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Sample records for clic main linac

  1. Beam Loading Compensation in the Main Linac of CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, D.; Syratchev, I.

    2000-01-01

    Compensation of multi-bunch beam loading is of great importance in the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The bunch-to-bunch energy variation has to stay below 1 part in 1000. In CLIC, the RF power is obtained by decelerating a drive beam which is formed by merging a number of short bunch trains. A promising scheme for tackling beam loading in the main linac is based on varying the lengths of the bunch trains in the drive beam. The scheme and its expected performance are presen...

  2. Ground Motion Mitigation in the Main Linac of CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The future linear collider CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) is CERN's propose for a successor of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The design of CLIC requires ultralow particle beam emittances, which makes the accelerator very sensitive to ground motion. Without countermeasure, the beam quality would be already unacceptable after a few seconds. In our work we present a feedback algorithm, which mitigates the parasitic effects of ground motion in the main linac of CLIC efficiently. We use an adaptive controller, which is composed of two parts: a system identification unit and a SVD control algorithm. The system identification unit calculates on-line estimates of the time changing accelerator behaviour. This precise model, which can adapt to system changes, is used by the control algorithm. If the system identification unit would not be used, drifting accelerator parameter would cause a mismatch between the real accelerator behaviour and the model used by the controller, which would result in a poor controller performance. Standard system identification algorithms cannot be used in an accelerator environment. The indispensable system excitation cause a not tolerable emittance growth, if it is applied thoughtless. Instead a special excitation scheme consisting of interleaved beam bumps was implemented, which keeps the emittance growth at an acceptable level. However, this special excitation has the disadvantage that not the complete system can be identified anymore. To still get an all over model of the system, we use the identification data and interpolate them with the help of a beam oscillation amplitude model, derived for the main linac of CLIC. The control algorithm uses the identified system data, which are the orbit response matrix R. With the help of the SVD decomposition of R, a very efficient filter can be created. This filter reconstructs the ground motion components, which are causing the majority of the emittance growth. At the same time the

  3. Choke-Mode Damped Structure Design for the CLIC Main Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zha, Hao; Tang, Chuanxiang; Huang, Wenhui; Shi, Jiaru; Grudiev, Alexej; Wuensch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Choke-mode damped structures are being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structures of main linacs of the compact linear collider (CLIC). Choke-mode structures have the potential for much lower pulsed temperature rise, and lower cost of manufacture and fabrication. A new kind of choke-mode structure was proposed and simulated by Gdfidl. This structures has comparable wakefield damping effect as the baseline design of CLIC main linacs.

  4. Implications of a Curved Tunnel for the Main Linac of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary studies of a linac that follows the earth curvature are presented for the CLIC main linac. The curvature of the tunnel is modeled in a realistic way by use of geometry changing elements. The emittance preservation is studied for a perfect machine as well as taking into account imperfections. Results for a curved linac are compared with those for a laser-straight machine.

  5. On-Line Dispersion Free Steering for the Main Linac of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, J

    2013-01-01

    For future linear colliders as well as for light sources, ground motion effects are a severe problem for the accelerator performance. After a few minutes, orbit feedback systems are not sufficient to mitigate all ground motion effects and additional long term methods will have to be deployed. In this paper, the long term ground motion effects in the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are analysed via simulation studies. The primary growth of the projected emittance is identified to originate from chromatic dilutions due to dispersive beam orbits. To counter this effect, an on-line identification algorithm is applied to measure the dispersion parasitically. This dispersion estimate is used to correct the beam orbit with an iterative dispersion free steering algorithm. The presented results are not only of interest for the CLIC project, but for all linacs in which the dispersive orbit has to be corrected over time.

  6. Fast Beam-ion Instabilities in CLIC Main Linac Vacuum Specifications

    CERN Document Server

    Oeftiger, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Specifications for the vacuum pressure in the CLIC electron Main Linac are determined by the onset of the fast beam-ion instability (FBII). When the electron beam is accelerated in the Main Linac, it ionizes the residual gas in the chamber through scattering ionization. If the density of ions around the beam exceeds a certain threshold, a resonant motion between the electron beam and the ions can be excited. A two-stream instability appears and as a result the beam acquires a coherent motion, which can quickly lead to beam quality degradation or even complete loss. Thus, the vacuum pressure must be kept below this threshold to prevent the excitation of FBII. The CLIC Main Linac poses an additional challenge with respect to previous FBII situations, because the gas ionization does not solely occur via scattering. The submicrometric beam sizes lead to extremely high electric fields around the beam and therefore result in field ionization beyond a certain threshold. The residual gas in the corresponding volume a...

  7. Feed Forward Orbit Correction in the CLIC Ring to Main LINAC Transfer lines

    CERN Document Server

    Apsimon, R; Schulte, D; Uythoven, J

    2014-01-01

    The emittance growth in the betatron collimation system of the 27 km long transfer lines between the CLIC damping rings and the main LINAC depends strongly on the transverse orbit jitter. The resulting stability requirements of the damping ring extraction elements seem extremely difficult to achieve. Position and angle feed forward systems in these long transfer lines bring the specified parameters of the extraction elements within reach. The designs of the optics and feed forward hardware are presented together with tracking simulations of the systems.

  8. Imperfection Tolerances For On-line Dipsersion Free Steering in the Main LINAC of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Pfingstner, J; Schulte, D

    2013-01-01

    Long-term ground motion misaligns the elements of the main linac of CLIC over time. Especially the misaligned quadrupoles create dispersion and hence the beam quality is decreased gradually due to an effect called chromatic dilution. Over longer time periods, orbit feedback systems are not capable to fully recover the beam quality and have to be supplemented by dispersion correction algorithms. In this paper, such and dispersion correction algorithm is presented, which is an extended version of the well-known dispersion free steering algorithm. This extended algorithm can recover the beam quality over long time scaled without stopping the accelerator operation (on-line). Tolerances for different imperfections of the system have been identified and a strong sensitivity to the resolution of the wake field monitors of the main linac accelerating structures has been identified. This problem can be mitigated by using a local excitation scheme as will be shown in this work.

  9. CLIC Main Linac Beam-Loading Compensation by Drive Beam Phase Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R; Syratchev, I V

    1999-01-01

    The CLIC final focus momentum acceptance of ± 0.5 % limits the bunch-to-bunch energy variation in the main beam to less than ± 0.1 %, since the estimated single-bunch contribution is ± 0.4 %. On the other hand, a relatively high beam-loading of the main accelerating structures (about 16 %) is unavoidable in order to optimize the RF-to-beam efficiency. Therefore, a compensation method is needed to reduce the resulting bunch-to-bunch energy spread of the main beam. Up to now, it has been planned to obtain the RF pulse shape needed for compensation by means of a charge ramp in the drive beam pulse. On the other hand, the use of constant-current drive beam pulses would make the design and operation of the drive beam injector considerably simpler. In this paper we present a possible solution adapted to the CLIC two-beam scheme with constant-current pulses, based on phase modulation of the drive beam bunches.

  10. Simulations for CLIC Drive Beam Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Aksoy, Avni

    2012-01-01

    The Drive Beam Linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) has to accelerate an electron beam with 4.2 A up to 2.4 GeV in almost fully-loaded structures. The pulse contains about 70000 bunches, one in every second rf bucket, and has a length of 140 $\\mu$s. The beam stability along the beamline is of concern for such a high current and pulse length. We present different options for the lattice of the linac based on FODO, triplet and doublet cells and compare the transverse instability for each lattice including the effects of beam jitter, alignment and beam-based correction. Additionally longitudinal stability is discussed for different bunch compressors using FODO type of lattice.

  11. Thermo-mechanical Analysis of the CLIC Post-Linac Energy Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, J; Latina, A

    2012-01-01

    The post-linac energy collimation system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) has been designed for passive protection of the Beam Delivery System (BDS) against miss-steered beams due to failure modes in the main linac. In this paper, a thermo-mechanical analysis of the CLIC energy collimators is presented. This study is based on simulations using the codes FLUKA and ANSYS when an entire bunch train hits the collimators. Different failure mode scenarios in the main linac are considered. The aim is to improve the collimator in order to make a reliable and robust design so that survives without damage the impact of a full bunch train in case of likely events generating energy errors.

  12. On structure design for the CLIC Booster Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Darvish, Esmat

    2015-01-01

    Using the SUPERFISH code we present a design for a traveling wave (TW) structure of the Booster Linac for CLIC. The structure, consisting of thirty asymmetric cells attached to the beam pipes at two ends, works in 2π/3 operating mode at working frequency 2 GHz. For the corresponding operating mode and frequency, the RF field configuration transmitted through the cavity is obtained. The results are prepared in an RF field data file to be used in the PARMELA code for further beam dynamic study.

  13. Technologies and R&D for a High Resolution Cavity BPM for the CLIC Main Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Towler, J R; Soby, L; Wendt, M; Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F J; Lyapin, A

    2013-01-01

    The Main Beam (MB) linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a beam orbit measurement system with high spatial (50 nm) and high temporal resolution (50 ns) to resolve the beam position within the 156 ns long bunch train, traveling on an energy-chirped, minimum dispersive trajectory. A 15 GHz prototype cavity BPM has been commissioned in the probe beam-line of the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility. We discuss performance and technical details of this prototype installation, including the 15 GHz analogue downconverter, the data acquisition and the control electronics and software. An R&D outlook is given for the next steps, which requires a system of 3 cavity BPMs to investigate the full resolution potential.

  14. Stabilization of the Beam Intensity in the Linac at the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A; Bathe, BN; Srivastava, S

    2013-01-01

    A new electron beam stabilization system has been introduced in CTF3 in order to open new possibilities for CLIC beam studies in ultra-stable conditions and to provide a sustainable tool to keep the beam intensity and energy at its reference values for long term operations. The stabilization system is based on a pulse-to-pulse feedback control of the electron gun to compensate intensity deviations measured at the end of the injector and at the beginning of the linac. Thereby it introduces negligible beam distortions at the end of the linac and it significantly reduces energy deviations. A self-calibration mechanism has been developed to automatically configure the feedback controller for the optimum performance. The residual intensity jitter of 0.045% of the stabilized beam was measured whereas the CLIC requirement is 0.075%.

  15. Beam dynamic simulation and optimization of the CLIC positron source and the capture linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayar, C.; Doebert, S.; Ciftci, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    The CLIC Positron Source is based on the hybrid target composed of a crystal and an amorphous target. Simulations have been performed from the exit of the amorphous target to the end of pre-injector linac which captures and accelerates the positrons to an energy of 200 MeV. Simulations are performed by the particle tracking code PARMELA. The magnetic field of the AMD is represented in PARMELA by simple coils. Two modes are applied in this study. The first one is accelerating mode based on acceleration after the AMD. The second one is decelerating mode based on deceleration in the first accelerating structure. It is shown that the decelerating mode gives a higher yield for the e+ beam in the end of the Pre-Injector Linac.

  16. CLIC simulations from the start of the linac to the interaction point

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel; Blair, G A; D'Amico, T E; Leros, Nicolas; Redaelli, S; Risselada, Thys; Zimmermann, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Simulations for linear colliders are traditionally performed separately for the different sub-systems, like damping ring, bunch compressor, linac, and beam delivery. The beam properties are usually passed from one sub-system to the other via bunch charge, RMS transverse emittances, RMS bunch length, average energy and RMS energy spread. It is implicitly assumed that the detailed 6D correlations in the beam distribution are not relevant for the achievable luminosity. However, it has recently been shown that those correlations can have a strong effect on the beam-beam interaction. We present first results on CLIC simulations that integrate linac, beam delivery, and beam-beam interaction. These integrated simulations also allow a better simulation of time-dependent effects, like ground perturbations and interference between several beam-based feedbacks.

  17. Transient beam-loading model and compensation in Compact Linear Collider main linac

    CERN Document Server

    Kononenko, O

    2011-01-01

    A new model to compensate for the transient beam loading in the CLIC main linac is developed. It takes into account the CLIC specific power generation scheme and the exact 3D geometry of the accelerating structure including couplers. A new method of calculating unloaded and loaded voltages during the transient is proposed and a dedicated optimization scheme of the rf pulse to compensate the transient beam-loading effect is presented. It is demonstrated that the 0.03% limit on the rms relative bunch-to-bunch energy spread in the main beam after acceleration can be reached. The optimization technique has been used to increase the rf to beam efficiency while preserving the CLIC requirements and to compensate for the energy spread caused by the Balakin-Novokhatski-Smirnov damping and transient process in the subharmonic buncher. Effects of charge jitters in the drive and main beams are studied. It is shown that within the 0.1% CLIC specification limit on the rms spread in beams charge the energy spread is not sig...

  18. Choke-mode damped structure design for the Compact Linear Collider main linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zha, Hao; Grudiev, Alexej; Huang, Wenhui; Shi, Jiaru; Tang, Chuanxiang; Wuensch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Choke-mode damped structures are being studied as an alternative design to waveguide damped structures for the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Choke-mode structures have the potential for lower pulsed temperature rise and simpler and less expensive fabrication. An equivalent circuit model based on transmission line theory for higher-order-mode damping is presented. Using this model, a new choke geometry is proposed and the wakefield performance is verified using GDFIDL. This structure has a comparable wakefield damping effect to the baseline design which uses waveguide damping. A prototype structure with the same iris dimensions and accelerating gradient as the nominal CLIC design, but with the new choke geometry, has been designed for high-power tests. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.15.122003

  19. Effects of machine errors on the ILC main linac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王逗; 高杰

    2011-01-01

    For a practical linac, the beam property is affected seriously by any machine imperfections. In this paper, the effects of several main errors in the ILC main linac, such as quadrupole misalignment, magnet strength error and cavity misalignment, were stud

  20. Two 352 MHz push pull linac pairs to generate two drive beams for CLIC multibunch operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present note describes a drive beam generation scheme for multibunch operation at 1 TeV continuous mode and the luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1. This rather conventional scheme is essentially based on acceleration with 352 MHz superconducting cavities. Contrary to a previous proposal for single bunch operation, an independent push pull linac pair per drive beam is foreseen mainly for the following reasons. Twice as many drive bunchlets per 352 MHz period halves the required charge per bunchlet. With two trains, the bunchlet deceleration variation inside one train is reduced. A good drive beam to RF efficiencies are obtained through matching of the train energy profile to the decelerating wake pattern in the drive linac. The reduced wake variation makes it feasible to preshape the train energy profile to the required ramp by simple phase shifting of the 352 MHz voltage in the superconducting cavities in conjunction with a small harmonics correction. The layout of the system consists of the 30 GHz accelerating structures, 30 GHz transfer structures, fourth harmonics (1408 MHz) superconducting structures, push pull fundamental (352 MHz) linac pair and switch yards. Emphasis has been put on wall-plug to main beam efficiency and minimum capital cost to the extent possible for the concept chosen. The issues of studies are harmonic synthesis of an optimum acceleration ramp, beam loading compensation for fundamental frequency cavities, acceleration of 22 bunchlets, fourth harmonic cavities, wall plug to main beam efficiency and RF deflectors. The main disadvantage of the scheme seem to be: a) high bunchlet charge of 45 n C. b) overall efficiency of only 10.1%, essentially because of the limited stored RF energy in the 352 MHz structures, which limits the number of drive bunchlet trains per pulse. c) significant amount of RF and cryogenics hardware for complete drive beam generation complex. The main advantage appears to be: a) no long drive beam transport lines, no 180 and

  1. The CLIC project and the design for an e+- collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-beam scheme of the CERN Linear Collider (CLIC) project is discussed. The problems in achieving the needed luminosity, caused by disruption and beam radiation are outlined. The main CLIC paramaters are presented. The supply of the RF power and problems of RF focusing caused by wakefield effects are discussed. The transfer and main LINAC structures, and the design of damping rings and the final focus are outlined. (H.W.). 25 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. A high resolution cavity BPM for the CLIC Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chritin, N.; Schmickler, H.; Soby, L.; /CERN; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In frame of the development of a high resolution BPM system for the CLIC Main Linac we present the design of a cavity BPM prototype. It consists of a waveguide loaded dipole mode resonator and a monopole mode reference cavity, both operating at 15 GHz, to be compatible with the bunch frequencies at the CLIC Test Facility. Requirements, design concept, numerical analysis, and practical considerations are discussed.

  3. CLIC and CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Tecker, F

    2008-01-01

    The CLIC study has been exploring the scheme for an electron-positron Collider (CLIC) with high luminosity (10$^{34}$ - 10$^{35}$ cm2/s) and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for physics. The CLIC Test Facility CTF3, built at CERN by an international collaboration, aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the CLIC scheme by 2010. CTF3 consists of a 150 MeV electron linac followed by a 42 m long delay loop and an 84 m combiner ring, followed by a two-beam test stand and a test decelerator. The linac and delay loop have been previously commissioned, while the combiner ring has been recently completed. After a presentation of the recent CLIC parameters, the status of the test facility, the experimental results achieved and the future plans will be presented.

  4. New clic-g structure design

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082335

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of the Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure is called ‘CLIC-G’. It is described in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report (CDR) [1]. As shown in Fig. 1, a regular cell of the structure has four waveguides to damp unwanted high-order-modes (HOMs). These waveguides are dimensioned to cut off the fundamental working frequency in order to prevent the degradation of the fundamental mode Q-factor. The cell geometry and HOM damping loads had been extensively optimized in order to maximize the RF-to-beam efficiency, to minimize the cost, and to meet the beam dynamics and the high gradient RF constraints [2

  5. CLIC Drive Beam Phase Stabilisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schulte, Daniel

    The thesis presents phase stability studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and focuses in particular on CLIC Drive Beam longitudinal phase stabilisation. This topic constitutes one of the main feasibility challenges for CLIC construction and is an essential component of the current CLIC stabilisation campaign. The studies are divided into two large interrelated sections: the simulation studies for the CLIC Drive Beam stability, and measurements, data analysis and simulations of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) Drive Beam phase errors. A dedicated software tool has been developed for a step-by-step analysis of the error propagation through the CLIC Drive Beam. It uses realistic RF potential and beam loading amplitude functions for the Drive and Main Beam accelerating structures, complete models of the recombination scheme and compressor chicane as well as of further CLIC Drive Beam modules. The tool has been tested extensively and its functionality has been verified. The phase error propagation at CLIC h...

  6. Estimates of dispersive effects in a bent NLC Main Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Syphers and Leo Michelotti

    2000-10-31

    An alternative being considered for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) is not to tunnel in a straight line but to bend the Main Linac into an arc so as to follow a gravitational equipotential. The authors begin here an examination of the effects that this would have on vertical dispersion, with its attendant consequences on synchrotron radiation and emittance growth by looking at two scenarios: a gentle continuous bending of the beam to follow an equipotential surface, and an introduction of sharp bends at a few sites in the linac so as to reduce the maximum sagitta produced.

  7. CLIC Status and Outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Stapnes, Stapnes

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider study (CLIC) is in the process of completing a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for a multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider. The CLICconcept is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures. The RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is produced by a novel two beam acceleration scheme, where power is extracted from a high current drive beam that runs parallel with the main linac. In order to establish the feasibility of this concept a number of key issues have been addressed. A short summary of the progress and status of the corresponding studies will be given, as well as an outline of the preparation and work towards an implementation plan by 2016.

  8. Development of input power coupler for ERL main linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing the 1.3GHz 9-cell superconducting cavities for realizing the ERL under the collaboration between KEK, JAEA, ISSP, and other institutes. A power coupler is designed for the ERL main linac superconducting cavity. Estimated input power is about 20kW for 20MV/m ERL operation. This coupler is based on the STF-BL input coupler, which adopts the TRISTAN type coaxial coupler, and some modifications are applied for the CW 20kW power operation. Now we are developing the high power coupler test stand to carry out the components test of the ceramic windows and bellows by using a 30kW IOT. In this paper, we report the design strategy of the input power coupler for ERL main linac and the recent status of the high power coupler test stand. (author)

  9. Submicron multi-bunch BPM for CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmickler, H.; Soby, L.; /CERN; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    A common-mode free cavity BPM is currently under development at Fermilab within the ILC-CLIC collaboration. This monitor will be operated in a CLIC Main Linac multi-bunch regime, and needs to provide both, high spatial and time resolution. We present the design concept, numerical analysis, investigation on tolerances and error effects, as well as simulations on the signal response applying a multi-bunch stimulus. The proposed CERN linear collider (CLIC) requires a very precise measurement of beam trajectory to preserve the low emittance when transporting the beam through the Main Linac. An energy chirp within the bunch train will be applied to measure and minimize the dispersion effects, which require high resolution (in both, time and space) beam position monitors (BPM) along the beam-line. We propose a low-Q waveguide loaded TM{sub 110} dipole mode cavity as BPM, which is complemented by a TM{sub 010} monopole mode resonator of same resonant frequency for reference signal purposes. The design is based on a well known TM{sub 110} selective mode coupling idea.

  10. Design of main linac emittance tuning bumps for the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Eliasson, Peder

    2008-01-01

    The installation of elements in the main linac of future linear colliders can only be done with a limited precision. The inevitable misalignments lead to unacceptable emittance growth. Beam-based alignment, e.g., one-to-one correction, dispersion free steering, or ballistic alignment, is necessary to reduce the emittance growth. In some cases, this is, however, not sufficient. For further reduction of the emittance growth, so-called emittance tuning bumps have to be used. A general strategy for the design of emittance tuning bumps has been developed and tested. Simulations suggest that the method can be conveniently used to understand the weaknesses of existing emittance tuning bumps and to significantly improve their performance in terms of, e.g., emittance reduction capability and convergence speed. An example of an application is the design of ten orthogonal knobs that, according to simulations, can reduce the normalized emittance growth in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) main linac from 23.8 to 0.34 nm...

  11. Fluka and thermo-mechanical studies for the CLIC main dump

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, Alessio; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    In order to best cope with the challenge of absorbing the multi-MW beam, a water beam dump at the end of the CLIC post-collision line has been proposed. The design of the dump for the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) was checked against with a set of FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, for the estimation of the peak and total power absorbed by the water and the vessel. Fluence spectra of escaping particles and activation rates of radio-nuclides were computed as well. Finally, the thermal transient behavior of the water bath and a thermo-mechanical analysis of the preliminary design of the window were done.

  12. Studies on the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC two-beam module

    CERN Document Server

    Nousiainen, R; Österberg, K

    2010-01-01

    To fulfil the mechanical requirements set by the luminosity goals of the CLIC collider, currently under study, the 2-m two-beam modules, the shortest repetitive elements in the main linac, have to be controlled at micrometer level. At the same time these modules are exposed to variable high power dissipation while the accelerator is ramped up to nominal power as well as when the mode of CLIC operation is varied. This will result into inevitable temperature excursions driving mechanical distortions in and between different module components. A FEM model is essential to estimate and simulate the fundamental thermo-mechanical behaviour of the CLIC two-beam module to facilitate its design and development. In this paper, the fundamental thermal environments for the RF-components of the module are described. Also the thermal and structural results for the studied module configuration are presented showing the fundamental thermo-mechanical behaviour under the main CLIC collider operation conditions.

  13. A Multi-TeV Linear Collider Based on CLIC Technology CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, P; Draper, M; Garvey, T; Lebrun, P; Peach, K; Phinney, N; Schmickler, H; Schulte, D; Toge, N

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the accelerator studies for a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The CLIC concept as described in the report is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures where the RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The focus of CLIC R&D over the last years has been on addressing a set of key feasibility issues that are essential for proving the fundamental validity of the CLIC concept. The status of these feasibility studies are described and summarized. The report also includes a technical description of the accelerator components and R&D to develop the most important parts and methods, as well as a description of the civil engineering and technical services associated with the installation. Several larger system tests have been performed to validate the two-beam scheme, and of particular importance are the results from ...

  14. Positron source investigation by using CLIC drive beam for Linac-LHC based e+p collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arιkan, Ertan; Aksakal, Hüsnü

    2012-08-01

    Three different methods which are alternately conventional, Compton backscattering and Undulator based methods employed for the production of positrons. The positrons to be used for e+p collisions in a Linac-LHC (Large Hadron Collider) based collider have been studied. The number of produced positrons as a function of drive beam energy and optimum target thickness has been determined. Three different targets have been used as a source investigation which are W75-Ir25, W75-Ta25, and W75-Re25 for three methods. Estimated number of the positrons has been performed with FLUKA simulation code. Then, these produced positrons are used for following Adiabatic matching device (AMD) and capture efficiency is determined. Then e+p collider luminosity corresponding to the methods mentioned above have been calculated by CAIN code.

  15. Design and construction of the main linac module for the superconducting energy recovery linac project at Cornell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell University has been designing and building superconducting accelerators for various applications for more than 50 years. Currently, an energy-recovery linac (ERL) based synchrotron-light facility is proposed making use of the existing CESR facility. As part of the phase 1 R and D program funded by the NSF, critical challenges in the design were addressed, one of them being a full linac cryo-module. It houses 6 superconducting cavities- operated at 1.8 K in continuous wave (CW) mode - with individual HOM absorbers and one magnet/ BPM section. Pushing the limits, a high quality factor of the cavities (2⋅1010) and high beam currents (100 mA accelerated plus 100 mA decelerated) are targeted. We will present the design of the main linac cryo-module (MLC) being finalized recently, its cryogenic features and report on the status of the fabrication which started in late 2012

  16. X-band crab cavities for the CLIC beam delivery system

    OpenAIRE

    Burt, Graeme; Ambattu, Praveen; Dexter, Amos; Abram, Thomas; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.; Jones, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to m...

  17. Developments in Beam-Based Alignment and Steering of the Next Linear Collider Main Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Next Linear Collider main linacs are 13 km linear accelerators which each contain approximately 750 hybrid iron/permanent-magnet quadrupoles in a FODO array. The small amount of vertical emittance dilution permitted in the main linacs implies a tight tolerance on the RMS distance between the beam and the centers of the quads. We describe two methods for measuring the offsets between the quads and their integrated beam position monitors, and three algorithms for steering the main linac to minimize the emittance dilution. Simulation studies of the alignment and steering algorithms are presented

  18. Beam dynamics design of the main accelerating section with KONUS in the CSR-LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao-Hu, Zhang; Jia-Wen, Xia; Xue-Jun, Yin; Heng, Du

    2013-01-01

    The CSR-LINAC injector has been proposed in Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The linac mainly consists of two parts, the RFQ and the IH-DTL. The KONUS (Kombinierte Null Grad Struktur) concept has been introduced into the DTL section. In this paper, the re-matching of the main accelerating section will be finished in the 3.7 MeV/u scheme and the new beam dynamics design up to 7 MeV/u will be also shown. Through the beam re-matching, the relative emittance growth has been suppressed greatly along the linac.

  19. CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Multimedia

    Kossyvakis, I; Faus-golfe, A

    2007-01-01

    The design of CLIC is based on a two-beam scheme, where short pulses of high power 30 GHz RF are extracted from a drive beam running parallel to the main beam. The 3rd generation CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) will demonstrate the generation of the drive beam with the appropriate time structure, the extraction of 30 GHz RF power from this beam, as well as acceleration of a probe beam with 30 GHz RF cavities. The project makes maximum use of existing equipment and infrastructure of the LPI complex, which became available after the closure of LEP.

  20. Wakefield and surface electromagnetic field optimisation of manifold damped accelerating structures for CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main travelling wave linacs of the compact linear collider (CLIC) operate at a frequency of 11.9942 GHz with a phase advance per cell of 2π/3. In order to minimise the overall footprint of the accelerator, large accelerating gradients are sought. The present baseline design for the main linacs of CLIC demands an average electric field of 100 MV/m. To achieve this in practical cavities entails the dual challenges of minimising the potential for electrical breakdown and ensuring the beam excited wakefield is sufficiently suppressed. We present a design to meet both of these conditions, together with a description of the structure, CLICDDSA, expressively designed to experimentally test the ability of the structure to cope with high powers.

  1. First Considerations Concerning an Optimized Cavity Design for the Main Linac of BERLinPro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (BERLinPro) is designed to develop and demonstrate CW linac technology and expertise required to drive next-generation Energy Recovery Linacs. Strongly HOM-damped multicell 1.3 GHz cavities are required for the main linac. The optimization of the cavities presented here is primarily based on the CEBAF 1.5 GHz 5-cell high-current cavity design, including HOM waveguide couplers. The cavity was scaled to 1.3 GHz and extended to 7 cells. Modifications to the end group design have also been studied. An effort was also made to reduce the ratio Epk/Eacc while still permitting HOMs to propagate.

  2. First Considerations Concerning an Optimized Cavity Design for the Main Linac of BERLinPro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Riemann, T. Weis, W. Anders, J. Knobloch, A. Neumann, H.-W. Glock, C. Potratz, U. van Rienen, F. Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    The Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (BERLinPro) is designed to develop and demonstrate CW linac technology and expertise required to drive next-generation Energy Recovery Linacs. Strongly HOM-damped multicell 1.3 GHz cavities are required for the main linac. The optimization of the cavities presented here is primarily based on the CEBAF 1.5 GHz 5-cell high-current cavity design, including HOM waveguide couplers. The cavity was scaled to 1.3 GHz and extended to 7 cells. Modifications to the end group design have also been studied. An effort was also made to reduce the ratio Epk/Eacc while still permitting HOMs to propagate.

  3. The main linac cavity for Cornell's energy recovery linac: Cavity design through horizontal cryomodule prototype test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future particle accelerators will require continuous wave operation of SRF cavities capable of supporting high beam currents. An example of this is the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) at Cornell University, a next generation light source designed to run high currents (100 mA) with a high bunch repetition rate (1.3 GHz). Obtaining the beam emittance necessary to meet design specification requires strong damping of higher-order modes that can lead to beam breakup. We discuss the optimization and verification of the accelerating cavity. Next we show that an ERL constructed from the optimized cavity geometry – including realistic shape errors – can support beam currents in excess of 300 mA while still maintaining beam stability. A niobium prototype 7-cell cavity was fabricated and tested in a horizontal cryomodule. We show that the prototype cavity exceeds quality factor and gradient specifications of 2×1010 at 16.2 MV/m at 1.8 K by 50%, reaching Q=(3.0±0.3)×1010. The prototype cavity also satisfies all design constraints and has a higher order mode spectrum consistent with the optimized shape geometry. At 1.6 K, the cavity set a record for quality factor of a multicell cavity installed in a horizontal cryomodule reaching Q=(6.1±0.6)×1010

  4. Quadrupole Centering and Beam Steering in the Next Linear Collider Main Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate measurement of quadrupole-to-BPM center offsets and use of this information in an auto-steering algorithm are two essential components of emittance preservation in the Next Linear Collider main linac. The authors present the results of an analytic/simulation study of possible statistical and systematic limitations on the measurement of quad-BPM center offsets. These results are incorporated in a simulation study of a potential main linac steering algorithm which relies entirely on remote-controlled magnet and RF-structure positioning devices to minimize emittance dilution. The effects of ground motion during the alignment process are also considered

  5. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but considered

  6. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H. (High Energy Physics); (Many)

    2012-02-10

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but

  7. Numerical investigation of transient beam loading compensation in JLC X-band main linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrachev, I.V. [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki; Higo, T.

    1996-06-01

    In the present paper, two methods, `staggered timing` and `RF modulation`, were studied for the transient beam loading compensation in the JLC X-band main linac. The inter bunch energy spread was found to be easily reduced down to less than {+-}0.06% with 10 sets of injection timings along the linac in the former case while with a simple linear ramping of the input RF voltage in the latter case. For both cases the energy transfer efficiencies from the power source to the beam were exactly the same. The tolerance of the beam intensity jitter was found to be {+-}1% for the multibunch energy spread of {+-}0.1%. (author)

  8. Study of an ILC Main Linac that Follows the Earth Curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Eliasson, P; Poirier, F; Schulte, Daniel; Walker, N

    2006-01-01

    In the base line configuration, the tunnel of the ILC will follow the earth curvature. The emittance growth in a curved main linac has been studied including static and dynamic imperfections. These include effects due to current ripples in the power supplies of the steering coils and the impact of the beam position monitors scale errors.

  9. CERN: Making CLIC tick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheme for counter-rotating proton beams in a new superconducting ring to be built in CERN's existing 27-kilometre LEP tunnel is being pushed as the Laboratory's main construction project for the 1990s, research and development continues in parallel for an eventual complementary attack on new physics frontiers with CERN's Linear Collider - CLIC - firing TeV electron and positron beams at each other

  10. $2\\times250$ GeV CLIC $\\gamma\\gamma$ Collider Based on its Drive Beam FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Aksakal, Husnu

    2007-01-01

    CLIC is a linear $e^+e^-$ ($\\gamma\\gamma$) collider project which uses a drive beam to accelerate the main beam. The drive beam provides RF power for each corresponding unit of the main linac through energy extracting RF structures. CLIC has a wide range of center-of-mass energy options from 150 GeV to 3 TeV. The present paper contains optimization of Free Electron Laser (FEL) using one bunch of CLIC drive beam in order to provide polarized light amplification using appropriate wiggler and luminosity spectrum of $\\gamma\\gamma$ collider for $E_{cm}$=0.5 TeV. Then amplified laser can be converted to a polarized high-energy $\\gamma$ beam at the Conversion point (CP-prior to electron positron interaction point) in the process of Compton backscattering. At the CP a powerful laser pulse (FEL) focused to main linac electrons (positrons). Here this scheme described and it is show that CLIC drive beam parameters satisfy the requirement of FEL additionally essential undulator parameters has been defined. Achievable $\\g...

  11. Cherenkov Fibers for Beam Loss Monitoring at the CLIC Two Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Holzer, E B

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at a nominal center of mass energy of 3TeV and is based on normal conducting travelling-wave accelerating structures, operating at very high field gradients of 100 MV/m. Such high fields require high peak power and hence a novel power source, the CLIC two beam system, has been developed, in which a high intensity, low energy drive beam (DB) supplies energy to a high energy, low intensity main beam (MB). At the Two Beam Modules (TBM), which compose the 2x21km long CLIC main linac, a protection against beam losses resulting from badly controlled beams is necessary and particularly challenging, since the beam power of both main beam (14 MW) and drive beam (70 MW) is impressive. To avoid operational downtimes and severe damages to machine components, a general Machine Protection System (MPS) scheme has been developed. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a key element of the CLIC machine protection system. Its main role will be to detect p...

  12. CLIC Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    De Melis, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson and with upgrades to higher energy and luminosity, the LHC is mapping the route of particle physics into the future. The next step in this journey of discovery could be a linear electron-positron collider, which would complement the LHC and allow high precision measurements of the Higgs boson, the top quark and electroweak processes in addition to possible new physics beyond the Standard Model. The Compact Linear Collider is under development by two worldwide collaborations, pushing the limits of particle acceleration and detection. Technological R&D, physics simulations and engineering studies must all come together to make CLIC a reality.

  13. Technological challenges of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Döbert, Steffen; Arnau-Izquierdo, G; Redaelli, Stefano; Mainaud, Helène; Lefèvre, Thibaut

    2006-01-01

    Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale and beyond to very high precision. While the International Linear Collider (ILC) scheme of a collider in the 0.5 - 1 TeV range enters the engineering design phase, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study explores the technical feasibility of a collider capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain. Key ingredients of the CLIC scheme are acceleration at high-frequency (30 GHz) and high-gradient (150 MV/m) in normal conducting structures and the use of the so-called Two Beam Acceleration concept, where a high-charge electron beam (drive beam) running parallel to the main beam is decelerated to provide the RF power to accelerate the main beam itself. A vigorous R&D effort is presently developed by the CLIC international collaboration to demonstrate its feasibility by 2010, when the first physics results from LHC should be available to guide the choice of the centre-of-mass energy better suited to explore the futu...

  14. The 30 GHz transfer structure for the CLIC study

    CERN Document Server

    Carron, G; Thorndahl, L

    1998-01-01

    In the so-called "Two-Beam Acceleration Scheme" the energy of a drive beam is converted to rf power by means of a "Transfer Structure", which plays the role of power source. In the Transfer Structure the bunched drive beam is decelerated by the electromagnetic field which it induces and builds up by the coherent interaction of successive bunches with the chosen longitudinal mode. The CLIC Transfer Structure is original in that it operates at 30 GHz and uses teeth-like corrugations to slow down the hybrid TM mode to make it synchronous with the drive beam. The beam energy is transformed into rf power, which travels along the structure and is collected by the output couplers. The 30 GHz rf power is then transported by means of two waveguides to two main linac disk-loaded accelerating structures. This report describes the CLIC Transfer Structure design, 3-D computer simulations, model construction and measure-ments as well as the prototype construction and testing with the low energy beam in the CLIC Test Facili...

  15. Analytical treatment of the emittance growth in the main linacs of future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the single and multibunch emittance growths in the main linac of a linear collider are analytically treated in analogy to the Brownian motion of a molecule, and the analytical formulae for the emittance growth due to accelerating structure misalignment errors are obtained by solving Langevin equation. The same set of formulae is derived also by solving directly Fokker-Planck equation. Comparisons with numerical simulation results are made and the agreement is quite well. (author)

  16. Numerical investigation of transient beam loading compensation in JLC X-band main linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, two methods, 'staggered timing' and 'RF modulation', were studied for the transient beam loading compensation in the JLC X-band main linac. The inter bunch energy spread was found to be easily reduced down to less than ±0.06% with 10 sets of injection timings along the linac in the former case while with a simple linear ramping of the input RF voltage in the latter case. For both cases the energy transfer efficiencies from the power source to the beam were exactly the same. The tolerance of the beam intensity jitter was found to be ±1% for the multibunch energy spread of ±0.1%. (author)

  17. Klystron Modulators for the 3 TeV CLIC Scheme An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, P

    2001-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) design is based on the Two-Beam technology being developed at CERN. The Drive Beam accelerator will have about 200 multi-beam klystron-modulator (MBK-M) RF power sources for each drive beam linac. These multi-beam klystrons (MBKs) should provide up to 50 MW peak power at 937 MHz, with a 100 ms pulse width and operating at 100 Hz repetition frequency. The CLIC drive beam injector will also use a number of these same MBK-Ms operating at slightly lower power levels. A 0.5 MW peak power, 468 MHz klystron with a bandwidth of around 150 MHz will be required for the sub-harmonic buncher in each drive beam injector chain as well. The Main Beams injector complex is required to deliver e+ and e- beams at 9 GeV via the transfer lines to the CLIC Main Beam accelerator. The present injector complex design uses a series of linacs to accelerate the electron and positron beams coming from RF guns working at 1.5 GHz up to an energy of 1.98 GeV before they are put into damping rings. Each of ...

  18. Beam dynamics and wakefield suppression in interleaved damped and detuned structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, A; Khan, V F; Jones, R M; Latina, A; Nesmiyan, I; Riddone, G

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of multiple bunches of charged particles in the main linacs of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) with high accelerating fields provides two major challenges: firstly, to ensure the surface electromagnetic fields do not cause electrical breakdown and subsequent surface damage, and secondly, to ensure the beam-excited wakefields are sufficiently suppressed to avoid appreciable emittance dilution. In the baseline design for CLIC, heavy wakefield suppression is used (Q ~ 10) [1] and this ensures the beam quality is well-preserved [2]. Here we discuss an alternative means to suppress the wakefield which relies on strong detuning of the cell dipole frequencies, together with moderate damping, effected by manifolds which are slot-coupled to each accelerating cell. This damped and detuned wakefield suppression scheme is based on the methodology developed for the Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider (JLC/NLC) [3]. Here we track the multi-bunch beam down the complete collider, u...

  19. Study of the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the CLIC Two-Beam Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, F; Riddone, G; Österberg, K; Kossyvakis, I; Gudkov, D; Samochkine, A

    2013-01-01

    The final luminosity target of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) imposes a micron-level stability requirement on the two-meter repetitive two-beam modules constituting the main linacs. Two-beam prototype modules are being assembled to extensively study their thermo-mechanical behaviour under different operation modes. The power dissipation occurring in the modules will be reproduced and the efficiency of the corresponding cooling systems validated. At the same time, the real environmental conditions present in the CLIC tunnel will be studied. Air conditioning and ventilation systems have been installed in the dedicated laboratory. The air temperature will be changed from 20 to 40°C, while the air flow rate will be varied up to 0.8 m/s. During all experimental tests, the alignment of the RF structures will be monitored to investigate the influence of power dissipation and air temperature on the overall thermo-mechanical behaviour. \

  20. Thermo-Mechanical tests for the CLIC two-beam module study

    CERN Document Server

    Xydou, A; Riddone, G; Daskalaki, E

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity goal of CLIC requires micron level precision with respect to the alignment of the components on its two-meter long modules, composing the two main linacs. The power dissipated inside the module components introduces mechanical deformations affecting their alignment and therefore the resulting machine performance. Several two-beam prototype modules must be assembled to extensively measure their thermo-mechanical behavior under different operation modes. In parallel, the real environmental conditions present in the CLIC tunnel should be studied. The air conditioning and ventilation system providing specified air temperature and flow has been installed in the dedicated laboratory. The power dissipation occurring in the modules is being reproduced by the electrical heaters inserted inside the RF structure mock-ups and the quadrupoles. The efficiency of the cooling systems is being verified and the alignment of module components is monitored. The measurement results will be compared to finite elemen...

  1. A CLIC-Prototype Higgs Factory

    OpenAIRE

    Belusevic, Radoje; Higo, Toshiyasu

    2012-01-01

    We propose that a pair of electron linacs with high accelerating gradients and an optical FEL be built at an existing laboratory. The linacs would employ CLIC-type rf cavities and a klystron-based power source; a two-beam scheme could be implemented at a later stage. The proposed facility would serve primarily as an e+e-/gamma-gamma Higgs-boson factory. The rich set of final states in e+e- and gamma-gamma collisions would play an essential role in measuring the mass, spin, parity, two-photon ...

  2. CLIC PHYSICS OVERVIEW

    CERN Document Server

    Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on the invited talk at the 17th Lomonosov Conference of Elementary Particle Physics, the physics program at the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on the Higgs physics studies. It will be demonstrated, on the basis of detailed physics and detector studies carried out at CLIC, that the CLIC is indeed a precision tool for studies both in the Higgs sector and beyond the Standard Model.

