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Sample records for clic crab cavity

  1. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  2. Wakefield damping for the CLIC crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P K; Dexter, A C; Carter, R G; Khan, V; Jones, R M; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  3. WAKEFIELD DAMPING FOR THE CLIC CRAB CAVITY

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Carter, R; Khan, V; Jones, R; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  4. M10.3.4: CLIC crab cavity specifications completed

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, A; Ambattu, P; Shinton, I; Jones, R

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 2 is to document the currently anticipated requirements for the CLIC crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of the basic specifications for the CLIC crab cavity system. This comprises kick, power requirement, phase and amplitude stability, technology choice, and RF layout. The wakefield calculations of a baseline CLIC cavity will be used to estimate the required damping of the higher order modes as well as other special modes in crab cavities (the lower and same order modes).

  5. CLIC CRAB CAVITY SPECIFICATIONS MILESTONE: M10.3.4

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Jones, R; McIntosh, P; Shinton, I

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 2 is to document the currently anticipated requirements for the CLIC crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of the basic specifications for the CLIC crab cavity system. This comprises kick, power requirement, phase and amplitude stability, technology choice, and RF layout. The wakefield calculations of a baseline CLIC cavity will be used to estimate the required damping of the higher order modes as well as other special modes in crab cavities (the lower and same order modes).

  6. CLIC Crab Cavity Design Optimisation for Maximum Luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, A.C.; /Lancaster U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Burt, G.; /Lancaster U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Ambattu, P.K.; /Lancaster U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2012-04-25

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  7. CLIC crab cavity design optimisation for maximum luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, A.C., E-mail: a.dexter@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K. [Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Jones, R. [University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-21

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  8. X-band crab cavities for the CLIC beam delivery system

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Abram, T; Dolgashev, V; Tantawi, S; Jones, R M

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC.

  9. X-Band Crab Cavities for the CLIC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Abram, T.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.

    2011-11-22

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC. Design of a crab cavity for CLIC is underway at the Cockcroft Institute in collaboration with SLAC. This effort draws on a large degree of synergy with the ILC crab cavity developed at the Cockcroft Institute and other deflecting structure development at SLAC. A study of phase and amplitude variations in the cavity suggests that the tolerances are very tight and require a 'beyond state of the art' LLRF control system. A study of cavity geometry and its effect on the cavity fields has been performed using Microwave studio. This study has suggested that for our cavity an iris radius between 4-5 mm is optimum with an iris thickness of 2-3 mm based on group velocity and peak fields. A study of the cavity wakefields show that the single bunch wakes are unlikely to be a problem but the short bunch spacing may cause the multi-bunch wakefields to be an issue. This will require some of the modes to be damped strongly so that the wake is damped significantly before any following bunch arrives. Various methods of damping have been investigated and

  10. Initial study on the shape optimisation of the CLIC crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P K; Carter, R G; Dexter, A C; Jones, R M; McIntosh, P

    2008-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) requires a crab cavity to align bunches prior to collision. The bunch structure demands tight amplitude and phase tolerances of the RF fields inside the cavity, for the minimal luminosity loss. Beam loading effects require special attention as it is one potential sources of field errors in the cavity. In order to assist the amplitude and phase control, we propose a travelling wave (TW) structure with a high group velocity allowing rapid propagation of errors out of the system. Such a design makes the cavity structure significantly different from previous ones. This paper will look at the implications of this on other cavity parameters and the optimisation of the cavity geometry.

  11. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  12. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  13. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  14. A high resolution cavity BPM for the CLIC Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chritin, N.; Schmickler, H.; Soby, L.; /CERN; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In frame of the development of a high resolution BPM system for the CLIC Main Linac we present the design of a cavity BPM prototype. It consists of a waveguide loaded dipole mode resonator and a monopole mode reference cavity, both operating at 15 GHz, to be compatible with the bunch frequencies at the CLIC Test Facility. Requirements, design concept, numerical analysis, and practical considerations are discussed.

  15. Crab cavities: Past, present, and future of a challenging device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    In two-ring facilities operating with a crossing-angle collision scheme, luminosity can be limited due to an incomplete overlapping of the colliding bunches. Crab cavities then are introduced to restore head-on collisions by providing the destined opposite deflection to the head and tail of the bunch. An increase in luminosity was demonstrated at KEKB with global crab-crossing, while the Large Hardron Collider (LHC) at CERN currently is designing local crab crossing for the Hi-Lumi upgrade. Future colliders may investigate both approaches. In this paper, we review the challenges in the technology, and the implementation of crab cavities, while discussing experience in earlier colliders, ongoing R&D, and proposed implementations for future facilities, such as HiLumi-LHC, CERN’s compact linear collider (CLIC), the international linear collider (ILC), and the electron-ion collider under design at BNL (eRHIC).

  16. Crab Cavities: Past, Present, and Future of a Challenging Device

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Q

    2015-01-01

    In two-ring facilities operating with a crossing-angle collision scheme, luminosity can be limited due to an incomplete overlapping of the colliding bunches. Crab cavities then are introduced to restore head-on collisions by providing the destined opposite deflection to the head and tail of the bunch. An increase in luminosity was demonstrated at KEKB with global crab- crossing, while the Large Hardron Collider (LHC) at CERN currently is designing local crab crossing for the Hi-Lumi upgrade. Future colliders may investigate both approaches. In this paper, we review the challenges in the technology, and the implementation of crab cavities, while discussing experience in earlier colliders, ongoing R&D, and proposed implementations for future facilities, such as HiLumi-LHC, CERN’s compact linear collider (CLIC), the international linear collider (ILC), and the electronion collider under design at BNL (eRHIC).

  17. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  18. LHC and CLIC LLRF final reports

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, A; Woolley, B; Ambattu, P; Tahir, I; Syratchev, Igor; Wuensch, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Crab cavities rotate bunches from opposing beams to achieve effective head-on collision in CLIC or collisions at an adjustable angle in LHC. Without crab cavities 90% of achievable luminosity at CLIC would be lost. In the LHC, the crab cavities allow the same or larger integrated luminosity while reducing significantly the requested dynamic range of physics detectors. The focus for CLIC is accurate phase synchronisation of the cavities, adequate damping of wakefields and modest amplitude stability. For the LHC, the main LLRF issues are related to imperfections: beam offsets in cavities, RF noise, measurement noise in feedback loops, failure modes and mitigations. This report develops issues associated with synchronising the CLIC cavities. It defines an RF system and experiments to validate the approach. It reports on the development of hardware for measuring the phase performance of the RF distributions system and cavities. For the LHC, the hardware being very close to the existing LLRF, the report focuses on...

  19. LHC crab cavity final report

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G et al

    2013-01-01

    A compact 400 MHz SRF crab cavity is designed for LHC. The design has low surface fields, has no hard multipactor barriers and fits within the transverse space available on the HL-LHC. The structure has been designed to have a constant deflecting voltage across the beam-pipe aperture and this has been verified on an aluminium model. The structure includes designs for the input and lower order mode couplers.

  20. Frequency Tuning for a DQW Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Leuxe, Raphael; Skaritka, John; Wu, Qiong; Xiao, Binping; Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The nominal operating frequency for the HL-LHC crab cavities is 400.79 MHz within a bandwidth of ±60kHz. Attaining the required cavity tune implies a good understanding of all the processes that influence the cavity frequency from the moment when the cavity parts are being fabricated until the cavity is installed and under operation. Different tuning options will be available for the DQW crab cavity of LHC. This paper details the different steps in the cavity fabrication and preparation that may introduce a shift in the cavity frequency and introduces the different tuning methods foreseen to bring the cavity frequency to meet the specifications.

  1. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  2. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  3. LHC Crab Cavity Progress and Outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R

    2013-01-01

    Three novel superconducting RF crab cavity designs proposed for the LHC luminosity upgrade have rapidly progressed. First Niobium prototypes are reaching close to the design performance and beyond. The highlights of the RF test results from the prototypes along with design modifications for initial beam tests in the SPS are presented. The status of the cryomodule development, integration into the SPS and the beam tests in view of validating the crab cavity system for LHC upgrade are addressed.

  4. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  5. LHC Crab Cavity Coupler Test Boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, James; Burt, Graeme; Calaga, Rama; Macpherson, Alick; Montesinos, Eric; Silva, Subashini; Tutte, Adam; Xiao, Binping

    2016-01-01

    The LHC double quarter wave (DQW) crab cavities have two different types of Higher Order Mode (HOM) couplers in addition to a fundamental power coupler (FPC). The FPC requires conditioning, so to achieve this we have designed a radio-frequency (RF) quarter wave resonator to provide high transmission between two opposing FPCs. For the HOM couplers we must ensure that the stop-band filter is positioned at the cavity frequency and that peak transmission occurs at the same frequencies as the strongest HOMs. We have designed two test boxes which preserve the cavity spectral response in order to test the couplers.

  6. Compensation of the Crossing Angle with Crab Cavities at KEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Akemoto, M; Akiyama, A; Arinaga, M; Ebihara, K; Egawa, K; Enomoto, A; Flanagan, J; Fukuda, S; Fukuma, H; Funakoshi, Y; Furukawa, K; Furuya, T; Hara, K; Higo, T; Hiramatsu, S; Hisamatsu, H; Honma, H; Honma, T; Hosoyama, K; Ieiri, T; Iida, N; Ikeda, H; Ikeda, M; Inagaki, S; Isagawa, S; Ishii, H; Kabe, A; Kadokura, E; Kageyama, T; Kakihara, K; Kako, E; Kamada, S; Kamitani, T; Kanazawa, K; Katagiri, H; Kato, S; Kawamoto, T; Kazakov, S; Kikuchi, M; Kikutani, E; Kitagawa, K; Koiso, H; Kojima, Y; Komada, I; Kubo, T; Kudo, K; Kudo, N; Marutsuka, K; Masuzawa, M; Matsumoto, S; Matsumoto, T; Michizono, S; Mikawa, K; Mimashi, T; Mitsunobu, S; Mori, K; Morita, A; Morita, Y; Nakai, H; Nakajima, H; Nakamura, T T; Nakanishi, H; Nakanishi, K; Nakao, K; Ninomiya, S; Ogawa, Y; Ohmi, K; Ohsawa, S; Ohsawa, Y; Ohnishi, Y; Ohuchi, N; Oide, K; Ono, M; Ozaki, T; Saitô, K; Sakai, H; Sakamoto, Y; Sato, M; Satoh, M; Shibata, K; Shidara, T; Shirai, M; Shirakawa, A; Sueno, T; Suetake, M; Suetsugu, Y; Sugahara, R; Sugimura, T; Suwada, T; Tajima, O; Takano, S; Takasaki, S; Takenaka, T; Takeuchi, Y; Tawada, M; Tejima, M; Tobiyama, M; Tokuda, N; Uehara, S; Uno, S; Yamamoto, Y; Yano, Y; Yokoyama, K; Yoshida, Ma; Yoshida, Mi; Yoshimoto, S; Yoshino, K; Perevedentsev, E; Shatilov, D N

    2007-01-01

    Crab cavities have been installed in the KEKB B--Factory rings to compensate the crossing angle at the collision point and thus increase luminosity. The beam operation with crab crossing has been done since February 2007. This is the first experience with such cavities in colliders or storage rings. The crab cavities have been working without serious issues. While higher specific luminosity than the geometrical gain has been achieved, further study is necessary and under way to reach the prediction of simulation.

  7. Technologies and R&D for a High Resolution Cavity BPM for the CLIC Main Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Towler, J R; Soby, L; Wendt, M; Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F J; Lyapin, A

    2013-01-01

    The Main Beam (MB) linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a beam orbit measurement system with high spatial (50 nm) and high temporal resolution (50 ns) to resolve the beam position within the 156 ns long bunch train, traveling on an energy-chirped, minimum dispersive trajectory. A 15 GHz prototype cavity BPM has been commissioned in the probe beam-line of the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility. We discuss performance and technical details of this prototype installation, including the 15 GHz analogue downconverter, the data acquisition and the control electronics and software. An R&D outlook is given for the next steps, which requires a system of 3 cavity BPMs to investigate the full resolution potential.

  8. M10.3.1: LHC crab cavity specifications completed

    CERN Document Server

    Ciapala, E

    2010-01-01

    • The starting point of Sub-task 1 is to determine the full LHC system requirements for the crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of basic specifications for the crab cavity system. This comprises the beam requirements, the cavity impedance constraints, the operating conditions and constraints, the layout and integration constraints in LHC and very importantly machine protection issues. The specifications of the cavity itself and its ancillaries follow from these system requirements and on the technology chosen for the cavity design. • The beam requirements result from the known parameters of the LHC upgrade lattice and the expected LHC beam parameters at ultimate bunch intensity. There are boundary conditions imposed by certain beam parameters such as the bunch length and intensity and by the machine layout, mainly the available beam pipe separations at the proposed cavity positions. Requirements on RF noise and stability are tight, to avoid emittance blow-up. Machine protection issues a...

  9. First Test Results of the 4-ROD Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Burt, G; Calaga, R; Capatina, O; Calatroni, S; Ciapala, E; Doherty, D; Ferreira, L; Jensen, E; Hall, B; Lingwood, C; Maesen, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M

    2013-01-01

    The first compact prototype crab cavity with the 4rod geometry has undergone surface treatment and cold testing. Due to the complex geometry and unique fabrication procedure, RF validation of the field at beyond the nominal operating voltage at a sufficiently high Q0 is an important pre-requisite. Preliminary results of the first cold tests are presented along with cavity performance at different stages of the cavity processing is described.

  10. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Alberty, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Artoos, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Capelli, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Carra, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Leuxe, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Kuder, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zanoni, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ratti, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  11. Design and Prototyping of HL-LHC Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavities for SPS Test

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, S; Wu, Q; Xiao, B P; Belomestnykh, S; Ben-Zv, I; Alberty, L; Artoos, Kurt; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Capelli, Teddy; Carra, Federico; Leuxe, Raphael; Kuder, Norbert; Zanoni, Carlo; Li, Z; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  12. Analysis of wakefields in the ILC crab cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Lancaster U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2006-06-01

    The large crossing angle schemes of the ILC need a correction of bunch orientation at the interaction point (IP) in order to recover a luminosity loss of up to 80%. The orientation of bunches can be changed using a set of transverse deflecting cavities. The location of these crab cavities would be close to the final focus, and small deflections caused by wake fields in the cavities could cause misalignments of the bunches at the IP. Wake fields in the 3.9GHz deflecting cavities under development at FNAL have been analysed and their effects studied in view of use as the ILC crab cavity. Numerical simulations have been performed to determine the long-range wake potentials of up to quadrupole order modes in this cavity and their effect upon bunches passing through this cavity. Trapped modes within the CKM cavity have been investigated. Short-range wakes have also been a topic of study. The effect of the final focus quadrupole magnets on the deflection given to the bunch have also been calculated and used to calculate luminosity loss due to wake fields.

  13. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, Jean [ODU, JLAB; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini [ODU, JLAB

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  14. Progress towards crab cavity solutions for the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Lancaster U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2006-06-01

    In order to achieve acceptable luminosity for ILC crossing angles greater than 2 mrad, RF deflection cavities must be used to rotate electron and position bunches leading up to the IP. A bunch that passes through a deflection cavity at a phase where the deflection averages to zero, receives a crab kick leading to a finite rotation at the IP. For a beam energy of 500 GeV and a crossing angle of 20 mrad the required crab kick is about 11.4 MV at 1.3 GHz and 3.8 MV at 3.9 GHz. Cavities are needed on both beams and are likely to be positioned about 12 m before the IP. Any RF phase error between the bunch and the cavity leads to a deflection of the bunch in addition to a rotation of the bunch. Any differential phase error between the cavities leads to differing deflections and consequential loss in luminosity. An updated analysis of system requirements and phase tolerances with respect to original calculations [1] is given. Issues on cavity and frequency choice are discussed.

  15. Machine Protection Studies for a Crab Cavity in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yee-Rendon, B; Baer, T; Barranco, J; Calaga, R; Marsili, A; Tomas, R; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Crab cavities (CCs) apply a transverse kick that rotates the bunches so as to have a head-on collision at the interaction point (IP). Such cavities were successfully used to improve the luminosity of KEKB. They are also a key ingredient of the HL-LHC project to increase the luminosity of the LHC. As CCs can rapidly change the particle trajectories, machine protection studies are required to assess the beam losses due to fast CC failures. In this paper, we discuss the effect of rapid voltage or phase changes in a CC for the HL-LHC layout using measured beam distributions from the present LHC.

  16. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  17. Design of Electron and Ion Crabbing Cavities for an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alejandro Castilla Loeza, Geoffrey Krafft, Jean Delayen

    2012-07-01

    Beyond the 12 GeV upgrade at the Jefferson Lab a Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) has been considered. In order to achieve the desired high luminosities at the Interaction Points (IP), the use of crabbing cavities is under study. In this work, we will present to-date designs of superconducting cavities, considered for crabbing both ion and electron bunches. A discussion of properties such as peak surface fields and higher-order mode separation will be presented. Keywords: super conducting, deflecting cavity, crab cavity.

  18. Design and Prototyping of a 400 MHz RF-dipole Crabbing Cavity for the LHC High-Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, S U; Delayen, J R; Li, Z; Nicol, T H

    2015-01-01

    LHC High Luminosity Upgrade is in need of two crabbing systems that deflects the beam in both horizontal and vertical planes. The 400 MHz rf-dipole crabbing cavity system is capable of crabbing the proton beam in both planes. At present we are focusing our efforts on a complete crabbing system in the horizontal plane. Prior to LHC installation the crabbing system will be installed for beam test at SPS. The crabbing system consists of two rfdipole cavities in the cryomodule. This paper discusses the electromagnetic design and mechanical properties of the rf-dipole crabbing system for SPS beam test.

  19. 800MHz Crab Cavity Conceptual Design For the LHC Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Liling; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2009-05-26

    In this paper, we present an 800 MHz crab cavity conceptual design for the LHC upgrade. The cell shape is optimized for lower maximum peak surface fields as well as higher transverse R/Q. A compact coax-to-coax coupler scheme is proposed to damp the LOM/SOM modes. A two-stub antenna with a notch filter is used as the HOM coupler to damp the HOM modes in the horizontal plane and rejects the operating mode at 800MHz. Multipacting (MP) simulations show that there are strong MP particles at the disks. Adding grooves along the short axis without changing the operating mode's RF characteristics can suppress the MP activities. Possible input coupler configurations are discussed.

  20. Summary of the 3rd LHC Crab Cavity Workshop (LHC-CC09)

    OpenAIRE

    Calaga, R.; Zimmermann, Frank; Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre; Delayen, Jean; Pierini, Paolo; Ciapala, Edmond; McIntosh, Peter; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Brüning, Oliver; Collier, Paul; Funakoshi, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    The 3rd workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC09) was held September 16-18, 2008 at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. The workshop was organized by joint collaboration of CERN, EUCARD, KEK and US-LARP. Approximately 50 workshop participants from 3 continents and several institutions discussed the future strategy of implementing crab cavities in the LHC

  1. Summary of CARE-HHH Mini-Workshop on LHC Crab Cavity Validation, 21 August 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Garoby, R; Linnecar, T; Tomás, R; Zimmermann, F; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2008-01-01

    A global LHC crab-cavity collaboration is rapidly advancing the R&D of a complete crab cavity cryomodule and performing the associated beam dynamics simulations compatible with a prototype test in the phase 0/I upgrade with the aim of establishing a full crab crossing scheme for the phase II upgrade of the LHC. A one day CARE-HHH mini-workshop was held on August 21, 2008 at CERN to discuss crab crossing in the LHC phase 0/I & II upgrades and this reports summarizes the activities of the four sessions that took place during the workshop. The goals of this crab-cavity workshop were fourfold: (1) to discuss prospects of crab cavities in LHC upgrades (2) to review the status of the cryomodule development and beam dynamics, (3) to establish validity requirements for LHC crab cavities which need to be demonstrated prior to their installation into the LHC, and (4) to provide guidance & coordination for the global collaborators.

  2. Cryogenic Test of a Proof-of-Principle Superconducting RF-Dipole Deflecting and Crabbing Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2013-01-01

    Recent applications in need of compact low-frequency deflecting and crabbing cavities have initiated the design and development of new superconducting structures operating at high gradients with low losses. Previously, TM$_{110}$ -type deflecting and crabbing cavities were developed and have also been operated successfully. However, these geometries are not favorable designs for low operating frequencies. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is the first compact deflecting and crabbing geometry that has demonstrated high gradients and high shunt impedance. Since the fundamental operating mode is the lowest mode and is widely separated from the nearest higher order mode, the rf-dipole design is an attractive geometry for effective damping of the higher order modes in high current applications. A 400 MHz rf-dipole cavity was designed, fabricated, and tested as a proof-of-principle cavity. The cavity achieved high operating gradients, and the multipacting levels were easily processed and did not reoccur.

  3. Analysis of HOM Properties of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications due to improved properties and compact design geometries. The 499 MHz deflecting cavity proposed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and the 400 MHz crab cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade are two of the major applications. For high current applications the higher order modes must be damped to acceptable levels to eliminate any beam instabilities. The frequencies and R/Q of the HOMs and mode separation are evaluated and compared for different parallel-bar cavity designs.

  4. Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

    2011-03-28

    A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

  5. An equivalent circuit model and power calculations for the APS SPX crab cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenc, T. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-21

    An equivalent parallel resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit with beam loading for a polarized TM110 dipole-mode cavity is developed and minimum radio-frequency (rf) generator requirements are calculated for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) short-pulse x-ray (SPX) superconducting rf (SRF) crab cavities. A beam-loaded circuit model for polarized TM110 mode crab cavities was derived. The single-cavity minimum steady-state required generator power has been determined for the APS SPX crab cavities for a storage ring current of 200mA DC current as a function of external Q for various vertical offsets including beam tilt and uncontrollable detuning. Calculations to aid machine protection considerations were given.

  6. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM and SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; /Lancaster U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-06-23

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  7. Analysis and control of wakefields in X-band crab cavities for Compact Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K., E-mail: praveen-kumar.ambattu@stfc.ac.uk [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4 YW (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4 YW (United Kingdom); Khan, V.F.; Jones, R.M. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dexter, A. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4 YW (United Kingdom); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2011-11-21

    The Compact Linear Collider requires a crab cavity on each beamline prior to the interaction point to rotate the bunches before collision. The cavities are X-band travelling wave type and are located close to the final doublet of the beam delivery system. This makes the beam very sensitive to transverse momentum imparted by wakefields; hence the wakefields must be tightly controlled. Of special concerns are the orthogonal polarisation of the operating mode and the fundamental monopole mode of the crab cavity. The former mode is at the same frequency as the operating mode of a cylindrically symmetric cavity and the latter one is at a lower frequency and hence is difficult to damp using a single means. In this paper major problematic modes of the crab cavity are investigated and damping requirements for them are calculated. Possibility of meeting the required wakefield control using waveguide damping and choke damping is thoroughly investigated. As a comparison, damped-detuning is also investigated.

  8. Analysis and Control of Wakefields in X-Band Crab Cavities for Compact Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Burt, G.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Khan, V.F.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-04-25

    The Compact Linear Collider requires a crab cavity on each beamline prior to the interaction point to rotate the bunches before collision. The cavities are X-band travelling wave type and are located close to the final doublet of the beam delivery system. This makes the beam very sensitive to transverse momentum imparted by wakefields; hence the wakefields must be tightly controlled. Of special concerns are the orthogonal polarization of the operating mode and the fundamental monopole mode of the crab cavity. The former mode is at the same frequency as the operating mode of a cylindrically symmetric cavity and the latter one is at a lower frequency and hence is difficult to damp using a single means. In this paper major problematic modes of the crab cavity are investigated and damping requirements for them are calculated. Possibility of meeting the required wakefield control using waveguide damping and choke damping is thoroughly investigated. As a comparison, damped-detuning is also investigated.

  9. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM And SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; /Lancaster U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  10. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y P; Barranco, J; Tomás, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F; Calaga, R; Morita, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit...

  11. Cryogenic Test of Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, B; Belomestnykh, S; Ben-Zvi, I; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, C; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, L; Li, Z; Marques, C; Skaritka, J; Verdú-Andres, S; Wu, Q

    2015-01-01

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109 . We report the test results of this design.

  12. CLIC OVERVIEW

    CERN Document Server

    Tomas, R

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electronpositron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for lepton physics. The current goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology by the year 2010. Recently, important progress has been made concerning the high-gradient accelerating structure tests and the experiments with beam in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. On the organizational side, the CLIC international collaborations have significantly gained momentum considerably boosting the CLIC study.

  13. CLIC Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electronpositron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for lepton physics. The current goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology by the year 2010. Recently, important progress has been made concerning the high-gradient accelerating structure tests and the experiments with beam in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. On the organizational side, the CLIC international collaborations have significantly gained momentum considerably boosting the CLIC study.

  14. Design, prototyping and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Binping; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdú-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    A novel design of superconducting Crab Cavity was proposed and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new cavity shape is a Double Quarter Wave or DQWCC. After fabrication and surface treatments, the niobium proof-of-principle cavity was cryogenically tested in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also well matched for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the requirement for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC of 3.34 MV. In this paper we present the design, prototyping and test results of the DQWCC.

  15. CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Multimedia

    Kossyvakis, I; Faus-golfe, A

    2007-01-01

    The design of CLIC is based on a two-beam scheme, where short pulses of high power 30 GHz RF are extracted from a drive beam running parallel to the main beam. The 3rd generation CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) will demonstrate the generation of the drive beam with the appropriate time structure, the extraction of 30 GHz RF power from this beam, as well as acceleration of a probe beam with 30 GHz RF cavities. The project makes maximum use of existing equipment and infrastructure of the LPI complex, which became available after the closure of LEP.

  16. 5th LHC Crab Cavity Workshop, LHC-CC11 Workshop Summary Report

    OpenAIRE

    G. Arduini; Calaga, R.; Ciapala, E.; Collier, P; Giovannozzi, M.; Jensen, E.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Mcintosh, P.; Metral, E.; Myers, S; Parma, V; Wenninger, J.; Zimmermann, F

    2012-01-01

    The 5th workshop on crab cavities for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC11) was held from 14 to 15 November 2011 at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. This report summarizes the contributions from the workshop and provides an overview of the present status of the crab crossing scheme considered for the LHC upgrade. The executive summary synthesizes the key conclusions from the advisory board session and lists the required next steps for R&D, testing and final implementation at the LHC.

  17. Compact superconducting rf-dipole cavity designs for deflecting and crabbing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, Subashini [JLAB, Old Dominion University; Delayen, Jean R. [JLAB, Old Dominion University; Castilla, Alejandro [JLAB, Old Dominion University

    2013-06-01

    Over the years the superconducting parallel-bar design has evolved into an rf-dipole cavity with improved properties. The new rf-dipole design is considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications. Some of those applications are the 499 MHz rf separator system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade, the 400 MHz crabbing cavity system for the proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade, and the 750 MHz crabbing cavity for the medium energy electron-ion collider in Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the optimized rf design in terms of rf performance including rf properties, higher order modes (HOM) properties, multipacting and multipole expansion for the above mentioned applications.

  18. Compact Superconducting RF-Dipole Cavity Designs for Deflecting and Crabbing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger; Castilla, A

    2013-01-01

    Over the years the superconducting parallel-bar designhas evolved into an rf-dipole cavity with improved proper-ties. The new rf-dipole design is considered for a numberof deflecting and crabbing applications. Some of those ap-plications are the 499 MHz rf separator system for the Jef-ferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade, the 400 MHz crabbing cav-ity system for the proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade,and the 750 MHz crabbing cavity for the medium energyelectron-ion collider in Jefferson Lab. In this paper wepresent the optimized rf design in terms of rf performanceincluding rf properties, higher order modes (HOM) prop-erties, multipacting, and multipole expansion for the abovementioned applications.

  19. Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity Field Profile Analysis and Higher Order Mode Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Carlos [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator R and D Div.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Physics and Astronomy Dept.; Xiao, B. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator R and D Div.; Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator R and D Div.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Physics and Astronomy Dept.

    2014-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is underway for a major upgrade to increase its luminosity by an order of magnitude beyond its original design specifications. This novel machine configuration known as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on various innovative technologies including very compact and ultra-precise superconducting crab cavities for beam rotation. A double quarter wave crab cavity (DQWCC) has been designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the HL-LHC. This cavity as well as the structural support components were fabricated and assembled at Niowave. The field profile of the crabbing mode for the DQWCC was investigated using a phase shift bead pulling technique and compared with simulated results to ensure proper operation or discover discrepancies from modeled results and/or variation in fabrication tolerances. Higher-Order Mode (HOM) characterization was also performed and correlated with simulations.

  20. Engineering of a Superconducting 400 MHz Crabbing Cavity for the LHC HiLumi Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, D; De Silva, S U; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed new simplified design for the 400 MHz LHC crabbing cavity presents attractive properties compared to conventional designs. The proposed approach can be equally compact in both transverse dimensions and allows horizontal as well as vertical deflection of the beam in the collider. The significant modification of the parallel-bar design with the bars merged to the side walls of the cavity gives improved properties, such as better mode separation and reduced surface fields*. A transverse deflecting voltage of 3 to 5 MV in a single cavity can be expected with the peak surface electric field lower then 50 MV/m and peak magnetic field below 100 mT. This paper presents engineering issues of the proof-of-concept crabbing cavity d esign and discusses the manufacturing techniques. The paper discusses present status of the project including fabrication of the niobium cavity, as well as room temperature and cryogenic testing.

  1. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Alberty, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cullen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marques, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  2. Designing the Four Rod Crab Cavity for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the design for a novel compact crab cavity for the HL-LHC upgrade at CERN, Geneva. The LHC requires 400MHz RF cavities that can provide up to 10MV transverse gradient across two to three cavities with suit- ably low surface fields for continual operation. As a result, a cavity design was required that would be optimised to these new parameters. From initial design studies based on Jefferson Laboratory’s CEBAF deflector, extensive optimiza- tion was carried out to design a superconducting crab cavity, dubbed the Four Rod Crab Cavity (4RCC). The design underwent several iterations throughout the course of the project due to changing requirements from CERN, particularly space requirements inside the LHC. In addition, it was decided that a focus on field flatness was required. An aluminium prototype was then constructed from the finalised and computer-simulated design to confirm the designed field flat- ness. Additional computer simulation studies using CST were performed to en-...

  3. Multipacting Analysis for the Half-Wave Spoke Resonator Crab Cavity for LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    A compact 400-MHz half-wave spoke resonator (HWSR) superconducting crab cavity is being developed for the LHC upgrade. The cavity shape and the LOM/HOM couplers for such a design have been optimized to meet the space and beam dynamics requirements, and satisfactory RF parameters have been obtained. As it is known that multipacting is an issue of concern in a superconducting cavity which may limit the achievable gradient. Thus it is important in the cavity RF design to eliminate the potential MP conditions to save time and cost of cavity development. In this paper, we present the multipacting analysis for the HWSR crab cavity using the Track3P code developed at SLAC, and to discuss means to mitigate potential multipacting barriers. Track3P was used to analyze potential MP in the cavity and the LOM, HOM and FPC couplers. No resonances were found in the LOM couplers and the coaxial beam pipe. Resonant trajectories were identified on various locations in cavity, HOM and FPC couplers. Most of the resonances are not at the peak SEY of Nb. Run-away resonances were identified in broader areas on the cavity end plate and in the HOM coupler. The enhancement counter for run-away resonances does not show significant MP. HOM coupler geometry will be optimized to minimize the high SEY resonance.

  4. Conceptual Design of a Cryomodule for Compact Crab Cavities for Hi-Lumi LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pattalwar, S; Templeton, N; Wheelhouse, A E; Hall, B; Capatina, O; Burt, G; Peterson, T J

    2013-01-01

    A prototype Superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule, comprising multiple compact crab cavities is foreseen to realise a local crab crossing scheme for the “Hi - Lumi LHC”, a project launched by CERN to increase the luminosity performance of LHC . A cryomodule with two cavities will be initially installed and tested on the SPS drive accelerator at CERN to evaluate performance with high - intensity proton beams. A series of boundary conditions influence the design of the cryomodule prototype, arising from ; the complexity of the cavity design, the requirement for multiple RF couplers, the close proximity to the second LHC beam pipe and the tight space constraints in the SPS and LHC tunnels. As a result, the design of the helium vessel and the cryomodule has become extremely challenging. This paper assesses some of the critical cryogenic and engineering design requirements and describes an optimised cryomodule solution for the evaluation tests on SPS.

  5. Effects of Crab Cavities' Multipole Content in an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata, Todd J. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Castillo, Alejandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The impact on the beam dynamics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Colider (MEIC) due to the multipole content of the 750 MHz crab cavity was studied using thin multipole elements for 6D phase space particle tracking in ELEGANT. Target values of the sextupole component for the cavity’s field expansion were used to perform preliminary studies on the proton beam stability when compared to the case of pure dipole content of the rf kicks. Finally, important effects on the beam sizes due to non-linear components of the crab cavities’ fields were identified, and some criteria for their future study were proposed.

  6. Higher Order Mode Filter Design for Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, B P; Ben-Zv, I; Burt, Graeme Campbell; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Hall, B; Jones, T; Skaritka, J; Verdú-Andrés, S; Wu, Q

    2015-01-01

    A Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A compact Higher Order Mode (HOM) filter with wide stop band at the deflecting mode is developed for this cavity. Multi-physics finite element simulation results are presented. The integration of this design to the cavity cryomodule is described.

  7. Higher order mode filter design for double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC high luminosity upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Burt, G. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hall, B. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Jones, T. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A compact Higher Order Mode (HOM) filter with wide stop band at the deflecting mode is developed for this cavity. Multiphysics finite element simulation results are presented. The integration of this design to the cavity cryomodule is described.

  8. Engineering Study of Crab Cavity HOM Couplers for LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Hyekyung; Delayen, Jean Roger; De Silva, S U; Li, Z; Nicol, T H; Capelli, Teddy; Templeton, Niklas John

    2015-01-01

    The LHC is planning to employ crab cavities for the high luminosity upgrade. Old Dominion University and SLAC National Laboratory are developing a crab cavity completed with the HOM damping couplers [1]. The HOM couplers are coaxial type and perform over broadband up to 2 GHz. The amount of extracted power requires active cooling using liquid helium. The electromagnetic study has provided expected power dissipation on the coupler. Correlations between the fabrication tolerance and its damping performance have been studied and the results are providing guidelines on how to manufacture the HOM couplers. This paper summarizes the engineering studies; mechanical strength as a part of pressure system, thermal stability, and fabrication method to ensure the required tolerance.

