WorldWideScience

Sample records for climatotherapy

  1. Climatotherapy in Psoriasis

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    Sedat Özçelik

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroclimatology is used successfully as a treatment modality for psoriasis, either solely or as an adjunct to more specific treatments. Climatotherapy is a type of treatment utilizing the atmosphere, temperature, humidity, sun light, sea water, thermo-mineral water and mud. Therapeutic effect is achieved through the combined action of sun light, sea water, and fresh air and, of combinations with spa water. Some elements such as selenium, magnesium, potassium, slica, calcium, sulfates, and sodium, found in water, are believed to be absorbed through the skin, and are also beneficial for the good therapeutic response to climatotherapy. Important climatotherapy centers for psoriasis in the world are Dead Sea, Kangal Hot Spring with Fish, Blue Lagoon, Black Sea-Bulgaria, and La Roche- Possay. Climatotherapy of psoriasis are alternative therapeutic options for the management of psoriasis. The promising results together with the combination of treatment and complete physical/mental recreation result in the growing popularity of these therapeutic options amongst the patients. However, further research and larger controlled studies are needed to evaluate the mechanism of action as well as to compare the efficacy of climatherapy to conventional therapeutic modalities.

  2. Climatotherapy at the dead sea for pediatric-onset psoriasis vulgaris.

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    Ben-Amitai, Dan; David, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Climatotherapy at the Dead Sea is highly effective and safe for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris in adults. We examine the efficacy and safety of climatotherapy at the Dead Sea in children with psoriasis vulgaris. More than 75% improvement in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index was noted in 35.3% of the patients. None of the patients had side effects.

  3. Significant immediate and long-term improvement in quality of life and disease coping in patients with vitiligo after group climatotherapy at the Dead Sea.

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    Krüger, Christian; Smythe, Jim W; Spencer, Jennifer D; Hasse, Sybille; Panske, Angela; Chiuchiarelli, Giorgia; Schallreuter, Karin U

    2011-03-01

    Quality of life in patients with vitiligo is impaired. This study explored the immediate effect of 20 days of climatotherapy at the Dead Sea on quality of life, coping with the disease, general well-being and individual stress levels in a group of 71 patients with vitiligo and 42 matched controls. The long-term effect was assessed after 12 months in 33/71 patients and 12/42 controls. Study instruments were Dermatology Life Quality Index, Beck Depression Inventory and the Adjustment to Chronic Skin Disorders Questionnaire. Stress measurements were based on cortisol and β-endorphin concentrations in saliva samples. Quality of life was significantly improved at day 20 at the Dead Sea compared with day 1, and this was still significant after 12 months. Moreover, social anxiety/avoidance, anxious-depressive mood and helplessness as measured by the Adjustment to Chronic Skin Disorders Questionnaire were significantly reduced. There was no difference in levels of cortisol and β-endorphin between patients and controls, indicating that stress per se is not a significant contributor in vitiligo. In conclusion, therapy in patient groups offers an effective tool for long-lasting improvement in quality of life and patients' well-being.

  4. Natural radioactivity in sand used in thermal therapy at the Red Sea Coast.

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    El-Arabi, A M

    2005-01-01

    The development of climatotherapy in Safaga opens the field of medical tourism in Egypt, in order to detect any harmful radiation that would affect the patients during treatment and is becoming important economic resource. Studies and survey of natural radiation and radioactivity in upper Egypt conducted since 1990, included monitoring of the concentration of natural radionuclides in environmental samples. The results of the study reveals that, for all sand samples, the mean activity concentration of 40K (618+/-122-548+/-82 Bq kg(-1)) are much higher than that of both 226Ra (25.3+/-14-20.6+/-10 Bq kg(-1)) and 232Th (21.4+/-10-22.4+/-10 Bq kg(-1)). Different radiation hazard indices were calculated, the radiation dose to which workers are subjected is not negligible (26.5-50.9 nGy h(-1)), although depending on the inhalation of dust.

  5. The disease of Franz Kafka.

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    Mydlík, M; Derzsiová, K

    2005-01-01

    On June 3, 2004, 80 years have passed since the death of one of the greatest and the most important world writers of 20th century, the Prague German writer Franz Kafka. On November 5, 2004 we reminded that remarkable anniversary, which was also the 3rd anniversary of revelation of the monument of Franz Kafka in Tatranské Matliare, the High Tatras. Franz Kafka suffered from lung tuberculosis from 1917 until his death 1924. He was treated on lung tuberculosis in the sanatorium "Villa Tatra" from December 20, 1920 until August 27, 1921 in Tatranské Matliare, the High Tatras. Lung tuberculosis was a very dangerous disease in that time and the treatment by dietotherapy, climatotherapy and symptomatic therapy without antituberculotic drugs was less effective in many patients. In the paper the disease of Franz Kafka was described according to available literature.