  3. CLIC MDI Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Gatignon, Lau

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to the layout of the CLIC Machine Detector Interface as it has been defined for the CLIC Conceptual Design Report. We concentrate on the specific case of the CLIC_SiD detector, although the push-pull concept for two detectors has been included in the design. Some recent work and developments are described as well. However, for the details we refer to the detailed technical talks at this conference.

  4. LHC and CLIC LLRF final reports

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, A; Woolley, B; Ambattu, P; Tahir, I; Syratchev, Igor; Wuensch, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Crab cavities rotate bunches from opposing beams to achieve effective head-on collision in CLIC or collisions at an adjustable angle in LHC. Without crab cavities 90% of achievable luminosity at CLIC would be lost. In the LHC, the crab cavities allow the same or larger integrated luminosity while reducing significantly the requested dynamic range of physics detectors. The focus for CLIC is accurate phase synchronisation of the cavities, adequate damping of wakefields and modest amplitude stability. For the LHC, the main LLRF issues are related to imperfections: beam offsets in cavities, RF noise, measurement noise in feedback loops, failure modes and mitigations. This report develops issues associated with synchronising the CLIC cavities. It defines an RF system and experiments to validate the approach. It reports on the development of hardware for measuring the phase performance of the RF distributions system and cavities. For the LHC, the hardware being very close to the existing LLRF, the report focuses on...

  5. The Cornell Main Linac Cryomodule: A Full Scale, High Q Accelerator Module for cw Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, R.; Bullock, B.; Elmore, B.; Clasby, B.; Furuta, F.; He, Y.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Liepe, M.; O'Connell, T.; Conway, J.; Quigley, P.; Sabol, D.; Sears, J.; Smith, E.; Veshcherevich, V.

    Cornell University is in the process of building a 10 m long superconducting accelerator module as a prototype of the main linac of a proposed ERL facility. This module houses 6 superconducting cavities- operated at 1.8 K in continuous wave (CW) mode - with individual HOM absorbers and one magnet/BPM section. In pushing the limits, a high quality factor of the cavities (2•1010) and high beam currents (100 mA accelerated plus 100 mA decelerated) were targeted. We will review the design shortly and present the results of the components tested before the assembly. This includes data of the quality-factors of all 6 cavities that we produced and treated in-house, the HOM absorber performance measured with beam on a test set-up as well as testing of the couplers and the tuners.

  6. Microwave Quadrupoles for Beam Break-Up Suppression in the NLC Main Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a preliminary study of the effect of using microwave quads (MQ's) instead of rf phase shifting to induce BNS damping in the main linac of the NLC collider. We consider MQ's running at X-band, and find that the total length of MQ's needed for the NLC is 6% of the total length of the accelerating structures. We show through simulations that, by using MQ's instead of phase shifting for BNS damping, the quad alignment tolerances can be relaxed but at the expense of shifting the tight tolerances to the MQ's; this can be advantageous if the MQ's can be better aligned than the quads. For the design final energy spread in the NLC of .3%, the quad tolerances are loosened by a factor of 2-3 when using MQ's. These tolerances can be loosened by an additional factor of 1.5, but at the cost of 1.7% in energy overhead

  7. Preparing for CLIC tests

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The Canon 5 undergoes first brazing for preparation in the CLIC study at the CLIC Test Facility 2 (CTF2). This will test injection for a proposed linear collider that will further explore discoveries made at the LHC. Electric fields in the canon will boost electrons into the acceleration fields of the collider.

  8. High performance electronics for alignment regulation on the CLIC 30GHz modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CERN is studying a linear collider (CLIC) to obtain electron-positron collisions with centre-of-mass energies in the TeV range. To demonstrate the feasibility of CLIC, a test facility (CTF2) is being constructed. CTF2 consists of 4 identical modules, each 1.4 m long module consists of 2 linac with a girder and a doublet or a triplet quadrupole. Girders are elements that support mechanically the cavities of the accelerator while the main objective of the quadrupole is to focus particle beams. The alignment system has 2 principal utilities. The first is to pre-align the elements to make the beam pass through the aperture and produce signals in beam position monitors. In respect to these signals the girders and the quadrupoles are moved for making the definitive alignment. The second utility is to maintain the elements in this position. The alignment control system of CTF2 must regulate the position of the girders and quadrupoles with a precision < 10 μm. In fact an accuracy of 1 μ has been obtained on CTF2. Thanks to its flexibility and its simplicity, the system is expected to adapt easily to CLIC even if it means to control modules that involve up to a maximum of 384 motors and 896 sensors

  9. X-band crab cavities for the CLIC beam delivery system

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Abram, T; Dolgashev, V; Tantawi, S; Jones, R M

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC.

  10. CLIC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The world's biggest and most powerful accelerator, the LHC, is mapping the route of particle physics for the future. The next step, to complement the LHC in exploring this new region, is most likely to be a linear electron-positron collider. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a novel approach to such a collider. It is currently under development by the CLIC collaboration, which is hosted at CERN.

  11. The booster linac of the Sparkle Company 18 MeV Cyclotron: main design elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sparkle Company (Casarano, Le) that is setting up a centre for production and research on radioisotopes for medical use, has requested to the ENEA Accelerator Laboratory a specific design of a linear accelerator for boosting the energy of its commercial cyclotron from 18 to 24 MeV, with the aim of implementing a small proton irradiation facility for radiobiology studies. This is the first case of coupling a cyclotron beam to a linac, that, if successful, can give rise to a new class of accelerators for proton therapy. The linac can accelerate only a very small portion of the cyclotron beam, due to the intrinsic mismatching of the two kind of accelerators both in the vertical and in the longitudinal phase planes. A beam transport line has been studied that besides matching at best the beam to the linac in the transverse plane, is equipped with a chopping system to lower drastically the primary beam power in order to protect the linac structure. The linac is SCDTL type, and operates at 3 GHz. In the following the results of the design are presented.

  12. A CLIC-Prototype Higgs Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Belusevic, Radoje

    2012-01-01

    We propose that a pair of electron linacs with high accelerating gradients and an optical FEL be built at an existing laboratory. The linacs would employ CLIC-type rf cavities and a klystron-based power source; a two-beam scheme could be implemented at a later stage. The proposed facility would serve primarily as an e+e-/gamma-gamma Higgs-boson factory. The rich set of final states in e+e- and gamma-gamma collisions would play an essential role in measuring the mass, spin, parity, two-photon width and trilinear self-coupling of the Higgs-boson, as well as its couplings to fermions and gauge bosons. These quantities are difficult to determine with only one initial state. For some processes within and beyond the Standard Model, the required CM energy is considerably lower at the proposed facility than at an e+e- or proton collider.

  13. CLIC Muon Sweeper Design

    CERN Document Server

    Aloev, A; Gatignon, L; Modena, M; Pilicer, B; Tapan, I

    2016-01-01

    There are several background sources which may affect the analysis of data and detector performans at the CLIC project. One of the important background source is halo muons, which are generated along the beam delivery system (BDS), for the detector performance. In order to reduce muon background, magnetized muon sweepers have been used as a shielding material that is already described in a previous study for CLIC [1]. The realistic muon sweeper has been designed with OPERA. The design parameters of muon sweeper have also been used to estimate muon background reduction with BDSIM Monte Carlo simulation code [2, 3].

  14. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D

    2015-01-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a meas- urement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → W b will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit tim- ing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC ver- tex det...

  15. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannheim, D.

    2015-03-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration.

  16. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R and D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration

  17. Measurements and Laboratory Tests on a Prototype Stripline Kicker for the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Belver-Aguilar, C; Toral, F; Barnes, MJ; Day, H

    2014-01-01

    The Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) of CLIC are required to reduce the beam emittances to the small values required for the main linacs. The injection and extraction, from the PDRs and DRs, are performed by kicker systems. To achieve both low beam coupling impedance and reasonable broadband impedancematching to the electrical circuit, striplines have been chosen for the kicker elements. Prototype striplines have been built: tests and measurements of these striplines have started. The goal of these tests is to characterize, without beam, the electromagnetic response of the striplines. The tests have been carried out at CERN. To study the signal transmission through the striplines, the measured S-parameters have been compared with simulations. In addition, measurements of longitudinal beam coupling impedance, using the coaxial wire method, are reported and compared with simulations.

  18. A Study of the Beam Physics in the CLIC Drive Beam Decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, Erik; Stapnes, Steinar

    2009-01-01

    CLIC is a study for a Multi-TeV e+e- linear collider, in which the rf power for the main linacs is extracted from 100 ampere electron drive beams, by the use of specially designed power extraction structures. Up to 90% of the beam energy is extracted from the drive beams along one kilometer long decelerator sectors, rendering the beam transport challenging. We have identified two major challenges for robust beam transport: the significant transverse wakes in the power extraction structures, and the large energy spread induced by the power extraction process. By beam dynamics studies we have qualified power extraction structure designs, leading to the present CLIC baseline structure in which the transverse wakes are sufficiently mitigated. We have further shown that the beam energy spread induced by the deceleration implies that standard 1-to-1 correction might not ensure satisfactory drive beam transport. As alternative, we propose a decelerator orbit correction scheme based on dispersion-free steering and ex...

  19. Superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project has two goals: to design, build, and test a small superconducting linac to serve as an energy booster for heavy ions from an FN tandem electrostatic accelerator, and to investigate various aspects of superconducting rf technology. The main design features of the booster are described, a status report on various components (resonators, rf control system, linac control system, cryostats, buncher) is given, and plans for the near future are outlined. Investigations of superconducting-linac technology concern studies on materials and fabrication techniques, resonator diagnostic techniques, rf-phase control, beam dynamics computer programs, asymmetry in accelerating field, and surface-treatment techniques. The overall layout of the to-be-proposed ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System, is shown; the ATLAS would use superconducting technology to produce beams of 5 to 25 MeV/A. 6 figures

  20. CLIC Post-Collision Line Luminosity Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B; Deacon, L; Geschwendtner, E

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC post collision line is designed to transport the un-collided beams and the products of the collided beams with a total power of 14MW to the main beam dump. Full Monte Carlo simulation has been done for the description of the CLIC luminosity monitoring in the post collision line. One method of the luminosity diagnostic is based on the detection of high energy muons produced by beamstrahlung photons in the main beam dump. The disrupted beam and the beamstrahlung photons produce at the order of 106 muons per bunch crossing per cm2, with energies higher than 10 GeV. Threshold Cherenkov counters are considered after the beam dump for the detection of these high energy muons. Another method for luminosity monitoring is presented using the direct detection of the beamstrahlung photons.

  1. Academic Training - Technological challenges of CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Technological challenges of CLIC R. Corsini, S. Doebert, S. Redaelli, T.Lefevre, CERN-AB and G. Arnau Izquierdo, H. Mainaud, CERN-TS Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale and beyond to very high precision. While the International Linear Collider (ILC) scheme of a collider in the 0.5 - 1 TeV range enters the engineering design phase, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study explores the technical feasibility of a collider capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain. Key ingredients of the CLIC scheme are acceleration at high-frequency (30 GHz) and high-gradient (150 MV/m) in normal conducting structures and the use of the so-called Two Beam Acceleration concept, where a high-charge electron beam (drive beam) running parallel to the main beam is decelerated to provide the RF power to accelerate the main beam itself. A vigorous R&...

  2. X-Band Crab Cavities for the CLIC Beam Delivery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC. Design of a crab cavity for CLIC is underway at the Cockcroft Institute in collaboration with SLAC. This effort draws on a large degree of synergy with the ILC crab cavity developed at the Cockcroft Institute and other deflecting structure development at SLAC. A study of phase and amplitude variations in the cavity suggests that the tolerances are very tight and require a 'beyond state of the art' LLRF control system. A study of cavity geometry and its effect on the cavity fields has been performed using Microwave studio. This study has suggested that for our cavity an iris radius between 4-5 mm is optimum with an iris thickness of 2-3 mm based on group velocity and peak fields. A study of the cavity wakefields show that the single bunch wakes are unlikely to be a problem but the short bunch spacing may cause the multi-bunch wakefields to be an issue. This will require some of the modes to be damped strongly so that the wake is damped significantly before any following bunch arrives. Various methods of damping have been investigated and suggest that

  3. X-Band Crab Cavities for the CLIC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Abram, T.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.

    2011-11-22

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC. Design of a crab cavity for CLIC is underway at the Cockcroft Institute in collaboration with SLAC. This effort draws on a large degree of synergy with the ILC crab cavity developed at the Cockcroft Institute and other deflecting structure development at SLAC. A study of phase and amplitude variations in the cavity suggests that the tolerances are very tight and require a 'beyond state of the art' LLRF control system. A study of cavity geometry and its effect on the cavity fields has been performed using Microwave studio. This study has suggested that for our cavity an iris radius between 4-5 mm is optimum with an iris thickness of 2-3 mm based on group velocity and peak fields. A study of the cavity wakefields show that the single bunch wakes are unlikely to be a problem but the short bunch spacing may cause the multi-bunch wakefields to be an issue. This will require some of the modes to be damped strongly so that the wake is damped significantly before any following bunch arrives. Various methods of damping have been investigated and

  4. CLIC Physics Overview

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)471575

    2016-01-01

    This paper, based on the invited talk given at the 17th Lomonosov Conference of Elementary Particle Physics, summarizes the physics program at CLIC, with particular emphasis on the Higgs physics studies. The physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, at 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV center-of-mass energies is reviewed. The energy-staged approach is motivated by the high-precision physics measurements in the Higgs and top sector as well as by direct and indirect searches for beyond the Standard Model physics. The first stage, at or above 350 GeV, gives access to precision Higgs physics through the Higgsstrahlung and WW-fusion production processes, providing absolute values of the Higgs couplings to fermions and bosons. This stage also addresses precision top physics around the top-pair-production threshold. The second stage, at 1.4 TeV, opens the energy frontier, allowing for the discovery of new physics phenomena. This stage also gives access to additional Higgs properties, such as the top-Yukawa co...

  5. CLIC accelerator modules under construction at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2012-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) study is dedicated to the design of an electron-positron (e- e+) linear accelerator, colliding particle beams at the energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC required luminosity can be reached with powerful particle beams (14 MW each) colliding with extremely small dimensions and high beam stability at the interaction point. The accelerated particle beams must have dimensions of 45 nm in the horizontal plane and 1 nm in the vertical plane. CLIC relies upon a novel two-beam acceleration concept in which the Radio Frequency (RF) power is extracted from a low energy but high-intensity particle beam, called Drive Beam (DB), and transferred to a parallel high energy accelerating particle beam, called Main Beam (MB). The extraction and transfer of the RF power is achieved by the Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) and the particle beam acceleration is achieved with high precision RF-Accelerating Structures (AS), operating at 11.9942 GHz with an accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m, whi...

  6. Status of the Stripline Beam Position Monitor developement for the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, A; Wendt, M; Faus-Golfe, A; Nappa, J M; Vilalte, S; Smith, S

    2013-01-01

    In collaboration with SLAC, LAPP and IFIC, a first prototype of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam and its associated readout electronics has been successfully tested in the CLIC Test Facility linac (CTF3) at CERN. In addition, a modified prototype with downstream terminated striplines is under development to improve the suppression of unwanted RF signal interference. This paper presents the results of the beam tests, and the most relevant aspects for the modified stripline BPM design and its expected improvements.

  7. The CLIC Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Robson, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    The physics and detector studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced. A staged programme of $e^{+}e^{−}$ collisions covering $\\sqrt{s}$ = 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV, and 3 TeV would allow precise measurements of Higgs boson couplings, in many cases to the percent level. This corresponds to precision higher than that expected for the high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider. Such precise Higgs coupling measurements would allow sensitivity to a variety of new physics models and the ability to distinguish between them. In addition, new particles directly produced in pairs could be measured with great precision, and measurements in the top-quark sector would provide sensitivity to new physics effects at the scales of tens of TeV.

  8. Experimental Study of the Effect of Beam Loading on RF Breakdown Rate in CLIC High-Gradient Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tecker, F; Kelisani, M; Doebert, S; Grudiev, A; Quirante, J; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wuensch, W; Kononenko, O; Solodko, A; Lebet, S

    2013-01-01

    RF breakdown is a key issue for the multi-TeV highluminosity e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Breakdowns in the high-gradient accelerator structures can deflect the beam and decrease the desired luminosity. The limitations of the accelerating structures due to breakdowns have been studied so far without a beam present in the structure. The presence of the beam modifies the distribution of the electrical and magnetic field distributions, which determine the breakdown rate. Therefore an experiment has been designed for high power testing a CLIC prototype accelerating structure with a beam present in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). A special beam line allows extracting a beam with nominal CLIC beam current and duration from the CTF3 linac. The paper describes the beam optics design for this experimental beam line and the commissioning of the experiment with beam.

  9. Development of Stripline Kickers for Low Emittance Rings: Application to the Beam Extraction Kicker for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)728476; Toral Fernandez, Fernando

    In the framework of the design study of Future Linear Colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several injection and extraction systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. The work of this Thesis consists of the design, fabrication and laboratory tests of the first stripline kicker prototype for beam extraction from the CLIC DRs, although the methodology proposed can be extended to stripline kickers for any low emittance ring. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most...

  10. First phase of CLIC R&D complete

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Let’s turn back the clocks to 2002: the LHC is still under construction, the wrap-up of the LEP physics programme is still in recent memory and the future of electron-positron accelerators at CERN is ambiguous. It was then that CLIC set out to prove the feasibility of their novel accelerator design in the CTF3 test facility. Though once a tall order for the collaboration, the recently released CLIC Conceptual Design Report has proven many of the major design elements… bringing to an end the first phase of CLIC R&D and pointing toward detailed performance optimisation studies in the next phase.   Streak camera images of the final beam, illustrating the combination of beams in the Combiner Ring. Over a decade ago, the CTF3 team set up shop in the vacated LIL injector site, once home to the weathered machine that delivered electrons and positrons to LEP. Rebuilding and upgrading the machine piece by piece, the CTF3 team converted this mA linac into a high-current drive b...

  11. CLIC crab cavity design optimisation for maximum luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  12. CLIC Crab Cavity Design Optimisation for Maximum Luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, A.C.; /Lancaster U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Burt, G.; /Lancaster U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Ambattu, P.K.; /Lancaster U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2012-04-25

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  13. CLIC crab cavity design optimisation for maximum luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, A.C., E-mail: a.dexter@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K. [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Jones, R. [University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-21

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  14. LHC and VLHC Based ep Colliders: E-Linac vs e-Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Gladilin, L; Recepoglu, E; Sultansoy, S

    2005-01-01

    Linac-ring analogues of the LHC and VLHC based standard type ep collider proposals are discussed. It is shown that sufficiently high luminosities can be obtained with TESLA-like linacs, whereas essential modifications are required for CLIC technology. The physics search potential of proposed ep colliders is demonstrated using pair production of heavy quarks as an example.

  15. Beam Position Monitoring at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Prochnow, J

    2003-01-01

    At the European Organisation for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva, Switzerland the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) for high energy physics is studied. To achieve the envisaged high luminosity the quadrupole magnets and radio-frequency accelerating structures have to be actively aligned with micron precision and submicron resolution. This will be done using beam-based algorithms which rely on beam position information inside of quadrupoles and accelerating structures. After a general introduction to the CLIC study and the alignment algorithms, the concept of the interaction between beams and radio-frequency structures is given. In the next chapter beam measurements and simulations are described which were done to study the performance of cavity beam position monitors (BPM). A BPM design is presented which is compatible with the multi-bunch operation at CLIC and could be used to align the quadrupoles. The beam position inside the accelerating structures will be measured by using the structures thems...

  16. The CLIC positron source based on compton schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, L; Braun, H; Papaphilippou, Y; Schulte, D; Vivoli, A; Zimmermann, F; Dadoun, O; Lepercq, P; Roux, R; Variola, A; Zomer, F; Pogorelski, I; Yakimenko, V; Gai, W; Liu, W; Kamitani, T; Omori, T; Urakawa, J; Kuriki, M; Takahasi, TM; Bulyak, E; Gladkikh, P; Chehab, R; Clarke, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a Compton process. In one option, Compton backscattering takes place in a so-called “Compton ring”, where an electron beam of 1 GeV interacts with circularly-polarized photons in an optical resonator. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent on to an amorphous target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The nominal CLIC bunch population is 4.2x109 particles per bunch at the exit of the Pre-Damping Ring (PDR). Since the photon flux coming out from a "Compton ring" is not sufficient to obtain the requested charge, a stacking process is required in the PDR. Another option is to use a Compton Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) where a quasicontinual stacking in the PDR could be achieved. A third option is to use a "Compton Linac" which would not require stacking. We describe the overall scheme as well as advantages and constraints of the three option...

  17. Design and evaluation of a low-level RF control system analog/digital receiver for the ILC main Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed RF distribution scheme for the two 15 km long ILC LINACs, uses one klystron to feed 26 superconducting RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. For a precise control of the vector sum of the signals coming from the SC cavities, the control system needs a high performance, low cost, reliable and modular multichannel receiver. At Fermilab we developed a 96 channel, 1.3 GHz analog/digital receiver for the ILC LINAC LLRF control system. In the paper we present a balanced design approach to the specifications of each receiver section, the design choices made to fulfill the goals and a description of the prototyped system. The design is tested by measuring standard performance parameters, such as noise figure, linearity and temperature sensitivity. Measurements show that the design meets the specifications and it is comparable to other similar systems developed at other laboratories, in terms of performance

  18. Design and evaluation of a low-level RF control system analog/digital receiver for the ILC main LINACs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed RF distribution scheme for the two 15 km long ILC LINACs uses one klystron to feed 26 superconducting RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. For a precise control of the vector sum of the signals coming from the SC cavities, the control system needs a high-performance, low-cost, reliable and modular multichannel receiver. At Fermilab we developed a 96-channel, 1.3 GHz analog/digital receiver for the ILC LINAC LLRF control system. In this paper we present a balanced design approach to the specifications of each receiver section, the design choices made to fulfill the goals and a description of the prototyped system. The design is tested by measuring standard performance parameters, such as noise figure, linearity and temperature sensitivity. Measurements show that the design meets the specifications and it is comparable to other similar systems developed at other laboratories, in terms of performance

  19. A Versatile Beam Loss Monitoring System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kastriotou, Maria; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Nebot Del Busto, Eduardo; Tecker, Frank; Welsch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The design of a potential CLIC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system presents multiple challenges. To successfully cover the 48 km of beamline, ionisation chambers and optical fibre BLMs are under investigation. The former fulfils all CLIC requirements but would need more than 40000 monitors to protect the whole facility. For the latter, the capability of reconstructing the original loss position with a multi-bunch beam pulse and multiple loss locations still needs to be quantified. Two main sources of background for beam loss measurements are identified for CLIC. The two-beam accelerator scheme introduces so-called crosstalk, i.e. detection of losses originating in one beam line by the monitors protecting the other. Moreover, electrons emitted from the inner surface of RF cavities and boosted by the high RF gradients may produce signals in neighbouring BLMs, limiting their ability to detect real beam losses. This contribution presents the results of dedicated experiments performed in the CLIC Test Facility to qu...

  20. Requirements of CLIC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Holzer, EB; Jonker, M; Mallows, S; Otto, T; Welsch, C

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) [1] is a proposed multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider being designed by a world-wide collaboration. It is based on a novel twobeam acceleration scheme in which two beams (drive and main beam) are placed in parallel to each other and energy is transferred from the drive beam to the main one. Beam losses on either of them can have catastrophic consequences for the machine, because of high intensity (drive beam) or high energy and small emittance (main beam). In the framework of machine protection, a Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has to be put in place. This paper discusses the requirements for the beam loss system in terms of detector sensitivity, resolution, dynamic range and ability to distinguish losses originating from various sources. The two-beam module where the protection from beam losses is particularly challenging and important, is studied.

  1. CLIC expands to include the Southern Hemisphere

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Australia has recently joined the CLIC collaboration: the enlargement will bring new expertise and resources to the project, and is especially welcome in the wake of CERN budget redistributions following the recent adoption of the Medium Term Plan.   The countries involved in CLIC collaboration With the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 26 August 2010, the ACAS network (Australian Collaboration for Accelerator Science) became the 40th member of in the multilateral CLIC collaboration making Australia the 22nd country to join the collaboration. “The new MoU was signed by the ACAS network, which includes the Australian Synchrotron and the University of Melbourne”, explains Jean-Pierre Delahaye, CLIC Study Leader. “Thanks to their expertise, the Australian institutes will contribute greatly to the CLIC damping rings and the two-beam test modules." Institutes from any country wishing to join the CLIC collaboration are invited to assume responsibility o...

  2. CLIC vertex detector R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar

    2016-07-01

    A vertex detector concept is under development for the proposed multi-TeV linear e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). To perform precision physics measurements in a challenging environment, the CLIC vertex detector pushes the technological requirements to the limits. This paper reviews the requirements for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensor, readout, powering and cooling.

  3. Development of 20 kW input power coupler for 1.3 GH ERL main linac. High power test of the renewed ceramic window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We started to develop an input power coupler for a 1.3 GHz ERL superconducting cavity for main linac. We fabricated power coupler components such as ceramic windows and bellows and carried out the high-power test of the components by using a CW 30 kW IOT power source. During this test, the ceramic window was broken by the sudden heat load. We found that this heat load occurred by the unexpected dipole mode. We renewed the ceramic window and successfully carried out the high power test up to CW 27 kW input power. (author)

  4. Beam position monitoring at CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Prochnow, Jan Erik

    2003-01-01

    At the European Organisation for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva, Switzerland the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) for high energy physics is studied. To achieve the envisaged high luminosity the quadrupole magnets and radio-frequency accelerating structures have to be actively aligned with micron precision and submicron resolution. This will be done using beam-based algorithms which rely on beam position information inside of quadrupoles and accelerating structures. After a gener...

  5. Tissue and subcellular distribution of CLIC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards John C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CLIC1 is a chloride channel whose cellular role remains uncertain. The distribution of CLIC1 in normal tissues is largely unknown and conflicting data have been reported regarding the cellular membrane fraction in which CLIC1 resides. Results New antisera to CLIC1 were generated and were found to be sensitive and specific for detecting this protein. These antisera were used to investigate the distribution of CLIC1 in mouse tissue sections and three cultured cell lines. We find CLIC1 is expressed in the apical domains of several simple columnar epithelia including glandular stomach, small intestine, colon, bile ducts, pancreatic ducts, airway, and the tail of the epididymis, in addition to the previously reported renal proximal tubule. CLIC1 is expressed in a non-polarized distribution in the basal epithelial cell layer of the stratified squamous epithelium of the upper gastrointesitinal tract and the basal cells of the epididymis, and is present diffusely in skeletal muscle. Distribution of CLIC1 was examined in Panc1 cells, a relatively undifferentiated, non-polarized human cell line derived from pancreatic cancer, and T84 cells, a human colon cancer cell line which can form a polarized epithelium that is capable of regulated chloride transport. Digitonin extraction was used to distinguish membrane-inserted CLIC1 from the soluble cytoplasmic form of the protein. We find that digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is primarily present in the plasma membrane of Panc1 cells. In T84 cells, we find digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is present in an intracellular compartment which is concentrated immediately below the apical plasma membrane and the extent of apical polarization is enhanced with forskolin, which activates transepithelial chloride transport and apical membrane traffic in these cells. The sub-apical CLIC1 compartment was further characterized in a well-differentiated mouse renal proximal tubule cell line. The distribution of CLIC1 was

  6. Overview of the CLIC beam instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T

    2011-01-01

    The performances of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) would rely on extremely tight tolerances on most beam parameters. The requirements for the CLIC beam instrumentation have been reviewed and studied in detail for the whole accelerator complex. In the context of the completion of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, a first attempt was made to propose a technical solution for every CLIC instruments. Even if these choices were based on most recent technological achievements, whenever possible, alternatives solutions focusing on potential improvements on performance, reliability or cost minimization are proposed and will be studied in the future. This paper presents an overview of the CLIC beam instruments, gives a status of their already achieved performances and presents the future work activities.

  7. LINAC 4

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On 13 March, a beam of negative hydrogen ions was injected into the first accelerator module of Linac 4, the linear accelerator which will replace Linac 2. The beam was created in the new source built for Linac 4 and accelerated from 45 kEV to 3 MeV by a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) module, the first link in the Linac 4 accelerator chain. This crucial phase went off without a hitch. The video above shows the new Linac 4 ion source, the low-energy transfer line and the RFQ, with running commentary by Giulia Bellodi and Carlo Rossi from the Beams Department.

  8. Precision Higgs boson measurement at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Pandurovic, Mila

    2016-01-01

    The design of the next generation collider in high energy physics will primarily focus on the possibility to achieve high precision of the measurements of interest. The necessary precision limits are set, in the first place, by the measurement of the Higgs boson but also by measurements that are sensitive to signs of New Physics. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an attractive option for a future multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider, with the potential to cover a rich physics program with high precision. In this lecture the CLIC accelerator, detector and backgrounds will be presented with emphesis on the capabilities of CLIC for precision Higgs physics.

  9. CLIC's three-step plan

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In early October, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) collaboration published its final Conceptual Design Report. Accompanying it was a strategic summary document that describes a whole new approach to the project: developing the linear e+e− collider in three energy stages. Though CLIC’s future still depends on signs from the LHC, its new staged approach to high-energy electron-positron physics for the post-LHC era is nothing short of convincing.   Instead of asking for a 48-kilometre-long commitment right off the bat, the CLIC collaboration is now presenting an accelerator that can be constructed in stages. For example, it could begin as an 11-kilometre 500 GeV accelerator that could later be extended to a 27-kilometre 1.5 TeV machine. Finally, after a decade or so of data taking, it could be taken up to the full 48-kilometre 3 TeV facility (see image 2). “Not only is the approach technically and financially practical, it also offers a very convincing physics prog...

  10. Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the damage potential of electron beam and tests of beam loss detector based on quartz Cherenkov radiator read out by a silicon photomultiplier on CLIC Test Facility 3(CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    Orfanelli, Styliani; Gazis, E

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at the development of an electron/positron linear collider with a centre of mass energy in the multi-TeV energy range. Each Linac will have a length of 21 km, which means that very high accelerating gradients (>100 MV/m) are required. To achieve the high accelerating gradients, a novel two-beam acceleration scheme, in which RF power is transferred from a high-current, low-energy drive beam to the low-current, high energy main accelerating beam is designed. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system will be designed for CLIC to meet the requirements of the accelerator complex. Its main role as part of the machine protection scheme will be to detect potentially dangerous beam instabilities and prevent subsequent injection into the main beam or drive beam decelerators. The first part of this work describes the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations performed to estimate the damage potential of high energy electron beams impacting a copper target. The second...

  11. CLIC CTF3 for open days

    CERN Multimedia

    CLIC

    2013-01-01

    CLIC – the Compact Linear Collider – is a study for a future accelerator that reaches unprecedented energies for electrons and their antimatter twins, positrons. It uses a novel two-beam acceleration scheme in which the electrons and positrons are propelled to high energy by an additional high current electron beam, the so-called Drive Beam. In order to generate this high current Drive Beam, a long train of electron bunches is accelerated, parts of the train delayed in a Delay Loop and Combiner Rings, and interleaved by transversely deflecting radio-frequency cavities. The CLIC Test Facility CTF3, which is shown in the movie, examines the new technologies envisioned by the CLIC design, in particular the Drive Beam generation and the two-beam acceleration. It is a scaled-down version of the CLIC facility, and it has demonstrated the feasibility of the novel scheme.

  12. CLIC CTF3 for open days

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    (subt french) CLIC – the Compact Linear Collider – is a study for a future accelerator that reaches unprecedented energies for electrons and their antimatter twins, positrons. It uses a novel two-beam acceleration scheme in which the electrons and positrons are propelled to high energy by an additional high current electron beam, the so-called Drive Beam. In order to generate this high current Drive Beam, a long train of electron bunches is accelerated, parts of the train delayed in a Delay Loop and Combiner Rings, and interleaved by transversely deflecting radio-frequency cavities. The CLIC Test Facility CTF3, which is shown in the movie, examines the new technologies envisioned by the CLIC design, in particular the Drive Beam generation and the two-beam acceleration. It is a scaled-down version of the CLIC facility, and it has demonstrated the feasibility of the novel scheme.

  13. Acquisition system for the CLIC Module

    CERN Document Server

    Vilalte, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    The status of R&D activities for CLIC module acquisition are discussed [1]. LAPP is involved in the design of the local CLIC module acquisition crate, described in the document Study of the CLIC Module Front-End Acquisition and Evaluation Electronics [2]. This acquisition system is a project based on a local crate, assigned to the CLIC module, including several mother boards. These motherboards are foreseen to hold mezzanines dedicated to the different subsystems. This system has to work in radiation environment. LAPP is involved in the development of Drive Beam stripline position monitors read-out, described in the document Drive Beam Stripline BPM Electronics and Acquisition [3]. LAPP also develops a generic acquisition mezzanine that allows to perform all-around acquisition and components tests for drive beam stripline BPM read-out.

  14. Detector Optimization of the CLIC Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Saxe, Gandalf

    2015-01-01

    CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) is a proposed high-energy electron-positron collider at CERN [1] that, if approved, will be built at the feet of the Jura Mountains in Switzerland, passing through CERN. As opposed to hadrons, electrons (e-) and positrons (e+) are elementary particles. Therefore, e-e+ collisions give a well defined initial state which allows high precision studies. A circular collider is not a viable option when going to high energies (several TeV) for a e-e+ collider due to synchrotron radiation. Therefore CLIC is designed as a linear collider. CLIC is proposed to be build in three center-of-mass energy stages: 380 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3.0 TeV. The CLIC physics program includes the high precision measurements of the Higgs and top properties, the observation of rare processes, and the possible discovery of new particles [3].

  15. Successful start for new CLIC test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A new test facility is being built to study key feasibility issues for a possible future linear collider called CLIC. Commissioning of the first part of the facility began in June 2003 and nominal beam parameters have been achieved already.

  16. Mechanical integration studies for the CLIC vertex and inner tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Villarejo Bermudez, M.A.; Gerwig, H.

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, work has proceeded in order to establish a preliminary mechanical design for the innermost CLIC detector region. This note proposes a design for the main Carbon-Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) structural elements of the inner detectors, for the beam pipe and their supports. It also describes an assembly sequence for the integration of the sensors and the mechanical components. Mechanical simulations of different structural elements and a material budget estimation are appended. Details of a proposed cabling layout for all the subdetectors are included.

  17. Highlights from CERN: The CLIC Project for a Future e$^{+}$e$^{−}$ Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tecker, Frank

    2007-01-01

    A high luminosity ( 10$^{34}$-10$^{35}$ cm$^{2}$/s) linear electron-positron Collider (CLIC) with a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV is under study in the framework of an international collaboration of laboratories and institutes, with the aim to provide the HEP community with a new facility for the post LHC era. After a brief introduction of the physics motivation, the CLIC scheme to extend Linear Colliders into the Multi-TeV colliding beam energy range will be described. In the following, the main challenges and the very promising achievements already obtained will be presented.

  18. Collective effects and experimental verification of the CLIC drive beam and decelerator

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a potential next-generation particle collider, in which electrons and positrons collide at a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. In order to reach a high accelerating gradient and reduce the length of the machine, CLIC uses a novel two-beam scheme. Here, the acceleration energy for the main beam is provided by energy extraction from a secondary electron drive beam, by the use of Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS). This Ph.D. thesis descr...

  19. Main of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of the radiotherapy treatment process with a linear accelerator for medical purposes (linac)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation safety assessments traditionally have been based on analyzing the lessons you learn of new events that are becoming known. Although these methods are very valuable, their main limitation is that only cover known events and leave without consider other possible failures that have occurred or have not been published, This does not mean they can not occur. Other tools to analyze prospectively the safety, among which found Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). This paper summarizes the project of American Forum of agencies radiological and nuclear regulators aimed at applying the methods of APS treatment process with a linear accelerator. We defined as unintended consequences accidental exposures both single patient and multiple patients. FMEA methodology was used to define events initiators of accidents and methods of event trees and trees failure to identify the accident sequences that may occur. A Once quantified the frequency of occurrence of accidental sequences Analyses of importance in determining the most recent events significant from the point of view of safety. We identified 158 of equipment failure modes and 295 errors human if they occurred would have the potential to cause the accidental exposures defined. We studied 118 of initiating events accident and 120 barriers. We studied 434 accident sequences. The accidental exposure of a single patient were 40 times likely that multiple patients. 100% of the total frequency of accidental exposures on a single patient is caused by human errors . 8% of the total frequency of accidental exposures on multiple patients initiating events may occur by equipment failure (Computerized tomography, treatment planning system, throttle linear) and 92% by human error. As part of the and recommendations of the study presents the events that are more contribution on the reduction of risk of accidental exposure. (author)

  20. CLIC-ACM: Acquisition and Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Bielawski, B; Magnoni, S

    2014-01-01

    CLIC [1] (Compact Linear Collider) is a world-wide collaboration to study the next terascale lepton collider, relying upon a very innovative concept of two-beamacceleration. In this scheme, the power is transported to the main accelerating structures by a primary electron beam. The Two Beam Module (TBM) is a compact integration with a high filling factor of all components: RF, Magnets, Instrumentation, Vacuum, Alignment and Stabilization. This paper describes the very challenging aspects of designing the compact system to serve as a dedicated Acquisition & Control Module (ACM) for all signals of the TBM. Very delicate conditions must be considered, in particular radiation doses that could reach several kGy in the tunnel. In such severe conditions shielding and hardened electronics will have to be taken into consideration. In addition, with more than 300 ADC&DAC channels per ACM and about 21000 ACMs in total, it appears clearly that power consumption will be an important issue. It is also obvious that...

  1. A prototype hybrid pixel detector ASIC for the CLIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio, P; Arfaoui, S; Ballabriga, R; Benoit, M; Bonacini, S; Campbell, M; Dannheim, D; De Gaspari, M; Felici, D; Kulis, S; Llopart, X; Nascetti, A; Poikela, T; Wong, W S

    2014-01-01

    A prototype hybrid pixel detector ASIC specifically designed to the requirements of the vertex detector for CLIC is described and first electrical measurements are presented. The chip has been designed using a commercial 65 nm CMOS technology and comprises a matrix of 64x64 square pixels with 25 μm pitch. The main features include simultaneous 4-bit measure- ment of Time-over-Threshold (ToT) and Time-of-Arrival (ToA) with 10 ns accuracy, on-chip data compression and power pulsing capability.

  2. CLICdp Overview. Overview of physics potential at CLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Aharon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CLICdp, the CLIC detector and physics study, is an international collaboration presently composed of 23 institutions. The collaboration is addressing detector and physics issues for the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC, a high-energy electron-positron accelerator which is one of the options for the next collider to be built at CERN. Precision physics under challenging beam and background conditions is the key theme for the CLIC detector studies. This leads to a number of cutting-edge R&D activities within CLICdp. The talk includes a brief introduction to CLIC, accelerator and detectors, hardware R&D as well as physics studies at CLIC.

  3. Tunable Achromats and CLIC Applications

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, T E

    2000-01-01

    It is imperative for linear colliders that the bunch length be adjustable. In most cases bunch compression is required, but recently, in the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) RF Power Source, it was shown that bunch stretching may also be necessary. In some situations, both modes may be needed, which implies the need for tunable magnetic insertions. This is even more essential in a test facility, to span a wide experimental range. In addition, flexible tuning provides a better control of the stability of an isochronous insertion. To start a numerical search for a tunable insertion from scratch is very uncertain because the related phase space is very uneven. However, a starting point obtained with an analytical approximation is often sufficient to ensure convergence. Another advantage of the analytical treatment described in this paper is that it sheds light on the shape of the entire phase space. To achieve this the isochronous achromat developed previously has been given tuning capabilities by ex...

  4. DC Breakdown experiments for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Descoeudres, A; Taborelli, M

    2008-01-01

    For the production of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) RF accelerating structures, a material capable of sustaining high electric field, with a low breakdown rate and showing low damages after breakdowns is needed. A DC breakdown study is underway at CERN in order to test candidate materials and surface preparations. The saturated breakdown fields of several metals and alloys have been measured, ranging from 100 MV/m for Al to 850 MV/m for stainless steel, being around 170 MV/m for Cu and 430 MV/m for Mo for example. The conditioning speed of Mo can be significantly improved by removing oxides at the surface with a vacuum heat treatment, typically at 875±C for 2 hours. DC breakdown rate measurements have been done with Cu and Mo electrodes, showing similar results as in RF experiments: the breakdown probability seems to exponentially increase with the applied field. Measurements of time delays before breakdown show two different populations of breakdowns, immediate and delayed breakdowns, indicating that t...

  5. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  6. Wakefield damping for the CLIC crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P K; Dexter, A C; Carter, R G; Khan, V; Jones, R M; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  7. WAKEFIELD DAMPING FOR THE CLIC CRAB CAVITY

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Carter, R; Khan, V; Jones, R; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  8. Light-flavor squark reconstruction at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)548062; Weuste, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a simulation study of the prospects for the mass measurement of TeV-scale light- flavored right-handed squark at a 3 TeV e+e collider based on CLIC technology. The analysis is based on full GEANT4 simulations of the CLIC_ILD detector concept, including Standard Model physics backgrounds and beam-induced hadronic backgrounds from two- photon processes. The analysis serves as a generic benchmark for the reconstruction of highly energetic jets in events with substantial missing energy. Several jet finding algorithms were evaluated, with the longitudinally invariant kt algorithm showing a high degree of robustness towards beam-induced background while preserving the features typically found in algorithms developed for e+e- collisions. The presented study of the reconstruction of light-flavored squarks shows that for TeV-scale squark masses, sub-percent accuracy on the mass measurement can be achieved at CLIC.