  9. Summary of the Mini BNL/LARP/CARE-HHH Workshop on Crab Cavities for the LHC (LHC-CC08)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi,I.; Calaga, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-05-01

    The first mini-workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC08) was held February 24-25, 2008 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A total of 35 participants from 3 continents and 15 institutions from around the world participated to discuss the exciting prospect of a crab scheme for the LHC. If realized it will be the first demonstration in hadron colliders. The workshop is organized by joint collaboration of BNL, US-LARP and CARE-HHH. The enormous interest in the subject of crab cavities for the international linear collider and future light sources has resulted in a large international collaboration to exchange aspects of synergy and expertise. A central repository for this exchange of information documenting the latest design effort for LHC crab cavities is consolidated in a wiki page: https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/LHCCrabCavities. The main goal of this workshop was to define a road-map for a prototype crab cavity to be installed in the LHC and to discuss the associated R&D and beam dynamics challenges. The diverse subject of implementing the crab scheme resulted in a scientific program with a wide range of subtopics which were divided into 8 sessions. Each session was given a list of fundamental questions to be addressed and used as a guideline to steer the discussions.

  10. Cryogenic Test of a 750 MHz Superconducting RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [ODU; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-07-01

    A superconducting rf dipole cavity has been designed to address the challenges of a high repetition rate (750 MHz), high current for both electron/ion species (0.5/3 A per bunch), and large crossing angle (50 mrad) at the interaction points (IPs) crabbing system for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The cavity prototype built at Niowave, Inc. has been tested at the Jefferson Lab facilities. In this work we present a detailed analysis of the prototype cavity performance at 4 K and 2 K, corroborating the absence of hard multipacting barriers that could limit the desired transverse fields, along with the surface resistance (Rs) temperature dependency.

  11. Beam Position Monitoring at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Prochnow, J

    2003-01-01

    At the European Organisation for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva, Switzerland the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) for high energy physics is studied. To achieve the envisaged high luminosity the quadrupole magnets and radio-frequency accelerating structures have to be actively aligned with micron precision and submicron resolution. This will be done using beam-based algorithms which rely on beam position information inside of quadrupoles and accelerating structures. After a general introduction to the CLIC study and the alignment algorithms, the concept of the interaction between beams and radio-frequency structures is given. In the next chapter beam measurements and simulations are described which were done to study the performance of cavity beam position monitors (BPM). A BPM design is presented which is compatible with the multi-bunch operation at CLIC and could be used to align the quadrupoles. The beam position inside the accelerating structures will be measured by using the structures thems...

  12. HOM Damping and Multipacting Analysis of the Quarter-wave Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Q; Ben-Zvi, I; Calaga, R

    2012-01-01

    The quarter-wave crab cavity design has been analyzed further to accommodate LHC requirements. The goal for the design is to provide strong deflecting voltage to the proton bunches at the IP, while keeping the effective length as short as possible. We will evaluate the higher order mode damping with two or four magnetic coupling dampers installed in different configuration. In this paper, we also show possible multipacting locations which are simulated by 2D and 3D codes.

  13. CLIC Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    De Melis, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson and with upgrades to higher energy and luminosity, the LHC is mapping the route of particle physics into the future. The next step in this journey of discovery could be a linear electron-positron collider, which would complement the LHC and allow high precision measurements of the Higgs boson, the top quark and electroweak processes in addition to possible new physics beyond the Standard Model. The Compact Linear Collider is under development by two worldwide collaborations, pushing the limits of particle acceleration and detection. Technological R&D, physics simulations and engineering studies must all come together to make CLIC a reality.

  14. CLIC CTF3 for open days

    CERN Multimedia

    CLIC

    2013-01-01

    CLIC – the Compact Linear Collider – is a study for a future accelerator that reaches unprecedented energies for electrons and their antimatter twins, positrons. It uses a novel two-beam acceleration scheme in which the electrons and positrons are propelled to high energy by an additional high current electron beam, the so-called Drive Beam. In order to generate this high current Drive Beam, a long train of electron bunches is accelerated, parts of the train delayed in a Delay Loop and Combiner Rings, and interleaved by transversely deflecting radio-frequency cavities. The CLIC Test Facility CTF3, which is shown in the movie, examines the new technologies envisioned by the CLIC design, in particular the Drive Beam generation and the two-beam acceleration. It is a scaled-down version of the CLIC facility, and it has demonstrated the feasibility of the novel scheme.

  15. CLIC CTF3 for open days

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    (subt french) CLIC – the Compact Linear Collider – is a study for a future accelerator that reaches unprecedented energies for electrons and their antimatter twins, positrons. It uses a novel two-beam acceleration scheme in which the electrons and positrons are propelled to high energy by an additional high current electron beam, the so-called Drive Beam. In order to generate this high current Drive Beam, a long train of electron bunches is accelerated, parts of the train delayed in a Delay Loop and Combiner Rings, and interleaved by transversely deflecting radio-frequency cavities. The CLIC Test Facility CTF3, which is shown in the movie, examines the new technologies envisioned by the CLIC design, in particular the Drive Beam generation and the two-beam acceleration. It is a scaled-down version of the CLIC facility, and it has demonstrated the feasibility of the novel scheme.

  16. Normal Conducting Deflecting Cavity Development at the Cockcroft Institute

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Woolley, B; Jones, R M; Grudiev, A; Dolgashev, V; Wheelhouse, A; Mackenzie, J; McIntosh, P A; Hill, C; Goudket, P; Buckley, S; Lingwood, C

    2013-01-01

    Two normal conducting deflecting structures are currently being developed at the Cockcroft Institute, one as a crab cavity for CERN linear collider CLIC and one for bunch slice diagnostics on low energy electron beams for Electron Beam Test Facility EBTF at Daresbury. Each has its own challenges that need overcome. For CLIC the phase and amplitude tolerances are very stringent and hence beamloading effects and wakefields must be minimised. Significant work has been undertook to understand the effect of the couplers on beamloading and the effect of the couplers on the wakefields. For EBTF the difficulty is avoiding the large beam offset caused by the cavities internal deflecting voltage at the low beam energy. Prototypes for both cavities have been manufactured and results will be presented.

  17. Highly Accurate Frequency Calculations of Crab Cavities Using the VORPAL Computational Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, T.M.; /Tech-X, Boulder; Cary, J.R.; /Tech-X, Boulder /Colorado U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01

    We have applied the Werner-Cary method [J. Comp. Phys. 227, 5200-5214 (2008)] for extracting modes and mode frequencies from time-domain simulations of crab cavities, as are needed for the ILC and the beam delivery system of the LHC. This method for frequency extraction relies on a small number of simulations, and post-processing using the SVD algorithm with Tikhonov regularization. The time-domain simulations were carried out using the VORPAL computational framework, which is based on the eminently scalable finite-difference time-domain algorithm. A validation study was performed on an aluminum model of the 3.9 GHz RF separators built originally at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the US. Comparisons with measurements of the A15 cavity show that this method can provide accuracy to within 0.01% of experimental results after accounting for manufacturing imperfections. To capture the near degeneracies two simulations, requiring in total a few hours on 600 processors were employed. This method has applications across many areas including obtaining MHD spectra from time-domain simulations.

  18. CLIC Detector Power Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2013-01-01

    An estimate for the CLIC detector power requirements is outlined starting from the available data on power consumptions of the four LHC experiments and considering the differences between a typical LHC Detector (CMS) and the CLIC baseline detector concept. In particular the impact of the power pulsing scheme for the CLIC Detector electronics on the overall detector consumption is considered. The document will be updated with the requirements of the sub-detector electronics once they are more defined.

  19. CLIC PHYSICS OVERVIEW

    CERN Document Server

    Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on the invited talk at the 17th Lomonosov Conference of Elementary Particle Physics, the physics program at the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on the Higgs physics studies. It will be demonstrated, on the basis of detailed physics and detector studies carried out at CLIC, that the CLIC is indeed a precision tool for studies both in the Higgs sector and beyond the Standard Model.

  20. CLIC MDI Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Gatignon, Lau

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to the layout of the CLIC Machine Detector Interface as it has been defined for the CLIC Conceptual Design Report. We concentrate on the specific case of the CLIC_SiD detector, although the push-pull concept for two detectors has been included in the design. Some recent work and developments are described as well. However, for the details we refer to the detailed technical talks at this conference.

  1. CLIC: Status and Plan

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a high energy electron–positron col- lider with a maximal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. In order to achieve high luminosity small bunches with high intensity are necessary. These lead to strong beam-beam forces, which create a challenging background environment. The accelerator concept and the detectors designed for CLIC are presented. Results from detector benchmark studies presented in the CLIC conceptual design report are summarised.

  2. Studies of Machine Protections for Fast Crab Cavity Failures in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Yee Rendon, Bruce; Lopez, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Crab Cavities (CCs) play a main role in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) project for increasing the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their successful installation at KEKB accelerator allowed reaching a peak luminosity of 2.1x10^34/cm^2/s. However, CCs have exhibited abrupt changes of phase and voltage during a time period of the order of a few LHC turns. If similar scenarios take place in the HL-LHC, considering the significant stored energy in the beam, CC failures represent a serious threat in regard to LHC machine protection. This thesis presents and discusses the effect of CC voltage or phase changes on a time interval similar to, or longer than, the one needed to dump the beam. The simulations assume a quasi-stationary state (QSS) distribution, before the failure is produced, in order to assess the particles losses for the HL-LHC. These distributions produce beam losses below the safe operation threshold for Gaussian tails, while, for non-Gaussian tails, they are on the sa...

  3. Preparing for CLIC tests

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The Canon 5 undergoes first brazing for preparation in the CLIC study at the CLIC Test Facility 2 (CTF2). This will test injection for a proposed linear collider that will further explore discoveries made at the LHC. Electric fields in the canon will boost electrons into the acceleration fields of the collider.

  4. CLIC Drive Beam Phase Stabilisation

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schulte, Daniel

    The thesis presents phase stability studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and focuses in particular on CLIC Drive Beam longitudinal phase stabilisation. This topic constitutes one of the main feasibility challenges for CLIC construction and is an essential component of the current CLIC stabilisation campaign. The studies are divided into two large interrelated sections: the simulation studies for the CLIC Drive Beam stability, and measurements, data analysis and simulations of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) Drive Beam phase errors. A dedicated software tool has been developed for a step-by-step analysis of the error propagation through the CLIC Drive Beam. It uses realistic RF potential and beam loading amplitude functions for the Drive and Main Beam accelerating structures, complete models of the recombination scheme and compressor chicane as well as of further CLIC Drive Beam modules. The tool has been tested extensively and its functionality has been verified. The phase error propagation at CLIC h...

  5. CLIC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The world's biggest and most powerful accelerator, the LHC, is mapping the route of particle physics for the future. The next step, to complement the LHC in exploring this new region, is most likely to be a linear electron-positron collider. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a novel approach to such a collider. It is currently under development by the CLIC collaboration, which is hosted at CERN.

  6. The CLIC Detector Concept

    CERN Document Server

    Pitters, Florian Michael

    2016-01-01

    CLIC is a concept for a future linear collider that would provide e+e- collisions at up to 3 TeV. The physics aims require a detector system with excellent jet energy and track momentum resolution, highly efficient flavour-tagging and lepton identification capabilities, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles and timing information in the order of nanoseconds to reject beam-induced background. To deal with those requirements, an extensive R&D programme is in place to overcome current technological limits. The CLIC detector concept includes a low-mass all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system and fine-grained calorimeters designed for particle flow analysis techniques, surrounded by a 4 T solenoid magnet. An overview of the requirements and design optimisations for the CLIC detector concept is presented.

  7. CLIC Muon Sweeper Design

    CERN Document Server

    Aloev, A; Gatignon, L; Modena, M; Pilicer, B; Tapan, I

    2016-01-01

    There are several background sources which may affect the analysis of data and detector performans at the CLIC project. One of the important background source is halo muons, which are generated along the beam delivery system (BDS), for the detector performance. In order to reduce muon background, magnetized muon sweepers have been used as a shielding material that is already described in a previous study for CLIC [1]. The realistic muon sweeper has been designed with OPERA. The design parameters of muon sweeper have also been used to estimate muon background reduction with BDSIM Monte Carlo simulation code [2, 3].

  8. Submicron multi-bunch BPM for CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmickler, H.; Soby, L.; /CERN; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    A common-mode free cavity BPM is currently under development at Fermilab within the ILC-CLIC collaboration. This monitor will be operated in a CLIC Main Linac multi-bunch regime, and needs to provide both, high spatial and time resolution. We present the design concept, numerical analysis, investigation on tolerances and error effects, as well as simulations on the signal response applying a multi-bunch stimulus. The proposed CERN linear collider (CLIC) requires a very precise measurement of beam trajectory to preserve the low emittance when transporting the beam through the Main Linac. An energy chirp within the bunch train will be applied to measure and minimize the dispersion effects, which require high resolution (in both, time and space) beam position monitors (BPM) along the beam-line. We propose a low-Q waveguide loaded TM{sub 110} dipole mode cavity as BPM, which is complemented by a TM{sub 010} monopole mode resonator of same resonant frequency for reference signal purposes. The design is based on a well known TM{sub 110} selective mode coupling idea.

  9. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D

    2015-01-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a meas- urement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → W b will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit tim- ing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC ver- tex det...

  10. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannheim, D.

    2015-03-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a measurement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → Wb will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit timing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin planar or active HV-CMOS sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. This contribution reviews the requirements and design optimisation for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensors, readout and detector integration.

  11. Design and Prototype Progress toward a Superconducting Crab Cavity Cryomodule for the APS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haipeng Wang, Guangfeng Cheng, Gianluigi Ciovati, James Henry, Peter Kneisel, Robert Rimmer, Gary Slack, Larry Turlington, Geoff waldschmidt, Alireza Nassiri

    2010-05-01

    A squashed, elliptical supercondconducting (SC) cavity with waveguide dampers on the beam pipes has currently been chosen as the baseline design [1] for the Short Pulse X-ray (SPX) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). An alternate cavity design, with a waveguide damper located directly on the cavity cell for improved damping characteristics, has also been designed and cold-tested with promising results. In either case, eight cavities would be operated CW in a single cryomodule at 2K to produce an electron bunch chirp of 4MV at a frequency of 2.815 GHz. Detailed analysis of multipactoring (MP), Lorentz force detuning (LFD), and the thermal properties of the baseline design has led to an engineering specification of the basic parameters of the cryomodule.

  12. FPC and Hi-Pass Filter HOM Coupler Design for the RF Dipole Crab Cavity for the LHC HiLumi Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Delayen, Jean Roger; De Silva, S U; Park, HyeKyoung; Olave, R G

    2015-01-01

    A 400-MHz compact RF dipole (RFD) crab cavity design was jointly developed by Old Dominion University and SLAC under the support of US LARP program for the LHC HiLumi upgrade. The RFD cavity design is consisted of a rounded-square tank and two ridged deflecting poles, operating with a TE11-like dipole mode, which is the lowest mode of the cavity. A prototype RFD cavity is being manufactured and will be tested on the SPS beam line at CERN. The coaxial fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) of the prototype cavity was re-optimized to minimizing the power heating on the coupler internal antenna. A hi-pass filter HOM damping coupler was developed to achieve the required wakefield damping while maintaining a compact size to fit into the beam line space. In this paper, we will discuss the details of the RF optimization and tolerance analyses of the FPC and HOM couplers.

  13. Measurement Report for the Four-Rod LHC Crab Cavity. Cold Tests held in July 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro Tapia, Maria; Calaga, Rama; Hernandez Chahin, Karim Gibran; Junginger, Tobias; Macpherson, Alick; Torres-Sanchez, Roberto; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the four-rod cavity prototype considered for the HL-LHC upgrade has already been assessed at CERN at cryogenic temperatures three times in the last two years [1, 2, 3]. In this report, the results of the latest measurements, carried out in July 2014, are shown. These measurements were to check the improvement of the cavity performance due to the change of the input and pick-up antennas. An estimation of the residual resistance of the Niobium was also performed.

  14. Technological challenges of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Döbert, Steffen; Arnau-Izquierdo, G; Redaelli, Stefano; Mainaud, Helène; Lefèvre, Thibaut

    2006-01-01

    Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale and beyond to very high precision. While the International Linear Collider (ILC) scheme of a collider in the 0.5 - 1 TeV range enters the engineering design phase, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study explores the technical feasibility of a collider capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain. Key ingredients of the CLIC scheme are acceleration at high-frequency (30 GHz) and high-gradient (150 MV/m) in normal conducting structures and the use of the so-called Two Beam Acceleration concept, where a high-charge electron beam (drive beam) running parallel to the main beam is decelerated to provide the RF power to accelerate the main beam itself. A vigorous R&D effort is presently developed by the CLIC international collaboration to demonstrate its feasibility by 2010, when the first physics results from LHC should be available to guide the choice of the centre-of-mass energy better suited to explore the futu...

  15. BSM physics at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Simoniello, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future electron-positron collider operating at centre-of-mass energies from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model through direct observation of new particles and precision measurements is one of the main motivations for the high-energy stages of CLIC. An overview of physics benchmark studies assuming different new physics scenarios is given in this contribution. These studies are based on full detector simulations. New particles can be discovered in most of the considered scenarios almost up to the kinematic limit ($\\sqrt{s}$/2 for pair production). The low background conditions at CLIC provide extended discovery potential compared to hadron colliders, for example in the case of non-coloured TeV-scale SUSY particles. In addition to direct particle searches, BSM models can be probed up to scales of tens of TeV through precision measurements. Examples, including recent results on the reaction $e^+e^- \\to \\gamma\\gam...

  16. Higgs physics at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is an option for a future multi-TeV electron-positron collider, offering the potential for a rich precision physics programme, combined with sensitivity to a wide range of new phenomena. The CLIC physics potential for measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson has been studied using full detector simulations for several centre-of-mass energies. The presented results provide crucial input to the energy staging strategy for the CLIC accelerator. The complete physics program for measurements of accessible Higgs boson couplings is presented in this talk. All measurements available at a given centre-of-mass energy were included in combined fits. Operation at a few hundred GeV allows the couplings and width of the Higgs boson to be determined in a model-independent manner through the study of the Higgsstrahlung and WW-fusion processes. At a lepton collider, the measurement of the Higgsstrahlung cross section using the recoil mass technique sets the absolute scale for all Higgs coupling...

  17. Higgs physics at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukić, Strahinja

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is an option for a future multi-TeV electron-positron collider, offering the potential for a rich precision physics programme, combined with sensitivity to a wide range of new phenomena. The CLIC physics potential for measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs boson has been studied using full detector simulations for several centre-of-mass energies. The presented results provide crucial input to the energy staging strategy for the CLIC accelerator. The complete physics program for measurements of accessible Higgs boson couplings is presented in this contribution. The ultimate measurement precision is reached when all measurements available at a given centre-of-mass energy are included in combined fits. Operation at a few hundred GeV allows the couplings and width of the Higgs boson to be determined in a model-independent manner through the study of the Higgsstrahlung and WW-fusion processes. At a lepton collider, the measurement of the Higgsstrahlung cross section using the recoil mas...

  18. Phase and Amplitude Control of Dipole Crabbing Modes in Multi-Cell Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Dexter, Amos; Burt, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    This report sets out the established theory of driving a mode in a beam loaded, multi-cell cavity via a waveguide coupling and derives associated envelope equations from which time domain solutions are developed. Time domain solution allows accurate simulation with realistic microphonic spectra, beamloading, drive amplifier characteristics, controller and measurement errors to be encompassed. A computer code that uses the model is used to compute limits on phase and amplitude stability of a d...

  19. CLIC Physics Overview

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)471575

    2016-01-01

    This paper, based on the invited talk given at the 17th Lomonosov Conference of Elementary Particle Physics, summarizes the physics program at CLIC, with particular emphasis on the Higgs physics studies. The physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, at 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV center-of-mass energies is reviewed. The energy-staged approach is motivated by the high-precision physics measurements in the Higgs and top sector as well as by direct and indirect searches for beyond the Standard Model physics. The first stage, at or above 350 GeV, gives access to precision Higgs physics through the Higgsstrahlung and WW-fusion production processes, providing absolute values of the Higgs couplings to fermions and bosons. This stage also addresses precision top physics around the top-pair-production threshold. The second stage, at 1.4 TeV, opens the energy frontier, allowing for the discovery of new physics phenomena. This stage also gives access to additional Higgs properties, such as the top-Yukawa co...

  20. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H. (High Energy Physics); (Many)

    2012-02-10

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but

  1. The Physics Prospects for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    ELLIS, J.

    2008-01-01

    Following a brief outline of the CLIC project, this talk summarizes some of the principal motivations for an e+e− collider with ECM = 3 TeV. It is shown by several examples that CLIC would represent a significant step beyond the LHC and ILC in its capabilities for precision measurements at high energies. It would make possible a complete study of a light Higgs boson, including rare decay modes, and would provide a unique tool to study a heavy Higgs boson. CLIC could also complete the studies of supersymmetric spectra, if sparticles are relatively light, and discover any heavier sparticles. It would also enable deeper probes of extra dimensions, new gauge bosons and excited quarks or leptons. CLIC has unique value to add to experimental particle physics, whatever the LHC discovers.

  2. Clic ring to main Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Stulle, F; Snuverink, J; Latina, A; Molloy, S

    2010-01-01

    The low emittance transport had been identified as one of the feasibility issues for CLIC. We discuss beam dynamics challenges occurring in the beam lines connecting the damping rings and the main linac. And we outline how these motivate design choices for the general RTML layout as well as its integration into the overall CLIC layout. Constraints originating from longitudinal dynamics and stabilization requirements of beam energy and phase at the main linac entrance are emphasized.

  3. The CLIC Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)554857

    2016-01-01

    The physics and detector studies for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced. A staged programme of $e^{+}e^{−}$ collisions covering $\\sqrt{s}$ = 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV, and 3 TeV would allow precise measurements of Higgs boson couplings, in many cases to the percent level. This corresponds to precision higher than that expected for the high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider. Such precise Higgs coupling measurements would allow sensitivity to a variety of new physics models and the ability to distinguish between them. In addition, new particles directly produced in pairs could be measured with great precision, and measurements in the top-quark sector would provide sensitivity to new physics effects at the scales of tens of TeV.

  4. CLIC Status and Outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Stapnes, Stapnes

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider study (CLIC) is in the process of completing a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for a multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider. The CLICconcept is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures. The RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is produced by a novel two beam acceleration scheme, where power is extracted from a high current drive beam that runs parallel with the main linac. In order to establish the feasibility of this concept a number of key issues have been addressed. A short summary of the progress and status of the corresponding studies will be given, as well as an outline of the preparation and work towards an implementation plan by 2016.

  5. A Versatile Beam Loss Monitoring System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kastriotou, Maria; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Nebot Del Busto, Eduardo; Tecker, Frank; Welsch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The design of a potential CLIC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system presents multiple challenges. To successfully cover the 48 km of beamline, ionisation chambers and optical fibre BLMs are under investigation. The former fulfils all CLIC requirements but would need more than 40000 monitors to protect the whole facility. For the latter, the capability of reconstructing the original loss position with a multi-bunch beam pulse and multiple loss locations still needs to be quantified. Two main sources of background for beam loss measurements are identified for CLIC. The two-beam accelerator scheme introduces so-called crosstalk, i.e. detection of losses originating in one beam line by the monitors protecting the other. Moreover, electrons emitted from the inner surface of RF cavities and boosted by the high RF gradients may produce signals in neighbouring BLMs, limiting their ability to detect real beam losses. This contribution presents the results of dedicated experiments performed in the CLIC Test Facility to qu...

  6. Crab Compensation for LHC Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Tomás, R; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    An R&D program to establish a road map for the installation of crab cavities in the LHC is rapidly advancing. Both local and global crab schemes are under investigation to develop cavities that will be compatible with the LHC optics and meet the aperture requirements. Space and aperture constraints to accommodate a prototype crab cavity in the LHC along with related optics issues are presented. The design of a prototype $TM_{110}$ cavity and pertinent RF requirements including impedance estimates and damping are discussed.

  7. Good Crab, Bad Crab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are crabs friends or foes of marsh grass, benefit or detriment to the salt marsh system? We examined Uca pugilator (sand fiddler) and Sesarma reticulatum (purple marsh crab) with Spartina patens (salt marsh hay) at two elevations (10 cm below MHW and 10 cm above MHW) in mesocosms...

  8. CLIC expands to include the Southern Hemisphere

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Australia has recently joined the CLIC collaboration: the enlargement will bring new expertise and resources to the project, and is especially welcome in the wake of CERN budget redistributions following the recent adoption of the Medium Term Plan.   The countries involved in CLIC collaboration With the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 26 August 2010, the ACAS network (Australian Collaboration for Accelerator Science) became the 40th member of in the multilateral CLIC collaboration making Australia the 22nd country to join the collaboration. “The new MoU was signed by the ACAS network, which includes the Australian Synchrotron and the University of Melbourne”, explains Jean-Pierre Delahaye, CLIC Study Leader. “Thanks to their expertise, the Australian institutes will contribute greatly to the CLIC damping rings and the two-beam test modules." Institutes from any country wishing to join the CLIC collaboration are invited to assume responsibility o...

  9. CLIC vertex detector R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar

    2016-07-01

    A vertex detector concept is under development for the proposed multi-TeV linear e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). To perform precision physics measurements in a challenging environment, the CLIC vertex detector pushes the technological requirements to the limits. This paper reviews the requirements for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensor, readout, powering and cooling.

  10. Synchro-betatron effects in the presence of large Piwinski angle and crab cavities at the HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White S.; Calaga, R.; Miyamoto, R.

    2012-05-20

    The reduction of {beta}* at the collision points for the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) requires an increment in the crossing angle to maintain the normalized beam separation to suppress the effects of long-range beam-beam interactions. However, an increase in the crossing angle may give rise to synchro-betatron resonances which may negatively affect the beam emittance and lifetime. 6D weak-strong and strong-strong simulations were performed to study the effect of synchro-betatron resonances in the context of the HL-LHC layout and its suppression via crab crossing.

  11. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bacteria produce acids that cause decay. Tooth pain occurs after decay reaches the inside of the tooth. Dentists can detect cavities by examining the teeth and taking x-rays periodically. Good oral hygiene and regular dental care plus a healthy diet can help prevent cavities. ...

  12. Status of the Fatigue Studies on the CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, S; Neupert, H; Wuensch, Walter; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The need for high accelerating gradients for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) imposes considerable constraints on the materials of the accelerating structures. The surfaces exposed to high pulsed RF (Radio Frequency) currents are subject to cyclic thermal stresses which are expected to induce surface break up by fatigue. Since no fatigue data exists in the literature up to very large numbers of cycles and for the particular stress pattern present in RF cavities, a comprehensive study of copper alloys in this parameter range has been initiated. Fatigue data for selected copper alloys in different states are presented

  13. Tissue and subcellular distribution of CLIC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards John C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CLIC1 is a chloride channel whose cellular role remains uncertain. The distribution of CLIC1 in normal tissues is largely unknown and conflicting data have been reported regarding the cellular membrane fraction in which CLIC1 resides. Results New antisera to CLIC1 were generated and were found to be sensitive and specific for detecting this protein. These antisera were used to investigate the distribution of CLIC1 in mouse tissue sections and three cultured cell lines. We find CLIC1 is expressed in the apical domains of several simple columnar epithelia including glandular stomach, small intestine, colon, bile ducts, pancreatic ducts, airway, and the tail of the epididymis, in addition to the previously reported renal proximal tubule. CLIC1 is expressed in a non-polarized distribution in the basal epithelial cell layer of the stratified squamous epithelium of the upper gastrointesitinal tract and the basal cells of the epididymis, and is present diffusely in skeletal muscle. Distribution of CLIC1 was examined in Panc1 cells, a relatively undifferentiated, non-polarized human cell line derived from pancreatic cancer, and T84 cells, a human colon cancer cell line which can form a polarized epithelium that is capable of regulated chloride transport. Digitonin extraction was used to distinguish membrane-inserted CLIC1 from the soluble cytoplasmic form of the protein. We find that digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is primarily present in the plasma membrane of Panc1 cells. In T84 cells, we find digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is present in an intracellular compartment which is concentrated immediately below the apical plasma membrane and the extent of apical polarization is enhanced with forskolin, which activates transepithelial chloride transport and apical membrane traffic in these cells. The sub-apical CLIC1 compartment was further characterized in a well-differentiated mouse renal proximal tubule cell line. The distribution of CLIC1 was

  14. Overview of the CLIC beam instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T

    2011-01-01

    The performances of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) would rely on extremely tight tolerances on most beam parameters. The requirements for the CLIC beam instrumentation have been reviewed and studied in detail for the whole accelerator complex. In the context of the completion of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, a first attempt was made to propose a technical solution for every CLIC instruments. Even if these choices were based on most recent technological achievements, whenever possible, alternatives solutions focusing on potential improvements on performance, reliability or cost minimization are proposed and will be studied in the future. This paper presents an overview of the CLIC beam instruments, gives a status of their already achieved performances and presents the future work activities.

  15. CLIC inner detectors cooling simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Ramos, F.; Villarejo Bermudez, M.

    2014-01-01

    The strict requirements in terms of material budget for the inner region of the CLIC detector concepts require the use of a dry gas for the cooling of the respective sen- sors. This, in conjunction with the compactness of the inner volumes, poses several challenges for the design of a cooling system that is able to fulfil the required detec- tor specifications. This note introduces a detector cooling strategy using dry air as a coolant and shows the results of computational fluid dynamics simulations used to validate the proposed strategy.

  16. Precision Higgs boson measurement at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)718111

    2016-01-01

    The design of the next generation collider in high energy physics will primarily focus on the possibility to achieve high precision of the measurements of interest. The necessary precision limits are set, in the first place, by the measurement of the Higgs boson but also by measurements that are sensitive to signs of New Physics. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an attractive option for a future multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider, with the potential to cover a rich physics program with high precision. In this lecture the CLIC accelerator, detector and backgrounds will be presented with emphesis on the capabilities of CLIC for precision Higgs physics.

  17. CLIC's three-step plan

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In early October, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) collaboration published its final Conceptual Design Report. Accompanying it was a strategic summary document that describes a whole new approach to the project: developing the linear e+e− collider in three energy stages. Though CLIC’s future still depends on signs from the LHC, its new staged approach to high-energy electron-positron physics for the post-LHC era is nothing short of convincing.   Instead of asking for a 48-kilometre-long commitment right off the bat, the CLIC collaboration is now presenting an accelerator that can be constructed in stages. For example, it could begin as an 11-kilometre 500 GeV accelerator that could later be extended to a 27-kilometre 1.5 TeV machine. Finally, after a decade or so of data taking, it could be taken up to the full 48-kilometre 3 TeV facility (see image 2). “Not only is the approach technically and financially practical, it also offers a very convincing physics prog...

  18. Acquisition system for the CLIC Module

    CERN Document Server

    Vilalte, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    The status of R&D activities for CLIC module acquisition are discussed [1]. LAPP is involved in the design of the local CLIC module acquisition crate, described in the document Study of the CLIC Module Front-End Acquisition and Evaluation Electronics [2]. This acquisition system is a project based on a local crate, assigned to the CLIC module, including several mother boards. These motherboards are foreseen to hold mezzanines dedicated to the different subsystems. This system has to work in radiation environment. LAPP is involved in the development of Drive Beam stripline position monitors read-out, described in the document Drive Beam Stripline BPM Electronics and Acquisition [3]. LAPP also develops a generic acquisition mezzanine that allows to perform all-around acquisition and components tests for drive beam stripline BPM read-out.

  19. Detector Optimization of the CLIC Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Saxe, Gandalf

    2015-01-01

    CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) is a proposed high-energy electron-positron collider at CERN [1] that, if approved, will be built at the feet of the Jura Mountains in Switzerland, passing through CERN. As opposed to hadrons, electrons (e-) and positrons (e+) are elementary particles. Therefore, e-e+ collisions give a well defined initial state which allows high precision studies. A circular collider is not a viable option when going to high energies (several TeV) for a e-e+ collider due to synchrotron radiation. Therefore CLIC is designed as a linear collider. CLIC is proposed to be build in three center-of-mass energy stages: 380 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3.0 TeV. The CLIC physics program includes the high precision measurements of the Higgs and top properties, the observation of rare processes, and the possible discovery of new particles [3].

  20. Successful start for new CLIC test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A new test facility is being built to study key feasibility issues for a possible future linear collider called CLIC. Commissioning of the first part of the facility began in June 2003 and nominal beam parameters have been achieved already.

  1. CLIC Accelerated R&D

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Ian H

    2005-01-01

    An accelerated R&D programme to demonstrate the key feasibility issues of the CLIC scheme before 2010 was approved by the CERN Council in March 2004. This report describes the activities, extra resources and time schedule to complete this programme. The activities are presented in the form of work-packages. Laboratories, Universities and Funding Agencies around the world have been invited by the CERN DG to participate in the programme by taking full technical responsibility for part, complete or several work packages and/or providing voluntary contributions "a la carte", in cash, in kind and/or in man-power. The intention is to set-up a multi-lateral collaboration between all laboratories interested in such a development.

  2. A Luminosity Calorimeter for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Sadeh, I

    2009-01-01

    For the relative precision of the luminosity measurement at CLIC, a preliminary target value of 1% is being assumed. This may be accomplished by constructing a finely granulated calorimeter, which will measure Bhabha scattering at small angles. In order to achieve the design goal, the geometrical parameters of the calorimeter need to be defined. Several factors influence the design of the calorimeter; chief among these is the need to minimize the error on the luminosity measurement while avoiding the intense beam background at small angles. In this study the geometrical parameters are optimized for the best performance of the calorimeter. In addition, the suppression of physics background to Bhabha scattering is investigated and a set of selection cuts is introduced.

  3. Multibunch Emittance Preservation in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Guignard, Gilbert

    1996-01-01

    In high-frequency linacs, where the wakefields are strong, the stability of a train of bunches is critical. The beam break-up due to long range wakefields induces a decoherence of the bunch oscillations and a consequent blow-up of the effective betatron emittances of the whole train. Since the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study now includes several bunches per pulse, it is important to analyse numerically and theoretically this emittance blow-up. possibilities of controlling the beam break-up without upsetting the single bunch stability have been considered: first a multibunch generalization of the BNS damping principle, secondly an attenuation of the long-range fields, and thirdly an increase of the focusing in order to overconstrain the beam. Simulation codes have been written for both checking the theoretical predictions and investigating the requirements associated with a possible application to the main linac. Animated graphics make it possible to get a didactic display of the multibunch instability.