  6. A proposal for a worldwide definition of health resort medicine, balneology, medical hydrology and climatology

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    Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Bender, Tamas; Cantista, Pedro; Karagülle, Zeki

    2010-09-01

    Health Resort Medicine, Balneology, Medical Hydrology and Climatology are not fully recognised as independent medical specialties at a global international level. Analysing the reasons, we can identify both external (from outside the field) and internal (from inside the field) factors. External arguments include, e.g. the lack of scientific evidence, the fact that Balneotherapy and Climatotherapy is not used in all countries, and the fact that Health Resort Medicine, Balneology, Medical Hydrology and Climatology focus only on single methods and do not have a comprehensive concept. Implicit barriers are the lack of international accepted terms in the field, the restriction of being allowed to practice the activities only in specific settings, and the trend to use Balneotherapy mainly for wellness concepts. Especially the implicit barriers should be subject to intense discussions among scientists and specialists. This paper suggests one option to tackle the problem of implicit barriers by making a proposal for a structure and description of the medical field, and to provide some commonly acceptable descriptions of content and terminology. The medical area can be defined as “medicine in health resorts” (or “health resort medicine”). Health resort medicine includes “all medical activities originated and derived in health resorts based on scientific evidence aiming at health promotion, prevention, therapy and rehabilitation”. Core elements of health resort interventions in health resorts are balneotherapy, hydrotherapy, and climatotherapy. Health resort medicine can be used for health promotion, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation. The use of natural mineral waters, gases and peloids in many countries is called balneotherapy, but other (equivalent) terms exist. Substances used for balneotherapy are medical mineral waters, medical peloids, and natural gases (bathing, drinking, inhalation, etc.). The use of plain water (tap water) for therapy is called

  7. A proposal for a worldwide definition of health resort medicine, balneology, medical hydrology and climatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Bender, Tamas; Cantista, Pedro; Karagülle, Zeki

    2010-09-01

    Health Resort Medicine, Balneology, Medical Hydrology and Climatology are not fully recognised as independent medical specialties at a global international level. Analysing the reasons, we can identify both external (from outside the field) and internal (from inside the field) factors. External arguments include, e.g. the lack of scientific evidence, the fact that Balneotherapy and Climatotherapy is not used in all countries, and the fact that Health Resort Medicine, Balneology, Medical Hydrology and Climatology focus only on single methods and do not have a comprehensive concept. Implicit barriers are the lack of international accepted terms in the field, the restriction of being allowed to practice the activities only in specific settings, and the trend to use Balneotherapy mainly for wellness concepts. Especially the implicit barriers should be subject to intense discussions among scientists and specialists. This paper suggests one option to tackle the problem of implicit barriers by making a proposal for a structure and description of the medical field, and to provide some commonly acceptable descriptions of content and terminology. The medical area can be defined as "medicine in health resorts" (or "health resort medicine"). Health resort medicine includes "all medical activities originated and derived in health resorts based on scientific evidence aiming at health promotion, prevention, therapy and rehabilitation". Core elements of health resort interventions in health resorts are balneotherapy, hydrotherapy, and climatotherapy. Health resort medicine can be used for health promotion, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation. The use of natural mineral waters, gases and peloids in many countries is called balneotherapy, but other (equivalent) terms exist. Substances used for balneotherapy are medical mineral waters, medical peloids, and natural gases (bathing, drinking, inhalation, etc.). The use of plain water (tap water) for therapy is called hydrotherapy

  8. [Health resorts and development of the health resort medicine in Lithuania].

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    Krisciūnas, Aleksandras

    2005-01-01

    Lithuanian health resorts are national resources of this country. Body hardening, health promotion, disease prevention and rehabilitation by means of applying natural factors are linked for centuries with the names of health resorts such as Druskininkai and Birstonas. The effect of natural factors is multiplex and depends on many parameters the study of which in concrete health resorts is indispensable in order to individualize the treatment at the health resorts and avoid undesirable side effects. As the contingent of the patients being referred to the sanatoria is changing--the number of severe patients after acute disorders and traumas is increasing constantly--the need of such studies becomes relevant. However, after renewal of independence of Lithuania in 1990, the policy of health resort development on the national scale has not been carried out yet. Besides, the number of localities that aim for becoming health resorts is increasing, however, such localities often do not meet the required criteria. The article reviews the status of health resorts and their localities together with their regulations in Lithuania, their development, specificity, the effects of the health resort natural factors (climatotherapy, balneotherapy, pelotherapy) on the healthy body and patients. The data are presented on the development of research studies concerning health resorts and main trends of health resort medicine: health promotion, prevention of disorders, early health resort rehabilitation, health resort tourism, treatment and health resort etiology. Possibilities of revival of studies concerning the effects of health resort factors on the rehabilities are discussed.