  9. CLIC a Two-Beam Multi-TeV $e\\pm$ Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P; Assmann, R W; Becker, F; Bossart, Rudolf; Braun, H; Burkhardt, H; Carron, G; Coosemans, Williame; Corsini, R; D'Amico, T E; Döbert, Steffen; Fartoukh, Stéphane David; Ferrari, A; Geschonke, Günther; Godot, J C; Groening, L; Guignard, Gilbert; Hutchins, S; Jeanneret, J B; Jensen, E; Jowett, John M; Kamitani, T; Millich, Antonio; Pearce, P; Perriollat, F; Pittin, R; Potier, J P; Riche, A; Rinolfi, Louis; Risselada, Thys; Royer, P; Ruggiero, F; Schulte, Daniel; Suberlucq, Guy; Syratchev, I V; Thorndahl, L; Trautner, H; Verdier, A; Wuensch, Walter; Zhou, F; Zimmermann, Frank; Napoly, O

    2000-01-01

    The CLIC study of a high-energy (0.5 - 5 TeV), high-luminosity (1034 - 1035 cm-2 sec-1) e± linear collider is presented. Beam acceleration using high frequency (30 GHz) normal-conducting structures operating at high accelerating fields (150 MV/m) significantly reduces the length and, in consequence, the cost of the linac. Using parameters derived from general scaling laws for linear colliders, the beam stability is shown to be similar to lower frequency designs in spite of the strong wake-field dependency on frequency. A new cost-effective and efficient drive beam generation scheme for RF power production by the so-called "Two-Beam Acceleration" method is described. It uses a thermionic gun and a fully-loaded normal-conducting linac operating at low frequency (937 MHz) to generate and accelerate the drive beam bunches, and RF multiplication by funnelling in compressor rings to produce the desired bunch structure. Recent 30 GHz hardware developments and CLIC Test Facility (CTF) results are described.

  10. Physics highlights at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, the physics potential for the e+e- linear collider experiments ILC and CLIC is reviewed. The experimental conditions are compared to those at hadron colliders and their intrinsic value for precision experiments, complementary to the hadron colliders, is discussed. The detector concepts for ILC and CLIC are outlined in their most important aspects related to the precision physics. Highlights from the physics program and from the benchmark studies are given. It is shown that linear colliders are a promising tool, complementing the LHC in essential ways to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics.

  11. CLIC preparations go up a notch

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider gears up for post-LHC physics with an international workshop. A schematic diagram of CLIC.In June CERN gained a new building: number 2010. And as chance would have it, this is more than just a number to its new residents. By the year 2010, teams working at the new CLIC Experimental Area, along with the already established CLIC Test Facility Three (CTF3), hope to have demonstrated the feasibility of the Compact Linear Collider and, depending on results from the LHC, embark on its final design and proposal. A workshop on 16t-18 October brought people from all around the world to CERN to exchange ideas and hear how the ambitious project is progressing. CLIC is a project that aims to extend lepton collider technology to multi-TeV energy physics, colliding leptons with a centre-of-mass-energy up to 3TeV, more than ten times the energy of the LEP. This is only possible in a linear collider, where no energy is lo...

  12. Performance of particle flow calorimetry at CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle flow approach to calorimetry can provide unprecedented jet energy resolution at a future high energy collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC). However, the use of particle flow calorimetry at the proposed multi-TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) poses a number of significant new challenges. At higher jet energies, detector occupancies increase, and it becomes increasingly difficult to resolve energy deposits from individual particles. The experimental conditions at CLIC are also significantly more challenging than those at previous electron–positron colliders, with increased levels of beam-induced backgrounds combined with a bunch spacing of only 0.5 ns. This paper describes the modifications made to the PandoraPFA particle flow algorithm to improve the jet energy reconstruction for jet energies above 250 GeV. It then introduces a combination of timing and pT cuts that can be applied to reconstructed particles in order to significantly reduce the background. A systematic study is performed to understand the dependence of the jet energy resolution on the jet energy and angle, and the physics performance is assessed via a study of the energy and mass resolution of W and Z particles in the presence of background at CLIC. Finally, the missing transverse momentum resolution is presented, and the fake missing momentum is quantified. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that high granularity particle flow calorimetry leads to a robust and high resolution reconstruction of jet energies and di-jet masses at CLIC.

  13. Feasibility study of multipoint based laser alignment system for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Mainaud-Durand, H; Piedigrossi, D; Geiger, A

    2012-01-01

    CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is a study for a future electron-positron collider that would allow physicists to explore a new energy region beyond the capabilities oftoday’s particle accelerators. Alignment is one of the major challenges within the CLIC study in order to achieve the high requirement of a multi-TeV center of mass colliding beam energy range (nominal 3 TeV). To reach this energy in a realistic and cost efficient scenario all accelerator components have to be aligned with an accuracy of 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m. The demand for a straight line reference is so far based on stretched wires coupled with Wire Positioning Sensors (WPS). These solutions are currently further developed inorder to reduce the drawbacks which are mainly given by their costs and difficult implementation. However, it should be validated through inter-comparison with a solution ideally based on a different physical principle. Therefore, a new metrological approach is proposed using a laser beam as straight lin...

  14. Achievements and Future Plans of CLIC Test Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    CTF2 was originally designed to demonstrate the feasibility of two-beam acceleration with high current drive beams and a string of 30 GHz CLIC accelerating structure prototypes (CAS). This goal was achieved in 1999 and the facility has since been modified to focus on high gradient testing of CAS's and 30 GHz single cell cavities (SCC). With these modifications, it is now possible to provide 30 GHz RF pulses of more than 150 MW and an adjustable pulselength from 3 to 15 ns. While the SCC results are promising, the testing of CAS's revealed problems of RF breakdown and related surface damage. As a consequence, a new R&D program has been launched to advance the understanding of RF breakdown processes, to improve surface properties, investigate new materials and to optimise the structure geometries of the CAS's. In parallel the construction of a new facility named CTF3 has started. CTF3 will mainly serve two purposes. The first is the demonstration of the CLIC drive beam generation scheme. CTF3 will acceler-a...

  15. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, L; Gavela, D; Lara, A; Rodríguez, E; Gutiérrez, J L; Calero, J; Toral, F; Samoshkin, A; Gudkov, D; Riddone, G

    2014-01-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e þ e collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS fi rst prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wake fi elds, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing...

  16. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, L.; Carrillo, D.; Gavela, D.; Lara, A.; Rodríguez, E.; Gutiérrez, J. L.; Calero, J.; Toral, F.; Samoshkin, A.; Gudkov, D.; Riddone, G.

    2014-05-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e+e- collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS first prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wakefields, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing, electron beam and arc welding were used to complete the assembly. Finally, several tests such as dimensional control and leak testing were carried out to validate design and fabrication methods. In addition, RF measurements at low power were made to study frequency tuning.

  17. QCD Explorer Proposal E-Linac Versus E-Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Karadeniz, H

    2006-01-01

    TeV center of mass energy lepton-hadron collider is necessary both to clarify fundamental aspects of strong interactions and for adequate interpretation of the LHC data. Recently proposed QCD Explorer utilizes the energy advantage of the LHC proton and ion beams, which allows the usage of relatively low energy electron beam. Two options for the LHC based ep collider are posibble: construction of a new electron ring in the LHC tunnel or construction of an e-linac tangentially to the LHC. In the latter case, which seems more acceptable for a number of reasons, two options are under consideration for electron linac: the CLIC technology allows shorter linac length, whereas TESLA technology gives higher luminosity.

  18. Beam instability induced by rf deflectors in the combiner ring of the CLIC test facility and mitigation by damped deflecting structures

    CERN Document Server

    Alesini, D; Biscari, C; Ghigo, A; Corsini, R

    2011-01-01

    In the CTF3 (CLIC test facility 3) run of November 2007, a vertical beam instability has been found in the combiner ring during operation. After a careful analysis, the source of the instability has been identified in the vertical deflecting modes trapped in the rf deflectors and excited by the beam passage. A dedicated tracking code that includes the induced transverse wakefield and the multibunch multipassage effects has been written and the results of the beam dynamics analysis are presented in the paper. The mechanism of the instability was similar to the beam breakup in a linear accelerator or in an energy recovery linac. The results of the code allowed identifying the main key parameters driving such instability and allowed finding the main knobs to mitigate it. To completely suppress such beam instability, two new rf deflectors have been designed, constructed, and installed in the ring. In the new structures the frequency separation between the vertical and horizontal deflecting modes has been increase...

  19. Light-flavor squark reconstruction at CLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frank; Weuste, Lars

    2015-08-01

    We present a simulation study of the prospects for the mass measurement of TeV-scale light-flavored right-handed squarks at a 3 TeV collider based on CLIC technology. In the considered model, these particles decay into their standard-model counterparts and the lightest neutralino, resulting in a signature of two jets plus missing energy. The analysis is based on full GEANT4 simulations of the CLIC_ILD detector concept, including Standard Model physics backgrounds and beam-induced hadronic backgrounds from two-photon processes. The analysis serves as a generic benchmark for the reconstruction of highly energetic jets in events with substantial missing energy. Several jet finding algorithms were evaluated, with the longitudinally invariant algorithm showing a high degree of robustness towards beam-induced background while preserving the features typically found in algorithms developed for collisions. The presented study of the reconstruction of light-flavored squarks shows that for TeV-scale squark masses, sub-percent accuracy on the mass measurement can be achieved at CLIC.

  20. Laser Wire Scanner Basic Process and Perspectives for the CTF's and CLIC Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T

    2002-01-01

    In a laser wire scanner, the basic idea is to replace the solid wire classically used in a standard wire scanner by a narrow laser beam. The basic process involved is the Thomson-Compton scattering process, where photons are scattered from the laser beam by the incoming electrons. By counting the number of scattered photons or degraded electrons as a function of laser position the bunch profile can be reconstructed. In this note the Compton scattering mechanism is first presented. In the framework of the CLIC project, a laser wire scanner (LWS) could be used as a non-interfering beam profile measurement both on the Drive Beam for a high current electron beam and on the Main Beam for very small electron beam sizes. A design for a LWS on the CTF2 and CTF3 machines is proposed and some considerations for the use of a LWS on the CLIC main beam are also mentioned.

  1. Integration of the PHIN RF Gun into the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Döbert, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    CERN is a collaborator within the European PHIN project, a joint research activity for Photo injectors within the CARE program. A deliverable of this project is an rf Gun equipped with high quantum efficiency Cs2Te cathodes and a laser to produce the nominal beam for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). The nominal beam for CTF3 has an average current of 3.5 A, 1.5 GHz bunch repetition frequency and a pulse length of 1.5 ìs (2332 bunches) with quite tight stability requirements. In addition a phase shift of 180 deg is needed after each train of 140 ns for the special CLIC combination scheme. This rf Gun will be tested at CERN in fall 2006 and shall be integrated as a new injector into the CTF3 linac, replacing the existing injector consisting of a thermionic gun and a subharmonic bunching system. The paper studies the optimal integration into the machine trying to optimize transverse and longitudinal phase space of the beam while respecting the numerous constraints of the existing accelerator. The presented scheme...

  2. From glutathione transferase to pore in a CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cromer, B A; Morton, C J; Parker, M W; 10.1007/s00249-002-0219-1

    2002-01-01

    Many plasma membrane chloride channels have been cloned and characterized in great detail. In contrast, very little is known about intracellular chloride channels. Members of a novel class of such channels, called the CLICs (chloride intracellular channels), have been identified over the last few years. A striking feature of the CLIC family of ion channels is that they can exist in a water- soluble state as well as a membrane-bound state. A major step forward in understanding the functioning of these channels has been the recent crystal structure determination of one family member, CLIC1. The structure confirms that CLICs are members of the glutathione S- transferase superfamily and provides clues as to how CLICs can insert into membranes to form chloride channels. (69 refs).

  3. Study of a 5-Tesla large aperture coil for the CLIC detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cure, B

    2011-01-01

    The present design of a CLIC detector foresees a large solenoid magnet with a 6 m aperture and a magnetic induction of 5 T at the interaction point. This can be achieved by a thin superconducting coil. This report gives the typical main parameters of such a coil and presents the feasibility based on and compared with the CMS and Atlas solenoid coil designs, indicating the limits on the conductor and the identified R&D prospects.

  4. The physics benchmark processes for the detector performance studies used in CLIC CDR Volume 3

    CERN Document Server

    Allanach, B.J.; Desch, K.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G.; Grefe, C.; Kraml, S.; Lastovicka, T.; Linssen, L.; Marschall, J.; Martin, S.P.; Muennich, A.; Poss, S.; Roloff, P.; Simon, F.; Strube, J.; Thomson, M.; Wells, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    This note describes the detector benchmark processes used in volume 3 of the CLIC conceptual design report (CDR), which explores a staged construction and operation of the CLIC accelerator. The goal of the detector benchmark studies is to assess the performance of the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detector concepts for different physics processes and at a few CLIC centre-of-mass energies.

  5. Design of the Injection and extraction system and related machine protection for the Clic Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Apsimon, Robert; Barnes, Mike; Borburgh, Jan; Goddard, Brennan; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Uythoven, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Linear machines such as CLIC have relatively low rates of collision between bunches compared to their circular counterparts. In order to achieve the required luminosity, a very small spot size is envisaged at the interaction point, thus a low emittance beam is needed. Damping rings are essential for producing the low emittances needed for the CLIC main beam. It is crucial that the beams are injected and extracted from the damping rings in a stable and repeatable fashion to minimise emittance blow-up and beam jitter at the interaction point; both of these effects will deteriorate the luminosity at the interaction point. In this paper, the parameters and constraints of the injection and extraction systems are considered and the design of these systems is optimised within this parameter space. Related machine protection is considered in order to prevent damage from potential failure modes of the injection and extraction systems.

  6. Power pulsing scheme for analog and digital electronics of the vertex detectors at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchot, Georges

    2015-01-01

    The precision requirements of the vertex detector at CLIC impose strong limitations on the mass of such a detector (< 0.2% of a radiation length, Xo, per layer). To achieve such a low material budget, ultra-thin hybrid pixel detectors are foreseen, while the mass for cooling and services will be reduced by implementing a power pulsing scheme that takes advantage of the low duty cycle of the accelerator. The principal aim is to achieve significant power reduction without compromising the power integrity supplied to the front-end electronics. This report summarises the study of a power pulsing scheme to power the vertex barrel electronics of the future CLIC experiment. Its main goal is to describe in more detail what has been already presented in TWEPP conferences and other presentations. The report can therefore serve as an operator manual for future use and development of the system

  7. Status of a study of stabilization and fine positioning of CLIC quadrupoles to the nanometre level

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Esposito, M; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C; Janssens, S; Kuzmin, A; Leuxe, R; Moron Ballester, R

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical stability to the nanometre and below is required for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) quadrupoles to frequencies as low as 1 Hz. An active stabilization and positioning system based on very stiff piezo electric actuators and inertial reference masses is under study for the Main Beam Quadrupoles (MBQ). The stiff support was selected for robustness against direct forces and for the option of incrementally repositioning the magnet with nanometre resolution. The technical feasibility was demonstrated by a representative test mass being stabilized and repositioned to the required level in the vertical and lateral direction. Technical issues were identified and the development programme of the support, sensors, and controller was continued to increase the performance, integrate the system in the overall controller, adapt to the accelerator environment, and reduce costs. The improvements are implemented in models, test benches, and design of the first stabilized prototype CLIC magnet. The characterizati...

  8. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  9. Conceptual Design for CLIC Gun Pulser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Tao [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposed future electron-positron collider, designed to perform collisions at energies from 0.5 to 5 TeV, with a nominal design optimized for 3 TeV (Dannheim, 2012). The Drive Beam Accelerator consists of a thermionic DC gun, bunching section and an accelerating section. The thermionic gun needs deliver a long (~143us) pulse of current into the buncher. A pulser is needed to drive grid of the gun to generate a stable current output. This report explores the requirements of the gun pulser and potential solutions to regulate grid current.

  10. Electro-Weak Fits at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    De Curtis, S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the future linear colliders is to extend the sensitivity to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. Several models predict the existence of new vector resonances in the multi-TeV region. We review the existing limits on the masses of these new resonances from LEP/SLC and TEVATRON data and from the atomic parity violation measurements, in some specific models. We study the potential of a multi-TeV e+e- collider, such as CLIC, for the determination of their properties and nature.

  11. Performance of Particle Flow Calorimetry at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, J.S.; Thomson, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The experimental conditions at CLIC are also significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders, with increased levels of beam-induced backgrounds combined with a bunch spacing of only 0.5 ns. This paper describes the modifications made to the PandoraPFA particle flow algorithm to improve the jet energy reconstruction for jet energies above 250 GeV. It then introduces a combination of timing and pT cuts that can be applied to reconstructed particles in order to significantly reduce the background. A systematic study is...

  12. M10.3.4: CLIC crab cavity specifications completed

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, A; Ambattu, P; Shinton, I; Jones, R

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 2 is to document the currently anticipated requirements for the CLIC crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of the basic specifications for the CLIC crab cavity system. This comprises kick, power requirement, phase and amplitude stability, technology choice, and RF layout. The wakefield calculations of a baseline CLIC cavity will be used to estimate the required damping of the higher order modes as well as other special modes in crab cavities (the lower and same order modes).

  13. CLIC CRAB CAVITY SPECIFICATIONS MILESTONE: M10.3.4

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Jones, R; McIntosh, P; Shinton, I

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 2 is to document the currently anticipated requirements for the CLIC crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of the basic specifications for the CLIC crab cavity system. This comprises kick, power requirement, phase and amplitude stability, technology choice, and RF layout. The wakefield calculations of a baseline CLIC cavity will be used to estimate the required damping of the higher order modes as well as other special modes in crab cavities (the lower and same order modes).

  14. Summary of the BDS and MDI CLIC08 Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Ahmed, I; Ambatu, PK; Angal-Kalinin, D; Barlow, R; Baud, J P; Bolzon, B; Braun, H; Burkhardt, H; Burt, GC; Corsini, R; Dalena, B; Dexter, AC; Dolgashev, V; Elsener, K; Fernandez Hernando, JL; Gaillard, G; Geffroy, N; Jackson, F; Jeremie, A; Jones, RM; McIntosh, P; Moffeit, K; Peltier, F; Resta-López, J; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Toader, A; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    This note summarizes the presentations held within the Beam Delivery System and Machine Detector Interface working group of the CLIC08 workshop. The written contributions have been provided by the presenters on a voluntary basis.

  15. Luminosity Upgrade of CLIC LHC ep/gp Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aksakal, H; Nergiz, Z; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

    2007-01-01

    An energy frontier or QCD Explorer ep and collider can be realized by colliding high-energy photons generated by Compton backscattered off a CLIC electron beam, at either 75 GeV or 1.5 TeV, with protons or ions stored in the LHC. In this study we discuss a performance optimization of this type of collider by tailoring the parameters of both CLIC and LHC. An estimate of the ultimately achievable luminosity is given.

  16. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Linear Accelerator A linear accelerator (LINAC) customizes high energy x-rays to ... ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the device most commonly used ...

  17. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W.-W.; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Brown, Louise J.; Brown, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1−/−) and wild-type (CLIC1+/+) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo. We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1−/− BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1+/+, but not CLIC1−/− cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1−/− BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  18. Contributed papers to the 1984 Linac Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LEP Injector Linacs (LIL) are the first part of the LEP injection chain, and consist of a 200 MeV high current electron linac, followed by a 600 MeV low current electron/positron linac. First a description of the complete machine is presented. Then the accelerating structures are more particularly described. The automatic phasing system which shall be used during the operation of the linacs is also presented together with measurements and tests. At least the front end linac is described, with the instrumentation developped by LAL in order to measure the beam parameters intensity, energy, emittance, bunch length. Main results of the experimental program which took place in 1982 and 1983 are given

  19. Wakefield monitor development for CLIC accelerating structure

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F; Girardot, P; Andersson, A; Riddone, G; Samoshkin, A; Solodko, A; Zennaro, R; Ruber, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract To achieve high luminosity in CLIC, the accelerating structures must be aligned to an accuracy of 5 μm with respect to the beam trajectory. Position detectors called Wakefield Monitors (WFM) are integrated to the structure for a beam based alignment. This paper describes the requirements of such monitors. Detailed RF design and electromagnetic simulations of the WFM itself are presented. In particular, time domain computations are performed and an evaluation of the resolution is done for two higher order modes at 18 and 24 GHz. The mechanical design of a prototype accelerating structure with WFM is also presented as well as the fabrication status of three complete structures. The objective is to implement two of them in CTF3 at CERN for a feasibility demonstration with beam and high power rf.

  20. Conceptual Design of the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Papaphilippou, Y; Barnes, M; Calatroni, S; Chiggiato, P; Corsini, R; Grudiev, A; Koukovini, E; Lefevre, T; Martini, M; Modena, M; Mounet, N; Perin, A; Renier, Y; Russenschuck, S; Rumolo, G; Schoerling, D; Schulte, D; Schmickler, H; Taborelli, M; Vandoni, G; Zimmermann, F; Zisopoulos, P; Boland, M; Palmer, M; Bragin, A; Levichev, E; Syniatkin, S; Zolotarev, K; Vobly, P; Korostelev, M; Vivoli, A; Belver-Aguilar, C; Faus-Golfe, A; Rinolfi, L; Bernhard, A; Pivi, M; Smith, S; Rassool, R; Wootton, K

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC Damping rings are designed to produce unprecedentedly low-emittances of 500 nm and 5 nm normalized at 2.86 GeV, with high bunch charge, necessary for the performance of the collider. The large beam brightness triggers a number of beam dynamics and technical challenges. Ring parameters such as energy, circumference, lattice, momentum compaction, bending and superconducting wiggler fields are carefully chosen in order to provide the target emittances under the influence of intrabeam scattering but also reduce the impact of collective effects such as space-charge and coherent synchrotron radiation. Mitigation techniques for two stream instabilities have been identified and tested. The low vertical emittance is achieved by modern orbit and coupling correction techniques. Design considerations and plans for technical systems, such as wigglers, transfer systems, vacuum, RF cavities, instrumentation and feedback are finally reviewed.

  1. Impedance effects in the CLIC damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Rumolo, G; Salvant, B

    2011-01-01

    Due to the unprecedented brilliance of the beams, the performance of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) damping rings (DR) is affected by collective effects. Single bunch instability thresholds based on a broad-band resonator model and the associated coherent tune shifts have been evaluated with the HEADTAIL code. Simulations performed for positive and negative values of chromaticity showed that higher order bunch modes can be potentially dangerous for the beam stability. This study also includes the effects of high frequency resistive wall impedance due to different coatings applied on the chambers of the wigglers for e-cloud mitigation and/or ultra-low vacuum pressure. The impact of the resistive wall wake fields on the transverse impedance budget is finally discussed.

  2. Simulation of Phase Stability at the Flat Top of the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, A; Burrows, P

    2011-01-01

    The drive beam phase stability is one of the critical issues of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). In this paper the generation and propagation of drive beam phase errors is studied for effects that vary during the drive beam pulse. This includes the influence of drive beam current and phase errors as well as of drive beam accelerator RF phase and amplitude errors on the drive beam phase after the compressor chicanes and the analysis of the propagation of these errors through the drive beam combination scheme. The impact of the imperfections on the main beam is studied including the possible correction with help of a feedforward system.

  3. Development of 20 kW input power coupler for 1.3 GHz ERL main linac. Component test at 30 kW IOT test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We started to develop an input coupler for a 1.3 GHz ERL superconducting cavity. Required input power is about 20 kW for the cavity acceleration field of 20 MV/m and the beam current of 100 mA in energy recovery operation. The input coupler is designed based on the STF-BL input coupler and some modifications are applied to the design for the CW 20 kW power operation. We fabricated input coupler components such as ceramic windows and bellows and carried out the high-power test of the components by using a 30 kW IOT power source and a test stand constructed for the highpower test. In this report, we mainly describe the results of the high-power test of ceramic window and bellows. (author)

  4. The CLIC electron and positron polarized sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Bulyak, Eugene; Chehab, Robert; Dadoun, Olivier; Gai, Wei; Gladkikh, Peter; Kamitani, Takuya; Kuriki, Masao; Liu, Wanming; Maryuama, Takashi; Omori, Tsunehiko; Poelker, Matt; Sheppard, John; Urakawa, Junji; Variola, Alessandro; Vivoli, Alessandro; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zhou, Feng; Zimmermann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC polarized electron source is based on a DC gun where the photocathode is illuminated by a laser beam. Each micro-bunch has a charge of 6x109 e−, a width of 100 ps and a repetition rate of 2 GHz. A peak current of 10 A in the micro-bunch is a challenge for the surface charge limit of the photo-cathode. Two options are feasible to generate the 2 GHz e− bunch train: 100 ps micro-bunches can be extracted from the photo-cathode either by a 2 GHz laser system or by generating a macro-bunch using a ~200 ns laser pulse and a subsequent RF bunching system to produce the appropriate micro-bunch structure. Recent results obtained by SLAC, for the latter case, are presented. The polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a laser Compton scattering process. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent onto a target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The Compton backscattering process occurs eithe...

  5. Minimizing Emittance for the CLIC Damping Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Levitchev, E; Piminov, P; Schulte, Daniel; Siniatkin, S; Vobly, P P; Zimmermann, Frank; Zolotarev, Konstantin V; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC damping rings aim at unprecedented small normalized equilibrium emittances of 3.3 nm vertical and 550 nm horizontal, for a bunch charge of 2.6·109 particles and an energy of 2.4 GeV. In this parameter regime the dominant emittance growth mechanism is intra-beam scattering. Intense synchrotron radiation damping from wigglers is required to counteract its effect. Here the overall optimization of the wiggler parameters is described, taking into account state-of-the-art wiggler technologies, wiggler effects on dynamic aperture, and problems of wiggler radiation absorption. Two technical solutions, one based on superconducting magnet technology the other on permanent magnets are presented. Although dynamic aperture and tolerances of this ring design remain challenging, benefits are obtained from the strong damping. For optimized wigglers, only bunches for a single machine pulse may need to be stored, making injection/extraction particularly simple and limiting the synchrotron-radiation power. With a 36...

  6. CLIC quadrupole stabilization and nano-positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, C; Artoos, K; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C

    2010-01-01

    In the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) currently under study, electrons and positrons will be accelerated in two linear accelerators to collide at the interaction point with an energy of 0.5- 3 TeV. This machine is constituted of a succession of accelerating structures, used to accelerate the beams of particles, and electromagnets (quadrupoles) used to focus the beams. In order to ensure good performances, the quadrupoles have to be extremely stable. Additionally, they should also have the capability to move by steps of some tens of nanometers every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1nm. This paper proposes a holistic approach to fulfill alternatively both requirements using the same device. The concept is based on piezoelectric hard mounts to isolate the quadrupoles from the ground vibrations in the sensitive range between 1 and 20 Hz, and to provide nano-positioning capabilities. It is also shown that this strategy ensures robustness to external forces (acoustic noise, water flow for the cooling, air flow for th...

  7. CLIC/ILC Researchers Explore New Avenues for Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Researchers from CLIC and ILC met for their first common International Workshop on Linear Colliders, which was held in Geneva from 18 to 22 October. Although the talks were mostly scientific and technical, the political message behind them was a breakthrough, as the workshop showed the progress made in unifying the two communities.   The International Workshop on Linear Colliders (IWLC), which was organised by the European Committee for Future Accelerators, hosted by CERN, and held at CERN and the International Conference Centre in Geneva, attracted a large audience of about 500 experts. Although there have been other joint conferences between the CLIC and ILC communities before, they have all been focused on specific technical and/or managerial issues. The IWLC was part of an ongoing effort by CLIC and ILC to provide an environment in which researchers can exchange ideas, inform their peers about their most recent achievements and work together on common issues. Given the possible technical ov...

  8. Status of Wakefield Monitor Experiments at the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Aftab, Namra; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Grudiev, Alexej; Javeed, Sumera; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    For the very low emittance beams in CLIC, it is vital to mitigate emittance growth which leads to reduced luminosity in the detectors. One factor that leads to emittance growth is transverse wakefields in the accelerating structures. In order to combat this the structures must be aligned with a precision of a few um. For achieving this tolerance, accelerating structures are equipped with wakefield monitors that measure higher-order dipole modes excited by the beam when offset from the structure axis. We report on such measurements, performed using prototype CLIC accelerating structures which are part of the module installed in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. Measurements with and without the drive beam that feeds rf power to the structures are compared. Improvements to the experimental setup are discussed, and finally remaining measurements that should be performed before the completion of the program are summarized.

  9. Linac working group technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working group looked at linac injectors for a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) or Hadron Facility. Discussion includes rf power, a possible strawman linac, ion source/injector, radio-frequency quadrupole, and coupled-cavity linac

  10. Linac 1, inner structure

    CERN Multimedia

    1968-01-01

    This photo shows the inner structure of Linac 1. As injector to the PS, and later to the Booster, Linac 1 accelerated protons to 50 MeV, but it has also accelerated heavier ions. Fitted with a 520 keV RFQ pre-injector (instead of the original Cockcroft-Walton generator), it delivered protons and heavy ions to LEAR, from 1982 to 1992. After 33 years of faithful service, Linac 1 was dismantled in 1992 to make room for Linac 3 (Pb ions).

  11. Vertex-Detector R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D

    2014-01-01

    A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin sensors (planar or active HV-CMOS) via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced air flow. In this contribution the CLIC vertex-detector requirements are reviewed and the current status of R&D on readout and sensors is presented.

  12. Single Z' production at CLIC based on e^- gamma collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Soa, D. V.; H.N. Long(Institute of Physics, VAST, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh, Hanoi, Vietnam); Binh, D. T.; Khoi, D. P.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of CLIC based on e- gamma collisions to search for new $Z'$ gauge boson. Single Z' production at e-gamma colliders in two SU(3)_C X SU(3)_L X U(1)_N models: the minimal model and the model with right-handed (RH) neutrinos is studied in detail. Results show that new Z' gauge bosons can be observed at the CLIC, and the cross sections in the model with RH neutrinos are bigger than those in the minimal one.

  13. Higgs Physics at the CLIC Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Philipp Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future $e^+e^-$ collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper presents the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, $\\sqrt{s} =$ 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung ($e^+e^-\\to ZH$) and $WW$-fusion ($e^+e^-\\to H\

  14. Impact of the New CLIC Beam Parameters on the Design of the Post-Collision Line and its Exit Window

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, A

    2008-01-01

    Following the recent modification of the CLIC beam parameters, we present an updated design of the post-collision line. As a result of the increase of the beamstrahlung photon cone size, the separation of the outgoing beams by the vertical magnetic chicane is more difficult, but still possible. The main changes in the post-collision line design include the implementation of a common dump for the wrong-sign charged particles of the coherent pairs and for the low-energy tails of the disrupted beam, as well as a significant reduction of the overall lattice length (allowing removal of the large refocusing quadrupoles). The thermal and mechanical stresses in the new exit window, 150 m downstream of the interaction point, were computed. We conclude that, despite the recent changes of the CLIC beam parameters and the necessary modifications of the post-collision line and its exit window, their performance is not significantly affected.

  15. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretchedwire RF measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Silvia Zorzetti, Silvia; Galindo Muño, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-m regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  16. Linac pre-injector

    CERN Multimedia

    1965-01-01

    New accelerating column of the linac pre-injector, supporting frame and pumping system. This new system uses two mercury diffusion pumps (in the centre) and forms part of the modifications intended to increase the intensity of the linac. View taken during assembly in the workshop.

  17. Workshop: Linac90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1960 the first linear accelerator (linac) conference was organized at Brookhaven by John Blewett. In the few years following, linear accelerator energies jumped from 50 MeV (at Brookhaven and CERN) to 2 GeV at Stanford. With the realization that, at least for electrons, circular accelerators have reached their practical limits, linacs are once more in the spotlight

  18. The Linac4 Project

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Linac4 is a normal conducting, 160 MeV H- ion accelerator that is being constructed within the scope of the LHC injectors upgrade project. Linac4 will be connected to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) during the next long LHC shut-down and it will replace the current 50 MeV hadron linac, Linac2. Linac4 is presently being commissioned, with the aim of achieving the final energy at the end of the year. A test of the injection chicane and a reliability run will follow. The beam commissioning, in steps of increasing energy, has been prepared by an extended series of studies and interlaced with phases of installation. In this paper we will detail the beam dynamics challenges and we will report on the commissioning results.

  19. Photon-Nucleon Collider based on LHC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Aksakal, Husnu; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    We describe the scheme of a photon-nucleon collider where high energy photons generated by Compton backscattering off a CLIC electron beam, at either 75 GeV or 1.5 TeV are collided with protons or ions stored in LHC. Different design constraints for such a collider are discussed and achievable luminosity performance is estimated.

  20. Grid Interface Design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Jankovic, Maria; Clare, Jon; Wheeler, Pat; Aguglia, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the grid interface challenges for CERN’s proposed Compact Linear Colliders’ (CLIC) klystron modulators, including a 280 MW power system optimisation. The modular multilevel converter is evaluated as a candidate topology for a Medium Voltage grid interface along with a control method for reducing the impact of klystron modulators on the electrical network.

  1. A 12 GHZ RF Power source for the CLIC study

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F; Curt, S; Doebert, S; McMonagle, G; Rossat, G; Schirm, KM; Syratchev, I; Timeo, L; Kuzikhov, S; Vikharev, AA; Haase, A; Sprehn, D; Jensen, A; Jongewaard, EN; Nantista, CD; Vlieks, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  2. Front-end physics design of APT linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accelerator for the Accelerator based Production of Tritium (APT), uses a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), followed by the newly developed coupled-cavity drift tube linac (CCDTL) and a coupled- cavity linac (CCL). The production target requires the APT linac to deliver a 100 mA proton beam with an energy of 1.3 -1.7 GeV. The main challenge in the design comes from the requirement to minimize beam loss. Hands-on maintenance of the entire linac requires very little beam loss

  3. Stabilisation and precision pointing quadrupole magnets in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, Stef; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro; Artoos, Kurt

    This thesis describes the research done to provide stabilisation and precision positioning for the main beam quadrupole magnets of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. The introduction describes why new particle accelerators are needed to further the knowledge of our universe and why they are linear. A proposed future accelerator is the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) which consists of a novel two beam accelerator concept. Due to its linearity and subsequent single pass at the interaction point, this new accelerator requires a very small beam size at the interaction point, in order to increase collision effectiveness. One of the technological challenges, to obtain these small beam sizes at the interaction point, is to keep the quadrupole magnets aligned and stable to 1.5 nm integrated r.m.s. in vertical and 5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) in lateral direction. Additionally there is a proposal to create an intentional offset (max. 50 nm every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1 nm), for several quadrupole ma...

  4. Interaction of the chloride intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 with different sterols in model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Aims: Sterols have been reported to modulate conformation and hence the function of several membrane proteins. One such group is the Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family of proteins. The CLIC protein family consists of six evolutionarily conserved protein members in vertebrates. These proteins are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as membrane bound proteins. We now for the first time demonstrate that the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 is dependent on the presence of cholesterol in membranes. Our novel findings also extend to the identification of a cholesterol-binding domain within CLIC1 that facilitates the spontaneous membrane insertion of the protein into membranes containing cholesterol. Methods: CLIC1 wild type (WT) and mutant proteins were purified by Ni-NTA followed by size‐exclusion chromatography. Langmuir monolayer film balance experiments were carried out using 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) alone, or in a 5:1 mole ratio combination with either one of the following sterols: Cholesterol (CHOL), β-Sitosterol (SITO), Ergosterol (ERG), Hydroxyecdysone (HYD) or Cholestane (CHOS). WT CLIC1 or mutant versions of CLIC1 were then injected into the aqueous subphase under the lipid film. Results: In lipid monolayers lacking sterols, CLIC1 did not insert. However significant membrane insertion occurred when CLIC1 was added to membranes containing cholesterol. Substitution of membrane cholesterol with either HYD, SITO or ERG, not only increased CLIC1’s membrane interaction but also increased its rate of insertion. Conversely, CLIC1 showed no insertion into monolayers containing CHOS, which lacked the intact sterol 3β-OH group. CLIC1 mutants G18A and G22A, did not insert in POPC:CHOL monolayers whereas the C24A mutant showed membrane insertion equivalent to WT CLIC1. X-ray and Neutron reflectivity, along with Small Angle X-ray Scattering techniques were subsequently used to probe

  5. Interaction of Human Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 1 (CLIC1) with Lipid Bilayers: A Fluorescence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Joanna E; Goodchild, Sophia C; Breit, Samuel N; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise J

    2016-07-12

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) is very unusual as it adopts a soluble glutathione S-transferase-like canonical fold but can also autoinsert into lipid bilayers to form an ion channel. The conversion between these forms involves a large, but reversible, structural rearrangement of the CLIC1 module. The only identified environmental triggers controlling the metamorphic transition of CLIC1 are pH and oxidation. Until now, there have been no high-resolution structural data available for the CLIC1 integral membrane state, and consequently, a limited understanding of how CLIC1 unfolds and refolds across the bilayer to form a membrane protein with ion channel activity exists. Here we show that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to establish the interaction and position of CLIC1 in a lipid bilayer. Our method employs a fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) approach between CLIC1 and a dansyl-labeled lipid analogue to probe the CLIC1-lipid interface. Under oxidizing conditions, a strong FRET signal between the single tryptophan residue of CLIC1 (Trp35) and the dansyl-lipid analogue was detected. When considering the proportion of CLIC1 interacting with the lipid bilayer, as estimated by fluorescence quenching experiments, the FRET distance between Trp35 and the dansyl moiety on the membrane surface was determined to be ∼15 Å. This FRET-detected interaction provides direct structural evidence that CLIC1 associates with membranes. The results presented support the current model of an oxidation-driven interaction of CLIC1 with lipid bilayers and also propose a membrane anchoring role for Trp35. PMID:27299171

  6. Pulsed SC Proton Linac

    OpenAIRE

    Ouchi, N.; Chishiro, E.; Tsukishima, C.; Mukugi, K.

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting (SC) proton linac is proposed in the JAERI/KEK Joint Project for a high-intensity proton accelerator in the energy region from 400 to 600 MeV. Highly stable fields in the SC cavities are required under the dynamic Lorentz force detuning. A new model describing the dynamic Lorentz detuning has been developed and the validity has been confirmed experimentally. The model has been applied successfully to the rf control simulation of the SC proton linac.

  7. Common ground in ILC and CLIC detector concepts

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider will accelerate particles and create collisions in different ways. Nonetheless, the detector concepts under development share many commonalities.   Timepix chips under scrutiny in the DESY test beam with the help of the beam telescope. CERN physicist Dominik Dannheim explains that the CLIC detector plans are adaptations of the ILC detector designs with a few select modifications. “When we started several years ago, we did not want to reinvent the wheel,” says Dannheim. “The approved ILC detector concepts served as an excellent starting point for our designs.” Essential differences Both CLIC and ILC scientists foresee general-purpose detectors that make measurements with exquisite precision. These colliders, however, have very different operating parameters, which will have important consequences for the various detector components. The ILC’s collision energy is set at 500 GeV ...

  8. Intra-Beam scattering in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Vivoli, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC 3 TeV nominal design requires very low emittance of the electron and positron beams to be reached in the damping rings. Due to low energy and to relatively high bunch charge and ultra-low emittance, Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) effect is very strong and an accurate calculation is needed to check if the required emittance is effectively reached. For this reason it is being developed at CERN a new software for IBS and Radiation Effects (SIRE), which simulates the evolution of the beam particle distribution in the damping rings, taking into account radiation damping, IBS and quantum excitation. In this paper we present the results of our simulations performed with SIRE on a lattice of the CLIC damping rings.

  9. Electron beam linac simulations, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of particle simulation studies of electron beam problems for the year 1985 are summarized. Although the main subjects this year were mostly the same as in previous years, namely foilless diodes, accelerating gaps, and beam extraction, a major new element this year was the addition of IFR (ion-focused-regime) channels to the various components of a linac beam line. Of particular interest may be the new results obtained for IFR autoacceleration gaps (relevant to MIMI), and the studies of extraction from a guide magnetic field onto an IFR propagation channel (relevant to RADLAC II). 49 figs., 20 refs

  10. Golden Jubilee Photos: A CLIC for the future

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ Prototype copper accelerating structures for CLIC. New accelerator projects take many years to make and mature. When the LHC project was still only a twinkle in CERN's eye, research was already starting on a new machine. A small team at CERN was setting about the task of studying a high-energy, compact, lepton linear collider, known as CLIC. This is possibly set to become the collider of the future. A machine of this kind has all the advantages of a collider (the total collision energy is equal to the sum of the energies of the two colliding beams) without the drawback of synchrotron radiation, which is produced when particles are accelerated around a ring and thus puts a limit on the energy of such colliders. But in a project as technically challenging as CLIC, considerable technological hurdles must be overcome. To limit the linear collider's length to some tens of kilometres, the beams must acquire a considerable quantity of energy per metre travelled. The collision rate (lumi...

  11. Sensitivity Analysis for the CLIC Damping Ring Inductive Adder

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse generators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the CLIC damping rings are particularly demanding: the flattop of the output pulse must be 160 ns duration, 12.5 kV and 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. An inductive adder allows the use of different modulation techniques and is therefore a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. PSpice has been utilised to carry out a sensitivity analysis of the predicted output pulse to the value of both individual and groups of circuit compon...

