosion along the Yukon River indicate that erosional processes associated with the thermal degradation of permafrost play a dominant role in many of these areas. Thermal niching and large scale bank collapse due to undercutting play a large role in bank erosion

  17. 76 FR 22033 - Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AAOO Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN AGENCY... Safety Unit Duluth, MN is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Red River, MN. This safety zone is... entering all navigable waters of the Red River in the State of Minnesota north of a line drawn...

  18. Rivers Run Through It: Discovering the Interior Columbia River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shelley; Wojtanik, Brenda Lincoln; Rieben, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Explores the Columbia River Basin, its ecosystems, and challenges faced by natural resource managers. By studying the basin's complexity, students can learn about common scientific concepts such as the power of water and effects of rain shadows. Students can also explore social-scientific issues such as conflicts between protecting salmon runs and…

  19. Setting targets in strategies for river restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroli, B.; De Blust, Geert; Van Looy, Kris; Rooij, S. van

    2006-01-01

    Since about 90% of the natural floodplain area of rivers in Europe has been reclaimed and now lacks river dynamics, nature rehabilitation along rivers is of crucial importance for the restoration of their natural function. Flood protection, self-purification of surface water, groundwater recharge, species protection and migration are all involved in this process. It is now generally recognised that rivers form natural arteries in Europe but are also of economic importance and are recognisable...

  20. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  1. The River Dart SAP Consultation Document

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This is the River Dart Salmon Action Plan Consultation document produced by the Environment Agency in 2003. The report pays attention on the external consultation of the River Dart Salmon Action Plan (SAP). This strategy represents an entirely new approach to salmon management within the UK and introduces the concept of river-specific salmon spawning targets as a salmon management tool. The north of the River Dart catchment is included in the Dartmoor candidate Special Area of Conservation (c...

  2. Economics of Yams Production in Rivers State

    OpenAIRE

    Esor, Prince. B; Okidim, I. A

    2015-01-01

    This research work was on the economics of yam production in Rivers State. The objectives of the study were: estimating the production function of yam in Rivers State using cob-Douglas production, determining the marginal physical product (mpp) of labour and capital, determine the optimum level of inputs required for attaining the optimum in yam production in Rivers State and determining the marginal Rate of Technical substitution (MRTS) of labour for capital in Rivers State. Methodology: Ana...

  3. The Economics of Transboundary River Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ansink, Erik; Houba, Harold

    2014-01-01

    We survey the economics of transboundary river water allocation, which emerged in the 1960s and has matured over the last decade due to increasing concerns over water scarcity and pollution. We outline the major approaches and pay specific attention to the strategic aspects of transboundary river water allocation. These strategic aspects are captured by employing game theory to assess the economics of transboundary river water allocation in a simple model of river sharing. This model allows u...

  4. RiverCare: towards self-sustaining multifunctional rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustijn, Denie; Schielen, Ralph; Hulscher, Suzanne

    2014-05-01

    Rivers are inherently dynamic water systems involving complex interactions among hydrodynamics, morphology and ecology. In many deltas around the world lowland rivers are intensively managed to meet objectives like safety, navigation, hydropower and water supply. With the increasing pressure of growing population and climate change it will become even more challenging to reach or maintain these objectives and probably also more demanding from a management point of view. In the meantime there is a growing awareness that rivers are natural systems and that, rather than further regulation works, the dynamic natural processes should be better utilized (or restored) to reach the multifunctional objectives. Currently many integrated river management projects are initiated all over the world, in large rivers as well as streams. Examples of large scale projects in the Netherlands are 'Room for the River' (Rhine), the 'Maaswerken' (Meuse), the Deltaprogramme and projects originating from the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). These projects include innovative measures executed never before on this scale and include for example longitudinal training dams, side channels, removal of bank protection, remeandering of streams, dredging/nourishment and floodplain rehabilitation. Although estimates have been made on the effects of these measures for many of the individual projects, the overall effects on the various management objectives remains uncertain, especially if all projects are considered in connection. For all stakeholders with vested interests in the river system it is important to know how that system evolves at intermediate and longer time scales (10 to 100 years) and what the consequences will be for the various river functions. If the total, integrated response of the system can be predicted, the system may be managed in a more effective way, making optimum use of natural processes. In this way, maintenance costs may be reduced, the system remains more natural

  5. A Review of Integrated River Basin Management for Sarawak River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuok K. Kuok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Sarawak River was a life-sustaining water source for the residents in Kuching City and surrounding areas. Raw water is treated at Batu Kitang Water Treatment Plant (BKWTP that supplies more than 98% of the total water production in Kuching City. The raw water supply to BKWTP is not adequate to meet the ever increasing water demand. In order to overcome this problem, four projects had been implemented along Sarawak River for managing and securing water supply to BKWTP. Approach: These four projects are construction of 1.5m height storage weir across Sungai Sarawak Kiri river channel, Kuching Barrage and Shiplock, Bengoh Dam and Kuching Centralized Wastewater Management System (KCWMS. In 2005, 1.5 m height submersible weir was constructed across Sungai Sarawak Kiri channel for increasing the safe yield that can last until year 2010. Kuching Barrage and Shiplock were commissioned in 2000 as barrier to avoid the saline intrusion reaching upper catchment. 24 telemetry stations were installed along Sarawak River for monitoring and regulating the water level. This will preserve high quality water storage at upper catchment of Sarawak River. In year 2010, Bengoh Dam was constructed to ensure adequate raw water will be supplied to BKWTP for meeting the increasing water demand from 2010-2030. This reservoir will store 144 million m3 of fresh water covering reservoir area of 8.77km2. Beyond 2030, the water supply shall not depend solely on fresh water. Results: Black and grey water in Sarawak Catchment was treated through Kuching Centralized Wastewater Management System (KCWMS and recycled for daily used. Conclusion: The treated water that comply Standard A water quality, can distribute for domestic, industrial and irrigation used in nearest future. This will reduce the water demand solely on raw water and create a sustainable living in Kuching City. Beyond 2030, a few alternatives are also proposed for conserving and

  6. River as a part of ground battlefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vračar, Miodrag S.; Pokrajac, Ivan; Okiljević, Predrag

    2013-05-01

    The rivers are in some circumstances part of the ground battlefield. Microseisms induced at the riverbed or ground at the river surrounding might be consequence of military activities (military ground transports, explosions, troop's activities, etc). Vibrations of those fluid-solid structures are modeled in terms of solid displacement and change of fluid pressure. This time varying fluid pressure in river, which originates from ground microseisms, is possible to detect with hydrophones. Therefore, hydroacoustic measurements in rivers enables detecting, identification and localization various types of military noisy activities at the ground as and those, which origin is in the river water (hydrodynamics of water flow, wind, waves, river vessels, etc). In this paper are presented river ambient noise measurements of the three great rivers: the Danube, the Sava and the Tisa, which flows in north part of Serbia in purpose to establish limits in detection of the ground vibrations in relatively wide frequency range from zero to 20 kHz. To confirm statement that the river is a part of ground battlefield, and that hydroacoustic noise is possible to use in detecting and analyzing ground microseisms induced by civil or military activities, some previous collected data of hydroacoustic noise measurement in the rivers are used. The data of the river ambient noise include noise induced by civil engineering activities, that ordinary take place in large cities, noise that produced ships and ambient noise of the river when human activities are significantly reduced. The poly spectral method was used in analysis such events.

  7. Lynne Cherry's "A River Ran Wild."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Carolyn; Brent, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    Paraphrases the book "A River Ran Wild" by Lynne Cherry, contrasts how Native American and European settlers use a river, and discusses the pollution and cleanup of the river. Provides classroom discussion questions, and individual or group activities in language arts, art, role-playing, geography, and interviewing. Includes an annotated…

  8. The science and practice of river restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen; Lane, Stuart N.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2015-08-01

    River restoration is one of the most prominent areas of applied water-resources science. From an initial focus on enhancing fish habitat or river appearance, primarily through structural modification of channel form, restoration has expanded to incorporate a wide variety of management activities designed to enhance river process and form. Restoration is conducted on headwater streams, large lowland rivers, and entire river networks in urban, agricultural, and less intensively human-altered environments. We critically examine how contemporary practitioners approach river restoration and challenges for implementing restoration, which include clearly identified objectives, holistic understanding of rivers as ecosystems, and the role of restoration as a social process. We also examine challenges for scientific understanding in river restoration. These include: how physical complexity supports biogeochemical function, stream metabolism, and stream ecosystem productivity; characterizing response curves of different river components; understanding sediment dynamics; and increasing appreciation of the importance of incorporating climate change considerations and resiliency into restoration planning. Finally, we examine changes in river restoration within the past decade, such as increasing use of stream mitigation banking; development of new tools and technologies; different types of process-based restoration; growing recognition of the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in rivers; increasing expectations of water quality improvements from restoration; and more effective communication between practitioners and river scientists.

  9. 33 CFR 117.189 - Sacramento River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sacramento River. 117.189 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.189 Sacramento River. (a) The draws of each bridge from Isleton to American River junction shall open on signal from May 1...

  10. 33 CFR 117.175 - Mokelumne River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mokelumne River. 117.175 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.175 Mokelumne River. (a) The draw of the California Department of Transportation highway bridge, the Mokelumne River Bridge, mile 3.0,...

  11. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  12. 33 CFR 117.359 - Chattahoochee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chattahoochee River. 117.359... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.359 Chattahoochee River. See § 117.107, Chattahoochee River, listed under Alabama....

  13. 33 CFR 117.337 - Trout River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trout River. 117.337 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.337 Trout River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Trout River, mile 0.9 at Jacksonville, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  14. 33 CFR 117.299 - Loxahatchee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loxahatchee River. 117.299... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.299 Loxahatchee River. The draw of the Florida East Coast Railway bridge across the Loxahatchee River, mile 1.2 at Jupiter, operates as...

  15. 33 CFR 117.291 - Hillsborough River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hillsborough River. 117.291... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.291 Hillsborough River. (a) The... the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Hillsborough River, mile 0.7, at Tampa, operates as follows:...

  16. 33 CFR 117.258 - Apalachicola River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apalachicola River. 117.258... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.258 Apalachicola River. The draw of the CSX Railroad bridge, mile 105.9, at River Junction shall open on signal Monday through Friday from 8...

  17. 33 CFR 117.391 - Chicago River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chicago River. 117.391 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.391 Chicago River. The draws of the bridges operated by the City of Chicago over the Main Branch of Chicago River, the bridges on the...

  18. 33 CFR 117.300 - Manatee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manatee River. 117.300 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.300 Manatee River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Manatee River, mile 4.5 Bradenton, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  19. 33 CFR 117.593 - Chelsea River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chelsea River. 117.593 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.593 Chelsea River. All drawbridges across the Chelsea River shall open on signal. The opening signal for each drawbridge is two...

  20. 33 CFR 117.531 - Piscataqua River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Piscataqua River. 117.531 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.531 Piscataqua River. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across the Piscataqua River: (1) Public vessels of the United...

  1. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  2. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  3. 33 CFR 117.333 - Suwannee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suwannee River. 117.333 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.333 Suwannee River. The draw of Suwannee River bridge, mile 35 at Old Town need not be opened for the passage of vessels, however, the draw...

  4. 33 CFR 117.397 - Wabash River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wabash River. 117.397 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.397 Wabash River. The draws of the bridges across the Wabash River need not be opened for the passage of vessels. Indiana...

  5. 33 CFR 117.183 - Old River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Old River. 117.183 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.183 Old River. The draw of the California... notice is given to the drawtender at the Rio Vista bridge across the Sacramento River, mile 12.8....

  6. 33 CFR 117.570 - Sassafras River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sassafras River. 117.570 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.570 Sassafras River. The draw of the Sassafras River (Route 213) bridge, mile 10.0 at Georgetown, Maryland, shall open on signal; except...

  7. 33 CFR 117.171 - Middle River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Middle River. 117.171 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.171 Middle River. (a) The draw of the San..., mile 9.8 near Middle River Station, shall open on signal if at least 12 hours notice is given to...