  4. Achievements and Future Plans of CLIC Test Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    CTF2 was originally designed to demonstrate the feasibility of two-beam acceleration with high current drive beams and a string of 30 GHz CLIC accelerating structure prototypes (CAS). This goal was achieved in 1999 and the facility has since been modified to focus on high gradient testing of CAS's and 30 GHz single cell cavities (SCC). With these modifications, it is now possible to provide 30 GHz RF pulses of more than 150 MW and an adjustable pulselength from 3 to 15 ns. While the SCC results are promising, the testing of CAS's revealed problems of RF breakdown and related surface damage. As a consequence, a new R&D program has been launched to advance the understanding of RF breakdown processes, to improve surface properties, investigate new materials and to optimise the structure geometries of the CAS's. In parallel the construction of a new facility named CTF3 has started. CTF3 will mainly serve two purposes. The first is the demonstration of the CLIC drive beam generation scheme. CTF3 will acceler-a...

  5. CLICdp Overview. Overview of physics potential at CLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Aharon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CLICdp, the CLIC detector and physics study, is an international collaboration presently composed of 23 institutions. The collaboration is addressing detector and physics issues for the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC, a high-energy electron-positron accelerator which is one of the options for the next collider to be built at CERN. Precision physics under challenging beam and background conditions is the key theme for the CLIC detector studies. This leads to a number of cutting-edge R&D activities within CLICdp. The talk includes a brief introduction to CLIC, accelerator and detectors, hardware R&D as well as physics studies at CLIC.

  6. Tunable Achromats and CLIC Applications

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, T E

    2000-01-01

    It is imperative for linear colliders that the bunch length be adjustable. In most cases bunch compression is required, but recently, in the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) RF Power Source, it was shown that bunch stretching may also be necessary. In some situations, both modes may be needed, which implies the need for tunable magnetic insertions. This is even more essential in a test facility, to span a wide experimental range. In addition, flexible tuning provides a better control of the stability of an isochronous insertion. To start a numerical search for a tunable insertion from scratch is very uncertain because the related phase space is very uneven. However, a starting point obtained with an analytical approximation is often sufficient to ensure convergence. Another advantage of the analytical treatment described in this paper is that it sheds light on the shape of the entire phase space. To achieve this the isochronous achromat developed previously has been given tuning capabilities by ex...

  7. Light-flavor squark reconstruction at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)548062; Weuste, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a simulation study of the prospects for the mass measurement of TeV-scale light- flavored right-handed squark at a 3 TeV e+e collider based on CLIC technology. The analysis is based on full GEANT4 simulations of the CLIC_ILD detector concept, including Standard Model physics backgrounds and beam-induced hadronic backgrounds from two- photon processes. The analysis serves as a generic benchmark for the reconstruction of highly energetic jets in events with substantial missing energy. Several jet finding algorithms were evaluated, with the longitudinally invariant kt algorithm showing a high degree of robustness towards beam-induced background while preserving the features typically found in algorithms developed for e+e- collisions. The presented study of the reconstruction of light-flavored squarks shows that for TeV-scale squark masses, sub-percent accuracy on the mass measurement can be achieved at CLIC.

  8. Physics highlights at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, the physics potential for the e+e- linear collider experiments ILC and CLIC is reviewed. The experimental conditions are compared to those at hadron colliders and their intrinsic value for precision experiments, complementary to the hadron colliders, is discussed. The detector concepts for ILC and CLIC are outlined in their most important aspects related to the precision physics. Highlights from the physics program and from the benchmark studies are given. It is shown that linear colliders are a promising tool, complementing the LHC in essential ways to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics.

  9. New clic-g structure design

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082335

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of the Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure is called ‘CLIC-G’. It is described in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report (CDR) [1]. As shown in Fig. 1, a regular cell of the structure has four waveguides to damp unwanted high-order-modes (HOMs). These waveguides are dimensioned to cut off the fundamental working frequency in order to prevent the degradation of the fundamental mode Q-factor. The cell geometry and HOM damping loads had been extensively optimized in order to maximize the RF-to-beam efficiency, to minimize the cost, and to meet the beam dynamics and the high gradient RF constraints [2

  10. CLIC preparations go up a notch

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider gears up for post-LHC physics with an international workshop. A schematic diagram of CLIC.In June CERN gained a new building: number 2010. And as chance would have it, this is more than just a number to its new residents. By the year 2010, teams working at the new CLIC Experimental Area, along with the already established CLIC Test Facility Three (CTF3), hope to have demonstrated the feasibility of the Compact Linear Collider and, depending on results from the LHC, embark on its final design and proposal. A workshop on 16t-18 October brought people from all around the world to CERN to exchange ideas and hear how the ambitious project is progressing. CLIC is a project that aims to extend lepton collider technology to multi-TeV energy physics, colliding leptons with a centre-of-mass-energy up to 3TeV, more than ten times the energy of the LEP. This is only possible in a linear collider, where no energy is lo...

  11. Modeling Crabbing Dynamics in an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Univ. de Guanajuato (DCI-UG), Leon (Mexico); Morozov, Vasiliy S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Satogata, Todd J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A local crabbing scheme requires π/2 (mod π) horizontal betatron phase advances from an interaction point (IP) to the crab cavities on each side of it. However, realistic phase advances generated by sets of quadrupoles, or Final Focusing Blocks (FFB), between the crab cavities located in the expanded beam regions and the IP differ slightly from π/2. To understand the effect of crabbing on the beam dynamics in this case, a simple model of the optics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) including local crabbing was developed using linear matrices and then studied numerically over multiple turns (1000 passes) of both electron and proton bunches. The same model was applied to both local and global crabbing schemes to determine the linear-order dynamical effects of the synchro-betatron coupling induced by crabbing.

  12. R&D Challenges of a CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kraaij, E

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for an electron-positron collider with a center- of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. Given the unprecedented experimental conditions at CLIC none of the technologies available today can fulfill all requirements set for the vertex detector. At the conference these conditions and the challenges they pose for the R&D of a CLIC vertex detector were presented.

  13. The CLIC feasibility demonstration in CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Skowroński, P K; Bettoni, S; Constance, B; Corsini, R; Divall Csatari, M; Dabrowski, A E; Doebert, S; Dubrovskiy, A; Kononenko, O; Olvegaard, M; Persson, T; Rabiller, A; Tecker, F; Farabolini, W; Lillestol, R L; Adli, E; Palaia, A; Ruber, R

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 is to demonstrate the feasibility issues of the CLIC two-beam technology: the efficient generation of a very high current drive beam, used as the power source to accelerate the main beam to multi-TeV energies with gradients of over 100 MeV/m, and stable drive beam deceleration. Results of successful beam acceleration with over 100 MeV/m energy gain are shown. Measurements of drive beam deceleration over a chain of Power Extraction Structures (PETS) are presented. The achieved RF power levels, the stability of the power production and of the deceleration are discussed. Finally, we give an overview of the remaining issues to be addressed by the end of 2011.

  14. The CLIC Post-Collision Line

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E; Elsener, K; Sailer, A; Uythoven, J; Appleby, R B; Salt, M; Ferrari, A; Ziemann, V

    2010-01-01

    The 1.5 TeV CLIC beams, with a total power of 14 MW per beam, are disrupted at the interaction point due to the very strong beam-beam effect. As a result, some 3.5 MW reach the main dump in form of beamstrahlung photons. About 0.5 MW of e+e- pairs with a very broad energy spectrum need to be disposed of along the post-collision line. The conceptual design of this beam line will be presented. Emphasis will be on the optimization studies of the CLIC post-collision line design with respect to the energy deposition in windows, dumps and absorbers, on the design of the luminosity monitoring for a fast feedback to the beam steering and on the background conditions for the luminosity monitoring equipment.

  15. Academic Training - Technological challenges of CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Technological challenges of CLIC R. Corsini, S. Doebert, S. Redaelli, T.Lefevre, CERN-AB and G. Arnau Izquierdo, H. Mainaud, CERN-TS Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale and beyond to very high precision. While the International Linear Collider (ILC) scheme of a collider in the 0.5 - 1 TeV range enters the engineering design phase, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study explores the technical feasibility of a collider capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain. Key ingredients of the CLIC scheme are acceleration at high-frequency (30 GHz) and high-gradient (150 MV/m) in normal conducting structures and the use of the so-called Two Beam Acceleration concept, where a high-charge electron beam (drive beam) running parallel to the main beam is decelerated to provide the RF power to accelerate the main beam itself. A vigorous R&...

  16. Light-flavor squark reconstruction at CLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frank; Weuste, Lars

    2015-08-01

    We present a simulation study of the prospects for the mass measurement of TeV-scale light-flavored right-handed squarks at a 3 TeV collider based on CLIC technology. In the considered model, these particles decay into their standard-model counterparts and the lightest neutralino, resulting in a signature of two jets plus missing energy. The analysis is based on full GEANT4 simulations of the CLIC_ILD detector concept, including Standard Model physics backgrounds and beam-induced hadronic backgrounds from two-photon processes. The analysis serves as a generic benchmark for the reconstruction of highly energetic jets in events with substantial missing energy. Several jet finding algorithms were evaluated, with the longitudinally invariant algorithm showing a high degree of robustness towards beam-induced background while preserving the features typically found in algorithms developed for collisions. The presented study of the reconstruction of light-flavored squarks shows that for TeV-scale squark masses, sub-percent accuracy on the mass measurement can be achieved at CLIC.

  17. Silicon pixel R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)754303

    2016-01-01

    Challenging detector requirements are imposed by the physics goals at the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). A single point resolution of 3μm for the vertex detector and 7μm for the tracker is required. Moreover, the CLIC vertex detector and tracker need to be extremely light weighted with a material budget of 0.2 % X0 per layer in the ver- tex detector and 1-2%X0 in the tracker. A fast time slicing of 10ns is further required to suppress background from beam-beam interactions. A wide range of sensor and readout ASIC technologies are investigated within the CLIC silicon pixel R&D effort. Various hybrid planar sensor assemblies with a pixel size of 25x25μm2 and 55x55μm2 have been produced and characterised by laboratory measurements and during test-beam campaigns. Experimental and simulation results for thin (50μm-500μm) slim edge and active-edge planar, and High-Voltage CMOS sensors hybridised to various readout ASICs (Timepix, Timepix3, CLICpix) are presented.

  18. CLIC accelerator modules under construction at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2012-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) study is dedicated to the design of an electron-positron (e- e+) linear accelerator, colliding particle beams at the energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC required luminosity can be reached with powerful particle beams (14 MW each) colliding with extremely small dimensions and high beam stability at the interaction point. The accelerated particle beams must have dimensions of 45 nm in the horizontal plane and 1 nm in the vertical plane. CLIC relies upon a novel two-beam acceleration concept in which the Radio Frequency (RF) power is extracted from a low energy but high-intensity particle beam, called Drive Beam (DB), and transferred to a parallel high energy accelerating particle beam, called Main Beam (MB). The extraction and transfer of the RF power is achieved by the Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) and the particle beam acceleration is achieved with high precision RF-Accelerating Structures (AS), operating at 11.9942 GHz with an accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m, whi...

  19. Higgs and BSM physics at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)669060

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a possible future multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider, offering the potential for a rich Standard Model physics programme and sensitivity to a wide range of phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The physics reach of CLIC has been studied for several centre-of-mass energies, motivating a staged construction and providing the opportunity for precise studies of the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson. Operation at a few hundred GeV allows the couplings and width of the Higgs to be determined in a model independent manner through the study of the Higgsstrahlung and WW-fusion processes. Operation at higher centre-of-mass energies, up to 3 TeV, provides higher statistics and the potential to study rare Higgs decays, the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs self-coupling. The results at all energy stages are combined in a model independent global Higgs fit. The higher energy stages of CLIC are targeted to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Within the kinematic...

  20. Impact of Dynamic Magnetic fields on the CLIC Main Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Snuverink, J; Jach, C; Jeanneret, JB; Schulte, D; Stulle, F

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) accelerator has strong precision requirements on the position of the beam. The beam position will be sensitive to external dynamic magnetic fields (stray fields) in the nanotesla regime. The impact of these fields on the CLIC main beam has been studied by performing simulations on the lattices and tolerances have been determined. Several mitigation techniques will be discussed.

  1. Simulation of Beam-Beam Background at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, A

    2010-01-01

    The dense beams used at CLIC to achieve a high luminosity will cause a large amount of background particles through beam-beam interactions. Generator level studies with GUINEAPIG and full detector simulation studies with an ILD based CLIC detector have been performed to evaluate the amount of beam-beam back- ground hitting the vertex detector.

  2. From glutathione transferase to pore in a CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cromer, B A; Morton, C J; Parker, M W; 10.1007/s00249-002-0219-1

    2002-01-01

    Many plasma membrane chloride channels have been cloned and characterized in great detail. In contrast, very little is known about intracellular chloride channels. Members of a novel class of such channels, called the CLICs (chloride intracellular channels), have been identified over the last few years. A striking feature of the CLIC family of ion channels is that they can exist in a water- soluble state as well as a membrane-bound state. A major step forward in understanding the functioning of these channels has been the recent crystal structure determination of one family member, CLIC1. The structure confirms that CLICs are members of the glutathione S- transferase superfamily and provides clues as to how CLICs can insert into membranes to form chloride channels. (69 refs).

  3. A Multi-TeV Linear Collider Based on CLIC Technology CLIC Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, P; Draper, M; Garvey, T; Lebrun, P; Peach, K; Phinney, N; Schmickler, H; Schulte, D; Toge, N

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the accelerator studies for a future multi-TeV e+e- collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) technology. The CLIC concept as described in the report is based on high gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures where the RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The focus of CLIC R&D over the last years has been on addressing a set of key feasibility issues that are essential for proving the fundamental validity of the CLIC concept. The status of these feasibility studies are described and summarized. The report also includes a technical description of the accelerator components and R&D to develop the most important parts and methods, as well as a description of the civil engineering and technical services associated with the installation. Several larger system tests have been performed to validate the two-beam scheme, and of particular importance are the results from ...

  4. The physics benchmark processes for the detector performance studies used in CLIC CDR Volume 3

    CERN Document Server

    Allanach, B.J.; Desch, K.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G.; Grefe, C.; Kraml, S.; Lastovicka, T.; Linssen, L.; Marschall, J.; Martin, S.P.; Muennich, A.; Poss, S.; Roloff, P.; Simon, F.; Strube, J.; Thomson, M.; Wells, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    This note describes the detector benchmark processes used in volume 3 of the CLIC conceptual design report (CDR), which explores a staged construction and operation of the CLIC accelerator. The goal of the detector benchmark studies is to assess the performance of the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detector concepts for different physics processes and at a few CLIC centre-of-mass energies.

  5. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  6. Small Angle Crab Compensation for LHC IR Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Akai, K; Dorda, U; Ohmi, K; Oide, K; Tomás, R; Zimmermann, T

    2007-01-01

    A small angle crab scheme is being considered for the LHC luminosity upgrade. In this paper we present a 400MHz superconducting cavity design and discuss the pertinent RF challenges. We also present a study on the beam-beam performance and proton-beam emittance growth in the presence of crab compensation, with RF noise sources.

  7. Conceptual Design for CLIC Gun Pulser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Tao [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a proposed future electron-positron collider, designed to perform collisions at energies from 0.5 to 5 TeV, with a nominal design optimized for 3 TeV (Dannheim, 2012). The Drive Beam Accelerator consists of a thermionic DC gun, bunching section and an accelerating section. The thermionic gun needs deliver a long (~143us) pulse of current into the buncher. A pulser is needed to drive grid of the gun to generate a stable current output. This report explores the requirements of the gun pulser and potential solutions to regulate grid current.

  8. Electro-Weak Fits at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    De Curtis, S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the future linear colliders is to extend the sensitivity to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. Several models predict the existence of new vector resonances in the multi-TeV region. We review the existing limits on the masses of these new resonances from LEP/SLC and TEVATRON data and from the atomic parity violation measurements, in some specific models. We study the potential of a multi-TeV e+e- collider, such as CLIC, for the determination of their properties and nature.

  9. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretchedwire RF measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Silvia Zorzetti, Silvia; Galindo Muño, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-m regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  10. Combined Fits of CLIC Higgs Results for the Snowmass Process

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, F; Roloff, P

    2013-01-01

    This note presents three combined fits of CLIC Higgs physics results, a model- independent fit based on minimal assumptions and two model-dependent fits assuming that the total width is described by the sum of nine (seven) different visible final states with coupling parameters given by the deviation of the re- spective partial widths from their SM values. The input values are a snapshot of the CLIC Higgs analyses as of September 2013. The results demonstrate the capabilities of the full three-stage CLIC physics program for a precise ex- ploration of the Higgs sector.

  11. Crab Crossing Schemes and Studies for Electron Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Ahmed, Y. Derbenev, V. Morozov, A. Castilla, G.A. Krafft, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang, J.R. Delayen

    2011-09-01

    This report shows our progress in crab crossing consideration for future electron-ion collider envisioned at JLab. In this design phase, we are evaluating two crabbing schemes viz., the deflecting and dispersive. The mathematical formulations and lattice design for these schemes are discussed in this paper. Numerical simulations involving particle tracking through a realistic deflecting RF cavity and optics illustrate the desired crab tilt of 25 mrad for 1.35 MV. Evolution of beam propagation are shown which provides the physical insight of the crabbing phenomenon.

  12. Summary of the BDS and MDI CLIC08 Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Ahmed, I; Ambatu, PK; Angal-Kalinin, D; Barlow, R; Baud, J P; Bolzon, B; Braun, H; Burkhardt, H; Burt, GC; Corsini, R; Dalena, B; Dexter, AC; Dolgashev, V; Elsener, K; Fernandez Hernando, JL; Gaillard, G; Geffroy, N; Jackson, F; Jeremie, A; Jones, RM; McIntosh, P; Moffeit, K; Peltier, F; Resta-López, J; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Toader, A; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    This note summarizes the presentations held within the Beam Delivery System and Machine Detector Interface working group of the CLIC08 workshop. The written contributions have been provided by the presenters on a voluntary basis.

  13. SMALL ANGLE CRAB COMPENSATION FOR LHC IR UPGRADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALAGA,R.; DORDA, U.; OHMI, D.; OIDE, K.; TOMAS, R.; ZIMMERMANN, F.

    2007-06-25

    A small angle (< 1 mrad) crab scheme is an attractive option for the LHC luminosity upgrade to recover the geometric luminosity loss from the finite crossing angle [I]. The luminosity loss increases steeply to unacceptable levels as the IP beta function is reduced below its nominal value (see Fig. 1 in Ref. [2]). The crab compensation in the LHC can be accomplished using only two sets of deflecting RF cavities, placed in collision-free straight sections of the LHC to nullify the effective crossing angles at IPI & IP5. We also explore a 400 MHz superconducting cavity design and discuss the pertinent RF challenges. We present IR optics configurations with low-angle crab crossing, study the beam-beam performance and proton-beam emittance growth in the presence of crab compensation, lattice errors, and crab RF noise sources.

  14. Luminosity Upgrade of CLIC LHC ep/gp Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aksakal, H; Nergiz, Z; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

    2007-01-01

    An energy frontier or QCD Explorer ep and collider can be realized by colliding high-energy photons generated by Compton backscattered off a CLIC electron beam, at either 75 GeV or 1.5 TeV, with protons or ions stored in the LHC. In this study we discuss a performance optimization of this type of collider by tailoring the parameters of both CLIC and LHC. An estimate of the ultimately achievable luminosity is given.

  15. Requirements of CLIC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Holzer, EB; Jonker, M; Mallows, S; Otto, T; Welsch, C

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) [1] is a proposed multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider being designed by a world-wide collaboration. It is based on a novel twobeam acceleration scheme in which two beams (drive and main beam) are placed in parallel to each other and energy is transferred from the drive beam to the main one. Beam losses on either of them can have catastrophic consequences for the machine, because of high intensity (drive beam) or high energy and small emittance (main beam). In the framework of machine protection, a Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has to be put in place. This paper discusses the requirements for the beam loss system in terms of detector sensitivity, resolution, dynamic range and ability to distinguish losses originating from various sources. The two-beam module where the protection from beam losses is particularly challenging and important, is studied.

  16. Assembly Test of Elastic Averaging Technique to Improve Mechanical Alignment for Accelerating Structure Assemblies in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is being studied at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e- collider [1]. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF-components are important for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is very sensitive to errors in shape and location of the accelerating cavity. This causes considerable issues in the field of mechanical design and manufacturing. Currently the design of the accelerating structures is a disk design. Alternatively it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which favour the mass manufacturing. The functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. The alignment of these quadrants has been previously made kinematic by using steel pins or spheres to align the pieces together. This method proved to be a quite tedious and time consuming method of assembly. To limit the number of different error sources, a meth...

  17. Studies on high-precision machining and assembly of CLIC RF structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huopana, J; Riddone, G; Österberg, K

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is currently under development at CERN as a potential multi-TeV e+e– collider. The manufacturing and assembly tolerances for the required RF components are essential for the final efficiency and for the operation of CLIC. The proper function of an accelerating structure is sensitive to mechanical errors in the shape and the alignment of the accelerating cavity. The current tolerances are in the micron range. This raises challenges in the field of mechanical design and demands special manufacturing technologies and processes. Currently the mechanical design of the accelerating structures is based on a disk design. Alternatively, it is possible to create the accelerating assembly from quadrants, which has the potential to be favoured for the mass production due to simplicity and cost. In this case, the functional shape inside of the accelerating structure remains the same and a single assembly uses less parts. This paper focuses on the development work done in design and sim...

  18. Rapid cavity prototyping using mode matching and globalised scattering matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Shinton, I

    2009-01-01

    Cavity design using traditional mesh based numerical means (such as the finite element or finite difference methods) require large mesh calculations in order to obtain accurate values and cavity optimisation is often not achieved. Here we present a mode matching scheme which utilises a globalised scattering matrix approach that allows cavities with curved surfaces (i.e. cavities with elliptical irises and or equators) to be accurately simulated allowing rapid cavity prototyping and optimisation to be achieved. Results on structures in the CLIC main

  19. Crab Rationalization Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Crab Rationalization Program (Program) allocates BSAI crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities. The North Pacific Fishery Management...

  20. CLIC TWO-BEAM MODULE FOR THE CLIC CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND RELATED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM*

    CERN Document Server

    Samoshkin, A; Solodko, A; Riddone, G

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) study is a site independent study exploring technological developments to extend linear colliders into the Multi-TeV colliding beam energy range. The two-beam linear accelerator being studied at CERN involves the design and integration of many different technical systems, tightly bound and influencing each other. For the construction of two linacs it has been decided to proceed with a modular design, and repetitive two-beam modules of a few types were defined. The modules consist of micron-level precision components operating under ultra-high vacuum as required by the beam physics. For the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, the development and system integration is mainly focused on the most complex module type containing the highest number of components and technical systems. For proving the proper functioning of the needed technical systems and confirming their feasibility it has been decided to build four prototype modules and test them without beam. In addition, three module...

  1. CLIC Two-Beam Module for the CLIC Conceptual Design and related experimental program

    CERN Document Server

    Samoshkin, A; Solodko, A; Riddone, G

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) study is a site independent study exploring technological developments to extend linear colliders into the Multi-TeV colliding beam energy range. The two-beam linear accelerator being studied at CERN involves the design and integration of many different technical systems, tightly bound and influencing each other. For the construction of two linacs it has been decided to proceed with a modular design, and repetitive two-beam modules of a few types were defined. The modules consist of micron-level precision components operating under ultra-high vacuum as required by the beam physics. For the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, the development and system integration is mainly focused on the most complex module type containing the highest number of components and technical systems. For proving the proper functioning of the needed technical systems and confirming their feasibility it has been decided to build four prototype modules and test them without beam. In addition, three module...

  2. The CLIC electron and positron polarized sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Bulyak, Eugene; Chehab, Robert; Dadoun, Olivier; Gai, Wei; Gladkikh, Peter; Kamitani, Takuya; Kuriki, Masao; Liu, Wanming; Maryuama, Takashi; Omori, Tsunehiko; Poelker, Matt; Sheppard, John; Urakawa, Junji; Variola, Alessandro; Vivoli, Alessandro; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zhou, Feng; Zimmermann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC polarized electron source is based on a DC gun where the photocathode is illuminated by a laser beam. Each micro-bunch has a charge of 6x109 e−, a width of 100 ps and a repetition rate of 2 GHz. A peak current of 10 A in the micro-bunch is a challenge for the surface charge limit of the photo-cathode. Two options are feasible to generate the 2 GHz e− bunch train: 100 ps micro-bunches can be extracted from the photo-cathode either by a 2 GHz laser system or by generating a macro-bunch using a ~200 ns laser pulse and a subsequent RF bunching system to produce the appropriate micro-bunch structure. Recent results obtained by SLAC, for the latter case, are presented. The polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a laser Compton scattering process. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent onto a target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The Compton backscattering process occurs eithe...

  3. CLIC quadrupole stabilization and nano-positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, C; Artoos, K; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C

    2010-01-01

    In the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) currently under study, electrons and positrons will be accelerated in two linear accelerators to collide at the interaction point with an energy of 0.5- 3 TeV. This machine is constituted of a succession of accelerating structures, used to accelerate the beams of particles, and electromagnets (quadrupoles) used to focus the beams. In order to ensure good performances, the quadrupoles have to be extremely stable. Additionally, they should also have the capability to move by steps of some tens of nanometers every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1nm. This paper proposes a holistic approach to fulfill alternatively both requirements using the same device. The concept is based on piezoelectric hard mounts to isolate the quadrupoles from the ground vibrations in the sensitive range between 1 and 20 Hz, and to provide nano-positioning capabilities. It is also shown that this strategy ensures robustness to external forces (acoustic noise, water flow for the cooling, air flow for th...

  4. Minimizing Emittance for the CLIC Damping Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Levitchev, E; Piminov, P; Schulte, Daniel; Siniatkin, S; Vobly, P P; Zimmermann, Frank; Zolotarev, Konstantin V; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC damping rings aim at unprecedented small normalized equilibrium emittances of 3.3 nm vertical and 550 nm horizontal, for a bunch charge of 2.6·109 particles and an energy of 2.4 GeV. In this parameter regime the dominant emittance growth mechanism is intra-beam scattering. Intense synchrotron radiation damping from wigglers is required to counteract its effect. Here the overall optimization of the wiggler parameters is described, taking into account state-of-the-art wiggler technologies, wiggler effects on dynamic aperture, and problems of wiggler radiation absorption. Two technical solutions, one based on superconducting magnet technology the other on permanent magnets are presented. Although dynamic aperture and tolerances of this ring design remain challenging, benefits are obtained from the strong damping. For optimized wigglers, only bunches for a single machine pulse may need to be stored, making injection/extraction particularly simple and limiting the synchrotron-radiation power. With a 36...

  5. Status of Wakefield Monitor Experiments at the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Aftab, Namra; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Grudiev, Alexej; Javeed, Sumera; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    For the very low emittance beams in CLIC, it is vital to mitigate emittance growth which leads to reduced luminosity in the detectors. One factor that leads to emittance growth is transverse wakefields in the accelerating structures. In order to combat this the structures must be aligned with a precision of a few um. For achieving this tolerance, accelerating structures are equipped with wakefield monitors that measure higher-order dipole modes excited by the beam when offset from the structure axis. We report on such measurements, performed using prototype CLIC accelerating structures which are part of the module installed in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. Measurements with and without the drive beam that feeds rf power to the structures are compared. Improvements to the experimental setup are discussed, and finally remaining measurements that should be performed before the completion of the program are summarized.

  6. CLIC/ILC Researchers Explore New Avenues for Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Researchers from CLIC and ILC met for their first common International Workshop on Linear Colliders, which was held in Geneva from 18 to 22 October. Although the talks were mostly scientific and technical, the political message behind them was a breakthrough, as the workshop showed the progress made in unifying the two communities.   The International Workshop on Linear Colliders (IWLC), which was organised by the European Committee for Future Accelerators, hosted by CERN, and held at CERN and the International Conference Centre in Geneva, attracted a large audience of about 500 experts. Although there have been other joint conferences between the CLIC and ILC communities before, they have all been focused on specific technical and/or managerial issues. The IWLC was part of an ongoing effort by CLIC and ILC to provide an environment in which researchers can exchange ideas, inform their peers about their most recent achievements and work together on common issues. Given the possible technical ov...

  7. Beam Loading Compensation in the Main Linac of CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, D.; Syratchev, I.

    2000-01-01

    Compensation of multi-bunch beam loading is of great importance in the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The bunch-to-bunch energy variation has to stay below 1 part in 1000. In CLIC, the RF power is obtained by decelerating a drive beam which is formed by merging a number of short bunch trains. A promising scheme for tackling beam loading in the main linac is based on varying the lengths of the bunch trains in the drive beam. The scheme and its expected performance are presen...

  8. Higgs Physics at the CLIC Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Philipp Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future $e^+e^-$ collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper presents the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, $\\sqrt{s} =$ 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung ($e^+e^-\\to ZH$) and $WW$-fusion ($e^+e^-\\to H\

  9. Single Z' production at CLIC based on e^- gamma collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Soa, D. V.; H.N. Long(Institute of Physics, VAST, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh, Hanoi, Vietnam); Binh, D. T.; Khoi, D. P.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of CLIC based on e- gamma collisions to search for new $Z'$ gauge boson. Single Z' production at e-gamma colliders in two SU(3)_C X SU(3)_L X U(1)_N models: the minimal model and the model with right-handed (RH) neutrinos is studied in detail. Results show that new Z' gauge bosons can be observed at the CLIC, and the cross sections in the model with RH neutrinos are bigger than those in the minimal one.

  10. Vertex-Detector R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D

    2014-01-01

    A detector concept based on hybrid planar pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC vertex detector. It comprises fast, low-power and small-pitch readout ASICs implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology (CLICpix) coupled to ultra-thin sensors via low-mass interconnects. The power dissipation of the readout chips is reduced by means of power pulsing, allowing for a cooling system based on forced gas flow. In this paper the CLIC vertex-detector requirements are reviewed and the current status of R&D on sensors, readout and detector integration is presented.

  11. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretched-wire RF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzetti, Silvia; Fanucci, Luca; Galindo Muñoz, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-μm regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  12. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretched-wire RF measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-μm regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method. (paper)

  13. Occupancy in the CLIC_ILD Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    KILLENBERG, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the occupancy in the CLIC ILD TPC caused by the beam induced background from gg !hadrons, e+e- pairs and beam halo muons. In addition the particle composition of the backgrounds and the origin of back-scattering particles have been studied.

  14. Photon-Nucleon Collider based on LHC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Aksakal, Husnu; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    We describe the scheme of a photon-nucleon collider where high energy photons generated by Compton backscattering off a CLIC electron beam, at either 75 GeV or 1.5 TeV are collided with protons or ions stored in LHC. Different design constraints for such a collider are discussed and achievable luminosity performance is estimated.

  15. Grid Interface Design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Jankovic, Maria; Clare, Jon; Wheeler, Pat; Aguglia, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the grid interface challenges for CERN’s proposed Compact Linear Colliders’ (CLIC) klystron modulators, including a 280 MW power system optimisation. The modular multilevel converter is evaluated as a candidate topology for a Medium Voltage grid interface along with a control method for reducing the impact of klystron modulators on the electrical network.

  16. Pulse Power Modulator development for the CLIC Damping Ring Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity (10-34 – 10-35 cm-2s-1) and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV: CLIC would complement LHC physics in the multi-TeV range. The CLIC design relies on Pre-Damping Rings (PDR) and Damping Rings (DR) to achieve the very low emittance, through synchrotron radiation, needed for the luminosity requirements of CLIC. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the DR kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses: the 2 GHz specification called for a 160 ns duration flat-top of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. In order to meet these demanding specifications, a combination of broadband impedance matching, optimized electrical circuit layout and advanced control techniques is required. A solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is the most promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications...

  17. Update on beam loss monitoring at CTF3 for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, L J; Effinger, E; Holzer, E B; del Busto, E N; Mallows, S; Branger, E

    2013-01-01

    The primary role of the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system for the compact linear collider (CLIC) study is to work within the machine protection system. Due to the size of the CLIC facility, a BLM that covers large distances along the beam line is highly desirable, in particular for the CLIC drive beam decelerators, which would alternatively require some ~40,000 localised monitors. Therefore, an optical fibre BLM system is currently under investigation which can cover large sections of beam line at a time. A multimode fibre has been installed along the Test Beam Line at the CLIC test facility (CTF3) where the detection principle is based on the production of Cherenkov photons within the fibre resulting from beam loss and their subsequent transport along the fibre where they are then detected at the fibre ends using silicon photomultipliers. Several additional monitors including ACEMs, PEP-II and diamond detectors have also been installed. In this contribution the first results from the BLMs are presented, comp...

  18. A 12 GHZ RF Power source for the CLIC study

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F; Curt, S; Doebert, S; McMonagle, G; Rossat, G; Schirm, KM; Syratchev, I; Timeo, L; Kuzikhov, S; Vikharev, AA; Haase, A; Sprehn, D; Jensen, A; Jongewaard, EN; Nantista, CD; Vlieks, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  19. Interaction of Human Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 1 (CLIC1) with Lipid Bilayers: A Fluorescence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Joanna E; Goodchild, Sophia C; Breit, Samuel N; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise J

    2016-07-12

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) is very unusual as it adopts a soluble glutathione S-transferase-like canonical fold but can also autoinsert into lipid bilayers to form an ion channel. The conversion between these forms involves a large, but reversible, structural rearrangement of the CLIC1 module. The only identified environmental triggers controlling the metamorphic transition of CLIC1 are pH and oxidation. Until now, there have been no high-resolution structural data available for the CLIC1 integral membrane state, and consequently, a limited understanding of how CLIC1 unfolds and refolds across the bilayer to form a membrane protein with ion channel activity exists. Here we show that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to establish the interaction and position of CLIC1 in a lipid bilayer. Our method employs a fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) approach between CLIC1 and a dansyl-labeled lipid analogue to probe the CLIC1-lipid interface. Under oxidizing conditions, a strong FRET signal between the single tryptophan residue of CLIC1 (Trp35) and the dansyl-lipid analogue was detected. When considering the proportion of CLIC1 interacting with the lipid bilayer, as estimated by fluorescence quenching experiments, the FRET distance between Trp35 and the dansyl moiety on the membrane surface was determined to be ∼15 Å. This FRET-detected interaction provides direct structural evidence that CLIC1 associates with membranes. The results presented support the current model of an oxidation-driven interaction of CLIC1 with lipid bilayers and also propose a membrane anchoring role for Trp35. PMID:27299171

  20. Edible crabs of Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Muthiga, N.

    1986-01-01

    This is a short paper on the edible crabs of Kenya especially Scylla serrata , their present state of exploitation, distribution, abundance and biology. Preliminary investigations have shown that the crab resources are under-exploited. Research is therefore needed into the available stocks, methods of harvesting, processing, marketing and their biologies.

