WorldWideScience

Sample records for cleveland

  1. 77 FR 36331 - Noise Exposure Maps; Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Noise Exposure Maps; Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, OH AGENCY: Federal Aviation... determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the City of Cleveland for Cleveland Hopkins... International Airport under Part 150 in conjunction with the noise exposure map, and that this program will...

  2. Building an engaged workforce at Cleveland Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrnchak JM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M PatrnchakCleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Employee engagement is widely recognized as a critical factor in organizational performance. This article examines an ongoing cultural development initiative at Cleveland Clinic designed to significantly increase employee engagement. Key components of this initiative include the introduction of serving leadership, new caregiver wellness and recognition programs, “Cleveland Clinic Experience” training focused on the institution’s core mission, and changes in the institutional vocabulary. Since 2008, the results include a dramatic improvement in engagement, as measured by the Gallup Q12 survey, with parallel improvements in patient satisfaction, as measured by the clinic's scores on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS survey. In addition to a discussion of the key components of the clinic’s engagement initiative, the article provides a partial review of the literature focused on employee engagement as well as a summary of “lessons learned” that may serve as a guide for others facing the challenge of increasing employee engagement in large, mature health care institutions.Keywords: health care, employee engagement, culture change, hospital performance, patient satisfaction

  3. Cleveland School Vouchers: Where the Students Come from.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Zach

    This report presents data on the Ohio Department of Education's Cleveland Scholarship and Tutoring program, examining where students who receive school vouchers attended school before entering the program. Overall, 33 percent of these students previously attended private schools, and 21 percent previously attended Cleveland public schools. The…

  4. Segregation Levels in Cleveland Public Schools and the Cleveland Voucher Program. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Examining the widespread claims that private schools have high segregation levels and vouchers will lead to greater segregation, this study finds that both assertions are empirically unsupportable. Private schools participating in Cleveland's voucher program are much less segregated than Cleveland's public schools. This means that students using…

  5. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Ecosystem Services by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset presents environmental benefits of the urban forest in 1,442 block groups in Cleveland, Ohio. Carbon attributes, temperature reduction,...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover Data (2011 and 2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Cleveland, OH EnviroAtlas Meter-scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) dataset comprises 2,737 km2 around the city of Cleveland and portions of surrounding counties. The...

  7. 76 FR 66250 - Television Broadcasting Services; Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Cleveland, OH AGENCY: Federal Communications... Community Television of Ohio License, LLC (``Community Television''), the licensee of station WJW (TV.... Community Television is seeking the channel substitution because a sizeable number of the station's...

  8. 78 FR 42733 - Safety Zone; Cleveland Dragon Boat Festival and Head of the Cuyahoga, Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Cleveland Dragon Boat Festival and Head of... during the Dragon Boat Festival and Head of the Cuyahoga boating events. The safety zone established by... (HOTC) rowing regatta has occurred annually for over a decade and the Dragon Boat Festival for the...

  9. How Cleveland Clinic used TDABC to improve value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Christopher J; Hopkins, Mike; Kimmel, Benjamin M; Koberna, Stephanie; Montie, Carrie A

    2014-06-01

    Cleveland Clinic partnered with Harvard Business School to conduct a pilot project to explore the differences between time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) and relative value unit costing. The goal was to determine whether TDABC could improve the accuracy of cost information and identify value-improvement opportunities for two types of heart-value procedures. Using TDABC, leaders gained a detailed look into process steps that could be consolidated, reduced, or performed with a lower cost mix of personnel.

  10. Developing a leadership pipeline: the Cleveland Clinic experience

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Caryl A.; Barss, Christina; Stoller, James K

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of health care requires excellent leadership to address the challenges of access, quality, and cost of care. Because competencies to lead differ from clinical or research skills, there is a compelling need to develop leaders and create a talent pipeline, perhaps especially in physician-led organizations like Cleveland Clinic. In this context, we previously reported on a cohort-based physician leadership development course called Leading in Health Care and, in the current report...

  11. Jurassic sedimentation in the Cleveland Basin : a review

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    This review combines two Presidential Addresses (2005, 2006) and aims to provides an up-to-date overview of the stratigraphy and sedimentation of the Jurassic sequence of the Cleveland Basin (Yorkshire), including poorly known data from the western outcrop. These fascinating rocks have been the focus of geological research since the 18th Century and have had a profound influence on the development of the geological sciences. Throughout the 20th Century, the excellent coastal exposures have ac...

  12. Developing a leadership pipeline: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Caryl A; Barss, Christina; Stoller, James K

    2014-11-01

    The complexity of health care requires excellent leadership to address the challenges of access, quality, and cost of care. Because competencies to lead differ from clinical or research skills, there is a compelling need to develop leaders and create a talent pipeline, perhaps especially in physician-led organizations like Cleveland Clinic. In this context, we previously reported on a cohort-based physician leadership development course called Leading in Health Care and, in the current report, detail an expanded health care leadership development programme called the Cleveland Clinic Academy (CCA). CCA consists of a broad suite of offerings, including cohort-based learning and 'a la carte' half- or full-day courses addressing specific competencies to manage and to lead. Academy attendance is optional and is available to all physicians, nurses, and administrators with the requisite experience. Course selection is guided by competency matrices which map leadership competencies to specific courses. As of December 2012, a total of 285 course sessions have been offered to 6,050 attendees with uniformly high ratings of course quality and impact. During the past 10 years, Cleveland Clinic's leadership and management curriculum has successfully created a pipeline of health care leaders to fill executive positions, search committees, board openings, and various other organizational leadership positions. Health care leadership can be taught and learned. PMID:25082312

  13. Natural fractures in a United Kingdom shale reservoir analog, Cleveland Basin, northeast England.

    OpenAIRE

    Imber, Jonathan; Armstrong, Howard; Clancy, Sarah; Daniels, Susan; Herringshaw, Liam; McCaffrey, Ken; Rodrigues, Joel; Trabucho-Alexandre, Joao; Warren, Cassandra

    2014-01-01

    Faults and fractures within the well-exposed Lower Jurassic Cleveland Ironstone and Whitby Mudstone formations may provide insights into the tectonic history of gas-prospective, Mississippian shale in northern England. Sub-vertical opening mode fractures occur throughout the Cleveland Basin. Bed-parallel fractures, some of which contain blocky calcite fills, occur preferentially within well-bedded, clay-rich mudstones of the Cleveland Ironstone and Whitby Mudstone formations at Jet Wyke and P...

  14. 77 FR 3500 - Hugo Boss Cleveland, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... location of Hugo Boss Cleveland, Inc. had their wages reported under a separate unemployment insurance (UI...., including workers whose unemployment insurance (UI) wages are paid through TJFC Distribution, Brooklyn, Ohio... Employment and Training Administration Hugo Boss Cleveland, Inc., Including Workers Whose...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 1,442 block groups in Cleveland, Ohio. The US EPA's...

  16. Flow Analysis of the Cleveland Clinic Centrifugal Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Golding, Leonard A. R.; Smith, William A.; Horvath, David; Medvedev, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    An implantable ventricular assist rotordynamic blood pump is being developed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in cooperation with the NASA Lewis Research Center. At the nominal design condition, the pump provides blood flow at the rate of 5 liters per minute at a pressure rise of 100 mm of mercury and a rotative speed of 3000 RPM. Bench testing of the centrifugal pump in a water/glycerin mixture has provided flow and pressure data at several rotative speeds. A one-dimensional empirical based pump flow analysis computer code developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used in the design process to simulate the flow in the primary centrifugal pump stage. The computer model was used to size key impeller and volute geometric parameters that influence pressure rise and flow. Input requirements to the computer model include a simple representation of the pump geometry. The model estimates the flow conditions at the design and at off-design operating conditions at the impeller leading and trailing edges and the volute inlet and exit. The output from the computer model is compared to flow and pressure data obtained from bench testing.

  17. Toward an Evaluation Design for the Cleveland Scholarship Program. Working Papers in Public Policy Analysis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Paul T.; Klein, Stephen P.

    In March 1995 the Ohio General Assembly enacted a Pilot Project Scholarship Program intended to provide a limited number of vouchers to allow Cleveland public school students to attend alternative schools, i.e. private schools, including those operated by religious organizations, within the Cleveland city limits and public schools in surrounding…

  18. Cleveland's Multicultural Librarian: Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, 1870-1954

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, who served immigrant populations in Cleveland throughout most of the Progressive Era and the Great Depression, was one of the first librarians to advocate for multiculturalism (then called cultural pluralism) as opposed to Americanism. In providing multicultural and multilingual library services for immigrants,…

  19. 77 FR 16800 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, AR, and Cleveland, MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, AR, and Cleveland, MS AGENCY: Federal... Allotments by substituting Channel 224A for vacant Channel 289A, at Dermott, Arkansas, and by substituting... ``hybrid'' application and rule making petition. Channel 224A can be allotted at Dermott, Arkansas,...

  20. 78 FR 27306 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, Arkansas, and Cleveland, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Dermott, Arkansas, and Cleveland, Mississippi AGENCY... Delta Radio Network, LLC, substitutes FM Channel 224A for 289A at Dermott, Arkansas, and substitutes FM...-20110913AAK. Channel 224A can be allotted at Dermott with a site restriction of 3.5 km (2.2 miles)...

  1. Calculating the Weather: Deductive Reasoning and Disciplinary "Telos" in Cleveland Abbe's Rhetorical Transformation of Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdik, Zoltan P.; Platt, Carrie Anne; Meister, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the rhetorical basis of a major paradigm change in meteorology, from a focus on inductive observation to deductive, mathematical reasoning. Analysis of Cleveland Abbe's "The Physical Basis of Long-Range Weather Forecasts" demonstrates how in his advocacy for a new paradigm, Abbe navigates the tension between piety to tradition…

  2. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Libby Creek (Lower Cleveland) Stabilization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2004-07-29

    This project is follow-up to stream stabilization activities on Libby Creek that were initiated on the Upper Cleveland reach of Libby Creek 2 years ago. BPA now proposes to fund FWP to complete channel stabilization activities on the Lower Cleveland reach of Libby Creek, reduce sediment sources, convert overwidened portions of the stream into self-maintaining channel types, use natural stream stabilization techniques, and improve wildlife migratory corridors. This lower reach is about one river mile below the upper Cleveland Reach and the proposed activities are very similar to those conducted before. The current work would be constructed in two additional phases. The first phase of the Lower Cleveland project would be completed in the fall of 2004 (9/1/04--12/31/04), to include the upper 3,100 feet. The second phase will be constructed in the fall of 2005 (9/1/05--12/31/05), to include stabilizing the remaining 6,200 feet of stream. The Cleveland reaches are a spawning and rearing tributary for resident redband trout, and resident and fluvial bull trout migrating from the Kootenai River. The planned work at the two remaining phases calls for shaping cut banks; installing root wads and tree revetments; installing channel grade control structures; planting native vegetation; and installing cross vanes constructed from rock and trees to control channel gradient. In the past, this reach of Libby Creek has been degraded by past management practices, including road building, hydraulic and dredge mining, and riparian logging. This past activity has resulted in accelerated bank erosion along a number of meander bends, resulting in channel degradation and poor fish habitat. Currently the stream channel is over-widened and shallow having limited pool habitat. The current stream channel is over-widened and shallow, having limited pool habitat.

  3. From IDs to Ice Cream to "I, Claudius": Security Is in the Cards at Cleveland Hill Union Free School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of plastic identity badges with photographs and barcodes issued to all administrators, teachers, staff members, and students in grades 6-12 at the Cleveland Hill Union Free School District in Cheektowaga, New York. (PKP)

  4. The Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition: "we have evolved".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Colleen C; Taggart, Morgan; Freedman, Darcy A; Trapl, Erika S; Borawski, Elaine A

    2015-01-01

    Several pieces of legislation passed in Cleveland, Ohio, from 2007 to 2011, focused on improving the city's food environment through urban agriculture initiatives. We used qualitative, case study methods, including interviews with 7 key informants, to examine the policy development process and investigate the role of the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition in developing and implementing 4 pieces of legislation. In this article, we focus on 2 pieces of legislation: zoning designation of an urban garden and allowance of small farm animals and bees on residential property. Five key themes emerged: impetus for policy came from community needs; education and raising awareness helped mitigate barriers; a cultural shift took place among policy makers; social connections and individual champions were needed; and concerns over food access and health influenced policy decisions. Legislative actions are important tools to influence the nutrition environment, as long as they are based on local needs and context. PMID:26043301

  5. The Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition: "we have evolved".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Colleen C; Taggart, Morgan; Freedman, Darcy A; Trapl, Erika S; Borawski, Elaine A

    2015-06-04

    Several pieces of legislation passed in Cleveland, Ohio, from 2007 to 2011, focused on improving the city's food environment through urban agriculture initiatives. We used qualitative, case study methods, including interviews with 7 key informants, to examine the policy development process and investigate the role of the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition in developing and implementing 4 pieces of legislation. In this article, we focus on 2 pieces of legislation: zoning designation of an urban garden and allowance of small farm animals and bees on residential property. Five key themes emerged: impetus for policy came from community needs; education and raising awareness helped mitigate barriers; a cultural shift took place among policy makers; social connections and individual champions were needed; and concerns over food access and health influenced policy decisions. Legislative actions are important tools to influence the nutrition environment, as long as they are based on local needs and context.

  6. Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area

    OpenAIRE

    Flachs, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    While the benefits of healthy eating and greenspace development have been well documented, the social impact of urban and community gardens remain less studied. This paper explores the social and cultural effects of urban gardening in the greater Cleveland area. Gardening is shown to have a multitude of motivating factors, including economic, environmental, political, social, and nutritional. While analyzing the impact that gardens have on community building, identity, and food security, s...

  7. Reflective Writing in the Competency-Based Curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, exce...

  8. Reflective writing in the competency-based curriculum at the cleveland clinic lerner college of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, excerpts of student pieces, and faculty and student perspectives are included. We have experienced the value of reflective writing in medical school education and believe elements of our program can be adapted to other training environments.

  9. Statistical summary of air quality data for metropolitian Cleveland, Ohio, 1967 - 1972: Total suspended particulates, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R. B.; Neustadter, H. E.; Fordyce, J. S.; Burr, J. C., Jr.; Cornett, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    Air-quality data for metropolitan Cleveland, Ohio, from 1967 through 1972 were collated and statistically analyzed. Total suspended particulates (TSP) departed from lognormal distribution in 1972. Nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, departed significantly from lognormal distributions in 1972. In Cleveland the Ohio standards were not met. However, the data indicate a general improvement in air quality. Unusually high precipitation (43% above the average in 1972) may be responsible in lowering these values from the 1971 levels. The mean values of TSP, NO2, and SO2 are 104, 191, and 83 microgram/cu m respectively.

  10. Detecting hidden volcanic explosions from Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Alaska with infrasound and ground-couples airwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Slivio; Fee, David; Haney, Matthew; Schneider, David

    2012-01-01

    In Alaska, where many active volcanoes exist without ground-based instrumentation, the use of techniques suitable for distant monitoring is pivotal. In this study we report regional-scale seismic and infrasound observations of volcanic activity at Mt. Cleveland between December 2011 and August 2012. During this period, twenty explosions were detected by infrasound sensors as far away as 1827 km from the active vent, and ground-coupled acoustic waves were recorded at seismic stations across the Aleutian Arc. Several events resulting from the explosive disruption of small lava domes within the summit crater were confirmed by analysis of satellite remote sensing data. However, many explosions eluded initial, automated, analyses of satellite data due to poor weather conditions. Infrasound and seismic monitoring provided effective means for detecting these hidden events. We present results from the implementation of automatic infrasound and seismo-acoustic eruption detection algorithms, and review the challenges of real-time volcano monitoring operations in remote regions. We also model acoustic propagation in the Northern Pacific, showing how tropospheric ducting effects allow infrasound to travel long distances across the Aleutian Arc. The successful results of our investigation provide motivation for expanded efforts in infrasound monitoring across the Aleutians and contributes to our knowledge of the number and style of vulcanian eruptions at Mt. Cleveland.

  11. Investigating the impact of local urban sources on total atmospheric mercury wet deposition in Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Event-based precipitation samples were collected at a downtown industrial and a predominantly upwind rural location in the Cleveland, Ohio metropolitan area from July 2009 through December 2010 to investigate the potential local total mercury (Hg) wet deposition enhancement in a ...

  12. 77 FR 25128 - Amended Land Management Plans for the Angeles, Cleveland, Los Padres, and San Bernardino National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... protocols for the four forests. This joint planning process will maintain the consistent management... prepared with a Record of Decision (ROD) for each Land Management Plan. DATES: Comments concerning the... Forest Service Amended Land Management Plans for the Angeles, Cleveland, Los Padres, and San...

  13. Eruption of Alkaline Basalts Prior to the Calc-alkaline Lavas of Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Aleutian Arc, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, D. L.; Nicolaysen, K. P.

    2005-12-01

    Mt. Cleveland is a 1,730 m stratovolcano, located on Chuginadak Island, that has erupted at least 23 times historically, with the latest occurring in August 2005. Major, trace, and REE analyses of 63 samples from Mt. Cleveland, including 8 from proximal cinder cones and 4 from andesitic domes on the lower flanks, identify two distinct lava suites. Modern Cleveland (MC) basalts to dacites (50.5-66.7 wt.% SiO2) exhibit a calc-alkaline differentiation trend. Major element trends suggest crystal fractionation of plagioclase +/- ortho- and clinopyroxene in MC lavas and olivine in cinder cone deposits. Resorption textures on plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts and multiple populations of plagioclase predominate throughout the MC suite suggesting magma mixing is a major process at Cleveland. Frothy white xenoliths of plagioclase + quartz + biotite are encased in glass and erupted as small pumiceous fragments in 2001. The partial resorption of the xenocrysts indicates assimilation is also an active crustal process at Cleveland. MC trace element spider diagrams exhibit a typical arc pattern in which HFS elements including Nb are depleted, and Pb and LIL elements are enriched. Th/La, Sm/La, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopic ratios indicate both a North Pacific MORB and a sediment component in the source of modern Cleveland lavas, consistent with sediment flux estimates of 90 to 95 m3/m/yr and an updip sediment thickness of 1300 to 1400 meters. Average 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, 87Sr/86Sr, and 143Nd/144Nd values for the calc-alkaline suite are 18.93, 15.58, 0.70345, and 0.51303 respectively. The second suite consists of 3 olivine-rich, mildly alkaline basalts (48.5-49.4 wt.% SiO2), of older stratigraphic position than MC lavas representing deposits from an older phase of activity (ancestral Cleveland, AC). La/Yb, Sr/Y, and Th/Nb ratios indicate lower degrees of partial melting, relative to MC lavas, and suggests presence of garnet in the source region. The AC lavas, however, are

  14. Sound velocity profile from velocimeter cast by NOAA Navigation Response Team-4 for Cleveland field examination survey in Lake Erie on 17 October 2007 (NODC Accession 0036139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical oceanographic data were collected by NOAA Navigation Response Team-4 for Cleveland field examination survey in Lake Erie on 17 October 2007. Sound velocity...

  15. Community Development and Human Capital Loretta J Mester-President and CEO-Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland-2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital, and Inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Mester, Loretta J.