  8. 33 CFR 117.424 - Belle River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Belle River. 117.424 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.424 Belle River. The draw of the S70 bridge, mile 23.8 (Landside Route) near Belle River, shall open on signal; except that, from 10 p.m. to 6...

  9. Multi-National River Basin Cooperation and Management Case Study: Senegal River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Ayaa, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    With increasing populations, urbanization and thus increasing demand for water, conflict on International River basins has been increasing over the years which has necessitated formation of International River frameworks to devise means of cooperation among the countries sharing the river basins. The main modes of cooperation in international river basins include allocating the waters of the river to the sharing countries such that each country manages its own water resources, or treating the...

  10. Eutrophication of lakes and rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eutrophication is an ecological process, akin to aging, in which a water body is increasingly enriched with organic matter. While the most obvious signs of eutrophication in lakes and rivers involve algal blooms and fish kills, the systemic of eutrophication, although profound, are often not as noti...

  11. Phytoplankton of the Tisa River

    OpenAIRE

    Ržaničanin Ana M.; Cvijan Mirko V.; Krizmanić Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of the Tisa River phytoplankton community was carried out directly after the cyanide spill in 2000. The investigation took place near Bečej from February of 2000 to January of 2001. We observed 374 taxa from eight algal divisions. The highest biodiversity was recorded among the divisions Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta.

  12. Phytoplankton of the Tisa River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ržaničanin Ana M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the Tisa River phytoplankton community was carried out directly after the cyanide spill in 2000. The investigation took place near Bečej from February of 2000 to January of 2001. We observed 374 taxa from eight algal divisions. The highest biodiversity was recorded among the divisions Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta.

  13. River water quality modelling: II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanahan, P.; Henze, Mogens; Koncsos, L.;

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. EPA QUAL2E model is currently the standard for river water quality modelling. While QUAL2E is adequate for the regulatory situation for which it was developed (the U.S. wasteload allocation process), there is a need for a more comprehensive framework for research and teaching. Moreover...

  14. Stochastic modelling of river morphodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vuren, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    Modern river management has to reconcile a number of functions, such as protection against floods and provision of safe and efficient navigation, floodplain agriculture, ecology and recreation. Knowledge on uncertainty in fluvial processes is important to make this possible, to design effective rive

  15. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km2 Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal

  16. Object-oriented river system simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an object-oriented approach to river basin simulation modeling that is event driven rather than time driven as are most river system simulation models. At the heart of this method are autonomous software objects which replicate the physical behavior of the components of an actual river system (Colorado River). These objects react to stimuli (changing values of their inputs, outputs or state) in much the same way as do the analogous components of the actual river. The simulation of river systems is the result of the coordinated actions, in any order, of the various objects representing the entities within the system. An object-oriented approach to modeling a river has a number of characteristics that make it worthy of consideration. The model's architecture makes it especially suited to graphic user interfaces and database operations. It allows the easy integration of artificial intelligence techniques that can aid in expressing complex policies governing system operation

  17. Research on the river function regionalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objectives, principles, classification system, zoning method and procedure of river function region-alization were investigated systematically based on the present status of modern river regulation and function requirement. Considering the ecosystem continuity and river function integrality, a river is suggested to be divided into five function zones: ecological protection zone, habitat restoration zone, exploitation and utilization zone, buffer zone,and transition zone, based on the developed intensity and the function characteristics of the river. In this paper, not only the five function zones were described qualitatively, but also the quantitative examination method on how to identify their function zone types was given. A double-criterion partitioning scheme was proposed according to the functional zoning diagram constructed by the evaluation of the social and ecological function of rivers. Finally, the procedures of river function regionalization were shown.

  18. Elwha River Restoration: Sediment Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrel, S.; Bountry, J.; Randle, T. J.; Ritchie, A.; Huginin, H.; Torrance, A.

    2013-12-01

    The removal of Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams on the Elwha River relies on controlled reservoir drawdown increments and natural river flows to erode and redistribute the reservoir sediment, estimated to be a total of 23 (× 3) million m3. To mitigate for the predicted sediment effects, facilities have been constructed for water quality and flood protection. A sediment monitoring program is being implemented by an interdisciplinary team from Reclamation and National Park Service to integrate real-time measurements with continually updated numerical model predictions. The most recent numerical reservoir modeling and monitoring results indicate about 20 to 25 percent of the reservoir sediment has been released since the start of dam removal. Monitoring results in 2012 and early 2013 confirmed that controlled reservoir drawdown increments have induced sufficient vertical and lateral erosion of delta surfaces behind both dams. Predam channel and floodplain surface has been exposed in numerous portions of Lake Aldwell, with the release of coarse and fine sediment in the first few pools below Elwha Dam. The material released from Lake Aldwell has included organic material. With the removal of about three quarters of Glines Canyon Dam and the disappearance of Lake Mills, coarse bedload sediment has been continually released into the downstream river since late fall 2012. Field measurements and numerical modeling are being used to track the progression of the sediment wave downstream to the Elwha River mouth. Initial findings are that the aggradation was greatest immediately downstream of Glines Canyon Dam, and filled pools and transformed river planform from step-pool to glide for most of the 7 mile reach between Lake Mills and Lake Aldwell. Although there has not been a major flood, winter flows and spring snowmelt have significantly reworked the released sediment and remnants of the pre-sediment release pools and rapids have re-emerged. Large wood and organics have also

  19. Large-scale river regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent concern over human impacts on the environment has tended to focus on climatic change, desertification, destruction of tropical rain forests, and pollution. Yet large-scale water projects such as dams, reservoirs, and inter-basin transfers are among the most dramatic and extensive ways in which our environment has been, and continues to be, transformed by human action. Water running to the sea is perceived as a lost resource, floods are viewed as major hazards, and wetlands are seen as wastelands. River regulation, involving the redistribution of water in time and space, is a key concept in socio-economic development. To achieve water and food security, to develop drylands, and to prevent desertification and drought are primary aims for many countries. A second key concept is ecological sustainability. Yet the ecology of rivers and their floodplains is dependent on the natural hydrological regime, and its related biochemical and geomorphological dynamics. (Author)

  20. Constructing river stage-discharge rating curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feifei; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing from satellites and airborne platforms provides valuable data for monitoring and gauging river discharge. One effective approach first estimates river stage from satellite-measured inundation area based on the inundation area-river stage relationship (IARSR), and then the estimated river stage is used to compute river discharge based on the stage-discharge rating (SDR) curve. However, this approach is difficult to implement because of a lack of data for constructing the SDR curves. This study proposes a new method to construct the SDR curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry. The proposed method was tested over a river reach between two USGS gauging stations, i.e., Kingston Mines (KM) and Copperas Creek (CC) along the Illinois River. First a polygon over each of two cross sections was defined. A complete IARSR curve was constructed inside each polygon using digital elevation model (DEM) and river bathymetric data. The constructed IARSR curves were then used to estimate 47 river water surface elevations at each cross section based on 47 river inundation areas estimated from Landsat TM images collected during 1994-2002. The estimated water surface elevations were substituted into an objective function formed by the Bernoulli equation of gradually varied open channel flow. A nonlinear global optimization scheme was applied to solve the Manning's coefficient through minimizing the objective function value. Finally the SDR curve was constructed at the KM site using the solved Manning's coefficient, channel cross sectional geometry and the Manning's equation, and employed to estimate river discharges. The root mean square error (RMSE) in the estimated river discharges against the USGS measured river discharges is 112.4 m3/s. To consider the variation of the Manning's coefficient in the vertical direction, this study also suggested a power-law function to describe the vertical decline of the Manning

  1. Clinical cytogenetics in river buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zicarelli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available While autosomal numeric chromosome abnormalities are phenotipically visible (abnormal body conformation and easily eliminated during the normal breeding selection, sex numeric abnormalities (including the cases of free-martinism, as well as the structural chromosome aberrations, especially the balanced ones, are more tolerate by the animals (normal body conformation but are often responsible of low fertility (structural abnormalities or sterility (sex chromosome aberrations, especially in the females. Although river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, 2n=50 chromosomes have been characterized......

  2. DYNAMIC RESOURCES OF RIVER SEDIMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George GERGOV; Tzviatka KARAGIOZOVA

    2005-01-01

    The currently enforced Bulgarian water legislation [the Water Act (1999),the Environmental Protection Act (2002),etc.] requires conducting special studies for accurate assessments of sand and gravel flux along the rivers,prior to the issue of the license for operation of the quarries,where they will be dredged. The activity of a quarry necessitates special investigations because of the large dimensions of the damages inflicted on the environment. Ours studies have shown that there are two types of river reaches,in which abstracion of sand and gravel is performed. The first one refers usually to the plain area river reaches. The other type is mountainous with high rate of sediment load,which consists of coarse solid matter. The "on-the-spot" study on the environmental impact of the sand and gravel dredging has revealed that in the area of the quarry the riverbed cuts into the alluvial sediments to about 6-7 m and this ditch has spread by attenuation at a distance of more than 25 km upstream. Downstream the pit the picture is replicated and at the 8th km a local scour on the riverbed,amounting to more than 1.80 - 2.00 m,has been measured near the foundation of a massive bridge in the centre of city of Plovdiv. Such assessments of dynamic resources of sand and gravel materials are expected to serve for the purposes of gradual limitation of this activity in river sections close to renewable resources. The amount of sediment load,which may be abstracted in the area of the Orizare quarry in Bulgaria on a yearly basis has been calculated as 6000 m3/a. It ensures that the resources will not be exhausted and irreversible distortion of the riverbed will be prevented. This is an environmentally safe limit.

  3. Modeling Water Quality in Rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Liren Yu; N. N.B. Salvador

    2005-01-01

    This study reports a PC software, used in a Windows-based environment, which was developed based on the first order reaction of Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) and a modified Streeter and Phelps equation, in order to simulate and determine the variations of Dissolved Oxygen (DO) and of the BOD along with the studied river reaches. The software considers many impacts of environmental factors, such as the different type of discharges (concentrated or punctual source, tributary contribution, dist...

  4. Raft River geoscience case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  5. Relationship to the River: The Case of the Muar River Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahaman A. Samah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Muar River which located in Johor, is an important river in Malaysia. Previously Muar River had a huge influence on the socio-economic status of the community. It has been used as the sources of income, protein and as well as the major mode of transportation for the community and traders. However, does the Muar River still has that influences on this modern day? The answer of this pertinent question will fulfill the main objective of this study which is to discover Muar River relationship with its surrounding community. Approach: In addition to relationship with the river, this quantitative study was conducted to determine the Muar River community agreement towards initiative to develop the river. A total of 300 respondents from 19 villages along Muar River were selected based on the simple random sampling. Results: Based on the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that Muar River still has a lot to offer to its surrounding community especially for the recreational activities (fish and prawn fishing. A large majority of Muar River community have a moderate and high level of agreement towards the river development. Further analysis performed revealed that income per month, number of household, age, distance to Muar River and period of staying in the areas had significant relationships with agreement towards river development. Conclusion/Recommendations: It is recommended that additional recreational facilities can be added, events at national and international level especially on fish and prawn fishing can be held at Muar River and campaign on the importance of river development and the danger of river pollution can be conducted.

  6. Decline of radionuclides in Columbia River biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1971, the last of nine plutonium production reactors using direct discharge of once-through cooling waters into the Columbia River was closed. Sampling was initiated at three stations on the Columbia River to document the decline of the radionuclide body burdens in the biota of the Columbia River ecosystem. The data show that in a river-reservoir complex, the measurable body burden of fission-produced radionuclides decreased to essentially undetectable levels within 18 to 24 mo after cessation of discharge of once-through cooling water into the river. On the basis of data from the free-flowing station, we believe that this decrease would be even more rapid in an unimpounded river

  7. Updating river basin models with radar altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailovsky, Claire Irene B.

    -applications include the impact analysis of planned hydraulic structures or land use changes and the predicted impact of climate change on water availability. One of the obstacles hydrologists face in setting up river basin models is data availability, whether because the datasets needed do not exist or because of....... Many types of RS are now routinely used to set up and drive river basin models. One of the key hydrological state variables is river discharge. It is typically the output of interest for water allocation applications and is also widely used as a source of calibration data as it presents the integrated...... response of a catchment to meteorological forcing. While river discharge cannot be directly measured from space, radar altimetry (RA) can measure water level variations in rivers at the locations where the satellite ground track and river network intersect called virtual stations or VS. In this PhD study...