  1. Intra-Beam scattering in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Vivoli, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC 3 TeV nominal design requires very low emittance of the electron and positron beams to be reached in the damping rings. Due to low energy and to relatively high bunch charge and ultra-low emittance, Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) effect is very strong and an accurate calculation is needed to check if the required emittance is effectively reached. For this reason it is being developed at CERN a new software for IBS and Radiation Effects (SIRE), which simulates the evolution of the beam particle distribution in the damping rings, taking into account radiation damping, IBS and quantum excitation. In this paper we present the results of our simulations performed with SIRE on a lattice of the CLIC damping rings.

  2. Common ground in ILC and CLIC detector concepts

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider will accelerate particles and create collisions in different ways. Nonetheless, the detector concepts under development share many commonalities.   Timepix chips under scrutiny in the DESY test beam with the help of the beam telescope. CERN physicist Dominik Dannheim explains that the CLIC detector plans are adaptations of the ILC detector designs with a few select modifications. “When we started several years ago, we did not want to reinvent the wheel,” says Dannheim. “The approved ILC detector concepts served as an excellent starting point for our designs.” Essential differences Both CLIC and ILC scientists foresee general-purpose detectors that make measurements with exquisite precision. These colliders, however, have very different operating parameters, which will have important consequences for the various detector components. The ILC’s collision energy is set at 500 GeV ...

  3. Measurement of stau_1 pair production at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Muennich, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a study performed for the CLIC Conceptual Design Report Volume 3 on the measurement of stau_1 pair production at sqrt(s) = 1.4 TeV. Only the hadronic decay of taus are considered. Results obtained using full detector simulation and including beam-induced backgrounds for the mass and for the production cross section of the stau_1 are discussed.

  4. First phase of CLIC R&D complete

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Let’s turn back the clocks to 2002: the LHC is still under construction, the wrap-up of the LEP physics programme is still in recent memory and the future of electron-positron accelerators at CERN is ambiguous. It was then that CLIC set out to prove the feasibility of their novel accelerator design in the CTF3 test facility. Though once a tall order for the collaboration, the recently released CLIC Conceptual Design Report has proven many of the major design elements… bringing to an end the first phase of CLIC R&D and pointing toward detailed performance optimisation studies in the next phase.   Streak camera images of the final beam, illustrating the combination of beams in the Combiner Ring. Over a decade ago, the CTF3 team set up shop in the vacated LIL injector site, once home to the weathered machine that delivered electrons and positrons to LEP. Rebuilding and upgrading the machine piece by piece, the CTF3 team converted this mA linac into a high-current drive b...

  5. The 30 GHz transfer structure for the CLIC study

    CERN Document Server

    Carron, G; Thorndahl, L

    1998-01-01

    In the so-called "Two-Beam Acceleration Scheme" the energy of a drive beam is converted to rf power by means of a "Transfer Structure", which plays the role of power source. In the Transfer Structure the bunched drive beam is decelerated by the electromagnetic field which it induces and builds up by the coherent interaction of successive bunches with the chosen longitudinal mode. The CLIC Transfer Structure is original in that it operates at 30 GHz and uses teeth-like corrugations to slow down the hybrid TM mode to make it synchronous with the drive beam. The beam energy is transformed into rf power, which travels along the structure and is collected by the output couplers. The 30 GHz rf power is then transported by means of two waveguides to two main linac disk-loaded accelerating structures. This report describes the CLIC Transfer Structure design, 3-D computer simulations, model construction and measure-ments as well as the prototype construction and testing with the low energy beam in the CLIC Test Facili...

  6. Golden Jubilee Photos: A CLIC for the future

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ Prototype copper accelerating structures for CLIC. New accelerator projects take many years to make and mature. When the LHC project was still only a twinkle in CERN's eye, research was already starting on a new machine. A small team at CERN was setting about the task of studying a high-energy, compact, lepton linear collider, known as CLIC. This is possibly set to become the collider of the future. A machine of this kind has all the advantages of a collider (the total collision energy is equal to the sum of the energies of the two colliding beams) without the drawback of synchrotron radiation, which is produced when particles are accelerated around a ring and thus puts a limit on the energy of such colliders. But in a project as technically challenging as CLIC, considerable technological hurdles must be overcome. To limit the linear collider's length to some tens of kilometres, the beams must acquire a considerable quantity of energy per metre travelled. The collision rate (lumi...

  7. RF Cavity Induced Sensitivity Limitations on Beam Loss Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastriotou, M.; Degiovanni, A.; Sousa, F. S. Domingues; Effinger, E.; Holzer, E. B.; Quirante, J. L. Navarro; del Busto, E. N.; Tecker, F.; Viganò, W.; Welsch, C. P.; Woolley, B. J.

    Due to the secondary showers generated when a particle hits the vacuum chamber, beam losses at an accelerator may be detected via radiation detectors located near the beam line. Several sources of background can limit the sensitivity and reduce the dynamic range of a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM). This document concentrates on potential sources of background generated near high gradient RF cavities due to dark current and voltage breakdowns. An optical fibre has been installed at an experiment of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF3), where a dedicated study of the performance of a loaded and unloaded CLIC accelerating structure is undergoing. An analysis of the collected data and a benchmarking simulation are presented to estimate BLM sensitivity limitations. Moreover, the feasibility for the use of BLMs optimised for the diagnostics of RF cavities is discussed.

  8. CLIC Detector Concepts as described in the CDR: Differences between the GEANT4 and Engineering Models

    CERN Document Server

    Elsener, K; Schlatter, D; Siegrist, N

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC_ILD and CLIC_SiD detector concepts as used for the CDR Vol. 2 in 2011 exist both in GEANT4 simulation models and in engineering layout drawings. At this early stage of a conceptual design, there are inevitably differences between these models, which are described in this note.

  9. Occupancy in the CLIC ILD Time Projection Chamber using Pixelised Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Killenberg, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The occupancy in the CLIC ILD TPC caused by the beam induced background from gamma gamma -> hadrons, e+e- pairs and beam halo muons is very high for conventional pad readout. We show that the occupancy for a pixelised TPC readout is moderate and might be a viable solution to operate a TPC at CLIC.

  10. Scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based eγ colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based eγ colliders. Both direct and resolved contributions to the cross section are examined. We find that the masses of scalar leptoquarks can be probed up to about 0.9 TeV at TESLA and 2.6 TeV at CLIC. (orig.)

  11. Scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based e-gamma colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Cakir, O.; Ateser, E.; Koru, H.

    2002-01-01

    We study scalar leptoquark production at TESLA and CLIC based e-gamma colliders. Both direct and resolved contributions to the cross section are examined. We find that the masses of scalar leptoquarks can be probed up to about 0.9 TeV at TESLA and 2.6 TeV at CLIC.

  12. Crab Meat with Potherb Mustard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Ingredients: Eight fresh crab. 75 grams of potherb mustard, two egg whites, scallions, ginger and cooking wine. Salt to the taste. Directions: 1. Slice and deep fry the potherb mustard till crisp. Place fried mustard on plate. 2. Steam the crab and remove meat. Stir fry meat with scallions, ginger, cooking wine and salt, Return meat to crab shells. 3. Beat egg white until stiff. Cover the crab meat with mixture and garnish. Steam meat for a few minutes. 4. Place the crab shells on fried mustard and serve. This attractive red and white dish features delicious crab meat with savory crisp mustard leaves.

  13. Interaction Point Backgrounds from the CLIC Post Collision Line

    OpenAIRE

    Salt, Michael David

    2012-01-01

    The proposed CLIC accelerator is designed to collide electrons and positrons ata centre of mass energy of 3 TeV, and a luminosity of 5.9 x 10^(34) cm^(−2) s^(−1) at the interactionpoint (IP). Being a single-pass machine, luminosity must be maximised byminimising the beam spot size to the order of a few nanometres. The effects of the finalfocussing and the intense beam-beam effects lead to a high production cross sectionof beamstrahlung photons, and highly divergent outgoing beams, both spatia...

  14. Design of a highly segmented Endcap at a CLIC detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gerwig, H; Siegrist, N

    2010-01-01

    This technical note describes a possible design for a highly segmented end-cap at a CLIC detector with a strong magnetic field up to 5 Tesla. Reinforcement is horizontal in order to allow an insertion of the muon chambers from the side. Construction issues, assembly questions as well as muon chamber access and support questions have been studied. A FEA analysis to optimize dead space for physics and checking the weakening effect of alignment channels through the end-cap have been performed.

  15. R&D for the Vertexing at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Redford, S

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider is a candidate to be the next high-energy particle physics collider. Using a novel acceleration technique, electrons and positrons would be brought into collision with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. Despite challenging levels of beam-induced background, this would provide a relatively clean environment in which to perform precision physics measurements. The vertex detector would be crucial in achieving this, and would need to provide accurate particle tracking information to facilitate secondary vertex reconstruction and jet flavour-tagging. With this goal in mind, current technological limits are being stretched to design a low occupancy, low mass and low-power dissipation vertex detector for CLIC. A concept comprising thin hybrid pixel detectors coupled to high- performance readout ASICs, power-pulsing and air-flow cooling is under development. In this paper, the CLIC vertex detector requirements are reviewed and the current status of R&D on sensors, readout, powerin...

  16. Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this ‘‘hybrid target’’, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

  17. Off-Axis Undulator Radiation for CLIC Drive Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff, A; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) will use a novel acceleration scheme in which energy extracted from a very intense beam of relatively low-energy electrons (the Drive Beam) is used to accelerate a lower intensity Main Beam to very high energy. The high intensity of the Drive Beam, with pulses of more than 1015 electrons, poses a challenge for conventional profile measurements such as wire scanners. Thus, new non-invasive profile measurements are being investigated. In this paper we propose the use of relatively inexpensive permanent-magnet undulators to generate off-axis visible Synchrotron Radiation from the CLIC Drive Beam. The field strength and period length of the undulator should be designed such that the on-axis undulator wavelength is in the ultra-violet. A smaller but still useable amount of visible light is then generated in a hollow cone. This light can be reflected out of the beam pipe by a ring-shaped mirror placed downstream and imaged on a camera. In this contribution, results of SRW and ZEMA...

  18. The CLIC positron source based on compton schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, L; Braun, H; Papaphilippou, Y; Schulte, D; Vivoli, A; Zimmermann, F; Dadoun, O; Lepercq, P; Roux, R; Variola, A; Zomer, F; Pogorelski, I; Yakimenko, V; Gai, W; Liu, W; Kamitani, T; Omori, T; Urakawa, J; Kuriki, M; Takahasi, TM; Bulyak, E; Gladkikh, P; Chehab, R; Clarke, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a Compton process. In one option, Compton backscattering takes place in a so-called “Compton ring”, where an electron beam of 1 GeV interacts with circularly-polarized photons in an optical resonator. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent on to an amorphous target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The nominal CLIC bunch population is 4.2x109 particles per bunch at the exit of the Pre-Damping Ring (PDR). Since the photon flux coming out from a "Compton ring" is not sufficient to obtain the requested charge, a stacking process is required in the PDR. Another option is to use a Compton Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) where a quasicontinual stacking in the PDR could be achieved. A third option is to use a "Compton Linac" which would not require stacking. We describe the overall scheme as well as advantages and constraints of the three option...

  19. Feasibility study of multipoint based laser alignment system for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Mainaud-Durand, H; Piedigrossi, D; Geiger, A

    2012-01-01

    CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) is a study for a future electron-positron collider that would allow physicists to explore a new energy region beyond the capabilities oftoday’s particle accelerators. Alignment is one of the major challenges within the CLIC study in order to achieve the high requirement of a multi-TeV center of mass colliding beam energy range (nominal 3 TeV). To reach this energy in a realistic and cost efficient scenario all accelerator components have to be aligned with an accuracy of 10 μm over a sliding window of 200 m. The demand for a straight line reference is so far based on stretched wires coupled with Wire Positioning Sensors (WPS). These solutions are currently further developed inorder to reduce the drawbacks which are mainly given by their costs and difficult implementation. However, it should be validated through inter-comparison with a solution ideally based on a different physical principle. Therefore, a new metrological approach is proposed using a laser beam as straight lin...

  20. Higgs Physics at the CLIC Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Afanaciev, K; Tehrani, N Alipour; Balázs, C; Benhammou, Y; Benoit, M; Bilki, B; Blaising, J -J; Boland, M J; Boronat, M; Borysov, O; Božović-Jelisavčić, I; Buckland, M; Bugiel, S; Burrows, P N; Charles, T K; Daniluk, W; Dannheim, D; Dasgupta, R; Demarteau, M; Gutierrez, M A Díaz; Eigen, G; Elsener, K; Felzmann, U; Firlej, M; Firu, E; Fiutowski, T; Fuster, J; Gabriel, M; Gaede, F; García, I; Ghenescu, V; Goldstein, J; Green, S; Grefe, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Kačarević, G; Kalinowski, J; Kananov, S; Klempt, W; Kopec, M; Krawczyk, M; Krupa, B; Kucharczyk, M; Kulis, S; Laštovička, T; Lesiak, T; Levy, A; Levy, I; Linssen, L; Lukić, S; Maier, A A; Makarenko, V; Marshall, J S; Mei, K; Milutinović-Dumbelović, G; Moroń, J; Moszczyński, A; Moya, D; Münker, R M; Münnich, A; Neagu, A T; Nikiforou, N; Nikolopoulos, K; Nürnberg, A; Pandurović, M; Pawlik, B; Codina, E Perez; Peric, I; Petric, M; Pitters, F; Poss, S G; Preda, T; Protopopescu, D; Rassool, R; Redford, S; Repond, J; Robson, A; Roloff, P; Ros, E; Rosenblat, O; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Sailer, A; Schlatter, D; Schulte, D; Shumeiko, N; Sicking, E; Simon, F; Simoniello, R; Sopicki, P; Stapnes, S; Ström, R; Strube, J; Świentek, K P; Szalay, M; Tesař, M; Thomson, M A; Trenado, J; Uggerhøj, U I; van der Kolk, N; van der Kraaij, E; Pinto, M Vicente Barreto; Vila, I; Gonzalez, M Vogel; Vos, M; Vossebeld, J; Watson, M; Watson, N; Weber, M A; Weerts, H; Wells, J D; Weuste, L; Winter, A; Wojtoń, T; Xia, L; Xu, B; Żarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zgura, I -S

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future e+e- collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper presents the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating in three energy stages, sqrt(s) = 350 GeV, 1.4 TeV and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e+e- -> ZH) and WW-fusion (e+e- -> Hnunu), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Gamma_H, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at sqrt(s) > 1 TeV provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through WW-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes e+e- -> ttH and e+e- -> HHnunu would allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of...

  1. Cavity-Beam-Transmitter Interaction Formula Collection with Derivation

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, J

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental beam-cavity-transmitter relations for accelerating and deflecting/crab cavities are presented for steady state and time-varying situations. For completeness a compact proof of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is given and the fundamental beam loading theorem is derived.Also the determination of relative bunch form factors is shown.

  2. Experimental Program for the CLIC test facility 3 test beam line

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dobert, S; Olvegaard, M; Schulte, D; Syratchev, I; Lillestol, Reidar

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 Test Beam Line is the first prototype for the CLIC drive beam decelerator. Stable transport of the drive beam under deceleration is a mandatory component in the CLIC two-beam scheme. In the Test Beam Line more than 50% of the total energy will be extracted from a 150 MeV, 28 A electron drive beam, by the use of 16 power extraction and transfer structures. A number of experiments are foreseen to investigate the drive beam characteristics under deceleration in the Test Beam Line, including beam stability, beam blow up and the efficiency of the power extraction. General benchmarking of decelerator simulation and theory studies will also be performed. Specially designed instrumentation including precision BPMs, loss monitors and a time-resolved spectrometer dump will be used for the experiments. This paper describes the experimental program foreseen for the Test Beam Line, including the relevance of the results for the CLIC decelerator studies.

  3. Studies on the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC two-beam module

    CERN Document Server

    Nousiainen, R; Österberg, K

    2010-01-01

    To fulfil the mechanical requirements set by the luminosity goals of the CLIC collider, currently under study, the 2-m two-beam modules, the shortest repetitive elements in the main linac, have to be controlled at micrometer level. At the same time these modules are exposed to variable high power dissipation while the accelerator is ramped up to nominal power as well as when the mode of CLIC operation is varied. This will result into inevitable temperature excursions driving mechanical distortions in and between different module components. A FEM model is essential to estimate and simulate the fundamental thermo-mechanical behaviour of the CLIC two-beam module to facilitate its design and development. In this paper, the fundamental thermal environments for the RF-components of the module are described. Also the thermal and structural results for the studied module configuration are presented showing the fundamental thermo-mechanical behaviour under the main CLIC collider operation conditions.

  4. Choke-Mode Damped Structure Design for the CLIC Main Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zha, Hao; Tang, Chuanxiang; Huang, Wenhui; Shi, Jiaru; Grudiev, Alexej; Wuensch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Choke-mode damped structures are being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structures of main linacs of the compact linear collider (CLIC). Choke-mode structures have the potential for much lower pulsed temperature rise, and lower cost of manufacture and fabrication. A new kind of choke-mode structure was proposed and simulated by Gdfidl. This structures has comparable wakefield damping effect as the baseline design of CLIC main linacs.

  5. The Crab Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The Crab Nebula, along with its central pulsar and its explosive originin SN 1054, plays a crucial role in our understanding of the linkbetween supernovae and pulsar formation and activity.Yet, there are fundamental uncertainties in the nature of the event thathave not been settled in more than two decades of investigation.The observed mass in the nebula and pulsar is nearly half of theexpected initial stellar mass and the observed energy {much of whichmay come from the central pulsar} is only a fewpercent of the typical supernova energy.An attractive solution to this ``missing mass'' problem is that this massis in a high velocity envelope around the observed Crab Nebula.The envelope would have most of the energy of the explosion {roughly 10^{51} ergs}, bringing the energy up to that typical of a Type II supernova. The fact that the Crab filaments have a measured acceleration and show no deceleration at the outer edge is consistent with this hypothesis. The lack of an interaction region created by the fast shell can be attributed to a very low density around the supernova. We propose to search for the fast shell by taking a COS spectrum of the Crab pulsar in the region of the C IV 1550 line. We have carried out time-dependent ionization calculations that show that this line should produce a detectable broad, blueshifted absorption if the shell is present.

  6. The variable Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The remarkable Crab Nebula is powered by an energetic pulsar whose relativistic wind interacts with the inner parts of the Supernova Remnant SN1054. Despite low-intensity optical and X-ray variations in the inner Nebula, the Crab has been considered until now substantially stable at X-ray and gamma-ray energies. This paradigm has been shattered by the AGILE discovery in September 2010 of a very intense transient gamma-ray flare of nebular origin. For the first time, the Crab Nebula was "caught in the act" of accelerating particles up to 10^15 eV within the shortest timescale ever observed in a cosmic nebula (1 day or less). Emission between 50 MeV and a few GeV was detected with a quite hard spectrum within a short timescale. Additional analysis and recent Crab Nebula data lead to identify a total of four major flaring gamma-ray episodes detected by AGILE and Fermi during the period mid-2007/mid-2011. These observations challenge emission models of the pulsar wind interaction and particle acceleration process...

  7. Analysis of SUSY Heavy Higgs events at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Quevillon, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study of the supersymmetric neutral heavy Higgs boson production channel e+e− → H◦A◦ → bb ̄bb ̄ at √s = 3 TeV. Reconstruction of data simulated at generator level shows a significant degradation of SUSY Heavy Higgs signal caused by γγ to hadrons background at s = 3 TeV. The importance of analysis procedures such as event cuts and transversal momentum cuts during jet-clustering to reduce the impact of the hadron background is underlined. Reconstruction at both the generator level and at the level of a full detector simulation forces us to introduce cuts to improve the quality of the results. This note describes a preliminary study of SUSY Heavy Higgs at CLIC - a more detailed paper on an extended study is in preparation.

  8. Physics requirements for Scalar Muons searches at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, M

    2010-01-01

    The determination of smuon and neutralino masses in smuon pair production is an important part of the program of spectroscopic studies of Supersymmetry at a high energy linear collider. In this note we report the first results of a study of e+e− → μ ̃R+μ ̃R− in a high-mass, cosmology-motivated Supersymmetric scenario at 3 TeV at CLIC. This process is a good example to study requirements on the beam energy spectrum and polarisation and the track momentum resolution in a simple final state. We discuss the expected accuracy on the mass measurements as a function of the momentum resolution, luminosity spectrum, beam polarisation and time stamping capability. Results obtained at generator level are validated by comparison to full simulation and reconstruction. Preliminary requirements for the detector performances and beam polarisation are presented.

  9. Vacuum arc localization in CLIC prototype radio frequency accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091976; Koivunen, Visa

    2016-04-04

    A future linear collider capable of reaching TeV collision energies should support accelerating gradients beyond 100 MV/m. At such high fields, the occurrence of vacuum arcs have to be mitigated through conditioning, during which an accelerating structure’s resilience against breakdowns is slowly increased through repeated radio frequency pulsing. Conditioning is very time and resource consuming, which is why developing more efficient procedures is desirable. At CERN, conditioning related research is conducted at the CLIC high-power X-band test stands. Breakdown localization is an important diagnostic tool of accelerating structure tests. Abnormal position distributions highlight issues in structure design, manufacturing or operation and may consequently help improve these processes. Additionally, positioning can provide insight into the physics of vacuum arcs. In this work, two established positioning methods based on the time-difference-ofarrival of radio frequency waves are extended. The first method i...

  10. 8th CLIC/CTF3 Collaboration Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The eighth CTF3 collaboration meeting was held at CERN on 30th September and 1st October 2003. All collaborating institutes participated: LNF (Frascati), LAL (Orsay), RAL (Oxford), SLAC (Stanford) and Uppsala University. This year a new collaboration partner (North Western University Illinois) participated for the first time. In addition many CERN groups made important contributions. Important results from operation of the Preliminary phase - the bunch combination by a factor of 4 and 5 - were reported, an important proof of principle for the CLIC Drive Beam scheme. A highlight of the commissioning of the Initial phase was the successful operation of the accelerating structures with 100 % beam loading with nominal beam parameters. Impressive progress was reported on all activities. The design and layout studies are far advanced and very active hardware design and prototyping is going on. Series production of many components has already started. The major milestones for 2004 are the installation and commission...

  11. Dynamics on the positron capture and accelerating sections of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, Freddy; Vivoli, Alessandro; Dadoun, Olivier; Lepercq, Pierre; Variola, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC Pre-Injector Linac for the e+ beam is composed of an Adiabatic Matching Device (AMD) followed by 4 (or 5) accelerating RF structures embedded in a solenoidal magnetic field. The accelerating sections are based on 2 GHz long travelling wave structures. In this note, the positrons capture strategy downstream the AMD is reviewed. The first RF structure can be phased either for full acceleration or for deceleration. In the latter case, the simulations results show that the number of e+ capture at the end of the 200 MeV Pre-Injector Linac is increased. Then the impact of the space charge is presented. Additional techniques are also studied to explore the potentiality of increasing the number of e+ namely an extra RF field at the beginning of the capture section and a higher solenoidal field.

  12. PACMAN – an Innovative Doctoral Programme for CLIC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The final network project funded under the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), Marie Curie Actions, held its kick-off meeting at CERN on 20 November 2013.   PACMAN – a study on Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometre scale – is in the final stage of recruiting 10 PhD students to do research on beam instrumentation, metrology, micrometric alignment, magnetic measurements, nano-positioning and high-precision engineering. The students will acquire multi-disciplinary expertise in advanced engineering combined with a broad span of transferable skills. “PACMAN gives us the opportunity to attract students to CERN at a key moment in the CLIC study,” said Frédérick Bordry, Head of CERN’s Technology Department. “This is also an ideal opportunity to further develop CERN’s networks with industry and universities.” “The project is...

  13. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar; Benoit, Mathieu; Dannheim, Dominik; Dette, Karola; Hynds, Daniel; Kulis, Szymon; Peric, Ivan; Petric, Marko; Redford, Sophie; Sicking, Eva; Valerio, Pierpaolo

    2015-01-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor. Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  14. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air–Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Khondker R.; Al Khamici, Heba; Holt, Stephen A.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2016-01-01

    CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels. PMID:26875987

  15. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air–Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondker R. Hossain

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels.

  16. Novel deflecting cavity design for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2011-07-25

    To prevent significant loss of the luminosity due to large crossing angle in the future ERL based Electron Ion Collider at BNL (eRHIC), there is a demand for crab cavities. In this article, we will present a novel design of the deflecting/crabbing 181 MHz superconducting RF cavity that will fulfil the requirements of eRHIC. The quarter-wave resonator structure of the new cavity possesses many advantages, such as compact size, high R{sub t}/Q, the absence of the same order mode and lower order mode, and easy higher order mode damping. We will present the properties and characteristics of the new cavity in detail. As the accelerator systems grow in complexity, developing compact and efficient deflecting cavities is of great interest. Such cavities will benefit situations where the beam line space is limited. The future linac-ring type electron-ion collider requires implementation of a crab-crossing scheme for both beams at the interaction region. The ion beam has a long bunches and high rigidity. Therefore, it requires a low frequency, large kicking angle deflector. The frequency of the deflecting mode for the current collider design is 181 MHz, and the deflecting angle is {approx}5 mrad for each beam. At such low frequency, the previous designs of the crab cavities will have very large dimensions, and also will be confronted by typical problems of damping the Lower Order Mode (LOM), the Same Order Mode (SOM), and as usual, the Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this paper we describe how one can use the concept of a quarter-wave (QW) resonator for a deflecting/crabbing cavity, and use its fundamental mode to deflect the beam. The simplicity of the cavity geometry and the large separation between its fundamental mode and the first HOM make it very attractive.

  17. 50 CFR Table 9 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 9 Table 9 to Part 680—Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS Fishery Column A:For each crab QS fishery: Column B:The Regional Administrator shall calculate...

  18. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab QS Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab QS... EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 7 Table 7 to Part 680—Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab QS Fishery Column A: Crab QS Fisheries Column B: Qualifying Years for QS Column C: Eligibility...

  19. Hairy Crab Arrives at Zen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The best time for feasting on hairy crab is only for a short period of time in autumn,so don’t miss out on this unparalleled delicacy. Zen has prepared a variety of dishes made from the crab. Gift boxes and gift vouchers are also available for your friends and family.

  20. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, F. J.; Boogert, S. T.; Farabolini, W.; Lefevre, T.; Lunin, A.; Lyapin, A.; Søby, L.; Towler, J.; Wendt, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires beam position monitors (BPMs) with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2 /3 ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  1. A New Technique For Information Processing of CLIC Technical Documentation

    CERN Document Server

    Tzermpinos, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    The scientific work presented in this paper could be described as a novel, systemic approach to the process of organization of CLIC documentation. The latter refers to the processing of various sets of archived data found on various CERN archiving services in a more friendly and organized way. From physics aspect, this is equal to having an initial system characterized by high entropy, which after some transformation of energy and matter will produce a final system of reduced entropy. However, this reduction in entropy can be considered valid for open systems only, which are sub-systems of grander isolated systems, to which the total entropy will always increase. Thus, using as basis elements from information theory, systems theory and thermodynamics, the unorganized form of data pending to be organized to a higher form, is modeled as an initial open sub-system with increased entropy, which, after the processing of information, will produce a final system with decreased entropy. This systemic approach to the ...

  2. Top quark mass measurements at and above threshold at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, Katja; Tesar, Michal; Poss, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the expected precision of the top quark mass determination, measured at a linear $e^+e^-$ collider based on CLIC technology. GEANT4-based detector simulation and full event reconstruction including realistic physics and beam-induced background levels are used. Two different techniques to measure the top mass are studied: The direct reconstruction of the invariant mass of the top quark decay products and the measurement of the mass together with the strong coupling constant in a threshold scan, in both cases including first studies of expected systematic uncertainties. For the direct reconstruction, experimental uncertainties around 100 MeV are achieved, which are at present not matched by a theoretical understanding on a similar level. With a threshold scan, total uncertainties of around 100 MeV are achieved, including theoretical uncertainties in a well-defined top mass scheme. For the threshold scan, the precision at ILC is also studied to provide a comparison of the two linear collide...

  3. Mustafa environment description and users' guide with applications to CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Guignard, Gilbert

    1998-01-01

    In the main linacs of future linear colliders, the control of the emittances and the stability of a train of bunches are critical. It was therefore important for the Compact Linear Collider study (CLIC) to have a tool allowing numerical investigations of these questions. An interactive environment called MUSTAFA (MUltibunch Simulation and Tracking Algorithm for Future Accelerators) has been created and different tools have been developed over the time according to the needs. Progressively, these code and interactive facilities evolved into two main features, their portability on PCs independent from the main frame computers and their analysis capability using animated graphics. All the codes have been written under the MS-DOS operating system. The main application MBTR has been written in FORTRAN, the animated graphics facility MOVIE and the so-called MBUNCH utility program in QUICKBASIC (MS V4.5). The MBUNCH code was created in order to manage in a user friendly set-up the other two mentioned as well as the ...

  4. The synchro laser system for the CLIC Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CLIC Test Facility at CERN uses a laser driven 3 GHz electron gun. Considerable effort has been spent to develop a laser system, which meets the requirements of the Test Facility. The laser is based on a diode-pumped ND:YLF mode-locked oscillator. It delivers a 250 MHz train of laser pulses at 1047 nm with a length of 6.6 ps. A phase-locked timing stabilizer is used to synchronize the laser with the rf-gun. One or two pulses are amplified to 10 mJ. The amplifier system is based on a regenerative amplifier and two single pass power amplifiers. A set of harmonic generators deliver laser pulses at 523 nm, 262 nm and optional at 209nm. The measured pulse length after amplification and harmonic generations is 8 ± 2 ps (FWHM). A good pointing stability and a reasonable uniform transverse profile is obtained by relay imaging and spatial filtering. For some experiments, a train of electron bunches is used. A new pulse train generator working at 262 nm was developed to split the laser beam into 12 pulses. The simultaneous amplification of two seed laser pulses gives the possibility to double the number of pulses in the train without the need to add further splitting stages

  5. Les mesures de métrologie pour le CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cherif, A

    2008-01-01

    Le projet CLIC est en tout point un défi technique majeur ; c?est le cas également pour la mesure dimensionnelle. Quels sont les équipements et les méthodes qui permettent de caractériser les pièces avec une incertitude de mesure aussi réduite que possible, vu les tolérances micrométriques imposées ? Afin de répondre à cette question, une veille technologique a été maintenue sur une longue période. Les acteurs relevants ont été contactés pour bénéficier d?une ouverture sur les dernières avancées dans le domaine. Différentes techniques ont été étudiées et comparées telles que la digitalisation, la tomographie X, la mesure tridimensionnelle. L'assemblage de haute précision des composants est aussi primordial. Sa mise en ?uvre sous un microscope optique ou à l'aide d'une machine tridimensionnelle est en cours d?étude. L'exposé traitera aussi de la mesure de rugosité, un domaine où nous disposons de moyens adaptés aux exigences spécifiques du projet.

  6. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, N. Alipour; Arfaoui, S.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Dette, K.; Hynds, D.; Kulis, S.; Perić, I.; Petrič, M.; Redford, S.; Sicking, E.; Valerio, P.

    2016-07-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor, where efficiencies of greater than 99% have been achieved at -60 V substrate bias, with a single hit resolution of 6.1 μm . Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  7. Silicon pixel-detector R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)718101

    2016-01-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e- collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few μm, ultra-low mass (∼ 0.2% X${}_0$ per layer for the vertex region and ∼ 1 % X${}_0$ per layer for the outer tracker), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ∼ 10 ns time stamping capabilities. A highly granular all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system is under development, following an integrated approach addressing simultaneously the physics requirements and engineering constraints. For the vertex-detector region, hybrid pixel detectors with small pitch (25 μm) and analog readout are explored. For the outer trac...

  8. Progress on modelling of the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC two-beam module

    CERN Document Server

    Raatikainen, R; Niinikoski, T; Riddone, G

    2011-01-01

    under study, imposes micrometer mechanical stability of the 2-m long two-beam modules, the shortest repetitive elements of the main linacs. These modules will be exposed to variable high power dissipation during operation resulting in mechanical distortions in and between module components. The stability of the CLIC module will be tested in laboratory conditions at CERN in a full-scale prototype module. In this paper, the FEA model developed for CLIC prototype module is described. The thermal and structural results for the new module configuration are presented considering the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC collider in its primary operation modes. These results will be compared to the laboratory measurements to be done during 2011 and 2012 with the full-scale prototype module. The experimental results will allow for better understanding of the module behaviour and they will be propagated back to the present thermo-mechanical model.

  9. 3D FEA Computation of the CLIC Machine Detector Interface Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bartalesi, A

    2012-01-01

    A critical aspect of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design is represented by the Accelerator/Experiment interface (called Machine Detector Interface or MDI). In the 3 TeV CLIC layout, the final focus QD0 quadrupole will be located inside the end-cap of the detector itself. This complex MDI scenario required to be simulated with a full 3D-FE analysis. This study was critical to check and control the magnetic cross-talk between the detector solenoid and the final focus magnet and therefore to optimize the design of an “antisolenoids” system needed to shield the QD0 and the e-/e+ beams from the detector magnetic field. In this paper the development and evolution of the computational FE model is presented together with the results obtained and their implication on the CLIC MDI design.

  10. Experimental study of DC vacuum breakdown and application to high-gradient accelerating structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Shipman, Nicholas; Jones, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is a leading candidate for the next generation high energy linear collider. As any breakdown would result in a partial or full loss of luminosity for the pulse in which it occurs, obtaining a low breakdown rate in CLIC accelerating structures is a critical requirement for the successful operation of the proposed collider. This thesis presents investigations into the breakdown phenomenon primarily in the low breakdown rate regime of interest to CLIC, performed using the CERN DC spark systems between 2011 and 2014. The design, construction and commissioning of several new pieces of hardware, as well as the development of improved techniques to measuring the inter-electrode gap distance are detailed. These hardware improvements were fundamental in enabling the exciting new experiments mentioned below, which in turn have provided significant additional insight into the phenomenon of breakdown. Experiments were performed to measure fundamental parameters of individual breakdowns...