    2015-01-01

    As president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Loretta J. Mester participates in the formulation of U.S. monetary policy, and oversees 950 employees in Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh who conduct economic research, supervise banking institutions, and provide payment services to commercial banks and the U.S. government. She assumed her role as president and CEO in June 2014.

  16. Results From a Microbial Source-Tracking Study at Villa Angela Beach, Cleveland, Ohio, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushon, Rebecca N.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Stoeckel, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    During the 2007 recreational season at Villa Angela Beach in Cleveland, Ohio, scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District (NEORSD) found high Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations that were not easily explained by results obtained to date in ongoing investigations of recreational water quality at the beach. To help understand the sources behind these elevated E. coli concentrations, the USGS and NEORSD sampled beach-area water for Bacteroides DNA markers. Bacteroides are a group of enteric bacteria that are being used in microbial source tracking, in hope that host-associated DNA markers could be used to indicate potential sources of E. coli in the Villa Angela environment. The USGS Ohio Water Microbiology Laboratory analyzed a total of 13 source samples (sewage and waterfowl feces) and 33 beach-area water and sand samples for three Bacteroides DNA markers. This report lists the results of those analyses, along with environmental conditions at Villa Angela on the dates that samples were collected.

  17. Walk-through survey report, Central Brass Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ohio, March 20, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaebst, D.D.; Seligman, P.J.; Bloom, T.F.

    1988-11-01

    In order to evaluate controls used to reduce or eliminate worker exposures to lead, a survey was undertaken at the nonferrous foundry, Central Brass Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ohio. After a review of the exposure and blood lead monitoring data, along with interviews with management and union officials and a tour of the facility, the investigators conclude that there is evidence to support excessive exposures to work-place lead at the time of compensation claims made early in 1985. Since that time the company has taken steps to reduce these exposures. Some engineering controls had been installed in October of 1984, including portable flexible-duct local exhaust hoods, side draft local exhaust systems and traveling hoods. Improvements or replacements were also made to existing equipment including doubling the ventilation capacity of the exhaust system on polishing equipment and replacing local exhaust hoods on all grinding machines. All new employees receive a complete physical examination including audiometry, pulmonary function test, and blood-lead screening. The frequency of subsequent blood lead monitoring was based on the previous blood-levels. The respiratory protection program seemed generally adequate. With the improvements made, a correlation between the decline in ambient lead and blood-lead levels was noted.

  18. Volcanic gas emissions during active dome growth at Mount Cleveland, Alaska, August 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Cynthia; Kern, Christoph; Lyons, John; Kelly, Peter; Schneider, David; Wallace, Kristi; Wessels, Rick

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic gas emissions and chemistry data were measured for the first time at Mount Cleveland (1730 m) in the Central Aleutian arc, Alaska, on August 14-15, 2015 as part of the NSF-GeoPRISMS initiative, and co-funded by the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) and the USGS Alaska Volcano Observatory. The measurements were made in the month following two explosive events (July 21 and August 7, 2015) that destroyed a small dome (˜50x85 m), which had experienced episodic growth in the crater since November, 2014. These explosions resulted in the elevation of the aviation color code and alert level from Yellow/Advisory to Orange/Watch on July 21, 2015. Between the November, 2014 and July, 2015 dome-destroying explosions, the volcano experienced: (1) frequent periods of elevated surface temperatures in the summit region (based on Mid-IR satellite observations), (2) limited volcano-seismic tremor, (3) visible degassing as recorded in webcam images with occasionally robust plumes, and (4) at least one aseismic volcanic event that deposited small amounts of ash on the upper flanks of the volcano (detected by infrasound, observed visually and in Landsat 8 images). Intermittent plumes were also sometimes detectable up to 60 km downwind in Mid-IR satellite images, but this was not typical. Lava extrusion resumed following the explosion as indicated in satellite data by highly elevated Mid-IR surface temperatures, but was not identifiable in seismic data. By early-mid August, 2015, a new dome growing in the summit crater had reached 80 m across with temperatures of 550-600 C as measured on August 4 with a helicopter-borne thermal IR camera. A semitransparent plume extended several kilometers downwind of the volcano during the field campaign. A helicopter instrumented with an upward-looking UV spectrometer (mini DOAS) and a Multi-GAS was used to measure SO2 emission rates and in situ mixing ratios of H2O, CO2, SO2, and H2S in the plume. On August 14 and 15, 2015, a total of 14

  19. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician–scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Methods: Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1 theoretical knowledge, 2 bench research, 3 scientific writing, 4 mentorship, and 5 soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. Results: The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. Conclusion: The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  20. Escherichia coli Concentrations in the Mill Creek Watershed, Cleveland, Ohio, 2001-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Amie M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Mill Creek in Cleveland, Ohio, receives discharges from combined-sewer overflows (CSOs) and other sanitary-sewage inputs. These discharges affect the water quality of the creek and that of its receiving stream, the Cuyahoga River. In an effort to mitigate this problem, the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District implemented a project to eliminate or control (by reducing the number of overflows) all of the CSOs in the Mill Creek watershed. This study focused on monitoring the microbiological water quality of the creek before and during sewage-collection system modifications. Routine samples were collected semimonthly from August 2001 through September 2004 at a site near a U.S. Geological Survey stream gage near the mouth of Mill Creek. In addition, event samples were collected September 19 and 22, 2003, when rainfall accumulations were 0.5 inches (in.) or greater. Concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) were determined and instantaneous discharges were calculated. Streamflow and water-quality characteristics were measured at the time of sampling, and precipitation data measured at a nearby precipitation gage were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Concentrations of E. coli were greater than Ohio's single-sample maximum for primary-contact recreation (298 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100 mL)) in 84 percent of the routine samples collected. In all but one routine sample E. coli concentrations in samples collected when instantaneous streamflows were greater than 20 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) were greater than Ohio's single-sample maximum. When precipitation occurred in the 24-hour period before routine sample collection, concentrations were greater than the maximum in 89 percent of the samples as compared to 73 percent when rainfall was absent during the 24 hours prior to routine sample collection. Before modifications to the sewage-collection system in the watershed began, E. coli concentrations in Mill Creek

  1. Late Pliensbachian-early Toarcian paleoenvironmental changes in the Cleveland Basin: new clues from high-resolution trace element analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Ruhl, Micha; Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz;

    The early Toarcian (~183 Ma ago) was characterized by massive carbon burial and a pronounced negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) in marine carbonate and marine and terrestrial organic matter. These features along with the high abundance of redox sensitive trace metals in that interval led...... to the recognition of a major oceanic anoxic event (OAE). More recently, an earlier companion of the early Toarcian CIE has been documented at the Pliensbachian/Toarcian (Pl/To) boundary in sections of NW Europe, but its expression in the sediment and possible causes are less constrained. One of the most studied...... elements across the late Pliensbachian to middle Toarcian of the Cleveland Basin. The Pl/To boundary CIE is associated with low Total Organic Carbon (TOC

  2. Late Pliensbachian-early Toarcian paleoenvironmental changes in the Cleveland Basin: new clues from high-resolution trace element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, N.; Ruhl, M.; Ullmann, C. V.; Korte, C.; Kemp, D. B.; Hesselbo, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The early Toarcian (~183 Ma ago) was characterized by massive carbon burial and a pronounced negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) in marine carbonate and marine and terrestrial organic matter. These features along with the high abundance of redox sensitive trace metals in that interval led to the recognition of a major oceanic anoxic event (OAE). More recently, an earlier companion of the early Toarcian CIE has been documented at the Pliensbachian/Toarcian (Pl/To) boundary in sections of NW Europe, but its expression in the sediment and possible causes are less constrained. One of the most studied areas for this interval is the Cleveland Basin, UK, which is well-studied for litho-, bio- and chemostratigraphy. Here, we present a new dataset of high-resolution element data produced by hand-held X-ray fluorescence analysis to test for the expression of redox-sensitive trace metals and detrital elements across the late Pliensbachian to middle Toarcian of the Cleveland Basin. The Pl/To boundary CIE is associated with low Total Organic Carbon (TOCoxygenation events that prevented massive deposition of organic matter. Trends from redox-sensitive elements such as Fe, V, Mo and U are in agreement with previous findings and scenarios of basin restriction across and after the early Toarcian OAE (McArthur et al., 2008). An interval of maximum enrichment in these elements immediately after the CIE is a feature very similar to the recent observations of Hermoso et al. (2013) in the Paris Basin. This suggests a similar tempo of regional anoxia and black shale deposition in NW Europe. These results also shed light on the behaviour of elements associated with organic matter and the sulphur cycle such as Ni, Cu, Zn and As. Cu is well-correlated to the TOC whereas As shows an enrichment in the interval of black shale deposition after the CIE and two distinct correlation lines with sulphur, one before and during the event, and one after the CIE. This suggests that more As could be

  3. Extensive 1-year survey of trace elements and compounds in the airborne suspended particulate matter in Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Antoine, A. C.; Leibecki, H. F.; Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Concentrations of 75 chemical constituents in the airborne particulate matter were measured in Cleveland, Ohio, during 1971 and 1972. Values covering a 1-year period (45 to 50 sampling days) at each of 16 sites are presented for 60 elements. A lesser number of values is given for sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, acidity, 10 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, and the aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds as a group. Methods used included instrumental neutron activation, emission spectroscopy, gas chromatography, combustion techniques, and colorimetry. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, the analysis methods, the use of several analytical facilities, and samples with concentrations below the detection limits are evaluated in detail. The data is discussed in relation to other studies and source origins. The trace constituent concentrations as a function of wind direction are used to suggest a practical method for air pollution source identification.

  4. Dome growth at Mount Cleveland, Aleutian Arc, quantified by time-series TerraSAR-X imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng; Poland, Michael; Lu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar imagery is widely used to study surface deformation induced by volcanic activity; however, it is rarely applied to quantify the evolution of lava domes, which is important for understanding hazards and magmatic system characteristics. We studied dome formation associated with eruptive activity at Mount Cleveland, Aleutian Volcanic Arc, in 2011–2012 using TerraSAR-X imagery. Interferometry and offset tracking show no consistent deformation and only motion of the crater rim, suggesting that ascending magma may pass through a preexisting conduit system without causing appreciable surface deformation. Amplitude imagery has proven useful for quantifying rates of vertical and areal growth of the lava dome within the crater from formation to removal by explosive activity to rebirth. We expect that this approach can be applied at other volcanoes that host growing lava domes and where hazards are highly dependent on dome geometry and growth rates.

  5. Childhood lead exposure and uptake in teeth in the Cleveland area during the era of leaded gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childhood uptake of lead from exposure to atmospheric leaded gasoline in the United States has been studied using mainly blood lead levels. Since reliable blood lead techniques were used only after the peak use of leaded gasoline, the prior exposure history is unclear. The well-documented decline in blood lead levels after the mid-1970s could represent the continuation of a historic steady decline in exposure from many sources. Alternatively, the post-1970s decline might represent the declining phase of a unimodal rise and fall corresponding closely to usage of leaded gasoline. To assess these possibilities, lead concentration and 207Pb/206Pb isotope ratios were measured in the enamel of permanent molar teeth formed between 1936 and 1993 in mainly African-American donors who grew up in the Cleveland area. Tooth enamel preserves the lead concentration and isotope ratio that prevails during tooth formation. Historical trends in enamel lead concentration were significantly correlated with surrogates of atmospheric lead exposure: lead in sediments of two dated Lake Erie cores, and lead consumed in gasoline. About two-thirds of the total lead uptake into enamel in this period was attributable to leaded gasoline, and the remainder to other sources (e.g. paint). Enamel 207Pb/206Pb isotope ratios were similar to those of one lake sediment. Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlation in neighborhoods with higher levels of traffic, and including lake sediment data, accounted for 53% of the variation in enamel lead levels. Enamel lead concentration was highly correlated with reported African-American childhood blood levels. The extrapolated peak level of 48 μg/dL (range 40 to 63) is associated with clinical and behavioral impairments, which may have implications for adults who were children during the peak gasoline lead exposure. In sum, leaded gasoline emission was the predominant source of lead exposure of African-American Cleveland children during the latter

  6. Evaluation of Psychometric Aspects of Cleveland Scale of Activity Daily Living in the Diagnosis of Dementia in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Noroozian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to design a valid questionnaire to the Iranian culture for dementia diagnosis and more specifically in its early stage.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Memory Clinic of Roozbeh Hospital and Iranian Alzheimer Association in Tehran in 2012. Among 235 subjects, there were 72 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, 137 patients with other types of dementia, and 26 subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI, which 107 of them were male. Moreover, 42 healthy subjects were selected as control group. We considered psychometric properties of the Cleveland Scale of Activity Daily Living (CSADL questionnaire and used standard making operations according to exploratory factor analysis.Results: Three factors were extracted: self-care (21 items, language skills (14 items, and planning (7 items. Convergent validity was 0.86 and cut off point for total, basic and instrumental scores respectively was 20, 3 and 20.Conclusion: It can be claimed that Persian Version of CSADL psychometric questionnaire has appropriate indicators and can serve as a useful tool for research in dementia and in its early stage. It can also enable the implementation of scientific research in academic and medical centers on dementia in general and Alzheimer's disease specifically in Iran.

  7. The Cleveland Sorting Test: a preliminary study of an alternate form of the Wisconsin Card-Sorting Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreh, Amir; Pastel, Dan; Miller, Ashley; Levin, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, studies have repeatedly shown that the Wisconsin Card-Sorting Test (WCST) is not as sensitive to prefrontal-lobe functioning as was originally suspected. Specifically, both clinical and brain-imaging studies have shown that several distinct neural circuits contribute to one's ability to successfully complete different aspects of the test. Another limitation of the WCST is its length, which makes it difficult and frustrating for certain clinical populations. To address the above limitations, researchers have proposed the development of new indexes and the integration of an adaptive testing approach that will allow for the premature termination of the test. Unfortunately, given the proprietary nature of the WCST, none of the above recommendations have been adopted. The present preliminary study examined an alternate form of the 64-Item WCST (WCST-64), the Cleveland Sorting Test (CST-64). The normative data of the two measures as well as the total number of errors, perseverative responses, perseverative errors, and categories completed were compared using a repeated-measures design. Overall, the study supports psychometric approximation of the CST-64 and the WCST-64. Suggestions for future studies and modifications of the CST-64, including the use of recently proposed indexes and adaptive administration approaches, are provided.

  8. Quality of life after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis: an evaluation of diet and other factors using the Cleveland Global Quality of Life instrument.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J C

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Although functional results after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis are excellent, imperfections of function do occur. In this setting, quality-of-life assessment is an invaluable tool in determining overall therapeutic efficacy. We evaluated the impact of dietary restrictions, preoperative diagnosis (ulcerative colitis vs. familial adenomatous polyposis), and pregnancy (after pouch insertion) on quality of life. METHODS: After ethical approval, 64 patients were reviewed (mean age, 31 (range, 15-54) years). Long-term quality of life in patients after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis was assessed using the Cleveland Global Quality of Life instrument or Fazio score. The Cleveland Global Quality of Life score is a novel quality-of-life instrument specifically designed for patients with ileal pouches. Stool frequency and continence were recorded to establish the functional status of this group. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients (95.3 percent) complained of some form of dietary restriction and adopted a fixed dietary regimen. All such patients felt that a breach of this regimen would impinge significantly on their quality of life. Late eating and alcohol were associated with diarrhea, whereas smoking was not. Constipation was infrequently reported. The mean Cleveland Global Quality of Life score of patients with ulcerative colitis (0.81 +\\/- 0.13) was greater than that of patients with ulcerative colitis and a background of pouchitis (0.78 +\\/- 0.16; P = 0.042). Whereas postoperative stool frequency in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis was always higher than the preoperative level (4 vs. 2 movements per day; P = 0.04), the Cleveland Global Quality of Life score of this group was lower than that of ulcerative colitis patients (0.77 vs. 0.81; P = 0.047). The Cleveland Global Quality of Life score of females who had had pregnancies after pouch formation was 0.70, significantly lower (P = 0.039) than that of ulcerative colitis patients, although pouch function was

  9. Statistical summary and trend evaluation of air quality data for Cleveland, Ohio in 1967 to 1971: Total suspended particulate, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.; Burr, J. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Air quality data for Cleveland, Ohio, for the period of 1967 to 1971 were collated and subjected to statistical analysis. The total suspended particulate component is lognormally distributed; while sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide are reasonably approximated by lognormal distributions. Only sulfur dioxide, in some residential neighborhoods, meets Ohio air quality standards. Air quality has definitely improved in the industrial valley, while in the rest of the city, only sulfur dioxide has shown consistent improvement. A pollution index is introduced which displays directly the degree to which the environmental air conforms to mandated standards.

  10. Deregulation Impact in Negotiating a New Electrical Contract Between NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field and FirstEnergy Corp., Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Quyen T.; Zala, Laszlo F.

    2002-01-01

    The governor of the State of Ohio signed amended substitute Senate bill 3 on July 6, 1999, requiring Ohio's electric industry to change from a monopoly environment to a competitive electric environment for generation services. The start date for competitive retail generation services was set for January 1, 2001. This new deregulation law allowed all Ohioans to choose the supplier of generation service, but the transmission and distribution would remain regulated. It also required electric utilities to unbundle the three main components (generation, transmission, and distribution) and make other changes designed to produce a competitive electric generation market. While deregulation was taking shape, the NASA Glenn Research Center electrical contract with FirstEnergy Corp. of Cleveland, Ohio, was to expire on September 7, 1999. Glenn strategically evaluated and incorporated the impacts of electric deregulation in the negotiations. Glenn and FirstEnergy spent over a year in negotiations until the Glenn utility team and the FirstEnergy negotiating team came to an agreement in the fall of 2000, and a new contract became effective on January 1, 2001.

  11. Final Environmental Statement related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The information in this Final Environmental Statement is the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the construction and operation of the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2, located on Lake Erie in Lake County, about 11 km (7 mi) northeast of Painesville, Ohio. The first assessment was the Final Environmental Statement related to the construction of the plant issued in April 1974, prior to issuance of the construction permits (CPRR-148 and CPPR-149). Plant construction for Unit 1 is currently about 83% complete, and Unit 2 about 43% complete. Fuel loading for Units 1 and 2 currently estimated by the licensee (Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company) for November 1983, with Unit 2 fuel load scheduled for May 1987. The present assessment is the result of the NRC staff review of the activities associated with the proposed operation of the plant

  12. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Kolthoff Landfill in Cleveland, Ohio. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 5, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Kolthoff Landfill site in Cleveland, Ohio, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  13. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Cleveland County, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  14. Fire Hydrants, Fire Hydrants Shapefile, Published in unknown, Cleveland County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Fire Hydrants dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'Fire Hydrants Shapefile'. Data by this publisher are often provided in State Plane coordinate system;...

  15. Cleveland Metropolitan School District Human Ware Audit: Findings and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osher, David; Poirier, Jeffrey M.; Dwyer, Kevin P.; Hicks, Regenia; Brown, Leah J.; Lampron, Stephanie; Rodriguez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Children and youth require safe and supportive schools and communities if they are to succeed in school and thrive. These needs are particularly great for children who struggle with the impacts of chronic poverty, lead poisoning and lead effect, community and media violence, drugs and alcohol, trauma and loss. There are many such students in…

  16. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Proximity to Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the approximate walking distance from a park entrance at any given location within the EnviroAtlas community boundary. The zones are...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Near Road Tree Buffer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset addresses the tree buffer along heavily traveled roads. The roads are interstates, arterials, and collectors within the EnviroAtlas...