  8. Home on the Big River, Part II: Great River Habitat Quality Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    USEPA’s EMAP sampled the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers from 2004 through 2006 as part of an integrated assessment of ecological condition. These Great Rivers are important human recreational destinations and transportation corridors, and represent significant wild...

  9. Field Plot Points for New River Gorge National River Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This data set contains point features which represent locations of vegetation sampling plots in the New River Gorge National River. Location coordinates for most...

  10. Color Infrared Orthorectified Photomosaic Leaf-off for New River Gorge National River Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Orthorectified color infrared ERDAS IMAGINE and MrSID image of New River Gorge National River (final_neri_mosaic.img). Produced from 471 color infrared photos taken...

  11. Unalakleet Wild River, Alaska, a wild and scenic river analysis: Preliminary draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Unalakleet River and its immediate surroundings possess the qualities necessary for inclusion in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Provisions be made...

  12. Charley River and tributaries, Alaska, a wild and scenic river analysis: Preliminary draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Charley River, Alaska, and its principal tributaries possess values which qualify it for inclusion in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. The Charley...

  13. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Open River 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  14. 1890's Land Cover/Use - Mississippi River Commission Surveys, Open River 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In the late 1880's and early 1900's the Mississippi River Commission (MRC) conducted an extensive high-resolution survey of the Mississippi River from Cairo,...

  15. Creating a catchment perspective for river restoration

    OpenAIRE

    L. Benda; MILLER, D; J. Barquín

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tribu...

  16. Sequential sharing rules for river sharing problems

    OpenAIRE

    Ansink, Erik; Weikard, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the redistribution of a resource amongst agents who have claims to the resource and who are ordered linearly. A well known example of this particular situation is the river sharing problem. We exploit the linear order of agents to transform the river sharing problem to a sequence of two-agent river sharing problems. These reduced problems are mathematically equivalent to bankruptcy problems and can therefore be solved using any bankruptcy rule. Our proposed class of solutions, that...

  17. Protecting and Enhancing River and Stream Continuity

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Scott D.; Bowden, Alison; Graber, Brian

    2007-01-01

    As long linear ecosystems, rivers and streams are particularly vulnerable to fragmentation. There is growing concern about the role of road crossings – and especially culverts – in altering habitats and disrupting river and stream continuity. The River and Stream Continuity Project began in the year 2000 with a startup grant from the Massachusetts Watershed Initiative. The University of Massachusetts took the lead in convening a group of people from a variety of agencies and organizations who...

  18. Global phosphorus retention by river damming

    OpenAIRE

    Maavara, Taylor; Parsons, Christopher T.; Ridenour, Christine; Stojanovic, Severin; Dürr, Hans H.; Powley, Helen R.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for life. Humans have massively altered the global phosphorus cycle by increasing loading to river systems through fertilizer use, soil erosion, and wastewater discharges. River damming interacts with anthropogenic phosphorus enrichment by trapping a fraction of the phosphorus in reservoir sediments. We estimate that in 2000, 12% of the global river phosphorus load was retained in dam reservoirs. This fraction could increase to 17% by 2030, because of the c...

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF RIVER WATER EXCESSIVE POLLUTION SOURCES

    OpenAIRE

    K. J. KACHIASHVILI; D. I. MELIKDZHANIAN

    2006-01-01

    The program package for identification of river water excessive pollution sources located between two controlled cross-sections of the river is described in this paper. The software has been developed by the authors on the basis of mathematical models of pollutant transport in the rivers and statistical hypotheses checking methods. The identification algorithms were elaborated with the supposition that the pollution sources discharge different compositions of pollutants or (at the identical c...

  20. Sediment load reduction in Chinese rivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng LIU; Jueyi SUI; Zhao-Yin WANG

    2008-01-01

    In this Paper,the changes in the annual runoff and sediment transport have been assessed by using the long term observation data from 10 gauging stations on 10 large rivers across China from far north to far south.It is found that the annual sediment yield has generally had a decreasing trend in the past half century.According to the changes in annual runoff and the sediment yield per area.rivers in China can be classified into the following three groups:1)rivers with decreasing annual sediment transport and stable runoff:2)rivers with both decreasing annual sediment transport and runoff and 3)rivers with greatly reduced annual sediment transport and decreasing annual runoff.The results indicate that,in all southern rivers(to the south of the Huaihe River including the Huaihe River),there has been little change in average annual runoff but a dramatic decrease in annual sediment transport.In the northern rivers.however,both the annual sediment yield and the runoff show significant evidence of reduction.To further investigate the recent changes in annual runoff and sediment transport.the short-term observation data from these 10 gauging stations in the recent 10 years have been assessed.Results show that both the annual sediment transport and the runoff have decreased significantly in the northern rivers in the past 10 years.Using the Yellow River at the Lijin Station as an example,the average annual runoff for the last 10 years is only 1/3 of the long term average value and the average annual sediment yield of the last 10 years is only 1/4 of the long term average value.More unusually,in the Yongding River the annual sediment yield has approached zero and the runoff has decreased significantly.In addition,the impacts of human activities on the changes in both runoff and sediment transport have been discussed.

  1. Assessment of Missouri River floodplain invertebrates during historic inundation: implications for river restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Gosch N.J.C.; Miller M.L.; Dzialowski A.R.; Morris D.M.; Gemeinhardt T.R.; Bonneau J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Floodplain connectivity is important to aquatic organisms in large rivers. Anthropogenic alterations regulating the Missouri River have limited connectivity and negatively affected native fauna. Determining the biological response to rare inundation events may be important when considering potential restoration options on a regulated river; thus, we assessed benthic invertebrate and zooplankton communities at three floodplain sites during a historic Missouri River high-water event. Chironomid...

  2. Evaluation of Early Effects of the River Restoration Project in the Kamisaigo River Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Lopa, Rita Tahir

    2013-01-01

    The Kamisaigo River has been restored by the Fukutsu City Government to improve the environmental quality of the river. Many different restoration measures have already been applied but only few projects have been monitored and knowledge on the effects is still limited. Therefore, we conducted a study in the Kamisaigo River, Fukuoka Prefecture Japan. The Kamisaigo River mainstream is divided into six sections called restored sites and have been???installed different types of restoration appr...

  3. Radiotracer study off Haldia river buoy in Hooghly river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass powder labelled with radioactive scandium-46 was used as tracer to study the movement of sediment on the Hooghly river bed in the Port of Calcutta. Three detection programmes spread over three months indicated that the direction of sediment transport is towards south-west during the period of October-December '92. Countrate balance method was applied to quantitatively estimate the sediment discharge rate and is of the order of 215-250 kg/d per metre width of the bed. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. River Restoration Data in Lamoille County, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Documented river and riparian buffer restoration projects in Lamoille County, Vermont. Restoration includes buffer plantings (trees and shrubs), bank stabilization...

  5. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  6. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  7. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  8. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  9. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  10. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  11. Tritium hydrology of the Mississippi River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the early 1960s, the US Geological Survey began routinely analysing river water samples for tritium concentrations at locations within the Mississippi River basin. The sites included the main stem of the Mississippi River (at Luling Ferry, Louisiana), and three of its major tributaries, the Ohio River (at Markland Dam, Kentucky), the upper Missouri River (at Nebraska City, Nebraska) and the Arkansas River (near Van Buren, Arkansas). The measurements cover the period during the peak of the bomb-produced tritium transient when tritium concentrations in precipitation rose above natural levels by two to three orders of magnitude. Using measurements of tritium concentrations in precipitation, a tritium input function was established for the river basins above the Ohio River, Missouri River and Arkansas River sampling locations. Owing to the extent of the basin above the Luling Ferry site, no input function was developed for that location. The input functions for the Ohio and Missouri Rivers were then used in a two-component mixing model to estimate residence times of water within these two basins. (The Arkansas River was not modelled because of extremely large yearly variations in flow during the peak of the tritium transient.) The two components used were: (i) recent precipitation (prompt outflow) and (ii) waters derived from the long-term groundwater reservoir of the basin. The tritium concentration of the second component is a function of the atmospheric input and the residence times of the groundwaters within the basin. Using yearly time periods, the parameters of the model were varied until a best fit was obtained between modelled and measured tritium data. The results from the model indicate that about 40% of the flow in the Ohio River was from prompt outflow, as compared with 10% for the Missouri River. Mean residence times of 10 years were calculated for the groundwater component of the Ohio River versus 4 years for the Missouri River. The mass flux of

  12. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-04-01

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  13. Challenges of river basin management: Current status of, and prospects for, the River Danube from a river engineering perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habersack, Helmut; Hein, Thomas; Stanica, Adrian; Liska, Igor; Mair, Raimund; Jäger, Elisabeth; Hauer, Christoph; Bradley, Chris

    2016-02-01

    In the Danube River Basin multiple pressures affect the river system as a consequence of river engineering works, altering both the river hydrodynamics and morphodynamics. The main objective of this paper is to identify the effects of hydropower development, flood protection and engineering works for navigation on the Danube and to examine specific impacts of these developments on sediment transport and river morphology. Whereas impoundments are characterised by deposition and an excess of sediment with remobilisation of fine sediments during severe floods, the remaining five free flowing sections of the Danube are experiencing river bed erosion of the order of several centimetres per year. Besides the effect of interruption of the sediment continuum, river bed degradation is caused by an increase in the sediment transport capacity following an increase in slope, a reduction of river bed width due to canalisation, prohibition of bank erosion by riprap or regressive erosion following base level lowering by flood protection measures and sediment dredging. As a consequence, the groundwater table is lowered, side-arms are disconnected, instream structures are lost and habitat quality deteriorates affecting the ecological status of valuable floodplains. The lack of sediments, together with cutting off meanders, leads also to erosion of the bed of main arms in the Danube Delta and coastal erosion. This paper details the causes and effects of river engineering measures and hydromorphological changes for the Danube. It highlights the importance of adopting a basin-wide holistic approach to river management and demonstrates that past management in the basin has been characterised by a lack of integration. To-date insufficient attention has been paid to the wide-ranging impacts of river engineering works throughout the basin: from the basin headwaters to the Danube Delta, on the Black Sea coast. This highlights the importance of new initiatives that seek to advance knowledge

  14. 33 CFR 207.330 - Mississippi River between Winnibigoshish and Pokegama dams, Leech River between outlet of Leech...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mississippi River between Winnibigoshish and Pokegama dams, Leech River between outlet of Leech Lake and Mississippi River, and Pokegama... Winnibigoshish and Pokegama dams, Leech River between outlet of Leech Lake and Mississippi River, and...

  15. 33 CFR 207.10 - Charles River, Mass.; dam of Charles River Basin Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Charles River, Mass.; dam of Charles River Basin Commission. 207.10 Section 207.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.10 Charles River, Mass.; dam...

  16. Recent Record of the Neotropical River Otter (Lontra longicaudis in the Choluteca River Tegucigalpa, Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Aceituno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the presence of the Neotropical river otter (Lontra longicaudis in the Choluteca River, Tegucigalpa, Honduras. To date the information is the second record verifiable of the species in the Choluteca River since one in the 1940s.

  17. Quantifying the extent of river fragmentation by hydropower dams in the Sarapiqui River Basin, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elizabeth P.; Pringle, C.M.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    1. Costa Rica has recently experienced a rapid proliferation of dams for hydropower on rivers draining its northern Caribbean slope. In the Sarapiqui River Basin, eight hydropower plants were built between 1990 and 1999 and more projects are either under construction or proposed. The majority of these dams are small (hydropower development. This study was a first attempt to quantify the extent of river fragmentation by dams in the Sarapiqui River Basin. 3. Using simple spatial analyses, the length of river upstream from dams and the length of de-watered reaches downstream from dams was measured. Results indicated that there are currently 306.8 km of river (9.4% of the network) upstream from eight existing dams in the Sarapiqui River Basin and 30.6 km of rivers (0.9% of the network) with significantly reduced flow downstream from dams. Rivers upstream from dams primarily drain two life zones: Premontane Rain Forest (107.9km) and Lower Montane Rain Forest (168.2km). 4. Simple spatial analyses can be used as a predictive or planning tool for considering the effects of future dams in a basin-scale context. In the Sarapiqui River Basin, we recommend that future dam projects be constructed on already dammed rivers to minimize additional river fragmentation and to protect remaining riverine connectivity.