  11. RF Design of the TW Buncher for the CLIC Drive Beam Injector (2nd report)

    CERN Document Server

    Shaker, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    CLIC is based on the two beams concept that one beam (drive beam) produces the required RF power to accelerate another beam (main beam). The drive beam is produced and accelerated up to 50MeV inside the CLIC drive beam injector. The drive beam injector main components are a thermionic electron gun, three sub-harmonic bunchers, a pre-buncher, a TW buncher, 13 accelerating structures and one magnetic chicane. This document is the second report of the RF structure design of the TW buncher. This design is based on the beam dynamic design done by Shahin Sanaye Hajari due to requirements mentioned in CLIC CDR. A disk-loaded tapered structure is chosen for the TW buncher. The axial electric field increases strongly based on the beam dynamic requirements. This second report includes the study of HOM effects, retuning the cells, study of dimensional tolerances and the heat dissipation on the surface.

  12. Detector optimization studies and light Higgs decay into muons at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grefe, Christian

    2013-09-15

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The design of a CLIC experiment is driven by the requirements related to the physics goals, as well as by the experimental conditions. For example, the short time between two bunch crossings of 0.5 ns and the backgrounds due to beamstrahlung have direct impact on the design of a CLIC experiment. The Silicon Detector (SiD) is one of the concepts currently being discussed as a possible detector for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In this thesis we develop a modified version of the SiD simulation model for CLIC, taking into account the specific experimental conditions. In addition, we developed a software tool to investigate the impact of beam-related backgrounds on the detector by overlaying events from different simulated event samples. Moreover, we present full simulation studies, determining the performance of the calorimeter and tracking systems. We show that the track reconstruction in the all-silicon tracker of SiD is robust in the presence of the backgrounds at CLIC. Furthermore, we investigate tungsten as a dense absorber material for the hadronic calorimeter, which allows for the construction of a compact hadronic calorimeter that fulfills the requirements on the energy resolution and shower containment without a significant increase of the coil radius. Finally, the measurement of the decays of light Higgs bosons into two muons is studied in full simulation. We find that with an integrated luminosity of 2 ab{sup -1}, corresponding to 4 years of data taking at CLIC, the respective Higgs branching ratio can be determined with a statistical uncertainty of approximately 15%.

  13. Detector optimization studies and light Higgs decay into muons at CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a future e+e- linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The design of a CLIC experiment is driven by the requirements related to the physics goals, as well as by the experimental conditions. For example, the short time between two bunch crossings of 0.5 ns and the backgrounds due to beamstrahlung have direct impact on the design of a CLIC experiment. The Silicon Detector (SiD) is one of the concepts currently being discussed as a possible detector for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In this thesis we develop a modified version of the SiD simulation model for CLIC, taking into account the specific experimental conditions. In addition, we developed a software tool to investigate the impact of beam-related backgrounds on the detector by overlaying events from different simulated event samples. Moreover, we present full simulation studies, determining the performance of the calorimeter and tracking systems. We show that the track reconstruction in the all-silicon tracker of SiD is robust in the presence of the backgrounds at CLIC. Furthermore, we investigate tungsten as a dense absorber material for the hadronic calorimeter, which allows for the construction of a compact hadronic calorimeter that fulfills the requirements on the energy resolution and shower containment without a significant increase of the coil radius. Finally, the measurement of the decays of light Higgs bosons into two muons is studied in full simulation. We find that with an integrated luminosity of 2 ab-1, corresponding to 4 years of data taking at CLIC, the respective Higgs branching ratio can be determined with a statistical uncertainty of approximately 15%.

  14. Experimental tests on the air cooling of the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Ramos, Fernando; Nuiry, Francois-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The strict requirements in terms of material budget for the inner region of the CLIC detector concept require the use of a dry gas for the cooling of the respective sensors. This, in conjunction with the compactness of the inner volumes, poses several challenges for the design of a cooling system that is able to fulfil the required detector specifications. This note summarizes the results obtained from experimental tests on the air cooling of the CLIC vertex detector as well as their comparison with the corresponding computational fluid dynamics simulations.

  15. Physics at the CLIC e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ Linear Collider -- Input to the Snowmass process 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Abramowicz, Halina; Abusleme, Angel; Battaglia, Marco; Świentek, Krzysztof; Szalay, Marco; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Tesař, Michal; Thamm, Andrea; Thomson, Mark; Garcia, Juan Trenado; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; van der Kraaij, Erik; Vila, Iván; Benoit, Mathieu; Vilella, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the physics potential of the CLIC high-energy e+e- linear collider. It provides input to the Snowmass 2013 process for the energy-frontier working groups on The Higgs Boson (HE1), Precision Study of Electroweak Interactions (HE2), Fully Understanding the Top Quark (HE3), as well as The Path Beyond the Standard Model -- New Particles, Forces, and Dimensions (HE4). It is accompanied by a paper describing the CLIC accelerator study, submitted to the Frontier Capabilities gr...

  16. Physics at the CLIC $e^{+}e^{-}$ Linear Collider - Input to the Snowmass process 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, Halina; Afanaciev, K.; Alexander, G.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Alonso, O.; Andersen, K.K.; Arfaoui, S.; Balazs, C.; Barklow, T.; Battaglia, M.; Benoit, M.; Bilki, B.; Blaising, J.J.; Boland, M.; Boronat, M.; Bozovic Jelisavcic, I.; Burrows, P.; Chefdeville, M.; Contino, R.; Dannheim, D.; Demarteau, M.; Diaz Gutierrez, M.A.; Dieguez, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Eigen, G.; Elsener, K.; Feldman, D.; Felzmann, U.; Firlej, M.; Firu, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Francis, K.; Gaede, F.; Garcia Garcia, I.; Ghenescu, V.; Giudice, G.; Graf, N.; Grefe, C.; Grojean, C.; Gupta, R.S.; Hauschild, M.; Holmestad, H.; Idzik, M.; Joram, C.; Kananov, S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; Kraml, S.; Krupa, B.; Kulis, S.; Lastovicka, T.; LeBlanc, G.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci Timoce, A.; Lukic, S.; Makarenko, V.; Marshall, J.; Martin, V.; Mikkelsen, R.E.; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G.; Miyamoto, A.; Monig, K.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Moron, J.; Munnich, A.; Neagu, A.; Pandurovic, M.; Pappadopulo, D.; Pawlik, B.; Porod, W.; Poss, S.; Preda, T.; Rassool, R.; Rattazzi, R.; Redford, S.; Reichold, A.; Repond, J.; Riemann, S.; Robson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ros, E.; Rosten, J.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Rzehak, H.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, K.; Shumeiko, N.; Sicking, E.; Simon, F.; Smith, J.; Soldner, C.; Stapnes, S.; Strube, J.; Suehara, T.; Swientek, K.; Szalay, M.; Tanabe, T.; Tesar, M.; Thamm, A.; Thomson, M.; Trenado Garcia, J.; Uggerhoj, U.I.; van der Kraaij, E.; Vila, I.; Vilella, E.; Villarejo, M.A.; Vogel Gonzalez, M.A.; Vos, M.; Watson, N.; Weerts, H.; Wells, J.D.; Weuste, L.; Wistisen, T.N.; Wootton, K.; Xia, L.; Zawiejski, L.; Zgura, I.S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the physics potential of the CLIC high-energy e+e- linear collider. It provides input to the Snowmass 2013 process for the energy-frontier working groups on The Higgs Boson (HE1), Precision Study of Electroweak Interactions (HE2), Fully Understanding the Top Quark (HE3), as well as The Path Beyond the Standard Model -- New Particles, Forces, and Dimensions (HE4). It is accompanied by a paper describing the CLIC accelerator study, submitted to the Frontier Capabilities group of the Snowmass process

  17. Energy and Beam-Offset dependence of the Luminosity weighted depolarization for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, Jakob; Uggerhoj, Ulrik; Dalena, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We report on simulations of e+e- depolarization due to beam-beam effects. These effects are studied for CLIC at 3 TeV, using GUINEA PIG++. We find a strong energy dependence of the luminosity weighted depolarization. In the luminosity peak at CLIC the total luminosity weighted depolarization remains below the one per-mil level. The effect of a vertical offset on the energy dependent depolarization is investigated. The depolarization in the luminosity peak remains below per-cent level even for 5sy offsets.

  18. Status of the Stripline Beam Position Monitor developement for the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, A; Wendt, M; Faus-Golfe, A; Nappa, J M; Vilalte, S; Smith, S

    2013-01-01

    In collaboration with SLAC, LAPP and IFIC, a first prototype of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam and its associated readout electronics has been successfully tested in the CLIC Test Facility linac (CTF3) at CERN. In addition, a modified prototype with downstream terminated striplines is under development to improve the suppression of unwanted RF signal interference. This paper presents the results of the beam tests, and the most relevant aspects for the modified stripline BPM design and its expected improvements.

  19. Collective effects and experimental verification of the CLIC drive beam and decelerator

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a potential next-generation particle collider, in which electrons and positrons collide at a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. In order to reach a high accelerating gradient and reduce the length of the machine, CLIC uses a novel two-beam scheme. Here, the acceleration energy for the main beam is provided by energy extraction from a secondary electron drive beam, by the use of Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS). This Ph.D. thesis descr...

  20. Highlights from CERN: The CLIC Project for a Future e$^{+}$e$^{−}$ Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tecker, Frank

    2007-01-01

    A high luminosity ( 10$^{34}$-10$^{35}$ cm$^{2}$/s) linear electron-positron Collider (CLIC) with a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV is under study in the framework of an international collaboration of laboratories and institutes, with the aim to provide the HEP community with a new facility for the post LHC era. After a brief introduction of the physics motivation, the CLIC scheme to extend Linear Colliders into the Multi-TeV colliding beam energy range will be described. In the following, the main challenges and the very promising achievements already obtained will be presented.

  1. Mechanical integration studies for the CLIC vertex and inner tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Villarejo Bermudez, M.A.; Gerwig, H.

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, work has proceeded in order to establish a preliminary mechanical design for the innermost CLIC detector region. This note proposes a design for the main Carbon-Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) structural elements of the inner detectors, for the beam pipe and their supports. It also describes an assembly sequence for the integration of the sensors and the mechanical components. Mechanical simulations of different structural elements and a material budget estimation are appended. Details of a proposed cabling layout for all the subdetectors are included.

  2. Proposal for an alignment method of the CLIC linear accelerator - From geodesic networks to the active pre-alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is the particle accelerator project proposed by the european organization for nuclear research (CERN) for high energy physics after the large hadron collider (LHC). Because of the nano-metric scale of the CLIC leptons beams, the emittance growth budget is very tight. It induces alignment tolerances on the positions of the CLIC components that have never been achieved before. The last step of the CLIC alignment will be done according to the beam itself. It falls within the competence of the physicists. However, in order to implement the beam-based feedback, a challenging pre-alignment is required: 10 μm at 3σ along a 200 m sliding window. For such a precision, the proposed solution must be compatible with a feedback between the measurement and repositioning systems. The CLIC pre-alignment will have to be active. This thesis does not demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC active pre-alignment but shows the way to the last developments that have to be done for that purpose. A method is proposed. Based on the management of the Helmert transformations between Euclidean coordinate systems, from the geodetic networks to the metrological measurements, this method is likely to solve the CLIC pre-alignment problem. Large scale facilities have been built and Monte-Carlo simulations have been made in order to validate the mathematical modeling of the measurement systems and of the alignment references. When this is done, it will be possible to extrapolate the modeling to the entire CLIC length. It will be the last step towards the demonstration of the CLIC pre-alignment feasibility. (author)

  3. Golden Crab Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In November 1995, a voluntary logbook program for the golden crab fishery in the waters under the jurisdiction of the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council...

  4. Multipacting Analysis of the Superconducting Parallel-bar Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

    2011-03-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is being considered for a number of applications. Multipacting can be a limiting factor to the performance of in any superconducting structure. In the parallel-bar cavity the main contribution to the deflection is due to the transverse deflecting voltage, between the parallel bars, making the design potentially prone to multipacting. This paper presents the results of analytical calculations and numerical simulations of multipacting in the parallel-bar cavity with resonant voltage, impact energies and corresponding particle trajectories.

  5. Antarctic crabs: invasion or endurance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Huw J; Whittle, Rowan J; Roberts, Stephen J; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the "discovery" of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This "invasion hypothesis" suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40-15 million years ago and are only now returning as "warm" enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60 °S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0 °C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day "crab invasion". We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the "invasion hypothesis".

  6. On the Crab Proper Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, P A; Caraveo, Patrizia A; Mignani, Roberto

    1998-01-01

    Owing to the dramatic evolution of telescopes as well as optical detectors in the last 20 yrs, we are now able to measure anew the proper motion of the Crab pulsar, after the classical result of Wyckoff and Murray (1977) in a time span 40 times shorter. The proper motion is aligned with the axis of symmetry of the inner Crab nebula and, presumably, with the pulsar spin axis.

  7. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, L; Gavela, D; Lara, A; Rodríguez, E; Gutiérrez, J L; Calero, J; Toral, F; Samoshkin, A; Gudkov, D; Riddone, G

    2014-01-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e þ e collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS fi rst prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wake fi elds, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing...

  8. Benchmarking of the Placet and Dimad tracking codes using the CLIC Post-Collision line

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, I; Ferrari, A; Latina, A

    2009-01-01

    In this benchmarking study, two contemporary codes, DIMAD and PLACET, are compared. We consider the 20 mrad post-collision line of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and perform tracking studies of heavily disrupted post-collision electron beams. We successfully find that the two codes provide an equivalent description of the beam transport from the interaction point to the final dump.

  9. Software and Parameters for Detailed TPC Studies in the CLIC CDR

    CERN Document Server

    Killenberg, M.

    2011-01-01

    For the TPC occupancy and time stamping studies in the CLIC CDR the MarlinTPC software package has been used in combination with Mokka for the full detector simulation. This document describes the working principle of the Marlin processors used for digitisation and reconstruction, and lists the parameters for reference.

  10. Cherenkov Fibers for Beam Loss Monitoring at the CLIC Two Beam Module

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Holzer, E B

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is a feasibility study aiming at a nominal center of mass energy of 3TeV and is based on normal conducting travelling-wave accelerating structures, operating at very high field gradients of 100 MV/m. Such high fields require high peak power and hence a novel power source, the CLIC two beam system, has been developed, in which a high intensity, low energy drive beam (DB) supplies energy to a high energy, low intensity main beam (MB). At the Two Beam Modules (TBM), which compose the 2x21km long CLIC main linac, a protection against beam losses resulting from badly controlled beams is necessary and particularly challenging, since the beam power of both main beam (14 MW) and drive beam (70 MW) is impressive. To avoid operational downtimes and severe damages to machine components, a general Machine Protection System (MPS) scheme has been developed. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a key element of the CLIC machine protection system. Its main role will be to detect p...

  11. Bounds on the electromagnetic dipole moments through the single top production at the CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Koksal, M; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, A

    2016-01-01

    We obtain bounds on the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of the $t$-quark from a future high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron collider, such as the CLIC, with unpolarized and polarized electron beams which are a powerful tool to determine new physics. We consider the processes $\\gamma e^- \\to \\bar t b\

  12. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, L.; Carrillo, D.; Gavela, D.; Lara, A.; Rodríguez, E.; Gutiérrez, J. L.; Calero, J.; Toral, F.; Samoshkin, A.; Gudkov, D.; Riddone, G.

    2014-05-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e+e- collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS first prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wakefields, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing, electron beam and arc welding were used to complete the assembly. Finally, several tests such as dimensional control and leak testing were carried out to validate design and fabrication methods. In addition, RF measurements at low power were made to study frequency tuning.

  13. HIGGS PHYSICS WITH A GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDER BASED ON CLIC 1*.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ASNER,D.; BURKHARDT,H.; DE ROECK,A.; ELLIS,J.; GRONBERG,J.; HEINEMEYER,S.; SCHMITT,M.; SCHULTE,D.; VELASCO,M.; ZIMMERMAN,F.

    2001-11-01

    We present the machine parameters and physics capabilities of the CLIC Higgs Experiment (CLICHE), a low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider based on CLIC 1, the demonstration project for the higher-energy two-beam accelerator CLIC. CLICHE is conceived as a factory capable of producing around 20,000 light Higgs bosons per year. We discuss the requirements for the CLIC 1 beams and a laser backscattering system capable of producing a {gamma}{gamma} total (peak) luminosity of 2.0 (0.36) x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with E{sub CM}({gamma}{gamma}) 115 GeV. We show how CLICHE could be used to measure accurately the mass, {bar b}b, WW and {gamma}{gamma} decays of a light Higgs boson. We illustrate how these measurements may distinguish between the Standard Model Higgs boson and those in supersymmetric and more general two-Higgs-doublet models, complementing the measurements to be made with other accelerators. We also comment on other prospects in {gamma}{gamma} and e{sup -}{gamma} physics with CLICHE.

  14. Halo and tail simulations with applications to the CLIC drive beam

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, M; Adli, E; Burkhardt, H; Dalena, B; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Latina, A; Ahmed, I

    2010-01-01

    We report about generic halo and tail simulations and estimates. Previous studies weremainly focused on very high energies as relevant for the beam delivery systems of linear colliders. We have now studied, applied and extended these simulations to lower energies as relevant for the CLIC drive beam.

  15. Development of an X-Band Dielectric-Based Wakefield Power Extractor for Potential CLIC Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, C -J; Kanareykin, A; Schoessow, P; Conde, M E; Gai, W; Power, J G; Syratchev, I

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, tremendous efforts have been put into the development of the CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), and significant progress has been made. However, one concern remains the manufacturing cost of the PETS, particularly considering the quantities needed for a TeV machine. A dielectric-based wakefield power extractor in principle is much cheaper to build. A low surface electric field to gradient ratio is another big advantage of the dielectric-loaded accelerating/decelerating structure. We are currently investigating the possibility of using a cost-effective dielectric-based wakefield power extractor as an alternative to the CLIC PETS. We designed a 12 GHz dielectric-based power extractor which has a similar performance to CLIC PETS with parameters 23 mm beam channel, 240 ns pulse duration, 135 MW output per structure using the CLIC drive beam. In order to study potential rf breakdown issues, as a first step we are building a 11.424 GHz dielectric-based power extractor scaled fr...

  16. Study of Cavity Imperfection Impact on RF-Parameters and Multipole Components in a Superconducting RF-Dipole Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Olave, R G; Delayen, Jean Roger; De Silva, S U; Li, Z

    2014-01-01

    The ODU/SLAC superconducting rf-dipole cavity is under consideration for the crab-crossing system in the upcoming LHC luminosity upgrade. While the proposed cavity complies well within the rf-parameters and multipolar component restrictions for the LHC system, cavity imperfections arising from cavity fabrication, welding and frequency tuning may have a significant effect in these parameters. We report on an initial study of the impact of deviation from the ideal shape on the cavity’s performance in terms of rf-parameters and multipolar components.

  17. Regulation of the membrane insertion and conductance activity of the metamorphic chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 by cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M Valenzuela

    Full Text Available The Chloride Intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 has the ability to spontaneously insert into lipid membranes from a soluble, globular state. The precise mechanism of how this occurs and what regulates this insertion is still largely unknown, although factors such as pH and redox environment are known contributors. In the current study, we demonstrate that the presence and concentration of cholesterol in the membrane regulates the spontaneous insertion of CLIC1 into the membrane as well as its ion channel activity. The study employed pressure versus area change measurements of Langmuir lipid monolayer films; and impedance spectroscopy measurements using tethered bilayer membranes to monitor membrane conductance during and following the addition of CLIC1 protein. The observed cholesterol dependent behaviour of CLIC1 is highly reminiscent of the cholesterol-dependent-cytolysin family of bacterial pore-forming proteins, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for spontaneous protein insertion into the membrane bilayer.

  18. Material studies in the frame of CLIC Accelerating structures production conducted within the Mechanics program together with Metso Oy

    CERN Document Server

    Nurminen, Janne

    2012-01-01

    MeChanICs (Marie Curie Linking Industry to CERN) is an Industry to Academia Partnership and Pathways (IAPP) platform for precision manufacturing knowledge exchange bringing together five Finnish manufacturing companies with Helsinki Insitute of Physics (HIP) and CERN. The scientific objective of MeChanICs project is to contribute to the manufacturing RTD of CLIC enabling technologies. The focus is on the design, materials, machining, brazing and assembly of A CLIC accelerating structure. This study deals with the materials work package of the program and wants to explore the following items: 1) producing copper accelerating structures for CLIC from raw copper powder by near net shape hot isostatic pressing (HIP). 2) The feasibility to use HIP diffusion bonding of the accelerator structures as a function of surface quality and applied temperature and pressure. 3) Brazing for CLIC AS auxiliary systems, like water cooling or damping manifolds, to the disc stack by coating one of the brazing partners with an enab...

  19. Caught in the Crab's claws

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    'The crab', a new cryo magnet transport vehicle, starts work at CERN. Produced by the ESI group of EST division and built in Finland, it has the job of transporting LHC magnets in buildings SM18 and SMA18. If you see a huge crab scuttling around building SMA18 don't be afraid! It is the new Cryo Magnet Transport Vehicle produced by the ESI group (Engineering Support for Infrastructure, EST Division) for CERN's LHC project and built by Finnish Company ROCLA. This orange vehicle, nicknamed 'The Crab', is perhaps the strangest piece of equipment used for the construction of LHC magnets. It will start work at the end of this month. The crab will be used to transport LHC cryo-magnets and their components in the assembly and preparation building, SMA18, and test building, SM18. It has many capabilities that will allow CERN staff and contractors transport magnets between the two buildings and to locate them in the right position on the test beds. The crab in action during its first tests on 8 February. How does th...

  20. Are Crab nanoshots Schwinger sparks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbins, Albert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yoo, Hojin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The highest brightness temperature ever observed are from "nanoshots" from the Crab pulsar which we argue could be the signature of bursts of vacuum e± pair production. If so this would be the first time the astronomical Schwinger effect has been observed. These "Schwinger sparks" would be an intermittent but extremely powerful, ~103 L, 10 PeV e± accelerator in the heart of the Crab. These nanosecond duration sparks are generated in a volume less than 1 m3 and the existence of such sparks has implications for the small scale structure of the magnetic field of young pulsars such as the Crab. As a result, this mechanism may also play a role in producing other enigmatic bright short radio transients such as fast radio bursts.

  1. Are Crab Nanoshots Schwinger Sparks?

    CERN Document Server

    Stebbins, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The highest brightness temperature ever observed are from "nanoshots" from the Crab pulsar which we argue could be the signature of bursts of vacuum $e^{\\pm}$ pair production. If so this would be the first time the astronomical Schwinger effect has been observed. These "Schwinger sparks" would be an intermittent but extremely powerful, $\\sim 10^3 L_{\\astrosun}$, 10 PeV $e^{\\pm}$ accelerator in the heart of the Crab. These nanosecond duration sparks are generated in a volume less than $1 m^3$ and the existence of such sparks has implications for the small scale structure of the magnetic field of young pulsars such as the Crab. This mechanism may also play a role in producing other enigmatic bright short radio transients such as fast radio bursts.

  2. A computational study of dielectric photonic-crystal-based accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, C. A.

    Future particle accelerator cavities may use dielectric photonic crystals to reduce harmful wakefields and increase the accelerating electric field (or gradient). Reduced wakefields are predicted based on the bandgap property of some photonic crystals (i.e. frequency-selective reflection/transmission). Larger accelerating gradients are predicted based on certain dielectrics' strong resistance to electrical breakdown. Using computation, this thesis investigated a hybrid design of a 2D sapphire photonic crystal and traditional copper conducting cavity. The goals were to test the claim of reduced wakefields and, in general, judge the effectiveness of such structures as practical accelerating cavities. In the process, we discovered the following: (1) resonant cavities in truncated photonic crystals may confine radiation weakly compared to conducting cavities (depending on the level of truncation); however, confinement can be dramatically increased through optimizations that break lattice symmetry (but retain certain rotational symmetries); (2) photonic crystal cavities do not ideally reduce wakefields; using band structure calculations, we found that wakefields are increased by flat portions of the frequency dispersion (where the waves have vanishing group velocities). A complete comparison was drawn between the proposed photonic crystal cavities and the copper cavities for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC); CLIC is one of the candidates for a future high-energy electron-positron collider that will study in greater detail the physics learned at the Large Hadron Collider. We found that the photonic crystal cavity, when compared to the CLIC cavity: (1) can lower maximum surface magnetic fields on conductors (growing evidence suggests this limits accelerating gradients by inducing electrical breakdown); (2) shows increased transverse dipole wakefields but decreased longitudinal monopole wakefields; and (3) exhibits lower accelerating efficiencies (unless a large photonic

  3. Cavity magnomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  4. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to cavities. Treatment may involve: Fillings Crowns Root canals Dentists fill teeth by removing the decayed tooth ... gold, porcelain, or porcelain attached to metal. A root canal is recommended if the nerve in a tooth ...

  5. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  6. CARE-JRA2* Activities on Photo-Injectors and CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis

    2005-01-01

    In the frame of the CARE project, there is a Joint Research Activity (JRA2) called PHIN (PHoto-INjectors). The main objective of this JRA is to perform Research and Development on charge-production by interaction of a laser pulse with material within RF fields and improve or extend existing infrastructures. Another activity of PHIN is the coordination of the activities of various Institutes concerning photo-injectors. A brief review of the work of the eight European laboratories involved in PHIN is presented. One of these R&D topics is the construction of a photo-injector for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). In this context the status of CTF3 and its main goals - the demonstration of the feasibility of the key issues of the CLIC two-beam acceleration scheme - is also presented.

  7. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  8. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  9. Status of a study of stabilization and fine positioning of CLIC quadrupoles to the nanometre level

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Esposito, M; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C; Janssens, S; Kuzmin, A; Leuxe, R; Moron Ballester, R

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical stability to the nanometre and below is required for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) quadrupoles to frequencies as low as 1 Hz. An active stabilization and positioning system based on very stiff piezo electric actuators and inertial reference masses is under study for the Main Beam Quadrupoles (MBQ). The stiff support was selected for robustness against direct forces and for the option of incrementally repositioning the magnet with nanometre resolution. The technical feasibility was demonstrated by a representative test mass being stabilized and repositioned to the required level in the vertical and lateral direction. Technical issues were identified and the development programme of the support, sensors, and controller was continued to increase the performance, integrate the system in the overall controller, adapt to the accelerator environment, and reduce costs. The improvements are implemented in models, test benches, and design of the first stabilized prototype CLIC magnet. The characterizati...

  10. Design of a choke-mode damped accelerating structure for CLIC Main LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, J; Grudiev, A; Wuensch, W; Tang, C; Chen, H; Huang, W

    2011-01-01

    Choke-mode damped accelerating structures are being studied as an alternative to the baseline structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC) by a CERN-Tsinghua collaboration. Choke-mode structures hold the potential for much lower levels of pulsed surface heating and, since milling is not needed, reduced cost. Structures with radial choke attached are simulated in GdfidL to investigate the damping of the transverse wake. The first pass-band of the dipole modes is well damped, while the higher order dipole modes are possibly reflected by the choke. Therefore, the geometry of the choke is tuned to minimize the reflection of these higher order dipole modes. Based on this damping scheme, an accelerating structure with the same iris dimensions as the nominal CLIC design but with choke-mode damping has been designed. A prototype structure will be manufactured and high power tested in the near future.

  11. Power pulsing scheme for analog and digital electronics of the vertex detectors at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchot, Georges

    2015-01-01

    The precision requirements of the vertex detector at CLIC impose strong limitations on the mass of such a detector (< 0.2% of a radiation length, Xo, per layer). To achieve such a low material budget, ultra-thin hybrid pixel detectors are foreseen, while the mass for cooling and services will be reduced by implementing a power pulsing scheme that takes advantage of the low duty cycle of the accelerator. The principal aim is to achieve significant power reduction without compromising the power integrity supplied to the front-end electronics. This report summarises the study of a power pulsing scheme to power the vertex barrel electronics of the future CLIC experiment. Its main goal is to describe in more detail what has been already presented in TWEPP conferences and other presentations. The report can therefore serve as an operator manual for future use and development of the system

  12. Optimal Power System and Grid Interface Design Considerations for the CLICs Klystron Modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Marija, Jankovic; Jon, Clare; Pat, Wheeler; Davide, Aguglia

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an electron-positron collider under study at CERN with the aim to explore the next generation of high precision/high energy particles physics. The CLIC’s drive beams will be accelerated by approximately 1300 klystrons, requiring highly efficient and controllable solid state capacitor discharge modulators. Capacitor charger specifications include the requirement to mask the pulsed effect of the load from the utility grid, ensure maximum power quality, control the derived DC voltage precisely (to maximize accuracy for the modulators being implemented), and achieve high efficiency and operability of the overall power system. This paper presents the work carried out on the power system interface for the CLIC facility. In particular it discusses the challenges on the utility interface and analysis of the grid interface converters with regards to required functionality, efficiency, and control methodologies.

  13. TCAD simulations of High-Voltage-CMOS Pixel structures for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Buckland, Matthew Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The requirements for precision physics and the experimental conditions at CLIC result in stringent constraints for the vertex detector. Capacitively coupled active pixel sensors with 25 μm pitch implemented in a commercial 180 nm High-Voltage CMOS (HV-CMOS) process are currently under study as a candidate technology for the CLIC vertex detector. Laboratory calibration measurements and beam tests with prototypes are complemented by detailed TCAD and electronic circuit simulations, aiming for a comprehensive understanding of the signal formation in the HV-CMOS sensors and subsequent readout stages. In this note 2D and 3D TCAD simulation results of the prototype sensor, the Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector version three (CCPDv3), will be presented. These include the electric field distribution, leakage current, well capacitance, transient response to minimum ionising particles and charge-collection.

  14. Beam dynamics and wakefield suppression in interleaved damped and detuned structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, A; Khan, V F; Jones, R M; Latina, A; Nesmiyan, I; Riddone, G

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of multiple bunches of charged particles in the main linacs of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) with high accelerating fields provides two major challenges: firstly, to ensure the surface electromagnetic fields do not cause electrical breakdown and subsequent surface damage, and secondly, to ensure the beam-excited wakefields are sufficiently suppressed to avoid appreciable emittance dilution. In the baseline design for CLIC, heavy wakefield suppression is used (Q ~ 10) [1] and this ensures the beam quality is well-preserved [2]. Here we discuss an alternative means to suppress the wakefield which relies on strong detuning of the cell dipole frequencies, together with moderate damping, effected by manifolds which are slot-coupled to each accelerating cell. This damped and detuned wakefield suppression scheme is based on the methodology developed for the Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider (JLC/NLC) [3]. Here we track the multi-bunch beam down the complete collider, u...

  15. Status of vertex and tracking detector R&D at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)754272

    2015-01-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e- collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the bunch train structure of the beam and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few micron, ultra-low mass (~0.2% X0 per layer for the inner vertex region), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ~10 ns time stamping capabilities. An overview of the R&D program for pixel and tracking detectors at CLIC will be presented, including recent results on an innovative hybridisation concept based on capacitive coupling between active sensors (HV-CMOS) and readout ASICs (CLICpix).

  16. Stabilization of the Beam Intensity in the Linac at the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, A; Bathe, BN; Srivastava, S

    2013-01-01

    A new electron beam stabilization system has been introduced in CTF3 in order to open new possibilities for CLIC beam studies in ultra-stable conditions and to provide a sustainable tool to keep the beam intensity and energy at its reference values for long term operations. The stabilization system is based on a pulse-to-pulse feedback control of the electron gun to compensate intensity deviations measured at the end of the injector and at the beginning of the linac. Thereby it introduces negligible beam distortions at the end of the linac and it significantly reduces energy deviations. A self-calibration mechanism has been developed to automatically configure the feedback controller for the optimum performance. The residual intensity jitter of 0.045% of the stabilized beam was measured whereas the CLIC requirement is 0.075%.

  17. Production of excited electrons at TESLA and CLIC based egamma colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kirca, Z; Cakir, O

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of TESLA and CLIC based electron-photon colliders to search for excited spin-1/2 electrons. The production of excited electrons in the resonance channel through the electron- photon collision and their subsequent decays to leptons and electroweak gauge bosons are investigated. We study in detail the three signal channels of excited electrons and the corresponding backgrounds through the reactions egamma yields egamma, egamma yields eZ and egamma yields vW. Excited electrons with masses up to about 90% of the available collider energy can be probed down to the coupling f = f prime = 0.05(0.1) at TESLA(CLIC) based egamma colliders. 22 Refs.

  18. Interaction point feedback design and integrated simulations to stabilize the CLIC final focus

    CERN Document Server

    Balik, G; Deleglise, G; Jeremie, A; Pacquet, L; Badel, A; Caron, B; Le Breton, R; Latina, A; Pfingstner, J; Schulte, D; Snuverink, J

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) accelerator has strong precision requirements on the offset position between the beams. Sensitive to ground motion (GM), the beam needs to be stabilized to unprecedented requirements. Different Beam Based Feedback (BBF) algorithms such as Orbit Feedback (OFB) and Interaction Point Feedback (IPFB) have been designed. This paper focuses on the IPFB control which could be added to the CLIC baseline. IPFB control has been tested for different GM models in presence of noises or disturbances and it uses digital linear control with an adaptive loop. The simulations demonstrate that it is possible to achieve the required performances and quantify the maximum allowed noise level. This amount of admitted noises and disturbances is given in terms of an equivalent disturbance on the position of the magnet that controls the beam offset. Due to the limited sampling frequency of the process, the control loop is in a very small bandwidth. The study shows that these disturbances have to be l...

  19. Study of the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the CLIC Two-Beam Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, F; Riddone, G; Österberg, K; Kossyvakis, I; Gudkov, D; Samochkine, A

    2013-01-01

    The final luminosity target of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) imposes a micron-level stability requirement on the two-meter repetitive two-beam modules constituting the main linacs. Two-beam prototype modules are being assembled to extensively study their thermo-mechanical behaviour under different operation modes. The power dissipation occurring in the modules will be reproduced and the efficiency of the corresponding cooling systems validated. At the same time, the real environmental conditions present in the CLIC tunnel will be studied. Air conditioning and ventilation systems have been installed in the dedicated laboratory. The air temperature will be changed from 20 to 40°C, while the air flow rate will be varied up to 0.8 m/s. During all experimental tests, the alignment of the RF structures will be monitored to investigate the influence of power dissipation and air temperature on the overall thermo-mechanical behaviour. \

  20. Thermo-Mechanical tests for the CLIC two-beam module study

    CERN Document Server

    Xydou, A; Riddone, G; Daskalaki, E

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity goal of CLIC requires micron level precision with respect to the alignment of the components on its two-meter long modules, composing the two main linacs. The power dissipated inside the module components introduces mechanical deformations affecting their alignment and therefore the resulting machine performance. Several two-beam prototype modules must be assembled to extensively measure their thermo-mechanical behavior under different operation modes. In parallel, the real environmental conditions present in the CLIC tunnel should be studied. The air conditioning and ventilation system providing specified air temperature and flow has been installed in the dedicated laboratory. The power dissipation occurring in the modules is being reproduced by the electrical heaters inserted inside the RF structure mock-ups and the quadrupoles. The efficiency of the cooling systems is being verified and the alignment of module components is monitored. The measurement results will be compared to finite elemen...