  18. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CLEVELAND COUNTY, ARKANSAS, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  19. Communicating with graduate medical trainees: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Laura R; Stoller, James K

    2013-06-01

    Optimizing communication with graduate medical trainees is critical, as they contribute importantly to the mission of academic medical centres. Yet, communication is challenged by their complex schedules, geographic separation, and time constraints. Few studies have examined this issue to offer valuable solutions. Because traditional approaches are suboptimal, two communication tools were implemented: (1) a web-based intranet site called [graduate medical education] GME|com, and (2) an electronic newsletter, GME|com Headlines. The goals were to: (1) build a single repository of information relevant to trainees, programme directors, and coordinators, and (2) minimize their email burdens. A post-launch survey showed that >75 % of respondents indicated they visited the site and, of those, >90 % perceived value to the site. Analysis of use over the first year showed 39,377 visits (mean 108/day) and 93,785 pageviews. Sixty percent of users visited GME|com between 9 and 201 times and 18 % >201 times. A survey of programme directors from the 25 largest training programmes in the US confirmed the challenges of communicating with trainees and suboptimal results of current solutions. GME|com and Headlines represent complementary communication tools that have been well-received and frequently used. Future opportunities include assessing the association of GME|com use with increments in quality and patient safety. PMID:27023456

  20. Communicating with graduate medical trainees: the Cleveland Clinic experience

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwald, Laura R.; Stoller, James K

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing communication with graduate medical trainees is critical, as they contribute importantly to the mission of academic medical centres. Yet, communication is challenged by their complex schedules, geographic separation, and time constraints. Few studies have examined this issue to offer valuable solutions. Because traditional approaches are suboptimal, two communication tools were implemented: (1) a web-based intranet site called [graduate medical education] GME|com, and (2) an electr...

  1. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  2. Floodplain Mapping or Redelineation Submission for Cleveland County OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  3. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2013, county, Cleveland County, OK, Current Address Ranges Relationship File

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  4. Election Districts and Precincts, Voting Precinct Shapefile, Published in unknown, Cleveland County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Election Districts and Precincts dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. It is described as 'Voting Precinct Shapefile'....

  5. F00539: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Cleveland, Ohio, 2007-10-23

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  6. Grover Cleveland High School Project CAUSA 1984-1985. OEE Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    This program, Project CAUSA, provided instruction in English as a second language (ESL), native language arts, and content-area courses, in addition to a career and vocational training program focused on office and computer skills, to a selected group of 141 Hispanic and Italian immigrant students of limited English proficiency (LEP). Students…

  7. Oxidation of high-temperature intermetallics; Proceedings of the Workshop, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 22, 23, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobstein, Toni (Editor); Doychak, Joseph (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of aerospace structures-applicable intermetallic compounds discusses the influence of reactive-element additions on the oxidation of Ni3Al base alloys, the effect of Ni3Al oxidation below 850 C on fracture behavior, the oxidation of FeAl + Hf, Zr, and B, the synergistic effect of Al and Si on the oxidation resistance of Fe alloys, and pack cementation coatings of Cr-Al on Fe, Ni, and Co alloys. Also discussed are the formation of alumina on Nb- and Ti-base alloys, the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminide alloys, silicide coatings for refractory metals, the oxidation of chromium disilicide, and the oxidation behavior of nickel beryllides.

  8. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Historic Places by Census Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset portrays the total number of historic places located within each Census Block Group (CBG). The historic places data were compiled from the...

  9. Empowering Communities for Environmental Decision-Making : Innovative Partnerships in Cleveland (USA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Edwards (Arthur)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this chapter, we discuss the relation between public innovation and the empowerment of local communities. Specifically, we explore the significance of cooperative public innovation efforts for the capability of local communities to participate in environmental decision-making, focusin

  10. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. In this community, forest is defined as Trees & Forest and Woody...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. In this community, forest is defined as Trees & Forest and Woody...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. In this community, vegetated cover is defined as Trees & Forest,...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. In this community, vegetated cover is defined as Trees & Forest,...

  14. Outcomes for patients with dementia from the Cleveland Alzheimer's Managed Care Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P A; Bass, D M; Looman, W J; McCarthy, C A; Eckert, S

    2004-01-01

    This investigation evaluates effects of care consultation delivered within a partnership between a managed health care system and Alzheimer's Association chapter. Care consultation is a multi-component telephone intervention in which Association staff work with patients and caregivers to identify personal strengths and resources within the family, health plan, and community. The primary hypothesis is that care consultation will decrease utilization of managed care services and improve psychosocial outcomes. A secondary modifying-effects hypothesis posits benefits will be greater for patients with more severe memory impairment. The sample is composed of managed care patients whose medical records indicate a diagnosis of dementia or memory loss. Patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group, which was offered care consultation in addition to usual managed care services, or to a control group, which was offered only usual managed care services. Data come from two in-person interviews with patients, and medical and administrative records. Results supporting the primary hypothesis show intervention group patients feel less embarrassed and isolated because of their memory problems and report less difficulty coping. Findings consistent with the modifying-effects hypothesis show intervention group patients with more severe impairment have fewer physician visits, are less likely to have an emergency department visit or hospital admission, are more satisfied with managed care services, and have decreased depression and strain. PMID:14690867

  15. 76 FR 56638 - Safety Zone; Head of the Cuyahoga, Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... safety zone is necessary to protect spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with a rowing... rowing regattas. Based on recent accidents that have occurred in other Captain of the Port zones, the Captain of the Port Buffalo, has determined a rowing regatta presents significant risks to public...

  16. Solar heating experiment on the Grover Cleveland School, Boston, Massachusetts. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-07-15

    This report presents quantitative and qualitative data obtained during the first full year's operation of an industrial type, solar heating system of pilot plant scale. A brief description of the system is given and operational data for the system is provided along with information on maintenance history, various relevant experiences, individual investigations and experiments, and problem areas which were experienced. (WDM)

  17. 77 FR 57116 - Cleveland J. Enmon, Jr., M.D.; Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... undergraduate degree from Morehouse College and then attended medical school at the Morehouse School of Medicine. . After graduating from medical school, Respondent began a residency program in emergency medicine, at the... total of 300 pills, and this was repeated on the subsequent encounter. In my opinion, this...

  18. 75 FR 14459 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ..., OH, that meet the definitions of ``sacred objects'' and ``objects of cultural patrimony'' under 25 U... or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. Lastly, officials of the...

  19. Vascular Flora of a Riparian Site on the Canadian River, Cleveland County, Oklahoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lacy Burgess; Bruce W. Hoagland

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the results of an inventory of the vascular plants from a riparian site in central Oklahoma. One hundred and sixty-three species of vascular plants in 131 genera and 45 families were collected. The most species were collected from the families Asteraceae (32) and Poaceae (26). Fifty-eight species were annuals, 97 perennials, and 8 biennials. Eight species of woody plants were present. Twenty-nine species, or 18% of the flora, were exotic to Oklahoma. No species listed as ...

  20. Multi-dimensional modeling of a thermal energy storage canister. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ., Dec. 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic Power Module being developed for Space Station Freedom uses a eutectic mixture of LiF-CaF2 phase change material (PCM) contained in toroidal canisters for thermal energy storage. Presented are the results from heat transfer analyses of a PCM containment canister. One and two dimensional finite difference computer models are developed to analyze heat transfer in the canister walls, PCM, void, and heat engine working fluid coolant. The modes of heat transfer considered include conduction in canister walls and solid PCM, conduction and pseudo-free convection in liquid PCM, conduction and radiation across PCM vapor filled void regions, and forced convection in the heat engine working fluid. Void shape, location, growth or shrinkage (due to density difference between the solid and liquid PCM phases) are prescribed based on engineering judgment. The PCM phase change process is analyzed using the enthalpy method. The discussion of the results focuses on how canister thermal performance is affected by free convection in the liquid PCM and void heat transfer. Characterizing these effects is important for interpreting the relationship between ground-based canister performance (in 1-g) and expected on-orbit performance (in micro-g). Void regions accentuate canister hot spots and temperature gradients due to their large thermal resistance. Free convection reduces the extent of PCM superheating and lowers canister temperatures during a portion of the PCM thermal charge period. Surprisingly small differences in canister thermal performance result from operation on the ground and operation on-orbit. This lack of a strong gravity dependency is attributed to the large contribution of container walls in overall canister energy redistribution by conduction.

  1. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Cleveland Metropolitan School District. Grade 4, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This one-page report presents overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, scores at selected percentiles, average scores for district and large cities, results for student groups (school race, gender, and eligibility for National School Lunch Program) in 2011, and score gaps for student groups. In 2011, the average…

  2. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Cleveland Metropolitan School District. Grade 4, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This one-page report presents overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, scores at selected percentiles, average scores for district and large cities, results for student groups (school race, gender, and eligibility for National School Lunch Program) in 2011, and score gaps for student groups. In 2011, the average…

  3. Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senor at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time sohare applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community.

  4. 77 FR 68073 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the St. Louis, MO; Southern Missouri; Cleveland, OH; and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... that White Sands Missile Range. OPM announced these changes in interim (65 FR 48641) and final (65 FR... Mexico: Bernalillo Sandoval Area of Application. Survey area plus: New Mexico: Catron Cibola Colfax...

  5. Correlation of finite element free vibration predictions using random vibration test data. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element analysis is regularly used during the engineering cycle of mechanical systems to predict the response to static, thermal, and dynamic loads. The finite element model (FEM) used to represent the system is often correlated with physical test results to determine the validity of analytical results provided. Results from dynamic testing provide one means for performing this correlation. One of the most common methods of measuring accuracy is by classical modal testing, whereby vibratory mode shapes are compared to mode shapes provided by finite element analysis. The degree of correlation between the test and analytical mode shapes can be shown mathematically using the cross orthogonality check. A great deal of time and effort can be exhausted in generating the set of test acquired mode shapes needed for the cross orthogonality check. In most situations response data from vibration tests are digitally processed to generate the mode shapes from a combination of modal parameters, forcing functions, and recorded response data. An alternate method is proposed in which the same correlation of analytical and test acquired mode shapes can be achieved without conducting the modal survey. Instead a procedure is detailed in which a minimum of test information, specifically the acceleration response data from a random vibration test, is used to generate a set of equivalent local accelerations to be applied to the reduced analytical model at discrete points corresponding to the test measurement locations. The static solution of the analytical model then produces a set of deformations that once normalized can be used to represent the test acquired mode shapes in the cross orthogonality relation. The method proposed has been shown to provide accurate results for both a simple analytical model as well as a complex space flight structure.

  6. 75 FR 18451 - Safety and Security Zones; Tall Ships Challenge 2010, Great Lakes; Cleveland, OH; Bay City, MI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public...: Sailing Vessel (S/V) AMISTAD, S/V APPLEDORE IV, S/V APPLEDORE V, HMS BOUNTY, S/V DENIS SULLIVAN,...

  7. 75 FR 33506 - Safety and Security Zones; Tall Ships Challenge 2010, Great Lakes, Cleveland, OH, Bay City, MI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... Register (75 FR 18451). The Coast Guard received 0 public submissions commenting on the proposed rule. No... Great Lakes. This includes, but is not limited to, the following: Sailing Vessel (S/V) AMISTAD,...

  8. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Harshaw Chemical Company, Cleveland, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the MED/AEC era, the Harshaw Chemical Company processed large quantities of normal uranium to produce both oxide and fluoride compounds. This work was done under contract to MED and its successor, AEC. Records indicated that at the time the AEC contract was terminated, the facility was decontaminated by Harshaw and released from AEC control in 1960. However, a search of AEC records indicated that documentation was insufficient to determine whether the decontamination work was adequate by current guidelines. Hence, a radiological assessment of the site ws initiated in 1976. The entire grounds and all buildings were surveyed using surface survey instruments to detect surface contamination and radiation detectors to determine general radiation levels. Extensive surface contamination was found throughout the site. While the major contamination was found in Plant C, significant levels of contamination also were found in 16 other buildings and at 32 exterior locations. The contaminating material seemed to be normal uranium exclusively. Air samples were taken at numerous indoor locations throughout the site, but no elevated levels of radon were detected. This was as expected since normal uranium has been separated from radium and hence radon levels are very low. Several soil samples were taken from around the site. Analyses of these samples indicated extensive soil contamination, as well as suspected contamination of the river bed in the vicinity of the plant outfall. Scheduled subsurface investigation of the site, as well as of the river bed and sewer system, have not been conducted. Levels of contamination at this site are significantly above guidelines for release of the site for unrestricted use. 57 figures, 7 tables

  9. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community-level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  10. A day in the life: a case series of acute care palliative medicine--the Cleveland model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan; Heintz, Jessica; Legrand, Susan B; Davis, Mellar P

    2008-01-01

    Palliative care in advanced disease is complex. Knowledge and experience of symptom control and management of multiple complications are essential. An interdisciplinary team is also required to meet the medical and psychosocial needs in life-limiting illness. Acute care palliative medicine is a new concept in the spectrum of palliative care services. Acute care palliative medicine, integrated into a tertiary academic medical center, provides expert medical management and specialized care as part of the spectrum of acute medical care services to this challenging patient population. The authors describe a case series to provide a snapshot of a typical day in an acute care inpatient palliative medicine unit. The cases illustrate the sophisticated medical care involved for each individual and the important skill sets of the palliative medicine specialist required to provide high-quality acute medical care for the very ill.

  11. A tale of two rain gardens: Barriers and bridges to adaptive management of urban stormwater in Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green infrastructure installations such as rain gardens and bioswales are increasingly regarded as viable tools to mitigate stormwater runoff at the parcel level. The use of adaptive management to implement and monitor green infrastructure projects as experimental attempts to man...

  12. Single Particulate SEM-EDX Analysis of Iron-Containing Coarse Particulate Matter in an Urban Environment: Sources and Distribution of Iron within Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    The physicochemical properties of coarse-mode, iron-containing particles, and their temporal and spatial distributions are poorly understood. Single particle analysis combining x-ray elemental mapping and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM-EDX) of passively ...

  13. To remediate or not: A case study of Co-60 contamination at the Southerly Waste Water Treatment Plant, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SWWTP was identified as being contaminated with 60Co (t1/2=5.27 a) in early 1991. The cobalt was apparently disposed of into the sanitary sewer system by a licensee of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission during the mid- to late 1970s. It is not known if this material was disposed of illegally or as a part of licensed activities. It appears as though the contamination resulted from a single, large discharge of 60Co from a licensed facility. However, this facility also reported periodic, permitted discharges into the sanitary sewer system while licensed by the NRC. The radioactive material was relatively immobile and heterogeneously deposited around the site at the SWWTP. In the case of the SWWTP, the regulators exercised restraint in requiring only a partial remediation of this site at a much lower cost than full remediation would have necessitated. However, given the very small risk posed by this site, it is likely that even this remediation was excessive and likely generated more risk than was abated. The most cost-effective risk reduction measure to have taken at this site would have been institutional controls, which would have generated almost exactly the same degree of risk reduction at about 1-2% of the cost of partial remediation

  14. X ray attenuation measurements for high-temperature materials characterization and in-situ monitoring of damage accumulation. Ph. D. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ. , 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y.

    1992-03-01

    The scope of this dissertation is to develop and apply x ray attenuation measurement systems that are capable of: (1) characterizing density variations in high-temperature materials, e.g., monolithic ceramics, ceramic and intermetallic matrix composites, and (2) noninvasively monitoring damage accumulation and failure sequences in ceramic matrix composites under room temperature tensile testing. This dissertation results in the development of: (1) a point scan digital radiography system, and (2) an in-situ x ray material testing system. Radiographic evaluation before, during, and after loading shows the effect of preexisting volume flaws on the fracture behavior of composites. Results show that x ray film radiography can monitor damage accumulation during tensile loading. Matrix cracking, fiber matrix debonding, fiber bridging, and fiber pullout are imaged throughout the tensile loading of the specimens. Further in-situ radiography is found to be a practical technique for estimating interfacial shear strength between the silicon carbide fibers and the reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix. It is concluded that pretest, in-situ, and post test x ray imaging can provide for greater understanding of ceramic matrix composite mechanical behavior.

  15. Geologic Map of the Kings Mountain and Grover Quadrangles, Cleveland and Gaston Counties, North Carolina, and Cherokee and York Counties, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, J. Wright, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This geologic map of the Kings Mountain and Grover 7.5-min quadrangles, N.C.-S.C., straddles a regional geological boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes. The Kings Mountain sequence (informal name) on the western flank of the Carolina terrane in this area includes the Neoproterozoic Battleground and Blacksburg Formations. The Battleground Formation has a lower part consisting of metavolcanic rocks and interlayered schist and an upper part consisting of quartz-sericite phyllite and schist interlayered with quartz-pebble metaconglomerate, aluminous quartzite, micaceous quartzite, manganiferous rock, and metavolcanic rocks. The Blacks-burg Formation consists of phyllitic metasiltstone interlayered with thinner units of marble, laminated micaceous quartzite, hornblende gneiss, and amphibolite. Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont terrane include muscovite-biotite gneiss, muscovite schist, and amphibolite. The Kings Mountain sequence has been intruded by metatonalite and metatrondhjemite (Neoproterozoic), metagabbro and metadiorite (Paleozoic?), and the High Shoals Granite (Pennsylvanian). Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont in this area have been intruded by the Toluca Granite (Ordovician?), the Cherryville Granite and associated pegmatite (Mississippian), and spodumene pegmatite (Mississippian). Diabase dikes (early Jurassic) are locally present throughout the area. Ductile fault zones of regional scale include the Kings Mountain and Kings Creek shear zones. In this area, the Kings Mountain shear zone forms the boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes, and the Kings Creek shear zone separates the Battleground Formation from the Blacksburg Formation. Structural styles change across the Kings Mountain shear zone from steeply dipping layers, foliations, and folds on the southeast to gently and moderately dipping layers, foliations, and recumbent folds on the northwest. Mineral assemblages in the Kings Mountain sequence show a westward decrease from upper amphibolite facies (sillimanite zone) near the High Shoals Granite in the eastern side of the map area to upper greenschist (epidote-amphibolite) facies in the south-central part of the area near the Kings Mountain shear zone. Amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages in the Inner Piedmont terrane increase in grade from the kyanite zone near the Kings Mountain shear zone to the sillimanite zone in the northwestern part of the map area. Surficial deposits include alluvium in the stream valleys and colluvium along ridges and steep slopes. These quadrangles are unusual in the richness and variety of the mineral deposits that they contain, which include spodumene (lithium), cassiterite (tin), mica, feldspar, silica, clay, marble, kyanite and sillimanite, barite, manganese, sand and gravel, gold, pyrite, and iron.

  16. AIAA/USAF/NASA/OAI Symposium on Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, 4th, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 21-23, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1 & 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The papers presented at the symposium cover aerodynamics, design applications, propulsion systems, high-speed flight, structures, controls, sensitivity analysis, optimization algorithms, and space structures applications. Other topics include helicopter rotor design, artificial intelligence/neural nets, and computational aspects of optimization. Papers are included on flutter calculations for a system with interacting nonlinearities, optimization in solid rocket booster application, improving the efficiency of aerodynamic shape optimization procedures, nonlinear control theory, and probabilistic structural analysis of space truss structures for nonuniform thermal environmental effects.