  18. 76 FR 24914 - Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River, Inc., Including Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River... Assistance on January 28, 2011, applicable to workers of Digital River Education Services, Inc., a division... on February 10, 2011 (76 FR 7587). At the request of the State agency, the Department reviewed...

  19. Reflections on Development Strategy of Pearl River Delta: In Comparison with Yangtze River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>1. A comparison between Pearl River Delta and Yangtze River Delta 1.1 Basic conditions 1.1.1 Location, area and scope Located in the southeast of Guangdong Province, the Pearl River Delta (PRD) as an economic zone is a compound delta

  20. Methodology for estimation of river discharge and applicationof the Zhujiang River Estuary (ZRE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENJay-Chung; WONGLai-Ah

    2004-01-01

    The ZRE is a very complicated estuary with multi-river inlets. The total sum of river discharge in the upstream(away from the tidal influence region) of the Zhujiang River can be easily measured. However, when the total river discharges into the estuary from eight inlets, it is a very difficult task to obtain a continuous river discharge flux data from each branch of the Zhujiang River. However, the different ratios of river discharges between the river branches can significantly affect the estuarine circulation feature and baroclinic process. Moreover, the accuracy of numerical forecast for the estuarine circulation is very much dependent on the accuracy of the time history of the river discharge flux for each branch. Therefore, it is important to estimate river discharge from each branch in order to improve the accuracy of the model forecast for the circulation of the ZRE. The development of a new estimation method of the river discharges is focused on based on the system identification theory, numerical modeling and the time history data from the CODAR observed sea surface current. The new approach has been appfied to estimating the time history (hourly) of river discharge from each branch in the upstream of the ZRE.

  1. Elk River Watershed - Flood Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. C.; Byrne, J. M.; MacDonald, R. J.; Lewis, D.

    2014-12-01

    Flooding has the potential to cause significant impacts to economic activities as well as to disrupt or displace populations. Changing climate regimes such as extreme precipitation events increase flood vulnerability and put additional stresses on infrastructure. Potential flooding from just under 100 (2009 NPRI Reviewed Facility Data Release, Environment Canada) toxic tailings ponds located in Canada increase risk to human safety and the environment. One such geotechnical failure spilt billions of litres of toxic tailings into the Fraser River watershed, British Columbia, when a tailings pond dam breach occurred in August 2014. Damaged and washed out roadways cut access to essential services as seen by the extensive floods that occurred in Saskatchewan and Manitoba in July 2014, and in Southern Alberta in 2013. Recovery efforts from events such as these can be lengthy, and have substantial social and economic impacts both in loss of revenue and cost of repair. The objective of this study is to investigate existing conditions in the Elk River watershed and model potential future hydrological changes that can increase flood risk hazards. By analyzing existing hydrology, meteorology, land cover, land use, economic, and settlement patterns a baseline is established for existing conditions in the Elk River watershed. Coupling the Generate Earth Systems Science (GENESYS) high-resolution spatial hydrometeorological model with flood hazard analysis methodology, high-resolution flood vulnerability base line maps are created using historical climate conditions. Further work in 2015 will examine possible impacts for a range of climate change and land use change scenarios to define changes to future flood risk and vulnerability.

  2. Consequence Analyses Following Potential Savannah River Site Hydrological Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-07-28

    Postulated accidental release of radiological material to surface water bodies on the Savannah River Site and the resulting downstream contamination of the Savannah River pose a potential threat to downstream river users.

  3. Savannah River Site dose control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) visited the Savannah River Site (SRS) as one of 12 facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). Their charter was to review, evaluate and summarize as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) techniques, methods and practices as implemented. This presentation gives an overview of the two selected ALARA practices implemented at the SRS: Administrative Exposure Limits and Goal Setting. These dose control methods are used to assure that individual and collective occupational doses are ALARA and within regulatory limits

  4. Pearls in Pearl River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Manman

    2009-01-01

    @@ When the Pearls in Pearl River Delta (PRD) is mentioned,Hong Kong will also naturally jump to people's mind.It must not only due to PRD's proximity with Hong Kong,but also due to Hong Kong s special role in the development of this region.Admittedly,Hong Kong really provided strong drive for the takeoff of the PRD Economic Zone.But with the prosperity of PRD,the nearly tailored combinations and complementarity have taken shape between Hong Kong and PRD,pushing the economy in the two areas to grow far more rapidly than otherwise.

  5. Decommissioning Experience: Chalk River, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has reported that work has continued on the decommissioning of old structures on the Chalk River laboratory site. An environmental assessment was approved in 2006 for the decommissioning of the NRX reactor fuel bays (A and B). The regulator approved two work packages for the removal of water and the wooden structure over the bays. The A bays were cleaned as far as possible and were emptied in 2007. Decontamination work will continue. Sections of the B bays were filled with sand and other parts filled with water. NRX is currently in storage (i.e. a dormant state) with surveillance. (author)

  6. Inundation risk for embanked rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupczewski, W. G.; Kochanek, K.; Bogdanowicz, E.; Markiewicz, I.

    2013-08-01

    The Flood Frequency Analysis (FFA) concentrates on probability distribution of peak flows of flood hydrographs. However, examination of floods that haunted and devastated the large parts of Poland lead us to revision of the views on the assessment of flood risk of Polish rivers. It turned out that flooding is caused not only by the overflow of the levee crest but also due to the prolonged exposure to high water on levees structure causing dangerous leaks and breaches that threaten their total destruction. This is because the levees are weakened by long-lasting water pressure and as a matter of fact their damage usually occurs after the culmination has passed the affected location. The probability of inundation is the total of probabilities of exceeding embankment crest by flood peak and the probability of washout of levees. Therefore, in addition to the maximum flow one should also consider the duration of high waters in a river channel. In the paper the new two-component model of flood dynamics: "Duration of high waters-Discharge Threshold-Probability of non-exceedance" (DqF), with the methodology of its parameter estimation was proposed as a completion to the classical FFA methods. Such a model can estimate the duration of stages (flows) of an assumed magnitude with a given probability of exceedance. The model combined with the technical evaluation of the probability of levee breaches due to the duration (d) of flow above alarm stage gives the annual probability of inundation caused by the embankment breaking. The results of theoretical investigation were illustrated by a practical example of the model implementation to the series of daily flow of the Vistula River at Szczucin. Regardless of promising results, the method of risk assessment due to prolonged exposure of levees to high water is still in its infancy despite its great cognitive potential and practical importance. Therefore, we would like to point out the need for and usefulness of the DqF model as

  7. Uncertainty of natural tracer methods for quantifying river-aquifer interaction in a large river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yueqing; Cook, Peter G.; Shanafield, Margaret; Simmons, Craig T.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of river-aquifer interaction is critical to the conjunctive management of surface water and groundwater, in particular in the arid and semiarid environment with much higher potential evapotranspiration than precipitation. A variety of natural tracer methods are available to quantify river-aquifer interaction at different scales. These methods however have only been tested in rivers with relatively low flow rates (mostly less than 5 m3 s-1). In this study, several natural tracers including heat, radon-222 and electrical conductivity were measured both on vertical riverbed profiles and on longitudinal river samples to quantify river-aquifer exchange flux at both point and regional scales in the Heihe River (northwest China; flow rate 63 m3 s-1). Results show that the radon-222 profile method can estimate a narrower range of point-scale flux than the temperature profile method. In particular, three vertical radon-222 profiles failed to estimate the upper bounds of plausible flux ranges. Results also show that when quantifying regional-scale river-aquifer exchange flux, the river chemistry method constrained the flux (5.20-10.39 m2 d-1) better than the river temperature method (-100 to 100 m2 d-1). The river chemistry method also identified spatial variability of flux, whereas the river temperature method did not have sufficient resolution. Overall, for quantifying river-aquifer exchange flux in a large river, both the temperature profile method and the radon-222 profile method provide useful complementary information at the point scale to complement each other, whereas the river chemistry method is recommended over the river temperature method at the regional scale.

  8. Environmental Ethics in River Water Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Moorthy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Environmental ethics concerns human beings’ ethical relationship with the natural environment. The fundamental question regarding environmental ethics is basically-what moral obligations do we have concerning the natural environment? The main objective of this study is to examine the extent environmental ethics manifest in river management. The study employs the case study of Malaysia's Gombak River-one of the most polluted urban rivers that run through some heavily inhabited urban areas. The study examines how the Department of Environment (DOE, Drainage and Irrigation Department (DID and Selayang Municipal Council (MPS manage the problem of pollution in the Gombak River. Approach: This study uses both quantitative and qualitative analysis. A quantitative approach is employed to assess the water quality in several points along Gombak River. This is done by way of series of scientific testing to determine the level of pollution in the river. Secondly, a qualitative approach is applied on the data gathered through expert interviews on inter-agency coordination efforts to manage pollution problems. Results: The study firstly shows that the Gombak River is considerably polluted, with higher levels of pollution in upstream as compared to the downstream. The second finding suggests that notwithstanding several legislations that are already in place, there is sluggishness in the enforcement of pollution mitigation efforts as a result of ineffective inter-agency communication and coordination. Conclusion: The lack of concerted and coordinated efforts between river management agencies have been cited as one of the main factors contributing to river pollution. Therefore, the agencies concerned should embark on cohesive measures to ensure the rivers are managed well and its water quality controlled. This requires for a structured coordination mechanism between agencies to be put in place and such mechanism can be emulated in the

  9. River Surface Velocity Fields Observed From Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääb, A.; Prowse, T. D.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of water-surface velocities in rivers is useful for understanding a wide range of lotic processes and systems, such as water and ice fluxes and forces, mixing, solute and sediment transport, bed and bank stability, aquatic and riparian ecology, and extreme hydrologic events. In cold regions, river-ice break up and the associated downstream transport of ice debris is often the most important hydrological event of the year, producing flood levels that commonly exceed those for the open-water period and dramatic consequences for river infrastructure and ecology. Quantification of river surface velocity and currents has relied mostly on very scarce in situ measurements or particle tracking in laboratory models, with few attempts to cover entire river reaches. Accurate and complete surface-velocity fields on rivers have rarely been produced. In this study, we use river-ice debris as an index of surface water velocity, and track it over a time period of about one minute, which is the typical time lapse between the two or more images that form a stereo data set in spaceborne, along-track optical-stereo mapping. Using this novel approach, we measure and visualize for the first time the almost complete two-dimensional surface velocity fields over many tens of kilometers long river reaches. We present the types of short time-delay imagery suitable for the measurements and discuss application examples on a number of North-American (e.g. Figs. 1 and 2) and Siberian rivers, using a range of high and medium resolution imagery. The methodology and results of the novel approach will be valuable to a number of disciplines requiring detailed information about river flow, such as hydraulics, hydrology, river ecology and natural-hazard management.

  10. Human impacts on river water quality- comparative research in the catchment areas of the Tone River and the Mur River-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, K.