  12. Development of the High Energy Linac Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this project is studying the extension plan of the proton engineering frontier project (PEFP) 100-MeV Linac. It includes three categories. One is studying operation plan of the PEFP linac and its extended accelerators, and developing a distribution system of 100-MeV proton beams with a laser striping. Other is designing superconducting RF (SRF) modules and fabricating and testing a copper cavity model. The other is designing a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The operation scheme of the PEFP linac is related to the optimization in the operation of the 100-MeV linac, 200-MeV SRF, and RCS. We studied several operational method to increase the validity of the accelerators. The beam distribution system has two roles. One is supplying proton beams of 100 MeV to the user group. The laser stripping of the negative hydrogen atoms is used in this case. The other beams are directed to the next high energy accelerators. This study contributes to increase the availability of the proton beams. The SRF is one of candidates to extend the PEFP linac system. Since the accelerating gradient of the SRF is much higher than the normal conducting accelerator, a lot of institutes over the world are developing the SRF structure. Main purposes are designing an SRF module, fabricating and testing an copper model which has similar material properties as Nb of the usual SRF cavity material. The RCS is a synchrotron whose injector is the PEFP 100-MeV linac. Main purposes are determining the lattice structure, studying the fast and slow extraction system, simulating beam behavior in the designed synchrotron. The RCS will be used as the spallation neutron source and tools in the basic and applied science including medical application

  13. Linac LU-20 as injector of Nuclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linac LU-20 created as an injector of Synchrophasotron and Nuclotron is described. Tables of main parameters and beam intensities are included. The functional diagram of LU-20 is shown. Injection channels, diagnostic and control systems are described also. The scheme of beam transport line is also provided. (author)

  14. Electro neutrons around a 12 MV Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron contamination around Linacs for radiotherapy is a source of undesirable doses for the patient. The main source of these neutrons is the photonuclear reactions occurring in the Linac head and the patient body. Electrons also produce neutrons through (e, en) reactions. This reaction is known as electro disintegration and is carried out by the electron scattering that produce a virtual photon that is absorbed by the scattering nucleus producing the reaction e + A → (A-1) + n + e'. In this work the electron-neutron spectrum to 100 cm from the isocenter of a 12 MV Linac has been measured using a passive Bonner spheres spectrometer in a novel procedure named Planetary mode. (Author)

  15. Electro neutrons around a 12 MV Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Perez L, L. H., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Instituto Zacatecano del Tumor, A. C., Lago de la Encantada No. 294, Fracc. Lomas del Lago, Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    Neutron contamination around Linacs for radiotherapy is a source of undesirable doses for the patient. The main source of these neutrons is the photonuclear reactions occurring in the Linac head and the patient body. Electrons also produce neutrons through (e, en) reactions. This reaction is known as electro disintegration and is carried out by the electron scattering that produce a virtual photon that is absorbed by the scattering nucleus producing the reaction e + A {yields} (A-1) + n + e'. In this work the electron-neutron spectrum to 100 cm from the isocenter of a 12 MV Linac has been measured using a passive Bonner spheres spectrometer in a novel procedure named Planetary mode. (Author)

  16. Simulation Study of Cool-Down of the CLIC Wiggler Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, L; van Weelderen, R; Xiong, L

    2013-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the CLIC wiggler magnets is under design. The cooldown process is one of the main dimensioning factors for the system. In this paper, the heat transfer model used to simulate the cool-down process is presented. Different configurations are then investigated and a detailed analysis of the corresponding temperature evolutions along the magnet strings is calculated. The temperature profiles are evaluated for the flowing helium as well as for the magnets allowing a detailed analysis of the temperature gradients. The impact of some key parameters, like the mass-flow rate, the diameter of the cooling channels and of the thermal coupling between the helium and the magnets is also investigated.

  17. Development of the Medium Energy Linac Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this project is developing 100-MeV proton linear accelerator (linac) for proton engineering frontier project (PEFP). In the first phase of the PEFP, the development of the 20-MeV linac has successfully finished. Hence the work scope of this project is designing the linac to accelerate proton beams from 20-MeV up to 100-MeV, fabricating the linac up to 45 MeV, fabricating one set of the medium energy beam transport (MEBT) tank, and developing the low level radio frequency (LLRF) system and the control system. The basic role of the new proton accelerator is accelerating 20-mA proton beams from 20 MeV up to 100 MeV. The first step of the design procedure is optimizing and determining the accelerator parameters. The beam loss is also main concern in the design stage. The drift tube (DT) and the quadrupole magnets are designed to be optimized to the new linac design. The other purpose is confirming the new design by fabricating and tuning the drift tube linac (DTL). The 20MeV proton beam divided into two directions. One is supplying the beams to user group by turning on the 45-degree bending magnet. The other is guided into the 100-MeV DTL by tuning off the dipole magnet. That is why the PEFP MEBT located after 20-MeV DTL. The MEBT is realized as two small DTL tanks with three cells and a 45-degree bending magnet. The fabrication of one MEBT tank is another purpose of this project. The other purposes of this project is developing the LLRF system to control the RF signal and control system to monitor and control the vacuum system, magnet power supply, etc

  18. Scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based eγ colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based eγ colliders. Both direct and resolved contributions to the cross section are examined. We find that the masses of scalar leptoquarks can be probed up to about 0.9 TeV at TESLA and 2.6 TeV at CLIC. (orig.)

  19. Scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based e-gamma colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Cakir, O.; Ateser, E.; Koru, H.

    2002-01-01

    We study scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based e-gamma colliders. Both direct and resolved contributions to the cross section are examined. We find that the masses of scalar leptoquarks can be probed up to about 0.9 TeV at TESLA and 2.6 TeV at CLIC.

  20. Intense positron beams: linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of monoenergetic positrons with energies of a few eV to many keV have been used in experiments in atomic physics, solid-state physics and materials science. The production of positron beams from a new source, an electron linac, is described. Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons were produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency, moderator geometry, beam spot size and other positron beam parameters were determined for electrons with energies from 60 to 120 MeV. Low-energy positron beams produced with a high-energy electron linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources. These higher intensity beams will make possible positron experiments previously infeasible. 10 references, 1 figure

  1. High field electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High field electron linacs are considered as potential candidates to provide very high energies beyond LEP. Since almost twenty years not much improvement has been made on linac technologies as they have been mostly kept at low and medium energies to be used as injectors for storage rings. Today, both their efficiency and their performances are being reconsidered, and for instance the pulse compression sheme developed at SLAC and introduced to upgrade the energy of that linac is a first step towards a new generation of linear accelerators. However this is not enough in terms of power consumption and more development is needed to improve both the efficiency of accelerating structures and the performances of RF power sources

  2. Half wave helix loaded superconducting resonator for heavy ion Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here the main characteristics and performances of the helix superconducting resonators designed and mounted in the new Saclay Booster Linac which is the first european heavy ion superconducting accelerator

  3. Present status of the TOHOKU 300 MeV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TOHOKU linac that was constructed about a quarter century before has been operated without serious trouble recently. This report describes as follows: main trouble, maintenance, present performance of the machine and status of operation. (author)

  4. Thermal joining studies of CLIC accelerating structures and Establishment of a test bench and studies of thermomechanical behaviour of a CLIC two beam module

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    The assembly procedure of the CLIC accelerating structures is constituted of several steps, involving ultra-precision machining, heating cycles at very high temperatures and many quality controls necessary to fulfil the very tight technical requirements. Diverse issues are related to the diffusion bonding process of CLIC accelerating structures; due to diffusion creep mechanisms occurring at high temperature and low stress, residual deformations might be present at the end of the joining process. A theoretical and experimental approach is presented here in order to understand this issue further and feedback on the design process. As a second issue tackled here, the final alignment of CLIC is also affected by the power dissipation occurring in the module during the normal operation modes and resulting in time-varying non-uniform thermal fields. The thermo-mechanical models of CLIC two-beam modules developed in the past are then useful to predict the structural deformations affecting the final alignment of the ...

  5. Online Resources for High School Teachers--A CLIC Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-04-01

    "I'm a high school teacher. I don't have time to sift through all of JCE to find what I need. I don't have enough time as it is!" If you need to find things in a hurry, go to JCE HS CLIC, the JCE High School Chemed Learning Information Center, http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/HS/. You will find good solid, reliable information, and you will find it fast. CLIC is open 24 hours every day, all over the world. What You Will Find at JCE CLIC We know teachers are pressed for time. During the few minutes between classes or at the end of the day, information needs to be found very quickly. Perhaps you are looking for a demo that illustrates electrochemistry using Cu, Mg, orange juice, and a clock; or a student activity on chromatography that is ready to copy and hand out; or a video to illustrate the action of aqua regia on gold, because you can't use aqua regia and can't afford gold. You can find each of these quickly at CLIC. The Journal has always provided lots of articles designed with high school teachers in mind. What the new JCE HS CLIC does is collect the recent materials at one address on JCE Online, making it quicker and easier for you to find them. Information has been gathered from both print and online versions of the Journal, from JCE Software, and from JCE Internet. It is organized as shown at the bottom of the page. Getting Access to Information You have located something that interests you, perhaps a list of tested demonstrations that pertain to consumer chemistry. Now it is time to get it. JCE subscribers (individuals and libraries) can read, download, and print the full versions of the articles as well as all supplemental materials, including student handouts and instructor's notes. You will need the username and password that are on the mailing label that comes with your Journaleach month. JCE HS CLIC home page: http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/HS/ Your Suggestions, Please Our plans for JCE HS CLIC do not end with what you find now. Other resources and features

  6. The Fermilab Linac Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade is planned to increase the energy of the H- linac from 200 to 400 MeV. This is intended to reduce the incoherent space-charge tuneshift at injection into the 8 GeV Booster which can limit either the brightness or the total intensity of the beam. The Linac Upgrade will be achieved by replacing the last four 201.25 MHz drift-tube tanks which accelerate the beam from 116 to 200 MeV, with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules operating at an average axial field of abut 7.5 MV/m. This will allow acceleration to 400 MeV in the existing Linac enclosure. Each accelerator module will be driven with a klystron-based rf power supply. A prototype rf modulator has been built and tested at Fermilab, and a prototype 12 MW klystron is being fabricated by Litton Electron Devices. Fabrication of production accelerator modules is in progress. 8 figs., 4 tabs

  7. The Fermilab Linac Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, R.J.

    1991-02-01

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade is planned to increase the energy of the H- linac from 200 to 400 MeV. This is intended to reduce the incoherent space-charge tuneshift at injection into the 8 GeV Booster which can limit either the brightness or the total intensity of the beam. The Linac Upgrade will be achieved by replacing the last four 201.25 MHz drift-tube tanks which accelerate the beam from 116 to 200 MeV, with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules operating at an average axial field of abut 7.5 MV/m. This will allow acceleration to 400 MeV in the existing Linac enclosure. Each accelerator module will be driven with a klystron-based rf power supply. A prototype rf modulator has been built and tested at Fermilab, and a prototype 12 MW klystron is being fabricated by Litton Electron Devices. Fabrication of production accelerator modules is in progress. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. TOP LINAC design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes a linear accelerator for protons named TOP LINAC designed for the TOP (Terapia Oncologica con Protoni, Oncological Protontherapy) project launched by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanita', ISS) to explore in collaboration with the biggest Oncological Hospital in Rome (Istituto Regina Elena, IRE) the potentialities of the therapy with accelerated protons and establish guide lines for the application of this new type of radiotherapy in comparison with the more traditional electron and x-rays radiotherapy. The concept of a compact accelerator for protontherapy applications bore within the Italian Hadrontherapy Collaboration (TERA Collaboration) with the aim to diffuse the protontherapy on the National territory. The ISS program plans to use the TOP linac proton beam also for production of PET (Positron Emission Tomography) radioisotopes and radiobiology studies. Official agreements are in course between ISS and ENEA which provides its experience in the industrial and medical accelerators for the design and the construction of the TOP linac. The accelerator that will be the first 3 GHz proton linac in the world, will be composed of a 428.3 MHz 7 Me V RFQ + DTL injector followed by a 7-65 Me V section of a 3 GHz SCDTL structure and a 65 - 200 Me V variable energy SCL 3 GHz structure. In particular the SCDTL section uses a highly innovative accelerating structure patented by ENEA. In this report the clinical and physical requests are discussed and a preliminary design of the whole machine is given

  9. Induced radioisotopes in a linac treatment hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When linacs operate above 8 MV an undesirable neutron field is produced whose spectrum has three main components: the direct spectrum due to those neutrons leaking out from the linac head, the scattered spectrum due to neutrons produced in the head that collides with the nuclei in the head losing energy and the third spectrum due to room-return effect. The third category of spectrum has mainly epithermal and thermal neutrons being constant at any location in the treatment hall. These neutrons induce activation in the linac components, the concrete walls and in the patient body. Here the induced radioisotopes have been identified in concrete samples located in the hall and in one of the wedges. The identification has been carried out using a gamma-ray spectrometer. - Highlights: • Portland cement samples were located inside a treatment hall with a 15 MV linac. • Induced radioisotopes were measured with a NaI(Tl) γ-ray spectrometer. • 56Mn, 24Na, and 28Al were identified and the specific activity was estimated. • In a wedge, 56Mn was induced by the photoneutrons

  10. Designing self-matching linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present trend in ion-linac design is to begin with a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac followed by one or more drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks in which permanent-magnet quadrupoles are used for transverse focusing. The lack of adjustable elements (knobs) strongly suggests that one should seek linac designs with intertank matching solutions that are insensitive to beam currents and emittances, which can be accomplished if there are no sharp discontinuities in the focusing properties along the entire linac. Guidelines are presented for linac design and describe techniques for longitudinal as well as transverse matching between tanks. For a wide range of beam currents and emittances, a beam matched at the entrance to the RFQ should remain well matched throughout the entire linac

  11. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  12. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretched-wire RF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzetti, Silvia; Fanucci, Luca; Galindo Muñoz, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-μm regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  13. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretched-wire RF measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-μm regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method. (paper)

  14. CLIC5A, a component of the ezrin-podocalyxin complex in glomeruli, is a determinant of podocyte integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Binytha; Al-Momany, Abass; Kulak, Stephen C; Kozlowski, Kathy; Obeidat, Marya; Jahroudi, Nadia; Paes, John; Berryman, Mark; Ballermann, Barbara J

    2010-06-01

    The chloride intracellular channel 5A (CLIC5A) protein, one of two isoforms produced by the CLIC5 gene, was isolated originally as part of a cytoskeletal protein complex containing ezrin from placental microvilli. Whether CLIC5A functions as a bona fide ion channel is controversial. We reported previously that a CLIC5 transcript is enriched approximately 800-fold in human renal glomeruli relative to most other tissues. Therefore, this study sought to explore CLIC5 expression and function in glomeruli. RT-PCR and Western blots show that CLIC5A is the predominant CLIC5 isoform expressed in glomeruli. Confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy reveal high levels of CLIC5A protein in glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes. In podocytes, CLIC5A localizes to the apical plasma membrane of foot processes, similar to the known distribution of podocalyxin and ezrin. Ezrin and podocalyxin colocalize with CLIC5A in glomeruli, and podocalyxin coimmunoprecipitates with CLIC5A from glomerular lysates. In glomeruli of jitterbug (jbg/jbg) mice, which lack the CLIC5A protein, ezrin and phospho-ERM levels in podocytes are markedly lower than in wild-type mice. Transmission electron microscopy reveals patchy broadening and effacement of podocyte foot processes as well as vacuolization of glomerular endothelial cells. These ultrastructural changes are associated with microalbuminuria at baseline and increased susceptibility to adriamycin-induced glomerular injury compared with wild-type mice. Together, the data suggest that CLIC5A is required for the development and/or maintenance of the proper glomerular endothelial cell and podocyte architecture. We postulate that the interaction between podocalyxin and subjacent filamentous actin, which requires ezrin, is compromised in podocytes of CLIC5A-deficient mice, leading to dysfunction under unfavorable genetic or environmental conditions. PMID:20335315

  15. Interaction Point Backgrounds from the CLIC Post Collision Line

    OpenAIRE

    Salt, Michael David

    2012-01-01

    The proposed CLIC accelerator is designed to collide electrons and positrons ata centre of mass energy of 3 TeV, and a luminosity of 5.9 x 10^(34) cm^(−2) s^(−1) at the interactionpoint (IP). Being a single-pass machine, luminosity must be maximised byminimising the beam spot size to the order of a few nanometres. The effects of the finalfocussing and the intense beam-beam effects lead to a high production cross sectionof beamstrahlung photons, and highly divergent outgoing beams, both spatia...

  16. Status of the Fatigue Studies on the CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, S; Neupert, H; Wuensch, Walter; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The need for high accelerating gradients for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) imposes considerable constraints on the materials of the accelerating structures. The surfaces exposed to high pulsed RF (Radio Frequency) currents are subject to cyclic thermal stresses which are expected to induce surface break up by fatigue. Since no fatigue data exists in the literature up to very large numbers of cycles and for the particular stress pattern present in RF cavities, a comprehensive study of copper alloys in this parameter range has been initiated. Fatigue data for selected copper alloys in different states are presented

  17. An Asset Test of the CLIC Accelerating Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transverse wakefield suppression in the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multibunch accelerating structure, called the TDS (Tapered Damped Structure), is achieved primarily through heavy damping. In order to verify the performance of the TDS design and the validity of the theoretical tools used to model it, a 15 GHz version of the TDS has been constructed and tested in the ASSET facility at SLAC. The test has directly demonstrated transverse wakefield suppression of over a factor 100, with an excellent agreement between the measured and the calculated wakefield

  18. The CERN study of a 2 TeV e+e- collider CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress with the CERN study of a 2 TeV e+e- linear collider (CLIC) is reported. The CLIC Test Facility for drive beam generation is giving first results. Results are also reported from development work on 30 GHz prototype accelerating structures (including RF quadrupole configurations) from a 30 GHz transfer structure for RF power generation in the CLIC two-beam scheme, from a prototype system for submicron automatic alignment and from theoretical work on wake-field stabilization, alignment tolerances, compensation of the beams energy spread and the final focus system

  19. A 2--4 nm Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful. short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Operating as an FEL, lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness rf photocathode electron gun; pulse compressors; about 1/5 of the SLAC linac; and a long undulator with a FODO quadrupole focussing system. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the system would operate at wavelengths down to about 3 nm, producing ≥10 GW peak power in sub-ps pulses. At a 120 Hz rate the average power is ∼ 1 W

  20. Design of the CLIC Quadrupole Vacuum Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider, under study, requires vacuum chambers with a very small aperture, of the order of 8 mm in diameter, and with a length up to around 2 m for the main beam quadrupoles. To keep the very tight geometrical tolerances on the quadrupoles, no bake out is allowed. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-9 mbar static pressure) in a system where the vacuum performance is driven by water outgassing. For this application, a thinwalled stainless steel vacuum chamber with two ante chambers equipped with NEG strips, is proposed. The mechanical design, especially the stability analysis, is shown. The key technologies of the prototype fabrication are given. Vacuum tests are carried out on the prototypes. The test set-up as well as the pumping system conditions are presented.

  1. R&D for the Vertexing at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Redford, S

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider is a candidate to be the next high-energy particle physics collider. Using a novel acceleration technique, electrons and positrons would be brought into collision with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. Despite challenging levels of beam-induced background, this would provide a relatively clean environment in which to perform precision physics measurements. The vertex detector would be crucial in achieving this, and would need to provide accurate particle tracking information to facilitate secondary vertex reconstruction and jet flavour-tagging. With this goal in mind, current technological limits are being stretched to design a low occupancy, low mass and low-power dissipation vertex detector for CLIC. A concept comprising thin hybrid pixel detectors coupled to high- performance readout ASICs, power-pulsing and air-flow cooling is under development. In this paper, the CLIC vertex detector requirements are reviewed and the current status of R&D on sensors, readout, powerin...

  2. Preliminary Design of an Inductive Adder for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC damping rings will produce ultra-low emittance beam, with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the damping rings kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses: specifications call for a 160 ns duration flattop of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. A solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is a very promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications; this topology allows the use of both digital and analogue modulation. To effectively use modulation techniques to achieve such low ripple and droop requires an in-depth knowledge of the behaviour of the solid-state switching components and their gate drivers, as well as a good understanding of the overa...

  3. Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this ‘‘hybrid target’’, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

  4. Higgs Physics at the CLIC Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Afanaciev, K; Tehrani, N Alipour; Balázs, C; Benhammou, Y; Benoit, M; Bilki, B; Blaising, J -J; Boland, M J; Boronat, M; Borysov, O; Božović-Jelisavčić, I; Buckland, M; Bugiel, S; Burrows, P N; Charles, T K; Daniluk, W; Dannheim, D; Dasgupta, R; Demarteau, M; Gutierrez, M A Díaz; Eigen, G; Elsener, K; Felzmann, U; Firlej, M; Firu, E; Fiutowski, T; Fuster, J; Gabriel, M; Gaede, F; García, I; Ghenescu, V; Goldstein, J; Green, S; Grefe, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Kačarević, G; Kalinowski, J; Kananov, S; Klempt, W; Kopec, M; Krawczyk, M; Krupa, B; Kucharczyk, M; Kulis, S; Laštovička, T; Lesiak, T; Levy, A; Levy, I; Linssen, L; Lukić, S; Maier, A A; Makarenko, V; Marshall, J S; Mei, K; Milutinović-Dumbelović, G; Moroń, J; Moszczyński, A; Moya, D; Münker, R M; Münnich, A; Neagu, A T; Nikiforou, N; Nikolopoulos, K; Nürnberg, A; Pandurović, M; Pawlik, B; Codina, E Perez; Peric, I; Petric, M; Pitters, F; Poss, S G; Preda, T; Protopopescu, D; Rassool, R; Redford, S; Repond, J; Robson, A; Roloff, P; Ros, E; Rosenblat, O; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Sailer, A; Schlatter, D; Schulte, D; Shumeiko, N; Sicking, E; Simon, F; Simoniello, R; Sopicki, P; Stapnes, S; Ström, R; Strube, J; Świentek, K P; Szalay, M; Tesař, M; Thomson, M A; Trenado, J; Uggerhøj, U I; van der Kolk, N; van der Kraaij, E; Pinto, M Vicente Barreto; Vila, I; Gonzalez, M Vogel; Vos, M; Vossebeld, J; Watson, M; Watson, N; Weber, M A; Weerts, H; Wells, J D; Weuste, L; Winter, A; Wojtoń, T; Xia, L; Xu, B; Żarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zgura, I -S

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future e+e- collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper presents the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, sqrt(s) = 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e+e- -> ZH) and WW-fusion (e+e- -> Hnunu), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Gamma_H, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at sqrt(s) > 1 TeV provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through WW-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes e+e- -> ttH and e+e- -> HHnunu would allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of...

  5. Trends in Intermediate-Energy Superconducting wide-β Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting low beta linacs have been developed during the last 20 years as heavy ion accelerators for nuclear research; such linacs, mainly made of 2 or 3 gap superconducting cavities, are used in many countries as boosters for tandem accelerators and also as standalone machines. An important contribution in this field was given by the Weizmann Institute, where the first superconducting quarter wave booster was developed, becoming the model for many other machines around the world

  6. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M A

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  7. Injector linac of SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linac that is SPring-8 injector was completed and started operation from August 1. A beam was able to be transported to the final beam dumping at a tail end on August 8. From now on this linac carries out beam adjustment and be scheduled to do a beam injection to a synchrotron in October. The construction and fundamental performance of the linac are described. (author)

  8. CLIC Pre-damping and Damping Ring Kickers: Initial Ideas to Achieve Stability Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Uythoven, J

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity (1034-1035 cm-2s-1) and a nominal centre-of mass energy of 3 TeV: CLIC would complement LHC physics in the multi-TeV range. The CLIC design relies on the presence of Pre-Damping Rings (PDR) and Damping Rings (DR) to achieve the very low emittance, through synchrotron radiation, needed for the luminosity requirements of CLIC. In order to limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations the combined flat top ripple and droop of the field pulse, for the DR extraction kickers, must be less than 0.02 %. In addition, the allowed beam coupling impedance is also very low: a few Ohms longitudinally and a few MW/m transversally. This paper discusses initial ideas for achieving the demanding requirements for the PDR and DR kickers.

  9. Experimental Program for the CLIC test facility 3 test beam line

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dobert, S; Olvegaard, M; Schulte, D; Syratchev, I; Lillestol, Reidar

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 Test Beam Line is the first prototype for the CLIC drive beam decelerator. Stable transport of the drive beam under deceleration is a mandatory component in the CLIC two-beam scheme. In the Test Beam Line more than 50% of the total energy will be extracted from a 150 MeV, 28 A electron drive beam, by the use of 16 power extraction and transfer structures. A number of experiments are foreseen to investigate the drive beam characteristics under deceleration in the Test Beam Line, including beam stability, beam blow up and the efficiency of the power extraction. General benchmarking of decelerator simulation and theory studies will also be performed. Specially designed instrumentation including precision BPMs, loss monitors and a time-resolved spectrometer dump will be used for the experiments. This paper describes the experimental program foreseen for the Test Beam Line, including the relevance of the results for the CLIC decelerator studies.

  10. Commissioning of the LCLS Linac and Bunch Compressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project under construction at SLAC [1]. The injector section, from drive-laser and RF photocathode gun through the first bunch compressor, was commissioned in the spring and summer of 2007. The second phase of commissioning, including the second bunch compressor and various main linac modifications, was completed in January through August of 2008. We report here on experience gained during this second phase of machine commissioning, including the injector, the first and second bunch compressor stages, the linac up to 14 GeV, and beam stability measurements. The final commissioning phase, including the undulator and the long transport line from the linac, is set to begin in December 2008, with first light expected in July 2009

  11. PACMAN – an Innovative Doctoral Programme for CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The final network project funded under the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), Marie Curie Actions, held its kick-off meeting at CERN on 20 November 2013.   PACMAN – a study on Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometre scale – is in the final stage of recruiting 10 PhD students to do research on beam instrumentation, metrology, micrometric alignment, magnetic measurements, nano-positioning and high-precision engineering. The students will acquire multi-disciplinary expertise in advanced engineering combined with a broad span of transferable skills. “PACMAN gives us the opportunity to attract students to CERN at a key moment in the CLIC study,” said Frédérick Bordry, Head of CERN’s Technology Department. “This is also an ideal opportunity to further develop CERN’s networks with industry and universities.” “The project is...

  12. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar; Benoit, Mathieu; Dannheim, Dominik; Dette, Karola; Hynds, Daniel; Kulis, Szymon; Peric, Ivan; Petric, Marko; Redford, Sophie; Sicking, Eva; Valerio, Pierpaolo

    2015-01-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor. Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  13. Vacuum arc localization in CLIC prototype radio frequency accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091976; Koivunen, Visa

    2016-04-04

    A future linear collider capable of reaching TeV collision energies should support accelerating gradients beyond 100 MV/m. At such high fields, the occurrence of vacuum arcs have to be mitigated through conditioning, during which an accelerating structure’s resilience against breakdowns is slowly increased through repeated radio frequency pulsing. Conditioning is very time and resource consuming, which is why developing more efficient procedures is desirable. At CERN, conditioning related research is conducted at the CLIC high-power X-band test stands. Breakdown localization is an important diagnostic tool of accelerating structure tests. Abnormal position distributions highlight issues in structure design, manufacturing or operation and may consequently help improve these processes. Additionally, positioning can provide insight into the physics of vacuum arcs. In this work, two established positioning methods based on the time-difference-ofarrival of radio frequency waves are extended. The first method i...

  14. NPL superconducting Linac control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control system for the NPL Linac is based on a Microvax II host computer connected in a star network with 9 satellite computers. These satellites use single board varsions of DEC's PDP 11 processor. The operator's console uses high performance graphics and touch screen technology to display the current linac status and as the means for interactively controlling the operation of the accelerator

  15. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air–Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondker R. Hossain

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels.

  16. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air–Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Khondker R.; Al Khamici, Heba; Holt, Stephen A.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2016-01-01

    CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels. PMID:26875987

  17. LINAC control automation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 7 MeV Electron Beam Linear Accelerator (LINAC) being used for pulse radiolysis experiments at RC and CDD, B.A.R.C. has been automated with a PLC based control panel designed and developed by Computer Division, B.A.R.C.. The control panel after power on switches ON various units in a pre-defined sequence and intervals on a single turn of START key from OFF to ON position. The control panel also generates various ramp signals in a pre-defined sequence and rate and steady values and feeds to the LINAC bringing it to the ready for experiment condition. Similarly on a single turn of STOP key from OFF to ON position, the panel ramps down the various signals in pre-defined manners and makes OFF the various units in predefined sequence and timing providing safety to the machine. The steady values for various signals are on line settable as and when required so. This automation system relieves the operator from fatigue of time consuming manual ramping up or down of various signals and running around in four rooms for switching ON or OFF the various units enhancing efficiency and safety. This also facilitates the user scientist to do start up and shutdown operation in the absence of skilled operators and thus adds flexibility for working up to extended timing. This unit has been working satisfactorily since August 2002. For extraordinary condition automation to manual or vice versa change over has been provided. (author)

  18. Optimization of SRF Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Tom [JLAB

    2013-09-01

    This work describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project.[1] The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs. The work was first published in an ICFA Beam Dynamics News Letter.[2] More recent additions to the software include the ability to save and restore input parameters as well as to adjust the Qo versus E parameters in order to explore the potential costs savings associated with doing so. Additionally, program changes now allow one to model the costs associated with a linac that makes use of energy recovery mode of operation.

  19. Planned Contributions of The Wcrp Climate and Cryosphere (clic) Project To Mountain Hydrological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, R. G.

    Formal discussions within the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) since 1997 have addressed the question of the role of the cryosphere in the climate system. An outcome has been the approval in March 2000 of a Science and Co-ordination Plan for a new Climate and Cryosphere (CliC) project by the WCRP Joint Scientific Com- mittee in March 2000. The concept of this plan (WCRP, 2001) and particular topics of concern for high-mountain hydrology are discussed here. The proposed definition of the cryosphere is that portion of the climate system consisting of the world's ice masses and snow deposits. of relevance for mountains are: ice caps and glaciers, sea- sonal snow cover, lake and river ice, and seasonally frozen ground and permafrost. Existing projects both within the framework of the WCRP, as well as of the IGBP are mainly regional and links into the global climate research effort are not sufficiently comprehensive. The WCRP GEWEX project has cryospheric components concerning the high latitude hydrological cycle, but mountain studies are currently only in Ti- bet. Other relevant programs include: the IGBP-BAHC Mountain Research Initiative, Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS), and Permafrost and Climate in Europe (PACE), for example. Integration of existing cryospheric projects within a global research structure, together with new efforts addressing current gaps, is re- quired in order to: - enhance links between regional and global climatic components studies, - promote appropriate treatment of cryospheric processes in climate models, and - assemble and make accessible quality controlled, well documented, comprehen- sive and coherent global gridded data sets necessary for driving and validating climate models. The principal scientific questions relating to the cryosphere in mountain re- gions concern: - glacier melt contributions to global sea level change, - the energy and water cycle in regions with land ice, snow cover and frozen ground, - the

  20. Advanced RF power sources for linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-10-01

    In order to maintain a reasonable over-all length at high center-of-mass energy, the main linac of an electron-positron linear collider must operate at a high accelerating gradient. For copper (non-superconducting) accelerator structures, this implies a high peak power per unit length and a high peak power per RF source, assuming a limited number of discrete sources are used. To provide this power, a number of devices are currently under active development or conceptual consideration: conventional klystrons with multi-cavity output structures, gyroklystrons, magnicons, sheet-beam klystrons, multiple-beam klystrons and amplifiers based on the FEL principle. To enhance the peak power produced by an rf source, the SLED rf pulse compression scheme is currently in use on existing linacs, and new compression methods that produce a flatter output pulse are being considered for future linear colliders. This paper covers the present status and future outlook for the more important rf power sources and pulse compression systems. It should be noted that high gradient electron linacs have applications in addition to high-energy linear colliders; they can, for example, serve as compact injectors for FEL`s and storage rings.

  1. Wake Field Effect Analysis in APT Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, S S

    1998-01-01

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. The APT linac comprises both the normal conducting (below 211 MeV) and superconducting (SC) sections. The high current leads to stringent restrictions on allowable beam losses (<1 nA/m), that requires analyzing carefully all possible loss sources. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, we study these effects for the APT to exclude potential problems at such a high current. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. Our main conclusion is that the only noticeable effect is the HOM heating of the 5-cell SC cavities. It, however, has an acceptable level and, in addition, will be taken care of by HOM couplers.

  2. Dedicated Linac for Radioneurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis-López, Miguel A.; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José M.

    2003-09-01

    The objective is to present a description and the main clinical applications of this dedicated Linac for benign and malignant tumors in the central nervous system. The Novalis (BrainLab, Germany) is a 6 MV dedicated linac for a single high dose Radiosurgery (RS) and for fractionated doses in Stereotactic Radiotherapy with a high level of precision at the isocenter.

  3. Instrumentation for Longitudinal Beam Gymnastics in FEL's and at the CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T; Bravin, E; Burger, S; Corsini, R; Döbert, S; Soby, L; Tecker, F A; Urschutz, P; Welsch, C P; Alesini, D; Biscari, C; Buonomo, B; Coiro, O; Ghigo, A; Marcellini, F; Preger, B; Dabrowski, A; Velasco, M; Craievich, P; Ferianis, M; Veronese, M; Ferrari, A

    2008-01-01

    Built at CERN by an international collaboration, the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a high luminosity 3 TeV e+-e- collider by the year 2010. One of the main issues to be demonstrated is the generation of a high average current (30 A) high frequency (12 GHz) bunched beam by means of RF manipulation. At the same time, Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are developed in several places all over the world with the aim of providing high brilliance photon sources. These machines rely on the production of high peak current electron bunches. The required performances put high demands on the diagnostic equipment and innovative longitudinal monitors have been developed during the past years. This paper gives an overview of the longitudinal instrumentation developed at ELETTRA and CTF3, where a special effort was made in order to implement at the same time non-intercepting devices for online monitoring, and destructive diagnostics which have the advantage of providing more detailed informati...

  4. A Gas-Jet Profile Monitor for the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff, A; Lefevre, T; Tzoganis, V; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) will use a novel acceleration scheme in which energy extracted from a very intense beam of relatively low-energy electrons (the Drive Beam) is used to accelerate a lower intensity Main Beam to very high energy. The high intensity of the Drive Beam, with pulses of more than 1015 electrons, poses a challenge for conventional profile measurements such as wire scanners. Thus, new non-invasive profile measurements are being investigated. Profile monitors using gas ionisation or fluorescence have been used at a number of accelerators. Typically, extra gas must be injected at the monitor and the rise in pressure spreads for some distance down the beam pipe. In contrast, a gas jet can be fired across the beam into a receiving chamber, with little gas escaping into the rest of the beam pipe. In addition, a gas jet shaped into a thin plane can be used like a screen on which the beam crosssectionis imaged. In this paper we present some arrangements for the generation of such a jet. In ...

  5. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1977-01-01

    Being redied for installation, those at the right are for tank 1, those on the left for tank 2. Contrary to Linac 1, which had drift-tubes supported on stems, here the tubes are suspended, for better mechanical stability.

  6. Heavy ion induction linac drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense beams of high energy heavy ions (e.g., 10 GeV Hg) are an attractive option for an ICF driver because of their favorable energy deposition characteristics. The accelerator systems to produce the beams at the required power level are a development from existing technologies of the induction linac, rf linac/storage ring and synchrotron. The high repetition rate of the accelerator systems, and the high efficiency which can be realized at high current make this approach especially suitable for commercial ICF. The present report gives a summary of the main features of the induction linac driver system, which is the approach now pursued in the USA. The main subsystems, consisting of injector, multiple beam accelerator at low and high energy, transport and pulse compression lines, and final focus are described. Scale relations are given for the current limits and other features of these subsystems

  7. SLAC Linac Preparations for FACET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, R.; Bentson, L.; Kharakh, D.; Owens, A.; Schuh, P.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stanek, M.; Wittmer, W.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been cut at the two-thirds point to provide beams to two independent programs. The last third provides the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), leaving the first two-thirds available for FACET, the new experimental facility for accelerator science and test beams. In this paper, we describe this separation and projects to prepare the linac for the FACET experimental program.

  8. NPL superconducting linac control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control system for the Nuclear Physics Lab (NPL) linac is based on a Microvax II host computer connected in a star network with nine satellite computers. These satellites use single-board versions of DEC's PDP 11 processor. The operator's console uses high-performance graphics and touch-screen technology to display the current linac status and as the means for interactively controlling the operation of the accelerator

  9. CTF3 Probe Beam LINAC Commissioning and Operations

    CERN Document Server

    Farabolini, W; Curtoni, A; Girardot, P; Peauger, F; Simon, C S; Chevallay, E; Divall Csatari, M; Lebas, N; Petrarca, M; Palaia, A; Ruber, R J M Y; Ziemann, V G

    2010-01-01

    The probe beam LINAC, CAL­IFES, of the CLIC Test Fa­cil­i­ty (CTF3) has been de­vel­oped by CEA Saclay, LAL Orsay and CERN to de­liv­er trains of short bunch­es (0.75 ps) spaced by 0.666 ps at an en­er­gy around 170 MeV with a charge of 0.6 nC to the TBTS (Two-beam Test Stand) in­tend­ed to test the high gra­di­ent CLIC ac­cel­er­at­ing struc­tures. Based on 3 for­mer LIL ac­cel­er­at­ing struc­tures and on a newly de­vel­oped RF pho­to-in­jec­tor, the whole ac­cel­er­a­tor is pow­ered with a sin­gle 3 GHz klystron de­liv­er­ing puls­es of 45 MW through a RF pulse com­pres­sion cav­i­ty and a net­work of waveg­uides, split­ters, phase-shifters and an at­ten­u­a­tor. We re­late here re­sults col­lect­ed dur­ing the var­i­ous com­mis­sion­ing and op­er­a­tion pe­ri­ods which led to nom­i­nal per­for­mances and sta­ble beam char­ac­ter­is­tics de­liv­ered to the TBTS. Progress has been made in the laser sys­tem for beam charge and sta...

  10. Inner structure of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows the inner structure of Linac 2, with drift-tubes hanging on stems under a rigid support structure, soon to be mounted inside tank 1 (750 keV to 10 MeV, the lowest-energy one of 3). Frank Malthouse is standing in the background.

  11. Testing begins on Linac4

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    On 3 August 2012, the Linac4 radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) module was installed at the accelerator test-stand in Building 152. The site will be the module’s home for almost a year, as the linear accelerator enters the assembly and testing stage.   Final module assembly is carried out before installation in Building 152.  Over the next Long Shutdown (LS2), Linac4 will replace the current Linac2 linear accelerator as the first link in CERN’s accelerator chain. It will deliver particles at 160 MeV to the PS Booster, more than triple the energy currently delivered by Linac2. But before the accelerator team can pop the champagne, the various elements of Linac4 will be tested and re-tested in facilities across CERN. “The first Linac4 tests are currently underway, starting with the CERN-built RFQ,” says Carlo Rossi, a physicist in the RF Group of the Beams (BE) Department and the RFQ project coordinator. “It’s an extremely impre...

  12. A New Technique For Information Processing of CLIC Technical Documentation

    CERN Document Server

    Tzermpinos, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    The scientific work presented in this paper could be described as a novel, systemic approach to the process of organization of CLIC documentation. The latter refers to the processing of various sets of archived data found on various CERN archiving services in a more friendly and organized way. From physics aspect, this is equal to having an initial system characterized by high entropy, which after some transformation of energy and matter will produce a final system of reduced entropy. However, this reduction in entropy can be considered valid for open systems only, which are sub-systems of grander isolated systems, to which the total entropy will always increase. Thus, using as basis elements from information theory, systems theory and thermodynamics, the unorganized form of data pending to be organized to a higher form, is modeled as an initial open sub-system with increased entropy, which, after the processing of information, will produce a final system with decreased entropy. This systemic approach to the ...

  13. Les mesures de métrologie pour le CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cherif, A

    2008-01-01

    Le projet CLIC est en tout point un défi technique majeur ; c?est le cas également pour la mesure dimensionnelle. Quels sont les équipements et les méthodes qui permettent de caractériser les pièces avec une incertitude de mesure aussi réduite que possible, vu les tolérances micrométriques imposées ? Afin de répondre à cette question, une veille technologique a été maintenue sur une longue période. Les acteurs relevants ont été contactés pour bénéficier d?une ouverture sur les dernières avancées dans le domaine. Différentes techniques ont été étudiées et comparées telles que la digitalisation, la tomographie X, la mesure tridimensionnelle. L'assemblage de haute précision des composants est aussi primordial. Sa mise en ?uvre sous un microscope optique ou à l'aide d'une machine tridimensionnelle est en cours d?étude. L'exposé traitera aussi de la mesure de rugosité, un domaine où nous disposons de moyens adaptés aux exigences spécifiques du projet.

  14. The synchro laser system for the CLIC Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CLIC Test Facility at CERN uses a laser driven 3 GHz electron gun. Considerable effort has been spent to develop a laser system, which meets the requirements of the Test Facility. The laser is based on a diode-pumped ND:YLF mode-locked oscillator. It delivers a 250 MHz train of laser pulses at 1047 nm with a length of 6.6 ps. A phase-locked timing stabilizer is used to synchronize the laser with the rf-gun. One or two pulses are amplified to 10 mJ. The amplifier system is based on a regenerative amplifier and two single pass power amplifiers. A set of harmonic generators deliver laser pulses at 523 nm, 262 nm and optional at 209nm. The measured pulse length after amplification and harmonic generations is 8 ± 2 ps (FWHM). A good pointing stability and a reasonable uniform transverse profile is obtained by relay imaging and spatial filtering. For some experiments, a train of electron bunches is used. A new pulse train generator working at 262 nm was developed to split the laser beam into 12 pulses. The simultaneous amplification of two seed laser pulses gives the possibility to double the number of pulses in the train without the need to add further splitting stages

  15. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, N. Alipour; Arfaoui, S.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Dette, K.; Hynds, D.; Kulis, S.; Perić, I.; Petrič, M.; Redford, S.; Sicking, E.; Valerio, P.

    2016-07-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor, where efficiencies of greater than 99% have been achieved at -60 V substrate bias, with a single hit resolution of 6.1 μm . Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  16. Experimental study of DC vacuum breakdown and application to high-gradient accelerating structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Shipman, Nicholas; Jones, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is a leading candidate for the next generation high energy linear collider. As any breakdown would result in a partial or full loss of luminosity for the pulse in which it occurs, obtaining a low breakdown rate in CLIC accelerating structures is a critical requirement for the successful operation of the proposed collider. This thesis presents investigations into the breakdown phenomenon primarily in the low breakdown rate regime of interest to CLIC, performed using the CERN DC spark systems between 2011 and 2014. The design, construction and commissioning of several new pieces of hardware, as well as the development of improved techniques to measuring the inter-electrode gap distance are detailed. These hardware improvements were fundamental in enabling the exciting new experiments mentioned below, which in turn have provided significant additional insight into the phenomenon of breakdown. Experiments were performed to measure fundamental parameters of individual breakdowns...