  17. SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

  18. 77 FR 54813 - Safety Zone; Head of the Cuyahoga, U.S. Rowing Masters Head Race National Championship, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... Head Race National Championship, and Dragon Boat Festival, Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, OH AGENCY: Coast... International Championship, and the Cleveland Dragon Boat Festival. This safety zone is necessary to protect... Cleveland, OH. In conjunction with the HOTC, the Cleveland Dragon Boat Festival will take place just...

  19. Profile of teriparatide in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sikon, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Andrea Sikon1, Pelin Batur21Cleveland Clinic Lerner COM, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Cleveland Clinic Lerner COM, Cleveland Clinic Independence, Independence, OH, USAAbstract: One out of every 2 women within postmenopause are at risk of fracture due to osteoporosis. Fortunately, a growing arsenal of therapies is becoming available to treat this disease and prevent fracture. A new class of anabolic agents has emerged within the last decade that brought with it a new concept in osteo...

  20. 77 FR 37801 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ..., CANCELED Cleveland, OH, Cleveland-Hopkins Intl, ILS OR LOC RWY 28, Amdt 24A Wapakoneta, OH, Neil Armstrong... ``significant rule '' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979) ; and...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Cancer Institute: Pancreatic Cancer National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Educational Resources (9 links) Boston Children's Hospital Cleveland Clinic: Cancer of the Pancreas Cleveland Clinic: Pancreatitis Disease InfoSearch: ...

  2. OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

  3. Rotator cuff repair: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Amini MH.; Ricchetti ET; Iannotti JP; Derwin KA

    2015-01-01

    Michael H Amini,1 Eric T Ricchetti,1 Joseph P Iannotti,1 Kathleen A Derwin2 1Orthopaedic and Rheumatologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Each year, 250,000 rotator cuff repairs are performed in the United States at a cost of $3 billion. Despite advancements in repair techniques and rehabilitation, 20%–70% of repairs continue to under...

  4. Rotator cuff repair: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Derwin, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Michael H Amini,1 Eric T Ricchetti,1 Joseph P Iannotti,1 Kathleen A Derwin2 1Orthopaedic and Rheumatologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Each year, 250,000 rotator cuff repairs are performed in the United States at a cost of $3 billion. Despite advancements in repair techniques and rehabilitation, 20%–70% of repairs continue to u...

  5. Invisible Ink in Teacher Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Emily; Walsh, Kate

    2010-01-01

    When the Cleveland, Ohio, school board had to make radical cuts in its budget last spring, it was forced to eliminate 540 teaching jobs. There wasn't a whole lot of mystery about "which" teachers among Cleveland's 3,500-member teaching force would be the ones to lose their jobs. The state's hard-and-fast seniority rule--last hired, first…

  6. The Supreme Court and Vouchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Charles J.; Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the facts and state and federal constitutional law related to "Zelman v. Simons-Harris," a Cleveland school-voucher case before the United States Supreme Court. Argues that the Court will likely uphold the constitutionality of the Cleveland voucher program, finding that it does not advance religion in violation of the First Amendment.…

  7. 5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptors Mediating Carotid and Systemic Haemodynamic Effects: The Relation to Acute Antimigraine Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Vries (Peter)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe presence of a vasoconstrictor substance in blood was suspected for 130 years (Ludwig & Schmidt, 1868) and, 50 years ago, Page and associates at the Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio, USA) succeeded in isolating 'serotonin' from the blood (Rapport et al., 1948). Within the next 3 year

  8. 75 FR 52014 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ..., Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is... control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN... with the Cherokee Tribes. The Cherokee are represented by the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern...

  9. Using business intelligence to improve performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Tom; Graves, Brian; Glass, Steve; Harrison, A Marc; Donovan, Chris; Proctor, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Cleveland Clinic's enterprise performance management program offers proof that comparisons of actual performance against strategic objectives can enable healthcare organization to achieve rapid organizational change. Here are four lessons Cleveland Clinic learned from this initiative: Align performance metrics with strategic initiatives. Structure dashboards for the CEO. Link performance to annual reviews. Customize dashboard views to the specific user.

  10. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture radar studies of Alaska volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles W., Jr.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Power, John A.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Masterlark, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we summarize our recent InSAR studies of 13 Alaska volcanoes, including New Trident, Okmok, Akutan, Kiska, Augustine, Westdahl, Peulik, Makushin, Seguam, Shishaldin, Pavlof, Cleveland, and Korovin volcanoes.

  11. American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Specialties (ABMS) member board or osteopathic medicine equivalent. Successful completion of an on-site clinical ... American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Canadian Obesity Network Cleveland Clinic ...

  12. EVALUATION OF DNA INTEGRITY USING TUNEL AND COMET ASSAY IN HUMAN SEMEN: IMMEDIATE- VERSUS DELAYED-FREEZING

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVALUATION OF DNA INTEGRITY USING TUNEL AND COMET ASSAY IN HUMAN SEMEN: IMMEDIATE- VERSUS DELAYED-FREEZING K. Young,* L. Xun,* S. Rothmann,? S. Perreault, ? W. Robbins**University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; ?Fertility Solutions Inc., Cleveland, ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Miller-Dieker syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allows the abdominal organs to protrude through the navel. People with Miller-Dieker syndrome may also have ... Disorders and Stroke: Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research Educational Resources (4 links) Cleveland Clinic: Lissencephaly Disease ...

  14. 77 FR 4582 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ..., 12000029 IOWA Buena Vista County Sioux Theatre, (Movie Theaters of Iowa MPS) 218 Main St., Sioux Rapids..., & Library Aves., & W. 25th St., Cleveland, 12000031 Shaker Farm Historic District, Roughly bounded...

  15. 77 FR 35424 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Dated: May 23, 2012. J. Paul Loether, Chief... Company Paper Mill and Sack Factory, 218 Cleveland St., Chagrin Falls, 12000391 Franklin County...

  16. Bear Capture. Research, and Request for Consideraton of Releases of Bears at Dahomey NWR in 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A series of memos and correspondences concerning the capture of a bear in Cleveland, MS and release on Dahomey NWR along with graduate research on bears from...

  17. 77 FR 48170 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Research Institute; TRW Automotive US, LLC; Union College; University Hospital of Cleveland; Virginia... of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and... Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C....

  18. Compact Wireless BioMetric Monitoring and Real Time Processing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZIN Technologies in collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation will use their combined experience and research and development expertise to develop a new...

  19. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infantile Psychomotor Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on child development outcomes were studied prospectively in an obstetric unit of a large US urban teaching hospital at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.

  20. Plaadid / Berk Vaher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaher, Berk, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Uutest plaatidest James Last "The Gentleman Of Music", Koufax "Social Life", Pixie Twins "Valgus ja varjud", Cleveland Watkiss "Victory's Happy Songbook", Hannah "Ballaadid", "Red Hot + Riot", Foo Fighters "One By One", Pearl Jam "Riot Act"

  1. 16 CFR 0.19 - The Regional Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... West Virginia. Federal Trade Commission, Eaton Center, Suite 200, 1111 Superior Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio... conferences with attorneys, consumers, and other members of the public on matters relating to the...

  2. US-Wahl 2016: Von Reagan träumen – aufwachen mit Trump

    OpenAIRE

    Brühwiler, Claudia Franziska

    2016-01-01

    Die grosse Rebellion blieb aus, dem Protokoll wurde Folge geleistet: Die Republikanische Partei krönte an ihrem Konvent in Cleveland, Ohio, den politischen Neuling, Unternehmer und Reality-TV-Star Donald J. Trump zu ihrem offiziellen Kandidaten.

  3. 76 FR 72901 - Notice of Petitions by Firms for Determination of Eligibility To Apply for Trade Adjustment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... the total or partial separation of the firm's workers, or threat thereof, and to a decrease in sales... Products Acme Express, Inc 3821 Prospect Avenue, 16-Nov-11 The firm manufactures Cleveland, OH...

  4. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Published on Dec 12, 2012 Do you have sleep apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure ( ... suggested video will automatically play next. Up Next Sleep Apnea Treatment - PAP Therapy - Duration: 13:44. Cleveland ...

  5. Mean annual runoff, precipitation, and evapotranspiration in the glaciated northeastern United States, 1951-80

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Two maps, compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale, depict mean annual runoff, precipitation, and evapotranspiration in the part of the United States east of Cleveland, Ohio...

  6. 76 FR 18779 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... Service Rd. 520, Creede, 11000219 INDIANA Porter County Solomon Enclave, 901, 903, 907 E. Lake Front Dr...-2121 Ontario St., Cleveland, 94000591 PENNSYLVANIA Pike County Grey, Zane, House (Boundary...

  7. They Don't Hire the Uglies

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Vocational Journal, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A brief report on the findings of a study of hiring practices in Cleveland found male concepts of beauty to be an influential factor, with women personnel directors as susceptible as their male counterparts. (Author)

  8. Genetics Home Reference: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mutations in other genes, studies have identified the mechanisms that lead to ALS. Some gene mutations lead ... PubMed Ling SC, Polymenidou M, Cleveland DW. Converging mechanisms in ALS and FTD: disrupted RNA and protein ...

  9. 78 FR 13905 - Government-Owned Inventions, Available for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... Center at Lewis Field, Code 21-14, Cleveland, OH 44135; telephone (216) 433-5754; fax (216) 433-6790... Etching of Silicon Carbide; NASA Case No.: LEW-18674-1: Polymer Electrolyte-Based Sensors; NASA Case...

  10. Virginia Tech's Michael Duncan receives civil engineering award

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2010-01-01

    J. Michael Duncan, Virginia Tech University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Via Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is the 2010 recipient of the G. Brooks Earnest Award and Lecture from the American Society of Civil Engineers' Cleveland Section.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9 links) American Heart Association Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Cleveland Clinic Disease InfoSearch: Jervell Lange-Nielsen syndrome ... and Advocacy Resources (5 links) Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) National Association of the Deaf National Organization for ...

  12. Angiotensin II receptor blockers in the prevention of complications from atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Eide, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Gerald V Naccarelli,1 Frank Peacock21Penn State Heart and Vascular institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA; 2Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially due to ischemic stroke. The occurrence of AF leads to atrial electrical and structural remodeling. The renin-angiotensin system appears to play a role in the development of atr...

  13. Update on the rational use of tositumomab and iodine-131 tositumomab radioimmunotherapy for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Burdick, Michael J; Macklis, Roger M.

    2009-01-01

    Michael J Burdick, Roger M MacklisDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Targeted radioimmunotherapy in non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma (NHL) offers an efficacious therapy and minimal toxicity compared to conventional chemotherapy. Iodine 131 tositumomab (131I-TST) is a murine monoclonal antibody against the CD20 cell surface protein and is directly covalently conjugated to 131I, a radioactiv...

  14. A technology-enabled adherence enhancement system for people with bipolar disorder: results from a feasibility and patient acceptance analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sajatovic M; Davis MS; Cassidy KA; Nestor J; Sams J; Fuentes-Casiano E

    2015-01-01

    Martha Sajatovic,1 Michael S Davis,2 Kristin A Cassidy,3 Joseph Nestor,2 Johnny Sams,3 Edna Fuentes-Casiano3 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurological and Behavioral Outcomes Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2MedicaSafe, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA Objective: As...

  15. Slovene poetry in the U.S.A.: the case of Ivan Zorman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maver

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Zorman was both a musician and a poet, born in 1889 in Šmarje near Grosuplje and died in 1957 in Cleveland (Ohio. In 1893 his family emigrated to the United States of America, first to Ely, Calumet, Cleveland and then to some other American towns. After a brief return to Slovenia in 1898/9, where Zorman attended elementary school in Velesovo near Kranj, they finally settled down in 1904 in Cleveland. In 1907 Zorman took up the study of modern languages (English, French and Italian, history and music at Western Reserve University and graduated only in music in 1912. For a number of years, during 1908 and 1956, he was chief organist and choir leader (like his father at the parish church of Sv. Lovrenc in Newburgh near Cleveland. During 1920 and 1925 he was professional director of the "Zorman Philharmonic". Not only was he known as a musician, he was very much present in the public life of the Slovene community living in Cleveland, as the enthusiastic teacher of Slovene literature in the Slovene school of the "Slovenski narodni dom", as a poet, translator and public speaker.

  16. New Research Methods Developed for Studying Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Brian Davis, one of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's researchers, has been investigating the risk factors related to diabetic foot ulceration, a problem that accounts for 20 percent of all hospital admissions for diabetic patients. He had developed a sensor pad to measure the friction and pressure forces under a person's foot when walking. As part of NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Act Agreement with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Dr. Davis requested Lewis' assistance in visualizing the data from the sensor pad. As a result, Lewis' Interactive Data Display System (IDDS) was installed at the Cleveland Clinic. This computer graphics program is normally used to visualize the flow of air through aircraft turbine engines, producing color two- and three-dimensional images.

  17. A web Implementation: The Good and The Not-So-Good

    OpenAIRE

    Bergsneider, Candice; Piraino, David; Fuerst, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    E-commerce, e-mail, e-greeting, e-this, and e-thate-verywhere you turn there is a new “e” word for an internet or Web application. We, at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, have been “e-nlightened” and will discuss in this report the implementation of a webbased radiology information system (RIS) in our radiology division or “e-radiology” division. The application, IDXRad Version 10.0 from IDX Corp, Burlington, VT, is in use at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and has both intranet (for use in R...

  18. Parenteral clevidipine for the acute control of blood pressure in the critically ill patient: a review

    OpenAIRE

    W Frank Peacock IV; Angeles, Jorge E; Karina M Soto; et al.

    2009-01-01

    W Frank Peacock IV1, Jorge E Angeles2, Karina M Soto2, Philip D Lumb3,  Joseph Varon41The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Facultad de Medicina, Tijuana, México; 3Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospita...

  19. The Mobi-C cervical disc for one-level and two-level cervical disc replacement: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvin MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Matthew D Alvin,1,2 Thomas E Mroz1,3,41Cleveland Clinic Center for Spine Health, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 4Department of Neurological Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA is a novel motion-preserving procedure that is an alternative to fusion. The Mobi-C disc prosthesis, one of many Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved devices for CDA, is the only FDA-approved prosthesis for two-level CDA. Hence, it may allow for improved outcomes compared with multilevel fusion procedures.Purpose: To critically assess the available literature on CDA with the Mobi-C prosthesis, with a focus on two-level CDA.Methods: All clinical articles involving the Mobi-C disc prosthesis for CDA through September 1, 2014 were identified on Medline. Any paper that presented Mobi-C CDA clinical results was included. Study design, sample size, length of follow-up, use of statistical analysis, quality of life outcome scores, conflict of interest, and complications were recorded.Results: Fifteen studies were included that investigated Mobi-C CDA, only one of which was a level Ib randomized control trial. All studies included showed non-inferiority of one-level Mobi-C CDA to one-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF. Only one study analyzed outcomes of one-level versus two-level Mobi-C CDA, and only one study analyzed two-level Mobi-C CDA versus two-level ACDF. In comparison with other cervical disc prostheses, the Mobi-C prosthesis is associated with higher rates of heterotopic ossification (HO. Studies with conflicts of interest reported lower rates of HO. Adjacent segment degeneration or disease, along with other complications, were not assessed in most studies.Conclusion: One-level Mobi-C CDA is non-inferior, but not superior, to one-level ACDF for patients

  20. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  1. Vacant urban lot soils and their potential to support ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    AimsUrban soils are the basis of many ecosystem services in cities. Here, we examine formerly residential vacant lot soils in Cleveland, Ohio and Detroit, Michigan, USA for their potential to provide multiple ecosystem services. We examine two key contrasts: 1) differences betwee...

  2. Developing Ways and Means for Minority Group Inclusion in Construction Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James R.

    A pilot program, developed by one of the largest construction companies, has had favorable experience in developing management training programs for small, black contractors in Cleveland, Ohio. The program has received national publicity and produced a substantial volume of new business for those who participated in the management seminar at Case…

  3. Relative Deprivation, Rising Expectations, and Black Militancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeles, Ronald P.

    1976-01-01

    Investigates the role of relative deprivation (RD) and rising expectations (RE) as mediating variables between social structure and black militancy through secondary analyses of survey data of blacks living in Cleveland and Miami in the late 1960s. Alternative explanations and implications derived from the present data and the theories for the…

  4. Forging Partnerships with Preschools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailie, Patti Ensel

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Head Start program for preschool children directed by the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes in Cleveland, Ohio. Presents information on the content of this program, which is also aligned with the regular Head Start curriculum. Lists contact phone numbers for more information. (YDS)

  5. Interpreting Urban Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Joseph Timothy; Schmidt, Mark Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Describes field trips to urban locations for geological instruction. The program was developed by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Authors claim these field trips have been an effective and enjoyable way of conveying a wide variety of geological information to participants at all levels and backgrounds and have created favorable publicity.…

  6. 40 CFR 420.01 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Steel, Aliquippa, PA PA 0006131 Chemical Rinse Treatment Plant Outfall 018. 7. J&L Steel, Cleveland, OH... scale map of the area of the plant served by the wastewater treatment facility, including the treatment... treatment works resulting from production operations in the Iron and Steel Point Source Category....

  7. Nature in the City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbert, Mary Lou

    1981-01-01

    Describes a science program developed by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, "Nature in the City," in which students and teachers learn together about the natural community surrounding their school. Includes program's rationale, list of "adventures," and methods. Discusses strategies of Sherlock Holmes'"adventure" focusing on animal tracks…

  8. Intelligent dc-dc Converter Technology Developed and Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the Cleveland State University have developed a digitally controlled dc-dc converter to research the benefits of flexible, digital control on power electronics and systems. Initial research and testing has shown that conventional dc-dc converters can benefit from improved performance by using digital-signal processors and nonlinear control algorithms.

  9. It Takes More Than a Hero: School Restructuring in Ohio under the No Child Left Behind Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    This report describes Ohio's school restructuring efforts under the No Child Left Behind Act, including findings from interviews with state officials and case studies of nine schools in four school districts: Cincinnati Public Schools, Cleveland Metropolitan School District, Mansfield City Schools, and Mount Vernon City Schools. Key findings from…

  10. 32 CFR 54.6 - Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Navy—Director, Navy Family Allowance Activity, Anthony J. Celebrezze Federal Building, Cleveland, OH...) Basic pay (including Military Service academy cadet and midshipman pay). (ii) Basic allowance for...) Basic allowance for subsistence for commissioned and warrant officers. (iv) Special pay for...

  11. Reflection of Foster Parents on Caring for Foster and Adopted Children and Their Suggestions to Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Fabrykowski, Krystyna; Helinski, Monica; Buchstein, Fred

    2009-01-01

    In this research project we investigated the process of adoption of foster children by foster parents and the foster parents' ideas of how to help foster children going through the process of adoption or those who have been adopted. We sent questionnaires to 200 foster parents living in the Cleveland area, but just 23 foster parents replied.…

  12. Protozoários intestinais de vertebrados observados em Salobra Intestinal protozoa from vertebrates observed at Salobra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pereira

    1941-01-01

    Full Text Available Protozoa were collected by means of dry smears and cultures in Cleveland's medium contained in 2cm3 ampules. The isolation and subsequent cultivation of trichomonad organisms in ampules were generally successfull; but the cultures went down, when transferred to test-tubes in the same medium, apparently because of the liberation of characteristic pigment by Bacillus pyocyaneus.