    2013-12-01

    Human activities in river basin affect river water quality as water discharges into river with pollutant after we use it. By detecting pollutants source, pathway, and influential factor of human activities, it will be possible to consider proper river basin management. In this study, material flow analysis was done first and then nutrient emission modeling by MONERIS was conducted. So as to clarify land use contribution and climate condition, comparison of Japanese and European river basin area has been made. The model MONERIS (MOdelling Nutrient Emissions in RIver Systems; Behrendt et al., 2000) was applied to estimate the nutrient emissions in the Danube river basin by point sources and various diffuse pathways. Work for the Mur River Basin in Austria was already carried out by the Institute of Water Quality, Resources and Waste Management at the Vienna University of Technology. This study treats data collection, modelling for the Tone River in Japan, and comparative analysis for these two river basins. The estimation of the nutrient emissions was carried out for 11 different sub catchment areas covering the Tone River Basin for the time period 2000 to 2006. TN emissions into the Tone river basin were 51 kt/y. 67% was via ground water and dominant for all sub catchments. Urban area was also important emission pathway. Human effect is observed in urban structure and agricultural activity. Water supply and sewer system make urban water cycle with pipeline structure. Excess evapotranspiration in arable land is also influential in water cycle. As share of arable land is 37% and there provides agricultural products, it is thought that N emission from agricultural activity is main pollution source. Assumption case of 10% N surplus was simulated and the result was 99% identical to the actual. Even though N surplus reduction does not show drastic impact on N emission, it is of importance to reduce excess of fertilization and to encourage effective agricultural activity

  11. River monitoring from satellite radar altimetry in the Zambezi River basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michailovsky, Claire Irene B.; McEnnis, S.; Berry, P. A. M.;

    2012-01-01

    Satellite radar altimetry can be used to monitor surface water levels from space. While current and past altimetry missions were designed to study oceans, retracking the waveforms returned over land allows data to be retrieved for smaller water bodies or narrow rivers. The objective of this study...... is the assessment of the potential for river monitoring from radar altimetry in terms of water level and discharge in the Zambezi River basin. Retracked Envisat altimetry data were extracted over the Zambezi River basin using a detailed river mask based on Landsat imagery. This allowed for stage measurements...

  12. THE FORMING CONDITIONS OF ALLUVIAL RIVER CHANNEL PATTERNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu QI; Gouting LIANG; Zangying SUN; Honghai QI

    2002-01-01

    In normal fluvial processes the river channel is determined by river flows while the movement of river flows is contained by river channels. The relationship between the river morphology and its bend curvature shows that rivers with large bend curvatures always have narrow and deep channels and those with shallow and wide channels are always straight. The plan form of a river reaches is determined by the cross-sectional morphology. A meandering river reach may be developed under various water-sediment conditions as long as the narrow and deep channels are formed.

  13. 33 CFR 117.755 - Shrewsbury River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shrewsbury River. 117.755 Section 117.755 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.755 Shrewsbury River. (a) The...

  14. 33 CFR 117.1095 - Root River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Root River. 117.1095 Section 117.1095 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Wisconsin § 117.1095 Root River. (a) The draw of the Main...

  15. Experimental meandering river with chute cutoffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, W.M. van; Lageweg, W.I. van de; Kleinhans, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Braided rivers are relatively simple to produce in the laboratory, whereas dynamic meandering rivers have not been sustained beyond initial bend formation. Meandering is theoretically explained by bend instability growing from planimetric perturbation, which convects downstream. In this study, we ex

  16. Environmental protection in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of a series of articles on the work of the Office of the Supervising Scientist for the Alligator Rivers Region (OSS) and its Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute (ARRRI), this discusses the environmental protection function of the OSS and the role of the ARRRI in achieving this

  17. 33 CFR 117.773 - Buffalo River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo River. 117.773 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.773 Buffalo River. (a) The draw of the Michigan Avenue bridge, mile 1.3, at Buffalo, shall operate as follows: (1) From March 22 through...

  18. Red River Basin Mapping 2008-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This LiDAR data covers the Red River Basin with portions of ND, MN, SD and flows into Canada. The US Red River Basin boudnary covers 40,860 sqmi,with the additional...

  19. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M

    1999-06-09

    The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

  20. 33 CFR 117.263 - Banana River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Banana River. 117.263 Section 117.263 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.263 Banana River. (a) The draw of the Mathers...

  1. 129I in the Ob river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was: 1) to determine 129I concentrations in the Ob river, and 2) to determine 129I concentrations in surficial sediments in the river. Some results from the study are summarized in the present paper. 5 refs., 3 figs

  2. 33 CFR 117.703 - Bass River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bass River. 117.703 Section 117.703 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.703 Bass River. The draw of the U.S. 9...

  3. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program

  4. 33 CFR 117.107 - Chattahoochee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chattahoochee River. 117.107 Section 117.107 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.107 Chattahoochee River. The draws...

  5. 33 CFR 117.486 - Pearl River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pearl River. 117.486 Section 117.486 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.486 Pearl River. (a) The draw of the...

  6. 33 CFR 117.135 - Red River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red River. 117.135 Section 117.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.135 Red River. The draws of the bridges...

  7. 33 CFR 117.527 - Kennebunk River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... board gages in accordance with 33 CFR 118.160, of this chapter. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kennebunk River. 117.527 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.527 Kennebunk River. The Dock...

  8. 33 CFR 117.131 - Little River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Little River. 117.131 Section 117.131 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.131 Little River. The draws of the...

  9. 33 CFR 117.523 - Back River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Back River. 117.523 Section 117.523 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.523 Back River. The draw of the Maine Department...

  10. 33 CFR 117.217 - Norwalk River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Norwalk River. 117.217 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.217 Norwalk River. (a) The draw of.... to 12 p.m., on the first Saturday in December, to facilitate the running of the annual Norwalk...

  11. 33 CFR 117.109 - Coosa River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coosa River. 117.109 Section 117.109 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.109 Coosa River. The draw of the...

  12. 33 CFR 117.491 - Red River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red River. 117.491 Section 117.491 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.491 Red River. (a) The draw of the Union...

  13. 33 CFR 117.121 - Arkansas River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arkansas River 117.121 Section 117.121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.121 Arkansas River The draw of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.567 - Patuxent River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Patuxent River. 117.567 Section 117.567 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.567 Patuxent River. The draw of...

  15. 33 CFR 117.139 - White River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false White River. 117.139 Section 117.139 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.139 White River. (a) The draws of the St....

  16. 33 CFR 117.187 - Petaluma River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Petaluma River. 117.187 Section 117.187 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.187 Petaluma River. (a) The draws...

  17. 33 CFR 117.365 - Oconee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oconee River. 117.365 Section 117.365 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.365 Oconee River. The draw of the SR46...

  18. 33 CFR 117.319 - Oklawaha River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oklawaha River. 117.319 Section 117.319 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.319 Oklawaha River. (a) The draw of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.575 - Susquehanna River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Susquehanna River. 117.575 Section 117.575 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.575 Susquehanna River. The draw of...

  20. 33 CFR 117.480 - Mermentau River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mermentau River. 117.480 Section 117.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.480 Mermentau River. The draw of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.389 - Calumet River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calumet River. 117.389 Section 117.389 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.389 Calumet River. The draws of...

  2. 33 CFR 80.715 - Savannah River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Savannah River. 80.715 Section 80.715 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.715 Savannah River. A line drawn from...

  3. 33 CFR 117.423 - Atchafalaya River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atchafalaya River. 117.423 Section 117.423 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.423 Atchafalaya River. The draw of...

  4. 33 CFR 117.381 - Clearwater River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearwater River. 117.381 Section 117.381 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Idaho § 117.381 Clearwater River. The draws of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.127 - Current River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Current River. 117.127 Section 117.127 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.127 Current River. The draws of...

  6. 33 CFR 117.219 - Pequonnock River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pequonnock River. 117.219 Section 117.219 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.219 Pequonnock River. (a)...

  7. 33 CFR 117.588 - Bass River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bass River. 117.588 Section 117.588 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.588 Bass River. The Hall Whitaker...

  8. 33 CFR 117.551 - Chester River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chester River. 117.551 Section 117.551 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.551 Chester River. The draw of the...

  9. 33 CFR 117.361 - Flint River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flint River. 117.361 Section 117.361 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.361 Flint River. The draws of the...

  10. 33 CFR 117.205 - Connecticut River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecticut River. 117.205 Section 117.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.205 Connecticut River. (a)...

  11. 33 CFR 117.533 - Sheepscot River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sheepscot River. 117.533 Section 117.533 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.533 Sheepscot River. The draw of the...

  12. 33 CFR 117.503 - Tensas River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tensas River. 117.503 Section 117.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.503 Tensas River. The draws of the S15...

  13. 33 CFR 117.553 - Choptank River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Choptank River. 117.553 Section 117.553 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.553 Choptank River. (a) The draw of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.211 - Mystic River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mystic River. 117.211 Section 117.211 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.211 Mystic River. (a) The draw of the...

  15. 33 CFR 117.305 - Miami River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miami River. 117.305 Section 117.305 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.305 Miami River. (a) General. Public vessels...

  16. 33 CFR 117.457 - Houston River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Houston River. 117.457 Section 117.457 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.457 Houston River. The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.367 - Ogeechee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ogeechee River. 117.367 Section 117.367 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.367 Ogeechee River. (a) The draw of...

  18. 33 CFR 117.363 - Ocmulgee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ocmulgee River. 117.363 Section 117.363 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.363 Ocmulgee River. The draws of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.587 - Apponagansett River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apponagansett River. 117.587 Section 117.587 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.587 Apponagansett River. (a)...

  20. 33 CFR 117.525 - Kennebec River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kennebec River. 117.525 Section 117.525 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.525 Kennebec River. (a) The draw of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.473 - Little River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Little River. 117.473 Section 117.473 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.473 Little River. The draw of the Louisiana...

  2. 33 CFR 117.500 - Tchefuncta River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tchefuncta River. 117.500 Section 117.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.500 Tchefuncta River. The draw of...

  3. 33 CFR 117.295 - Kissimmee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kissimmee River. 117.295 Section 117.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.295 Kissimmee River. The draw of the...

  4. 33 CFR 117.215 - Niantic River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Niantic River. 117.215 Section 117.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.215 Niantic River. (a) The draw...

  5. 33 CFR 117.125 - Black River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black River. 117.125 Section 117.125 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.125 Black River. The following draws need not...

  6. 33 CFR 117.417 - Ohio River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ohio River. 117.417 Section 117.417 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.417 Ohio River. The draw of the Southern...

  7. 33 CFR 117.403 - Wabash River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wabash River. 117.403 Section 117.403 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Indiana § 117.403 Wabash River. See § 117.397, Wabash...

  8. 33 CFR 117.385 - Snake River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Snake River. 117.385 Section 117.385 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Idaho § 117.385 Snake River. The drawspan of the U.S. 12...

  9. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  10. 33 CFR 117.207 - Housatonic River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Housatonic River. 117.207 Section 117.207 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.207 Housatonic River. (a) The...

  11. 33 CFR 117.585 - Acushnet River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acushnet River. 117.585 Section 117.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.585 Acushnet River. (a)...

  12. 33 CFR 117.271 - Blackwater River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blackwater River. 117.271 Section 117.271 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.271 Blackwater River. The draw of...

  13. 33 CFR 117.415 - Green River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Green River. 117.415 Section 117.415 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kentucky § 117.415 Green River. (a) The draw of the...

  14. 33 CFR 117.483 - Ouachita River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ouachita River. 117.483 Section 117.483 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.483 Ouachita River. The draw of the...

  15. 33 CFR 117.529 - Narraguagus River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Narraguagus River. 117.529 Section 117.529 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.529 Narraguagus River. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.241 - Mispillion River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mispillion River. 117.241 Section 117.241 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Delaware § 117.241 Mispillion River. The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.369 - Satilla River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Satilla River. 117.369 Section 117.369 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.369 Satilla River. The draw of...

  18. 33 CFR 117.371 - Savannah River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Savannah River. 117.371 Section 117.371 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.371 Savannah River. (a) The draw of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.509 - Vermilion River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vermilion River. 117.509 Section 117.509 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.509 Vermilion River. (a) The draw...

  20. 33 CFR 117.253 - Anacostia River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anacostia River. 117.253 Section 117.253 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements District of Columbia § 117.253 Anacostia River....

  1. 33 CFR 117.113 - Tensaw River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tensaw River. 117.113 Section 117.113 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.113 Tensaw River. The draw of the...

  2. 33 CFR 117.245 - Smyrna River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smyrna River. 117.245 Section 117.245 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Delaware § 117.245 Smyrna River. The draw of the...

  3. 33 CFR 117.422 - Amite River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amite River. 117.422 Section 117.422 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.422 Amite River. (a) The draw of the S22...