  1. Background and Energy Deposition Studies for the CLIC Post-Collision Line

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B; Deacon, L C; Gschwendtner, E

    2011-01-01

    After the interaction point, the 1.5 TeV, 14MW CLIC electron/positron beams must be transported safely to the main beam dump. In designing the CLIC post-collision line detailed simulations must be carried out in order to ensure that losses are kept within reasonable limits. Results for back-scattered photon flux arriving at the detector are recalculated after updates and enhancements to the geometry description used in the study presented in [1]. Initial results of neutron fluxes are presented. Additionally, energy deposition calculations are carried out, showing that, when the full electromagnetic showers are included, in the current design the standard magnet coils would have a short lifetime due to radiation damage to conventional insulation material. Changing the magnet mask material from graphite to iron and lengthening the intermediate dump by 2m of iron are shown to substantially lessen the energy deposition in the magnet coils and thereby extend magnet lifetimes.

  2. Design of the Injection and extraction system and related machine protection for the Clic Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Apsimon, Robert; Barnes, Mike; Borburgh, Jan; Goddard, Brennan; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Uythoven, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Linear machines such as CLIC have relatively low rates of collision between bunches compared to their circular counterparts. In order to achieve the required luminosity, a very small spot size is envisaged at the interaction point, thus a low emittance beam is needed. Damping rings are essential for producing the low emittances needed for the CLIC main beam. It is crucial that the beams are injected and extracted from the damping rings in a stable and repeatable fashion to minimise emittance blow-up and beam jitter at the interaction point; both of these effects will deteriorate the luminosity at the interaction point. In this paper, the parameters and constraints of the injection and extraction systems are considered and the design of these systems is optimised within this parameter space. Related machine protection is considered in order to prevent damage from potential failure modes of the injection and extraction systems.

  3. The Event Display for CLIC: DD4hep Compatibility and Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    Quast, Thorben

    2015-01-01

    This document is a short summary of my contributions to the Event Display for the CLICdp Software group in the context of CERN’s Summer Student Programme 2015. After a brief outline of CLIC and the relevant software package, the project is motivated. The individual achievements and their technical realizations are explained rather qualitatively, as details are well documented directly in the source code.

  4. Implications of a Curved Tunnel for the Main Linac of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary studies of a linac that follows the earth curvature are presented for the CLIC main linac. The curvature of the tunnel is modeled in a realistic way by use of geometry changing elements. The emittance preservation is studied for a perfect machine as well as taking into account imperfections. Results for a curved linac are compared with those for a laser-straight machine.

  5. Nonlinear Optimization of CLIC DRS New Design with Variable Bends and High Field Wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasem, H.; Alabau-Gonzalvo, J.; Papadopoulou, S.; Papaphilippou, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The new design of CLIC damping rings is based on longitudinal variable bends and high field superconducting wiggler magnets. It provides an ultra-low horizontal normalised emittance of 412 nm-rad at 2.86 GeV. In this paper, nonlinear beam dynamics of the new design of the damping ring (DR) with trapezium field profile bending magnets have been investigated in detail. Effects of the misalignment errors have been studied in the closed orbit and dynamic aperture.

  6. Parameter scan for the CLIC Damping rings under the infleunce of intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, F; Papaphilippou, Y; Vivoli, A

    2010-01-01

    Due to the high bunch density, the output emittances of the CLIC Damping Rings (DR) are strongly dominated by the effect of Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). In an attempt to optimize the ring design, the bench-marking of the multiparticle tracking code SIRE with the classical IBS formalisms and approximations is first considered. The scaling of the steady state emittances and IBS growth rates is also studied, with respect to several ring parameters including energy, bunch charge and wiggler characteristics.

  7. Pre-Alignment of CLIC using the Double-Wire Method

    CERN Document Server

    Coosemans, Williame

    1998-01-01

    The pre-alignment and active control method for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is described. Two new types of instruments are used in this system - a biaxial Wire Positioning System (WPS) which uses a stretched wire as the spatial reference, and a capacitive three axes Tilt Meter System (TMS). The instruments, and the way they are used with the well-known Hydrostatic Levelling System (HLS) are described.

  8. Study of a 5-Tesla large aperture coil for the CLIC detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cure, B

    2011-01-01

    The present design of a CLIC detector foresees a large solenoid magnet with a 6 m aperture and a magnetic induction of 5 T at the interaction point. This can be achieved by a thin superconducting coil. This report gives the typical main parameters of such a coil and presents the feasibility based on and compared with the CMS and Atlas solenoid coil designs, indicating the limits on the conductor and the identified R&D prospects.

  9. Wakefield calculation for superconducting TM110 cavity without azimuthal symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab; Burt, Graeme; /Lancaster U.

    2006-08-01

    The 3.9GHz TM{sub 110} mode deflecting cavity developed at FNAL has many applications, including use as a longitudinal bunch profile diagnostic, and as a crab cavity candidate for the ILC. These applications involve beams with substantial time structure. For the 13-cell version intended for the bunch profile application, long-range wakes have been evaluated in the frequency domain and short-range wakes have been evaluated in the time domain. Higher-order interactions of the main field in the cavity with the beam have also been parameterized. Pedagogic derivations are included as appendices.

  10. Power production experiments at the Test Beam Line in the CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar Lunde; Adli, Erik; Lundheim, Lars Magne

    2010-01-01

    CLIC is an international study of a future multi-TeV electron-positron linear collider, where the energy of a high-intensity drive beam is extracted and transferred to the main beam via Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) in the form of rf power. The study of power production is therefore essential for the feasibility of CLIC. Power production in PETS has been studied, and ex- periments have been performed in the decelerator Test Beam Line in the CLIC Test Facility 3. In particular, the correlation of the power production and the beam position inside the structure has been studied. It is shown that the total produced power is constant when the beam has a position offset through the PETS. In addition, the difference between the measured phases from each side is independent of the beam position, which allows for efficient combination of the fields. However, the ratio of the power on each side of the PETS unexpectedly shows a linear dependence on the horizontal offset, with a correlation value of 0.8...

  11. Mass and Cross Section Measurements of light-flavored Squarks at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    WEUSTE, L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the prospects for the measurement of TeV-scale light-flavored right-squark masses and and the production cross sections at a 3 TeV e+e- collider based on CLIC technology. The analysis, performed in the framework of the CLIC Conceptual Design Report, is based on full Geant4 simulations of the CLIC ILD detector concept, including standard model physics background and machine related hadronic background from two-photon processes. The events were reconstructed using particle flow event reconstruction, and the mass and cross sections were obtained from a template fit built from generator-level simulations with smearing to parametrize the detector response. For an integrated luminosity of 2 ab^-1, a statistical precision of 5.9 GeV, corresponding to 0.52%, was obtained for unseparated first and second generation right squarks. For the combined cross section, a precision of 0.07 fb, corresponding to 5%, was obtained.

  12. Klystron Modulators for the 3 TeV CLIC Scheme An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, P

    2001-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) design is based on the Two-Beam technology being developed at CERN. The Drive Beam accelerator will have about 200 multi-beam klystron-modulator (MBK-M) RF power sources for each drive beam linac. These multi-beam klystrons (MBKs) should provide up to 50 MW peak power at 937 MHz, with a 100 ms pulse width and operating at 100 Hz repetition frequency. The CLIC drive beam injector will also use a number of these same MBK-Ms operating at slightly lower power levels. A 0.5 MW peak power, 468 MHz klystron with a bandwidth of around 150 MHz will be required for the sub-harmonic buncher in each drive beam injector chain as well. The Main Beams injector complex is required to deliver e+ and e- beams at 9 GeV via the transfer lines to the CLIC Main Beam accelerator. The present injector complex design uses a series of linacs to accelerate the electron and positron beams coming from RF guns working at 1.5 GHz up to an energy of 1.98 GeV before they are put into damping rings. Each of ...

  13. En route vers la nano stabilisation de CLIC faisceau principale et focalisation finale

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, Claude; Lackner, F; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Pour atteindre la luminosité voulue de CLIC, la taille transversale du faisceau doit être de l?ordre du nanomètre. Ceci nécessite une stabilité vibratoire des quadripôles du faisceau principal de 1 nm et même 0.1 nm pour les doublets de la focalisation finale. La nano technologie et la nano stabilisation sont des activités qui évoluent rapidement dans l?industrie et centres de recherche pour des applications très variées comme l?électronique, l?optique, la chimie voire la médecine. Cette présentation décrit les avancées techniques nécessaires pour atteindre l?objectif de CLIC et les projets et collaborations R&D prévus pour démontrer la faisabilité de la nano stabilisation de CLIC en 2010.

  14. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2010-10-27

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  15. Simulations and Vacuum Tests of a CLIC Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2011-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider, under study, is based on room temperature high gradient structures. The vacuum specificities of these cavities are low conductance, large surface areas and a non-baked system. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-7 Pa) in a system where the residual vacuum is driven by water outgassing. A finite element model based on an analogy thermal/vacuum has been built to estimate the vacuum profile in an accelerating structure. Vacuum tests are carried out in a dedicated set-up, the vacuum performances of different configurations are presented and compared with the predictions.

  16. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 680 - Crab Species Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Table 2 Table 2 to Part 680—Crab Species Code Species code Common name Scientific name 900 Box... crab Paralithodes platypus. 923 Golden (brown) king crab Lithodes aequispinus. 924 Scarlet king...

  17. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Jensen: Bitter crab disease mortality in SE Alaska Tanner crab

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from a laboratory experiment in which wild caught male Tanner crab (Chionoecetes bairdi) from Stephens Passage, SE Alaska were held to evaluate crab...

  18. Measurement of the H$\\rightarrow$WW$^*$ Branching Ratio at 1.4TeV using the semileptonic final state at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)762723; Watson, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This note summarises a study to evaluate the potential to measure the H$\\rightarrow$WW$^*$ branching fraction at CLIC, 1.4TeV centre-of-mass energy, with the CLIC_ILD detector, using the WW$\\rightarrow$qql$\

  19. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavitytThere is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  20. The Crab Nebula flaring activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montani, G., E-mail: giovanni.montani@frascati.enea.it [ENEA – C.R, UTFUS-MAG, via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “Sapienza”, p.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Bernardini, M.G. [INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2014-12-12

    The discovery made by AGILE and Fermi of a short time scale flaring activity in the gamma-ray energy emission of the Crab Nebula is a puzzling and unexpected feature, challenging particle acceleration theory. In the present work we propose the shock-induced magnetic reconnection as a viable mechanism to explain the Crab flares. We postulate that the emitting region is located at ∼10{sup 15} cm from the central pulsar, well inside the termination shock, which is exactly the emitting region size as estimated by the overall duration of the phenomenon ∼1 day. We find that this location corresponds to the radial distance at which the shock-induced magnetic reconnection process is able to accelerate the electrons up to a Lorentz factor ∼10{sup 9}, as required by the spectral fit of the observed Crab flare spectrum. The main merit of the present analysis is to highlight the relation between the observational constraints to the flare emission and the radius at which the reconnection can trigger the required Lorentz factor. We also discuss different scenarios that can induce the reconnection. We conclude that the existence of a plasma instability affecting the wind itself as the Weibel instability is the privileged scenario in our framework.

  1. Background at the Interaction Point from the CLIC Post-Collision Line

    CERN Document Server

    Salt, M D; Apyan, A; Elsener, K; Gschwendtner, E; Ferrari, A

    2010-01-01

    The 1.5 TeV electron/positron CLIC beams, with a total power of 14 MW per beam, are disrupted at the interaction point (IP) due to the very strong beam-beam effect. The resulting spent beam products are transported to suitable dumps by the post-collision beam line, which generates beam losses and causes the production of secondary cascades towards the interaction region. In this paper the electromagnetic backgrounds at the IP are presented, which were calculated using biasing Monte Carlo techniques. Also, a first estimate is made of neutron backshine from the main beam dump.

  2. Mechanical design of a pre-isolator for the CLIC final focusing magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A; Ramos, F; Siegrist, N

    2012-01-01

    Due to the very small vertical beam sizes, the final focusing elements at the future CLIC linear collider need to be stable against vibrations to below 0.15 nanometres at frequencies above about 4 Hz. One of the key elements in the strategy to achieve such a stable environment is a passive, heavy pre-isolator. In this report, the results from the dynamic finite element analyses of the proposed design for such a passive preisolator are summarized. Furthermore, the results from a low frequency, heavy mass passive vibration isolation test set-up used to validate the calculations are shown.

  3. Measurement of the Higgs decay to electroweak bosons at low and intermediate CLIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)471575; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, Gordana; Pandurovic, Mila; Lukic, Strahinja

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a simulation of measurements of the Higgs boson decay to electroweak bosons in $e^+e^-$ collisions at CLIC is presented. Higgs boson production and subsequent $H\\rightarrow ZZ^\\ast$ and $H\\rightarrow WW^\\ast$ decay processes were simulated alongside the relevant background processes at 350 GeV and 1.4 TeV center-of-mass energy. Full detector simulation and event reconstruction were used under realistic beam conditions. The achievable statistical precision of the measured product of the Higgs production cross section and the branching ratio for the analysed decays has been determined.

  4. El mundo en un clic: usabilidad y accesibilidad en la Web

    OpenAIRE

    Domènech, Luisa

    2004-01-01

    La filosofía de Internet es el acceso libre a la información, pero esta información se encuentra limitada espacialmente por dos vertientes, el navegador y el tamaño del monitor donde se visualiza la información. A la hora de construir las páginas Web para su visualización en Internet, los arquitectos de la información deberían cumplir una serie de requerimientos para que el visitante obtenga la información deseada en poco tiempo y con pocos clic de ratón.

  5. Production of excited electrons at TESLA and CLIC based $e\\gamma$ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Aydin, Z Z; Kirca, Z

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of TESLA and CLIC based electron-photon colliders to search for excited spin-1/2 electrons. The production of excited electrons in the resonance channel through the electron-photon collision and their subsequent decays to leptons and electroweak gauge bosons are investigated. We study in detail the three signal channels of excited electrons and the corresponding backgrounds through the reactions e gamma --> e gamma, e gamma --> eZ and e gamma --> nu W. Excited electrons can be discovered with the masses up to about 90% of the available collider energy.

  6. Evaluation of 65nm technology for CLIC pixel front-end

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio, P; Ballabriga, R; Campbell, M; Llopart, X

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC vertex detector design requires a high single point resolution (~ 3 μm) and a precise time stamp (≤ 10 ns). In order to achieve this spatial resolution, small pixels (in the order of 20 μm pitch) must be used, together with the measurement of the charge deposition of neighbouring channels. Designing such small pixels requires the use of a deep downscaled CMOS technology. This note describes the design and characterisation of suitable building blocks implemented in a commercial 65 nm process. The characterisation included an evaluation of the radiation hardness of the blocks.

  7. Z′ Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    A. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez; Hernández-Ruíz, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional $Z'$ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process $e^{+}e^{-}\\rightarrow (Z, Z') \\to Zh$, including both the resonant and non-resonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of $Zh$ and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500-2000\\hspace{0.8mm}$fb^{-1}$ and center of mass en...

  8. Feed Forward Orbit Correction in the CLIC Ring to Main LINAC Transfer lines

    CERN Document Server

    Apsimon, R; Schulte, D; Uythoven, J

    2014-01-01

    The emittance growth in the betatron collimation system of the 27 km long transfer lines between the CLIC damping rings and the main LINAC depends strongly on the transverse orbit jitter. The resulting stability requirements of the damping ring extraction elements seem extremely difficult to achieve. Position and angle feed forward systems in these long transfer lines bring the specified parameters of the extraction elements within reach. The designs of the optics and feed forward hardware are presented together with tracking simulations of the systems.

  9. Fluka and thermo-mechanical studies for the CLIC main dump

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, Alessio; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    In order to best cope with the challenge of absorbing the multi-MW beam, a water beam dump at the end of the CLIC post-collision line has been proposed. The design of the dump for the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) was checked against with a set of FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, for the estimation of the peak and total power absorbed by the water and the vessel. Fluence spectra of escaping particles and activation rates of radio-nuclides were computed as well. Finally, the thermal transient behavior of the water bath and a thermo-mechanical analysis of the preliminary design of the window were done.

  10. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab economic data report (EDR). 680.6... General § 680.6 Crab economic data report (EDR). Persons participating in the CR crab fisheries are... complete. Use these tables to complete the EDRs described in this section: Table 1, Crab...

  11. Nutritional quality and safety of cooked edible crab (Cancer pagurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Anacleto, Patrícia; Lourenço, Helena Maria; Carvalho, Maria Luísa; Nunes, Maria Leonor; Marques, António

    2012-07-15

    Edible crab (Cancer pagurus) is one of the most important crustaceans consumed in Southern European countries, either as boiled or steamed cooked product. So far, the majority of studies assessing health benefits and risks associated to seafood consumption have been carried out in raw products, despite being generally cooked before consumption, and mostly in muscle tissue. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of steaming and boiling on the chemical safety and nutritional value of C. pagurus caught in spring and summer. Generally, chemical and elemental composition of brown meat (tissue in the body cavity comprising mainly gonads and hepatopancreas) differed significantly from muscle (white meat in claws and legs). Additionally, the same tissue revealed differences in chemical and elemental composition of raw and cooked C. pagurus, likely due to water leaching. In contrast, few variations between seasons were observed. The results revealed that the consumption of cooked edible crab muscle should be promoted, whereas brown meat ingestion should be done parsimoniously.

  12. What brakes the Crab pulsar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čadež, A.; Zampieri, L.; Barbieri, C.; Calvani, M.; Naletto, G.; Barbieri, M.; Ponikvar, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Optical observations provide convincing evidence that the optical phase of the Crab pulsar follows the radio one closely. Since optical data do not depend on dispersion measure variations, they provide a robust and independent confirmation of the radio timing solution. Aims: The aim of this paper is to find a global mathematical description of Crab pulsar's phase as a function of time for the complete set of published Jodrell Bank radio ephemerides (JBE) in the period 1988-2014. Methods: We apply the mathematical techniques developed for analyzing optical observations to the analysis of JBE. We break the whole period into a series of episodes and express the phase of the pulsar in each episode as the sum of two analytical functions. The first function is the best-fitting local braking index law, and the second function represents small residuals from this law with an amplitude of only a few turns, which rapidly relaxes to the local braking index law. Results: From our analysis, we demonstrate that the power law index undergoes "instantaneous" changes at the time of observed jumps in rotational frequency (glitches). We find that the phase evolution of the Crab pulsar is dominated by a series of constant braking law episodes, with the braking index changing abruptly after each episode in the range of values between 2.1 and 2.6. Deviations from such a regular phase description behave as oscillations triggered by glitches and amount to fewer than 40 turns during the above period, in which the pulsar has made more than 2 × 1010 turns. Conclusions: Our analysis does not favor the explanation that glitches are connected to phenomena occurring in the interior of the pulsar. On the contrary, timing irregularities and changes in slow down rate seem to point to electromagnetic interaction of the pulsar with the surrounding environment.

  13. A CLIC Damping Wiggler Prototype at ANKA: Commissioning and Preparations for a Beam Dynamics Experimental Program

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhard, Axel; Casalbuoni, Sara; Ferracin, Paolo; Garcia Fajardo, Laura; Gerstl, Stefan; Gethmann, Julian; Grau, Andreas; Huttel, Erhard; Khrushchev, Sergey; Mezentsev, Nikolai; Müller, Anke-Susanne; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Saez de Jauregui, David; Schmickler, Hermann; Schoerling, Daniel; Shkaruba, Vitaliy; Smale, Nigel; Tsukanov, Valery; Zisopoulos, Panagiotis; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    In a collaboration between CERN, BINP and KIT a prototype of a superconducting damping wiggler for the CLIC damping rings has been installed at the ANKA synchrotron light source. On the one hand, the foreseen experimental program aims at validating the technical design of the wiggler, particularly the conduction cooling concept applied in its cryostat design, in a long-term study. On the other hand, the wiggler's influence on the beam dynamics particularly in the presence of collective effects is planned to be investigated. ANKA's low-alpha short-bunch operation mode will serve as a model system for these studies on collective effects. To simulate these effects and to make verifiable predictions an accurate model of the ANKA storage ring in low-alpha mode, including the insertion devices is under parallel development. This contribution reports on the first operational experience with the CLIC damping wiggler prototype in the ANKA storage ring and steps towards the planned advanced experimental program with th...

  14. CLIC Main Linac Beam-Loading Compensation by Drive Beam Phase Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R; Syratchev, I V

    1999-01-01

    The CLIC final focus momentum acceptance of ± 0.5 % limits the bunch-to-bunch energy variation in the main beam to less than ± 0.1 %, since the estimated single-bunch contribution is ± 0.4 %. On the other hand, a relatively high beam-loading of the main accelerating structures (about 16 %) is unavoidable in order to optimize the RF-to-beam efficiency. Therefore, a compensation method is needed to reduce the resulting bunch-to-bunch energy spread of the main beam. Up to now, it has been planned to obtain the RF pulse shape needed for compensation by means of a charge ramp in the drive beam pulse. On the other hand, the use of constant-current drive beam pulses would make the design and operation of the drive beam injector considerably simpler. In this paper we present a possible solution adapted to the CLIC two-beam scheme with constant-current pulses, based on phase modulation of the drive beam bunches.

  15. First Magnetic Tests of a Superconducting Damping Wiggler for the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Bernhard, A; Karppinen, M; Maccaferri, R; Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R

    2010-01-01

    Each of the proposed CLIC electron and positron damping rings will be equipped with 76 wigglers. The length of each wiggler is 2 m, the period length lambda 40 to 50 mm, and the beam-stay-clear gap 13 mm. The minimum required mid-plane field B0 is 2.5 T, that can only be obtained with superconducting technologies. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such a wiggler, a short model with a period length of 40mm was built and successfully tested at CERN. The measured mid-plane field was 2 T at 4.2K and 2.5 T at 1.9 K in the center of a 16mm gap. The currents were 730 and 910 A, respectively. To fulfill the field specification for the CLIC damping rings at 4.2 K it is planned to replace the Nb-Ti wire with a Nb3Sn wire.

  16. Initial measurements on a prototype inductive adder for the CLIC kicker systems

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the damping ring kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the DRs are particularly demanding: the flattops of the pulses must be ±12.5 kV with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. To achieve ultra-flat pulses with a fast rise time the output impedance of the inductive adder needs to be well matched to the system impedance. The parasitic circuit elements of the inductive adder have a significant effect upon the output impedance and these values are very difficult to calculate accurately analytically. To predict these paramet...

  17. Fast Beam-ion Instabilities in CLIC Main Linac Vacuum Specifications

    CERN Document Server

    Oeftiger, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Specifications for the vacuum pressure in the CLIC electron Main Linac are determined by the onset of the fast beam-ion instability (FBII). When the electron beam is accelerated in the Main Linac, it ionizes the residual gas in the chamber through scattering ionization. If the density of ions around the beam exceeds a certain threshold, a resonant motion between the electron beam and the ions can be excited. A two-stream instability appears and as a result the beam acquires a coherent motion, which can quickly lead to beam quality degradation or even complete loss. Thus, the vacuum pressure must be kept below this threshold to prevent the excitation of FBII. The CLIC Main Linac poses an additional challenge with respect to previous FBII situations, because the gas ionization does not solely occur via scattering. The submicrometric beam sizes lead to extremely high electric fields around the beam and therefore result in field ionization beyond a certain threshold. The residual gas in the corresponding volume a...

  18. Integration of the PHIN RF Gun into the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Döbert, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    CERN is a collaborator within the European PHIN project, a joint research activity for Photo injectors within the CARE program. A deliverable of this project is an rf Gun equipped with high quantum efficiency Cs2Te cathodes and a laser to produce the nominal beam for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). The nominal beam for CTF3 has an average current of 3.5 A, 1.5 GHz bunch repetition frequency and a pulse length of 1.5 ìs (2332 bunches) with quite tight stability requirements. In addition a phase shift of 180 deg is needed after each train of 140 ns for the special CLIC combination scheme. This rf Gun will be tested at CERN in fall 2006 and shall be integrated as a new injector into the CTF3 linac, replacing the existing injector consisting of a thermionic gun and a subharmonic bunching system. The paper studies the optimal integration into the machine trying to optimize transverse and longitudinal phase space of the beam while respecting the numerous constraints of the existing accelerator. The presented scheme...

  19. Stabilisation and precision pointing quadrupole magnets in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, Stef; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro; Artoos, Kurt

    This thesis describes the research done to provide stabilisation and precision positioning for the main beam quadrupole magnets of the Compact Linear Collider CLIC. The introduction describes why new particle accelerators are needed to further the knowledge of our universe and why they are linear. A proposed future accelerator is the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) which consists of a novel two beam accelerator concept. Due to its linearity and subsequent single pass at the interaction point, this new accelerator requires a very small beam size at the interaction point, in order to increase collision effectiveness. One of the technological challenges, to obtain these small beam sizes at the interaction point, is to keep the quadrupole magnets aligned and stable to 1.5 nm integrated r.m.s. in vertical and 5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) in lateral direction. Additionally there is a proposal to create an intentional offset (max. 50 nm every 20 ms with a precision of +/- 1 nm), for several quadrupole ma...

  20. A high phase advance damped and detuned structure for the main linacs of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Vasim; Jones, Roger M; Wuensch, Walter; Grudiev, A

    2010-01-01

    The main accelerating structures for the CLIC are designed to operate at an average accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m. The accelerating frequency has been optimised to 11.994 GHz with a phase advance of 2π/3 [1] of the main accelerating mode. The moderately damped and detuned structure (DDS) design [2-3] is being studied as an alternative to the strongly damped WDS design [1]. Both these designs are based on the nominal accelerating phase advance. Here we explore high phase advance (HPA) structures in which the group velocity of the rf fields is reduced compared to that of standard (2π/3) structures. The electrical breakdown strongly depends on the fundamental mode group velocity. Hence it is expected that electrical breakdown is less likely to occur in the HPA structures. We report on a study of both the fundamental and dipole modes in a CLIC_DDS_ HPA structure, designed to operate at 5π/6 phase advance per cell. Higher order dipole modes in both the standard and HPA structures are also studied.

  1. Measurements on Prototype Inductive Adders with Ultra-Flat-Top Output Pulses for CLIC DR Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J; Belver-Aguilar, C

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study is investigating the technical feasibility of an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the DR extraction kickers call for a 160 ns duration flat-top pulses of ±12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications because this topology allows the use of both passive and analogue modulation methods to adjust the output waveform. Recently, two five-layer, 3.5 kV, prototype inductive adders have been built at CERN. The first of these has been used to test the passive and active analogue modulation methods to compensate voltage droop and ripple of the output pulses. Pulse waveforms have been reco...

  2. Stabilization and Fine Positioning to the Nanometre Level of the CLIC Main Beam Quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C; Janssens, S; Kuzmin, A; Lackner, F; Leuxe, R; Slaathaug, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC main beam quadrupoles need to be stabilized to 1.5 nm integrated R.M.S. displacement at 1 Hz. The choice was made to apply active stabilization with piezoelectric actuators in a rigid support with flexural guides. The advantages of this choice are the robustness against external forces and the possibility to make fast incremental nanometre positioning of the magnet with the same actuators. The study and feasibility demonstration is made in several steps from a single degree of freedom system (s.d.o.f.) with a small mass, a s.d.o.f. with a large mass, leading to the demonstration including the smallest (type 1) and largest (type 4) CLIC main beam quadrupoles. The paper discusses the choices of the position and orientation of the actuators and the tailored rigidities of the flexural hinges in the multi degree of freedom system, and the corresponding MIMO control system. The compatibility with the magnet support and micrometre alignment system is essential. The status of the study and performed tests wi...

  3. CLIC main beam quadrupole active pre-alignment based on cam movers

    CERN Document Server

    Kemppinen, J; Leuxe, R; Mainaud Durand, H; Sandomierski, J; Sosin, M

    2012-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a study for a future 48 km long linear electron-positron collider in the multi TeV range. Its target luminosity can only be reached if the main beam quadrupoles (MB quads) are actively pre-aligned within 17 µm in sliding windows of 200 m with respect to a straight reference line. In addition to the positioning requirement, the pre-alignment system has to provide a rigid support for the nano-stabilization system to ensure that the first eigenfrequency is above 100 Hz. Re-adjustment based on cam movers was chosen for detailed studies to meet the stringent pre-alignment requirements. There are four different types of MB quads in CLIC. Their lengths and masses vary so that at least two types of cam movers have to be developed. The validation of the cams with less stringent space restrictions has proceeded to a test setup in 5 degrees of freedom (DOF). Prototypes of the more demanding, smaller cams have been manufactured and they are under tests in 1 DOF. This paper describes the...

  4. Oesophageal chemoreceptors of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, sense chemical deterrents and can block ingestion of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggio, Juan F; Tieu, Ryan; Wei, Amy; Derby, Charles D

    2012-05-15

    Decapod crustaceans such as blue crabs possess a variety of chemoreceptors that control different stages of the feeding process. All these chemoreceptors are putative targets for feeding deterrents that cause animals to avoid or reject otherwise palatable food. As a first step towards characterizing the chemoreceptors that mediate the effect of deterrents, we used a behavioral approach to investigate their precise location. Data presented here demonstrate that chemoreceptors located on the antennules, pereiopods and mouthparts do not mediate the food-rejection effects of a variety of deterrents, both natural and artificial to crabs. Crabs always searched for deterrent-laced food and took it to their oral region. The deterrent effect was manifested as either rejection or extensive manipulation, but in both cases crabs bit the food. The biting behavior is relevant because the introduction of food into the oral cavity ensured that the deterrents gained access to the oesophageal taste receptors, and so we conclude that they are the ones mediating rejection. Additional support comes from the fact that a variety of deterrent compounds evoked oesophageal dilatation, which is mediated by oesophageal receptors and has been linked to food rejection. Further, there is a positive correlation between a compound's ability to elicit rejection and its ability to evoke oesophageal dilatation. The fact that deterrents do not act at a distance is in accordance with the limited solubility of most known feeding deterrents, and likely influences predator-prey interactions and their outcome: prey organisms will be attacked and bitten before deterrents become relevant.

  5. Measurement of sigma(ee->Hnunu)xBR(H->tautau) at CLIC @ 1.4 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Münnich, A.

    2013-01-01

    This detector benchmark study evaluates the statistical precision with which the H -> tautau branching ratio times cross section can be measured at CLIC running at rout(s)= 1.4 TeV. Only the hadronic decays of taus are considered.

  6. $2\\times250$ GeV CLIC $\\gamma\\gamma$ Collider Based on its Drive Beam FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Aksakal, Husnu

    2007-01-01

    CLIC is a linear $e^+e^-$ ($\\gamma\\gamma$) collider project which uses a drive beam to accelerate the main beam. The drive beam provides RF power for each corresponding unit of the main linac through energy extracting RF structures. CLIC has a wide range of center-of-mass energy options from 150 GeV to 3 TeV. The present paper contains optimization of Free Electron Laser (FEL) using one bunch of CLIC drive beam in order to provide polarized light amplification using appropriate wiggler and luminosity spectrum of $\\gamma\\gamma$ collider for $E_{cm}$=0.5 TeV. Then amplified laser can be converted to a polarized high-energy $\\gamma$ beam at the Conversion point (CP-prior to electron positron interaction point) in the process of Compton backscattering. At the CP a powerful laser pulse (FEL) focused to main linac electrons (positrons). Here this scheme described and it is show that CLIC drive beam parameters satisfy the requirement of FEL additionally essential undulator parameters has been defined. Achievable $\\g...

  7. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  8. What brakes the Crab pulsar?

    CERN Document Server

    Čadež, A; Barbieri, C; Calvani, M; Naletto, G; Barbieri, M; Ponikvar, D

    2015-01-01

    Optical observations provide convincing evidence that the optical phase of the Crab pulsar follows the radio one closely. Since optical data do not depend on dispersion measure variations, they provide a robust and independent confirmation of the radio timing solution. The aim of this paper is to find a global mathematical description of Crab pulsar's phase as a function of time for the complete set of published Jodrell Bank radio ephemerides (JBE) in the period 1988-2014. We apply the mathematical techniques developed for analyzing optical observations to the analysis of JBE. We break the whole period into a series of episodes and express the phase of the pulsar in each episode as the sum of two analytical functions. The first function is the best-fitting local braking index law, and the second function represents small residuals from this law with an amplitude of only a few turns, which rapidly relaxes to the local braking index law. From our analysis, we demonstrate that the power law index undergoes "inst...

  9. A large bubble around the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Reach, William T.; Koo, Bon Chul; Heiles, Carl

    1990-01-01

    IRAS and 21 cm observations of the interstellar medium around the Crab nebula show evidence of a large bubble surrounded by a partial shell. If located at the canonical 2 kpc distance of the Crab pulsar, the shell is estimated to have a radius of about 90 pc and to contain about 50,000 solar masses of swept-up gas. The way in which interior conditions of this bubble can have important implications for observations of the Crab are described, and the fashion in which presupernova evolution of the pulsar progenitor has affected its local environment is described.

  10. Beam Tests of a Prototype Stripline Beam Position Monitoring System for the Drive Beam of the CLIC Two-beam Module at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, Alfonso; Nappa, Jean-Marc; Vilalte, Sebastien; Wendt, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with LAPP and IFIC, two units of a prototype stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam (DB), and its associated readout electronics have been successfully installed and tested in the Two-Beam-Module (TBM) at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. This paper gives a short overview of the BPM system and presents the performance measured under different Drive Beam configurations.

  11. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge : Hunting Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for the administration of hunting activity and for the development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and guidelines on Crab...

  12. The anatomy of the king crab Hapalogaster mertensii Brandt, 1850 (Anomura: Paguroidea: Hapalogastridae): new insights into the evolutionary transformation of hermit crabs into king crabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keiler, J.; Richter, S.; Wirkner, C.S.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of king crabs from a hermit crab-like ancestor is one of the most curious events in decapod evolution. King crabs comprise two taxa, Lithodidae and Hapalogastridae, and while lithodids have formed the focus of various anatomical studies, the internal anatomy of hapalogastrids has never

  13. 50 CFR Table 2b to Part 679 - Species Codes: FMP Prohibited Species and CR Crab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CR Crab 2b Table 2b to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... CR Crab Species Description Code CR Crab Groundfish PSC CRAB Box Lopholithodes mandtii 900... ✓ Korean horsehair crab Erimacrus isenbeckii 940 ✓ Multispinus crab Paralomis multispinus 951 ✓...