  17. Induction Linac Pulsers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulsers used in most of the induction linacs evolved from the very large body of work that was done in the U.S. and Great Britain during the development of the pulsed magnetron for radar. The radar modulators started at ∼100 kW and reached >10 MW by 1945. A typical pulse length was 1 μs at a repetition rate of 1,000 pps. A very comprehensive account of the modulator development is Pulse Generators by Lebacqz and Glasoe, one of the Radiation Laboratory Series. There are many permutations of possible modulators, two of the choices being tube type and line type. In earlier notes I wrote that technically the vacuum tube pulser met all of our induction linac needs, in the sense that a number of tubes, in series and parallel if required, could produce our pulses, regulate their voltage, be useable in feed-forward correctors, and provide a low source impedance. At a lower speed, an FET array is similar, and we have obtained and tested a large array capable of >10 MW switching. A modulator with an electronically controlled output only needs a capacitor for energy storage and in a switched mode can transfer the energy from the capacitor to the load at high efficiency. Driving a full size Astron induction core and a simulated resistive 'beam load' we achieved >50% efficiency. These electronically controlled output pulses can produce the pulses we desire but are not used because of their high cost. The second choice, the line type pulser, visually comprises a closing switch and a distributed or a lumped element transmission line. The typical switch cannot open or stop conducting after the desired pulse has been produced, and consequently all of the initially stored energy is dissipated. This approximately halves the efficiency, and the original cost estimating program LIACEP used this factor of two, even though our circuits are usually worse, and even though our inveterate optimists often omit it. The 'missing' energy is that which is reflected back into the line from

  18. A sensitiviy analysis for the stabilization of the CLIC main beam quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, S; Artoos, K; Fernandez Carmona, P; Hauviller, C

    2010-01-01

    In particle colliders (like the LHC), particles are highly accelerated in a circular beam pipe before the collision. However, due to the curved trajectory of the particles, they are also loosing energy because of the so-called Bremsstrahlung. In order to bypass this fundamental limitation imposed by circular beams, the next generation of particle colliders will accelerate two straight beams of particles before the collision. One of them, the Compact Linear Collider, is currently under study at CERN. The machine is constituted of a huge number of accelerating structures (used to accelerate the particles) and quadrupoles (electromagnets used to focus the particles). The latter ones are required to be stable at the nanometer level. This extreme stability has to be guaranteed by active vibration isolation from all types of disturbances like ground vibrations, ventilation, cooling system, or acoustic noise. Because of the huge number of quadrupoles (about 4000), it is critical that the strategy adopted for the act...

  19. Progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in CLIC5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Oonk, Anne M M; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; Draaisma, Jos M T; Gandía, Marta; Oostrik, Jaap; Neveling, Kornelia; Kunst, Henricus P M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; del Castillo, Ignacio; Pennings, Ronald J E; Kremer, Hannie; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Schraders, Margit

    2015-02-01

    In a consanguineous Turkish family diagnosed with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI), a homozygous region of 47.4 Mb was shared by the two affected siblings on chromosome 6p21.1-q15. This region contains 247 genes including the known deafness gene MYO6. No pathogenic variants were found in MYO6, neither with sequence analysis of the coding region and splice sites nor with mRNA analysis. Subsequent candidate gene evaluation revealed CLIC5 as an excellent candidate gene. The orthologous mouse gene is mutated in the jitterbug mutant that exhibits progressive hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction. Mutation analysis of CLIC5 revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation c.96T>A (p.(Cys32Ter)) that segregated with the hearing loss. Further analysis of CLIC5 in 213 arNSHI patients from mostly Dutch and Spanish origin did not reveal any additional pathogenic variants. CLIC5 mutations are thus not a common cause of arNSHI in these populations. The hearing loss in the present family had an onset in early childhood and progressed from mild to severe or even profound before the second decade. Impaired hearing is accompanied by vestibular areflexia and in one of the patients with mild renal dysfunction. Although we demonstrate that CLIC5 is expressed in many other human tissues, no additional symptoms were observed in these patients. In conclusion, our results show that CLIC5 is a novel arNSHI gene involved in progressive hearing impairment, vestibular and possibly mild renal dysfunction in a family of Turkish origin. PMID:24781754

  20. Detector optimization studies and light Higgs decay into muons at CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a future e+e- linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The design of a CLIC experiment is driven by the requirements related to the physics goals, as well as by the experimental conditions. For example, the short time between two bunch crossings of 0.5 ns and the backgrounds due to beamstrahlung have direct impact on the design of a CLIC experiment. The Silicon Detector (SiD) is one of the concepts currently being discussed as a possible detector for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In this thesis we develop a modified version of the SiD simulation model for CLIC, taking into account the specific experimental conditions. In addition, we developed a software tool to investigate the impact of beam-related backgrounds on the detector by overlaying events from different simulated event samples. Moreover, we present full simulation studies, determining the performance of the calorimeter and tracking systems. We show that the track reconstruction in the all-silicon tracker of SiD is robust in the presence of the backgrounds at CLIC. Furthermore, we investigate tungsten as a dense absorber material for the hadronic calorimeter, which allows for the construction of a compact hadronic calorimeter that fulfills the requirements on the energy resolution and shower containment without a significant increase of the coil radius. Finally, the measurement of the decays of light Higgs bosons into two muons is studied in full simulation. We find that with an integrated luminosity of 2 ab-1, corresponding to 4 years of data taking at CLIC, the respective Higgs branching ratio can be determined with a statistical uncertainty of approximately 15%.

  1. Detector optimization studies and light Higgs decay into muons at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grefe, Christian

    2013-09-15

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The design of a CLIC experiment is driven by the requirements related to the physics goals, as well as by the experimental conditions. For example, the short time between two bunch crossings of 0.5 ns and the backgrounds due to beamstrahlung have direct impact on the design of a CLIC experiment. The Silicon Detector (SiD) is one of the concepts currently being discussed as a possible detector for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In this thesis we develop a modified version of the SiD simulation model for CLIC, taking into account the specific experimental conditions. In addition, we developed a software tool to investigate the impact of beam-related backgrounds on the detector by overlaying events from different simulated event samples. Moreover, we present full simulation studies, determining the performance of the calorimeter and tracking systems. We show that the track reconstruction in the all-silicon tracker of SiD is robust in the presence of the backgrounds at CLIC. Furthermore, we investigate tungsten as a dense absorber material for the hadronic calorimeter, which allows for the construction of a compact hadronic calorimeter that fulfills the requirements on the energy resolution and shower containment without a significant increase of the coil radius. Finally, the measurement of the decays of light Higgs bosons into two muons is studied in full simulation. We find that with an integrated luminosity of 2 ab{sup -1}, corresponding to 4 years of data taking at CLIC, the respective Higgs branching ratio can be determined with a statistical uncertainty of approximately 15%.

  2. Linac transport and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceleration of intense bunches maintaining high brightness is limited both by single-particle effects, e.g., misalignments, injection errors, and rf-steering, and collective phenomena, where the effects of the longitudinal and transverse wakefield on particles within a single bunch are the most severe. The working group has considered both problems and potentials of linac acceleration from ∼50 MeV to 1 GeV for free electron laser (FEL) applications, as well as from a few Gev to 1 TeV for linear colliders. The outlook for free electron lasers is bright: no fundamental problems seem to arise in the acceleration of peak currents in excess of 100 A with small emittance and low momentum spread. The situation of linear colliders is more complex and more difficult. Two examples, one operating at 11.4 GHz, the other at 30 GHz, are used to illustrate some of the difficulties and the exceedingly tight tolerances required. Both examples are based on round beams, and thus neither benefit from the advantages of flat beams nor address the increased care required in transporting beams of very small emittance in one plane. The working group acknowledges, but did not explore, promising concepts for colliders based on RF superconductivity

  3. Energy and Beam-Offset dependence of the Luminosity weighted depolarization for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, Jakob; Uggerhoj, Ulrik; Dalena, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We report on simulations of e+e- depolarization due to beam-beam effects. These effects are studied for CLIC at 3 TeV, using GUINEA PIG++. We find a strong energy dependence of the luminosity weighted depolarization. In the luminosity peak at CLIC the total luminosity weighted depolarization remains below the one per-mil level. The effect of a vertical offset on the energy dependent depolarization is investigated. The depolarization in the luminosity peak remains below per-cent level even for 5sy offsets.

  4. Experimental tests on the air cooling of the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Ramos, Fernando; Nuiry, Francois-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The strict requirements in terms of material budget for the inner region of the CLIC detector concept require the use of a dry gas for the cooling of the respective sensors. This, in conjunction with the compactness of the inner volumes, poses several challenges for the design of a cooling system that is able to fulfil the required detector specifications. This note summarizes the results obtained from experimental tests on the air cooling of the CLIC vertex detector as well as their comparison with the corresponding computational fluid dynamics simulations.

  5. Physics at the CLIC $e^{+}e^{-}$ Linear Collider - Input to the Snowmass process 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, Halina; Afanaciev, K.; Alexander, G.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Alonso, O.; Andersen, K.K.; Arfaoui, S.; Balazs, C.; Barklow, T.; Battaglia, M.; Benoit, M.; Bilki, B.; Blaising, J.J.; Boland, M.; Boronat, M.; Bozovic Jelisavcic, I.; Burrows, P.; Chefdeville, M.; Contino, R.; Dannheim, D.; Demarteau, M.; Diaz Gutierrez, M.A.; Dieguez, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Eigen, G.; Elsener, K.; Feldman, D.; Felzmann, U.; Firlej, M.; Firu, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Francis, K.; Gaede, F.; Garcia Garcia, I.; Ghenescu, V.; Giudice, G.; Graf, N.; Grefe, C.; Grojean, C.; Gupta, R.S.; Hauschild, M.; Holmestad, H.; Idzik, M.; Joram, C.; Kananov, S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; Kraml, S.; Krupa, B.; Kulis, S.; Lastovicka, T.; LeBlanc, G.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci Timoce, A.; Lukic, S.; Makarenko, V.; Marshall, J.; Martin, V.; Mikkelsen, R.E.; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G.; Miyamoto, A.; Monig, K.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Moron, J.; Munnich, A.; Neagu, A.; Pandurovic, M.; Pappadopulo, D.; Pawlik, B.; Porod, W.; Poss, S.; Preda, T.; Rassool, R.; Rattazzi, R.; Redford, S.; Reichold, A.; Repond, J.; Riemann, S.; Robson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ros, E.; Rosten, J.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Rzehak, H.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, K.; Shumeiko, N.; Sicking, E.; Simon, F.; Smith, J.; Soldner, C.; Stapnes, S.; Strube, J.; Suehara, T.; Swientek, K.; Szalay, M.; Tanabe, T.; Tesar, M.; Thamm, A.; Thomson, M.; Trenado Garcia, J.; Uggerhoj, U.I.; van der Kraaij, E.; Vila, I.; Vilella, E.; Villarejo, M.A.; Vogel Gonzalez, M.A.; Vos, M.; Watson, N.; Weerts, H.; Wells, J.D.; Weuste, L.; Wistisen, T.N.; Wootton, K.; Xia, L.; Zawiejski, L.; Zgura, I.S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the physics potential of the CLIC high-energy e+e- linear collider. It provides input to the Snowmass 2013 process for the energy-frontier working groups on The Higgs Boson (HE1), Precision Study of Electroweak Interactions (HE2), Fully Understanding the Top Quark (HE3), as well as The Path Beyond the Standard Model -- New Particles, Forces, and Dimensions (HE4). It is accompanied by a paper describing the CLIC accelerator study, submitted to the Frontier Capabilities group of the Snowmass process

  6. Physics at the CLIC e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ Linear Collider -- Input to the Snowmass process 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Abramowicz, Halina; Abusleme, Angel; Battaglia, Marco; Świentek, Krzysztof; Szalay, Marco; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Tesař, Michal; Thamm, Andrea; Thomson, Mark; Garcia, Juan Trenado; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; van der Kraaij, Erik; Vila, Iván; Benoit, Mathieu; Vilella, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the physics potential of the CLIC high-energy e+e- linear collider. It provides input to the Snowmass 2013 process for the energy-frontier working groups on The Higgs Boson (HE1), Precision Study of Electroweak Interactions (HE2), Fully Understanding the Top Quark (HE3), as well as The Path Beyond the Standard Model -- New Particles, Forces, and Dimensions (HE4). It is accompanied by a paper describing the CLIC accelerator study, submitted to the Frontier Capabilities gr...

  7. Application of RF crossed lenses for beam focusing in linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of beam focusing by two-electrode RF crossed lenses with decelerating fields is proposed. The lenses are arranged in accelerating gaps of a drift tube linac. The crossed lens is a set of plane electrodes with rectangular apertures such that the apertures in the neighbouring electrodes are rotated 90 degrees each other. Different variants of the focusing period structure are considered. The βλ FD period is shown to be used for low energy part of the linac. The transverse phase advance for the FD period is independent on the particle phase when the synchronous harmonics of the accelerating field is absent and the structure is analogous to RFQ with unmodulated vanes in the case. In the main part of the linac it is worth to change to the 2βλ FODO period to obtain essentially higher acceleration rate. (author)

  8. A hot-spare injector for the APS linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last year a second-generation SSRL-type thermionic cathode rf gun was installed in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac. This gun (referred to as ''gun2'') has been successfully commissioned and now serves as the main injector for the APS linac, essentially replacing the Koontz-type DC gun. To help ensure injector availability, particularly with the advent of top-up mode operation at the APS, a second thermionic-cathode rf gun will be installed in the APS linac to act as a hot-spare beam source. The hot-spare installation includes several unique design features, including a deep-orbit Panofsky-style alpha magnet. Details of the hot-spare beamline design and projected performance are presented, along with some plans for future performance upgrades

  9. IH linac development at INS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new tuning method of the gap voltage distribution has been developed for an interdigital H type linac. With an asymmetrically ridged IH resonator, the voltage distribution was significantly improved by introducing a pair of Wing Tuners. The quality factor and the shunt impedance of the resonant cavity remained practically unchanged by these inductive tuning elements. The Wing Tuners strongly affect on linac characteristics similarly to the local reduction of the resonator diameter. A prototype IH linac has been constructed to demonstrate the operational capabilities of the tuning method. The linac is designed to accelerate protons from an energy of 15 to 161 keV with an rf frequency of 100 MHz. The linac tank is made of mild steel, and 48 and 92 cm in diameter and in length, respectively. The drift tube structure of π/3π mode is adopted, and an electrostatic quadrupole lens is installed in every 3π drift tube. The experimental results of the proton model agree well with the design characteristics. (author)

  10. Status of the RFD Linac Structure Developement

    OpenAIRE

    Swenson, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    The Proof-of-Principle (POP) prototype of the Rf-Focused Drift tube (RFD) linac structure is currently under test at Linac Systems, after years of delay due to a variety of technical problems. A discussion of these technical problems and their solutions will be presented. The status of these tests will be reported. Plans for future development of this linac structure will be revealed. Potential uses of this linac structure for a variety of scientific, medical, and industrial applications will...

  11. Upgrading the Fermilab Linac local control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new control system for the Fermilab Linac is being designed, built and implemented. First, the nine-year-old linac control system is being replaced. Second, a control system for the new 805 MHz part of the linac is being built. The two systems are essentially identical, so that when the installations are complete, we will still have a single Linac Control System. 8 refs., 5 figs

  12. Proposal for an alignment method of the CLIC linear accelerator - From geodesic networks to the active pre-alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is the particle accelerator project proposed by the european organization for nuclear research (CERN) for high energy physics after the large hadron collider (LHC). Because of the nano-metric scale of the CLIC leptons beams, the emittance growth budget is very tight. It induces alignment tolerances on the positions of the CLIC components that have never been achieved before. The last step of the CLIC alignment will be done according to the beam itself. It falls within the competence of the physicists. However, in order to implement the beam-based feedback, a challenging pre-alignment is required: 10 μm at 3σ along a 200 m sliding window. For such a precision, the proposed solution must be compatible with a feedback between the measurement and repositioning systems. The CLIC pre-alignment will have to be active. This thesis does not demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC active pre-alignment but shows the way to the last developments that have to be done for that purpose. A method is proposed. Based on the management of the Helmert transformations between Euclidean coordinate systems, from the geodetic networks to the metrological measurements, this method is likely to solve the CLIC pre-alignment problem. Large scale facilities have been built and Monte-Carlo simulations have been made in order to validate the mathematical modeling of the measurement systems and of the alignment references. When this is done, it will be possible to extrapolate the modeling to the entire CLIC length. It will be the last step towards the demonstration of the CLIC pre-alignment feasibility. (author)

  13. RF system of FELI linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FELI (Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is constracting a Free Electron Laser facility covering from 20μm (infrared region) to 0.35μm (ultra violet region), using an S-band linac. The building will be completed in November 1993 and linac will start to be installed in December 1993. RF system of linac for FEL is required of long pulse duration and high stability. An S-band klystron (Toshiba E3729) is operated in three pulse operation modes (pulse width and peak RF power); 24μs-24MW, 12.5μs-34MW, 0.5μs-70MW. Each klystron modulator has the PFN consisting of 4 parallel networks of 24 capacitors and 24 inductors, and it has a line switch of optical thyristor stack. (author)

  14. Linac3 - 1992-1994

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN; A Van der Shueren; Jean-Claude Vialis

    1995-01-01

    This film reports the differents steps of the construction in differents places (Italy, Germany, France) from 29 October 1992 to 29 April 1994. This linac, commissioned in summer 1994, presently provides beams of 208Pb53+. A 14 GHz ECR ion source operating in the "afterglow" mode produces Pb 27+ ions at 2.5 keV/u. This beam is accelerated in an RFQ and a three tank IH linac to 4.2 MeV/u where stripping in a 1 um carbon foil to a charge state distribution centered around Pb53+ takes place. 53+ ions are selected from this mixture in a magnetic filter before being transported to the PS Booster and other circular machines. Linac3, the more common name for this machine, was built by a truly international collaboration involving France, Italy, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, India, the Czech Republic and CERN.

  15. Cockcroft-Walton generator for Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1976-01-01

    Its higher voltage of 750 kV, compared to the 520 kV Cockcroft-Walton of Linac 1, contributed to the higher current that Linac 2 could deliver. The cubic container houses the electronics. The ion-source, in the spherical container, delivered protons and, for tests, also deuterons. In 1993 an RFQ replaced it as Linac 2 preinjector.

  16. IMPACT simulation and the SNS linac beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-particle tracking simulations for the SNS linac beam dynamics studies are performed with the IMPACT code. Beam measurement results are compared with the computer simulations, including beam longitudinal halo and beam losses in the superconducting linac, transverse beam Courant-Snyder parameters and the longitudinal beam emittance in the linac. In most cases, the simulations show good agreement with the measured results

  17. SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac is comprised of both normal and superconducting rf (SRF) accelerating structures. The SRF linac accelerates the beam from 186 to 1250 MeV through 117 elliptical, multi-cell niobium cavities. This paper describes the SRF linac architecture, physics design considerations, cavity commissioning, and the expected beam dynamics performance

  18. Intrabeam stripping in H- Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, V; Ostigy, J -F; Alexandrov, A; Shishlo, A

    2012-01-01

    A beam loss in the superconducting part of the SNS linac has been observed during its commissioning and operation. Although the loss does not prevent the SNS high power operation, it results in an almost uniform irradiation of linac components and increased radiation levels in the tunnel. Multi-particle tracking could neither account for the magnitude of the observed loss nor its dependence on machine parameters. It was recently found that the loss is consistent with the intrabeam particle collisions resulting in stripping of H- ions. The paper describes experimental observations and corresponding analytical estimates of the intrabeam stripping.

  19. Bounds on the electromagnetic dipole moments through the single top production at the CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Koksal, M; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, A

    2016-01-01

    We obtain bounds on the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of the $t$-quark from a future high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron collider, such as the CLIC, with unpolarized and polarized electron beams which are a powerful tool to determine new physics. We consider the processes $\\gamma e^- \\to \\bar t b\

  20. Benchmarking of the Placet and Dimad tracking codes using the CLIC Post-Collision line

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, I; Ferrari, A; Latina, A

    2009-01-01

    In this benchmarking study, two contemporary codes, DIMAD and PLACET, are compared. We consider the 20 mrad post-collision line of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and perform tracking studies of heavily disrupted post-collision electron beams. We successfully find that the two codes provide an equivalent description of the beam transport from the interaction point to the final dump.

  1. First magnetic test of a superconducting Nb$_{3}$Sn Wiggler magnet for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Fessia, P; Karppinen, M; Mazet, J; Russenschuck, S; Peiffer, P; Grau, A

    2012-01-01

    To achieve high luminosity at the collision point of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the normalized horizontal and vertical emittances of the electron and positron beams must be reduced to 500 nm and4 nm before the beams enter the 1.5 TeV linear accelerators. An effective way to accomplish ultra-low emittances with only small effects on the electron polarization is using damping rings operating at 2.86GeV equipped with superconducting wiggler magnets. Only superconducting wiggler magnets meet the demanding magnetic specifications of the CLIC damping rings. Although Nb-Ti damping wiggler magnets fulfill the specifications of CLIC, Nb3Sn wiggler magnets would reach higher magnetic fields leading to even better beam properties for CLIC. Moreover, they have at the same time higher thermal and magnetic margins. Therefore, Nb3Sn wiggler magnets are under investigation at CERN despite the challenging manufacturing process. This paper presents first results of Nb3Sn coils and short model tests and outlines the fur...

  2. Exergetic analysis of refrigeration system of the Pelletron-Linac particle accelerator of the University of Sao Paulo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pelletron-Linac accelerator of the University of Sao Paulo will use the existing electrostatic Pelletron accelerator as an injector for the linear superconducting accelerator (Linac), to increase the acceleration of the particles. The Linac uses a forced flow circulation helium system to promote continuous refrigeration for long periods of time, at temperatures below or equal to 4,9 K. This paper shows the exergetic analysis of the Pelletron-linac refrigerator, identifying the main sources of irreversibilities and evaluating energetic consumption of the system. An exergy-enthalpy diagram for the helium shows the thermodynamic processes that take place in the refrigeration plant and the exergy losses. (author)

  3. Approach of a failure analysis for the MYRRHA linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MYRRHA project currently under development at SCK-CEN (Mol, Belgium) is a subcritical research reactor that requires a 600 MeV proton accelerator as a driver. This linac is expected to produce a beam power of 1.5 MW onto a spallation target for the reactor to deliver a thermal power around 70 MW. Thermomechanical considerations of the spallation target set stringent requirements on the beam trip rate which should not exceed 40 trips/year for interruptions longer than three seconds. The 3 underlying principles in the design of the MYRRHA linac are elements redundancy (like the dual-injector), elements operation at de-rated values (like cavities operating at about 30% from their nominal operating points) and the fault tolerance concept, which allows the failure of a beamline component to be compensated by its neighbouring elements. Studies presented in this document show that in the event of a failure of the first cryo-module or the first quadrupole doublet the linac can resume nominal operation with a re-matched lattice. Since the fault tolerance procedure is expected to work more efficiently at higher energies (due to lower space charge effects) we can extrapolate from our studies that the MYRRHA linac is expected to operate with the failure of any cryo-module or quadrupole doublet in the main linac. A virtual accelerator-based control system is mandatory for the operation of the MYRRHA linac to ensure the very fast implementation (<3 seconds) of the fault tolerance procedure. The virtual accelerator uses a beam dynamics code (like TRACEWIN or TRACK) to compute the model of the real accelerator in operation and interacts with this later through the accelerator control command

  4. Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1

    CERN Document Server

    Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

    2014-01-01

    Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

  5. Development of the Medium Energy Linac Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purposes of the proton engineering frontier project is developing a proton linac which accelerates 20 mA proton beams up to 100 MeV and supplying 20 MeV and 100 MeV proton beams to the user groups. The project 'Development of the medium energy linac systems' is aiming to design the 100 MeV proton linac, to construct an accelerating cavity, to design a MEBT system, and to develop a energy measurement system. The 100 MeV linac consists of 20 DTL tanks which are operated by five additional klystrons. The focusing lattice is FFDD as the 20 MeV DTL. However the hollow conductors are used for coils of the quadrupole magnets. The shape of the drift tubes in the new tanks is changed to compensate the reduction of the accelerating efficiency in the high energy region. For example, the face angle of drift tubes begins at 40 degrees. The bore radius is selected as 10 mm in order to eliminate beam loss in the beam line. We can obtain the 100 MeV proton beams by using these accelerating structure. We have designed some of the tanks in detail. It covers the modification of the structure by including the stem, post-coupler, and sulg-tuner effects, the error analysis, the thermal and structure analysis, the drift tube design, the magnet design, the various ports design, the support structure design, the end-plate design, etc. Now the first DTL tank is constructed by a local company. An beam extraction system is essential after 20 MeV DTL in order to supply 20 MeV proton beams. Since there are no focusing elements in the structure, the beam should be spread out. The MEBT which consists of two 3-cell DTL tanks is designed to control the beam size in the beam extraction system by magnets in the first tank and to transversely match the beam into the next DTL by magnets in the the second tank. The longitudinal matching is done by the RF in both tanks. We have also developed an energy measurement system using the time of flight method

  6. Emittance growth in rf linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the space-charge limit is approached, the current that can be accelerated in an rf linac and the output emittance that can be expected are discussed. The role of the envelope equations to estimate limits is outlined. The results of numerical experiments to explore general properties of emittance growth are given

  7. Design of long induction linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-consistent design strategy for induction linacs is presented which addresses the issues of brightness preservation against space charge induced emittance growth, minimization of the beam breakup instability and the suppression of beam centroid motion due to chromatic effects (corkscrew) and misaligned focusing elements. A simple steering algorithm is described that widens the effective energy bandwidth of the transport system

  8. The new Linac moves mountains

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The civil engineering work has started for Linac 4, one of the major renovation projects for the CERN accelerator complex. The work will be completed at the end of 2010 and the new linear accelerator is scheduled to be commissioned in 2013.

  9. Prototype of the RFD linac structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2.5-MeV prototype of a 'Compact 12-MeV Proton Linac for PET Isotope Production' is under construction at Linac Systems. This unit will serve as the 'proof of principle' for the revolutionary new Rf Focused Drift tube (RFD) linac structure. Both the prototype and the production unit will operate at 600 MHz. The prototype comprises a 25- keV proton ion source, a short LEBT, a 0.65-m-long RFQ linac to 0.8 MeV, and a 0.35-m-long RFD linac to 2.5 MeV. Because of the similarity of the accelerating and focusing properties of the RFQ and RFD linac structures, no matching section is required between them. The two linac structures will be resonantly coupled together and powered by a collection of planar triodes. The prototype is scheduled for completion in the fall of 1997. (author)

  10. Progress in design of the SNS linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a six-laboratory collaboration to build an intense pulsed neutron facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The linac design has evolved from the conceptual design presented in 1997 in order to achieve higher initial performance and to incorporate desirable upgrade features. The linac is now designed to produce 2-MW beam power using a combination of radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, drift-tube linac (DTL), coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and superconducting-RF (SRF) linac. Designs of each of these elements support he high peak intensity and high quality beam required for injection into the SNS accumulator ring. This paper will trace the evolution of the linac design and the progress made in the R and D program. (author)

  11. PROGRESS IN DESIGN OF THE SNS LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. HARDEKOPF

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a six-laboratory collaboration to build an intense pulsed neutron facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The linac design has evolved from the conceptual design presented in 1997 to achieve higher initial performance and to incorporate desirable upgrade features. The linac will initially produce 2-MW beam power using a combination of radio-frequency quadruple (RFQ) linac, drift-tube linac (DTL), coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and superconducting-cavity linac (SCL). Designs of each of these elements support the high peak intensity and high quality beam required for injection into the SNS accumulator ring. This paper will trace the evolution of the linac design, the cost and performance factors that drove architecture decisions, and the progress made in the R&D program.

  12. Progress in design of the SNS linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardekopf, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2001-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a six-laboratory collaboration to build an intense pulsed neutron facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The linac design has evolved from the conceptual design presented in 1997 in order to achieve higher initial performance and to incorporate desirable upgrade features. The linac is now designed to produce 2-MW beam power using a combination of radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, drift-tube linac (DTL), coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and superconducting-RF (SRF) linac. Designs of each of these elements support the high peak intensity and high quality beam required for injection into the SNS accumulator ring. This paper will trace the evolution of the linac design and the progress made in the R and D program. (author)

  13. Material studies in the frame of CLIC Accelerating structures production conducted within the Mechanics program together with Metso Oy

    CERN Document Server

    Nurminen, Janne

    2012-01-01

    MeChanICs (Marie Curie Linking Industry to CERN) is an Industry to Academia Partnership and Pathways (IAPP) platform for precision manufacturing knowledge exchange bringing together five Finnish manufacturing companies with Helsinki Insitute of Physics (HIP) and CERN. The scientific objective of MeChanICs project is to contribute to the manufacturing RTD of CLIC enabling technologies. The focus is on the design, materials, machining, brazing and assembly of A CLIC accelerating structure. This study deals with the materials work package of the program and wants to explore the following items: 1) producing copper accelerating structures for CLIC from raw copper powder by near net shape hot isostatic pressing (HIP). 2) The feasibility to use HIP diffusion bonding of the accelerator structures as a function of surface quality and applied temperature and pressure. 3) Brazing for CLIC AS auxiliary systems, like water cooling or damping manifolds, to the disc stack by coating one of the brazing partners with an enab...

  14. Regulation of the membrane insertion and conductance activity of the metamorphic chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 by cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M Valenzuela

    Full Text Available The Chloride Intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 has the ability to spontaneously insert into lipid membranes from a soluble, globular state. The precise mechanism of how this occurs and what regulates this insertion is still largely unknown, although factors such as pH and redox environment are known contributors. In the current study, we demonstrate that the presence and concentration of cholesterol in the membrane regulates the spontaneous insertion of CLIC1 into the membrane as well as its ion channel activity. The study employed pressure versus area change measurements of Langmuir lipid monolayer films; and impedance spectroscopy measurements using tethered bilayer membranes to monitor membrane conductance during and following the addition of CLIC1 protein. The observed cholesterol dependent behaviour of CLIC1 is highly reminiscent of the cholesterol-dependent-cytolysin family of bacterial pore-forming proteins, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for spontaneous protein insertion into the membrane bilayer.

  15. Florida State University superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As early as the fall of 1977 it was decided that the future research needs of their nuclear structure laboratory required an increase in energy capability to at least 8 MeV per nucleon for the lighter ions, and that these needs could be met by the installation of a 17 MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. The chief problem with this proposal was the high cost. It became apparent that a far less expensive option was to construct a linear accelerator to boost the energy from their existing 9 MV tandem. The options open to them among linac boosters were well represented by the room temperature linac at Heidelberg and the superconducting Stony Brook and Argonne systems. By the Spring of 1979 it had been decided that both capital cost and electric power requirements favored a superconducting system. As regards the two superconducting resonator technologies - the Argonne niobium-copper or the Caltech-Stony Brook lead plated copper - the Argonne resonators, though more expensive to construct, had the advantages of more boost per resonator, greater durability of the superconducting surface and less stringent beam bunching requirements. In 1980 pilot funding from the State of Florida enabled the construction of a building addition to house the linac and a new target area, and the setting up of a small, three resonator, test booster. Major funding by the NSF for the laboratory upgrade started in 1984. With these funds they purchased their present helium liquefaction and transfer system and constructed three large cryostats, each housing four Argonne beta = 0.105 resonators and two superconducting solenoids. The last large cryostat was completed and installed on-line early this year and the linac was dedicated on March 20. Nuclear physics experiments using the whole linac began in early June. 4 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  16. BNCT with linac, feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy photon beams from Medical Linear Accelerators (linacs) which are used in radiotherapy produce undesirable neutrons, beside the clinically useful electron and photon beams. Neutrons are produced from the photonuclear reaction (γ,n) of high energy photons with high Z-materials which compose the accelerator head. In this paper the possible use of these undesirable neutrons for BNCT is investigated, making use of high energy linacs already installed in hospitals, primarily for high energy electron and photon therapy and applying them in the context of BNCT. The photoneutron components emitted by the accelerator is the source for Monte Carlo simulations of the interactions that take place within the head of a voxel-based phantom. The neutron flux across the phantom head is calculated using different moderator arrangements and different techniques in the aim of increasing the thermal neutron flux at the targeted site. Also, we shall test different configurations of the linac head to maximize the exposure of high-Z materials to the photon beam, including the removal of the flattening filter, so as to boost the photoneutron production in the linac head. Experimental work will be conducted in hospitals to validate the Monte Carlo simulations. To make use of linacs for BNCT will be advantageous in the sense that the setting in a hospital department is much more acceptable by the public than a reactor installation. This will mean less complications regarding patient positioning and movement with respect to the beams, additional patient transportation and management will be more cost effective. (author)

  17. CLIC5 Stabilizes Membrane-Actin Filament Linkages at the Base of Hair Cell Stereocilia in a Molecular Complex with Radixin, Taperin, and Myosin VI

    OpenAIRE

    Salles, Felipe T.; Andrade, Leonardo R.; Tanda, Soichi; Grati, M’hamed; Plona, Kathleen L.; Gagnon, Leona H.; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Kachar, Bechara; Berryman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 5 protein (CLIC5) was originally isolated from microvilli in complex with actin binding proteins including ezrin, a member of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of membrane-cytoskeletal linkers. CLIC5 concentrates at the base of hair cell stereocilia and is required for normal hearing and balance in mice, but its functional significance is poorly understood. This study investigated the role of CLIC5 in postnatal development and maintenance of hair bundles. Co...

  18. The vacuum system of the University of Washington Booster-Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Linac-Booster vacuum system provides insulating vacuum for 12 accelerator and 2 buncher cryostats and evacuates the beamlines that transport the beam to and from the linac. Turbo-molecular pumps (TMP) are used in the system. The TMP pumping stations are described, and the performance of the system is discussed. The system is monitored and controlled by a vacuum satellite computer communicating with a main control computer. The control hardware and software are described

  19. Optical modeling of induction-linac driven free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free-electron laser (FEL) simulation code FRED, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) primarily to model single-pass FEL amplifiers driven by induction linear accelerators, is described. The main emphasis is on the modeling of optical propagation in the laser and on the differences between the requirements for modeling rf-linac-driven vs. induction-linac-driven FELs. Examples of optical guiding and mode cleanup are presented for a 50 μm FEL

  20. first tank of Linac 1

    CERN Multimedia

    This was the first tank of the linear accelerator Linac1, the injection system for the Proton Synchrotron, It ran for 34 years (1958 - 1992). Protons entered at the far end and were accelerated between the copper drift tubes by an oscillating electromagnetic field. The field flipped 200 million times a second (200 MHz) so the protons spent 5 nanoseconds crossing a drift tube and a gap. Moving down the tank, the tubes and gaps had to get longer as the protons gained speed. The tank accelerated protons from 500 KeV to 10 MeV. Linac1 was also used to accelerate deutrons and alpha particles for the Intersecting Storage Rings and oxygen and sulpher ions for the Super Proton Synchrotron heavy ion programme.

  1. An Overview of the MaRIE X-FEL and Electron Radiography LINAC RF Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to investigate the performance limits of materials in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility will utilize a 12 GeV linac to drive an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Most of the same linac will also be used to perform electron radiography. The main linac is driven by two shorter linacs; one short linac optimized for X-FEL pulses and one for electron radiography. The RF systems have historically been the one of the largest single component costs of a linac. We will describe the details of the different types of RF systems required by each part of the linacs. Starting with the High Power RF system, we will present our methodology for the choice of RF system peak power and pulselength with respect to klystron parameters, modulator parameters, performance requirements and relative costs. We will also present an overview of the Low Level RF systems that are proposed for MaRIE and briefly describe their use with some proposed control schemes.

  2. An Overview of the MaRIE X-FEL and Electron Radiography LINAC RF Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Joseph Thomas III [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rees, Daniel Earl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scheinker, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sheffield, Richard L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to investigate the performance limits of materials in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility will utilize a 12 GeV linac to drive an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Most of the same linac will also be used to perform electron radiography. The main linac is driven by two shorter linacs; one short linac optimized for X-FEL pulses and one for electron radiography. The RF systems have historically been the one of the largest single component costs of a linac. We will describe the details of the different types of RF systems required by each part of the linacs. Starting with the High Power RF system, we will present our methodology for the choice of RF system peak power and pulselength with respect to klystron parameters, modulator parameters, performance requirements and relative costs. We will also present an overview of the Low Level RF systems that are proposed for MaRIE and briefly describe their use with some proposed control schemes.

  3. Harmonic Analysis of Linac Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    McCrady, Rodney C

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed the requirements on alignment of the focusing elements (quadrupole doublets) in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) side coupled linac. The analysis is performed in terms of harmonics of the quardrupole spacing. This allows us to determine the effect of intentional deviations from a straight line, such as following the curvature of the Earth, and of unintentional deviations introduced by measurement and alignment errors. Results are compared to measured positions of the doublets.

  4. High power pulse modulator for PLS LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete design, assembly, and testing of 200 MW modulators are in progress at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) for the full energy injection linac system of the Pohang Light Source (PLS). A 150-MW pre-prototype modulator (350 kV, 3.5 μs flat-top width, and 840 Ω load) has been assembled and tested up to 175 MW. Design, construction, and test of a 200-MW prototype modulator (400 kV, 4.4 μs flat-top width, 800 Ω load) has also been completed. Eleven units of main 200-MW modulators are under construction, and their assembly is expected to be completed in 1993. This paper presents the design and the current status of performance results of 150-MW and 200-MW modulators

  5. Radiation processing with the Messina electron linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auditore, L.; Barnà, R. C.; De Pasquale, D.; Emanuele, U.; Loria, D.; Morgana, E.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2008-05-01

    In the last decades radiation processing has been more and more applied in several fields of industrial treatments and scientific research as a safe, reliable and economic technique. In order to improve existing industrial techniques and to develop new applications of this technology, at the Physics Department of Messina University a high power 5 MeV electron linac has been studied and set-up. The main features of the accelerating structure will be described together with the distinctive features of the delivered beam and several results obtained by electron beam irradiations, such as improvement of the characteristics of polymers and polymer composite materials, synthesis of new hydrogels for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications, reclaim of culture ground, sterilization of medical devices, development of new dosimeters for very high doses and dose rates required for monitoring of industrial irradiations.

  6. RF control of ICR proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the ICR Kyoto University, the proton linac has been developed. The RF high power is fed into the cavity from the klystron and the RF pulse width is 65 μsec. The RF amplitude and the phase in the cavity are affected by the beam loading and the pulse shape of the klystron cathode voltage. The fast RF stabilization system are required to accelerate the high beam stably. The stabilization system consists of the auto level control (ALC) and the phase locked loop (PLL). The designed band width is more than 1 MHz. The main modules of the circuit are the PIN diode attenuator, the fast phase detector, the phase shifter and the wideband feedback amplifier. The variation of the RF amplitude and the RF phase are 0.5 % with ALC and 5deg with PLL, respectively. (author)

  7. Linacs for medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear accelerators for medical and industrial applications have become an important commercial business. Microwave electron linacs for cancer radiation therapy and high-energy industrial radiography form the bulk of this market, but these, as well as induction linacs, are now being offered for radiation processing applications such as sterilization of disposable medical products, food preservation and material modifications. The radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac has now made the ion linac also practical for commercial applications in medicine and industry, including radiation therapy, isotope production, neutron production, materials modification, and energy transfer processes. Ion linacs for several of these applications will soon be commercially available. The market for both ion and electron linacs is expected to significantly grow in several exciting and important areas

  8. Optimal Power System and Grid Interface Design Considerations for the CLICs Klystron Modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Marija, Jankovic; Jon, Clare; Pat, Wheeler; Davide, Aguglia

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an electron-positron collider under study at CERN with the aim to explore the next generation of high precision/high energy particles physics. The CLIC’s drive beams will be accelerated by approximately 1300 klystrons, requiring highly efficient and controllable solid state capacitor discharge modulators. Capacitor charger specifications include the requirement to mask the pulsed effect of the load from the utility grid, ensure maximum power quality, control the derived DC voltage precisely (to maximize accuracy for the modulators being implemented), and achieve high efficiency and operability of the overall power system. This paper presents the work carried out on the power system interface for the CLIC facility. In particular it discusses the challenges on the utility interface and analysis of the grid interface converters with regards to required functionality, efficiency, and control methodologies.

  9. Production of excited electrons at TESLA and CLIC based egamma colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kirca, Z; Cakir, O

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of TESLA and CLIC based electron-photon colliders to search for excited spin-1/2 electrons. The production of excited electrons in the resonance channel through the electron- photon collision and their subsequent decays to leptons and electroweak gauge bosons are investigated. We study in detail the three signal channels of excited electrons and the corresponding backgrounds through the reactions egamma yields egamma, egamma yields eZ and egamma yields vW. Excited electrons with masses up to about 90% of the available collider energy can be probed down to the coupling f = f prime = 0.05(0.1) at TESLA(CLIC) based egamma colliders. 22 Refs.

  10. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  11. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  12. Status of vertex and tracking detector R&D at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Firu, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e- collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the bunch train structure of the beam and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few micron, ultra-low mass (~0.2% X0 per layer for the inner vertex region), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ~10 ns time stamping capabilities. An overview of the R&D program for pixel and tracking detectors at CLIC will be presented, including recent results on an innovative hybridisation concept based on capacitive coupling between active sensors (HV-CMOS) and readout ASICs (CLICpix).