  4. 33 CFR 117.569 - Pocomoke River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pocomoke River. 117.569 Section 117.569 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.569 Pocomoke River. (a) The...

  5. 33 CFR 117.351 - Altamaha River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Altamaha River. 117.351 Section 117.351 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.351 Altamaha River. (a) The draws of...

  6. 33 CFR 117.224 - Thames River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Thames River. 117.224 Section 117.224 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.224 Thames River. The draw of the...

  7. 33 CFR 117.141 - American River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false American River. 117.141 Section 117.141 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.141 American River. The draw of...

  8. 33 CFR 117.133 - Ouachita River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ouachita River. 117.133 Section 117.133 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.133 Ouachita River. The draw of the...

  9. 33 CFR 117.255 - Potomac River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potomac River. 117.255 Section 117.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements District of Columbia § 117.255 Potomac River. (a)...

  10. 33 CFR 117.427 - Black River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black River. 117.427 Section 117.427 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.427 Black River. The draw of the US84...

  11. 33 CFR 117.209 - Mianus River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mianus River. 117.209 Section 117.209 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.209 Mianus River. The draw of the...

  12. 33 CFR 117.493 - Sabine River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.493 Section 117.493 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.493 Sabine River. (a) The draw of the...

  13. 33 CFR 117.243 - Nanticoke River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nanticoke River. 117.243 Section 117.243 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Delaware § 117.243 Nanticoke River. (a) The draw...

  14. 33 CFR 117.221 - Saugatuck River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Saugatuck River. 117.221 Section 117.221 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.221 Saugatuck River. (a)...

  15. 33 CFR 117.313 - New River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New River. 117.313 Section 117.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.313 New River. (a) The draw of the SE....

  16. 33 CFR 117.565 - Miles River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miles River. 117.565 Section 117.565 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.565 Miles River. The draw of the Route...

  17. Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in river floodplains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miletto, M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis constitutes a pioneer attempt at elucidating the ecology of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in river floodplains. These are non-typical sulfate-reducing environmental settings, given the generally low sulfate concentration that characterize freshwater habitats, and river flow regulation tha

  18. Sea Otter, River Otter. The Wonder Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sandra Chisholm

    This curriculum guide is all about otters and provides information on both sea and river otters. Included are activities related to the diet of sea otters, the adaptations sea otters have made to live in the sea, their tool-using abilities, where they live and how to spot them, comparative anatomy of sea and river otters, and otter movement. The…

  19. Estimating the bankfull velocity and discharge for rivers using remotely sensed river morphology information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerklie, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    A method to estimate the bankfull velocity and discharge in rivers that uses the morphological variables of the river channel, including bankfull width, channel slope, and meander length was developed and tested. Because these variables can be measured remotely from topographic and river alignment information derived from aerial photos and satellite imagery, it is possible that the bankfull state of flow can be estimated for rivers entirely from remotely-sensed information. Defining the bankfull hydraulics of rivers would also provide a reference condition for remote tracking of dynamic variables including width, stage, and slope, and for quantifying relative change in flow conditions of rivers over large regions. This could provide a more efficient method to inventory and quantify river hydraulic attributes and dynamics.

  20. Sandbar-regulated hydrodynamic influences on river hydrochemistry at Mengabang Telipot River, Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Mei Kee; Sathiamurthy, Edlic; Suratman, Suhaimi; Tahir, Norhayati Mohd

    2012-12-01

    Influences of river hydrodynamic behaviours on hydrochemistry (salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen saturations and dissolved phosphorus) were evaluated through high spatial and temporal resolution study of a sandbar-regulated coastal river. River hydrodynamic during sandbar-closed event was characterized by minor dependency on tidal fluctuations, very gradual increase of water level and continual low flow velocity. These hydrodynamic behaviours established a hydrochemistry equilibrium, in which water properties generally were characterized by virtual absence of horizontal gradients while vertical stratifications were significant. In addition, the river was in high trophic status as algae blooms were visible. Conversely, river hydrodynamic in sandbar-opened event was tidal-controlled and showed higher flow velocity. Horizontal gradients of water properties became significant while vertically more homogenised and with lower trophic status. In essence, this study reveals that estuarine sandbar directly regulates river hydrodynamic behaviours which in turn influences river hydrochemistry. PMID:22302401

  1. Environmental flow for Monsoon Rivers in India: The Yamuna River as a case study

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, Vikram; Singh, Diwan

    2013-01-01

    We consider the flows of Monsoon Rivers in India that will permit the river to perform all its natural functions. About 80% of the total flow for Indian rivers is during the monsoon and the remaining 20% is during the non monsoon period. By carrying out a case study of the river Yamuna in Delhi we find that at least 50% of the virgin monsoon (July to September) flow is required for the transport of the full spectrum of soil particles in the river sediment. A similar flow is needed for adequate recharge of the floodplain aquifers along river. For the non monsoon period (October to June) about 60% of the virgin flow is necessary to avoid the growth of still water algae and to support river biodiversity.

  2. 10 years After The Largest River Restoration Project In Northern Europe:Hydromorphological changes on multiple scales in River Skjern

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Esben; Kronvang, Brian; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Thodsen, Hans; Nielsen, Carsten Brian; Amor, E.; Friberg, Nikolai; Pedersen, Morten Lauge; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette

    2014-01-01

    The lower river Skjern (Denmark) historically contained a large variation in habitats and the river ran through large areas with wetlands, many backwaters, islands and oxbow lakes. During the 1960s the river was channelized and the wetland drained. A restoration during 2001–2002 transformed 19 km of channelized river into 26 km meandering river. The short-term effects of this restoration have previously been reported and for this study we revisited the river and with new data evaluated the lo...

  3. Circumpolar synchrony in big river bacterioplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Byron C; Peterson, Bruce J; Raymond, Peter A; Amon, Rainer M W; Rinehart, Amanda; McClelland, James W; Holmes, Robert M

    2009-12-15

    Natural bacterial communities are extremely diverse and highly dynamic, but evidence is mounting that the compositions of these communities follow predictable temporal patterns. We investigated these patterns with a 3-year, circumpolar study of bacterioplankton communities in the six largest rivers of the pan-arctic watershed (Ob', Yenisey, Lena, Kolyma, Yukon, and Mackenzie), five of which are among Earth's 25 largest rivers. Communities in the six rivers shifted synchronously over time, correlating with seasonal shifts in hydrology and biogeochemistry and clustering into three groups: winter/spring, spring freshet, and summer/fall. This synchrony indicates that hemisphere-scale variation in seasonal climate sets the pace of variation in microbial diversity. Moreover, these seasonal communities reassembled each year in all six rivers, suggesting a long-term, predictable succession in the composition of big river bacterioplankton communities. PMID:19940248

  4. Downstream Hydraulic Geometry of Mountain Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, E.

    2003-12-01

    The concept of downstream hydraulic geometry (DHG) was developed for fully alluvial rivers that are presumed to be capable of continually adjusting their dimensions to changes in bankfull discharge. Mountain rivers, although mostly formed in alluvium, may behave differently because discharges along the channel lack the competence to move coarse clasts introduced from colluvial processes or glaciation, or because discontinuous bedrock exposures limit channel adjustment. Consequently, the DHG of mountain rivers could reflect bankfull flows; larger magnitude, less frequent flows; or non-fluvial processes such as debris flows. The research summarized here was designed to test whether traditional DHG concepts apply to mountain rivers, and to determine when correlations between velocity, flow depth, or width, and bankfull discharge, are strongly developed. Rivers with strongly developed DHG are defined here as those with r2 values > 0.5 for at least two of the correlations. I hypothesize that a quantifiable threshold separates mountain rivers with well-developed DHG from those with poorly-developed DHG. This threshold can be expressed using a ratio of hydraulic driving forces to substrate resisting forces. As the ratio increases, the ability of bankfull flows to adjust channel dimensions should also increase. The hypothesis was tested using 8 datasets from mountain rivers in Alaska, Montana, Colorado, Panama, Nepal, and New Zealand. A ratio of either total stream power/D84, or unit stream power/D84, separates rivers with and without well-developed DHG. This approach is a simplification which ignores the presence of bedrock; the duration and frequency of flows as these affect stream power; and non-fluvial processes. However, the results suggest that mountain rivers with greater hydraulic driving forces are more likely to behave like fully alluvial rivers in terms of having well-developed DHG relations.

  5. Trends in the occurrence of human and veterinary antibiotics in the sediments of the Yellow River, Hai River and Liao River in northern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Lijun [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ying Guangguo, E-mail: guang-guo.ying@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhao Jianliang [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yang Jifeng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Department, Hunan University of Arts and Science, Changde 415000 (China); Wang Li; Yang Bin; Liu Shan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2011-07-15

    The occurrence of four classes of 17 commonly used antibiotics (including fluoroquinolones, tetracycline, sulfonamides, and macrolides) was investigated in the sediments of the Yellow River, Hai River and Liao River in northern China by using rapid resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Higher concentrations were detected for most antibiotics in the sediments of the Hai River than in the sediments of the other rivers. Norfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and oxytetracycline in the three rivers were most frequently detected with concentrations up to 5770, 1290, 653 and 652 ng/g, respectively. High frequencies and concentrations of the detected antibiotics were often found in the downstream of large cities and areas influenced by feedlot and fish ponds. Good fitted linear regression equations between antibiotic concentration and sediment physicochemical properties (TOC, texture and pH) were also found, indicating that sediment properties are important factors influencing the distribution of antibiotics in the sediment of rivers. - Highlights: > Presence of four classes of commonly used antibiotics in the river sediments. > Higher concentrations in the Hai River than in the Liao River and Yellow River. > Norfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and oxytetracycline most frequently detected. > High antibiotic concentrations often found in the downstream of large cities. > River sediments are an important reservoir of antibiotics. - Higher concentrations of selected antibiotics were determined in the sediments of the Hai River than in the Liao River and Yellow River.

  6. Hotspots within the Transboundary Selenga River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimov, Nikolay; Lychagin, Mikhail; Chalov, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    Gathering the efficient information on water pollution of transboundary river systems remains the crucial task in international water management, environmental pollution control and prevention health problems. Countries, located in the low parts of the river basins, depend on the water strategy and water use in the adjacent countries, located upstream. Surface water pollution is considered to be the most serious problem, facing the above-mentioned countries. Large efforts in terms of field measurement campaigns and (numerical) transport modeling are then typically needed for relevant pollution prediction and prevention. Russian rivers take inflow from 8 neighboring countries. Among them there are 2 developing economies - People Republic of China and Mongolia, which are located in water-scarce areas and thus solve their water-related problems through the consumption of international water. Negative change of water runoff and water quality in the foreign part of transboundary river is appeared inside Russian territory with more or less delay. The transboundary river system of Selenga is particularly challenging, being the biggest tributary of Lake Baikal which is the largest freshwater reservoir in the world. Selenga River contributes about 50 % of the total inflow into Baikal. It originates in the mountainous part of Mongolia and then drains into Russia. There are numerous industries and agricultural activities within the Selenga drainage basin that affect the water quality of the river system. Absence of the single monitoring system and predictive tools for pollutants transport in river system requires large efforts in understanding sources of water pollution and implemented data on the relevant numerical systems for the pollution prediction and prevention. Special investigations in the Selenga river basin (Mongolia and Russia) were done to assess hot spots and understand state-of-the art in sediment load, water chemistry and hydrobiology of transboundary systems

  7. An analysis of similarity of digital river networks with different resolutions in various river basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magome, J.; Masutani, K.; Ishidaira, H.

    2011-12-01

    In order to apply hydrological models and establish computer aided hydrological discharge nowcast eventually forecast system for large regions like Asian continent or whole world, accuracy of digital river network is one of the key issue to produce useful information. In this study, we propose and apply a method which analyses the similarity of digital river networks with different spatial resolutions. We use the coordinates and upstream catchment areas at major confluent points in order to represent the features of river networks. Turning counter- clockwise around the river network from the estuary, we arrange confluent points into one string. The sets of the one-dimensional data obtained from river networks are compared by using DP matching. A set of river networks with different scales ranging from 90 m to 20 km grids were developed based on this scaling algorithm (Masutani et al., 2006) using 90m HydroSHEDS. We evaluated the developed dataset using the proposed method to small to large rivers in Asian Regions (including Mekong River, Yellow River. etc.). A possibility of utilizing the proposed method was successfully shown. The proposed method and the river network dataset developed can provide better hydrological simulation with different grid scales with little effect.