  14. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    Mechanical oscillators have been recently widely utilized to couple with optical and microwave photons in a variety of hybrid quantum systems, but they all lack the tunability. The magnetostrictive force provides an alternative mechanism to allow phonon to couple with a different type of information carrier-magnon, the collective excitation of magnetization whose frequency can be tuned by a bias magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate an intriguing hybrid system that consists of a magnonic, a mechanical, and a microwave resonator. The magnon-phonon interaction results in hallmark coherent phenomena such as magnomechanically induced transparency/absorption and magnomechanical parametric amplification. The magnetic field dependence of magnon provides our system with unprecedented tunability. Moreover, the great flexibility of our system allows us to achieve triple resonance among magnon, phonon and photon, which drastically enhances the magnomechanical interaction. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnetomechanics, opening up great opportunities in various applications, such as tunable microwave filter and amplifier, long-lifetime quantum memories, microwave-to-optics conversion.

  15. Multi-step lining-up correction of the CLIC trajectory

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, T E

    1999-01-01

    In the CLIC main linac it is very important to minimise the trajectory excursion and consequently the emittance dilution in order to obtain the required luminosity. Several algorithms have been proposed and lately the ballistic method has proved to be very effective. The trajectory correction method described hereafter retains the main advantages of the latter while adding some interesting features. It is based on the separation of the unknown variables like the quadrupole misalignments, the offset and slope of the injection straight line and the misalignments of the beam position monitors (BPM). This is achieved by referring the trajectory relatively to the injection line and not to the average pre-alignment line and by using two trajectories each corresponding to slightly different quadrupole strengths. A reference straight line is then derived onto which the beam is bent by a kick obtained by moving the first quadrupole. The other quadrupoles are then aligned on that line. The quality of the correction dep...

  16. Flow induced vibrations of the CLIC X-Band accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, Tessa; Boland, Mark; Riddone, Germana; Samoshkin, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent cooling water in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) accelerating structures will inevitably induce some vibrations. The maximum acceptable amplitude of vibrations is small, as vibrations in the accelerating structure could lead to beam jitter and alignment difficulties. A Finite Element Analysis model is needed to identify the conditions under which turbulent instabilities and significant vibrations are induced. Due to the orders of magnitude difference between the fluid motion and the structure’s motion, small vibrations of the structure will not contribute to the turbulence of the cooling fluid. Therefore the resonant conditions of the cooling channels presented in this paper, directly identify the natural frequencies of the accelerating structures to be avoided under normal operating conditions. In this paper a 2D model of the cooling channel is presented finding spots of turbulence being formed from a shear layer instability. This effect is observed through direct visualization and wavelet ana...

  17. High-Gradient test results from a CLIC prototype accelerating structure : TD26CC

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, A; Farabolini, W; Grudiev, A; Kovermann, J; Montessinos, E; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wegner, R; Wuensch, W; Solodko, A; Woolley, B

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study has progressively tested prototype accelerating structures which incorporate an ever increasing number of features which are needed for a final version ready to be installed in a linear collider. The most recent high power test made in the CERN X-band test stand, Xbox-1, is of a CERN-built prototype which includes damping features but also compact input and output power couplers, which maximize the overall length to active gradient ratio of the structure. The structure’s high-gradient performance, 105 MV/m at 250 ns pulse length and low breakdown rate, matches previously tested structures validating both CERN fabrication and the compact coupler design.

  18. A closer look at the beam-beam processes at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Hartin, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The strength of the electromagnetic fields in the bunch collision at a linear collider will have a significant effect, yielding large numbers of beamstrahlung photons and associated coherent pair production. These effects are limited in the proposed ILC beam parameters which limit the strength of the bunch field to $\\Upsilon_{\\text{ave}}=0.27$. The CLIC 3 Tev design by comparison has a $\\Upsilon_{\\text{ave}}=3.34$ yielding huge number of coherent pairs. In terms of the precision physics programs of these proposed colliders there is an imperative to investigate the effect of the strong bunch fields on higher order processes. From the exact wavefunctions used in the calculation of transition rates within the Furry interaction picture, and using appropriate simplifications, a multiplicative factor to the coupling constants was obtained. This indicates a significant variation to the transition rate near threshold energies. Further studies are in progress to calculate the exact effect on expected observables.

  19. High power operation with beam of a CLIC pets equipped with on/off mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Syratchev, I; Dubrovskiy, A; Skowronski, P; Ruber, R

    2012-01-01

    One of the feasibility issues of the CLIC two-beam scheme, is the possibility of rapidly switching off the rf power production in an individual Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) in case of breakdowns, either in the PETS or one of the main beam accelerating structures. The proposed solution is to use a variable external reflector connected to the PETS. When activated, this scheme allows us to gradually manipulate the rf power transfer to the accelerating structure and to reduce the rf power production in the PETS itself by a factor of 4. Recently the first operation of the Two Beam Test Stand (TBTS) PETS equipped with an ON/OFF mechanism was performed in CTF3. In this paper we will present the results of the PETS operation when powered by the drive beam up to high peak power levels (>100 MW) and compare them to expectations.

  20. Recent results with HV-CMOS and planar sensors for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)734627

    2016-01-01

    The physics aims for the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) impose high precision requirements on the vertex detector which has to match the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of 3μm, 10 ns time stamping capabilities, low mass (⇠0.2% X0 per layer), low power dissipation and pulsed power operation. Recent results of test beam measurements and GEANT4 simulations for assemblies with Timepix3 ASICs and thin active-edge sensors are presented. The 65 nm CLICpix readout ASIC with 25μm pitch was bump bonded to planar silicon sensors and also capacitively coupled through a thin layer of glue to active HV-CMOS sensors. Test beam results for these two hybridisation concepts are presented.

  1. Experience on Fabrication and Assembly of the First CLIC Two-Beam Module Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Gudkov, D; Riddone, G; Rossi, F; Lebet, S

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC two-beam module prototypes are intended to prove the design of all technical systems under the different operation modes. Two validation programs are currently under way and they foresee the construction of four prototype modules for mechanical tests without beam and three prototype modules for tests with RF and beam. The program without beam will show the capability of the technical solutions proposed to fulfil the stringent requirements on radio-frequency, supporting, pre-alignment, stabilization, vacuum and cooling systems. The engineering design was performed with the use of CAD/CAE software. Dedicated mock-ups of RF structures, with all mechanical interfaces and chosen technical solutions, are used for the tests and therefore reliable results are expected. The components were fabricated by applying different technologies and methods for manufacturing and joining. The first full-size prototype module was assembled in 2012. This paper is focused on the production process including the comparison o...

  2. Low-level feedback control for the phase regulation of CLIC Drive Beam Klystrons

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)752526

    2015-01-01

    The requirement of luminosity loss below 1% raises tight tolerances for the phase and power stability of the CLIC drive beam (DB) klystrons and consequently for the high voltage pulse ripple of the modulators. A low-level RF (LLRF) feedback system needs to be developed and combined with the modulator in order to guarantee the phase and amplitude tolerances. To this aim, three feedback control strategies were investigated, i) Proportional Integral (PI) controller, ii) Linear Quadratic Integral Regulator (LQI) and iii) Model Predictive Controller (MPC). The klystron, as well as the incident phase noise were modelled and used for the design and evaluation of the controllers. First simulation results are presented along with future steps and directions.

  3. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the Clic Two-Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2011-08-19

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC's parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  4. Z′ Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional Z′ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process e+e-→(Z,Z′)→Zh, including both the resonant and the nonresonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of Zh and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500–2000 fb−1 and center of mass energies between 500 and 3000 GeV. We find that the total number of expected Zh events can reach 106, which is a very optimistic scenario and it would be possible to perform precision measurements for both Z′ and Higgs boson in future high-energy e+e- colliders experiments

  5. Z′ Resonance and Associated Zh Production at Future Higgs Boson Factory: ILC and CLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional Z′ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process e+e-→(Z,Z′→Zh, including both the resonant and the nonresonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of Zh and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500–2000 fb−1 and center of mass energies between 500 and 3000 GeV. We find that the total number of expected Zh events can reach 106, which is a very optimistic scenario and it would be possible to perform precision measurements for both Z′ and Higgs boson in future high-energy e+e- colliders experiments.

  6. High Power RF Induced Thermal Fatigue in the High Gradient CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Arnau-Izquierdo, G; Heikkinen, S; Neupert, N; Wuensch, W

    2007-01-01

    The need for high accelerating gradients for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) imposes considerable constraints on the materials of the accelerating structures. The surfaces exposed to high pulsed RF (Radio Frequency) currents are subjected to cyclic thermal stresses possibly resulting in surface break up by fatigue. Various high strength alloys from the group of high conductivity copper alloys have been selected and have been tested in different states, with different surface treatments and in different stress ratios. Low to medium cycle fatigue data (up to 108 cycles) of fully compressive surface thermal stresses has been collected by means of a pulsed laser surface heating apparatus. The surface damage has been characterized by SEM observations and roughness measurements. High cycle fatigue data, up to 7x1010 cycles, of varying stress ratio has been collected in high frequency bulk fatigue tests using an ultrasonic apparatus. Up-to-date results from these experiments are presented.

  7. Physics potential of the BR(H →WW∗) measurement at a √s=350 GeV and √s=1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pandurovic, Mila

    2016-01-01

    Precision measurements of the number of properties of the Higgs boson, like invariant mass and couplings to the Standard Model particles, represent one of the key measurements of the CLIC physic program. The CLIC energy staging scenario allows to perform these meas- urements using different Higgs production channels. The Higgs decay to a WW pair, which is analysed at two CLIC energy stages, plays an important role in this program, as it gives access to the relative Higgs couplings to the vector bosons and to the total Higgs decay width. The studies presented here are part of an ongoing effort to investigate the full physics potential of the CLIC collider.

  8. Crabs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.

    stream_size 2 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Biodiversity_Western_Ghats_Inf_Kit_1994_3.6_1.pdf.txt stream_source_info Biodiversity_Western_Ghats_Inf_Kit_1994_3.6_1.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  9. Impact of the New CLIC Beam Parameters on the Design of the Post-Collision Line and its Exit Window

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, A

    2008-01-01

    Following the recent modification of the CLIC beam parameters, we present an updated design of the post-collision line. As a result of the increase of the beamstrahlung photon cone size, the separation of the outgoing beams by the vertical magnetic chicane is more difficult, but still possible. The main changes in the post-collision line design include the implementation of a common dump for the wrong-sign charged particles of the coherent pairs and for the low-energy tails of the disrupted beam, as well as a significant reduction of the overall lattice length (allowing removal of the large refocusing quadrupoles). The thermal and mechanical stresses in the new exit window, 150 m downstream of the interaction point, were computed. We conclude that, despite the recent changes of the CLIC beam parameters and the necessary modifications of the post-collision line and its exit window, their performance is not significantly affected.

  10. Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar: Mechanical stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupoles with sub-nanometre resolution

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Thursday 24 November 2010 Accelerator and Technical Sector Seminar at 14:15  -  BE Auditorium, bldg. 6 (Meyrin) – please note unusual place Mechanical stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupoles with sub-nanometre resolution Stef Janssens /EN-MME Abstract: To reach the required luminosity at the CLIC interaction point, about 4000 quadrupoles are needed to obtain a vertical beam size of 1 nm at the interaction point. The mechanical jitter of the quadrupole magnets will result in an emittance growth. An active vibration isolation system is required to reduce vibrations from the ground and from external forces to about 1.5 nm integrated root mean square (r.m.s.) vertical displacement at 1 Hz. A short overview of vibration damping and isolation strategies will be presented as well as a comparison of existing systems. The unprecedented resolution requirements and the instruments enabling these measurements will be discussed. The vibration sources from which the magnets need to...

  11. Crab-crossing in a Tau-Charm facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: crab-crossing; horizontal versus vertical beam crossing; a crab-crossing arrangement for a Tau-Charm facility; tolerance; and beam loading and average current limitations. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Epibiotic community of the horseshoe crab Tachypleus gigas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    -epibionts) present on horseshoe crabs, according to gender, were evaluated, and the macro-epibiont population from different regions of the carapace was mapped. In general, female horseshoe crabs harbored fewer epibionts than the males. Among the diatoms, Navicula...

  13. Physics performance for measurements of chargino and neutralino pair production at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    A study of chargino and neutralino pair production at a CLIC collider operating at √s = 1.4 TeV is presented. Fully hadronic final states with four jets and missing transverse energy were considered. The analysis was performed using full detector simulation and including pileup from gg → hadrons interactions. Results for the masses and production cross sections of the chargino and the next-to-lightest neutralino are discussed.

  14. Conséquences des perturbations de la gravité sur l'alignement du CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, F

    1999-01-01

    For the CLIC alignment, the accuracy required for the definition of the geometrical references entails the evaluation of the effects of the Earth's gravity field's disturbances. The distortions of the WPS wires, of the water in the hydrostatic levelling network and of the ground resulting from the Moon and the Sun's attractions and from the neighbouring masses are therefore estimated. Solutions are suggested for the distortions important enough to have to be taken into account.

  15. High-power Microwave Pulse Compression of Klystrons by Phase-Modulation of High-Q Storage Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bossart, Rudolf; Mourier, J; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L

    2004-01-01

    At the CERN linear electron accelerators LIL and CTF, the peak RF power from the 3GHz-klystrons was doubled by means of LIPS microwave pulse compressors. To produce constant RF power from the cavity-based pulse compressors, the klystrons were driven by a fast RF-phase modulation program. For the CLIC Test Facility CTF3, a new type of a Barrel Open Cavity (BOC) with a high quality factor Q0 has been developed. Contrary to LIPS with two resonant cavities, BOC operates with a single cavity supporting two orthogonal resonant modes TM 10,1,1 in the same cavity. For both LIPS and BOC storage cavities, it is important that the RF power reflected back to the klystron is minimal. This implies that the resonant frequencies, Q-factors and coupling factors of the two resonant modes of a pulse compressor are closely matched, and that the resonant frequencies are accurate to within a few KHz. The effects of small differences between the two orthogonal modes of the BOC cavity have been investigated. The dynamic pulse respon...

  16. Chemoreception in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.H.; Olla, B.L.

    1977-10-01

    The aims of the study were to observe the feeding behavior of the blue crab under laboratory conditions and select those components of the feeding repertoire that appeared to be most sensitive to the presence of sapid substances, utilize the selected behavioral components to determine the threshold concentration at which a food extract is detected, and examine the effects of food deprivation upon the detection threshold. Results showed that: (1) An increase in the rate of antennule flicking and gill bailing upon presentation of sea water solutions of a freeze-dried clam extract indicated detection of sapid substances by the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. (2) The threshold concentration at which crabs detected the sapid solution was 10 (E-15) g/liter. Feeding behaviors were released at higher concentrations, 10 (E-1) to 10 (E-2) g/liter. (3) Food deprivation for six days lowered the threshold for feeding behaviors but did not affect the detection threshold.

  17. Planned Contributions of The Wcrp Climate and Cryosphere (clic) Project To Mountain Hydrological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, R. G.

    Formal discussions within the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) since 1997 have addressed the question of the role of the cryosphere in the climate system. An outcome has been the approval in March 2000 of a Science and Co-ordination Plan for a new Climate and Cryosphere (CliC) project by the WCRP Joint Scientific Com- mittee in March 2000. The concept of this plan (WCRP, 2001) and particular topics of concern for high-mountain hydrology are discussed here. The proposed definition of the cryosphere is that portion of the climate system consisting of the world's ice masses and snow deposits. of relevance for mountains are: ice caps and glaciers, sea- sonal snow cover, lake and river ice, and seasonally frozen ground and permafrost. Existing projects both within the framework of the WCRP, as well as of the IGBP are mainly regional and links into the global climate research effort are not sufficiently comprehensive. The WCRP GEWEX project has cryospheric components concerning the high latitude hydrological cycle, but mountain studies are currently only in Ti- bet. Other relevant programs include: the IGBP-BAHC Mountain Research Initiative, Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS), and Permafrost and Climate in Europe (PACE), for example. Integration of existing cryospheric projects within a global research structure, together with new efforts addressing current gaps, is re- quired in order to: - enhance links between regional and global climatic components studies, - promote appropriate treatment of cryospheric processes in climate models, and - assemble and make accessible quality controlled, well documented, comprehen- sive and coherent global gridded data sets necessary for driving and validating climate models. The principal scientific questions relating to the cryosphere in mountain re- gions concern: - glacier melt contributions to global sea level change, - the energy and water cycle in regions with land ice, snow cover and frozen ground, - the

  18. An assessment of discard mortality for two Alaskan crab species, Tanner crab (Chionoecetes bairdi) and snow crab (C. opilio), based on reflex impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Stoner, Allan W.; Rose, Craig S.; Munk, J. Eric; Hammond, Carwyn F.; Davis, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    Delayed mortality associated with discarded crabs and fishes has ordinarily been observed through tag and recovery studies or during prolonged holding in deck tanks, and there is need for a more efficient assessment method. Chionoecetes bairdi (Tanner crab) and C. opilio (snow crab) collected with bottom trawls in Bering Sea waters off Alaska were evaluated for reflexes and injuries and held onboard to track mortality. Presence or absence of six reflex actions was determined and combine...

  19. A Comparative Study of Genetic Variation betwccn Chinese Mitten Crab Eriocheir Sinensis and Hepu Mitten Crab E. Hepuensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guangdong; ZHANG Xiumei; GAO Tianxiang; LOU Dong

    2002-01-01

    Horizontal starch gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the biochemical genetic structure of Chinese mittencrab Eriocheir sinensis and Hepu mitten crab E. hepuensis. Sixteen putative enzyme-coding loci were examined for forty-nineChinese mitten crabs and thirty-eight Hepu mitten crabs. Nine loci, AAT-1 *, AAT-2 *, G3PDH*, GPI*, IDHP-1 *, IDHP-2 *,MDH-1 *, MDH-2 * and PGM * , are polymorphic in Chinese mitten crab, and seven, AAT-1 *, AAT-2 *, GPI *, IDHP-1 *,MDH-1 *, MDH-2 * and PGM * , are polymorphic in Hepu mitten crab. The proportion of polymorphic loci and the expectedheterozygosity are 0.562 5 and 0.080 3 for Chinese mitten crab, and 0.437 5 and 0.075 4 for Hepu mitten crab. The Nei' s ge-netic distance between two species is 0.002 4.

  20. RF Cavity Design

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2014-01-01

    After a short overview of a general approach to cavity design, we sketch the derivation of waveguide modes from plane waves and of cavity fields from waveguide modes. The characteristic parameters describing cavities and their performance are defined and explained. An equivalent circuit is introduced and extended to explain beam loading and higher order modes. Finally travelling- and standing-wave multi-gap cavities are introduced using the Brillouin diagram.

  1. Development and Validation of a Multipoint Based Laser Alignment System for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, G; Lackner, F; Mainaud-Durand, H; Piedigrossi, D; Sandomierski, J; Sosin, M; Geiger, A; Guillaume, S

    2013-01-01

    Alignment is one of the major challenges within CLIC study, since all accelerator components have to be aligned with accuracy up to 10 μm over sliding windows of 200 m. So far, the straight line reference concept has been based on stretched wires coupled with Wire Positioning Sensors. This concept should be validated through inter-comparison with an alternative solution. This paper proposes an alternative concept where laser beam acts as straight line reference and optical shutters coupled with cameras visualise the beam. The principle was first validated by a series of tests using low-cost components. Yet, in order to further decrease measurement uncertainty in this validation step, a high-precision automatised micrometric table and reference targets have been added to the setup. The paper presents the results obtained with this new equipment, in terms of measurement precision. In addition, the paper gives an overview of first tests done at long distance (up to 53 m), having emphasis on beam divergence

  2. High Frequency Effects of Impedances and Coatings in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Koukovini Platia, Eirini; Rumolo, G

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a 3 TeV eÅe¡ machine, currently under design at CERN, that targets to explore the terascale particle physics regime. The experiment requires a high luminosity of 2£1034 cm2 s¡1, which can be achieved with ultra low emittances delivered from the Damping Rings (DRs) complex. The high bunch brightness of the DRs gives rise to several collective effects that can limit the machine performance. Impedance studies during the design stage of the DR are of great importance to ensure safe operation under nominal parameters. As a first step, the transverse impedance model of the DRis built, accounting for the wholemachine. Beam dynamics simulations are performedwith HEADTAIL to investigate the effect on beam dynamics. For the correct impedancemodeling of the machine elements, knowledge of the material properties is essential up to hundreds of GHz, where the bunch spectrum extends. Specifically, Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) is a commonly used coating for good vacuumbut its properti...

  3. A Trajectory Correction based on Multi-Step Lining-up for the CLIC Main Linac

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, T E

    1999-01-01

    In the CLIC main linac it is very important to minimise the trajectory excursion and consequently the emittance dilution in order to obtain the required luminosity. Several algorithms have been proposed and lately the ballistic method has proved to be very effective. The trajectory method described in this Note retains the main advantages of the latter while adding some interesting features. It is based on the separation of the unknown variables like the quadrupole misalignments, the offset and slope of the injection straight line and the misalignments of the beam position monitors (BPM). This is achieved by referring the trajectory relatively to the injection line and not to the average pre-alignment line and by using two trajectories each corresponding to slightly different quadrupole strengths. A reference straight line is then derived onto which the beam is bent by a kick obtained by moving the first quadrupole. The other quadrupoles are then aligned on that line. The quality of the correction depends mai...

  4. A Gas-Jet Profile Monitor for the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff, A; Lefevre, T; Tzoganis, V; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) will use a novel acceleration scheme in which energy extracted from a very intense beam of relatively low-energy electrons (the Drive Beam) is used to accelerate a lower intensity Main Beam to very high energy. The high intensity of the Drive Beam, with pulses of more than 1015 electrons, poses a challenge for conventional profile measurements such as wire scanners. Thus, new non-invasive profile measurements are being investigated. Profile monitors using gas ionisation or fluorescence have been used at a number of accelerators. Typically, extra gas must be injected at the monitor and the rise in pressure spreads for some distance down the beam pipe. In contrast, a gas jet can be fired across the beam into a receiving chamber, with little gas escaping into the rest of the beam pipe. In addition, a gas jet shaped into a thin plane can be used like a screen on which the beam crosssectionis imaged. In this paper we present some arrangements for the generation of such a jet. In ...

  5. Instrumentation for Longitudinal Beam Gymnastics in FEL's and at the CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T; Bravin, E; Burger, S; Corsini, R; Döbert, S; Soby, L; Tecker, F A; Urschutz, P; Welsch, C P; Alesini, D; Biscari, C; Buonomo, B; Coiro, O; Ghigo, A; Marcellini, F; Preger, B; Dabrowski, A; Velasco, M; Craievich, P; Ferianis, M; Veronese, M; Ferrari, A

    2008-01-01

    Built at CERN by an international collaboration, the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a high luminosity 3 TeV e+-e- collider by the year 2010. One of the main issues to be demonstrated is the generation of a high average current (30 A) high frequency (12 GHz) bunched beam by means of RF manipulation. At the same time, Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are developed in several places all over the world with the aim of providing high brilliance photon sources. These machines rely on the production of high peak current electron bunches. The required performances put high demands on the diagnostic equipment and innovative longitudinal monitors have been developed during the past years. This paper gives an overview of the longitudinal instrumentation developed at ELETTRA and CTF3, where a special effort was made in order to implement at the same time non-intercepting devices for online monitoring, and destructive diagnostics which have the advantage of providing more detailed informati...

  6. Design of a new UHV all-metal joint for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lutkiewicz, P; Rathjen, Ch

    2009-01-01

    All-metal joints are widely used in the vacuum systems of particle accelerators. The most common ConFlat® design consists of a flat soft copper gasket captured between two stainless steel flanges with sharp edges (knives). The gasket is plastically deformed and a high contact pressure develops around knives to obtain leak tightness. For large accelerators, a high reliability and a cost-optimized design are required. A smooth internal transition between flanges is needed for the RF waveguides of the compact linear collider (CLIC), with limited deformation of the inner part of the gasket. We present the study of a flange meeting these requirements. First the finite element analysis (FEA) of the Stanford linear accelerator center (SLAC) X-band all-metal joint, which has a similar specification, is shown. Some drawbacks, such as non-homogeneous sealing properties, are highlighted. Then, a new joint design is described. FEA results are presented and are compared with experimental measurements carried out on proto...

  7. The occupancy in the Hadronic Calorimeter endcap of the CLIC detector

    CERN Document Server

    van Dam, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve the optimal physics performance of a detector for a linear electron–positron col- lider it is essential to minimize the effect of the beam-induced background. Incoherent electron–positron pairs shower in the very forward region of the CLIC detector and cause a too high occupancy of approximately 80% in the inner radius of the HCal endcap. The occupancy is studied by performing full detector simulations and reduced by changing the material and thickness of the support tube that serves as shielding. The effect of the tile size in the HCal endcap is also studied. A minimal occupancy of ⇠ 4% in the HCal inner radius can be reached with a thick tungsten support tube. When taking a more realistic engineering point of view into account and including polyethylene, an occupancy of ⇠ 8% is achieved. These results show that it is possible to reduce the occupancy due to incoherent pairs in the HCal endcap to a similar level as that due to gg ! hadrons events.

  8. Optimum frequency and gradient for the CLIC main linac accelerating structure

    CERN Document Server

    Grudiev, A; Wuensch, Walter

    2006-01-01

    A novel procedure for the optimization of CLIC main linac parameters including operating frequency and the accelerating gradient is presented. The optimization procedure takes into account both beam dynamics and high power rf constraints. Beam dynamics constraints are given by emittance growth due to short- and long-range transverse wakefields. RF constraints are given by rf breakdown and pulsed surface heating limitations of the accelerating structure. Interpolation of beam and structure parameters in a wide range allows hundreds of millions of accelerating structures to be analyzed to find the structure with the highest ratio of luminosity to main linac input power, which is used as the figure of merit. The frequency and gradient have been varied in the ranges 12-30 GHz and 90-150 MV/m respectively. It is shown that the optimum frequency lies in the range from 16 to 20 GHz depending on the accelerating gradient and that the optimum gradient is below 100 MV/m. Based on our current understanding of the constr...

  9. Studies of Cs3Sb cathodes for the CLIC drive beam photo injector option

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, Irene; Doebert, Steffen; Fedosseev, Valentine; Hessler, Christoph; Martyanov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Within the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project, feasibility studies of a photo injector option for the drive beam as an alternative to its baseline design using a thermionic electron gun are on-going. This R&D program covers both the laser and the photocathode side. Whereas the available laser pulse energy in ultra-violet (UV) is currently limited by the optical defects in the 4thharmonics frequency conversion crystal induced by the0.14 ms long pulse trains, recent measurements of Cs3Sbphotocathodes sensitive to green light showed their potential to overcome this limitation. Moreover, using visible laser beams leads to better stability of produced electron bunches and one can take advantages of the availability of higher quality optics. The studied Cs3Sbphotocathodes have been produced in the CERN photo emission laboratory using the co-deposition technique and tested in a DC gun set-up. The analysis of data acquired during the cathode production process will be presented in this paper, as well as the r...

  10. Dawn of Cavity Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Can-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Merging the progress of spintronics with the advancement in cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity polaritons, a new field of Cavity Spintronics is forming, which connects some of the most exciting modern physics, such as quantum information and quantum optics, with one of the oldest science on the earth, the magnetism.

  11. Corneal laceration caused by river crab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinuthinee N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Naidu Vinuthinee,1,2 Anuar Azreen-Redzal,1 Jaafar Juanarita,1 Embong Zunaina2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Sultanah Bahiyah, Alor Setar, 2Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Malaysia Abstract: A 5-year-old boy presented with right eye pain associated with tearing and photophobia of 1-day duration. He gave a history of playing with a river crab when suddenly the crab clamped his fingers. He attempted to fling the crab off, but the crab flew and hit his right eye. Ocular examination revealed a right eye corneal ulcer with clumps of fibrin located beneath the corneal ulcer and 1.6 mm level of hypopyon. At presentation, the Seidel test was negative, with a deep anterior chamber. Culture from the corneal scrapping specimen grew Citrobacter diversus and Proteus vulgaris, and the boy was treated with topical gentamicin and ceftazidime eyedrops. Fibrin clumps beneath the corneal ulcer subsequently dislodged, and revealed a full-thickness corneal laceration wound with a positive Seidel test and shallow anterior chamber. The patient underwent emergency corneal toileting and suturing. Postoperatively, he was treated with oral ciprofloxacin 250 mg 12-hourly for 1 week, topical gentamicin, ceftazidime, and dexamethasone eyedrops for 4 weeks. Right eye vision improved to 6/9 and 6/6 with pinhole at the 2-week follow-up following corneal suture removal. Keywords: corneal ulcer, pediatric trauma, ocular injury

  12. Horseshoe crab behavior:Patterns and processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher C.Chabot; Winsor H.Watson Ⅲ

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction The American horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus has long served as a source of delight and inspiration to a broad cross-section of scientists - from naturalists to neuroscientists. Periodically, for the last hundred years or so, new discoveries have been made about this ancient creature that both enlighten scientists and reinforce the importance of conserving this ancient species.

  13. A HYPERSPECTRAL VIEW OF THE CRAB NEBULA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the Hβ, [O III] λ4959, λ5007, Hα, [N II] λ6548, λ6584, and [S II] λ6717, λ6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Megantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Cadez et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [S II] λ6717 /[S II] λ6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  14. The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiga, D.; Cinquilli, M.; Servoli, L.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U; Lacaprara, S.; Fanzago, F.; Dorigo, A.; /INFN, Padova; Merlo, M.; Farina, F.; /INFN, Milan /Milan U; Fanfani, A.; Codispoti, G.; Bacchi, W.; /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U /CERN /INFN, CNAF /INFN, Trieste /Fermilab

    2008-01-22

    The CMS experiment will produce several Pbytes of data every year, to be distributed over many computing centers geographically distributed in different countries. Analysis of this data will be also performed in a distributed way, using grid infrastructure. CRAB (CMS Remote Analysis Builder) is a specific tool, designed and developed by the CMS collaboration, that allows a transparent access to distributed data to end physicist. Very limited knowledge of underlying technicalities are required to the user. CRAB interacts with the local user environment, the CMS Data Management services and with the Grid middleware. It is able to use WLCG, gLite and OSG middleware. CRAB has been in production and in routine use by end-users since Spring 2004. It has been extensively used in studies to prepare the Physics Technical Design Report (PTDR) and in the analysis of reconstructed event samples generated during the Computing Software and Analysis Challenge (CSA06). This involved generating thousands of jobs per day at peak rates. In this paper we discuss the current implementation of CRAB, the experience with using it in production and the plans to improve it in the immediate future.

  15. Tarantula and Hermit Crab Emergency Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnell, Cinthia

    2016-05-01

    Tarantulas and hermit crabs are commonly kept pets and are underappreciated in veterinary medicine. Safe handling, biology and husbandry, diagnostic techniques, anesthesia, fluid therapy, disorders, and euthanasia are covered in this article. Current research is applied to these topics to keep practitioners abreast with the best medicine for these creatures. PMID:27131164

  16. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  17. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  18. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  19. Physics performances for Z' searches at 3 TeV and 1.5 TeV CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Blaising, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Extra neutral gauge bosons (Z') are predicted in many extensions of the Standard Model (SM). In the minimal anomaly-free Z' model (AFZ'), the phenomenology is controlled by only three parameters beyond the SM ones, the Z' mass and two effective coupling constants g'_Y and g'_{BL}. We study the Z' 5-sigma discovery potential in e+e- collisions at 1.4 and 3 TeV CLIC. Assuming LHC discovers a Z' of 5 TeV mass, the expected accuracies on the Z'mu+mu- couplings are presented. We discuss also the requirements on detector performance and beam polarization.

  20. Analysis of the behaviour of the CLIC_SiD iron return yoke during a seismic event

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Ramos, F.

    2012-01-01

    The iron return yoke of the CLIC SiD detector concept is composed of three barrel rings and two endcap discs which, during a seismic event, are subjected to horizontal and vertical accelerations that can result in both a mechanical failure of internal structural elements and high deformations which can lead to unwanted collisions with other internal or external detector elements, as well as the walls of the experimental cavern. This report presents the results from the analysis of the return yoke barrel rings and endcaps under a seismic event load case.

  1. Study of the hybrid controller electronics for the nano-stabilization of mechanical vibrations of CLIC quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Carmona, P; Collette, C; Esposito, M; Guinchard, M; Janssens, S; Kuzmin, A; Moron Ballester, R

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve the required levels of luminosity in the CLIC linear collider, mechanical stabilization of quadrupoles to the nanometre level is required. The paper describes a design of hybrid electronics combining an analogue controller and digital communication with the main machine controller. The choice of local analogue control ensures the required low latency while still keeping sufficiently low noise level. Furthermore, it reduces the power consumption, rack space and cost. Sensitivity to radiation single events upsets is reduced compared to a digital controller. The digital part is required for fine tuning and real time monitoring via digitization of critical parameters.

  2. Sensitivity on the Dipole Moments of the τ-Neutrino at e+e- Colliders: ILC and CLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the sensitivity on the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of the τ-neutrino at a high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron collider, such as the ILC or CLIC, through the reaction e+e-→νν̅γ. We obtain limits on the dipole moments at the future linear colliders energies. For integrated luminosities of 500 fb−1 and center of mass energies between 0.5 and 3 TeV, the future e+e- colliders may improve the existing limits by two or three orders of magnitude.

  3. Accumulation and depuration of pectenotoxins in brown crab Cancer pagurus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhaoxin

    2009-01-01

    Pectenotoxins (PTXs) are a group of marine algal toxins. In this study, the accumulation and depuration of pectenotoxins in brown crab Cancer pagurus were investigated. Crabs were fed with toxic blue mussels Mytilus edulis for 21 days and then depurated for 42 days. Toxins were extracted with methanol from the digestive glands of contaminated crabs, uncontaminated crabs (control group) and from blue mussels for comparison. Extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatograph coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The concentrations of PTX-2, PTX-2 SA, 7-epi-PTX-2 SA, and PTX-12 were analyzed in two batches of toxic blue mussels and the crabs. A one-compartment model was applied to describe the depuration of PTXs. The half-life of PTXs was estimated to be 6-7.5 days. After depuration for 42 days, the amount of PTXs measured in the crab digestive glands was less than 1 μg/kg.