  13. TCAD simulations of High-Voltage-CMOS Pixel structures for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Buckland, Matthew Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The requirements for precision physics and the experimental conditions at CLIC result in stringent constraints for the vertex detector. Capacitively coupled active pixel sensors with 25 μm pitch implemented in a commercial 180 nm High-Voltage CMOS (HV-CMOS) process are currently under study as a candidate technology for the CLIC vertex detector. Laboratory calibration measurements and beam tests with prototypes are complemented by detailed TCAD and electronic circuit simulations, aiming for a comprehensive understanding of the signal formation in the HV-CMOS sensors and subsequent readout stages. In this note 2D and 3D TCAD simulation results of the prototype sensor, the Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector version three (CCPDv3), will be presented. These include the electric field distribution, leakage current, well capacitance, transient response to minimum ionising particles and charge-collection.

  14. Diagnostic expert system in the PF LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype diagnostic expert system (ES) was developed for the Photon Factory 2.5-GeV electron/positron LINAC injector system. The ES has been on-lined with the conventional linac computer network for receiving real data. This project was undertaken in an attempt to reduce the linac operator's mental workload, diagnosis duties, and to explore Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies. The outlook for ES and its problems, and what has been achieved are outlined in this presentation. (author)

  15. Design of a Marx-Topology Modulator for FNAL Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, T. A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Garcia, F. G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kufer, M. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pfeffer, H. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wolff, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-04-28

    The Fermilab Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) was formed in late 2011 to address important and necessary upgrades to the Proton Source machines (Injector line, Linac and Booster). The goal is to increase the proton flux by doubling the Booster beam cycle rate while maintaining the same intensity per cycle, the same uptime, and the same residual activation in the enclosure. For the Linac, the main focus within PIP is to address reliability. One of the main tasks is to replace the present hard-tube modulator used on the 200 MHz RF system. Plans to replace this high power system with a Marx-topology modulator, capable of providing the required waveform shaping to stabilize the accelerating gradient and compensate for beam loading, will be presented, along with development data from the prototype unit.

  16. Cryogenic concept of the Berline Energy Recovery Linac Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Helmoholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) is currently in the design process of the Berline Energy Recovery Linac Project (BERLinPro) as a demonstrator of ERL science and technology. The accelerator itself consists of three main parts: an SRE photo-injector, three superconducting booster cavities and three main linac cavities. The operating temperature will be at 1.8 K. The corresponding subatmospheric pressure of 16 mbar will be achieved by pumping with a set of cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps. Liquid helium at 4.5 K necessary for the cooling of the accelerator cavity structure, HOM and RF couplers is supplied by a Linde L700 helium liquefier. A helium distribution system with several transfer lines and valve boxes has to be designed. The conceptual design of the cryogenic system and supply lines are being described. (author)

  17. Analyzing the Anomalous Dipole Moment Type Couplings of Heavy Quarks with FCNC Interactions at the CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine both anomalous magnetic and dipole moment type couplings of a heavy quark via its single production with subsequent dominant standard model decay modes at the compact linear collider (CLIC). The signal and background cross sections are analyzed for heavy quark masses 600 and 700 GeV. We make the analysis to delimitate these couplings as well as to find the attainable integrated luminosities for 3σ observation limit

  18. Parameter scan for the CLIC Damping rings under the infleunce of intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, F; Papaphilippou, Y; Vivoli, A

    2010-01-01

    Due to the high bunch density, the output emittances of the CLIC Damping Rings (DR) are strongly dominated by the effect of Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). In an attempt to optimize the ring design, the bench-marking of the multiparticle tracking code SIRE with the classical IBS formalisms and approximations is first considered. The scaling of the steady state emittances and IBS growth rates is also studied, with respect to several ring parameters including energy, bunch charge and wiggler characteristics.

  19. Gluino Pair Production in $e^+ e^-$ and Photon-Photon Collisions at CERN CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Berge, S; 10.1140/epjc/s2003-01194-4

    2003-01-01

    We confront the generally small cross sections for gluino pair production in e^+e^- annihilation with the much larger ones in photon-photon scattering at a multi-TeV linear collider like CERN CLIC. The larger rates and the steeper rise of the cross section at threshold may allow for a precise gluino mass determination in high-energy photon-photon collisions for a wide range of squark masses and post-LEP SUSY benchmark points.

  20. Nonlinear Optimization of CLIC DRS New Design with Variable Bends and High Field Wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasem, H.; Alabau-Gonzalvo, J.; Papadopoulou, S.; Papaphilippou, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The new design of CLIC damping rings is based on longitudinal variable bends and high field superconducting wiggler magnets. It provides an ultra-low horizontal normalised emittance of 412 nm-rad at 2.86 GeV. In this paper, nonlinear beam dynamics of the new design of the damping ring (DR) with trapezium field profile bending magnets have been investigated in detail. Effects of the misalignment errors have been studied in the closed orbit and dynamic aperture.

  1. The Event Display for CLIC: DD4hep Compatibility and Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    Quast, Thorben

    2015-01-01

    This document is a short summary of my contributions to the Event Display for the CLICdp Software group in the context of CERN’s Summer Student Programme 2015. After a brief outline of CLIC and the relevant software package, the project is motivated. The individual achievements and their technical realizations are explained rather qualitatively, as details are well documented directly in the source code.

  2. Linac-LHC EP Collider Options

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F; Bordry, Frederick; Braun, H H; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Çiftçi, A K; Chattopadhyay, S; Dainton, J B; de Roeck, A; Eide, A; Garoby, R; Holzer, B J; Klein, M; Linnecar, T; Mess, K H; Osborne, J; Rinolfi, L; Schulte, D; Sultansoy, S; Tomás, R; Tückmantel, Joachim; Vivoli, A; Willeke, F J

    2008-01-01

    We describe various parameter scenarios for a ring-linac ep collider based on LHC and an independent electron linac. Luminosities between $10^{31}$ and $10^{33} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ can be achieved with a s.c. linac, operated either in pulsed or in cw mode, with optional recirculation, at a total electric wallplug power of order 20 MW. Higher luminosities, of several $10^{33} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ can be reached by investing more electric power or by energy recovery. Finally, merits of a linac-ring ep collider are discussed.

  3. Status of the RFI Linac Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, D A

    2004-01-01

    A prototype of the Rf Focused Interdigital (RFI) linac structure is currently under construction at Linac Systems. The RFI linac structure is basically an interdigital (or Wideröe) linac structure with rf quadrupole focusing incorporated into each drift tube. The 200 MHz RFI prototype, consisting of a short RFQ linac followed by a short RFI linac, will accelerate a 20 mA beam of protons from an injection energy of 25 keV to an output energy of 2.50 MeV in a total linac structure length of 1.44 meters. The linac structures are designed for continuous (cw) operation, and will be tested initially at a 33% duty factor. The peak structure power of 66 kW and peak beam power of 50 kW will be supplied by a 144 kW, 33% duty rf power system. A microwave ion source will supply the proton beam and an articulated Einzel lens will steer and focus the beam into the RFQ aperture. The mechanical design of the linac structures will be presented, the calculated performance will be described, the status of the components will b...

  4. Dual mode medical Linac development at SAMEER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SAMEER has developed a 6 MV Oncology machine. These types of machines are already tested and treating patients at Head and Neck Cancer Institute, Indore and Adyar Cancer Hospital at Chennai. Two more such machines are in the process of commissioning at Amravati Cancer Foundation, Amravati and B K L Walawalkar Hospital, Dervan. For treating malignant tumors, high energy X-rays are required and for treatment of skin cancer electrons are used. Therefore, to enhance the present low energy radiotherapy linac technology at SAMEER, a dual photon energy linac capable of giving 6 and 15 MV photons and multiple electron energies (6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 MeV) for treatment is being developed indigenously. The prototype of a 15 MeV linac is already developed and tested at SAMEER. The sub-assemblies for the dual mode medical linac like gridded electron gun and target is designed and tested. A linac tube with a detuning plunger or energy switch is designed and assembled. The linac is tuned and tested at low power. The measured parameters are given. Outgassing of linac tube was carried out at a temperature of 250 C. The vacuum achieved after baking is ∼10-10 mbar. The linac tube is now integrated on the gantry head for high power testing. This paper will discuss the design, experimental measurement results and vacuum processing aspects of the linac tube. (author)

  5. Evaluation of Components for the High Precision Inductive Adder for the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse generators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat high-voltage pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the CLIC damping rings are particularly demanding: the flattop of the output pulse must be 160 ns duration, 12.5 kV and 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. An inductive adder allows the use of different modulation techniques and is therefore a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. In addition to semiconductors working in their saturated region, semiconductors working in their linear region are needed for applying analogue modulation techniques. Simulat...

  6. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2010-10-27

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  7. En route vers la nano stabilisation de CLIC faisceau principale et focalisation finale

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, Claude; Lackner, F; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Pour atteindre la luminosité voulue de CLIC, la taille transversale du faisceau doit être de l?ordre du nanomètre. Ceci nécessite une stabilité vibratoire des quadripôles du faisceau principal de 1 nm et même 0.1 nm pour les doublets de la focalisation finale. La nano technologie et la nano stabilisation sont des activités qui évoluent rapidement dans l?industrie et centres de recherche pour des applications très variées comme l?électronique, l?optique, la chimie voire la médecine. Cette présentation décrit les avancées techniques nécessaires pour atteindre l?objectif de CLIC et les projets et collaborations R&D prévus pour démontrer la faisabilité de la nano stabilisation de CLIC en 2010.

  8. Development of the low energy linac systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project 'Development of the Low Energy Linac System' is aiming to develop the 20 MeV proton linac system. This consists of a 50 keV proton injector, a 3 MeV RFQ, and a 20 MeV DTL. We obtained the first beam signal after the 20 MeV linac. The high power switch installed in the ion source supplies the pulsed beam into the following LEBT. The pulse operation was successfully tested. The main role of the LEBT is to match the beam into the 3 MeV RFQ. The total length of the four-vane type RFQ is about 3.26m. For the field stabilization, we used the resonant coupling scheme and dipole stabilizer rods. An 1 MW klystron supplies the RF power into the RFQ. After tuning, the field deviation of the quadrupole mode is less than 2% of the design value and the dipole fraction is less than 5% of the operating mode. The following accelerating structure is DTL which accelerate 20 mA proton beams up to 20 MeV. It consists of 4 tanks and the length of each tank is less than 5 m. The lattice is FFDD type and the integrated fields of the quadrupole magnets are 1.75 T. The inner walls of the tanks are copper-plated by PR plating method. The thickness is 100m with the roughness of 0.3m. Each drift tube consists of 6 parts and assembled by e-beam welding. The tanks and drift tubes are aligned under the installation limit of 50m by using the laser-tracker. The tuning by the slug tuners and post couplers results in the field uniformity of 2% and field sensitivity of 100%/MHz. In order to detect the beam signal, we installed the Faraday cup after the RFQ or the DTL. For the RFQ, we observed the beam of 12 A under the forward RF power of 450 kW. The beam current after DTL is about 0.5 A when RF power of 150 kW was fed into each tank

  9. High-voltage pixel detectors in commercial CMOS technologies for ATLAS, CLIC and Mu3e experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Peric,I et al.

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage particle detectors in commercial CMOS technologies are a detector family that allows implementation of low-cost, thin and radiation-tolerant detectors with a high time resolution. In the R/D phase of the development, a radiation tolerance of 1015 neq=cm2 , nearly 100% detection efficiency and a spatial resolution of about 3 μm were demonstrated. Since 2011 the HV detectors have first applications: the technology is presently the main option for the pixel detector of the planned Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). Several prototype sensors have been designed in a standard 180 nm HV CMOS process and successfully tested. Thanks to its high radiation tolerance, the HV detectors are also seen at CERN as a promising alternative to the standard options for ATLAS upgrade and CLIC. In order to test the concept, within ATLAS upgrade R/D, we are currently exploring an active pixel detector demonstrator HV2FEI4; also implemented in the 180 nm HV process.

  10. High-voltage pixel detectors in commercial CMOS technologies for ATLAS, CLIC and Mu3e experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Peric, Ivan; Backhaus, Malte; Barbero, Marlon; Benoit, Mathieu; Berger, Niklaus; Bompard, Frederic; Breugnon, Patrick; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Dannheim, Dominik; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feigl, Simon; Fischer, Peter; Fougeron, Denis; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Heim, Timon; Hügging, Fabian; Kiehn, Moritz; Kreidl, Christian; Krüger, Hans; La Rosa, Alessandro; Liu, Jian; Lütticke, Florian; Mariñas, Carlos; Meng, Lingxin; Miucci, Antonio; Münstermann, Daniel; Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Obermann, Theresa; Pangaud, Patrick; Perrevoort, Ann-Kathrin; Rozanov, Alexandre; Schöning, André; Schwenker, Benjamin; Wiedner, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage particle detectors in commercial CMOS technologies are a detector family that allows implementation of low-cost, thin and radiation-tolerant detectors with a high time resolution. In the R/D phase of the development, a radiation tolerance of 10 15 n eq = cm 2 , nearly 100% detection ef fi ciency and a spatial resolution of about 3 μ m were demonstrated. Since 2011 the HV detectors have fi rst applications: the technology is presently the main option for the pixel detector of the planned Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). Several prototype sensors have been designed in a standard 180 nm HV CMOS process and successfully tested. Thanks to its high radiation tolerance, the HV detectors are also seen at CERN as a promising alternative to the standard options for ATLAS upgrade and CLIC. In order to test the concept, within ATLAS upgrade R/D, we are currently exploring an active pixel detector demonstrator HV2FEI4; also implemented in the 180 nm HV process

  11. Superconducting resonator used as a phase and energy detector for linac setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Nikolai R.

    2016-07-01

    Booster linacs for tandem accelerators and positive ion superconducting injectors have matured into standard features of many accelerator laboratories. Both types of linac are formed as an array of independently-phased resonators operating at room temperature or in a superconducting state. Each accelerating resonator needs to be individually set in phase and amplitude for optimum acceleration efficiency. The modularity of the linac allows the velocity profile along the structure to be tailored to accommodate a wide range charge to mass ratio. The linac setup procedure, described in this paper, utilizes a superconducting resonator operating in a beam bunch phase detection mode. The main objective was to derive the full set of phase distributions for quick and efficient tuning of the entire accelerator. The phase detector was operated in overcoupling mode in order to minimize de-tuning effects of microphonic background. A mathematical expression was derived to set a limit on resonator maximum accelerating field during the crossover search to enable extracting unambiguous beam phase data. A set of equations was obtained to calculate the values of beam phase advance and energy gain produced by accelerating resonators. An extensive range of linac setting up configurations was conducted to validate experimental procedures and analytical models. The main application of a superconducting phase detector is for fast tuning for beams of ultralow intensities, in particular in the straight section of linac facilities.

  12. Measurement of the H$\\rightarrow$WW$^*$ Branching Ratio at 1.4TeV using the semileptonic final state at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)762723; Watson, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This note summarises a study to evaluate the potential to measure the H$\\rightarrow$WW$^*$ branching fraction at CLIC, 1.4TeV centre-of-mass energy, with the CLIC_ILD detector, using the WW$\\rightarrow$qql$\

  13. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of chloride intracellular channel 2 (CLIC2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chloride intracellular channel 2 (CLIC2) belongs to a family of intracellular chloride-channel proteins that can exist in a soluble form. The expression, purification and crystallization in two different crystal forms of human CLIC2 is reported. The chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) family of proteins are unusual in that they can exist in either an integral membrane-channel form or a soluble form. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of CLIC2, one of the least-studied members of this family, are reported. Human CLIC2 was crystallized in two different forms, both in the presence of reduced glutathione and both of which diffracted to better than 1.9 Å resolution. Crystal form A displayed P212121 symmetry, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.0, b = 74.7, c = 79.8 Å. Crystal form B displayed P21 symmetry, with unit-cell parameters a = 36.0, b = 66.9, c = 44.1 Å. Structure determination will shed more light on the structure and function of this enigmatic family of proteins

  14. Wake Field Effect Analysis in APT Linac

    OpenAIRE

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1998-01-01

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. The APT linac comprises both the normal conducting (below 211 MeV) and superconducting (SC) sections. The high current leads to stringent restrictions on allowable beam losses (

  15. Study of characteristics of linac with TWRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High power electron linac which is developed by PNC is an electron linac with the TWRR (Traveling Wave Resonant Ring). Some phenomena occurred on our high power test are mentioned. Some important characteristics such as stability and phase characteristic are discussed. (author)

  16. RF linacs for esoteric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle accelerators of various types have been considered for many years in terms of their application to national defense. Recently, the Strategic Defense Initiative has focused and emphasized such applications. After appropriate and extensive development, accelerators could fulfill important roles in a defensive-system architecture and could compete effectively with other technologies. A great deal of the required development is engineering. Aspects of the R and D program on rf-linac-based applications are discussed, and potential long-term influences on accelerator technology are outlined

  17. The linac coherent light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is a self-amplified spontaneous emission based free electron laser to be built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre by a multi-laboratory collaboration. This facility will provide ultra-short pulses of coherent X-ray radiation with the fundamental harmonic energy tuneable over the energy range of 0.82 to 8.2 keV. In addition to the coherent X-ray radiation, which will have an extremely high peak and average brightness, a continuous spectrum of spontaneous synchrotron radiation (SR) of high brightness will also be produced. The characteristics of the LCLS and its associated radiological issues are discussed. (authors)

  18. Induction linacs and pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in electronic power conversion technology is making possible a new class of induction linacs that can operate at extremely high repetition rates. Advances in insulator technology, pulse forming line design and switching may also lead to a new type of high current accelerator with accelerating gradients at least an order of magnitude greater than those attainable today. The evolution of the induction accelerator pulsed power system will be discussed along with some details of these emerging technologies which are at the frontiers of accelerator technology

  19. Phase scan signature matching for linac tuning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relatively simple method for linac tuning has been devised, tested and used on the Alvarez and side coupled linacs. Tank or Module phase is varied over 360 degrees while the phase of signals from strip-line beam monitor is measured. Reference phase is taken from the master oscillator for the linac. Theoretical curves of beam phase versus tank/module phase are matched to the measured curves to determine the tank/module field amplitude and phase, and the input and output betas of the tanks/modules. Early experiments on tanks 4--7 of the Alvarez linac have demonstrated the feasibility of the technique. Recently this method was used for commissioning of the Fermilab upgraded linac

  20. Spectral fluence of neutrons generated by radiotherapeutic Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral fluences of neutrons generated in the heads of the radiotherapeutic linacs Varian Clinac 2100 C/D and Siemens ARTISTE were measured by means of the Bonner spheres spectrometer whose active detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by an activation detector, i.e. a tablet made of pure manganese. Measurements with different collimator settings reveal an interesting dependence of neutron fluence on the area defined by the collimator jaws. The determined neutron spectral fluences were used to derive ambient dose equivalent rate along the treatment coach. To clarify at which components of the linac neutrons are mainly created, the measurements were complemented with MCNPX calculations based on a realistic model of the Varian Clinac. (authors)

  1. Depolarization in the ILC Linac-To-Ring Positron beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Valentyn; Ushakov, Andriy [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Riemann, Sabine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    To achieve the physics goals of future Linear Colliders, it is important that electron and positron beams are polarized. The positron source planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC) is based on a helical undulator system and can deliver a polarised beam with vertical stroke Pe{sup +} vertical stroke {>=} 60%. To ensure that no significant polarization is lost during the transport of the electron and positron beams from the source to the interaction region, spin tracking has to be included in all transport elements which can contribute to a loss of polarization. These are the positron source, the damping ring, the spin rotators, the main linac and the beam delivery system. In particular, the dynamics of the polarized positron beam is required to be investigated. The results of positron spin tracking and depolarization study at the Positron-Linac-To-Ring (PLTR) beamline are presented. (orig.)

  2. The DARHT Phase 2 Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Rutkowski, H L; Waldron, W L; Chow, K P; Vella, M C; Fawley, W M; Briggs, R; Nelson, S; Wolf, Z; Birx, D L; Rutkowski, HL; Reginato, LL; Waldron, WL; Chow, KP; Vella, MC; Fawley, WM

    2000-01-01

    The second phase accelerator for the Dual Axis Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) is designed to provide an electron beam pulse that is 2 microsec long, 2kA, and 20 MeV in particle energy. The injector provides 3.2 MeV so that the linac need only provide 16.8 MeV. The linac is made with two types of induction accelerator cells. The first block of 8 cells have a 14 in. beam pipe compared to 10 in. in the remaining 80 cells. The other principal difference is that the first 8 cells have reduced volt-sec in their induction cores as a result of a larger diameter beam pipe. The cells are designed for very reliable high voltage operation. The insulator is Mycalex. Results from prototype tests are given including results from solenoid measurements. Each cell contains a solenoid for beam transport and a set of x-y correction coils to reduce corkscrew motion. Details of tests to determine RF mode impedances relevant to BBU generation are given. Blocks of cells are separated by "intercells" some of which contain transpo...

  3. Indigenous 6 MV medical LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear Accelerators were made for physics research all over the world; in India too the first indigenous accelerator was made for research of materials using the 3.5 MeV Linear Accelerator in the 1960s at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. Prof. R.V.S. Sitaram was the leading scientist who contributed in the development of the first indigenous linac that served research scholars for more than two decades. The travelling wave S-band Linac using a magnetron as a source of high power microwaves was a significant development towards the indigenous accelerator. The accelerating structure had magnetic coils for beam focusing, the HV modulator, microwave system and control unit were indigenously developed by TIFR scientists. Dr. Homi Bhabha, Director, TIFR had taken keen interest in the project and an appropriate room in the basement was selected for the accelerator facility. The Iinac tube cavities, magnetic coils and pulse transformer were designed and fabricated in TIFR laboratory and only raw material was imported. The group working on Radar transmitters developed the transmission line type modulator using components such as charging choke and locally available HV transformers. However, the rectifier diodes, cores switching tubes were imported. The complete system design was done in-house and also included operation and maintenance of the facility. Over its life of two decades, a second generation of technologists were developed with a first hand knowledge of an accelerator system

  4. Induced radioisotopes inside the treatment hall with a Linac for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leon M, H. A. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Adolfo Lopez Mateos 1801 Ote., Fracc. Bona Gens, 20255 Aguascalientes (Mexico); Rivera P, E.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: asa_15@hotmail.com [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, C. Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    When Linacs operate above 8 MV an undesirable neutron field is produced whose spectrum has three main components: the direct spectrum due to those neutrons leaking out from the Linac head, the scattered spectrum due to neutrons produced in the head that collides with the nuclei in the head losing energy and the third spectrum due to room-return effect; this last are mainly epithermal and thermal neutrons being constant at any location in the treatment hall. These neutrons induce activation mainly in the concrete walls and the Linac components. Here the induced radioisotopes have been identified in concrete samples located in the hall and in one of the wedges. The identification has been carried out using a gamma-ray spectrometer. (Author)

  5. 25th anniversary for Linac-2

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On Friday, 3 October 2003, the Linac team celebrated a quarter century of successful operation of one of its linear accelerators: Linac-2, the proton workhorse of the CERN accelerator complex. Linac-2, CERN's linear proton accelerator, has now been running for 25 years - ample reason for a small celebration. About 30 members of the original team (10 of the initially more than 50 are still working at CERN), and other CERN personnel met on 3 October 2003. Linac-2 is the first link in the accelerator chain Linac-2 - PS Booster - PS - SPS and eventually LHC. Beams from Linac-2 are used after further acceleration in the CERN complex for SPS fixed target physics; for antiproton production for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD); for test beams in the East Experimental Hall and in the PS; for nuclear physics at ISOLDE; for LHC test beams and in the past for both ISR physics and Antiproton production (AA/AC) and test beams in LEAR. Linac-2 was built to obtain higher intensities and better stability than with ...

  6. Linac Upgrades for FERMI@ELETTRA

    CERN Document Server

    D'Auria, G; Craievich, P; De Ninno, G; Di Mitri, S; Ferianis, M; Pangon, G; Rumiz, R L; Tosi, T L; Zangrando, D

    2004-01-01

    To fulfill the stringent requirements expected from the FERMI project, the existing Linac needs some modifications in the layout and an upgrading of the present plants. Moreover, for the next two years, until the new injection system (now under construction) is fully commissioned, the Linac has to be kept in operation as injector for the ELETTRA Storage Ring. Therefore most of the planned activities have to be carried out without interfering with the normal operation of the machine. Details on the new Linac layout and related activities are discussed.

  7. Wire alignment system for ATF LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wire based alignment system is adopted to make less than 40μm precision alignment for injector linac of Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The system consists of two stretched SUS wires, pickup coils and active mover stages. The position of pickup coils in a mount which will be installed into LINAC stages is set to the calculated wire position prior to installation. All of LINAC stages are then moved to keep the calculated position by the active mover. The test results of wire position detection in a long term are described. (author)

  8. The SNS super conducting linac architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is presently under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. A conventional linac, accelerates a 52-mA beam to 186 MeV. The SRF linac accelerates the beam to 1.25 GeV using 117 elliptically shaped 6 cell cavities. Two cavity beta types are used, with geometrical betas of 0.61 and 0.81. This paper describes the optimization leading to the choice of cavity betas and number of different cavity types. Also, beam-dynamics throughout the entire linac are presented. (author)

  9. Superconducting LINAC booster for the Mumbai pelletron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Srinivasan; S K Singh; R G Pillay; M P Kurup; M K Pandey

    2001-08-01

    We are in the process of constructing a superconducting linear accelerator (LINAC), to boost the energy of heavy ion beams from the 14UD Pelletron accelerator, at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. The accelerating structures in the LINAC are quarter wave resonators (QWR) coated with lead which is superconducting at liquid helium temperature. With feasibility studies having been completed during the course of the 4th and 5th five-year plan periods, culminating with the demonstration of beam acceleration using one accelerating module, the construction of the LINAC is now under way.

  10. The superconducting linac booster at the ANU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlines the progress of the installation of the superconducting Linac booster at the Australian National University. The Linac is based upon four modules, three of which contain three split-loop resonators. The fourth cryostat was intended to be a superbuncher and so houses only one resonator. The first stage of Linac operation will employ only three modules with 2 MV/m from each resonator. It is expected that the implementation of all nine modules, in subsequent stages, would boost beams by 18 MV/q. The project has fostered productive international collaboration between UK and Australian scientists. 1 tab., 6 figs

  11. Gridded gun test results for dual mode medical Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an advancement in the current low energy (6 MV) radiotherapy linac technology, SAMEER is developing a dual photon energy linac capable of giving 6 and 15 MV photons and multiple electron energies (6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 MeV) for electron treatment. The main feature of this development is to produce clinically acceptable quality electron beam and photon beam. The gridded gun development is a crucial part of this project because of the electron beam current requirement which ranges from milliampere to nanoampere level from photon mode to electron mode. Therefore, precise control on the beam current is key feature in linac operation. The gridded gun design specifications is given. The gun assembly was successfully carried out. The gridded gun was assembled in a test jig and baked at 100 °C. The vacuum achieved after baking was ∼10-9 mbar. The cathode activation results and DC test results were obtained. The high voltage test results in pulsed mode is discussed in this paper along with its supply. (author)

  12. A novel electron gun for inline MRI-linac configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin, Dragoş E.; Holloway, Lois; Keall, Paul J.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work introduces a new electron gun geometry capable of robust functioning in the presence of a high strength external magnetic field for axisymmetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-linac configurations. This allows an inline MRI-linac to operate without the need to isolate the linear accelerator (linac) using a magnetic shield. This MRI-linac integration approach not only leaves the magnet homogeneity unchanged but also provides the linac flexibility to move along the magnet a...

  13. Progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in CLIC5

    OpenAIRE

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Oonk, Anne MM; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; Draaisma, Jos MT; Gandía, Marta; Oostrik, Jaap; Neveling, Kornelia; Kunst, Henricus PM; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; del Castillo, Ignacio; Pennings, Ronald JE; Kremer, Hannie; Admiraal, Ronald JC; Schraders, Margit

    2014-01-01

    In a consanguineous Turkish family diagnosed with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI), a homozygous region of 47.4 Mb was shared by the two affected siblings on chromosome 6p21.1-q15. This region contains 247 genes including the known deafness gene MYO6. No pathogenic variants were found in MYO6, neither with sequence analysis of the coding region and splice sites nor with mRNA analysis. Subsequent candidate gene evaluation revealed CLIC5 as an excellent candidate gen...

  14. Production of excited electrons at TESLA and CLIC based $e\\gamma$ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Aydin, Z Z; Kirca, Z

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of TESLA and CLIC based electron-photon colliders to search for excited spin-1/2 electrons. The production of excited electrons in the resonance channel through the electron-photon collision and their subsequent decays to leptons and electroweak gauge bosons are investigated. We study in detail the three signal channels of excited electrons and the corresponding backgrounds through the reactions e gamma --> e gamma, e gamma --> eZ and e gamma --> nu W. Excited electrons can be discovered with the masses up to about 90% of the available collider energy.

  15. A Search for Leptophilic Vector Boson Z_l at CLIC by Using Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Akkoyun, S

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the possible dynamics associated with leptophilic Z_l boson at CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) have been investigated by using artificial neural networks (ANNs). These hypotetic massive boson Z_l have been shown through the process e+e- -> M+M-. Furthermore, the invariant mass distributions for final muons have been consistently predicted by using ANN. For these highly non-linear data, we have constructed consistent empirical physical formulas (EPFs) by appropriate feed- forward ANN. These ANN-EPFs can be used to derive further physical functions which could be relevant to studying Z_l.

  16. Anomalous production of top quarks at CLIC+LHC based gamma p colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Cakir, O

    2003-01-01

    The single production of top quark due to flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) interaction and its decay to bW are studied at CLIC+LHC based gamma-p colliders. We consider both t-c-gamma and t-u-gamma anomalous couplings. The anomalous charm (up) quark anomalous coupling parameter kappa_gamma^c (kappa_gamma^u) can be probed down to 9.5x10^-3 (8.0x10^-3) at a gamma-p collider with sqrt{s_ep}=6.48 TeV and L_int=100 fb^-1.

  17. Evaluation of 65nm technology for CLIC pixel front-end

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio, P; Ballabriga, R; Campbell, M; Llopart, X

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC vertex detector design requires a high single point resolution (~ 3 μm) and a precise time stamp (≤ 10 ns). In order to achieve this spatial resolution, small pixels (in the order of 20 μm pitch) must be used, together with the measurement of the charge deposition of neighbouring channels. Designing such small pixels requires the use of a deep downscaled CMOS technology. This note describes the design and characterisation of suitable building blocks implemented in a commercial 65 nm process. The characterisation included an evaluation of the radiation hardness of the blocks.

  18. Z′ Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    A. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez; Hernández-Ruíz, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional $Z'$ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process $e^{+}e^{-}\\rightarrow (Z, Z') \\to Zh$, including both the resonant and non-resonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of $Zh$ and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500-2000\\hspace{0.8mm}$fb^{-1}$ and center of mass en...

  19. Modeling of the ALS linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALS injector linac is used for the Beam Test Facility (BTF) and the Damping Experiments when it is available in between the ALS filings. These experiments usually require higher quality beams and a better characterization than is normally required for ALS operations. This paper focuses on the beam emittance, energy tilt, and especially the longitudinal variation of the beam parameters. For instance, the authors want to avoid longitudinal variations at the low beta section of the BTF. On the other hand, a large energy tilt is required for post-acceleration compression of the bunch using an alpha magnet. The PARMELA code was modified to calculate and display longitudinal variations of the emittance ellipse. Using the Microsoft Development Studio under Windows NT environment the code can handle a much larger number of particles than was previously possible

  20. The chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC5 is expressed at high levels in hair cell stereocilia and is essential for normal inner ear function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Leona H; Longo-Guess, Chantal M; Berryman, Mark; Shin, Jung-Bum; Saylor, Katherine W; Yu, Heping; Gillespie, Peter G; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2006-10-01

    Although CLIC5 is a member of the chloride intracellular channel protein family, its association with actin-based cytoskeletal structures suggests that it may play an important role in their assembly or maintenance. Mice homozygous for a new spontaneous recessive mutation of the Clic5 gene, named jitterbug (jbg), exhibit impaired hearing and vestibular dysfunction. The jbg mutation is a 97 bp intragenic deletion that causes skipping of exon 5, which creates a translational frame shift and premature stop codon. Western blot and immunohistochemistry results confirmed the predicted absence of CLIC5 protein in tissues of jbg/jbg mutant mice. Histological analysis of mutant inner ears revealed dysmorphic stereocilia and progressive hair cell degeneration. In wild-type mice, CLIC5-specific immunofluorescence was detected in stereocilia of both cochlear and vestibular hair cells and also along the apical surface of Kolliker's organ during cochlear development. Refined immunolocalization in rat and chicken vestibular hair cells showed that CLIC5 is limited to the basal region of the hair bundle, similar to the known location of radixin. Radixin immunostaining appeared reduced in hair bundles of jbg mutant mice. By mass spectrometry and immunoblotting, CLIC5 was shown to be expressed at high levels in stereocilia of the chicken utricle, in an approximate 1:1 molar ratio with radixin. These results suggest that CLIC5 associates with radixin in hair cell stereocilia and may help form or stabilize connections between the plasma membrane and the filamentous actin core. PMID:17021174

  1. 补体成分 C3及其缺失突变体蛋白的表达及与 CLIC1蛋白共定位的研究%The expression of human complement component C3 and its deletion mutants and the colocalization with CLIC1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王二宁; 陈丹丹; 刘晓颖; 范礼斌

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究补体成分 C3及其缺失突变体 C3(1-840)、C3(824-1663)在真核细胞内的表达及与氯离子通道蛋白(CLIC1)的共定位。方法构建 pcDNA3.1-C3-FLAG、pcDNA3.1-C3(1-840)-FLAG、pcDNA3.1-C3(824-1663)-FLAG 三个真核表达质粒(缺失突变体根据 C3的结构域及其裂解断裂位置设计),并分别转染至 HEK 293T 细胞中, Western blot 检测表达情况;上述质粒分别瞬时单转至 COS7细胞和分别与 GFP-CLIC1共转至 COS7细胞内,观察共定位情况。结果成功构建带 FLAG 标签的 C3基因及其两个缺失突变体[C3(1-840)、C3(824-1663)]的真核表达载体, Western blot 结果显示它们在 HEK 293T 细胞中均能成功表达;免疫荧光显示它们在 COS7细胞中均主要分布于细胞质,且三个真核表达载体中只有 C3(824-1663)与 CLIC1有共定位。结论补体 C3及其缺失突变体 C3(1-840)和 C3(824-1663)在 HEK 293T、COS7细胞中均能高效表达,且主要分布在细胞质内,C3(824-1663)与 CLIC1蛋白有共定位。%Objective To study the expression and cell localization of complement component C3 and its deletion mutants C3(1-840)and C3(824-1663)in eukaryotic cells and the colocalization with CLIC1.Methods To con-struct three eukaryotic expression plasmids of pcDNA3.1-C3-FLAG,pcDNA3.1-C3(1-840)-FLAG and pcDNA3.1-C3(824-1663)-FLAG(according to C3 structure domain and splitting position).The plasmids were transfected into HEK 293T cells.Then the expression was detected by Western blot,and their cellular localization was detected in COS7 cells by fluorescence microscopy.Results The eukaryotic expression plasmids of pcDNA3.1-C3-FLAG, pcDNA3.1-C3(1-840)-FLAG and pcDNA3.1-C3(824-1663)-FLAG were constructed successfully,which could be expressed in HEK 293T and COS7 cells,and the cellular localization of C3 and C3(1-840),C3(824-1663)ap-peared similar,mainly in the cytoplasm,and only C3(824-1663)co

  2. The invention that is shaping Linac4

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator experts are no strangers to innovative optimizations of existing techniques and to the development of novel solutions. Sometimes, they even come up with ideas that have the potential to revolutionize the field. This is the case with the Tolerance Aligned Cantilever Mounting (TACM) system, a completely new way of supporting the drift tubes, one of the core elements of linear accelerators. The new, patent-pending technique will be implemented at Linac4.   Drift tubes in a prototype for Linac4, assembled using the new TACM technology. “Assemble and adjust” – that was the technique used to build drift-tube linacs before the arrival of the TACM. Now, the inventors’ motto has become ‘adjust and assemble’. The inversion of these two words represents a real revolution for people working in the field. “The drift tubes are a critical element of Linac4 and they have to satisfy several requirements: they have to be mechanically ...

  3. Progress in the photocathode linac project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress achieved so far in the Photocathode Linac Project have developed and tested linear accelerator structures at 2856 MHz, commissioned the klystron modulator and microwave systems, and developed the beamline, and are ready to commence acceleration experiments

  4. Operational experience with the CERN hadron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present CERN proton linac (Linac2) was commissioned in 1978 and since that date has been the primary source of protons to the CERN accelerator complex. During the past 18 years, the machine has had a very good reliability record in spite of the demands made upon it. Modifications have been made with the view of maintaining this reliability with reduced resources and new requirements from the users. Further demands will be made in the future for LHC operation. In 1994, a new linac for heavy ion production was put into service replacing the original CERN proton linac. As this machine was built within an international collaboration, operation had to take into account the novelty of the techniques used and the variety of equipment supplied by outside collaborators. Even so, the new machine has also had very good reliability. (author)

  5. Expected performance in the injectors at 25 ns without and with Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G; Damerau, H; Findlay, A; Hancock, S; Mikulec, B; Oeftiger, A

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the 25ns beams that can be delivered at the LHC injection is determined by the injection process into the PSB, as well as by space charge, collective interactions, electron cloud and RF power limitations in the PS and SPS. Using the information available from our present experience, the main goal of this paper is twofold: (1) to assess the intensity and brightness reach of the 25ns beams produced by the LHC injector chain with the two main schemes, before and after the connection of the PSB to Linac 4; and (2) to identify which bottlenecks will be likely to limit the performance with Linac 4. A few options to maximize the potential of the increased brightness provided by Linac 4, based on flattened bunch profiles at the PS injection or the use of alternative optics configurations, will be included in the analysis.

  6. BLIP. [Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stang, Jr, L G

    1976-01-01

    The operation of the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) is discussed. Topics covered include targets, target holders, linac specifications, beam transport, and current production performance. The use of the BLIP is confined exclusively to the development of radionuclides that are, or should be, of medical interest, and the facility is moving rapidly into a self-supporting state from the income of the products. (PMA)

  7. Preliminary Design of a Bunching System for the CLIC Polarized Electron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Feng

    2009-10-30

    Major parameters of the CLIC and ILC electron sources are given in Table I. It is shown that the CLIC source needs to provide 312 15-ps-long 2-GHz microbunches. There are two approaches to achieve the time structure [2]: one is to develop a 2-GHz optical pulse train, and the other to develop a 156-ns-long CW optical pulse and use an RF bunching system to generate 312 2-GHz microbunches. The former scheme may ease the RF bunching system but still need it to bunch 100-ps of microbunch down to 15-ps level. Otherwise, a huge amount of energy spread is accumulated when the beam is accelerated through downstream 2-GHz accelerator. In addition, in the former scheme, the space charge is high and surface charge is not yet proven in the parameter regime and 2-GHz mode locked laser is challenging. The latter scheme needs a high-efficiency bunching system to generate 312 15-ps microbunches with 2-GHz repetition rate but it has some notable advantages: a 156-ns CW laser technique is matured, and the charge limit behavior in the scheme is better characterized than that in the former case, as listed in the table. This note presents a design and modeling of the bunching system for the latter scheme to convert a 156-ns CW pulse to 312 15-ps long 2-GHz microbunches.

  8. Studies on high-precision machining and assembly of CLIC RF structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J; Riddone, G; Österberg, K

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is currently under development at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e– collider. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF components are essential for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is sensitive to mechanical errors in the shape and the alignment of the accelerating cavity. The current tolerances are in the micron range. This raises challenges in the field of mechanical design and demands special manufacturing technologies and processes. Currently the mechanical design of the accelerating structures is based on a disk design. Alternatively, it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which has the potential to be favoured for the mass production due to simplicity and cost. In this case, the functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. This paper focuses on the development work done in design and sim...

  9. Assembly Test of Elastic Averaging Technique to Improve Mechanical Alignment for Accelerating Structure Assemblies in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider [1]. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF-components are important for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is very sensitive to errors in shape and location of the accelerating cavity. This causes considerable issues in the field of mechanical design and manufacturing. Currently the design of the accelerating structures is a disk design. Alternatively it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which favour the mass manufacturing. The functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. The alignment of these quadrants has been previously made kinematic by using steel pins or spheres to align the pieces together. This method proved to be a quite tedious and time consuming method of assembly. To limit the number of different error sources, a meth...

  10. Initial measurements on a prototype inductive adder for the CLIC kicker systems

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the damping ring kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the DRs are particularly demanding: the flattops of the pulses must be ±12.5 kV with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. To achieve ultra-flat pulses with a fast rise time the output impedance of the inductive adder needs to be well matched to the system impedance. The parasitic circuit elements of the inductive adder have a significant effect upon the output impedance and these values are very difficult to calculate accurately analytically. To predict these paramet...

  11. Modelling of Parasitic Inductances of a High Precision Inductive Adder for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J; Ovaska, S J

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the damping ring kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the DRs are particularly demanding: the flat-top of the pulses must be ±12.5 kV with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. However, the output impedance of the inductive adder needs to be well matched to the system impedance. The primary leakage inductance, which cannot be computed accurately analytically, has a significant effect upon the output impedance of the inductive adder. This paper presents predictions, obtained by modelling the 3D geometry of the adder struc...