  8. Powering up the River Thames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small and micro hydro power schemes have the potential to make a significant contribution to the UK Government's target of using more renewable energy sources to meet its global warming targets. However, the cost of meeting environmental regulations could make schemes too expensive. The Environment Agency requires an environmental impact assessment (EIA) at potential hydro power sites. Such assessment may indicate the need for additional items such as fish ladders and flow measurements. Many of the weirs and mill sites on the River Thames could be used for small hydro power (potential installed capacity is estimated at 25 MW), but very few of the 45 locks/weirs have flow measuring devices and only those weirs below Mapledurham have fish passes. Sandford lock near Oxford is used as an example of what could be achieved and the benefits to the environment

  9. River Basin Standards Interoperability Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesquer, Lluís; Masó, Joan; Stasch, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    There is a lot of water information and tools in Europe to be applied in the river basin management but fragmentation and a lack of coordination between countries still exists. The European Commission and the member states have financed several research and innovation projects in support of the Water Framework Directive. Only a few of them are using the recently emerging hydrological standards, such as the OGC WaterML 2.0. WaterInnEU is a Horizon 2020 project focused on creating a marketplace to enhance the exploitation of EU funded ICT models, tools, protocols and policy briefs related to water and to establish suitable conditions for new market opportunities based on these offerings. One of WaterInnEU's main goals is to assess the level of standardization and interoperability of these outcomes as a mechanism to integrate ICT-based tools, incorporate open data platforms and generate a palette of interchangeable components that are able to use the water data emerging from the recently proposed open data sharing processes and data models stimulated by initiatives such as the INSPIRE directive. As part of the standardization and interoperability activities in the project, the authors are designing an experiment (RIBASE, the present work) to demonstrate how current ICT-based tools and water data can work in combination with geospatial web services in the Scheldt river basin. The main structure of this experiment, that is the core of the present work, is composed by the following steps: - Extraction of information from river gauges data in OGC WaterML 2.0 format using SOS services (preferably compliant to the OGC SOS 2.0 Hydrology Profile Best Practice). - Model floods using a WPS 2.0, WaterML 2.0 data and weather forecast models as input. - Evaluation of the applicability of Sensor Notification Services in water emergencies. - Open distribution of the input and output data as OGC web services WaterML, / WCS / WFS and with visualization utilities: WMS. The architecture

  10. Reactor loops at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes broadly the nine in-reactor loops, and their components, located in and around the NRX and NRU reactors at Chalk River. First an introduction and general description is given of the loops and their function, supplemented with a table outlining some loop specifications and nine simplified flow sheets, one for each individual loop. The report then proceeds to classify each loop into two categories, the 'main loop circuit' and the 'auxiliary circuit', and descriptions are given of each circuit's components in turn. These components, in part, are comprised of the main loop pumps, the test section, loop heaters, loop coolers, delayed-neutron monitors, surge tank, Dowtherm coolers, loop piping. Here again photographs, drawings and tables are included to provide a clearer understanding of the descriptive literature and to include, in tables, some specifications of the more important components in each loop. (author)

  11. Tipping Points in Texas Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Anticipating geomorphic tipping points requires that we learn from the past. Major geomorphic changes in coastal plain rivers of Texas resulting in river metamorphosis or regime shifts were identified, and the major driving factors determined. Nine fluvial tipping points were identified from contemporary observations, historical records, and Quaternary reconstructions. Two of the tipping points (between general aggrading and degrading valley states) are associated with reversals in a fundamental system control (sea-level). One (stable or aggrading vs. degrading channels) is associated with an abrupt change in sediment supply due to dam construction, and two others (changes from meandering to anastomosing channel patterns, and different anastomosis styles) are similarly related to changes in sediment supply and/or transport capacity, but with additional elements of historical contingency. Three tipping points are related to avulsions. One, from a regime dominated to reoccupation of former channels to one dominated by progradation into flood basins, is driven by progressive long term filling of incised valleys. Another, nodal avulsions, are driven by disturbances associated with tectonics or listric faults. The third, avulsions and related valley metamorphosis in unfilled incised valleys, is due to fundamental dynamical instabilities within the fluvial system. This synthesis and analysis suggests that geomorphic tipping points are sometimes associated with general extrinsic or intrinsic (to the fluvial system) environmental change, independent of any disturbances or instabilities. Others are associated with natural (e.g., tectonic) or human (dams) disturbances, and still others with intrinsic geomorphic instabilities. This suggests that future tipping points will be equally diverse with respect to their drivers.

  12. Water Quality Data Analysis for Kanhan River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal K. Kamble

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Kanhan River originates from the high lands of Chindawara District and flows in south east direction for about 160 kms before it enters the state of Maharashtra near Raiwari village in Saoner Taluka of Nagpur District. Nagpur city is presently getting water for from two major sources namely Kanhan River (Head work located near village Juni Kamptee &Pench Dam (through Right Bank Canal with Lifting Point at Mahadula at 48.5 Km of canal. Samples were collected from seven major locations along the stretch of river. The samples were subjected to physicochemical analysis and performed during summer, rainy and winter seasons. The physicochemical parameters of the water samples includes pH, temperature, turbidity, conductivity (EC, suspended solids (SS, total dissolved solids (TDS, total solids (TS, dissolved oxygen (DO and biological oxygen demand (BOD. The water quality index (WQI is used to evaluate the quality of the river water for drinking in rainy, winter and summer season.The study was carried out to examine the change in the quality of the river water due to addition of human waste discharge, industrial waste discharge into river body and the seasonal variation in the physicochemical properties of the river.

  13. Vertical distribution of Pahang River plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, T. M.; Lihan, T.; Mustapha, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    Large rivers transported high amount of discharge towards the sea and induced the river plume formation. The contents of the plume consist of suspended solids, nutrients, pollutants and other particles. Productivity at estuary depends on the organic and nutrient contents from the river discharge. Due to many possible factors, the dispersal of the plume shows spatial variation horizontally and vertically. The monsoonal wind is a factor that effecting plume vertical profile pattern. This study determines the vertical distribution pattern of the plumeat Pahang River through field observation. Several water parameters were measured during cruises conducted at respective monsoon. Data collected includes depth, chlorophyll-a, salinity, temperature and suspended particulate matter. Depth at Pahang's offshore usually does not reached more than 15 m depth because of the shallow continental shelf at South China Sea. The plume has higher concentration at the mouth of the river which causes the area to be less saline and it decreases as the station furthers from the river. Chlorophyll-a is distributed mainly at the surface level where the area is warmer and received freshwater runoff. Suspended particulate matter shows downward distribution from the front of the estuary towards deep water column depth (10 m). Temperature pattern shows warmer surface layer with depth less than 5 m while deeper water column has lower temperature. Vertical profile pattern of Pahang River plume generally shows slight difference between each monsoon by referring to particular parameter.

  14. River Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2006-08-01

    This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and hydraulic parameters and input values that will be used in river modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by PNNL for DOE. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. The module is based on the legacy code for the Modular Aquatic Simulation System II (MASS2), which is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged model that provides the capability to simulate the lateral (bank-to-bank) variation of flow and contaminants. It simulates river hydrodynamics (water velocities and surface elevations), sediment transport, contaminant transport, biotic transport, and sediment-contaminant interaction, including both suspended sediments and bed sediments. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River. MASS2 requires data on the river flow rate, downstream water surface elevation, groundwater influx and contaminants flux, background concentrations of contaminants, channel bathymetry, and the bed and suspended sediment properties. Stochastic variability for some input parameters such as partition coefficient (kd) values and background radionuclide concentrations is generated by the Environmental Stochastic Preprocessor. River flow is randomized on a yearly basis. At this time, the conceptual model does not incorporate extreme flooding (for example, 50 to 100 years) or dam removal scenarios.

  15. Construction of river transfer models for MOGRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two dynamic compartment models were constructed as basic river transfer models for MOGRA (Migration Of GRound Additions) - an environmental load effect predicting code developed by JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute). One model is for the river transfer of one component where particulate form and dissolved form are in equilibrium. The other model is structured for the river transfer of two components when the particulates and dissolved forms are treated individually by separate compartmentalization. In each model the river sediment is set in a compartment. The sedimentation of particulate form and resuspension of radionuclides in the river sediment are taken into account. Modeling a river system with MOGRA is done by connecting one of these models to match the system. To verify the analysis function of the constructed models, calculation conditions were set using data of 137Cs concentration obtained from Kuji River, Japan. The length of the river was set to 50 km and was divided into 5 equal parts. The inflow of 137Cs and parameter values concerning transfer velocities were set differently in case of normal flow rate and high flow rate. In calculation, high flow rate caused by rain was supposed to occur after a period to normal flow rate. There is almost no difference seen between these models when sedimentation velocity is low. There is apparent difference when sedimentation velocity is high. It is concluded that in selecting and applying models to real environment enough consideration should be taken as to which system to be assessed and what the purpose is. To make it possible to analyze various river systems for various purposes, models need to be developed, for example, compartmentalizing the watershed. The data needed will be collected with it. (author)

  16. Rapid River Hatchery - Spring Chinook, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Rapid River Hatchery (Spring Chinook). The hatchery is located in the lower Snake River basin near Riggins Idaho. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of spring chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  17. Raft River Geothermal Aquaculture Experiment. Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.K.; Rose, F.L.; Kent, J.C.; Watson, L.R.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1979-08-01

    Channel catfish, tilapia and Malaysian prawns were cultured directly in geothermal water for approximately seven months at the Department of Energy, Raft River Geothermal Site, to evaluate the organisms throughout a grow-out cycle. Parameters evaluated included survival, growth, bioaccumulation of metals and fluoride, collagen synthesis, and bone calcium levels. Growth at Raft River was slightly lower than at a companion commercial facility at Buhl, Idaho, but was attributed to facility differences rather than an adverse impact of geothermal water. No significant differences were recorded between Raft River and Buhl fish for bone calcium or collagen concentrations. No significant accumulation of heavy metals by fish or prawns was recorded.

  18. Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the Jablanica river, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Katarina S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the community of aquatic macroinvertebrates was carried out during 2005 and 2006 at four sampling sites along the Jablanica River, a right-hand tributary of the Kolubara River. Fifty-seven taxa were recorded in the course of the investigation. The most diverse group was Ephemeroptera, followed by Trichoptera and Plecoptera. Members of the Rhitrogena semicolorata group were the most abundant. Our results could be the basis for evaluation of the influence of damming of the Jablanica River on the status of its water and can serve as a model for studying the influ­ence of hydromorphological degradation of aquatic ecosystems.

  19. Rapid River Hatchery - Spring Chinook, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Rapid River Hatchery (Spring Chinook). The hatchery is located in the lower Snake River basin near Riggins Idaho. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of spring chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

  20. The law of the river: Policy expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to accurately represent the law of the Colorado River has heretofore precluded the use of any general purpose river basin simulation model. In order to overcome the inflexibility associated with policies coded directly into a model, a new approach for river basin simulation modeling has been developed. The new approach allows the user to capture the operating policy in a series of policy statements separate from the basic simulation model. These statements are accessible without writing code and may easily be modified to explore policy alternatives

  1. Lindane residues in fish inhabiting Nigerian rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis for residues of lindane in fish collected from various rivers close to rice agroecosystems showed that the concentrations of lindane ranged from none detectable to 3.4 mg kg-1. Fish from rivers where strict regulations prohibits its use had no detectable lindane residues while appreciable amounts of lindane were found in fish were such restriction was not enforced with the variation attributed to the extent of use of lindane in the area of contamination. The investigation confirms that the use of lindane in rice production in Nigeria can cause the contamination of fish in nearby rivers. (author). 16 refs, 2 tab

  2. 76 FR 7837 - Big Rivers Electric Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Big Rivers Electric Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on February 4, 2011, Big Rivers Electric Corporation (Big Rivers) filed a notice of cancellation of its Second Revised and Restated Open Access Transmission Tariff. Big Rivers also requests waiver of the...