  4. Ghost fishing activity in derelict blue crab traps in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Julie A; Alford, Amy B

    2014-02-15

    Derelict crab traps impact the coastal ecosystem through continued catch of target species and species of conservation, economic, or recreational importance. During volunteer-supported crab trap cleanups in 2012 and 2013, we quantified ghost fishing activity in derelict crab traps in coastal Louisiana through a citizen scientist program. Volunteers removed 3607 derelict traps during these events, and over 65% of traps analyzed by citizen scientists were actively ghost fishing. Additionally, volunteers identified 19 species enmeshed in derelict traps, including a combination of fresh and saltwater species. We also detected a significant difference in the number of blue crab in actively ghost fishing derelict traps across removal locations with estimated catches varying between 2.4 and 3.5 crabs/trap. Our instantaneous estimates of ghost fishing activity are greater than those previously thought in Louisiana, further justifying current derelict crab trap prevention and removal extension and outreach programs in Louisiana and throughout the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:24360333

  5. Reproduction in crabs: strategies, invasiveness and environmental influences thereon

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, van den, R.B.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis provides insights into the interconnectedness of crab reproductive biology, the selective forces leading to their development, the possible links to invasiveness and the influences of environmental factors thereon. The empirical data collected and presented in this thesis can be used to compare different crab species and make predictions about the effect of climate change on their population dynamics and invasiveness. Two crab species in particular are examined in this thesis, Hal...

  6. A 150-million-year-old crab larva and its implications for the early rise of brachyuran crabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Joachim T; Martin, Joel W; Haug, Carolin

    2015-03-09

    True crabs (Brachyura) are the most successful group of decapod crustaceans. This success is most likely coupled to their life history, including two specialised larval forms, zoea and megalopa. The group is comparably young, starting to diversify only about 100 million years ago (mya), with a dramatic increase in species richness beginning approximately 50 mya. Early evolution of crabs is still very incompletely known. Here, we report a fossil crab larva, 150 mya, documented with up-to-date imaging techniques. It is only the second find of any fossil crab larva, but the first complete one, the first megalopa, and the oldest one (other fossil ca. 110 mya). Despite its age, the new fossil possesses a very modern morphology, being indistinguishable from many extant crab larvae. Hence, modern morphologies must have been present significantly earlier than formerly anticipated. We briefly discuss the impact of this find on our understanding of early crab evolution.

  7. Bacterial septicaemia in prerecruit edible crabs, Cancer pagurus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A L; Whitten, M M A; Hirschle, L; Pope, E C; Wootton, E C; Vogan, C L; Rowley, A F

    2014-08-01

    Juvenile edible crabs, Cancer pagurus L., were surveyed from Mumbles Head and Oxwich Bay in South Wales, UK, and the number of heterotrophic bacteria and vibrios in the hemolymph was determined. The percentage of crabs with hemolymph containing bacteria was variable over the survey with higher numbers of animals affected in summer than in winter. Post-moult crabs contained significantly higher numbers of heterotrophic bacteria in the hemolymph than pre- and intermoult animals. Crabs with cuticular damage to the gills also had significantly higher numbers of bacteria in the hemolymph. Crabs were found to have a high prevalence of infection by the dinoflagellate, Hematodinium. Such animals had significantly fewer bacteria in the blood in comparison with Hematodinium-free animals. Of the 463 crabs surveyed, only 3 individuals had hemolymph containing 2000 + CFU mL(-1). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, two of these crabs contained a Vibrio pectenicida-like isolate, while the other had a mixed assemblage of vibrios. Although 59% of the crabs surveyed had culturable bacteria in the hemolymph, the majority only had small numbers (crab fishery in this region.

  8. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  9. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  10. A search for shells around crabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to conducting a survey of the galactic plane at 327 MHz using the VLA, the authors have imaged four fields near galactic longitude of 20 degrees. Each image will cover a 2.5 degree field with ∼ 1 arcmin resolution. The fields have been chosen to include the remnants G20.0-0.2, G21.5-0.9, and G24.7 + 0.6. The first two are isolated Crab-like objects, that is, there is no discernible associated shell. Since such shells have relatively steep spectra, images at 327 MHz will be more sensitive to their presence. The absence of a shell can constrain the density of the ISM in the vicinity of the SNR. Since ∼ 50% of Crabs are naked, the implications can be extended to a significant fraction of the ISM

  11. Analysis of test-beam data with hybrid pixel detector prototypes for the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pequegnot, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is currently the most powerful accelerator in the world. This proton-proton collider is now stoppped to increase significantly its luminosity and energy, which would provide a larger discovery potential in 2014 and beyond. A high-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider, such as CLIC, is an option to complement and to extend the LHC physics programme. Indeed, a lepton collider gives access to additional physics processes, beyond those observable at the LHC, and therefore provides new discovery potential. It can also provide complementary and/or more precise information about new physics uncovered at the LHC. Many essential features of a detector are required to deliver the full physics potential of this CLIC machine. In this present report, I present my work on the vertex detector R\\&D for this future linear collider, which aims at developping highly granular and ultra-thin position sensitive detection devices with very low power consumption and fast time-stamping capability. We tested here thin silicon pixel...

  12. Development of Stripline Kickers for Low Emittance Rings: Application to the Beam Extraction Kicker for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)728476; Toral Fernandez, Fernando

    In the framework of the design study of Future Linear Colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several injection and extraction systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. The work of this Thesis consists of the design, fabrication and laboratory tests of the first stripline kicker prototype for beam extraction from the CLIC DRs, although the methodology proposed can be extended to stripline kickers for any low emittance ring. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most...

  13. A Large Glitch in the Crab Pulsar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using a new pulsar timing system at the 25-m radio telescope of Urumqi Astronomical Observatory, we have detected a large glitch in the Crab pulsar which occurred in 2000 July. The size of the gfitch is Av/v ~ 2.4 × 10-8, with a rela tive increment in frequency derivative Av/v ~ 5 × 10-3. The observing system is introduced and the observed properties of the glitch are discussed.

  14. Element Distributions In The Crab Nebula

    OpenAIRE

    Satterfield, T. J.; Katz, A. M.; Sibley, A. R.; G. M. MacAlpine; Uomoto, A.

    2012-01-01

    Images of the Crab Nebula have been obtained through custom interference filters which transmit emission from the expanding supernova remnant in HI, HeI, HeII, [CI], [NII], [OI], [SII], and [SIII] emission lines. We present both raw and flux-calibrated data. Arrays of 19,440 photoionization models, with extensive input abundance ranges, were matched pixel by pixel to the calibrated data in order to derive corresponding element abundance or mass-fraction distributions for helium, carbon, nitro...

  15. The Crab Nebula's Moving Wisps in Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, M F; Hester, J J

    2001-01-01

    We present three high resolution radio images of the Crab nebula, taken in 1998.6, 1998.8 and 2000.1 with the VLA. These are the best radio images of the Crab to date. We show that, near the pulsar, there are significant changes between our three observing epochs. These changes have an elliptical geometry very similar to that of the optical wisps. One radio wisp in particular can be unambiguously identified between two of our observing epochs, and moves outward with an apparent velocity of ~0.24. The similarity in both morphology and behavior of the present radio wisps to the optical wisps suggests that they are associated. This implies that the radio wisps, like the optical ones, are likely manifestations of the shock in the Crab pulsar's wind. This suggests that the radio emitting electrons are accelerated in the same region as the ones responsible for the optical to X-ray emission, contrary to most current models.

  16. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; Bockelman, B. P.; Hernandez, J. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Konstantinov, P. B.; Silva, J. M. D.; Ali, M. A. B. M.; Melo, A. M.; Riahi, H.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Yusli, M. N. B.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A. E.; Vaandering, E.

    2015-12-01

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day. CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks and submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. The new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service. Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.

  17. The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray and Sequence Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Wang, Mei; Lindquist, Erika; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Teranishi, Kristen S.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wong, Mike; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2010-01-27

    Background: With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Methodology/Principal Findings: A set of ~;;30K unique sequences (UniSeqs) representing ~;;19K clusters were generated from ~;;98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66percent of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD), a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases.Conclusions/Significance: The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the transcriptome as can reasonably be captured in

  18. Comparative analysis of the proximate and elemental composition of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, the warty crab Eriphia verrucosa, and the edible crab Cancer pagurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Maurizio; Coco, Laura Del; Pascali, Sandra Angelica De; Migoni, Danilo; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Mancinelli, Giorgio; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The proximate composition and element contents of claw muscle tissue of Atlantic blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) were compared with the native warty crab (Eriphia verrucosa) and the commercially edible crab (Cancer pagurus). The scope of the analysis was to profile the chemical characteristics and nutritive value of the three crab species. Elemental fingerprints showed significant inter-specific differences, whereas non-significant variations in the moisture and ash contents were observed. In the blue crab, protein content was significantly lower than in the other two species, while its carbon content resulted lower than that characterizing only the warty crab. Among micro-elements, Ba, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Ni, and Pb showed extremely low concentrations and negligible among-species differences. Significant inter-specific differences were observed for Na, Sr, V, Ba, Cd and Zn; in particular, cadmium and zinc were characterized in the blue crab by concentrations significantly lower than in the other two species. The analysis of the available literature on the three species indicated a general lack of comparable information on their elemental composition. The need to implement extended elemental fingerprinting techniques for shellfish quality assessment is discussed, in view of other complementary profiling methods such as NMR-based metabolomics.

  19. Comparative analysis of the proximate and elemental composition of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, the warty crab Eriphia verrucosa, and the edible crab Cancer pagurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Maurizio; Coco, Laura Del; Pascali, Sandra Angelica De; Migoni, Danilo; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Mancinelli, Giorgio; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The proximate composition and element contents of claw muscle tissue of Atlantic blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) were compared with the native warty crab (Eriphia verrucosa) and the commercially edible crab (Cancer pagurus). The scope of the analysis was to profile the chemical characteristics and nutritive value of the three crab species. Elemental fingerprints showed significant inter-specific differences, whereas non-significant variations in the moisture and ash contents were observed. In the blue crab, protein content was significantly lower than in the other two species, while its carbon content resulted lower than that characterizing only the warty crab. Among micro-elements, Ba, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Ni, and Pb showed extremely low concentrations and negligible among-species differences. Significant inter-specific differences were observed for Na, Sr, V, Ba, Cd and Zn; in particular, cadmium and zinc were characterized in the blue crab by concentrations significantly lower than in the other two species. The analysis of the available literature on the three species indicated a general lack of comparable information on their elemental composition. The need to implement extended elemental fingerprinting techniques for shellfish quality assessment is discussed, in view of other complementary profiling methods such as NMR-based metabolomics. PMID:27441254

  20. Cavity spin optodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, N

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a large quantum spin coupled parametrically to an optical resonator is treated in analogy with the motion of a cantilever in cavity optomechanics. New spin optodynamic phenonmena are predicted, such as cavity-spin bistability, optodynamic spin-precession frequency shifts, coherent amplification and damping of spin, and the spin optodynamic squeezing of light.

  1. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  2. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  3. Superconducting RF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    It was 20 years ago when the research and development programme for LEP superconducting cavities was initiated. It lasted about 10 years. Today, my aim is not to tell you in great detail about the many innovations made thanks to our research, but I would like to point out some milestones in the development of superconducting cavities where Emilio's influence was particularly important.

  4. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  5. Ferrite loaded rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of a ferrite-loaded rf cavity is explained from the point of view of its operation. Then, an analysis of the automatic cavity-tuning system is presented using the transfer function; and a systematic analysis of a beam-feedback system using transfer functions is also presented. (author)

  6. Passivated niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  7. Experimental infections of Orchitophrya stellarum (Scuticociliata) in American blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and fiddler crabs (Uca minax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Terrence L; Small, Hamish J; Peemoeller, Bhae-Jin; Gibbs, David A; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2013-11-01

    Outbreaks of an unidentified ciliate have occurred on several occasions in blue crabs from Chesapeake Bay held during winter months in flow-through systems. The parasite was initially thought to be Mesanophrys chesapeakensis, but molecular analysis identified it as Orchitophyra stellarum, a facultative parasite of sea stars (Asteroidea). We investigated the host-parasite association of O. stellarum in the blue crab host. Crabs were inoculated with the ciliate, or they were held in bath exposures after experimentally induced autotomy of limbs in order to determine potential mechanisms for infection. Crabs inoculated with the ciliate, or exposed to it after experimental autotomy, rapidly developed fatal infections. Crabs that were not experimentally injured, but were exposed to the ciliate, rarely developed infections; thus, indicating that the parasite requires a wound or break in the cuticle as a portal of entry. For comparative purposes, fiddler crabs, Uca minax, were inoculated with the ciliate in a dose-titration experiment. Low doses of the ciliate (10 per crab) were sometimes able to establish infections, but high intensity infections developed quickly at doses over 500 ciliates per crab. Chemotaxis studies were initiated to determine if the ciliate preferentially selected blue crab serum (BCS) over other nutrient sources. Cultures grown on medium with BCS or fetal bovine serum showed some conditioning in their selection for different media, but the outcome in choice experiments indicated that the ciliate was attracted to BCS and not seawater. Our findings indicate that O. stellarum is a facultative parasite of blue crabs. It can cause infections in exposed crabs at 10-15°C, but it requires a portal of entry for successful host invasion, and it may find injured hosts using chemotaxis.

  8. Land crabs as key drivers in tropical coastal forest recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, E.S.; Krauss, K.W.; Green, P.T.; O'Dowd, D. J.; Sherman, P.M.; Smith, T. J.

    2009-01-01

    Plant populations are regulated by a diverse assortment of abiotic and biotic factors that influence seed dispersal and viability, and seedling establishment and growth at the microsite. Rarely does one animal guild exert as significant an influence on different plant assemblages as land crabs. We review three tropical coastal ecosystems-mangroves, island maritime forests, and mainland coastal terrestrial forests-where land crabs directly influence forest composition by limiting tree establishment and recruitment. Land crabs differentially prey on seeds, propagules and seedlings along nutrient, chemical and physical environmental gradients. In all of these ecosystems, but especially mangroves, abiotic gradients are well studied, strong and influence plant species distributions. However, we suggest that crab predation has primacy over many of these environmental factors by acting as the first limiting factor of tropical tree recruitment to drive the potential structural and compositional organisation of coastal forests. We show that the influence of crabs varies relative to tidal gradient, shoreline distance, canopy position, time, season, tree species and fruiting periodicity. Crabs also facilitate forest growth and development through such activities as excavation of burrows, creation of soil mounds, aeration of soils, removal of leaf litter into burrows and creation of carbon-rich soil microhabitats. For all three systems, land crabs influence the distribution, density and size-class structure of tree populations. Indeed, crabs are among the major drivers of tree recruitment in tropical coastal forest ecosystems, and their conservation should be included in management plans of these forests. ?? 2009 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  9. Brachyuran Crabs collected at Curaçao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rathbun, Mary J.

    1924-01-01

    In 1920 a report ¹) on Dr. BOEKE’S collection of crabs and shrimps from Curaçao and other Dutch West Indian Islands was published. Dr. VAN DER HORST’S collection forms an important addition to the fauna of Curaçao, especially as to the Xanthids and Majids, or spider crabs. Four new species were disc

  10. Mitigating by-catch of diamondback terrapins in crab pots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kristen M.; Crowder, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic by-catch of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) pots is a concern for terrapin conservation along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Despite the availability of by-catch reduction devices (BRDs) for crab pots, adoption of BRDs has not been mandated and by-catch of terrapins continues. We conducted experimental fishing studies in North Carolina's year-round blue crab fishery from 2000 to 2004 to evaluate the ability of various BRDs to reduce terrapin by-catch without a concomitant reduction in the catch of blue crabs. In 4,822 crab pot days fished, we recorded only 21 terrapin captures. Estimated capture rates were 0.003 terrapins/pot per day in hard crab experimental fishing and 0.008 terrapins/pot per day in peeler experimental fishing. All terrapin captures occurred from April to mid-May within 321.4 m of the shoreline. Longer soak times produced more dead terrapins, with 4 live and 4 dead during hard crab experimental fishing and 11 live and 2 dead during peeler experimental fishing. The 4.0-cm BRDs in fall and 4.5-cm and 5.0-cm BRDs in spring reduced the catch of legal-sized male hard crabs by 26.6%, 21.2%, and 5.7%, respectively. Only the 5.0-cm BRDs did not significantly affect the catch of legal-sized hard male crabs. However, BRDs had no measurable effect on catch of target crabs in the peeler crab fishery. Our results identify 3 complementary and economically feasible tools for blue crab fishery managers to exclude terrapins from commercially fished crab pots in North Carolina: 1) gear modifications (e.g., BRDs); 2) distance-to-shore restrictions; and 3) time-of-year regulations. These measures combined could provide a reduction in terrapin by-catch of up to 95% without a significant reduction in target crab catch.

  11. Crabs in Labs: The Shore Crab (Carcinus maenas) as Teaching Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The shore crab (Carcinus maenas) is an excellent subject for school study, both in the field and the laboratory. It is easily collected and maintained and can be used for a wide range of investigations. Some background details are given and possible areas of investigation suggested. (Author)

  12. Death rate due to horseshoe crab poisoning:summarization on Thai reports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe crab can be poisonous and intoxication due to intake of horseshoe crab is possible. Horseshoe crab intoxication can be seen in many countries with seacoasts including Thailand. Here, the authors summarized the death rate due to horseshoe crab poisoning in Thailand.

  13. 75 FR 32360 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Crab Report Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Crab Report Forms AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of.... 1801 et seq.) The FMP for Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab includes the Crab Rationalization (CR) Program, a limited access system that allocates BSAI Management Area Crab resources...

  14. 50 CFR 648.263 - Red crab possession and landing restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Red crab possession and landing... Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.263 Red crab possession and landing restrictions. (a) Vessels issued limited access red crab permits—(1) Possession and landing restrictions. (i)...

  15. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  16. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  17. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  18. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  19. Identification of irradiated crab using EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghraby, A. [Radiation Dosimetry Department, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Ministry of Scientific Research, Haram, 12211- Giza, P.O. Box: 136 (Egypt)]. E-mail: maghrabism@yahoo.com

    2007-02-15

    EPR spectroscopy is a fast and powerful technique for the identification of irradiated food. Crab exoskeleton was divided into six parts: dactyl, cheliped, carapace, apron, swimming legs, and walking legs. Samples of the exoskeleton were prepared and irradiated to Cs-137 gamma radiation in the range (1.156-5.365 kGy). EPR spectra of unirradiated as well as irradiated samples were recorded and analyzed. Response to gamma radiation was plotted for each part of the exoskeleton, dactyl was found to be the most sensitive part, followed by the apron (38%), cheliped (37%), walking legs (30%), swimming legs (24%), and carapace (21%) relative to the dactyl response.

  20. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Red king crab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Stephen C.; Onuf, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for evaluating habitat of different life stages of red king crab (Paralithodes camtschatica). A model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) and 1.0 (optimum habitat) in Alaskan coastal waters, especially in the Gulf of Alaska and the southeastern Bering Sea. HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  1. Effects of pesticides on crab cheliped regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costlow, J.D. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The mud crab cheliped regeneration bioassay has proven to be a sensitive and reliable bioassay in studies of the potential sublethal effects of pesticides, including teratogenesis, spontaneous autotomy, and duration of the various stages of development. The assay has also been demonstated to be a useful indication of mortality associated with the impact of these chemicals of anthropogenic origin during the megalopal and early postlarval stages of development. Four pesticides were tested here using the cheliped regeneration bioassay technique. Although carbofuran is approximately 5--6 times more toxic than methomyl, both compounds yield very similar results in terms of sublethal effects.

  2. Design and Manufacturing Description of the Prototype Striplines for the Extraction Kicker of the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Belver-Aguilar, C; Faus-Golfe, A; Gómez, J; Gutiérrez, D; Toral, F

    2013-01-01

    The Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) of CLIC are needed to reduce the beam emittances to the small values required for the main linacs. The injection and extraction, from the PDRs and DRs, are carried out by kicker systems. In order to achieve both low beam coupling impedance and reasonable broadband impedance matching to the electrical circuit, striplines have been chosen for the kicker elements. The design of the stripline kicker was previously carried out by modelling the striplines with simulation codes such as HFSS, Quickfield and CST Particle Studio. In order to have a complete analysis of the striplines, the effect of electrode supports and coaxial feedthroughs have been studied in detail. In this paper, electromagnetic analyses of the complete striplines, including fabrication tolerances, are reported. Furthermore, a new idea for impedance matching is presented.

  3. Theoretical and practical feasibility demonstration of a micrometric remotely controlled pre-alignment system for the CLIC linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, H; Chritin, N; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Sosin, M; Touze, T

    2011-01-01

    The active pre-alignment of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is one of the key points of the project: the components must be pre-aligned w.r.t. a straight line within a few microns over a sliding window of 200 m, along the two linacs of 20 km each. The proposed solution consists of stretched wires of more than 200 m, overlapping over half of their length, which will be the reference of alignment. Wire Positioning Sensors (WPS), coupled to the supports to be pre-aligned, will perform precise and accurate measurements within a few microns w.r.t. these wires. A micrometric fiducialisation of the components and a micrometric alignment of the components on common supports will make the strategy of pre-alignment complete. In this paper, the global strategy of active pre-alignment is detailed and illustrated by the latest results demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed solution.

  4. Analytical considerations for linear and nonlinear optimization of the TME cells. Application to the CLIC pre-damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Fanouria, Antoniou

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical minimum emittance cells are the optimal configurations for achieving the absolute minimum emittance, if specific optics constraints are satisfied at the middle of the cell's dipole. Linear lattice design options based on an analytical approach for the theoretical minimum emittance cells are presented in this paper. In particular the parametrization of the quadrupole strengths and optics functions with respect to the emittance and drift lengths is derived. A multi-parametric space can be then created with all the cell parameters, from which one can chose any of them to be optimized. An application of this approach are finally presented for the linear and non-linear optimization of the CLIC Pre-damping rings.

  5. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8202397: View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  6. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  7. Moving Detectors in Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Obadia, N

    2007-01-01

    We consider two-level detectors, coupled to a quantum scalar field, moving inside cavities. We highlight some pathological resonant effects due to abrupt boundaries, and decide to describe the cavity by switching smoothly the interaction by a time-dependent gate-like function. Considering uniformly accelerated trajectories, we show that some specific choices of non-adiabatic switching have led to hazardous interpretations about the enhancement of the Unruh effect in cavities. More specifically, we show that the emission/absorption ratio takes arbitrary high values according to the emitted quanta properties and to the transients undergone at the entrance and the exit of the cavity, {\\it independently of the acceleration}. An explicit example is provided where we show that inertial and uniformly accelerated world-lines can even lead to the same ``pseudo-temperature''.

  8. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  9. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  10. Alignement général du CLIC: stratégie et progrès

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud-Durand, H

    2008-01-01

    La faisabilité concernant le pré-alignement actif du CLIC sera démontrée si l?on peut prouver qu?il existe une référence et ses capteurs associés permettant l?alignement des composants à mieux que 3 microns (1?). Pour répondre à ce challenge, une méthode de mesure d?écarts à un fil tendu est proposée, basée sur 40 ans de pratique de cette technique au CERN. Quelques problèmes demeurent concernant cette méthode : la connaissance de la forme du fil tendu utilisé comme référence droite, la détermination du géoïde à la précision souhaitée et le développement de capteurs bas coût permettant des mesures sub-micrométriques. Des études ont été entreprises afin de lever les derniers points en suspens, pendant que cette solution est intégrée dans une proposition concernant l?alignement général du CLIC. Cela implique un grand nombre d?interactions au niveau du projet, dans des domaines aussi différents que le génie civil, l?intégration, la physique du faisceau, la métrologie des �...

  11. Hydroforming of Elliptical Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    W. Singer; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area ...

  12. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  13. The porcelain crab transcriptome and PCAD, the porcelain crab microarray and sequence database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Tagmount

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A set of approximately 30K unique sequences (UniSeqs representing approximately 19K clusters were generated from approximately 98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66% of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD, a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the

  14. Pulse profile stability of the Crab pulsar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chetana Jain; Biswajit Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present an X-ray timing analysis of the Crab pulsar,PSR B0531+21,using archival RXTE data.We have investigated the stability of the Crab pulse profile,in soft (2-20keV) and hard (30-100keV) X-ray energies,over the last decade of RXTE operation.The analysis includes measurement of the separation between the two pulse peaks and the intensity and widths of the two peaks.We did not find any significant time dependency in the pulse shape.The two peaks have been stable in phase,intensity and width for the last ten years.The first pulse is relatively stronger at soft X-rays.The first pulse peak is narrower than the second peak in both soft and hard X-ray energies.Both the peaks show a slow rise and a steeper fall.The ratio of the pulsed photons in the two peaks is also constant in time.

  15. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Long: Data from: Effects of Ocean Acidification on Juvenile Red King Crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) and Tanner Crab (Chionoecetes bairdi) Growth, Condition, Calcification, and Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is the results of a laboratory experiment. Juvenile red king crab and Tanner crab were reared in individual containers for nearly 200 days in flowing...

  16. Effects of Underwater Turbine Noise on Crab Larval Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Matthew K; Jeffs, Andrew G; Radford, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    The development of marine tidal turbines has advanced at a rapid rate over the last decade but with little detailed understanding of the potential noise impacts on invertebrates. Previous research has shown that underwater reef noise plays an important role in mediating metamorphosis in many larval crabs and fishes. New research suggests that underwater estuarine noise may also mediate metamorphosis in estuarine crab larvae and that the noise emitted from underwater tidal and sea-based wind turbines may significantly influence larval metamorphosis in estuarine crabs. PMID:26611041

  17. Issues and Feasibility Demonstration of Positioning Closed Loop Control for the CLIC Supporting System Using a Test Mock-up with Five Degrees of Freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Sosin, M; Chritin, N; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Mainaud Durand, H; Rude, V; Sterbini, G

    2012-01-01

    Since several years, CERN is studying the feasibility of building a high energy e+ e- linear collider: the CLIC (Compact LInear Collider). One of the challenges of such a collider is the pre-alignment precision and accuracy requirement on the transverse positions of the linac components, which is typically 14 μm over a window of 200 m. To ensure the possibility of positioning within such tight constraints, CERN Beams Department’s Survey team has worked intensively at developing the methods and technology needed to achieve that objective. This paper describes activities which were performed on a test bench (mock-up) with five degrees of freedom (DOF) for the qualification of control algorithms for the CLIC supporting system active-pre-alignment. Present understanding, lessons learned (“know how”), issues of sensors noise and mechanical components nonlinearities are presented.

  18. Alignment Methods Developed for the Validation of the Thermal and Mechanical Behaviour of the Two Beam Test Modules for the CLIC Project

    CERN Document Server

    Mainaud Durand, Helene; Sosin, Mateusz; Rude, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    CLIC project will consist of more than 20 000 two meters long modules. A test setup made of three modules is being built at CERN to validate the assembly and integration of all components and technical systems and to validate the short range strategy of pre-alignment. The test setup has been installed in a room equipped with a sophisticated system of ventilation able to reproduce the environmental conditions of the CLIC tunnel. Some of the components have been equipped with electrical heaters to simulate the power dissipation, combined with a water cooling system integrated in the RF components. Using these installations, to have a better understanding of the thermal and mechanical behaviour of a module under different operation modes, machine cycles have been simulated; the misalignment of the components and their supports has been observed. This paper describes the measurements methods developed for such a project and the results obtained.

  19. Comparison of automated BAX polymerase chain reaction and standard culture methods for detection of Listeria monocyogenes in blue crab meat (Callinectus sapidus) and blue crab processing plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared the BAX Polymerase Chain Reaction method (BAX PCR) with the Standard Culture Method (SCM) for detection of L. monocytogenes in blue crab meat and crab processing plants. The aim of this study was to address this data gap. Raw crabs, finished products and environmental sponge samp...

  20. Evolutionary history of true crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura) and the origin of freshwater crabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Ling Ming; Schubart, Christoph D; Ahyong, Shane T; Lai, Joelle C Y; Au, Eugene Y C; Chan, Tin-Yam; Ng, Peter K L; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-05-01

    Crabs of the infra-order Brachyura are one of the most diverse groups of crustaceans with approximately 7,000 described species in 98 families, occurring in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. The relationships among the brachyuran families are poorly understood due to the high morphological complexity of the group. Here, we reconstruct the most comprehensive phylogeny of Brachyura to date using sequence data of six nuclear protein-coding genes and two mitochondrial rRNA genes from more than 140 species belonging to 58 families. The gene tree confirms that the "Podotremata," are paraphyletic. Within the monophyletic Eubrachyura, the reciprocal monophyly of the two subsections, Heterotremata and Thoracotremata, is supported. Monophyly of many superfamilies, however, is not recovered, indicating the prevalence of morphological convergence and the need for further taxonomic studies. Freshwater crabs were derived early in the evolution of Eubrachyura and are shown to have at least two independent origins. Bayesian relaxed molecular methods estimate that freshwater crabs separated from their closest marine sister taxa ~135 Ma, that is, after the break up of Pangaea (∼200 Ma) and that a Gondwanan origin of these freshwater representatives is untenable. Most extant families and superfamilies arose during the late Cretaceous and early Tertiary.

  1. AFSC/REFM: BSAI Crab Economic Data Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Economic data collected for years 1998, 2001, 2004, and 2005 and onward for the BSAI Crab Economic Data Report (EDR). Reporting is required of any owner or...

  2. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge : Prescribed Fire Plan : 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Prescribed Fire Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan, by aiding the forest...

  3. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge : Law Enforcement Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Law Enforcement Plan clarifies U.S. Fish and Wildlife enforcement policies as they apply to the Refuge. It provides...

  4. Crab Orchard Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Back-end data file for the Crab Orchard Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use.The Wilderness Act of...

  5. Removal of nickel from aqueous solutions using crab shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Swapna; Shukla, Shyam S; Dorris, Kenneth L

    2005-10-17

    Partially converted crab shell waste, which contains chitosan, was used to remove nickel from water. The chelating ability of chitosan makes it an excellent adsorbent for removing pollutants. Advantages of chitosan in crab shells include availability, low cost, and high biocompatibility. The metal uptake by partially converted crab shell waste was successful and rapid. The sorption occurred primarily within 5 min. The sorption mechanism appears to be quite complicated and cannot be adequately described by either the Langmuir or Freundlich theories. Various anions, including chloride, bromide, fluoride, acetate, sulfate, nitrate, and phosphate, were found to have a very small effect on the capacity of the crab shells for uptake of nickel. The effect of pH was also found not to be prominent.

  6. Narrative report : 1964. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by...

  7. Narrative report : 1966. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by...

  8. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report : September - December, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by...

  9. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : September - December, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by...

  10. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : May - August, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : September - December, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The report begins by...

  12. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : September - December, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The report begins by...

  13. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report : January - April, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1953. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : May - August, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : May - August, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1950. The report begins by summarizing...

  16. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : September - December, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by...

  17. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report : January - April, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1954. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Narrative report : 1967. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by...

  19. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : May - August, 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1951. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : January - April, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1950. The report begins by summarizing...

  1. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : May - August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing...

  2. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Narrative report : January - April, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : September - December, 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1952. The report begins by...

  4. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : September - December, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by...

  5. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : January - April, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1955. The report begins by summarizing...

  6. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : May - August, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1948. The report begins by summarizing...

  7. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : May - August, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : September - December, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by...

  9. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : January - April, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1949. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : May - August, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : January - April, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1956. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : January - April, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1948. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. Narrative report : 1968. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by...

  14. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : September - December, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by...

  15. Narrative report : 1965. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by...

  16. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : January - April, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1957. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge [Annual narrative : May - August, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Narrative report : 1973 [Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1973 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing...

  19. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Urban: Golden King Crab tagging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data is comprised of the records of individual male golden king crab (GKC) tagged at the Kodiak Laboratory. Initial size, shell condition and missing limbs was...

  20. Economic Assessment of the Atlantic Coast Horseshoe Crab Fishery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In this report, Industrial Economics, Incorporated (lEc) provides an assessment of the economic value of the Atlantic Coast horseshoe crab fishery. We accomplish...

  1. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative: Calender year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities during the 1997 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  2. Narrative report : 1971. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by...

  3. Narrative report : 1970. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by...

  4. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Inventory Plan outlines the strategy, techniques and purpose of a wildlife inventory on the Refuge. Futhermore...

  5. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge : Furbearer Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Furbearer Management Plan directs the management and regulation of trapping. The furbearer management program directly...

  6. Narrative report : 1969. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by...

  7. Narrative report - Fiscal year 1975 [Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1975 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Narrative report : 1972 [Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by...

  9. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  10. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  11. Morphometric characteristics in the horseshoe crab Tachypleus gigas (Arthropoda: Merostomata)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Das, S.; Chatterji, A.; Parulekar, A.H.

    and uniform as also indicated by linear reiationship. It appears, therefore that the energy gained by these crabs from ingested food gets evenly distributed in the body building processes. Telson length-total length relationship indicated a linear... was of highest magnitude than that of the total length. In the length range 300-400 mm, the weight increased sharply. The increase in the soft body parts could probably be due to increased feeding efficiency and food availability to horseshoe crabs. Carapace...

  12. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Element Distributions In The Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Satterfield, T J; Sibley, A R; MacAlpine, G M; Uomoto, A

    2012-01-01

    Images of the Crab Nebula have been obtained through custom interference filters which transmit emission from the expanding supernova remnant in HI, HeI, HeII, [CI], [NII], [OI], [SII], and [SIII] emission lines. We present both raw and flux-calibrated data. Arrays of 19,440 photoionization models, with extensive input abundance ranges, were matched pixel by pixel to the calibrated data in order to derive corresponding element abundance or mass-fraction distributions for helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. These maps show distinctive structure, and they illustrate regions of gas in which various stages of nucleosynthesis have apparently occurred, including the CNO-cycle, helium-burning, carbon-burning, and oxygen-burning. It is hoped that the calibrated observations and chemical abundance distribution maps will be useful for developing a better understanding of the precursor star evolution and the supernova explosive process.

  14. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  15. Melatonin and oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  16. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat İnanç Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  17. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8302397: View from the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138. Giacomo Primadei stands on the left.

  18. Statistical electromagnetics: Complex cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2008-01-01

    A selection of the literature on the statistical description of electromagnetic fields and complex cavities is concisely reviewed. Some essential concepts, for example, the application of the central limit theorem and the maximum entropy principle, are scrutinized. Implicit assumptions, biased choic

  19. Laser cavity modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Damakoa, I.; Audounet, J.; Bouyssou, G.; Vassilieff, G.

    1993-01-01

    Two approachs of modelling nonhomogeneous cavity laser are presented. They are based on the beam propagation method which allows the use of fast Fourier transform (FFT). The resulting procedures provide selfconsistent solutions to the Maxwell and diffusion equations. Results are given to illustrate the two methods.


  20. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.