  12. A CLIC Damping Wiggler Prototype at ANKA: Commissioning and Preparations for a Beam Dynamics Experimental Program

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhard, Axel; Casalbuoni, Sara; Ferracin, Paolo; Garcia Fajardo, Laura; Gerstl, Stefan; Gethmann, Julian; Grau, Andreas; Huttel, Erhard; Khrushchev, Sergey; Mezentsev, Nikolai; Müller, Anke-Susanne; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Saez de Jauregui, David; Schmickler, Hermann; Schoerling, Daniel; Shkaruba, Vitaliy; Smale, Nigel; Tsukanov, Valery; Zisopoulos, Panagiotis; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    In a collaboration between CERN, BINP and KIT a prototype of a superconducting damping wiggler for the CLIC damping rings has been installed at the ANKA synchrotron light source. On the one hand, the foreseen experimental program aims at validating the technical design of the wiggler, particularly the conduction cooling concept applied in its cryostat design, in a long-term study. On the other hand, the wiggler's influence on the beam dynamics particularly in the presence of collective effects is planned to be investigated. ANKA's low-alpha short-bunch operation mode will serve as a model system for these studies on collective effects. To simulate these effects and to make verifiable predictions an accurate model of the ANKA storage ring in low-alpha mode, including the insertion devices is under parallel development. This contribution reports on the first operational experience with the CLIC damping wiggler prototype in the ANKA storage ring and steps towards the planned advanced experimental program with th...

  13. Measurements on Prototype Inductive Adders with Ultra-Flat-Top Output Pulses for CLIC DR Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J; Belver-Aguilar, C

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study is investigating the technical feasibility of an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the DR extraction kickers call for a 160 ns duration flat-top pulses of ±12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications because this topology allows the use of both passive and analogue modulation methods to adjust the output waveform. Recently, two five-layer, 3.5 kV, prototype inductive adders have been built at CERN. The first of these has been used to test the passive and active analogue modulation methods to compensate voltage droop and ripple of the output pulses. Pulse waveforms have been reco...

  14. Prospects for the measurement of the Higgs Yukawa couplings to b and c quarks, and muons at CLIC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grefe, C.; Laštovička, Tomáš; Strube, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2 (2013), s. 1-7. ISSN 1434-6044 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Higgs * branching * ratio * Yukawa * couplings * quarks * muons * CLIC * inear collider Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.436, year: 2013

  15. What do therapy linacs and A-bombs have in common?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Japanese survivors of the atomic-bomb blasts of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are the main source of information on the biological effects of low doses of low LET radiations. The epidemiological studies of the survivors are supplemented by laboratory-based radio-biological studies. Whereas the survivors were exposed to radiation with a large component of high-energy radiations, >1 MeV, past radio-biological studies have predominantly used lower energy radiations. Recent radio-biological studies suggest that the biological effectiveness of low LET radiations is not independent of energy, as implicitly assumed in current radiation protection philosophy, but that RBE and energy are inversely related. Radio-biological studies comparing test radiations with atomic-bomb-like radiations should extend the generality of the epidemiological studies. A recent study (Pattison et al, Radiation Protection Dosimetry, 2001, in press) has shown the feasibility of using therapy linacs to simulate atomic-bomb radiations. In that study, a Philips SL15 linac was utilized as photon contamination of the electron beams was known to be small (<3%) and was ignored. In this study, a Varian 2100C linac was investigated as its output is well-characterized (Rogers et al, Medical Physics, 1995, 22, 503-524) allowing the effect of photon contamination to be investigated. The photon fluence spectra that were incident on the survivors were obtained partly from the DS86 report, and partly from George Kerr of ORNL. The photon radiation was transported through a model body representing the average survivor, using EGS4, in order to obtain the electron fluence spectra passing through the colon. The various radiations from the linac were transported, similarly, and in turn, through an experimental set-up in order to obtain the electron fluence spectra at a cell culture. Combinations of the linac radiations were then determined which produced a similar electron fluence spectrum through a cell

  16. Simulations and Vacuum Tests of a CLIC Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2011-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider, under study, is based on room temperature high gradient structures. The vacuum specificities of these cavities are low conductance, large surface areas and a non-baked system. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-7 Pa) in a system where the residual vacuum is driven by water outgassing. A finite element model based on an analogy thermal/vacuum has been built to estimate the vacuum profile in an accelerating structure. Vacuum tests are carried out in a dedicated set-up, the vacuum performances of different configurations are presented and compared with the predictions.

  17. Simulation of the CLIC transfer structure by means of MAFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millich, Antonio

    1993-12-01

    The function of the CTS is to extract 30 GHz power from the drive beam and to make it available for the acceleration of the main beam. The simulation of a six cells section of the CTS using the MAFIA set of codes has provided the designers of the structure with a set of RF parameters at 30 GHz. The frequency domain analysis has allowed the plotting of the dispersion curves for the first few pass bands, whereas the time domain analysis has provided results on the shape and magnitude of the longitudinal and transverse wake fields and of the loss factors.

  18. SARAF Phase I linac operation in 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, L.; Berkovits, D.; Arenshtam, A.; Ben-Aliz, Y.; Buzaglo, Y.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Feinberg, G.; Fishman, I.; Gertz, I.; Grin, A.; Halfon, S.; Har-Even, D.; Haruvy, Y. F.; Hirschmann, D.; Hirsh, T.; Horovitz, Z.; Kaizer, B.; Kijel, D.; Kreisel, A.; Luner, Y.; Mor, I.; Paul, M.; Perry, A.; Rodnizki, J.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Tessler, M.; Vaintraub, S.

    2015-10-01

    Phase I of the SARAF superconducting RF linac is under operation at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The present status of Phase I main components is reported, as well as, the beam operation experience accumulated in 2013-2014. The latter include acceleration of a 2 mA and 1.6 mA CW proton beams at energies of 2 MeV and 3.9 MeV correspondingly and 1 mA pulsed, duty cycle of few %, deuteron beams up to 5.6 MeV. The recent experiments include operation of intense CW proton beams on the liquid lithium target.

  19. Physics design of the National Spallation Neutron Source linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) requires a linac that accelerates a H- beam to 1.0 GeV. The linac starts with a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, which is followed by a drift-tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL), and a conventional coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In this paper, the authors focus on the DTL, CCDTL, and CCL parts of the accelerator. They discuss the linac design parameters and beam dynamics issues. The design rationale of no separate matching sections between different accelerating sections maintains the current independence of beam behavior

  20. Linac4 H⁻ ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettry, J; Aguglia, D; Alessi, J; Andersson, P; Bertolo, S; Briefi, S; Butterworth, A; Coutron, Y; Dallocchio, A; David, N; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Fantz, U; Fink, D A; Garlasche, M; Grudiev, A; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Haase, M; Hatayama, A; Jones, A; Koszar, I; Lallement, J-B; Lombardi, A M; Machado, C; Mastrostefano, C; Mathot, S; Mattei, S; Moyret, P; Nisbet, D; Nishida, K; O'Neil, M; Paoluzzi, M; Scrivens, R; Shibata, T; Steyaert, D; Thaus, N; Voulgarakis, G

    2016-02-01

    CERN's 160 MeV H(-) linear accelerator (Linac4) is a key constituent of the injector chain upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider that is being installed and commissioned. A cesiated surface ion source prototype is being tested and has delivered a beam intensity of 45 mA within an emittance of 0.3 π ⋅ mm ⋅ mrad. The optimum ratio of the co-extracted electron- to ion-current is below 1 and the best production efficiency, defined as the ratio of the beam current to the 2 MHz RF-power transmitted to the plasma, reached 1.1 mA/kW. The H(-) source prototype and the first tests of the new ion source optics, electron-dump, and front end developed to minimize the beam emittance are presented. A temperature regulated magnetron H(-) source developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory was built at CERN. The first tests of the magnetron operated at 0.8 Hz repetition rate are described. PMID:26932021

  1. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaboration of scientists from SLAC, UCLA, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory have proposed to build the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) facility, a free-electron laser (FEL) on the SLAC site, spanning photon energies 0.8-8 keV. The laser output will be 8-10 GW with pulse lengths 230 fsec or less. The LCLS will offer unprecedented experimental opportunities in the areas of atomic physics, chemical dynamics, plasma physics, nanoscale dynamics, and biomolecular imaging. SLAC has proposed to begin engineering design of the laser in 2003, leading to project completion in 2008. The laser produces x-rays by the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process: an intense, highly collimated pulse of 14.5 GeV electrons, traveling through a 122 m-long undulator magnet system, is induced by its own synchrotron radiation to form sub-nanometer-scale bunches. The bunching process enhances the coherence and hence the intensity of the emitted synchrotron radiation. The process is analogous to the instability of a high-gain amplifier; the ''noise'' signal that seeds the instability is the shot noise in the electron beam

  2. RNB-specific linac development

    CERN Document Server

    Ratzinger, U

    2002-01-01

    The acceleration of secondary, radioactive beams from primary beam driven ion sources provides many challenges when compared to the case of conventional ion beams. The clean separation of the specific ion species, the low beam current, the short life time of the ions as well as the needed energy variability have consequences on the layout of the accelerator. As also experiments with astrophysical relevance are performed, the energy range should go down below 1 MeV/u in some cases. Additionally, to investigate nuclear reactions around the Coulomb barrier, the beam energy should be flexible up to around 8 MeV/u. Short isotope life times below a few milliseconds do not allow for charge breeding. In these cases, low charged ions from 'simple' ion sources have to be accepted by the accelerator. Furthermore, stripping processes along the linac are excluded in case of low beam currents. Multicoincidence experiments profit a lot from cw operation of ion source and accelerators. During the last three decades, room tem...

  3. Linac4 H- ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettry, J.; Aguglia, D.; Alessi, J.; Andersson, P.; Bertolo, S.; Briefi, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; David, N.; Chaudet, E.; Faircloth, D.; Fantz, U.; Fink, D. A.; Garlasche, M.; Grudiev, A.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Haase, M.; Hatayama, A.; Jones, A.; Koszar, I.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lombardi, A. M.; Machado, C.; Mastrostefano, C.; Mathot, S.; Mattei, S.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; Nishida, K.; O'Neil, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Scrivens, R.; Shibata, T.; Steyaert, D.; Thaus, N.; Voulgarakis, G.

    2016-02-01

    CERN's 160 MeV H- linear accelerator (Linac4) is a key constituent of the injector chain upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider that is being installed and commissioned. A cesiated surface ion source prototype is being tested and has delivered a beam intensity of 45 mA within an emittance of 0.3 π ṡ mm ṡ mrad. The optimum ratio of the co-extracted electron- to ion-current is below 1 and the best production efficiency, defined as the ratio of the beam current to the 2 MHz RF-power transmitted to the plasma, reached 1.1 mA/kW. The H- source prototype and the first tests of the new ion source optics, electron-dump, and front end developed to minimize the beam emittance are presented. A temperature regulated magnetron H- source developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory was built at CERN. The first tests of the magnetron operated at 0.8 Hz repetition rate are described.

  4. Klystron pulse mudulator for linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly stable klystron pulse modulator is required in constructing a linac with good beam characteristics. The De-Qing circuit has been used conventionally to stabilize the output of a pulse modulator, but this method can achieve a stability of 1 percent at best, which is far larger than the targeted stability (less than 0.1 percent). The following three types of regulators are available to stabilize the D.C. power source of a pulse modulator: series regulator, shunt regulator and switching regulator. Advantages and disadvantages of these regulators are examined and the shunt regulator is selected because of its simple circuit structure and easy adjustment. The klystron pulse modulator has the features of being able to serve as a component of a large-power pulse klystron, being high in pulse stability (reproducibility), giving good pulse profiles (free from evershoot or undershoot), being small in size, etc. The klystron pulse modulator consists of a power source step-up transfermer, three-phase full-wave rectifying circuit, smoothing circuit, constant voltage control circuit, switching circuit, PFN circuit and pulse transformer. (Nogami, K.)

  5. CERN Linac4. The space charge challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, Lutz Matthias

    2013-08-06

    In the first phase of the upgrade program of the CERN accelerator complex the proton injector Linac2 will be replaced by a new, normal-conducting H-ion Linac, Linac4, allowing a significant increase of the proton flux intensity along the downstream accelerator complex. In the design of Linac4 three beam transport sections are implemented to match the beam between the different accelerator elements and to model the longitudinal pulse structure. These three beam transport sections, which are the most critical locations in terms of beam quality preservation, are in the focus of this thesis. During the work of this thesis the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), which is required to match the source beam to the radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), has been commissioned and its beam dynamics re-constructed. The measurement campaign used to reconstruct the LEBT beam dynamics was performed with the aim to prepare the RFQ commissioning and to maximise the LEBT performance. Downstream of the Linac4 accelerator the beam is transported along a 180 m long transfer line to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PS-Booster). The transfer line optics was studied, optimised and sections were completely re-designed. The new transfer line optics is characterised by an improved preservation of the beam emittance, higher stability of the optical solution with respect to alignment errors and field jitters of the transfer line magnets and it is matched to each of the PS-Booster injection schemes. In a concluding ''Start-To-End'' simulation based on the measured beam characteristics at the LEBT exit the beam dynamics of the downstream Linac, including the transfer line, was calculated. To minimise particle losses within acceptable emittance preservation the beam optics of the Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) was adapted to the measured beam parameters. This ''Start-To-End'' simulation was performed to identify critical sections of the Linac4 beam dynamics and

  6. CERN Linac4. The space charge challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first phase of the upgrade program of the CERN accelerator complex the proton injector Linac2 will be replaced by a new, normal-conducting H-ion Linac, Linac4, allowing a significant increase of the proton flux intensity along the downstream accelerator complex. In the design of Linac4 three beam transport sections are implemented to match the beam between the different accelerator elements and to model the longitudinal pulse structure. These three beam transport sections, which are the most critical locations in terms of beam quality preservation, are in the focus of this thesis. During the work of this thesis the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), which is required to match the source beam to the radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), has been commissioned and its beam dynamics re-constructed. The measurement campaign used to reconstruct the LEBT beam dynamics was performed with the aim to prepare the RFQ commissioning and to maximise the LEBT performance. Downstream of the Linac4 accelerator the beam is transported along a 180 m long transfer line to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PS-Booster). The transfer line optics was studied, optimised and sections were completely re-designed. The new transfer line optics is characterised by an improved preservation of the beam emittance, higher stability of the optical solution with respect to alignment errors and field jitters of the transfer line magnets and it is matched to each of the PS-Booster injection schemes. In a concluding ''Start-To-End'' simulation based on the measured beam characteristics at the LEBT exit the beam dynamics of the downstream Linac, including the transfer line, was calculated. To minimise particle losses within acceptable emittance preservation the beam optics of the Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) was adapted to the measured beam parameters. This ''Start-To-End'' simulation was performed to identify critical sections of the Linac4 beam dynamics and to adjust the commissioning strategies.

  7. Status of the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) Cryo-Module

    CERN Document Server

    Parma, V; Capatina, O; Chambrillon, J; Montesinos, E; Schirm, K; Vande Craen, A; Vandoni, G; Van Weelderen, R

    2014-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort conducted by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories, aimed at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art SRF technology. Such an accelerator could serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or radioactive ion beams [1]. Amongst the main objectives of this effort, are the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities (operating at 2 K and providing an accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m) and the test of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryo-module. In an initial phase, only four out of the eight cavities of the SPL cryo-module will be tested in a half-length cryo-module developed for this purpose, which nonetheless preserves the main features of the full size module. This paper presents the final design of the cryo-module and the status of the construction of the main cryostat parts. Preliminary plans for the assembly a...

  8. Physics design of a CW high-power proton Linac for accelerator-driven system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajni Pande; Shweta Roy; S V L S Rao; P Singh; S Kailas

    2012-02-01

    Accelerator-driven systems (ADS) have evoked lot of interest the world over because of their capability to incinerate the MA (minor actinides) and LLFP (long-lived fission products) radiotoxic waste and their ability to utilize thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel. One of the main subsystems of ADS is a high energy (∼1 GeV) and high current (∼30 mA) CW proton Linac. The accelerator for ADS should have high efficiency and reliability and very low beam losses to allow hands-on maintenance. With these criteria, the beam dynamics simulations for a 1 GeV, 30 mA proton Linac has been done. The Linac consists of normal-conducting radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), drift tube linac (DTL) and coupled cavity drift tube Linac (CCDTL) structures that accelerate the beam to about 100 MeV followed by superconducting (SC) elliptical cavities, which accelerate the beam from 100 MeV to 1 GeV. The details of the design are presented in this paper.

  9. Development of multi-beam type IH-RFQ linac system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a two-beam type IH-RFQ (Interdigital H type Radio Frequency Quadrupole) linac system to prove the principle of a multi-beam type IH-RFQ linac in Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors of Tokyo Institute of Technology. The multi-beam type RFQ linac has several beam channels in a cavity for accelerating high intensity and low energy heavy ion beams. The developed system consists of a two-beam type IH-RFQ cavity as a prototype of the multi-beam type cavity, a two-beam type laser ion source with DPIS (Direct Plasma Injection Scheme) and beam analyzers mainly. As a result of the beam acceleration test, the linac system accelerates carbon ions from 5 keV/u to 60 keV/u and generates about 108 mA (2x54 mA/channel) in the total output current. In this paper, we describe the development of the linac system and some results of the beam acceleration test. (author)

  10. 1974 view into the cage of the 520 keV electrostatic preaccelerator of Linac 1

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The condenser of the high voltage circuit (column in the foreground) is being serviced by Jean Luc Vallet. Standing on the electronics platform (the big, open metallic structure on insulating pillars, for details see 7403120) is Bob Nettelton. The column at the right edge of the photo is part of the bouncer (see also 7403066X) which compensated the voltage drop during acceleration of a proton pulse. In the background is the source (open pill box structure) attached to the accelerating column, barely visible) behind. The "old" 50 MeV Linac 1, the original PS injector built in the 1950s, was (since 1976) replaced by a new 50 MeV linac (Linac 2) with a 750 keV "Cockcroft-Walton" pre-injector(see 7602012X), later replaced by a 750 keV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) preaccelerator. Linac 1 co-existed until mid 1992 (from 1982 onwards it was mainly used to inject "test-particles" into the Low Energy Antiproton ring LEAR). In 1984 the electrostatic preaccelerator of linac 1 was replaced by a 520 keV RFQ ( 8303511X...

  11. The KAERI 10 MeV Electron Linac - Description and Operational Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this technical report is to guide the right operation and maintenance of the KAERI electron linac system. The KAERI electron linac system consists of 2 MeV injector based on 176 MHz Normal conducting RF (Radio Frequency)cavity and 10 MeV main accelerator based on 352 MHz Superconducting RF cavity, electron beamlines (injection and extraction). Since a electron accelerator generates hazard radiation, this system is located at the shielded room in basement and we can operate the system using the remote control system. It includes the description and the operational manual as well as the detailed technical direction for trouble shooting

  12. The KAERI 10 MeV Electron Linac - Description and Operational Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Cheol; Park, Seong Hee; Jung, Young Uk; Han, Young Hwan; Kang, Hee Young

    2005-06-15

    The objective of this technical report is to guide the right operation and maintenance of the KAERI electron linac system. The KAERI electron linac system consists of 2 MeV injector based on 176 MHz Normal conducting RF (Radio Frequency)cavity and 10 MeV main accelerator based on 352 MHz Superconducting RF cavity, electron beamlines (injection and extraction). Since a electron accelerator generates hazard radiation, this system is located at the shielded room in basement and we can operate the system using the remote control system. It includes the description and the operational manual as well as the detailed technical direction for trouble shooting.

  13. RF control at transient beamloading for high-duty-factor linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effective RF control with the transient beamloading is the major issue in the operation of the high-duty-factor linacs to suppress the undesirable beam loss. The RF control method is considered to obtain the control principle and the state equation, under the analysis of electrodynamical properties of the excitation in the resonator of the linac due to the transient beamloading. The concept of the directional selective coupling is applied for the RF system to define the main characteristics and to optimize the RF control parameters. (author)

  14. Conceptual study of high power proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Ouyang Hua Fu; Xu Tao Guang

    2001-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. The ADS accelerator presented by the consists of a 5 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole, a 100 MeV independently phased superconducting cavity linac and a 1 GeV elliptical superconducting cavity linac. The accelerating structures and main parameters are determined and the research and development plan is considered

  15. Session 2: post LS1 scenarios without and with Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Arduini, G

    2014-01-01

    This document summarizes the talks and discussion that took place in the second session of the RLIUP Review. The main aims were to examine the performance of the injectors and LHC and what could be the integrated luminosity by 2035 if no major upgrade except the connection of LINAC4 and H- injection is implemented and to take into account the lifetime of major accelerator components whose repair or replacement would require long shutdowns. The session comprised four presentations: “Expected performance in the injectors at 25 ns without and with LINAC4” by G. Rumolo; “Integrated performance of the LHC at 25 ns without and with LINAC4” by J. Wenninger; “Required maintenance and consolidation to run like that (injectors and LHC) until 2035?” by K. Foraz; and “What could stop us, when and how long?” by L. Bottura.

  16. Results from the CLIC X-BAND structure test program at the NLCTA

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Dolgashev, Valery; Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Wang, Faya; Wang, W Juwen; Doebert, Steffen; Grudiev, Alexej; Riddone, Germana; Wuensh, Walter; Zennaro, Riccardo; Higashi, Yasuo; Higo, Toshiyasu

    2010-01-01

    As part of a SLAC-CERN-KEK col­lab­o­ra­tion on high gra­di­ent X-band struc­ture re­search, sev­er­al pro­to­type struc­tures for the CLIC lin­ear col­lid­er study have been test­ed using two of the high power (300 MW) X-band rf sta­tions in the NLCTA fa­cil­i­ty at SLAC. These struc­tures dif­fer in terms of their man­u­fac­tur­ing (brazed disks and clamped quad­rants), gra­di­ent pro­file (amount by which the gra­di­ent in­creas­es along the struc­ture which op­ti­mizes ef­fi­cien­cy and max­i­mizes sus­tain­able gra­di­ent) and HOM damp­ing (use of slots or waveg­uides to rapid­ly dis­si­pate dipole mode en­er­gy). The CLIC goal in the next few years is to demon­strate the fea­si­bil­i­ty of a CLIC-ready base­line de­sign and to in­ves­ti­gate al­ter­na­tives which could bring even high­er ef­fi­cien­cy. This paper sum­ma­rizes the high gra­di­ent test re­sults from the NLCTA in sup­port of this ef­fort.

  17. Beam Tests of a Prototype Stripline Beam Position Monitoring System for the Drive Beam of the CLIC Two-beam Module at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, Alfonso; Nappa, Jean-Marc; Vilalte, Sebastien; Wendt, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with LAPP and IFIC, two units of a prototype stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam (DB), and its associated readout electronics have been successfully installed and tested in the Two-Beam-Module (TBM) at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. This paper gives a short overview of the BPM system and presents the performance measured under different Drive Beam configurations.

  18. Dispersion and betatron matching into the linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In high energy linear colliders, the low emittance beam from a damping ring has to be preserved all the way to the linac, in the linac and to the interaction point. In particular, the Ring-To-Linac (RTL) section of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) should provide an exact betatron and dispersion match from the damping ring to the linac. A beam with a non-zero dispersion shows up immediately as an increased emittance, while with a betatron mismatch the beam filaments in the linac. Experimental tests and tuning procedures have shown that the linearized beta matching algorithms are insufficient if the actual transport line has some unknown errors not included in the model. Also, adjusting quadrupole strengths steers the beam if it is offset in the quadrupole magnets. These and other effects have lead to a lengthy tuning process, which in the end improves the matching, but is not optimal. Different ideas will be discussed which should improve this matching procedure and make it a more reliable, faster and simpler process. 5 refs., 2 figs

  19. RFI-Based Ion Linac Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Donald A.

    A new company, Ion Linac Systems, Inc., has been formed to promote the development, manufacture, and marketing of intense, RFI-based, Ion Linac Systems. The Rf Focused Interdigital (RFI) linac structure was invented by the author while at Linac Systems, LLC. The first step, for the new company, will be to correct a flaw in an existing RFI-based linac system and to demonstrate "good transmission" through the system. The existing system, aimed at the BNCT medical application, is designed to produce a beam of 2.5 MeV protons with an average beam current of 20 mA. In conjunction with a lithium target, it will produce an intense beam of epithermal neutrons. This system is very efficient, requiring only 180 kW of rf power to produce a 50 kW proton beam. In addition to the BNCT medical application, the RFI-based systems should represent a powerful neutron generator for homeland security, defence applications, cargo container inspection, and contraband detection. The timescale to the demonstration of "good transmission" is early fall of this year. Our website is www.ionlinacs.com.

  20. CLIC5 stabilizes membrane-actin filament linkages at the base of hair cell stereocilia in a molecular complex with radixin, taperin, and myosin VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Felipe T; Andrade, Leonardo R; Tanda, Soichi; Grati, M'hamed; Plona, Kathleen L; Gagnon, Leona H; Johnson, Kenneth R; Kachar, Bechara; Berryman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 5 protein (CLIC5) was originally isolated from microvilli in complex with actin binding proteins including ezrin, a member of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of membrane-cytoskeletal linkers. CLIC5 concentrates at the base of hair cell stereocilia and is required for normal hearing and balance in mice, but its functional significance is poorly understood. This study investigated the role of CLIC5 in postnatal development and maintenance of hair bundles. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy of CLIC5-deficient jitterbug (jbg) mice revealed progressive fusion of stereocilia as early as postnatal day 10. Radixin (RDX), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Q (PTPRQ), and taperin (TPRN), deafness-associated proteins that also concentrate at the base of stereocilia, were mislocalized in fused stereocilia of jbg mice. TPRQ and RDX were dispersed even prior to stereocilia fusion. Biochemical assays showed interaction of CLIC5 with ERM proteins, TPRN, and possibly myosin VI (MYO6). In addition, CLIC5 and RDX failed to localize normally in fused stereocilia of MYO6 mutant mice. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which these proteins work together as a complex to stabilize linkages between the plasma membrane and subjacent actin cytoskeleton at the base of stereocilia. PMID:24285636

  1. Proposition d'une méthode d'alignement de l'accélérateur linéaire CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Thomas; Mainaud-Durand, H

    2011-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is the particles accelerator project proposed by the european organization for nuclear research (CERN) for high energy physics after the large hadron collider (LHC). Because of the nanometric scale of the CLIC leptons beams, the emittance growth budget is very tight. It induces alignment tolerances on the positions of the CLIC components that have never been achieved. The last step of the CLIC alignment will be done according to the beam itself. It falls within the competence of the physicists. However, in order to implement the beam-based feedback, a challenging pre-alignment is required : 10 μm at 3σ along a 200 m sliding window. For such a precision, the proposed solution must be compatible with a feedback between the measurement and repositioning systems. The CLIC pre-alignment will have to be active. This thesis does not demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC active prealignment but shows the way to the last developments that have to be done for that purpose. A metho...

  2. Magnetron based high energy S-band linac system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the study of magnetron based high energy S-band linear accelerator (linac) system operating at spot frequency 2.998 GHz. The energy and dose are two important parameters of linac system which depend on input power of microwave source and length of linac tube. Here the author has studied how these parameters can be improved for side coupled standing wave S-band linac system

  3. Intense positron beams: linacs - preworkshop copy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of monoenergetic positrons with energies of a few eV to many keV have been used in experiments in atomic physics, solid-state physics and materials science. The production of positron beams from a new source, an electron linac, is described. Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons have been produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency, moderator geometry, beam spot size and other positron beam parameters have been determined for electrons with energies from 60 to 120 MeV. Low-energy positron beams produced with a high-energy electron linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources. These higher-intensity beams will make possible positron experiments previously infeasible

  4. Intense positron beams: linacs. Preworkshop copy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of monoenergetic positrons with energies of a few eV to many keV have been used in experiments in atomic physics, solid state physics and materials science. The production of positron beams from a new source, an electron linac, is described. Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons have been produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency, moderator geometry, beam spot size and other positron beam parameters have been determined for electrons with energies from 60 to 120 MeV. Low-energy positron beams produced with a high-energy electron linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources. These higher intensity beams will make possible positron experiments previously infeasible

  5. Transverse Matching Techniques for the SNS Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon Dong Oh; Danilov, Viatcheslav V

    2005-01-01

    It is crucial to minimize beam loss and machine activation by obtaining optimal transverse matching for a high-intensity linear accelerator such as the Spallation Neutron Source linac. For matching the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) to Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL), there are four wire-scanners installed in series in CCL module 1 as proposed by the author.* A series of measurements was conducted to minimize envelope breathing and the results are presented here. As an independent approach, Chu et al is developing an application based on another technique by estimating rms emittance using the wire scanner profile data.** For matching the Medium Energy Beam Transport Line to the DTL, a technique of minimizing rms emittance was used and emittance data show that tail is minimized as well.

  6. The Linac Cooherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Such an FEL requires a high energy, high brightness electron beam to drive the FEL instability to saturation. When fed by an RF-photocathode gun, and modified to include two bunch compressor chicanes, the SLAC linac will provide such a high quality beam at 14 GeV and 1-{micro}m normalized emittance. In this paper, we report on recent linac studies, including beam stability and tolerances, longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, conventional and time-resolved diagnostics, and beam collimation systems. Construction and installation of the injector through first bunch compressor will be completed by December 2006, and electron commissioning is scheduled to begin in January of 2007.

  7. Drive linac for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnacki, E.; Konecny, R.; Rosing, M.; Simpson, J.

    1993-08-01

    The drive linac in Phase I of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) will be used to accelerate short duration (10 ps), high charge (100 nC) electron bunches from 2 MV to 20 MV for use in a variety of wakefield acceleration and measurement studies. The high charge is required since this drive bunch will generate the wakefields of interest in various test sections and their amplitudes are proportional to bunch charge. The short bunch duration is required to drive high-frequency wakefields without intra-bunch cancellation effects. The drive linac design was a balance between having a small wake function to maintain a drive bunch energy spread of {le}10% and obtaining an adequate accelerating gradient of {ge}10 MV/m. This yielded a large aperture, low shunt impedance, high group velocity, L-band, standing-wave linac. Details of the design, fabrication, and testing are presented in the following.

  8. Status of the TOP Linac project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianfarani, Cesidio [ENEA, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Cisbani, Evaristo [ISS, Viale Regina Elena 199, Rome (Italy); Orlandi, Gianluca [ENEA, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Frullani, Salvatore [ISS, Viale Regina Elena 199, Rome (Italy); Picardi, Luigi [ENEA, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascatim(Rome) (Italy)]. E-mail: picardi@frascati.enea.it; Concetta Ronsivalle [ENEA, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati (Rome) (Italy)

    2006-06-23

    The TOP Linac (Oncological Therapy with Protons), under development by ENEA and ISS is a sequence of three pulsed (5 {mu}s 300 Hz) linear accelerators: a 7 MeV, 425 MHz RFQ+DTL (AccSys Model PL-7), a 7-65 MeV, 2998 MHz Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac (SCDTL) and a 65-200 MeV, variable energy 2998 MHz Side Coupled Linac (SCL). The status of the project will be presented. The 7 MeV injector is installed at ENEA-Frascati laboratories. The first SCDTL module structure, composed by nine DTL tanks coupled by eight side cavities, has been built and tested on RF bench, so that it is ready for proton acceleration. The results of the measurements done will be also shown.

  9. Status of the TOP Linac project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TOP Linac (Oncological Therapy with Protons), under development by ENEA and ISS is a sequence of three pulsed (5 μs 300 Hz) linear accelerators: a 7 MeV, 425 MHz RFQ+DTL (AccSys Model PL-7), a 7-65 MeV, 2998 MHz Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac (SCDTL) and a 65-200 MeV, variable energy 2998 MHz Side Coupled Linac (SCL). The status of the project will be presented. The 7 MeV injector is installed at ENEA-Frascati laboratories. The first SCDTL module structure, composed by nine DTL tanks coupled by eight side cavities, has been built and tested on RF bench, so that it is ready for proton acceleration. The results of the measurements done will be also shown

  10. LINAC4 low energy beam measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hein, L M; Lallement, J B; Lombardi, A M; Midttun, O; Posocco, P; Scrivens, R

    2012-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator for negative Hydrogen ions (H−), which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac (Linac2) as linear injector for the CERN accelerators. The low energy part, comprising a 45 keV Low Energy Beam Transport system (LEBT), a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) is being assembled in a dedicated test stand for pre-commissioning with a proton beam. During 2011 extensive measurements were done after the source and after the LEBT with the aim of preparing the RFQ commissioning and validating the simulation tools, indispensable for future source upgrades. The measurements have been thoroughly simulated with a multi-particle code, including 2D magnetic field maps, error studies, steering studies and the generation of beam distribution from measurements. Emittance, acceptance and transmission measurements will be presented and compared to the results of the simulations.

  11. Required energy gain in the linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, J.C.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of this note is to determine how much energy is required for each bunch at the end of the linac such that 100 GeV center of mass collision energy at the IP may be achieved. Once this has been ascertained it is possible to decide how much energy per station in the linac is needed, considering the effects of beamloading, shortened pieces of DLWG, and RF detuning. An appendix is included to cover a related topic: assuming lower bunch currents and lower collision energies, how many low power klystrons can remain in the linac. An attempt has been made to indicate what assumptions have been made so that the readers may try other assumptions to see what happens.

  12. Beam steering in the SLC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to control emittance growth due to transverse wakefields it will be necessary to transport electrons and positrons through the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) linac to within a hundred μm of the centers of the linac irises. Beam centering will be accomplished using computer routines to read stripline beam position monitors and in turn correct the orbits with dipole magnets. Several different steering algorithms have been investigated using electrons in the first third of the SLC linac lattice. The most promising scheme is a cascade of modified ''three-bumps'' in conjunction with long spanning harmonic corrections. General features of the orbit correcting software are discussed along with the mathematical recipes for correction. Experimental results and a discussion of future plans are presented

  13. System design work on proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutron Science Project at JAERI calls for a high intensity proton linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average beam power of 8 MW. The linac is required to operate in both pulse (up to 30% duty factor) and CW mode. The front end part of the linac, which consists of an RFQ, a DTL and an SDTL (Separated type DTL), uses normal conducting structures. The higher energy structure is superconducting (SC). The system design and beam dynamics studies have been performed with the PARMTEQ and modified PARMILA codes. An equipartitioned design approach has been taken for the DTL, the SDTL and the SC sections to obtain lower longitudinal emittance growth. The linac design parameters and the beam simulation results are presented. (J.P.N.)

  14. Integrated design of the SSC linac injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ion Source, Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Linac act as a unit (referred to as the Linac Injector), the Ion Source and LEBT being cantilevered off of the RFQ. Immediately adjacent to both ends of the RFQ cavity proper are endwall chambers containing beam instrumentation and independently-operated vacuum isolation valves. The Linac Injector delivers 30 mA of H- beam at 2.5 MeV. This paper describes the design constraints imposed on the endwalls, aspects of the integration of the Ion Source and LEBT including attachment to the RFQ, maintainability and interchangeability of LEBTs, vacuum systems for each component, and the design of necessary support structure. (Author) 2 tab

  15. An Object-Oriented linac control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ESRF linac has been working since the start of its commissioning (1991) with an industrial turnkey Control System which was not giving reliable service and was difficult to interface to the ESRF machine control system (MCS). It was decided in 1992 to redesign the entire linac electronic interface, using ESRF standards. Following this, it was decided to redesign the control system and to integrate it as part of the proven ESRF distributed control system [W.D. Klotz, Proc. Int. Conf. on Accelerator and Large Physics Experiments (ICALEPS-91), Tsukuba, Japan]. Preparation of the software began in spring 93. The installation and commissioning of the hardware and software has been carried out during a six week summer shutdown. The linac delivered its first beam on schedule using the complete control software. ((orig.))

  16. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Such an FEL requires a high energy, high brightness electron beam to drive the FEL instability to saturation. When fed by an RF-photocathode gun, and modified to include two bunch compressor chicanes, the SLAC linac will provide such a high quality beam at 14 GeV and 1-(micro)m normalized emittance. In this paper, we report on recent linac studies, including beam stability and tolerances, longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, conventional and time-resolved diagnostics, and beam collimation systems. Construction and installation of the injector through first bunch compressor will be completed by December 2006, and electron commissioning is scheduled to begin in January of 2007

  17. Energy Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sy, Amy [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL; Roberts, Tom; Boulware, Chase; Hollister, Jerry

    2015-09-01

    Photonuclear reactions with bremsstrahlung photon beams from electron linacs can generate radioisotopes of critical interest. An SRF Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) provides a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes in a more compact footprint and at a lower cost than those produced by conventional reactor or ion accelerator methods. Use of an ERL enables increased energy efficiency of the complex through energy recovery of the waste electron beam, high electron currents for high production yields, and reduced neutron production and shielding activation at beam dump components. Simulation studies using G4Beamline/GEANT4 and MCNP6 through MuSim, as well as other simulation codes, will design an ERL-based isotope production facility utilizing bremsstrahlung photon beams from an electron linac. Balancing the isotope production parameters versus energy recovery requirements will inform a choice of isotope production target for future experiments.

  18. The Climate and Cryosphere Project (CliC): Helping bring sea ice Models and Observations together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, V.; Goodison, B.; Worby, A.; Ryabinin, V.; Prick, A.; Villinger, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Climate and Cryosphere Project is sponsored by the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and the Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR). One of the four themes within the CliC project is the Marine Cryosphere Theme (MarC). This paper will review the recent projects and workshops held within this Theme and how they relate to other, international initiatives. Recent recommendations on sea ice thickness are being implemented, and groups have been formed to work towards improvements in models, particularly in their representation of the Southern Ocean. SOPHOCLES (Southern Ocean Physical Oceanography and Cryosphere Processes and Climate) will work with other modeling groups to improve the representation of the Southern Ocean in climate models. This will include cooperation with other modeling and observational groups to develop metrics to help evaluate models. In the Arctic, we are working to help develop, standardize, and implement observation and measurement protocols for Arctic sea ice in coastal, seasonal, and perennial ice zones.

  19. Present status of development of damping ring extraction kicker system for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne; Belver-Aguilar, Caroline; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Toral, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC damping rings will produce ultra-low emittance beam, with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses: specifications call for a 160 ns duration and a flattop of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than \\pm0.02 %. The stripline design is also extremely challenging: the field for the damping ring kicker system must be homogenous to within \\pm0.01 % over a 1 mm radius, and low beam coupling impedance is required. The solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is a very promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications for the field pulse ripple and droop. This paper describes the initial design of the inductive adder and the striplines of the kicker system.

  20. Present status of development of damping ring extraction kicker system for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne; Belver-Aguilar, Caroline; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Toral, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC damping rings will produce ultra-low emittance beam, with high bunch charge, necessary for the luminosity performance of the collider. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the damping ring kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses: specifications call for a 160 ns duration and a flattop of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. The stripline design is also extremely challenging: the field for the damping ring kicker system must be homogenous to within ±0.01 % over a 1 mm radius, and low beam coupling impedance is required. The solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is a very promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications for the field pulse ripple and droop. This paper describes the initial design of the inductive adder and the striplines of the kicker system.

  1. Experience on Fabrication and Assembly of the First CLIC Two-Beam Module Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Gudkov, D; Riddone, G; Rossi, F; Lebet, S

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC two-beam module prototypes are intended to prove the design of all technical systems under the different operation modes. Two validation programs are currently under way and they foresee the construction of four prototype modules for mechanical tests without beam and three prototype modules for tests with RF and beam. The program without beam will show the capability of the technical solutions proposed to fulfil the stringent requirements on radio-frequency, supporting, pre-alignment, stabilization, vacuum and cooling systems. The engineering design was performed with the use of CAD/CAE software. Dedicated mock-ups of RF structures, with all mechanical interfaces and chosen technical solutions, are used for the tests and therefore reliable results are expected. The components were fabricated by applying different technologies and methods for manufacturing and joining. The first full-size prototype module was assembled in 2012. This paper is focused on the production process including the comparison o...

  2. Recent results with HV-CMOS and planar sensors for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)734627

    2016-01-01

    The physics aims for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) impose high precision requirements on the vertex detector which has to match the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of 3μm, 10 ns time stamping capabilities, low mass (⇠0.2% X0 per layer), low power dissipation and pulsed power operation. Recent results of test beam measurements and GEANT4 simulations for assemblies with Timepix3 ASICs and thin active-edge sensors are presented. The 65 nm CLICpix readout ASIC with 25μm pitch was bump bonded to planar silicon sensors and also capacitively coupled through a thin layer of glue to active HV-CMOS sensors. Test beam results for these two hybridisation concepts are presented.

  3. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  4. High-Gradient test results from a CLIC prototype accelerating structure : TD26CC

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, A; Farabolini, W; Grudiev, A; Kovermann, J; Montessinos, E; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wegner, R; Wuensch, W; Solodko, A; Woolley, B

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study has progressively tested prototype accelerating structures which incorporate an ever increasing number of features which are needed for a final version ready to be installed in a linear collider. The most recent high power test made in the CERN X-band test stand, Xbox-1, is of a CERN-built prototype which includes damping features but also compact input and output power couplers, which maximize the overall length to active gradient ratio of the structure. The structure’s high-gradient performance, 105 MV/m at 250 ns pulse length and low breakdown rate, matches previously tested structures validating both CERN fabrication and the compact coupler design.

  5. Initial study on the shape optimisation of the CLIC crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P K; Carter, R G; Dexter, A C; Jones, R M; McIntosh, P

    2008-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) requires a crab cavity to align bunches prior to collision. The bunch structure demands tight amplitude and phase tolerances of the RF fields inside the cavity, for the minimal luminosity loss. Beam loading effects require special attention as it is one potential sources of field errors in the cavity. In order to assist the amplitude and phase control, we propose a travelling wave (TW) structure with a high group velocity allowing rapid propagation of errors out of the system. Such a design makes the cavity structure significantly different from previous ones. This paper will look at the implications of this on other cavity parameters and the optimisation of the cavity geometry.

  6. Stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupole magnets with sub-nanometre resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, S; Collette, C; Esposito, M; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C; Kuzmin, A; Leuxe, R; Moron Ballester, R

    2011-01-01

    To reach the required luminosity at the CLIC interaction point, about 2000 quadrupoles along each linear collider are needed to obtain a vertical beam size of 1 nm at the interaction point. Active mechanical stabilization is required to limit the vibrations of the magnetic axis to the nanometre level in a frequency range from 1 to 100 Hz. The approach of a stiff actuator support was chosen to isolate from ground motion and technical vibrations acting directly on the quadrupoles. The actuators can also reposition the quadrupoles between beam pulses with nanometre resolution. A first conceptual design of the active stabilization and nano positioning based on the stiff support and seismometers was validated in models and experimentally demonstrated on test benches. Lessons learnt from the test benches and information from integrated luminosity simulations using measured stabilization transfer functions lead to improvements of the actuating support, the sensors used and the system controller. The controller elect...