  3. Integrated ecological modelling for decision support in river management: a lowland river case study (Cauca river in Colombia)

    OpenAIRE

    Holguin Gonzalez, Javier; Goethals, Peter; Galvis, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Several practical concepts and software systems have been recently developed in the issue of environmental decision support. However, the application of ecological modelling approaches that integrate hydrodynamic, physical-chemical, and biological components sub-models for predicting macroinvertebrates in rivers, is rather limited and hardly described in literature. The Cauca river is one of most severe cases of contamination for domestic and industrial wastewater discharges in Colombia. One ...

  4. Conservatives and champions: river managers and the river restoration discourse in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, William M.; Martin R Perrow; Angus Carpenter

    2004-01-01

    We discuss two contrasting discourses of environmental management for the management of rivers and floodplain environments in the United Kingdom. Through the 1990s a long-established flood defence discourse gave way to a new discourse of river and floodplain restoration. We draw on qualitative interviews with river managers to set out these discourses, and consider the engagement between them. We consider particularly the way in which flood defence engineers have resisted and gradually been w...

  5. Conservation status and distribution pattern of the Indus River Dolphin in River Beas, India

    OpenAIRE

    MOHD SHAHNAWAZ KHAN; ANJANA PANT

    2014-01-01

    Khan MS, Pant A. 2014. Conservation status and distribution pattern of the Indus River Dolphin in River Beas, India. Biodiversitas 15: 73-77. Decline in the populations of Indus River Dolphins Platanista gangetica minor throughout its range of distribution and a perception that it is a 'keystone species' for riverine ecosystem stirred the idea of proposed study. Deficiency of baseline data on its distribution and ecology is a major constraint that this (only known sub-population in India) spe...

  6. River Water Quality Zoning: A Case Study of Karoon and Dez River System

    OpenAIRE

    M Karamouz, N Mahjouri, R Kerachian

    2004-01-01

    Karoon-Dez River basin, with an area of 67000 square kilometers, is located in southern part of Iran. This river system supplies the water demands of 16 cities, several villages, thousands hectares of agricultural lands, and several hydropower plants. The increasing water demands at the project development stage including agricultural networks, fish hatchery projects, and inter-basin water transfers, have caused a gloomy future for water quality of the Karoon and Dez Rivers. A good part of us...

  7. Suitability Evaluation of River Bank Filtration along the Second Songhua River, China

    OpenAIRE

    Lixue Wang; Xueyan Ye; Xinqiang Du

    2016-01-01

    The Second Songhua River is the biggest river system in Jilin Province, China. In recent years, the rapid economic development in this area has increased the prominence of water resources and water-related environmental problems; these include surface water pollution and the overexploitation of groundwater resources. Bank infiltration on the floodplains of the Second Songhua River is an important process of groundwater-surface water exchange under exploitation conditions. Understanding this p...

  8. Impact of Yangtze River Water Transfer on the Water Quality of the Lixia River Watershed, China

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiaoxue; Wang, Lachun; Wu, Hao; Li, Na; Ma, Lei; Zeng, Chunfen; Zhou, Yi; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    To improve water quality and reduce the negative impacts of sudden inputs of water pollution in the Lixia River watershed, China, a series of experimental water transfers from the Yangtze River to the Lixia River were conducted from 2 December 2006 to 7 January 2007. Water samples were collected every six days at 55 monitoring sites during this period. Eight water parameters (water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), chemical oxygen demand (COD), potassium permanganate index (CODMn), ammo...

  9. EVALUATION OF WATER AND SEDIMENT QUALITIES AT RIVER MOUTHS IN THE HAIHE RIVER SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng LIU; Zhaoyin WANG; Yun HE; Dongsheng CHENG

    2007-01-01

    Water and sediment qualities are studied by analyzing samples taking from the mouths of the Haihe, Duliujian, New Ziya and Beipai rivers in the Haihe river basin in north China in 2005 and 2001, in order to find the changes of water and sediment pollutions. The concentrations of heavy metals, arsenic, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) are analyzed and results have been compared for the two times. The in-situ measurement for Dissolved Oxygen (DO) and Sediment Oxygen Demand (SOD) rates were carried at the Haihe and Duliujian river mouths in 2006. The results show that the waters of the 4 river mouths are still seriously polluted, though much improved in the case of the Haihe and Duliujian rivers. The main pollutants are TP and TN in the New Ziya and Beipai rivers and mercury (Hg) at all 4 river mouths. Compared with those in 2001, the concentrations of almost all metals and arsenic in the 4 river mouths have decreased. Water quality at Haihe and Duliujian shows an improving trend, while the water quality at Beipai is similar to that of 2001. In contrast, water at the New Ziya river mouth is more severely polluted. The sediments in the 4 river mouths are not seriously polluted by heavy metals but are polluted by nitrogen and phosphorus. Most of the pollutant contents in the sediments show little change between 2001 and 2005. The in-situ DO and SOD measurement shows that the waters at the Haihe river mouth is in the state of oxygen depletion, and SOD is important consumer of DO at the river mouths. The overall analysis shows that increasing water pollution and eutrophication in waters far from cities are ongoing causes of concern.

  10. 33 CFR 165.802 - Lower Mississippi River, vicinity of Old River Control Structure-Safety Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of Old River Control Structure-Safety Zone. 165.802 Section 165.802 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.802 Lower Mississippi River, vicinity of Old River Control Structure—Safety Zone... permission from the Captain of the Port, New Orleans. The resident engineer at Old River Control...

  11. Persistent organochlorine residues in sediments of Haihe River and Dagu Drainage River in Tianjin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Hui; LI Xin-gang; LIU Hun; WANG Jun; SHEN Wei-ran; SUN Yi-chao; SHAO Xiao-long

    2005-01-01

    Persistent organochlorine compounds were analyzed by means of GC-ECD in surface sediment samples from two selected rivers in Tianjin, Haihe River and Dagu Drainage River. A total of 16 surface sediment sites were selected along the both rivers. The frequency of detection of T-HCH and T-DDT in sediment samples both was up to 100%, which illustrated that the contamination of HCH and DDT was widespread in Haihe and Dagu Drainage Rivers. Results indicated that the concentrations of vadous pesticides in sediments from Haihe River were in the range of 3.30-75.96 ng/g dw for T-HCH and 1.57-211.57 ng/g dw for T-DDT. Compared with Haihe River,Dagu Drainage River was contaminated by HCHs and DDTs along the all locations and the values of T-HCH and T-DDT residues in sediments ranged from 2.30 to 124.61 ng/g dw and from 11.28 to 237.30 ng/g dw, respectively. The possible pollution sources were analyzed through monitoring results of organochlorine pesticides(OCPs) residues in sediments from the two rivers. The investigation also indicated that HCH was still used as pesticide in Tianjin partial area.

  12. Taking the Pulse of a River System: Research on the Upper Mississippi River System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Jennifer; Johnson, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Mark Twain raved about the Mississippi River basin as, 'the body of the Nation'. The 'upper body', upstream of the confluence with the Ohio River, includes commercially navigable reaches and branching tributaries that are recreationally and environmentally important. Together they feed and shelter an array of fish and wildlife in their flowing channels, floodplain lakes, backwaters, wetlands, and floodplain forests. Effective river management requires knowledge about factors controlling the dynamics and interactions of important ecosystem components. The Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) is the prized diagnostic tool in the Environmental Management Program for the Upper Mississippi River System that provides critical information about the status and trends of key environmental resources.

  13. Geochemical fingerprints and controls in the sediments of an urban river: River Manzanares, Madrid (Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel García, Eduardo de; Charlesworth, Susanne; Ordóñez, Almudena; Seijas, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The geochemical fingerprint of sediment retrieved from the banks of the River Manzanares as it passes through the City of Madrid is presented here. The river collects the effluent water from several Waste Water Treatment (WWT) plants in and around the city, such that, at low flows, up to 60% of the flow has been treated. A total of 18 bank-sediment cores were collected along the course of the river, down to its confluence with the Jarama river, to the south–east of Madrid. Trace and major ele...

  14. Trace elements and radionuclides in the Connecticut River and Amazon River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Connecticut River, its estuary, and the Amazon River estuary were studied to elucidate some of the processes which control river water chemistry and the flux of elements to the sea. The approach taken was to identify inputs to the Connecticut River and to investigate geochemical processes which modify the dissolved load. The form and quantity of nuclides which are in turn supplied to the estuary are altered by processes unique to that transition zone to the ocean. The Connecticut River estuary was sampled on a seasonal basis to investigate the role of the estuary in controlling the flux of elements to the sea. The knowledge gained from the Connecticut River study was applied to the quantitatively more significant Amazon River estuary. There a variety of samples were analyzed to understand the processes controlling the single greatest flux of elements to the Atlantic Ocean. The results indicate that estimates of the total flux of nuclides to the oceans can best be calculated based on groundwater inputs. Unless significant repositories for nuclides exist in the river-estuarine system, the groundwater flux of dissolved nuclides is that which will eventually be delivered to the ocean despite the reactions which were shown to occur in both rivers and estuaries. 153 references, 63 figures, 28 tables

  15. Contribution of River Mouth Reach to Sediment Load of the Yangtze River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the sediment gain and loss in the river mouth reach of the Yangtze River by considering sediment load from the local tributaries, erosion/accretion of the river course, impacts of sand mining, and water extraction. A quantitative estimation of the contribution of the river mouth reach to the sediment load of the Yangtze River was conducted before and after impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD in 2003. The results showed that a net sediment load loss of 1.78 million ton/yr (Mt/yr occurred from 1965 to 2002 in the study area. The contribution of this reach to the sediment discharge into the sea is not as high as what was expected before the TGD. With impoundment of the TGD, channel deposition (29.90 Mt/yr and a net sediment loss of 30.89 Mt/yr occurred in the river mouth reach from 2003 to 2012. The river mouth reach has acted as a sink but not a source of sediment since impoundment of the TGD, which has exacerbated the decrease in sediment load. Technologies should be advanced to measure changes in river channel morphology, as well as in water and sediment discharges at the river mouth reach.

  16. The Three Colorado Rivers: Comparing the Physical, Legal, and Economic Allocation of a Shared River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushforth, R.; Ruddell, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    : For many rivers, the legal allocation of surface water was settled decades ago. The process of apportioning surface water between multiple stakeholders is an arduous process with opposing interests competing for scarce resources. The political capital spent initially allocating a river often cannot be regained, stymieing future attempts for re-allocation. The Colorado River Compact (Compact), signed in 1922, has been "the law of the river" for over 90 years. Since its signing, the Colorado River Basin (CRB) population has increased tenfold, while average river flows have decreased due to threats unforeseeable to Compact signers, such as global climate change. Water sharing agreements, like the Compact, legally re-allocate physical river flows; however, water is increasingly shared through trade rather than aqueducts. Virtual water, or the water embodied by a good or service, is a trade adaption to resource scarcity, namely water and land. This study presents findings of a virtual water complement to the Compact. The goal of this study is to determine how the legal allocation of physical water resources are re-allocated as virtual water via economic trade in a shared river basin. Results are presented by at the sub-basin, state, and county-level, showing the geographic origin and destination of virtual water from CRB states and the Upper and Lower basins. A water stress index is calculated to show the indirect water stress of Colorado River water resources and network statistics are employed to rank the importance of virtual water sources in the CRB.

  17. Canoeing on the Sheenjek River: Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a recreational canoe trip on the Upper Sheenjek River in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The report describes the authors experiences...

  18. Coldwater River NWR Ancillary Bird Observations 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ancillary bird observations on Coldwater River NWR in 2006 were recorded by local birders. No sampling design was used to generate the observations

  19. Savannah River Site environmental data for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents data from Savannah River Site routine environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. An attempt also has been made to include all available data from environmental research programs

  20. Coldwater River NWR Ancillary Bird Observations 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ancillary bird observations on Coldwater River NWR in 2009 were recorded by local birders. No sampling design was used to generate the observations