  9. Combining balneotherapy and health promotion to promote active and healthy ageing: the Balaruc-MACVIA-LR(®) approach.

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    Blain, H; Bernard, P L; Canovas, G; Raffort, N; Desfour, H; Soriteau, L; Noguès, M; Camuzat, T; Mercier, J; Dupeyron, A; Quéré, I; Laffont, I; Hérisson, C; Solimene, H; Bousquet, J

    2016-12-01

    Scaling up and replication of successful innovative integrated care models for chronic diseases is one of the targets of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA). MACVIA-LR(®) (MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif en Languedoc-Roussillon) is a Reference Site of the EIP on AHA. The main objective of MACVIA-LR(®) is to develop innovative solutions in order to (1) improve the care of patients affected by chronic diseases, (2) reduce avoidable hospitalization and (3) scale up the innovation to regions of Europe. The MACVIA-LR(®) project also aims to assess all possible aspects of medicine-including non-pharmacologic approaches-in order to maintain health and prevent chronic diseases. These approaches include hydrotherapy and balneotherapy which can be of great importance if health promotion strategies are considered. Balneotherapy at Balaruc-les-Bains focusses on musculoskeletal diseases and chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs. Each year, over 46,000 people attend an 18-day course related to a new falls prevention initiative combining balneotherapy and education. On arrival, each person receives a flyer providing information on the risk of fall and, depending on this risk, a course is proposed combining education and physical activity. A pilot study assesses the impact of the course 6 and 12 months later. This health promotion strategy for active and healthy ageing follows the FEMTEC (World Federation of Hydrotherapy and Climatotherapy) concept.

  10. [Sanatorium "Arkhangelskoe" celebrates 80th anniversary].

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    Kirillov, G N

    2013-10-01

    The article is dedicated to the 80th anniversary of sanatorium "Arkhangelskoe" celebrating in October 2013. Since October 16th, 1933 sanatorium is a military health resort, in 1934 sanatorium was named for "Sanatorium for command personnel of the Red Army". In 1935-1936 such prominent commaders as V.K. Blyukher, A.I. Egorov, A.I. Kork, M.N. Tukhachevskiy, G.M.Shtern, A.V. Khrulev, I.E. Yakir took rest in the sanatorium. Today organization of treatment and diagnostic services in the sanatorium meets modern requirements of medical science. Diagnostics includes the following methods: bicycle ergometry, medical treadmills, ECG and ABP monitoring, rheoencephalography, oscillography, ultrasonic diagnosis, monitoring of lipid and carbonaceous metabolism, blood coagulation and anticoagulation, enzymes, electrolytes and also bacteriologic, immunologic and serological tests. The following treatment methotds are used: climatotherapy, clinical nutrition, exercise therapy, spa treatment, balneo- and fangotherapy. Also methods of magnetotherapy, lasertherapy, ultrasonic therapy, hyperbaric oxygenation, phytotherapy and halotherapy are used.

  11. EFFECTS OF CARDIOVASCULAR REHABILITATION IN PATIENTS ADMITTED TO THE “Dr Benedek Geza” Hospital of Rehabilitation IN CARDIOVASCULAR Diseases, COVASNA