  13. Library Automation: The Next Wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Marilyn Gell

    1991-01-01

    Describes a long-range plan developed by the Cleveland Public Library to provide users with electronic information and full text delivery. Specific goals are addressed, including online catalog access and converting periodical holdings to electronic format; legal issues involving copyright are discussed; and pricing issues and user fees are…

  14. The Work of a Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2012-01-01

    If there's one message that Joan Hillsman wants to get across to music directors, it's this: Teaching is a lifetime commitment. Hillsman is a longtime music educator, African-American music historian, author, consultant, music producer, clinician, radio show host, and current member of the Academic Board of the James Cleveland Gospel Music…

  15. 32 CFR 726.4 - Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to determine the mental capability of a member to manage his financial affairs. (3) A finding of... concerning his mental health, is accurate and complete. (5) The requirement to convene a competency board... report to the Defense Finance and Accounting Service-Cleveland Center, Office of Continuing...

  16. 78 FR 6334 - Housing Choice Voucher Program; Office of Public and Indian Housing Announcement of Funding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... 715 E. BRIER DR, SAN BERNARDINO, 105 573,201 CA 92408. CA: ALAMEDA COUNTY HA 22941 ATHERTON ST... 90057. CA: COUNTY OF MONTEREY HSG AUTH 123 RICO ST, SALINAS, CA 93907... 105 881,975 CA: ALAMEDA COUNTY...: CUYAHOGA MHA 8120 KINSMAN RD, CLEVELAND, OH 9 60,572 44104. OH: CINCINNATI METRO HA 16 WEST CENTRAL...

  17. Music Therapy for the Visually Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Anita Louise; Crawford, Celeste

    1982-01-01

    The development and implementation of a music therapy program to achieve behavioral change in visually impaired children and adolescents are described. Goals targeted by the music therapist at the Cleveland Society for the Blind include altering unusual body movements, poor posture, and other mannerisms often associated with blindness. (SEW)

  18. Meeting at the Crossroads: Women's Psychology and Girls' Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lyn Mikel; Gilligan, Carol

    A study explored girls' development and its implication for the psychology of women. From 1986-1990, nearly 100 girls between the ages of 7 and 18 at the Laurel School for Girls in Cleveland, Ohio, were interviewed. Most of the girls were from middle- or upper-middle-class families (80%), although some were scholarship students from working-class…

  19. Somatostatin and dopamine receptors as molecular targets for the medical treatment of Cushing’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Bruin (Christiaan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHarvey Williams Cushing (1869-1939) was born as the 10th child of a well-educated, puritanical medical family in Cleveland (figure 1). He attended Yale University, graduated cum laude from Harvard Medical School and was trained as a general surgeon at Johns Hopkins under the famous but d

  20. Attracting New Audiences through Special Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christyson, M. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Explores reasons to create special events, change existing events, or discontinue events, in the pursuit of new audiences. Describes surveys of usership at Cleveland Metroparks to identify new audiences. Effective event design and implementation requires effective advertising, which is expensive, so a discussion of fund development, branding, and…

  1. Transfer of cysto-urethroscopy skills from a virtual-reality simulator to the operating room : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schout, Barbara M. A.; Ananias, Hildo J. K.; Bemelmans, Bart L. H.; d'Ancona, Frank C. H.; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Dolmans, Valerie E. M. G.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; Hendrikx, Ad J. M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess whether real-time cysto-urethroscopy (CUS) performance improves by simulator-based training (criterion or predictive validity), addressing the research question 'Does practical skills training on the URO Mentor (UM, Simbionix USA Corp., Cleveland, OH, USA) virtual-reality simulat

  2. Transfer of cysto-urethroscopy skills from a virtual-reality simulator to the operating room : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schout, B.M.; Ananias, H.J.; Bemelmans, B.L.H.; Ancona, F.C.H. d'; Muijtjens, A.M.M.; Dolmans, V.E.; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Hendrikx, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether real-time cysto-urethroscopy (CUS) performance improves by simulator-based training (criterion or predictive validity), addressing the research question 'Does practical skills training on the URO Mentor (UM, Simbionix USA Corp., Cleveland, OH, USA) virtual-reality simula

  3. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Published on Dec 12, 2012 Do you have sleep apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure ( ... 5:05. ApneaTreatmentCenter 38,307 views 5:05 Sleep Apnea Treatment - PAP Therapy - Duration: 13:44. Cleveland ...

  4. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Published on Dec 12, 2012 Do you have sleep apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure ( ... 39. ReVu tv 54,618 views 4:39 Sleep Apnea Treatment - PAP Therapy - Duration: 13:44. Cleveland ...

  5. Death Education and Attitudes toward Euthanasia and Terminal Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagi, Mostafa H.; Lazerine, Neil G.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzed attitudes of 614 Protestant and Catholic Cleveland clergy toward terminal illness and euthanasia. Clergy responses revealed that, although eager to prolong life, terminally ill patients feared prolonged illness more than death. The controversial nature of euthanasia became more apparent with clergy who had more training in death…

  6. Association of Research Self-Efficacy with Medical Student Career Interests, Specialization, and Scholarship: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, S. Beth; Prayson, Richard A.; Dannefer, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal…

  7. The Search for Constitutional School Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauknight, Suzanne H.

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the constitutionality of tuition-voucher programs that provide access to private, parochial schools. Surveys Establishment Clause jurisprudence of the United States Supreme Court. Examines the Cleveland, Ohio, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, tuition-voucher programs, currently being litigated in the respective state courts, in an attempt to…

  8. Genetics Home Reference: McKusick-Kaufman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH Scientists Educational Resources (5 links) Cleveland Clinic: Congenital Hand Differences Disease InfoSearch: McKusick Kaufman syndrome MalaCards: mckusick-kaufman syndrome March of Dimes: Genital and Urinary Tract Defects Orphanet: McKusick-Kaufman syndrome Patient Support and ...

  9. Preparing Administrators and Faculty of Cuyahoga Community College for a More Active Role in Implementing the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppley, George

    This five-part report discusses the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of 1973 (CETA), explains how it operates locally through the Cleveland Area Western Reserve Manpower Consortium (CAWRMC), and specifies ways in which Cuyahoga Community College (CCC) can play a greater role in the CETA system. Part I describes existing federal manpower…

  10. 77 FR 34067 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Robotics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Automation, Apex, NC; BBN Technologies Corp., Cambridge, MA; BioRobots, LLC, Cleveland, OH; Defense Research..., Inc. (GLSV), Houghton, MI; Integration Innovation Inc., Huntsville, AL; John H. Northrop & Associates..., Marina del Rey, CA; Valde Systems, Inc., Nashua, NH; and Virtus Advanced Sensors, Pittsburgh, PA,...

  11. 77 FR 35751 - Wisconsin Central Ltd.-Abandonment Exemption-in Manitowoc County, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Wisconsin Central Ltd.--Abandonment Exemption--in Manitowoc County, WI... 62.2 in Cleveland in Manitowoc County, WI. The line traverses United States Postal Service Zip...

  12. John Carroll University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  13. Global risks to U.S. monetary policy

    OpenAIRE

    Owen F. Humpage

    2007-01-01

    We recently invited four international economists to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland to discuss global developments and to help us identify and understand the key international risks that these developments present for U.S. monetary policy. This Commentary develops a key macroeconomic concern that emerged from our conversations.

  14. Reading Study: 1989-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Michael P.; Lanese, James

    The reading pariety study for 1989-90 provided information for the Cleveland, Ohio school district, parents, and community to determine what progress the school system is making toward parity in reading proficiency. Parity will be attained when statistically equivalent proportions of Black and White students score at or above the thirty-fourth…

  15. Assessment for 1983-4 School Year. Administrative/Supervisory Performance Review Process. Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Michael P.

    School administrators and supervisors who were evaluated using the Cleveland, Ohio City School District's Administrator/Supervisory Review Process were surveyed concerning their opinions of the review process. The questionnaire, which was returned by 203 principals, assistant principals, and other supervisory staff out of a total of 376…

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Affirmative Reading Skills Program, 1984-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Michael P.

    The 1984-85 cost-effects study represents the third annual analysis of the components of Cleveland's Affirmative Reading Skills Plan, which offers three instructional strands--developmental (regular reading/language arts), support (additional enrichment, corrective or remedial), and compensatory (instruction for students having reading scores in…

  17. School Vouchers: Examining the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnoy, Martin

    This study reviews recent empirical research on the effect of school vouchers on student achievement (particularly for low-income minorities attending private schools) and the effect of the threat of vouchers on low-performing public schools. The study examines the Milwaukee voucher experiment, the Cleveland voucher program, and new voucher…

  18. Langston Hughes and his poem "Harlem"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝红

    2005-01-01

    @@ James Langston Hughes was born February 1,1902, in Joplin, Missouri. His parents divorced when he was a small child, and his father moved to Mexico. He was raised by his Grandmother until he was thirteen, when he moved to Lincoln,Illinois, to live with his mother and her husband, eventually settling in Cleveland, Ohio.

  19. Air pollution and emergency department visits for asthma among Ohi Medicaid recipients, 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the effects of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3) particulate matter of 10), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) on asthmatics ages 5-34 years enrolled in Medicaid i Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Columbus, OH (N=5416). Our study period was fo the summer months, June-August, from July 1, 1991 to June 30, 1996. W preformed Poisson regression analyses for the number of daily emergency department (ED) visits for asthma in each city and on the aggregate dat controlling for time trends and minimum temperature. We found a 12% increase likelihood of an asthma ED visit per 50 μg/m3 increase in PM10 i Cleveland [95% confidence interval (CI)=0-27%] and a 35% increase per 5 μg/m3 increase in SO2 in Cincinnati (95% CI=9-21%). When data wer analyzed for all three cities combined, the risk of an ED visit increased fo all pollutant increases and specifically by 12% (95% CI=1-23%) per 5 μg/m3 increase in SO2. Attributable risk estimates show a five time greater impact on Cleveland over Cincinnati or Columbus. Between 1991 an 1996, air pollutants in Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Columbus increased E visits for asthmatics enrolled in Medicaid

  20. The U.S. Supreme Court and the Politics of Vouchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Brian L.

    2004-01-01

    On June 27, 2002, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in "Zelman v. Simmons-Harris" was promulgated by the justices. The case involved the constitutionality of Ohio's Pilot Project Scholarship Program, which provides tuition aid for certain students in the Cleveland City School District to attend participating public or private (religious and…

  1. Do the Math: Course Redesign's Impact on Learning and Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, John; Faulkner, Jerry; Hite, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The math department at Cleveland State Community College embarked upon course redesign in 2008. As a result of this project, student engagement, learning, and success rates have increased dramatically. By including both developmental and college level math courses in the redesign, the department has been able to implement innovative scheduling and…

  2. 76 FR 18893 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Organic Compound Emission Control Measures for Lithographic and Letterpress Printing in Cleveland AGENCY... volatile organic compound (VOC) rule. These rule revisions specify compliance dates for subject facilities... solution. In EPA's December 30, 2010, proposal (75 FR 82363), we present a detailed legal and...

  3. Microstructures of Early Jurassic (Toarcian) shales of Northern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M.E.; Barnhoorn, A.; Wasch, L.; Trabucho-Alexandre, João; Peach, C.J.; Drury, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    The Toarcian (Early Jurassic) Posidonia Shale Formation is a possible unconventional gas source in Northern Europe and occurs within the Cleveland Basin (United Kingdom), the Anglo-Paris Basin (France), the Lower Saxony Basin and the Southwest Germany Basin (Germany), and the Roer Valley Graben, the

  4. A Collaborative, Ongoing University Strategic Planning Framework: Process, Landmines, and Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Susan E. Kogler; Thomas, Edward G.; Keller, Lawrence F.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the strategic planning process at Cleveland State University, a large metropolitan state university in Ohio. A faculty-administrative team used a communicative planning approach to develop a collaborative, ongoing, bottom-up, transparent strategic planning process. This team then spearheaded the process through plan…

  5. The importance of structure in decisionmaking

    OpenAIRE

    Jerry L. Jordan

    1992-01-01

    Should the economics profession be judged on its ability to predict the economy's twists and turns? Not according to Cleveland Federal Reserve Bank President Jerry L. Jordan, who argues that an economist's real contribution lies not in eliminating the uncertainties of the marketplace, but in providing a proper framework for discussing and evaluating those uncertainties.

  6. Natural hydraulic fractures and the mechanical stratigraphy of shale-dominated strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, Jonathan; Armstrong, Howard; Atar, Elizabeth; Clancy, Sarah; Daniels, Susan; Grattage, Joshua; Herringshaw, Liam; Trabucho-Alexandre, João; Warren, Cassandra; Wille, Jascha; Yahaya, Liyana

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate stratigraphic variations in the spatial distribution and density of natural hydraulic and other fractures within oil mature, shale-dominated strata from the Cleveland Basin, northeast England. The studied interval includes the Pliensbachian Cleveland Ironstone and Toarcian Whitby Mudstone Formations. The Cleveland Ironstone Formation (ca. 25m thick) consists of silt- and mudstone units with discrete ironstone layers (seams). Ironstones account for 20% of the thickness of the formation. The Whitby Mudstone Formation is up to ca. 100 m thick; up to 2% of its total thickness consists of discrete calcium carbonate horizons, such as the Top Jet Dogger. Natural hydraulic fractures, characterised by plumose marks and concentric arrest lines on fracture surfaces are ubiquitous throughout both formations; shear fractures with mm- to cm-scale displacements occur locally, particularly within silt- and mudstones. Natural hydraulic fractures locally contain thin, sometimes fibrous, calcite fills and are commonly observed to terminate at bedding plane interfaces between silt- or mudstone and carbonate beds. We have recorded fracture locations and apertures along 139 transects in both shale (i.e. silt- and mudstone intervals) and carbonate strata. Natural hydraulic and shear fractures, measured along transects up to 50m long within all lithologies in both formations, typically display uniform distributions. There is no correlation between spacing distribution and bulk extension in any lithology. Median fracture densities recorded within the Cleveland Ironstone Formation are higher in intervening ironstone beds (lean Redcar Mudstone Formation.

  7. Working Close to Home. WIRE-Net's Hire Locally Program. Workforce Development Report to the Field. Field Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Patricia; Proscio, Tony

    In 1986, three neighborhood development organizations in Cleveland, Ohio, created the Westside Industrial Retention Network (WIRE-Net) to retain manufacturing jobs on the city's West Side. In 1989, WIRE-Net launched its Hire Locally program, which was designed to provide local business with candidates judged to be effective workers and help…

  8. The Practicing Librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineman, Marcia Pollack; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes three literacy organization and public library programs: Project LEARN (Cleveland, Ohio), which encourages higher-level beginning adult readers to want to read on their own; Greenville County (South Carolina) Library's Latchkey Kids Program; and policies on unattended and disruptive children developed by Iowa City and Cedar Rapids (Iowa)…

  9. Cuyahoga County Early Childhood Initiative Evaluation: Phase II Final Report. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Rob; Coulton, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Since mid-1999, a bold initiative has been underway in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, to improve the well-being of the youngest members of the greater Cleveland community. A community-wide initiative targeting children from birth through age five and their families was launched in July 1999, and in the following 5 years demonstrated substantial success in…

  10. A Preliminary Study of Classroom Motivators and De-Motivators from a Motivation-Hygiene Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katt, James A.; Condly, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    This study seeks to begin answering two simple questions: "What motivates our students?" and its corollary, "What prevents our students from being motivated?" The motivation-hygiene theory (F. Herzberg, "Work and the nature of man," World Publishing, Cleveland, OH, 1966), a well-tested theory from organizational psychology, holds that people's…

  11. Trends in the levels of halogenated flame retardants in the Great Lakes atmosphere over the period 2005-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang-Ying; Salamova, Amina; Venier, Marta; Hites, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    Air (vapor and particle phase) samples were collected every 12days at five sites near the North American Great Lakes from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2013 as a part of the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN). The concentrations of 35 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and eight other halogenated flame retardants were measured in each of the ~1,300 samples. The levels of almost all of these flame retardants, except for pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), and Dechlorane Plus (DP), were significantly higher in Chicago, Cleveland, and Sturgeon Point. The concentrations of PBEB and HBB were relatively high at Eagle Harbor and Sturgeon Point, respectively, and the concentrations of DP were relatively high at Cleveland and Sturgeon Point, the two sites closest to this compound's production site. The data were analyzed using a multiple linear regression model to determine significant temporal trends in these atmospheric concentrations. The concentrations of PBDEs were decreasing at the urban sites, Chicago and Cleveland, but were generally unchanging at the remote sites, Sleeping Bear Dunes and Eagle Harbor. The concentrations of PBEB were decreasing at almost all sites except for Eagle Harbor, where the highest PBEB levels were observed. HBB concentrations were decreasing at all sites except for Sturgeon Point, where HBB levels were the highest. DP concentrations were increasing with doubling times of 3-9years at all sites except those closest to its source (Cleveland and Sturgeon Point). The levels of 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (TBE) were unchanging at the urban sites, Chicago and Cleveland, but decreasing at the suburban and remote sites, Sturgeon Point and Eagle Harbor. The atmospheric concentrations of 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EHTBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromophthalate (BEHTBP) were increasing at almost every site with doubling times of 3-6years.

  12. Prospective Clinical Study of Precision Oncology in Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, Davendra P S; Rini, Brian I; Khorana, Alok A; Dreicer, Robert; Abraham, Jame; Procop, Gary W; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Pennell, Nathan A; Stevenson, James P; Pelley, Robert; Estfan, Bassam; Shepard, Dale; Funchain, Pauline; Elson, Paul; Adelstein, David J; Bolwell, Brian J

    2016-03-01

    Systematic studies evaluating clinical benefit of tumor genomic profiling are lacking. We conducted a prospective study in 250 patients with select solid tumors at the Cleveland Clinic. Eligibility required histopathologic diagnosis, age of 18 years or older, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-2, and written informed consent. Tumors were sequenced using FoundationOne (Cambridge, MA). Results were reviewed at the Cleveland Clinic Genomics Tumor Board. Outcomes included feasibility and clinical impact. Colorectal (25%), breast (18%), lung (13%), and pancreatobiliary (13%) cancers were the most common diagnoses. Median time from consent to result was 25 days (range = 3-140). Of 223 evaluable samples, 49% (n = 109) of patients were recommended a specific therapy, but only 11% (n = 24) received such therapy: 12 on clinical trials, nine off-label, three on-label. Lack of clinical trial access (n = 49) and clinical deterioration (n = 29) were the most common reasons for nonrecommendation/nonreceipt of genomics-driven therapy.