  7. Z′ Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional Z′ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process e+e-→(Z,Z′)→Zh, including both the resonant and the nonresonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of Zh and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500–2000 fb−1 and center of mass energies between 500 and 3000 GeV. We find that the total number of expected Zh events can reach 106, which is a very optimistic scenario and it would be possible to perform precision measurements for both Z′ and Higgs boson in future high-energy e+e- colliders experiments

  8. Z′ Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional Z′ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process e+e-→(Z,Z′→Zh, including both the resonant and the nonresonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of Zh and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500–2000 fb−1 and center of mass energies between 500 and 3000 GeV. We find that the total number of expected Zh events can reach 106, which is a very optimistic scenario and it would be possible to perform precision measurements for both Z′ and Higgs boson in future high-energy e+e- colliders experiments.

  9. A closer look at the beam-beam processes at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Hartin, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The strength of the electromagnetic fields in the bunch collision at a linear collider will have a significant effect, yielding large numbers of beamstrahlung photons and associated coherent pair production. These effects are limited in the proposed ILC beam parameters which limit the strength of the bunch field to $\\Upsilon_{\\text{ave}}=0.27$. The CLIC 3 Tev design by comparison has a $\\Upsilon_{\\text{ave}}=3.34$ yielding huge number of coherent pairs. In terms of the precision physics programs of these proposed colliders there is an imperative to investigate the effect of the strong bunch fields on higher order processes. From the exact wavefunctions used in the calculation of transition rates within the Furry interaction picture, and using appropriate simplifications, a multiplicative factor to the coupling constants was obtained. This indicates a significant variation to the transition rate near threshold energies. Further studies are in progress to calculate the exact effect on expected observables.

  10. Beam lines from Linac 1 and Linac 2 to the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    View against the direction of the beams. Both Linacs are behind the concrete wall at the back of the picture. The 50 MeV proton beam from Linac 1 enters the PS tunnel through the hole at left. The line from Linac 2, in the process of being installed, comes from the hole at right. The lines converge at a switching magnet (prominently in the foreground), which selects which of the 2 beams to send on to the Booster. See also 7802261 and further explanations there.

  11. Physics potential of the BR(H →WW∗) measurement at a √s=350 GeV and √s=1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pandurovic, Mila

    2016-01-01

    Precision measurements of the number of properties of the Higgs boson, like invariant mass and couplings to the Standard Model particles, represent one of the key measurements of the CLIC physic program. The CLIC energy staging scenario allows to perform these meas- urements using different Higgs production channels. The Higgs decay to a WW pair, which is analysed at two CLIC energy stages, plays an important role in this program, as it gives access to the relative Higgs couplings to the vector bosons and to the total Higgs decay width. The studies presented here are part of an ongoing effort to investigate the full physics potential of the CLIC collider.

  12. 4-rod RFQ linac for ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka [Nisshin Electric Co. Ltd., Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A 34 MHz 4-rod RFQ linac system has been upgraded in both its rf power efficiency and beam intensity. The linac is able to accelerate in cw operation 0.83 mA of a B{sup +} ion beam from 0.03 to 0.91 MeV with transmission of 61 %. The rf power fed to the RFQ is 29 kW. The unloaded Q-value of the RFQ has been improved approximately 61 % to 5400 by copper-plating stainless steel cooling pipes in the RFQ cavity. (author)

  13. Linac design algorithm with symmetric segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell lengths in linacs of traditional design are typically graded as a function of particle velocity. By making groups of cells and individual cells symmetric in both the CCDTL AND CCL, the cavity design as well as mechanical design and fabrication is simplified without compromising the performance. We have implemented a design algorithm in the PARMILA code in which cells and multi-cavity segments are made symmetric, significantly reducing the number of unique components. Using the symmetric algorithm, a sample linac design was generated and its performance compared with a similar one of conventional design

  14. Preinjector for Linac 1, accelerating column

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    For a description of the Linac 1 preinjector, please see first 7403070X. High up on the wall of the Faraday cage (7403073X) is this drum-shaped container of the ion source (7403083X). It is mounted at the HV end of the accelerating column through which the ions (usually protons; many other types of ions in the course of its long history) proceed through the Faraday cage wall to the low-energy end (at ground potential) of Linac 1. The 520 kV accelerating voltage was supplied by a SAMES generator (7403074X).

  15. Error analysis in post linac to driver linac transport beam line of RAON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effects of magnet errors in the beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator in Korea (RAON). The P2DT beam line is bent by 180-degree to send the radioactive Isotope Separation On-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in Linac-3 to Linac-2. This beam line transports beams with multi-charge state 132Sn45,46,47. The P2DT beam line includes 42 quadrupole, 4 dipole and 10 sextupole magnets. We evaluate the effects of errors on the trajectory of the beam by using the TRACK code, which includes the translational and the rotational errors of the quadrupole, dipole and sextupole magnets in the beam line. The purpose of this error analysis is to reduce the rate of beam loss in the P2DT beam line. The distorted beam trajectories can be corrected by using six correctors and seven monitors.

  16. Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar: Mechanical stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupoles with sub-nanometre resolution

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Thursday 24 November 2010 Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar at 14:15  -  BE Auditorium, bldg. 6 (Meyrin) – please note unusual place Mechanical stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupoles with sub-nanometre resolution Stef Janssens /EN-MME Abstract: To reach the required luminosity at the CLIC interaction point, about 4000 quadrupoles are needed to obtain a vertical beam size of 1 nm at the interaction point. The mechanical jitter of the quadrupole magnets will result in an emittance growth. An active vibration isolation system is required to reduce vibrations from the ground and from external forces to about 1.5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) vertical displacement at 1 Hz. A short overview of vibration damping and isolation strategies will be presented as well as a comparison of existing systems. The unprecedented resolution requirements and the instruments enabling these measurements will be discussed. The vibration sources from which the magnets need to...

  17. CLIC-ACM: generic modular rad-hard data acquisition system based on CERN GBT versatile link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CLIC is a world-wide collaboration to study the next ''terascale'' lepton collider, relying upon a very innovative concept of two-beam-acceleration. This accelerator, currently under study, will be composed of the subsequence of 21000 two-beam-modules. Each module requires more than 300 analogue and digital signals which need to be acquired and controlled in a synchronous way. CLIC-ACM (Acquisition and Control Module) is the 'generic' control and acquisition module developed to accommodate the controls of all these signals for various sub-systems and related specification in term of data bandwidth, triggering and timing synchronization. This paper describes the system architecture with respect to its radiation-tolerance, power consumption and scalability

  18. Wakefield Simulation of CLIC PETS Structure Using Parallel 3D Finite Element Time-Domain Solver T3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic time-domain code T3P. Higher-order Finite Element methods on conformal unstructured meshes and massively parallel processing allow unprecedented simulation accuracy for wakefield computations and simulations of transient effects in realistic accelerator structures. Applications include simulation of wakefield damping in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) power extraction and transfer structure (PETS).

  19. Vacuum system for superconducting LINAC at TIFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The superconducting heavy ion LINAC booster at the TIFR-BARC facility has been operational. Seven super conducting cryostats containing 4 quarter wave resonators each along with beam lines, bending magnets, switching magnet, diagnostics and vacuum system have been commissioned. The heart of the cryogenic system for the heavy ion superconducting LINAC booster is a custom-built liquid helium refrigerator made by Linde Kryotechnik, Switzerland. The Refrigerator is rated for 300 Watts at 4.5 K with a dual JT (Joule-Thomson valve) at the final cooling stage, which allows simultaneous connections to the cryogenic loads (the LINAC module cryostats) and to a liquid helium storage dewar (1000 litres). The two-phase helium at 4.5 K produced at the JT stage in the refrigerator is delivered to the cryostats through a cryogenic distribution system. The cryogenic distribution system for the LINAC is designed to deliver both liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to the cryostats. The details of UHV system, indigenously developed beam line components, pumps and module cryostats will be presented

  20. Upgrade of GUI for linac control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are now upgrading GUI(Graphical User Interface) of the control system at Tohoku Linac. This system uses Personal Computer (DECpc466D2LP-66MHz) and Visual Basic which makes coding GUI easy and simple. The first results of this system are presented. (author)

  1. Status of the Novosibirsk energy recovery linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Novosibirsk terahertz free electron laser is based on the energy recovery linac (ERL) with room-temperature radiofrequency system. Some features of the ERL are discussed. The results of emittance measurements and electron optics tests are presented. The second stage of the ERL, which has four orbits, is described briefly

  2. Linac based radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were discussed: Definition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Stereo market; Indications for SRS/SRT; History of linac-based SRS/SRT; Variety of systems; QA for SRS; Localization; and Imaging. (P.A.)

  3. First beam in Linac4 DTL

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Following the installation of the Linac4 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) earlier this summer (see here), the first DTL tank saw beams at 12 MeV on 5 August.   Transverse emittance measured at 12 MeV after the DTL tank1 using a temporary slit-and-grid emittance device. You never forget your first beam. That was especially true for the Linac4 DTL team, as it followed years of design, construction and vigorous testing. "We performed countless measurements of the geometry, vacuum and magnet polarisation of the DTL tanks while we were in the workshop," says Suitbert Ramberger, project engineer for the Linac4 DTL. "Add that preparation to the excellent RF conditioning that we carried out in the weeks before the beam tests and I was confident that the acceleration with beam would fully meet expectations!" Indeed it did. Beam commissioning tests ran until 21 August and found the DTL operating with nominal transmission. This successful run has confirmed the innovative design ...

  4. Preinjector for Linac 1, ion source

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    For a description of the Linac 1 preinjector, please see first 7403070X. Inside the drum-shaped container shown in 7403081X, is the ion source with its associated electronics. It sits at the HV end of the accelerating column seen also in 7403081.

  5. Neutron and photon spectra in LINACs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10–6 and 1 MeV. Neutron and the Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage. - Highlights: ► With MCNPX code realistic models of two LINACs were built. ► Photon and neutron spectra below the flattening filter and at the isocenter were calculated. ► Neutron spectrum at the flattening filter was compared against the Tosi et al. source-term model. ► Tosi et al. model underestimates the neutron contribution below 1 MeV. ► Photon spectra look alike to those published in literature.

  6. Making electron beams for the SLC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A source of high-intensity, single-bunch electron beams has been developed at SLAC for the SLC. The properties of these beams have been studied extensively utilizing the first 100-m of the SLAC linac and the computer-based control system being developed for the SLC. The source is described and the properties of the beams are summarized. (orig.)

  7. LIGHT SOURCE: Physical design of a 10 MeV LINAC for polymer radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guang-Yao; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wu, Cong-Feng; Jin, Kai; Li, Wei-Min

    2009-06-01

    In China, polymer radiation processing has become one of the most important processing industries. The radiation processing source may be an electron beam accelerator or a radioactive source. Physical design of an electron beam facility applied for radiation crosslinking is introduced in this paper because of it's much higher dose rate and efficiency. Main part of this facility is a 10 MeV travelling wave electron linac with constant impedance accelerating structure. A start to end simulation concerning the linac is reported in this paper. The codes Opera-3d, Poisson-superfish and Parmela are used to describe electromagnetic elements of the accelerator and track particle distribution from the cathode to the end of the linac. After beam dynamic optimization, wave phase velocities in the structure have been chosen to be 0.56, 0.9 and 0.999 respectively. Physical parameters about the main elements such as DC electron gun, iris-loaded periodic structure, solenoids, etc, are presented. Simulation results proves that it can satisfy the industrial requirement. The linac is under construction. Some components have been finished. Measurements proved that they are in a good agreement with the design values.

  8. Operating experience of 10 MeV industrial linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past three years, an Industrial 10 MeV RF Electron linac has been in operation at Electron Beam Centre, Navi Mumbai. This pulsed linac has an on-axis coupled cavity bi-periodic π/2 structure and operates at frequency of 2856 MHz. The linac has been tested up to a maximum beam power of 5 kW and is being used for industrial applications. A successful 24-hour continuous run, at 3 kW, established the long term stability of all the linac parameters. This paper describes the high power operating experience of the 10 MeV linac. Details of RF conditioning and performance of the linac during long term tests is presented. Effect of various linac parameters, including injection voltage, RF input power, PRF, gun filament heating power, on the output beam power and energy has been discussed. (author)

  9. Beam tests on a proton linac booster for hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    De Martinis, C; Berra, P; Birattari, C; Calabretta, L; Crandall, K; Giove, D; Masullo, M R; Mauri, M; Rosso, E; Rovelli, A; Serafini, L; Szeless, Balázs; Toet, D Z; Vaccaro, Vittorio G; Weiss, M; Zennaro, R

    2002-01-01

    LIBO is a 3 GHz modular side-coupled proton linac booster designed to deliver beam energies up to 200 MeV, as required for the therapy of deep seated tumours. The injected beam of 50 to 70 MeV is produced by a cyclotron like those in several hospitals and research institutes. A full-scale prototype of the first module with an input/output energy of 62/74 MeV, respectively, was designed and built in 1999 and 2000. Full power RF tests were carried out successfully at CERN using a test facility at LIL at the end of the year 2000. In order to prove the feasibility of the acceleration process, an experimental setup with this module was installed at the INFN Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud (LNS) in Catania during 2001. The superconducting cyclotron provided the 62 MeV test beam. A compact solid-state RF modulator with a 4 MW klystron, made available by IBA-Scanditronix, was put into operation to power the linac. In this paper the main features of the accelerator are reviewed and the experimental results obtained duri...

  10. Thermal evaluation of different DC multi-conductor cable cross-sections and installation patterns for the CLIC drive-beam quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Maglio, D

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to determine the thermal behaviour of different dc multi-conductor cable cross-sections and installations patterns for the CLIC drive beam quadrupoles loaded with increasing values of current intensity. A simplified two dimensional model of the heat transfer problem was prepared with a commercial CFD software, STAR-CD 4.2. The heat flux generated by Joule effect in conductors was estimated taking into account the current value per conductor and the temperature dependence of the copper electrical resistance. In parallel, a geometrical simplification of the problem has been done in order to be able to apply theoretical formulas which have been implemented by Microsoft Excel. Obtained results have been compared with those got by the dedicated software, showing between them a good correspondence for two-conductor cables and confirming, for this case, the rules given in the in the French norm NF C15-100. In case of multiconductor cables, attention is to be paid to the temperature lev...

  11. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units

  12. Operation of the tandem-linac accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tandem-linac accelerator system is operated as a source of energetic heavy-ion projectiles for research in several areas of nuclear physics and occasionally in other areas of science. The accelerator system consists of a 9-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and a superconducting-linac energy booster that can provide an additional 20 MV of acceleration. A figure shows the layout of this system, which will be operated in its present form until September 1985, when it will be incorporated into the larger ATLAS system. In both the present and future forms the accelerator is designed to provide the exceptional beam quality and overall versatility required for precision nuclear-structure research

  13. Bunch Shape Monitor for SSCL linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory and the Institute for Nuclear Research ore collaboratively developing a Bunch Shape Monitor diagnostics for commission the SSCL linac. The Bunch Shape Monitor is designed to measure the intensity of beam as a function of time over the micro-bunch of the beam. Design resolution for the SSCL monitors is approximately 7 psec. The first monitor will operate at the fundamental frequency of 428 MHz and will be used to measure the output beam of the RFQ Linac. First available results will be presented and compared with predictions. Further development will allow the monitors to fit in a standard SSCL beam box and one will operate at the third harmonic of 428 MHz. Proposals to use the Bunch Shape Monitor to measure the longitudinal phase space distribution of the beam will be discussed

  14. Bunch shape measurements at the INR linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bunch shape analyser (BSA) has been developed in the INR and is used for the INR linac tuning. The operation of the device is based on a transverse scanning of a low energy secondary electrons emitted from a thin target crossed by an accelerated beam. The phase resolution obtained is better than 1deg (f = 198.2 MHz). The results of the bunch shape measurements at the exit of the first (20 MeV) accelerating cavity as well as at the exit of the drift tube linac part (100 MeV) of the accelerator are presented. The methods and the results of rf amplitudes and phases setting and a longitudinal emittance measurements with the help of BSA are described. (author)

  15. Bunch shape monitor for SSCL linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory and the Institute for Nuclear Research are collaboratively developing a Bunch Shape Monitor diagnostic for commissioning the SSCL linac. The Bunch Shape Monitor is designed to measure the intensity of beam as a function of time over the micro-bunch of the beam. Design resolution for the SSCL monitors is approximately 7 psec. The first monitor will operate at the fundamental frequency of 428 MHz and will be used to measure and output beam of the RFQ Linac. First available results will be presented and compared with predictions. Further development will allow the monitors to fit in a standard SSCL beam box and one will operate at the third harmonic of 428 MHz. Proposals to use the Bunch Shape Monitor to measure the longitudinal phase space distribution of the beam will be discussed

  16. Electronics Platform of PS Linac 1 Preinjector

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    For servicing during shutdowns, a draw-bridge from a door in the Faraday cage led to the "electronics platform" of the linac 1 preinjector (at 520 kV when in operation) and the top of the electronics platform was lifted on hydraulic jacks for easy access. Henry Charmot is busy with a service. The platform contained the electronics for the ion source, controlled from outside the Faraday cage via an infrared optical link. The ion source, also at 520 kV potential, is housed in the drum, visible in the background, on the insulator column, which at its right end is mounted at ground potential. Behind the wall, to the right, is the 50 MeV linac 1. See also 7403064X, 7403066X, 7403124.

  17. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-05-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units.

  18. Re-circulating linac vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum system for a proposed 2.5 GeV, 10ΜA recirculating linac synchrotron light source [1] is readily achievable with conventional vacuum hardware and established fabrication processes. Some of the difficult technical challenges associated with synchrotron light source storage rings are sidestepped by the relatively low beam current and short beam lifetime requirements of a re-circulating linac. This minimal lifetime requirement leads directly to relatively high limits on the background gas pressure through much of the facility. The 10ΜA average beam current produces very little synchrotron radiation induced gas desorption and thus the need for an ante-chamber in the vacuum chamber is eliminated. In the arc bend magnets, and the insertion devices, the vacuum chamber dimensions can be selected to balance the coherent synchrotron radiation and resistive wall wakefield effects, while maintaining the modest limits on the gas pressure and minimal outgassing

  19. Main Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discuss on main nuclear facilities available in the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). As a national research institute whose core activities are nuclear science and technology, MINT are made up of main commercializable radiation irradiators, pilot plant and fully equipped laboratories. Well elaboration on its characteristics and functions explain for RTP (PUPSPATI TRIGA reactors), Cobalt-60 gamma irradiator, electron beam accelerators, and radioactive waste management center

  20. Impedances for electron linacs and storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some basic concepts and results are presented concerning the impedances of electron linacs and storage rings. The impedances of an accelerator or ring completely characterizes the interaction of the beam with its environment. Not only does the impedance (or its Fourier transform, the wake potential) determine the energy loss by a bunched beam to its environment, but it is also the chief ingredient required for any calculation of beam stability

  1. Making electron beams for the SLC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A source of high-intensity, single-bunch electron beams has been developed at SLAC for the SLC. The properties of these beams have been studied extensively utilizing the first 100-m of the SLAC linac and the computer-based control system being developed for the SLC. The source is described and the properties of the beams are summarized. 9 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  2. Injection schemes for the TOP Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report two schemes are studied for the injection in the SCDTL section of the TOP Linac of the proton beam produced by a 7 MeV linear accelerator. The project derives by an agreement between ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and Environment) and ISS. In these new versions of the design the constraint of a synchronization of the radio frequencies of the two accelerators is suppressed

  3. Stereotactic linac radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations.

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, B G; Hitchcock, E. R.; Kitchen, G.; Dalton, A E; Yates, D A; Chavda, S V

    1992-01-01

    Stereotactic linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery has been in operation in the West Midlands since 1987, the first of its kind in the United Kingdom. Forty two patients with high-flow cerebral arteriovenous malformations have been treated, 26 of whom have been followed up. Angiography one year after treatment showed that five lesions were obliterated, 11 were reduced in size and/or flow rate and 10 were unchanged. Overall results show that nine out of 10 patients reviewed at 24 months had ...

  4. PHOTOCATHODES FOR THE ENERGY RECOVERY LINACS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed

  5. Photocathodes for the energy recovery linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed

  6. Photocathodes for the energy recovery linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various energy recovering linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed

  7. Cost projection for a superconducting linac structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase of energy of the present 800 MeV proton linac at LAMPF to 1.6 to 2.2 GeV is of primary importance for the proposed future experimental program of this Laboratory. Layout and cost studies have been performed for (a) normalconducting and (b) superconducting accelerating structures. A more recent cost analysis for a superconducting structure is given in this report. 4 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Photocathodes for the energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Chang, X. Y.; Smedley, J.; Nishitani, T.; Hernandez Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.; Seddon, E.; Hannon, F. E.; Sinclair, C. K.; Lewellen, J.; Feldman, D.

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various energy recovering linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed.

  9. Linac for the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nominally 100 MeV electron linear accelerator to be used as an injector for the booster synchrotron of the National Synchrotron Light Source is described. The machine utilizes a combination of Varian and SLAC accelerating guides and is interfaced by means of a microprocessor-based Intel Multibus system, to the Data General central control computer. Provision for emittance and momentum measurement is provided in the transport line between the linac and the booster synchrotron

  10. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run

  11. High Frequency Effects of Impedances and Coatings in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koukovini Platia, Eirini; Rumolo, G

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a 3 TeV eÅe¡ machine, currently under design at CERN, that targets to explore the terascale particle physics regime. The experiment requires a high luminosity of 2£1034 cm2 s¡1, which can be achieved with ultra low emittances delivered from the Damping Rings (DRs) complex. The high bunch brightness of the DRs gives rise to several collective effects that can limit the machine performance. Impedance studies during the design stage of the DR are of great importance to ensure safe operation under nominal parameters. As a first step, the transverse impedance model of the DRis built, accounting for the wholemachine. Beam dynamics simulations are performedwith HEADTAIL to investigate the effect on beam dynamics. For the correct impedancemodeling of the machine elements, knowledge of the material properties is essential up to hundreds of GHz, where the bunch spectrum extends. Specifically, Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) is a commonly used coating for good vacuumbut its properti...

  12. Transverse Beam Polarizationas an Alternate View into New Physics at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    In e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions, transverse beam polarization can be a useful tool in studying the properties of particles associated with new physics beyond the Standard Model(SM). However, unlike in the case of measurements associated with longitudinal polarization, the formation of azimuthal asymmetries used to probe this physics in the case of transverse polarization requires both e{sup {+-}} beams to be simultaneously polarized. In this paper we discuss the further use of transverse polarization as a probe of new physics models at a high energy, {radical}s = 3 TeV version of CLIC. In particular, we show (i) how measurements of the sign of these asymmetries is sufficient to discriminate the production of spin-0 supersymmetric states from the spin-1/2 Kaluza-Klein excitations of Universal Extra Dimensions. Simultaneously, the contribution to this asymmetry arising from the potentially large SM W{sup +}W{sup -} background can be made negligibly small. We then show (ii) how measurements of such asymmetries and their associated angular distributions on the peak of a new resonant Z{prime}-like state can be used to extract precision information on the Z{prime} couplings to the SM fermions.

  13. Development and Validation of a Multipoint Based Laser Alignment System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Lackner, F; Mainaud-Durand, H; Piedigrossi, D; Sandomierski, J; Sosin, M; Geiger, A; Guillaume, S

    2013-01-01

    Alignment is one of the major challenges within CLIC study, since all accelerator components have to be aligned with accuracy up to 10 μm over sliding windows of 200 m. So far, the straight line reference concept has been based on stretched wires coupled with Wire Positioning Sensors. This concept should be validated through inter-comparison with an alternative solution. This paper proposes an alternative concept where laser beam acts as straight line reference and optical shutters coupled with cameras visualise the beam. The principle was first validated by a series of tests using low-cost components. Yet, in order to further decrease measurement uncertainty in this validation step, a high-precision automatised micrometric table and reference targets have been added to the setup. The paper presents the results obtained with this new equipment, in terms of measurement precision. In addition, the paper gives an overview of first tests done at long distance (up to 53 m), having emphasis on beam divergence

  14. Studies of Cs3Sb cathodes for the CLIC drive beam photo injector option

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, Irene; Doebert, Steffen; Fedosseev, Valentine; Hessler, Christoph; Martyanov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Within the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project, feasibility studies of a photo injector option for the drive beam as an alternative to its baseline design using a thermionic electron gun are on-going. This R&D program covers both the laser and the photocathode side. Whereas the available laser pulse energy in ultra-violet (UV) is currently limited by the optical defects in the 4thharmonics frequency conversion crystal induced by the0.14 ms long pulse trains, recent measurements of Cs3Sbphotocathodes sensitive to green light showed their potential to overcome this limitation. Moreover, using visible laser beams leads to better stability of produced electron bunches and one can take advantages of the availability of higher quality optics. The studied Cs3Sbphotocathodes have been produced in the CERN photo emission laboratory using the co-deposition technique and tested in a DC gun set-up. The analysis of data acquired during the cathode production process will be presented in this paper, as well as the r...

  15. All Digital IQ Servo-System for CERN Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Rohlev, A; Garoby, R

    2003-01-01

    A new VME based system has been developed and built at CERN for the servo loops regulating the field in the linac accelerating structure. It makes use of high speed digital In-phase/Quadrature (IQ) detection, digital processing, and digital IQ modulation. The digital processing and IQ modulation is done in a single PLD. The system incorporates continually variable set points, iterative learning, feed forward as well as extensive diagnostics and other features well suited for digital implementations. Built on a single VME card, it will be first used in the energy ramping RF chain of the CERN Heavy Ion Linac (linac 3) and later for upgrading the present proton linac (linac 2). This system serves also as a prototype for the future Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL). The design principle and the experimental results are described.

  16. LINAC4 takes a tour of Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Along the German Autobahnen, a truck carrying 20 tonnes of copper is on its way to Poland. The metal has already made a short tour of Europe, yet the drive across the high-speed highway is only the beginning of its transformation into CERN’s next linear accelerator, LINAC4.   Grzegorz Wrochna (left), director of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), and Rolf Heuer (right), CERN DG, sign the framework agreement between the two institutes. By the summer of 2012, the PI-Mode Structures (PIMS) will be constructed and completely installed in the LINAC4 tunnel. The PIMS cavities are the final accelerating structures needed for LINAC4, and have been designed to accelerate protons from 100 to 160MeV. While the first cavity was built entirely at CERN, construction of the remaining cavities has become a larger, multi-national operation. In a 1 million euro framework agreement signed on 11 February by the Director-General, the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in Swie...

  17. Machining of cavities for travelling wave LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Traveling Wave (T.W.), 2π/3 mode electron linear accelerator of 2856 MHz is under development at CAT for radiation processing of agricultural products. This LINAC consists of a thermionic triode electron gun, TW buncher section and Regular Section. Machining of input/output couplers, regular section cells and disc were carried out using CNC lathe LAL- 2 BT and CNC milling machine BMV - 40. This paper highlights the dimensional and geometrical requirements of cavities, problems encountered during machining of OFE copper and their solutions to achieve high precision with ultrahigh surface finish. The performance of Linac depends upon a number of factors such as operating vacuum level, accuracies of cavity dimensions, materials, and surface finish of cavities comprising the LINAC. Each of these depends upon material and fabrication techniques used for manufacturing OFE copper of higher purity has been used since they offer lower surface resistivity and lower power losses. With CNC tuning and milling machines, the high surface finish has been achieved with higher dimensional and geometrical accuracies

  18. Wake fields in SLAC Linac Collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, Alexander [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Decker, F. -J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Smith, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Sullivan, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-12-02

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. In addition, we also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  19. Preinjector for Linac 1, Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The 50 MeV Linac 1 started up in 1958 as injector to the 26 GeV PS, with a 520 kV Cockcroft-Walton generator as its preinjector, housed in a vast Faraday cage, visible here. When the Cockcroft-Walton broke down in 1973, it was replaced by a much smaller SAMES generator, of the kind used for electrostatic separators. From 1980 on, Linac 2 took over as injector for the 800 MeV Booster, and Linac 1 continued as injector for LEAR. In 1984, the electrostatic preinjector (i.e. the Faraday cage with its contents, SAMES generator and all) was replaced by a 520 keV RFQ. At the lower left corner we see the HV connectors to the SAMES generator, at the right edge part of the opened electronics-platform. Jean-Luc Vallet sees to it that all parts are properly grounded. See also 7403073X, 7403074X, 7403081X, 7403083X.

  20. S-band linac-based X-ray source with π/2-mode electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities with the compact X-ray source are attracting more attention, particularly for the applications of the source in medical fields. We propose the fabrication of a compact X-ray source using the SAMEER electron linear accelerator and the KEK laser undulator X-ray source (LUCX) technologies. The linac developed at SAMEER is a standing wave side-coupled S-band linac operating in the π/2 mode. In the proposed system, a photocathode RF gun will inject bunches of electrons in the linac to accelerate and achieve a high-energy, low-emittance beam. This beam will then interact with the laser in the laser cavity to produce X-rays of a type well suited for various applications. The side-coupled structure will make the system more compact, and the π/2 mode of operation will enable a high repetition rate operation, which will help to increase the X-ray yield.

  1. Bunch Extension Monitor for LINAC of SPIRAL2 facility

    OpenAIRE

    Revenko, R.V.; Vignet, J.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the bunch longitudinal shape of beam particles are crucial for optimization and control of the LINAC beam parameters and maximization of its integrated luminosity. The non-interceptive bunch extension monitor for LINAC of SPIRAL2 facility is being developed at GANIL. The five bunch extension monitors are to be installed on the entrance of LINAC between superconducting cavities. The principle of monitor operation is based on registration of x-rays induced by ions of accelerator...

  2. Investigations of Slow Motions of the SLAC Linac Tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Seryi, Andrei

    2000-01-01

    Investigations of slow transverse motion of the linac tunnel of the Stanford Linear Collider have been performed over period of about one month in December 1999 -- January 2000. The linac laser alignment system, equipped with a quadrant photodetector, allowed submicron resolution measurement of the motion of the middle of the linac tunnel with respect to its ends. Measurements revealed two major sources responsible for the observed relative motion. Variation of the external atmospheric pressu...

  3. Review of Linac-Ring Type Collider Proposals

    CERN Document Server

    Akay, A N; Sultansoy, S

    2009-01-01

    There are three possibly types of particle colliders schemes: familiar (well known) ring-ring colliders, less familiar however sufficiently advanced linear colliders and less familiar and less advanced linac-ring type colliders. The aim of this paper is two-fold: to present possibly complete list of papers on linac-ring type collider proposals and to emphasize the role of linac-ring type machines for future HEP research.

  4. Measurements of longitudinal phase space in the SLC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron and positron bunch distributions in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) linac have been measured using a Hamamatsu, model N3373-02, 500-femtosecond streak camera. The distributions were measured at the end of the SLC linac versus the bunch compressor RF voltage. The energy spread at the end of the linac was also measured using a wire scanner. The effects of the bunch compressor on the shape of the bunch distribution are also presented

  5. Beam position correction in the Fermilab linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbit correction has long been an essential feature of circular accelerators, storage rings, multipass linacs, and linear colliders. In a drift tube linear accelerator (DTL) such as the H- Linac at Fermilab, beam position monitors (BPMs) and dipole corrector magnets can only be located in between accelerating tanks. Within a tank many drift tubes (from 20 to 60) each house a quadrupole magnet to provide strong transverse focusing of the beam. With good alignment of the drift tubes and quadrupoles and a sufficiently large diameter for the drift tubes, beam position is not typically a major concern. In the Fermilab DTL, 95% of the beam occupies only 35% of the available physical aperture (4.4 cm). The recent upgrade of the Fermilab Linac from a final energy of 200 MeV to 400 MeV has been achieved by replacing four 201.25 MHz drift tube linac tanks with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules (the high energy portion of the linac or HEL). In order to achieve this increase in energy within the existing enclosure, an accelerating gradient is required that is a factor of 3 larger than that found in the DTL. This in turn required that the physical aperture through which the beam must pass be significantly reduced. In addition, the lattice of the side-coupled structure provides significantly less transverse focusing than the DTL. Therefore in the early portion of the HEL the beam occupies over 95% of the available physical aperture (3.0 cm). In order to prevent beam loss and the creation of excess radiation, the ability to correct beam position throughout the HEL is of importance. An orbit smoothing algorithm commonly used in the correction of closed orbits of circular machines has been implemented to achieve a global least-squares minimization of beam position errors. In order to accommodate several features of this accelerator a refinement in the algorithm has been made to increase its robustness and utilize correctors of varying strengths

  6. Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Frank; /CERN; Bruning, Oliver; /CERN; Ciapala, Edmond; /CERN; Haug, Friedrich; /CERN; Osborne, John; /CERN; Schulte, Daniel; /CERN; Sun, Yipeng; /CERN; Tomas, Rogelio; /CERN; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Calaga, Rama; /Brookhaven; Litvinenko, Vladimir; /Brookhaven; Chattopadhyay, Swapan; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Dainton, John; /Liverpool U.; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Eide, Anders; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2012-06-21

    We consider three scenarios for the recirculating electron linear accelerator (RLA) of a linac-ring type electron-proton collider based on the LHC (LHeC): (i) a pulsed linac with a final beam energy of 60 GeV ['p-60'], (ii) a higher luminosity configuration with two cw linacs and energy-recovery (ERL) also at 60 GeV ['erl'], and (iii) a high energy option using a pulsed linac with 140-GeV final energy ['p-140']. We discuss parameters, synchrotron radiation, footprints, and performance for the three scenarios.

  7. SIMULATIONS OF A MUON LINAC FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Beard, Alex Bogacz ,Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin

    2011-04-01

    The Neutrino Factory baseline design involves a complex chain of accelerators including a single-pass linac, two recirculating linacs and an FFAG. The first linac follows the capture and bunching section and accelerates the muons from about 244 to 900 MeV. It must accept a high emittance beam about 30 cm wide with a 10% energy spread. This linac uses counterwound, shielded superconducting solenoids and 201 MHz superconducting cavities. Simulations have been carried out using several codes including Zgoubi, OptiM, GPT, Elegant and G4beamline, both to determine the optics and to estimate the radiation loads on the elements due to beam loss and muon decay.

  8. Oxygen ion source and RFQ for Linac 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1986-01-01

    As injector to the PS Booster, Linac 1 was replaced by Linac 2 in 1980. It continued to be used for the acceleration of oxygen and sulfur ions. In 1984, its Cockcroft-Walton preinjector was replaced by an RFQ. In the foreground at the right is the oxygen ion source. A 90 deg bending magnet selects O6+ ions which are preaccelerated in an RFQ and enter Linac 1, at the far left. In the background is the proton and negative hydrogen ion source, followed by the 520 keV RFQ-1 and a bending magnet towards the entrance of Linac 1.

  9. Boeing 120 MeV RF linac for FEL research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new electron linac for high power, visible wavelength, free electron laser research is under construction at the Boeing Radiation Laboratory in Seattle. The linac is a five section, traveling wave, L band structure with a specialized comb pulse format of widely separated high charge micropulses. The paper describes the accelerator design and prototyping of key components of the linac. These include a double subharmonic injector and a long pulse phase and amplitude stabilized RF source which have been tested on Boeing's 20 MeV S band linac

  10. All Digital IQ Servo-System for CERN Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Broere, J; Garoby, R; Rohlev, A; Serrano, J

    2004-01-01

    A VME based control system has been developed and built at CERN for the servo loops regulating the field in linac accelerating structures. It is an all-digital system built on a single VME card, providing digital detection, processing, and modulation. It is foreseen to be used, in different versions, for the needs of both present and future CERN hadron linacs. The first application will be in the energy ramping RF chain of the CERN Heavy Ion Linac (linac 3). Design principle and the experimental results are described.

  11. Linac4: the final assembly stage is under way

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The Linac4 radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) module was installed at the accelerator test-stand in Building 152 last August. After an assembly phase and tests that concluded last March with the acceleration of a hydrogen beam to 3 MeV, the module has just been permanently installed in the new Linac4 tunnel (Building 400). The installation of the MEBT (Medium Energy Beam Transport) will begin shortly, followed by the start of the first Linac4 commissioning phase.     To find out more about the Linac4 RFQ module, read the previous Bulletin articles published in Nos. 21-22/2010 and 35-36/2012.

  12. Effects of Linac Wakefield on CSR Microbunching in the Linac Coherent Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) requires two-stage bunch compression for stability against timing and charge jitters. Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) induced in these bunch compressors can drive a microbunching instability that may degrade the beam brightness. In this paper, we study effects of the longitudinal wakefield in the accelerator on this instability. We show that significant energy modulation can be accumulated in the linac through the geometrical wakefield and can enhance the CSR microbunching in these compressors. Analytical calculations are compared with numerical simulations to evaluate the gain of microbunching for the entire LCLS accelerator system.

  13. Effects of Linac Wakefield on CSR Microbunching in the Linac Coherent Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Z

    2003-01-01

    The design of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) requires two-stage bunch compression for stability against timing and charge jitters. Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) induced in these bunch compressors can drive a microbunching instability that may degrade the beam brightness. In this paper, we study effects of the longitudinal wakefield in the accelerator on this instability. We show that significant energy modulation can be accumulated in the linac through the geometrical wakefield and can enhance the CSR microbunching in these compressors. Analytical calculations are compared with numerical simulations to evaluate the gain of microbunching for the entire LCLS accelerator system..

  14. Interdigital H -mode drift-tube linac design with alternative phase focusing for muon linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, M.; Mibe, T.; Yoshida, M.; Hasegawa, K.; Kondo, Y.; Hayashizaki, N.; Iwashita, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Kitamura, R.; Saito, N.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed an interdigital H-mode (IH) drift-tube linac (DTL) design with an alternative phase focusing (APF) scheme for a muon linac, in order to measure the anomalous magnetic moment and electric dipole moment (EDM) of muons at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The IH-DTL accelerates muons from β =v /c =0.08 to 0.28 at an operational frequency of 324 MHz. The output beam emittances are calculated as 0.315 π and 0.195 π mm mrad in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, which satisfies the experimental requirement.

  15. Longitudinal space charge-driven microbunching instability in the TESLA Test Facility linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study a possible microbunching instability in the TESLA Test Facility linac. A longitudinal space charge is found to be the main effect driving the instability. Analytical estimates show that initial perturbations of beam current in the range 0.5-1 mm are amplified by a factor of a few hundred when the beam passes two bunch compressors. A method to suppress the instability is discussed

  16. MAIN ABSTRACTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Zhou Enlai and the Sinicization of Marxism Chen Dacai As a key member of the first generation of collective leadership of the CPC, Zhou Enlai contributed greatly to the theoretical cause of the sinicization of Marxism. Such contribution mainly include the fllowing aspects: he spread Marxism in a at a very special historical period as one of the representative of the earliest Chinese Marxists; he presented at an early stage the relationship between Marxism and Chinese revolution,

  17. Main Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Boncz, Peter; Liu, Lei; Özsu, Tamer, M.

    2008-01-01

    Primary storage, presently known as main memory, is the largest memory directly accessible to the CPU in the prevalent Von Neumann model and stores both data and instructions (program code). The CPU continuously reads instructions stored there and executes them. It is also called Random Access Memory (RAM), to indicate that load/store instructions can access data at any location at the same cost, is usually implemented using DRAM chips, which are connected to the CPU and other peripherals (di...

  18. High power X-band RF test stand development and high power testing of the CLIC crab cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Woolley, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and operation of multiple high power X-band RF test facilities for high gradient acceleration and deflecting structures at CERN, as re-quired for the e+ e- collider research programme CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). Signif-icant improvements to the control system and operation of the first test stand, Xbox-1 are implemented. The development of the second X-band test stand at CERN, Xbox-2 is followed from inception to completion. The LLRF (Low Level Radio ...

  19. Wakefield Computations for the CLIC PETS using the Parallel Finite Element Time-Domain Code T3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the high-performance parallel 3D electromagnetic time-domain code, T3P, for simulations of wakefields and transients in complex accelerator structures. T3P is based on advanced higher-order Finite Element methods on unstructured grids with quadratic surface approximation. Optimized for large-scale parallel processing on leadership supercomputing facilities, T3P allows simulations of realistic 3D structures with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) are presented.

  20. First operation of the rf-focused interdigital linac structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new rf-focused interdigital (RFI) linac structure came into operation at the Linac Systems laboratory in May of 2006, after a multi-year development program supported by the US Department of Energy. The RFI linac structure is basically an interdigital (or Wideroee) linac structure with rf quadrupole focusing incorporated into each drift tube. The RFI prototype operates at 200-MHz and consists of an ECR ion source, an Einzel lens LEBT, a radial-strut, four-bar RFQ linac section to 0.75 MeV and an RFI linac section to a final energy of 2.5 MeV. The total length of the prototype is 2.2 m. The RFQ and RFI linac sections are resonantly coupled and require a total of 120 kW of rf power for cavity excitation. The energy of the accelerated beam was confirmed by requiring it to pass through a 2.25-MeV energy-degrading foil. The specifications for the RFI linac prototype were chosen to address the demanding Boron Neutron Capture Therapy medical application. There are, however, many other potential applications for the structure as it has efficiency and size advantages for both protons and heavy ions at a variety of energies and currents. To date, we have achieved a beam current of approximately 1 mA peak at a relatively low duty factor. We continue to improve the performance of the prototype structure on a daily basis as we better understand the optimal operational settings for the prototype system. Now that the first operational milestone for the RFI linac structure has been achieved, Linac Systems will vigorously pursue projects and partnerships for multiple applications such as compact and intense neutron sources, proton and carbon injector linacs for synchrotrons and PET isotope production