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    Suceveanu Mihaela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiovascular rehabilitation is an important objective of the treatment of cardiovascular patients in general, and ischemic heart disease patients in particular. The aim of the study is to monitor the effects of long-term cardiovascular rehabilitation in patients readmitted to the “Dr Benedek Geza” Hospital of Rehabilitation in Cardiovascular Diseases Covasna. Material and methods. The study included 92 patients with a mean age of 66.31±9 years, of which 63% women, who had two successive admissions to the “Dr Benedek Geza” Hospital of Rehabilitation in Cardiovascular Diseases, Covasna. At both admissions, all patients were evaluated for the presence of the main cardiovascular risk factors. All patients attended cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, including physical training, climatotherapy, CO2 baths, mofette therapy, aerotherapy, electrotherapy .. We mention that cardioprotective therapy (aspirin, angiotensin enzyme converting inhibitors, beta-blockers and statins did not undergo major changes from one admission to the other. Results. More than half of the patients had the following risk factors: hypertension - 79.35%, dyslipidemia - 64.13%, overweight and obesity - 76.4%. The complex rehabilitation programs attended by the patients consisted of physical training - 33.7%, CO2 baths - 85.9%, mofette therapy - 53.3%, aerotherapy - 96.7%, electrotherapy - 88%. A comparison of the main cardiovascular risk factors during both admissions showed no significant differences between these, except for LDL-cholesterol (3.151.26 vs 2.581.65 mmol/dl, p=0.004 and HDL-cholesterol (1.06±0.61 vs 1.194±0.41 mmol/dl, p=0.075 In conclusion, in cardiovascular patients, obtaining improvements of cardiovascular risk factors requires long-term cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, in parallel to the application of measures for lifestyle change and for secondary drug prevention.

  12. SPELEOTHERAPY EFFECTS ON WISTAR RATS REFLECTED BY PULMONARY AND DERMAL FIBROBLASTS CULTURES 

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    Munteanu Constantin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Speleotherapy – a special kind of climatotherapy, uses the certain conditions of caves and salt mines to cure several diseases, especially respiratory and skin diseases. Atmospheric dust could cause allergic reactions or asthmatic attacks.The cave air is very low on dust. This fact reduces any kind of irritation. In this way, the symptoms of the diseases are reduced or eliminated completely, while the patient is in the cave. But that does not explain how it should have a longer lasting effect. Curing asthma involves spending 2-3 hours a day underground in subterranean caves or salt mines over a 1-2 month period. An old study describes a speleotherapy course, which was 4 hours a day for 6-8 weeks, with 100 COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and asthma patients and reported improvement that lasted 6 months to 7 years (Skulimowski, 1965. Our objectives were to explore the effects of speleotherapy on cellular morphology and physiology of pulmonary and dermal fibroblasts obtained from tissues of Wistar rats, in normal and Ovalbumin challenged, “asthmatic” conditions. 60 Wistar rats of 75-100 g weight were divided in two lots: control and ovalbumin challenged animals. Ten animals of each lot were send to Cacica, Turda and Dej Salt Mine for 14 days and maintained in the salt mine medium, as in speleotherapy treatment. Pulmonary and dermal fibroblasts cultures were prepared from Wistar rat lung and respectively dermal tissue. Trying to identify the biological mechanisms of speleotherapy, our experimental design was made for cell morphology, physiology and biochemical evaluation of cells in cultures obtained from animals that were treated by speleotherapy. The complex picture of results was analysed and explained through biological mechanisms comparing to the control cell cultures obtained from healthy, untreated Wistar rats. In this article we describe the supposed biological mechanisms that explain the protective effects of

  13. Medical Tourism and the Libyan National Health Services

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    El Taguri A

    2007-01-01

    resemble guestrooms in four-star hotels [2].Interventions aimed at medical tourism include cancer treatment, neurosurgery, organ transplantation, aesthetic treatment, dental treatments, eye surgery, kidney dialysis, « preventive health screening» and hip resurfacing [2]. Other opportunities are constantly being exploited. Examples include different services as aphaeresis tourism in India [4] and climatotherapy in Egypt [5].Medical tourism is a rapidly growing industry in many countries. India is becoming a «global health destination». Encouraged by the government, India is promoting the «high-tech healing» of its private healthcare sector as a tourist attraction [1,2]. More than 100 000 foreigners visited India for medical treatment in the year 2005. India estimates that medical tourism could bring as much as $2.2 billion per year by 2012. Besides India, popular international medical travel destinations include Singapore and Thailand. About 374, 000 visitors came to Singapore purely to seek healthcare in 2005, half of them from the Middle East [2]. South Africa promotes an attractive «medical safari» catchphrase: Come to see African wildlife and get a facelift in the same trip. Other countries include Tunisia which is attracting Italians, British and French besides the so- called traditional visitors from Libya and Algeria [6]. The list of countries currently promoting medical tourism include many others such as Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Cuba, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Jordan, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malaysia and the Philippines [2,3]. Some hospitals in certain countries are gaining the confidence of their customers by obtaining hospital accreditation from international bodies in the United States [2]. Dubai, already known for its festival and other luxury attractions, is planning to open the Dubai Healthcare City by 2010. This is expected to be the largest international medical centre between Europe and Southeast Asia and it is hoped to become an internationally