  13. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441). Supplement No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 5 to the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0887) on the application filed by the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company on behalf of itself and as agent for the Duquesne Light Company, the Ohio Edison Company, The Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company (the Central Area Power Coordination Group or CAPCO), as applicants and owners, for a license to operate the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lake County, Ohio, approximately 35 miles northeast of Cleveland, Ohio. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement Nos. 1 through 4 to that report

  14. Carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin levels in residents living in industrial and nonindustrial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woebkenberg, N.R.; Mostardi, R.A.; Ely, D.L.; Worstell, D.

    1981-12-01

    Carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin concentrations were compared in residents living in an industrial (Cleveland, Ohio) and a nonindustrial community (Elyria, Ohio). Carboxyhemoglobin levels were significantly higher among both male and female smokers and nonsmokers in Cleveland as compared to their counterparts in Elyria. Male smokers at both sites had significantly higher carboxyhemoglobin values than did the females. Methemoglobin levels were significantly higher in the nonindustrial site for all breakdowns even though ambient NO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 3/ levels were higher in the industrial site. The high methemoglobin levels are attributed to the higher nitrate levels in the drinking water in the nonindustrial city. In the industrial city, both male and female smokers had significantly higher methemoglobin values than nonsmokers. These differences were not found in the nonindustrial site. It is suggested that methemoglobin has physiological importance and in combination with carboxyhemoglobin elevated values could be a health factor.

  15. The Impact of Vouchers on the Science and Mathematics Achievement of Elementary Students in a Majority African American Public School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Patricia A.; Boone, William J.; Metcalf, Kim K.

    In many settings, the issue of publicly funded vouchers for students is being discussed. This article presents the results of evaluating test data from students living within the city boundaries of Cleveland, Ohio. In Cleveland, a limited number of low - socioeconomic status students can receive publicly funded vouchers. Data were analyzed using multivariate and univariate techniques. The results suggest that (a) students who did not return to the scholarship program from third to fourth grade exhibited lower achievement levels than those who remained in the program, (b) scholarship students who continued in the scholarship program from third to fourth grade continue to be very much like their public school counterparts, and (c) the effects of the program on scholarship students' academic performance are slightly positive but are mediated by the schools they attend. This study is important because vouchers may or may not provide a mechanism by which the participation of underrepresented groups in science and mathematics can be increased.

  16. Update on the rational use of tositumomab and iodine-131 tositumomab radioimmunotherapy for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Burdick

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Burdick, Roger M MacklisDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Targeted radioimmunotherapy in non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma (NHL offers an efficacious therapy and minimal toxicity compared to conventional chemotherapy. Iodine 131 tositumomab (131I-TST is a murine monoclonal antibody against the CD20 cell surface protein and is directly covalently conjugated to 131I, a radioactive β and γ emitter. While initially approved for use in relapsed, refractory, or transformed low grade B-cell NHL, investigational uses with promising results include autologous stem cell transplant, intermediate grade NHL, and the frontline management of indolent NHL. This review summarizes the 131I-TST literature on mechanism of action, treatment indications, treatment delivery, efficacy, investigational uses, and future prospects.Keywords: tositumomab, radioimmunotherapy, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Bexxar

  17. All-weather ice information system for Alaskan arctic coastal shipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedney, R. T.; Jirberg, R. J.; Schertler, R. J.; Mueller, R. A.; Chase, T. L.; Kramarchuk, I.; Nagy, L. A.; Hanlon, R. A.; Mark, H.

    1977-01-01

    A near real-time ice information system designed to aid arctic coast shipping along the Alaskan North Slope is described. The system utilizes a X-band Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) mounted aboard a U.S. Coast Guard HC-130B aircraft. Radar mapping procedures showing the type, areal distribution and concentration of ice cover were developed. In order to guide vessel operational movements, near real-time SLAR image data were transmitted directly from the SLAR aircraft to Barrow, Alaska and the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Glacier. In addition, SLAR image data were transmitted in real time to Cleveland, Ohio via the NOAA-GOES Satellite. Radar images developed in Cleveland were subsequently facsimile transmitted to the U.S. Navy's Fleet Weather Facility in Suitland, Maryland for use in ice forecasting and also as a demonstration back to Barrow via the Communications Technology Satellite.

  18. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441). Supplement No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 7 to the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0887) on the application filed by the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company on behalf of itself and as agent for the Duquesne Light Company, the Ohio Edison Company, the Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company (the Central Area Power Coordination Group or CAPCO), as applicants and owners, for a license to operate the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket No. 50-440 and 50-441) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lake County, Ohio, approximately 35 miles northeast of Cleveland, Ohio. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement Nos. 1 through 6 to that report

  19. The emerging role of bexarotene in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tousi B

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Babak Tousi Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brian Health, Neurological Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: In 2012, a novel approach to the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease was introduced, heralding a wave of excitement in the field of dementia. Bexarotene, a retinoid X receptor agonist, was shown to reverse neurodegeneration, improve cognition, and decrease levels of amyloid-ß in transgenic mice expressing familial Alzheimer disease mutations. Since then, there has been widespread discussion about bexarotene, as well as a number of follow-up studies. Bexarotene is a unique compound, as it is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for other purposes and there are reasonable data to justify its mechanism of action in dementia. This review discusses these studies and the emerging role of bexarotene in the clinical field of Alzheimer’s dementia. Keywords: repurposing, ApoE-targeted mice, amyloid, therapy, dementia

  20. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441). Supplement No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 6 to the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0887) on the application filed by the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company on behalf of itself and as agent for the Duquesne Light Company, the Ohio Edison Company, the Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company (the Central Area Power Coordination Group or CAPCO), as applicants and owners, for a license to operate the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-540 and 50-441), has been prepared by the Office of the Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lake County, Ohio, approximately 35 miles northeast of Cleveland, Ohio. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement Nos. 1 through 5 to that report

  1. A High Temperature Cyclic Oxidation Data Base for Selected Materials Tested at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic oxidation test results for some 1000 high temperature commercial and experimental alloys have been collected in an EXCEL database. This database represents over thirty years of research at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The data is in the form of a series of runs of specific weight change versus time values for a set of samples tested at a given temperature, cycle time, and exposure time. Included on each run is a set of embedded plots of the critical data. The nature of the data is discussed along with analysis of the cyclic oxidation process. In addition examples are given as to how a set of results can be analyzed. The data is assembled on a read-only compact disk which is available on request from Materials Durability Branch, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  2. Renal manifestations of genetic mitochondrial disease

    OpenAIRE

    O’Toole JF

    2014-01-01

    John F O'Toole Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, MetroHealth Medical System, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Mitochondrial diseases can be related to mutations in either the nuclear or mitochondrial genome. Childhood presentations are commonly associated with renal tubular dysfunction, but renal involvement is less commonly reported outside of this age-group. Mitochondrial diseases are notable for the significant...

  3. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  4. Special Article: Howard Dittrick: curator to the McMechans' legacy journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bause, George S; Edmonson, James M

    2012-12-01

    A noted medical historian and museum curator, Canadian American Howard Dittrick was a Cleveland gynecologist who served as Directing Editor of Current Researches in Anesthesia and Analgesia (1940-1954). In the aftermath of World War II, even after Congresses of Anesthetists had resumed, Dittrick and his editorial board allowed their yellow, then tan-covered journal, the so-called "yellow peril," to languish into near irrelevance.

  5. Opportunities for the CTEI: disentangling frequency and quality in evaluating teaching behaviours

    OpenAIRE

    Schonrock-Adema, J.; Boendermaker, P.M.; Remmelts, P.

    2012-01-01

    Students’ perceptions of teaching quality are vital for quality assurance purposes. An increasingly used, department-independent instrument is the (Cleveland) clinical teaching effectiveness instrument (CTEI). Although the CTEI was developed carefully and its validity and reliability confirmed, we noted an opportunity for improvement given an intermingling in its rating scales: the labels of the answering scales refer to both frequency and quality of teaching behaviours. Our aim was to invest...

  6. A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles. Progress report for Task A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reines, F.; Sobel, H.W.

    1991-08-01

    Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. Task A consists of three experimental programs; a Double-Beta Decay study (currently at the Hoover Dam), a Reactor Neutrino program (until this year at Savannah River), and the IMB Proton Decay experiment in a Cleveland salt mine. Discussion of the research in each area is given.

  7. Stoma care is our affair for the senior citizens everywhere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Coyle

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available The first reported colostomy was in 1776 and it was a caecostomy, or opening into the caecum. This was the first attempt to surgically help the problem of an imperforate anus. The first stomatherapist was a patient in the Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, U.S.A. Now there are 22 countries in the world with qualified stomatherapists. Stomatherapy was founded in South Africa in 1958 and in England in 1967.

  8. Differential activation of JAK enzymes in rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmune disorders by pro-inflammatory cytokines: potential drug targets

    OpenAIRE

    Malemud, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Charles J MalemudArthritis Research Laboratory, Division of Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Although several pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-12/IL-23, IL-17, IL-2, interferon, and the anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-4/IL-13, IL-10, and IL-22, all activate the Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, in autoimmune disorders, ...

  9. Progress on the Design and Development of the Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Horvath, David J.; Mielke, Nicole; Shiose, Akira; Kuban, Barry; Goodin, Mark; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Golding, Leonard A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Cleveland Clinic’s continuous-flow total artificial heart has one motor and one rotating assembly supported by a hydrodynamic bearing. The right hydraulic output is self regulated by passive axial movement of the rotating assembly to balance itself with the left output. The purpose of this article is to present progress in four areas of development: the automatic speed control system, self-regulation to balance right/left inlet pressures and flows, hemolysis testing using calf blood, and coup...

  10. Community organizations in the foreclosure crisis: the failure of neoliberal civil society

    OpenAIRE

    McQuarrie, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the prehistory of the foreclosure crisis in Cleveland, Ohio, in order to understand the effectiveness of civil society organizations in mitigating its impact on the city’s neighborhoods. Social theorists and movement activists have often postulated civil society as an authentic and voluntaristic realm in which we constitute and act on shared values. The voluntary nature of civil society organizations also, it is argued, make them more responsive, adaptable, and effective i...

  11. Engineering Aspects in Blood Pump Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Leonard; Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    NASA turbomachinery computer codes assisted in the design of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's centrifugal bladed blood pump. The codes were originally developed for the aerospace industry, but are applicable to the blood pump because of a high degree of synergy with this application. Traditional turbomachinery design criteria were used in the design of the blood pump centrifugal impeller and volute casing. The fluid dynamic performance of the blood pump is meeting the engineering design goals of flow rate and pressure rise.

  12. Maternal Work Hours and Adolescents’ School Outcomes Among Low-Income Families in Four Urban Counties

    OpenAIRE

    Gennetian, Lisa A.; LOPOO, LEONARD M.; LONDON, ANDREW S.

    2008-01-01

    We examine how changes in maternal work hours affect adolescent children’s school participation and performance outcomes using data from interviews in 1998 and 2001 with approximately 1,700 women who, in May 1995, were welfare-reliant, single mothers of adolescents living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty in Cuyahoga (Cleveland), Los Angeles, Miami-Dade, and Philadelphia counties. Analyses control for a broad array of mothers’ characteristics, including their psychological and physical...

  13. Flying Saucer? Aliens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    No, it's not a flying saucer, it is the domed top to a 70 foot long vacuum tank at the Lewis Research Center's Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio. The three technicians shown here in protective clothing had just emerged from within the tank where they had been cleaning in the toxic mercury atmosphere, left after ion engine testing in the tank. Lewis has since been renamed the John H. Glenn Research Center.

  14. Acculturation to the global consumer culture: A generational cohort comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, Jason; Moore, Marguerite; Doherty, Anne Marie; Alexander, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    While on a global scale consumers are becoming more homogeneous, as a result of the increasingly globalized marketplace, researchers suggest that consumers within individual countries are becoming more culturally heterogeneous. Consequently, M. Cleveland and J. Laroche (2007. Acculturation to the global consumer culture: Scale development and research paradigm. Journal of Business Research, 60, 249–259) advocate segmenting consumers acrossmarkets on the basis of acculturation to the global co...

  15. A Boost for the Emerging Field of RNA Nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Girish C.; Haque, Farzin; Tor, Yitzhak; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Isambert, Hervé; Guo, Peixuan; John J. Rossi; Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This Nano Focus article highlights recent advances in RNA nanotechnology as presented at the First International Conference of RNA Nanotechnology and Therapeutics, which took place in Cleveland, OH, USA (October 23–25, 2010) (http://www.eng.uc.edu/nanomedicine/RNA2010/), chaired by Peixuan Guo and co-chaired by David Rueda and Scott Tenenbaum. The conference was the first of its kind to bring together more than 30 invited speakers in the frontier of RNA nanotechnology from France, Sweden, Sou...

  16. Making Wireless Work: A Look at What Hospitals Are Doing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockley, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Three events in January 2016 did a terrific job of capturing the essence of wireless technology in healthcare today, putting the expectations, innovations, and problems in the limelight. In glitzy Las Vegas, more than 150,000 people flocked to CES (formerly the Consumer Electronics Show) and the colocated Digital Health Summit. An equally engaged crowd of 1,000+ health information technology (IT) and healthcare technology management (HTM) professionals gathered in Cleveland for the IHE North American Connectathon. PMID:27046683

  17. Fetal alcohol exposure and development of the integument

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Larry

    2016-01-01

    William D Longhurst,1 Jordan Ernst,2 Larry Burd3 1Center for Emergency Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USA; 3Department of Pediatrics, North Dakota Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Center, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USA Background: The physiology of fetal alcohol exposure changes across ges...

  18. Final report : breastfeeding and maternal smoking, breastfeeding and substance misuse : a review of programs/interventions nationwide.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudzik, Alanna E.F.

    2014-01-01

    Two areas of maternal and child health were identified as important contributors to the health of the local populations of Middlesbrough and Redcar/Cleveland. These areas were maternal smoking (in pregnancy and the postpartum) and breastfeeding and maternal substance misuse (drugs and alcohol) and breastfeeding. The goal of the consultancy was to identify programs or interventions from around the UK that have been designed to deal with these two issues, to evaluate outcom...

  19. Impact of a new condensed toluene mechanism on air quality model predictions in the US

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwar, G.; K. W. Appel; A. G. Carlton; Mathur, R.; K. Schere; Zhang, R.; MAJEED, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A new condensed toluene mechanism is incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling system. Model simulations are performed using the CB05 chemical mechanism containing the existing (base) and the new toluene mechanism for the western and eastern US for a summer month. With current estimates of tropospheric emission burden, the new toluene mechanism increases monthly mean daily maximum 8-h ozone by 1.0–3.0 ppbv in Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Cleveland, northeaste...

  20. Impact of a new condensed toluene mechanism on air quality model predictions in the US

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwar, G.; K. W. Appel; A. G. Carlton; Mathur, R.; K. Schere; Zhang, R.; MAJEED, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new condensed toluene mechanism is incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling system. Model simulations are performed using the CB05 chemical mechanism containing the existing (base) and the new toluene mechanism for the western and eastern US for a summer month. With current estimates of tropospheric emission burden, the new toluene mechanism increases monthly mean daily maximum 8-h ozone by 1.0–3.0 ppbv in Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Cleveland, northeaste...

  1. Python Engine Installed in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    An engine mechanic checks instrumentation prior to an investigation of engine operating characteristics and thrust control of a large turboprop engine with counter-rotating propellers under high-altitude flight conditions in the 20-foot-dianieter test section of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Cleveland, Ohio, now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  2. Interview with Paul DeMarinis

    OpenAIRE

    Ouzounian, Gascia

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, the American electronic media artist Paul DeMarinis (b. 1948, Cleveland, Ohio, USA) has created works that re-imagine modes of communication and reinvent the technologies that enable communication. His works (see Table 1) have taken shape as recordings, performances, electronic inventions, and site-specific and interactive installations; many are considered landmarks in the histories of electronic music and media art. Paul DeMarinis pioneered live performance with compu...

  3. Prevention of cervical, vaginal, and vulval cancers: role of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (6, 11, 16, 18) recombinant vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Lina Diaz

    2010-01-01

    Maria Lina DiazSection of Ambulatory Gynecology Cleveland Clinic Florida Weston, Florida, USAAbstract: The relationship between the human papillomavirus (HPV) and malignancies of the uterine cervix, vagina, and vulva has been established. The development of a quadrivalent HPV recombinant prophylactic vaccine represents the first time in history that primary prevention of these cancers is offered to girls and women. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV subtypes in cervical cancers has been the most...

  4. Economic and technical analysis of retrofit to cogenerating district energy systems: North-Central cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, D.J.; Davis, A.A.; Marder, S.M.

    1979-06-01

    Six major US cities (Washington, DC, St. Louis, Cleveland, Milwaukee, Detroit, and Chicago) were studied to achieve reasonably accurate estimates of costs required to retrofit them with district energy systems. Demand estimates and energy-supply analyses are made, and component capital costs are estimated to arrive at annualized system costs. Finally, a comparison of alternative energy delivery options is made, and estimates of scarce-fuel savings are derived.

  5. Memorial—John A. Washington II, M.D.▿

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    John A. Washington II, M.D., former Head of Clinical Microbiology at the Mayo Clinic from 1972 to 1986 and Chairman of the Department of Microbiology at the Cleveland Clinic from 1986 to 1992, died on 5 September 2010 at the age of 74. John was an internationally recognized, widely respected leader in the disciplines of clinical microbiology and infectious diseases, authoring more than 450 scientific articles, books, and book chapters and training scores of pathology residents and clinical mi...

  6. Regional resilience in the face of foreclosures: Evidence from six metropolitan areas

    OpenAIRE

    Swanstrom, Todd; Chapple, Karen; Immergluck, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Based on approximately fifty interviews, along with analysis of data and newspaper coverage, this report compares local responses to surging foreclosures in three pairs of regions with similar housing markets and foreclosure-related challenges (St. Louis/Cleveland, East Bay/Riverside, and Chicago/Atlanta). The authors examine the choices made by leaders and organizations both to prevent foreclosures and to reduce their negative spillovers (neighborhood stabilization). Resilience is defined as...

  7. Effect of genistein on basal jejunal chloride secretion in R117H CF mice is sex and route specific

    OpenAIRE

    Rayyan E; Polito S; Leung L; Bhakta A; Kang J; Willey J; Mansour W; Drumm ML; Al-Nakkash L

    2015-01-01

    Esa Rayyan,1 Sarah Polito,1 Lana Leung,1 Ashesh Bhakta,1 Jonathan Kang,1 Justin Willey,1 Wasim Mansour,1 Mitchell L Drumm,2 Layla Al-Nakkash11Department of Physiology, Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, USA; 2Pediatric Pulmonology Division, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from the loss or reduction in function of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein) chloride ...

  8. Enzyme immunoassay for rabies antibody in hybridoma culture fluids and its application to differentiation of street and laboratory strains of rabies virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J S; Sumner, J. W.; Roumillat, L. F.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive enzyme immunoassay is described for detecting rabies antibody in hybridoma culture fluids. Glass fiber filter disks were used to immobilize gamma-irradiated mouse neuroblastoma cells infected with street or laboratory strains of rabies virus. Bound rabies-specific antibody was detected by reaction with horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin G. The assay was performed in a 96-well filtration device developed by Cleveland et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. ...

  9. Student nurses and the electronic medical record: a partnership of academia and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Anna Mary; Kavanagh, Joan; Gregorich, Tom; Shumway, Julia; Campbell, Yolanda; Stafford, Susan

    2011-12-01

    The advent of the electronic medical record has brought a new challenge to nursing education. Although most nursing students are proficient in data entry and computer skills, they often do not comprehend how the information they enter becomes a vital component of interdisciplinary team communication. Furthermore, the electronic medical record becomes a repository for information that can be retrieved for the purpose of decision support. Developed by the Cleveland Clinic, the Deans' Roundtable, and University Hospitals of Cleveland, the Student Nurse Portal provides a means of assisting the student to understand how data entered into the computer transforms into information and knowledge, resulting in the wisdom that enables healthcare workers to provide optimal patient care. Current courses present the purpose of the electronic medical record and its roleas a powerful communication tool, but future courses will also help the student develop data entry and retrieval skills. Hosted on the Cleveland Clinic servers and available to students around-the-clock from any computer with Internet access, students have found the Student Nurse Portal to be a valuable tool in preparing for the use of the electronic medical record during their clinical experiences.

  10. Association between Hyperprolactinemia and Granulomatous Mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Blake, Cassann N; Carlson, Diane L

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) is a relatively uncommon inflammatory breast lesion with multiple suggested etiologies. Although most GM cases show association with lactation and pregnancy, a minority of cases have been linked to hyperprolactinemia caused by either dopamine antagonist medications or with intracranial lesions, such as pituitary adenoma. The goal of this study is to review the GM cases reported in the literature with a specific emphasis on those cases associated with hyperprolactinemia and prolactinomas and to identify cases of GM seen at the Cleveland Clinic Florida which demonstrate co-occurrences of GM and intracranial lesions. CoPath and Epic data bases at Cleveland Clinic Florida were searched for cases describing inflammatory breast lesions in patients with pituitary pathology. Chart reviews were conducted and pertinent medical history was extracted for case reports. H&E-stained paraffin-embedded sections retrieved from Cleveland Clinic Florida pathology storage were evaluated by light microscopy. Four cases showing a co-occurrence of GM and hyperprolactinemia were consequently identified. A prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma was present in two of the three GM cases. The third case demonstrated a concomitant craniopharyngioma, which was also associated with a rise in serum prolactin. This phenomenon was presumably attributable to compression, resulting in compromised transport of dopamine to the adenohypophysis and subsequent disinhibition of prolactin secretion by lactotrophs. The fourth patient with GM had a similar history of elevated prolactin. Classical histopathological features of GM were found in all four cases, including noncaseating granulomas, multinucleated giant cells, epithelioid histiocytes, and chronic inflammation. Intriguingly, complete resolution of inflammatory breast lesions along with normalization of prolactin levels occurred following the surgical excision of the craniopharyngioma, suggesting that intracranial lesion

  11. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukowski RM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ronald M BukowskiCleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor's underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus, and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α. The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients

  12. Spirituality and well being among elders: differences between elders with heart failure and those without heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T Quinn Griffin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mary T Quinn Griffin1, Yi-Hui Lee2, Ali Salman1, Yaewon Seo1, Patricia A Marin3, Randall C Starling3, Joyce J Fitzpatrick11Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH; 2College of Nursing and Health Wright State University Dayton, OH; 3Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OhioAbstract: Heart failure is a chronic debilitating disease that affects all aspects of a person’s life, including physical, mental and spiritual dimensions. The associations among these dimensions, and the relationship to overall health status, have not been clearly identified. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to explore differences between spirituality, depressive symptoms, and quality of life among elders with and without heart failure. A total of 44 elders with heart failure and 40 non-heart failure elders completed several questionnaires including: The Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES, Spirituality Index of Well-Being (SIWB, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, and SF-12™ Health Survey. There were significant differences in the groups on gender and ethnicity; thus these variables were controlled in the analyses related to the dependent variables. After controlling for gender and ethnicity, there were significant differences in the physical component of quality of life and spiritual well-being. The heart failure patients had significantly lower physical quality of life but more spiritual well-being than the non-heart failure patients. There were no significant differences in daily spiritual experiences, mental component of quality of life, and depressive symptoms between the two groups.Keywords: spiritual experience, spiritual well-being, heart failure, depressive symptoms, quality of life, elders

  13. Explosion Source Similarity Analysis via SVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedlin, Matthew; Ben Horin, Yochai; Margrave, Gary

    2016-04-01

    An important seismological ingredient for establishing a regional seismic nuclear discriminant is the similarity analysis of a sequence of explosion sources. To investigate source similarity, we are fortunate to have access to a sequence of 1805 three-component recordings of quarry blasts, shot from March 2002 to January 2015. The centroid of these blasts has an estimated location 36.3E and 29.9N. All blasts were detonated by JPMC (Jordan Phosphate Mines Co.) All data were recorded at the Israeli NDC, HFRI, located at 30.03N and 35.03E. Data were first winnowed based on the distribution of maximum amplitudes in the neighborhood of the P-wave arrival. The winnowed data were then detrended using the algorithm of Cleveland et al (1990). The detrended data were bandpass filtered between .1 to 12 Hz using an eighth order Butterworth filter. Finally, data were sorted based on maximum trace amplitude. Two similarity analysis approaches were used. First, for each component, the entire suite of traces was decomposed into its eigenvector representation, by employing singular-valued decomposition (SVD). The data were then reconstructed using 10 percent of the singular values, with the resulting enhancement of the S-wave and surface wave arrivals. The results of this first method are then compared to the second analysis method based on the eigenface decomposition analysis of Turk and Pentland (1991). While both methods yield similar results in enhancement of data arrivals and reduction of data redundancy, more analysis is required to calibrate the recorded data to charge size, a quantity that was not available for the current study. References Cleveland, R. B., Cleveland, W. S., McRae, J. E., and Terpenning, I., Stl: A seasonal-trend decomposition procedure based on loess, Journal of Official Statistics, 6, No. 1, 3-73, 1990. Turk, M. and Pentland, A., Eigenfaces for recognition. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 3(1), 71-86, 1991.

  14. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit JJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan J Streit,1 Yousef Shishani,1 Mark Rodgers,2 Reuben Gobezie1 1The Cleveland Shoulder Institute, 2Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, USA Background: Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Methods: Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Results: Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Conclusion: Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body. Keywords: biceps tendinitis, biceps tendinopathy, tenosynovium, anterior shoulder pain, long head biceps

  15. Proposed solar neutrino experiment using 81Br(nu,e-)81Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has now been shown that it is feasible to measure the 7Be neutrino source in the sun by using the reaction 81Br(nu,e-)81Kr in a radiochemical experiment. Such an experiment would be quite similar to the Davis, Cleveland, and Rowley method for measuring the 8B neutrino using 37Cl(nu,e-)37Ar except that the resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) method (instead of decay counting) would be employed to count the 2 x 105-yr 81Kr atoms

  16. Proposed solar neutrino experiment using 81Br(ν,e-)81Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has now been show that it is feasible to measure the 7Be neutrino source in the sun by using the reaction 81Br(ν,e-)81Kr in a radiochemical experiment. Such an experiment would be quite similar to the Davis, Cleveland, and Rowley method for measuring the 8B neutrino using 37Cl(ν,e-)37Ar except that the resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) method (instead of decay counting) would be employed to count the 2 x 105-yr 81Kr atoms

  17. Non-Equilibrium Plasma Applications for Water Purification Supporting Human Spaceflight and Terrestrial Point-of-Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.; Foster, John E.; Adamovsky, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    2016 NASA Glenn Technology Day Panel Presentation on May 24, 2016. The panel description is: Environmental Impact: NASA Glenn Water Capabilities Both global water scarcity and water treatment concerns are two of the most predominant environmental issues of our time. Glenn researchers share insights on a snow sensing technique, hyper spectral imaging of Lake Erie algal blooms, and a discussion on non-equilibrium plasma applications for water purification supporting human spaceflight and terrestrial point-of-use. The panel moderator will be Bryan Stubbs, Executive Director of the Cleveland Water Alliance.

  18. The type material of Mantodea (praying mantises deposited in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Svenson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The collection of Mantodea of the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, includes 26 holotypes, 7 allotypes, 4 lectotypes, 23 paratypes, and 1 paralectotype. Four type specimens were designated as lectotypes within this work. Highly accurate measurement data, high resolution images of specimens and labels, verbatim label data, georeferenced coordinates, original and newly assigned database codes, and bibliographic data are presented for all primary types. Label data for all paratype specimens in the collection are provide in tabular form. The location of the USNM collection has been moved to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History as a loan under the Off-site Enhancement Program.

  19. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, Volume 44, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes the issuances received in October 1996. Issuances are from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors' Decisions. 15 issuances were received and are abstracted individually in the database: Louisiana Energy Services, U.S. Enrichment Corporation, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation, James L. Shelton, Juan Guzman, Northern States Power Company, TESTCO Inc., Washington Public Power Supply System, all nuclear plants, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Duke Power Company, Florida Power Corporation, and Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (2 issuances). No issuances were received from the the Administrative Law Judges or the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking

  20. Results of the Workshop on Two-Phase Flow, Fluid Stability and Dynamics: Issues in Power, Propulsion, and Advanced Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, John; Rame, Enrique; Kassemi, Mohammad; Singh, Bhim; Motil, Brian

    2003-01-01

    The Two-phase Flow, Fluid Stability and Dynamics Workshop was held on May 15, 2003 in Cleveland, Ohio to define a coherent scientific research plan and roadmap that addresses the multiphase fluid problems associated with NASA s technology development program. The workshop participants, from academia, industry and government, prioritized various multiphase issues and generated a research plan and roadmap to resolve them. This report presents a prioritization of the various multiphase flow and fluid stability phenomena related primarily to power, propulsion, fluid and thermal management and advanced life support; and a plan to address these issues in a logical and timely fashion using analysis, ground-based and space-flight experiments.

  1. Workshop on the Thermophysical Properties of Molten Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The role of accurate thermophysical property data in the process design and modeling of solidification processes was the subject of a workshop held on 22-23 Oct. 1992 in Cleveland, Ohio. The workshop was divided into three sequential sessions dealing with (1) industrial needs and priorities for thermophysical data, (2) experimental capabilities for measuring the necessary data, and (3) theoretical capabilities for predicting the necessary data. In addition, a 2-hour panel discussion of the salient issues was featured as well as a 2-hour caucus that assessed priorities and identified action plans.

  2. Status and Evaluation of Microwave Furnace Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizcano, Maricela; Mackey, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    The microwave (MW) furnace is a HY-Tech Microwave Systems, 2 kW 2.45 GHz Single Mode Microwave Applicator operating in continuous wave (CW) with variable power. It is located in Cleveland, Ohio at NASA Glenn Research Center. Until recently, the furnace capabilities had not been fully realized due to unknown failure that subsequently damaged critical furnace components. Although the causes of the problems were unknown, an assessment of the furnace itself indicated operational failure may have been partially caused by power quality. This report summarizes the status of the MW furnace and evaluates its capabilities in materials processing.

  3. 《A Running Hero》精读

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪华英

    2005-01-01

    Jesse Owens was born in Alabama.His real name was James Cleveland Owens.The nickname“Jessecame from his initials,J.C.As a child Owens liked to run.He was quite fast.In college he was on the track team.He won many races.In one track meet,he broke three world recordsand tied a fourth.He did it all in less than one hour。But his greatest moment came after college.It was the Summer Olympic Games of 1936.The games wereheld in Germany.Adolf Hitler ruled Germany.Hitler believed Germans were the best athletes.He wan...

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the March 1996 listing of NRC issuances. Included are: (1) NRC orders granting Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company's petition for review of the ASLB order LBP-95-17, (2) NRC orders relating to the potential disqualification of two commissioners in the matter of the decommissioning of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (3) ASLB orders pertaining to the Oncology Services Corporation, (4) ASLB orders pertaining to the Radiation Oncology Center, (5) ASLB orders pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and (6) Director's decision pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station

  5. The Financial Stress Index: Identification of Systemic Risk Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Oet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a financial stress measure for the United States, the Cleveland Financial Stress Index (CFSI. The index is based on publicly available data describing a six-market partition of the financial system comprising credit, funding, real estate, securitization, foreign exchange, and equity markets. This paper improves upon existing stress measures by objectively selecting between several index weighting methodologies across a variety of monitoring frequencies through comparison against a volatility-based benchmark series. The resulting measure facilitates the decomposition of stress to identify disruptions in specific markets and provides insight into historical stress regimes.

  6. Costs of urban area retrofit to district heating and cooling systems: north-central cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, D J; Davis, A A; Marder, S M

    1978-03-01

    This study considers the major urbanized areas of six U.S. cities (Washington, D.C.; St. Louis; Cleveland; Milwaukee; Detroit; Chicago) to arrive at reasonably accurate estimates of costs required to retrofit them with district heating and cooling systems. Only costs associated with heating and hot water are addressed here. Demand estimates and energy-supply analyses are made, and component capital costs are estimated to arrive at annualized system costs. Finally, a comparison of alternative energy-delivery options is made, and estimates of scarce-fuel savings are derived. 39 refs., 12 figs., 14 tables.

  7. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of Oklahoma Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Oklahoma for a renewal of Operating License R-53 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Oklahoma and is located on the campus in Norman, Cleveland County, Oklahoma. The staff concludes that the Aerojet General Nucleonics (AGN) reactor facility can continue to be operated by University of Oklahoma without endangering the health and safety of the public

  8. Perspectives of public spaces in Irkutsk. Visions, Alliances, Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Engel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Open spaces are ‘backbones’ of the city, important places of communication and identification of the urban society. In an era of increasing privatization and commercialization of urban spaces the design of public spaces remains as one of the most important responsibilities for the municipality. The article discusses possibilities for improving public spaces in Irkutsk. Three conceptional approaches – 1: Network of public spaces, 2: Integration of different interests, 3: Encouraging special features and spatial identity – by presenting international best practices (e.g. from Dresden, Cleveland, Oulu are recommended as approach for sustainable city development.

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, Volume 44, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received in October 1996. Issuances are from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors` Decisions. 15 issuances were received and are abstracted individually in the database: Louisiana Energy Services, U.S. Enrichment Corporation, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation, James L. Shelton, Juan Guzman, Northern States Power Company, TESTCO Inc., Washington Public Power Supply System, all nuclear plants, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Duke Power Company, Florida Power Corporation, and Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (2 issuances). No issuances were received from the the Administrative Law Judges or the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

  10. Large Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresher, R. W. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The proceedings of a workshop held in Cleveland, July 28-30, 1981 are described. The workshop emphasized recent experience in building and testing large propeller-type wind turbines, expanding upon the proceedings of three previous DOE/NASA workshops at which design and analysis topics were considered. A total of 41 papers were presented on the following subjects: current and advanced large wind turbine systems, rotor blade design and manufacture, electric utility activities, research and supporting technology, meteorological characteristics for design and operation, and wind resources assessments for siting.

  11. Retail health care: gaining advantage by dropping below the radar screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    There are many examples throughout the country of providers that are getting into retail medicine themselves, and of companies that are helping providers do this. Carolinas Healthcare System, e-Cleveland Clinic and the aforementioned partners of Health Ventures are examples. Orlikoff believes that retail medicine is a key piece in building an infrastructure that is relevant to the future for healthcare providers, and as he often says, "The riches are in the niches." "It's an exciting time for providers," Firestone says, "but they've got to risk doing things very differently, driven by their patients, the consumer." PMID:12412574

  12. General aviation internal combustion engine research programs at NASA-Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An update is presented of non-turbine general aviation engine programs underway at the NASA-Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The program encompasses conventional, lightweight diesel and rotary engines. Its three major thrusts are: (a) reduced SFC's; (b) improved fuels tolerance; and (c) reducing emissions. Current and planned future programs in such areas as lean operation, improved fuel management, advanced cooling techniques and advanced engine concepts, are described. These are expected to lay the technology base, by the mid to late 1980's, for engines whose life cycle fuel costs are 30 to 50% lower than today's conventional engines.

  13. Engaging doctors in the health care revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas H; Cosgrove, Toby

    2014-06-01

    A health care revolution is under way, and doctors must be part of it. But many are deeply anxious and angry about the transformation, fearing loss of autonomy, respect, and income. Given their resistance, how can health system Leaders engage them in redesigning care? In this article, Dr. Thomas H. Lee, Press Ganey's chief medical officer, and Dr. Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, describe a framework they've developed for encouraging buy-in. Adapting Max Weber's "typology of motives," and applying behavioral economics and other motivational principles, they describe four tactics leadership must apply in concert: engaging doctors in a noble shared purpose; addressing their economic self-interest; leveraging their desire for respect; and appealing to their sense of tradition. Drawing from experiences at the Mayo Clinic, Geisinger Health System, Partners HealthCare, the Cleveland Clinic, Ascension Health, and others, the authors show how the four motivational levers work together to bring this critical group of stakeholders on board. PMID:25051859

  14. Update on quetiapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder: results from the BOLDER studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Gajwani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prashant Gajwani1, David J Muzina2, David E Kemp3, Keming Gao1, Joseph R Calabrese11Case Western Reserve University (CWRU School of Medicine, 2Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of CWRU, 3Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: The essential features of bipolar affective disorder involve the cyclical occurrence of high (manic or hypomanic episodes and low mood states. Depressive episodes in both bipolar I and II disorder are more numerous and last for longer duration than either manic or hypomanic episodes. In addition depressive episodes are associated with higher morbidity and mortality. While multiple agents, including all 5 atypical antipsychotics, have demonstrated efficacy and earned US FDA indication for manic phase of bipolar illness, the acute treatment of bipolar depression is less well-studied. The first treatment approved by the US FDA for acute bipolar depression was the combination of the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine and the antidepressant fluoxetine. Recently, quetiapine monotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of depressive episodes associated with both bipolar I and II disorder and has earned US FDA indication for the same.Keywords: bipolar disorder, quetiapine, BOLDER studies

  15. Clinical and pharmacologic aspects of blinatumomab in the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portell CA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Craig A Portell, Candice M Wenzell, Anjali S Advani Leukemia Program, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adults remains a challenging disease to treat, and novel therapies are needed. Precursor-B ALL comprises 80% of cases, and the CD19 antigen is expressed in nearly all precursor-B ALL patients. Bispecific T-cell-engaging antibodies are novel bioengineered proteins. The bispecific T-cell-engaging antibody blinatumomab engages polyclonal T cells to CD19-expressing B cells. By binding to both CD3 and CD19, blinatumomab physically brings these T cells in close proximity to malignant B cells and potentiates T-cell-induced cytotoxic cell kill. Blinatumomab requires continuous intravenous infusion due to its short half-life, the need for continuous exposure for the drug to exert sufficient efficacy, and lessened toxicity. A phase II trial of B-cell ALL patients with persistent or relapsed minimal residual disease demonstrated an 80% rate of complete molecular remission. Cytokine-release syndrome and central nervous system events, such as seizures and encephalopathy, are reversible toxicities. Promising results in B-cell ALL with minimal residual disease have led to further evaluation of this drug in newly diagnosed and relapsed B-cell ALL. Keywords: blinatumomab, B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, CD19, BiTE antibodies

  16. Is the radiographic appearance of the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint representative of its true anatomical structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanicola, Shawn M; Arnold, Thomas B; Osher, Lawrence

    2002-10-01

    The medial cuneiforms and first metatarsals were identified in 515 randomly selected specimens at the Hamman-Todd osteology collection in the Cleveland Museum of Natural History in Cleveland, Ohio, and the transverse plane angulation of the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint was determined by direct measurement of the selected bones. Medial cuneiforms were subsequently separated into three categories corresponding to the amount of measured obliquity. The first tarsometatarsal joint was reassembled, and the paired medial cuneiforms and first metatarsals were radiographed at different declination angles in inverted, everted, and rectus positions. Radiographic evaluation revealed discordance between the appearance of atavism and true atavism in the cuneiform. Specifically, it was determined that the position of the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint significantly influenced the appearance of atavism in the cuneiform. It is concluded that the position of the first ray in an anteroposterior radiograph can produce the appearance of an increased obliquity angle of the medial cuneiform, resulting in an inaccurate representation of the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint. (J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 92(9): 491-498, 2002) PMID:12381798

  17. Lightweight Aggregate Made from Dredged Material in Green Roof Construction for Stormwater Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available More than 1.15 million cubic meters (1.5 million cubic yards of sediment require annual removal from harbors and ports along Ohio’s Lake Erie coast. Disposing of these materials into landfills depletes land resources, while open water placement of these materials deteriorates water quality. There are more than 14,000 acres of revitalizing brownfields in Cleveland, U.S., many containing up to 90% impervious surface, which does not allow “infiltration” based stormwater practices required by contemporary site-based stormwater regulation. This study investigates the potential of sintering the dredged material from the Harbor of Cleveland in Lake Erie to produce lightweight aggregate (LWA, and apply the LWA to green roof construction. Chemical and thermal analyses revealed the sintered material can serve for LWA production when preheated at 550 °C and sintered at a higher temperature. Through dewatering, drying, sieving, pellet making, preheating, and sintering with varying temperatures (900–1100 °C, LWAs with porous microstructures are produced with specific gravities ranging from 1.46 to 1.74, and water absorption capacities ranging from 11% to 23%. The water absorption capacity of the aggregate decreases as sintering temperature increases. The LWA was incorporated into the growing media of a green roof plot, which has higher water retention capacity than the conventional green roof system.

  18. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feza Y Karakayali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. Materials and Methods: In 10 patients treated with TAMIS for benign and malignant rectal tumors, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function was evaluated with anorectal manometry and Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. Results: The mean distance of the tumors from the anal verge was 5.6 cm, and mean tumor diameter was 2.6 cm. All resection margins were tumor free. There was no difference in preoperative and 3-week postoperative anorectalmanometry findings; only mean minimum rectal sensory volume was lower at 3 weeks after surgery. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all patients except one which resolved by 6 weeks after surgery.The mean postoperative follow-up was 28 weeks without any recurrences. Conclusion: Transanal minimally invasive surgery is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of rectal tumors and can be performed without impairing anorectal functions.

  19. Lung transplantation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: patient selection and special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane CR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available C Randall Lane, Adriano R Tonelli Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Lung transplantation is one of the few treatments available for end-stage COPD with the potential to improve survival and quality of life. The selection of candidates and timing of listing present challenges, as COPD tends to progress fairly slowly, and survival after lung transplantation remains limited. Though the natural course of COPD is difficult to predict, the use of assessments of functional status and multivariable indices such as the BODE index can help identify which patients with COPD are at increased risk for mortality, and hence which are more likely to benefit from lung transplantation. Patients with COPD can undergo either single or bilateral lung transplantation. Although many studies suggest better long-term survival with bilateral lung transplant, especially in younger patients, this continues to be debated, and definitive recommendations about this cannot be made. Patients may be more susceptible to particular complications of transplant for COPD, including native lung hyperinflation, and development of lung cancer. Keywords: emphysema, pulmonary hypertension, mortality, prognosis, outcomes, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

  20. La “nueva” Doctrina Monroe de 1895 y sus implicaciones para el Caribe español: algunas interpretaciones coetáneas españolas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton, Sylvia L.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Not available.

    El análisis de una selección de periódicos españoles de diversas ideologías políticas demuestra que la mayoría de los comentaristas relacionaban la política de Cleveland en la disputa anglo-venezolana en 1895 con la de McKinley en la crisis colonial española de 1895-1898, interpretando ambas intervenciones como una función de la Doctrina Monroe. Sin embargo, al contrario que el presidente Cleveland, McKinley no apeló a esta Doctrina como justificación de su política exterior iberoamericana o de su actitud ante la guerra hispano- cubana, por lo que se interpreta que las referencias a ella en el discurso periodístico peninsular de estos años obedecen a móviles más relacionados con los resortes y objetivos de la propia retórica periodística, dentro del contexto de la política española, tanto doméstica y colonial como internacional. Esto explica las contradicciones y diferencias interpretativas en torno a la Doctrina Monroe que se reflejan en la prensa española.

  1. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wotman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Wotman1, Catherine A Demko1, Kristin Victoroff1, Joseph J Sudano2, James A Lalumandier11Department of Community Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Center of Health Care Research and Policy, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction.Keywords: dental practice, dental practice core activities, direct observation of dental practice, Dental Davis Observation Code, dentist, hygienist patient behaviors

  2. Critical appraisal of laropiprant and extended-release niacin combination in the management of mixed dyslipidemias and primary hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A Hussein

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ayman A Hussein, Stephen J NichollsCardiovascular Medicine Department, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Niacin is a B-complex vitamin which has been used for decades for the management of mixed dyslipidemias and primary hypercholesterolemia. It decreases the risk of cardiovascular events either when used as a monotherapy or in combination with other lipid lowering medications. However, a major limitation to its use is niacin-induced flushing occurring even with the extended-release formulations. Laropiprant, a selective prostaglandin-2 receptor inhibitor, specifically targets the cascade of events causing the flushing. It has been recently used in combination with extended-release niacin. This article will review the early experience with this combination with focus on efficacy, safety, tolerability and current place in therapy. Early data are promising and suggest that more patients in clinical practice will benefit from niacin combined with laropiprant. Ongoing clinical trials will provide a better insight on the long-term safety of the drug and its efficacy for reducing cardiovascular events.Keywords: niacin, laropiprant, dyslipidemias, hypercholesterolemia

  3. Assessment and monitoring of patients receiving chemotherapy for multiple myeloma: strategies to improve outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiman B

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Beth Faiman, Jason Valent Department of Hematologic Oncology and Blood Disorders, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Improved understanding as to the biology of multiple myeloma (MM and the bone marrow microenvironment has led to the development of new drugs to treat MM. This explosion of new and highly effective drugs has led to dramatic advances in the management of MM and underscores the need for supportive care. Impressive and deep response rates to chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies, and small molecule drugs provide hope of a cure or prolonged remission for the majority of individuals. For most patients, long-term, continuous therapy is often required to suppress the malignant plasma cell clone, thus requiring clinicians to become more astute in assessment, monitoring, and intervention of side effects as well as monitoring response to therapy. Appropriate diagnosis and monitoring strategies are essential to ensure that patients receive the appropriate chemotherapy and supportive therapy at relapse, and that side effects are appropriately managed to allow for continued therapy and adherence to the regimen. Multiple drugs with complex regimens are currently available with varying side effect profiles. Knowledge of the drugs used to treat MM and the common adverse events will allow for preventative strategies to mitigate adverse events and prompt intervention. The purpose of this paper is to review updates in the diagnosis and management of MM, and to provide strategies for assessment and monitoring of patients receiving chemotherapy for MM. Keywords: multiple myeloma, treatment, symptoms, assessment, monitoring, symptom management, targeted therapies

  4. Metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney: therapeutic role of bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M Bukowski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ronald M BukowskiCleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, CCF Lerner College of Medicine of CWRU Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: The biology and pathogenesis of clear cell carcinoma of the kidney has been extensively investgated, and the role of von Hipple-Landau gene inactivation and tumor associated angiogenesis is now recognized. Development of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and phase 3 clinical trials utilizing this class of agents has produced a new treatment paradigm for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC. One of the active regimens identified is the combination of bevacizumab and interferon-α. Recently published reports provided evidence of the clinical and biologic activity of this therapy. The current manuscript reviews the background and rationale for the activity of bevacizumab in RCC, and results from recent clinical trials with this agent alone or in combination with targeted agents or cytokines. The role of this therapy in contrast to other targeted agents is reviewed, and the potential utility as well as questions raised by recent studies are discussed.Keywords: metastatic renal cell carcinoma, bevacizumab, interferon-α

  5. Healing leadership: the serving leader's impact on patient outcomes in a clinical environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andenoro A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Chris Nagel1, Anthony C Andenoro21Medical Operations – Continuous Improvement, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; 2Department of Organizational Leadership, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA, USAAbstract: The future of health care is a topic that has significant importance to patients and caregivers alike for generations to come. As the health care industry becomes more complex, leadership and the examination of how to most effectively apply it to meet efficiency standards and optimize the patient experience will become paramount. Through this paper the authors provide the foundation for meeting this need through an innovative and socially adept framework that identifies the critical character attributes of a serving leader and the powerful impact that serving leaders can have on patient outcomes in the health care setting. This framework is grounded in a leadership theoretical foundation and contextually examined through qualitative methods. As the business of health care becomes more complex and more competitive, finding ways to improve processes and create healing environments conducive to improved patient outcomes will differentiate average health care and excellent health care in the future. This paper provides the impetus for successfully addressing these needs through the development of serving leaders, and three specific characteristics: emotional care, presence, and awareness.Keywords: servant leadership, health care, patient outcomes

  6. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-Plow, Yanqing GongDepartments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Joseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1 improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2 identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3 development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress.Keywords: mobilization, expansion, homing, survival, engraftment

  7. Radioimmunoguided imaging of prostate cancer foci with histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have previously presented a technique that fuses ProstaScint and pelvic CT images for the purpose of designing brachytherapy that targets areas at high risk for treatment failure. We now correlate areas of increased intensity seen on ProstaScint-CT fusion images to biopsy results in a series of 7 patients to evaluate the accuracy of this technique in localizing intraprostatic disease. Methods and Materials: The 7 patients included in this study were evaluated between June 1998 and March 29, 1999 at Metrohealth Medical Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland in Cleveland, Ohio. ProstaScint and CT scans of each patient were obtained before transperineal biopsy and seed implantation. Each patient's prostate gland was biopsied at 12 separate sites determined independently of Prostascint-CT scan results. Results: When correlated with biopsy results, our method yielded an overall accuracy of 80%: with a sensitivity of 79%, a specificity of 80%, a positive predictive value of 68%, and a negative predictive value of 88%. Conclusion: The image fusion of the pelvic CT scan and ProstaScint scan helped identify foci of adenocarcinoma within the prostate that correlated well with biopsy results. These data may be useful to escalate doses in regions containing tumor by either high-dose rate or low-dose rate brachytherapy, as well as by external beam techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

  8. Biologics in the management of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Bahner

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer D Bahner1, Lauren Y Cao2, Neil J Korman11Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease for which there exist topical, ultraviolet, systemic, and biologic treatments. Biologic agents selectively interfere with the immune mechanisms responsible for psoriasis. Etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab target tumor necrosis factor-alpha and have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Alefacept and efalizumab target T lymphocytes, are effective in the treatment of psoriasis, but are not approved for psoriatic arthritis. Finally, ustekinumab and ABT-874 target interleukin-12 and interleukin-23, and they have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of psoriasis. The objective of this review is to present efficacy and safety data from randomized controlled trials of the biologic agents in the treatment of psoriasis.Keywords: biologics, psoriasis, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-12/23

  9. Historical and Critical Review on Biophysical Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigüzel, Yekbun

    2016-07-01

    Biophysical economics is initiated with the long history of the relation of economics with ecological basis and biophysical perspectives of the physiocrats. It inherently has social, economic, biological, environmental, natural, physical, and scientific grounds. Biological entities in economy like the resources, consumers, populations, and parts of production systems, etc. could all be dealt by biophysical economics. Considering this wide scope, current work is a “biophysical economics at a glance” rather than a comprehensive review of the full range of topics that may just be adequately covered in a book-length work. However, the sense of its wide range of applications is aimed to be provided to the reader in this work. Here, modern approaches and biophysical growth theory are presented after the long history and an overview of the concepts in biophysical economics. Examples of the recent studies are provided at the end with discussions. This review is also related to the work by Cleveland, “Biophysical Economics: From Physiocracy to Ecological Economics and Industrial Ecology” [C. J. Cleveland, in Advances in Bioeconomics and Sustainability: Essay in Honor of Nicholas Gerogescu-Roegen, eds. J. Gowdy and K. Mayumi (Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, England, 1999), pp. 125-154.]. Relevant parts include critics and comments on the presented concepts in a parallelized fashion with the Cleveland’s work.

  10. Transitions of care in anticoagulated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michota F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Franklin Michota Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Anticoagulation is an effective therapeutic means of reducing thrombotic risk in patients with various conditions, including atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves, and major surgery. By its nature, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding; this risk is particularly high during transitions of care. Established anticoagulants are not ideal, due to requirements for parenteral administration, narrow therapeutic indices, and/or a need for frequent therapeutic monitoring. The development of effective oral anticoagulants that are administered as a fixed dose, have low potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions, do not require regular anticoagulation monitoring, and are suitable for both inpatient and outpatient use is to be welcomed. Three new oral anticoagulants, the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have been approved in the US for reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation; rivaroxaban is also approved for prophylaxis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis, which may lead to pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery. This review examines current options for anticoagulant therapy, with a focus on maintaining efficacy and safety during transitions of care. The characteristics of dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are discussed in the context of traditional anticoagulant therapy. Keywords: hemorrhagic events, oral anticoagulation, parenteral anticoagulation, stroke, transitions of care

  11. Visualization of Air Particle Dynamics in an Engine Inertial Particle Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jason; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are regularly deployed around the world in support of military, civilian and humanitarian efforts. Due to their unique mission profiles, these advanced UAVs utilize various internal combustion engines, which consume large quantities of air. Operating these UAVs in areas with high concentrations of sand and dust can be hazardous to the engines, especially during takeoff and landing. In such events, engine intake filters quickly become saturated and clogged with dust particles, causing a substantial decrease in the UAVs' engine performance and service life. Development of an Engine Air Particle Separator (EAPS) with high particle separation efficiency is necessary for maintaining satisfactory performance of the UAVs. Inertial Particle Separators (IPS) have been one common effective method but they experience complex internal particle-laden flows that are challenging to understand and model. This research employs an IPS test rig to simulate dust particle separation under different flow conditions. Soda lime glass spheres with a mean diameter of 35-45 microns are used in experiments as a surrogate for airborne particulates encountered during flight. We will present measurements of turbulent flow and particle dynamics using flow visualization techniques to understand the multiphase fluid dynamics in the IPS device. This knowledge can contribute to design better performing IPS systems for UAVs. Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio, 44115.

  12. Potential role of gabapentin and extended- release gabapentin in the management of menopausal hot flashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Manisha Yadav, Judith Volkar Center for Specialized Women’s Health, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA Abstract: About 80% of postmenopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flashes and night sweats – symptoms that are associated with sleep disruption and can lead to fatigue and mood changes. Moreover, hot flashes can be embarrassing for women, causing difficulties at work and in their social lives. Many therapies have been advocated for relief of vasomotor symptoms, but only hormone therapy has been US Food and Drug Administration approved. However, after the Women's Health Initiative Study suggested that there was a correlation between hormone therapy and increased risk for breast cancer and cardiovascular events, many women stopped taking hormone therapy, and many do not want to initiate it. Hormone therapy is also contraindicated in certain women, such as those with a history of hormone-stimulated cancer like breast and uterine cancer. Gabapentin (Neurontin has shown efficacy in relieving vasomotor symptoms and is used as off-label for this indication. A new extended-release formulation of gabapentin has also shown efficacy in treating hot flashes and improving sleep quality with possibly fewer side effects than regular gabapentin. Keywords: Hot flushes, vasomotor symptoms, postmenopausal, hormone-sensitive cancer, non-hormonal therapy, gastric-retentive, Breeze

  13. CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; and (4) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Consolidation of the team of stakeholders; Move the site for the commercial demonstration to LTV Steel, Cleveland, Ohio; Permitting for new site; Site specific engineering; Cost update of the project as it relates to the Cleveland location; FETC update; DCAA audit; and Updated endorsement of Calderon process by Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA, Region 5

  14. Future of radiation therapy for malignant melanoma in an era of newer, more effective biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan MK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad K Khan1, Niloufer Khan2, Alex Almasan1,2, Roger Macklis11Taussig Cancer Institute, Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: The incidence of melanoma is rising. The primary initial treatment for melanoma continues to be wide local excision of the primary tumor and affected lymph nodes. Exceptions to wide local excision include cases where surgical excision may be cosmetically disfiguring or associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The role of definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy has largely been relegated to palliative measures because melanoma has been viewed as a prototypical radiotherapy-resistant cancer. However, the emerging clinical and radiobiological data summarized here suggests that many types of effective radiation therapy, such as radiosurgery for melanoma brain metastases, plaque brachytherapy for uveal melanoma, intensity modulated radiotherapy for melanoma of the head and neck, and adjuvant radiotherapy for selected high-risk, node-positive patients can improve outcomes. Similarly, although certain chemotherapeutic agents and biologics have shown limited responses, long-term control for unresectable tumors or disseminated metastatic disease has been rather disappointing. Recently, several powerful new biologics and treatment combinations have yielded new hope for this patient group. The recent identification of several clinically linked melanoma gene mutations involved in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway such as BRAF, NRAS, and cKIT has breathed new life into the drive to develop more effective therapies. Some of these new therapeutic approaches relate to DNA damage repair inhibitors, cellular immune system activation, and pharmacological cell cycle checkpoint manipulation. Others relate to the investigation of more effective targeting and dosing schedules for underutilized therapeutics, such as

  15. Sulfur dioxide emissions from Alaskan volcanoes quantified using an ultraviolet SO_{2} camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Werner, Cynthia; Kelly, Peter; Brewer, Ian; Ketner, Dane; Paskievitch, John; Power, John

    2016-04-01

    Alaskan volcanoes are difficult targets for direct gas measurements as they are extremely remote and their peaks are mostly covered in ice and snow throughout the year. This makes access extremely difficult. In 2015, we were able to make use of an ultraviolet SO2 camera to quantify the SO2 emissions from Augustine Volcano, Redoubt Volcano, Mount Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcano in the Aleutian Arc. An airborne gas survey performed at Augustine Volcano in April 2015 found that the SO2 emission rate from the summit area was below 10 tonnes per day (t/d). SO2 camera measurements were performed two months later (June 2015) from a snow-free area just 100 meters from the fumarole on the south side of Augustine's summit dome to maximize camera sensitivity. Though the visible appearance of the plume emanating from the fumarole was opaque, the SO2 emissions were only slightly above the 40 ppmṡm detection limit of the SO2 camera. Still, SO2 could be detected and compared to coincident MultiGAS measurements of SO2, CO2 and H2S. At Redoubt Volcano, SO2 camera measurements were conducted on 13 June 2015 from a location 2 km to the north of the final 72x106 m3 dome extruded during the 2009 eruption. Imagery was collected of the plume visibly emanating from the top of the dome. Preliminary evaluation of the imagery and comparison with a coincident, helicopter-based DOAS survey showed that SO2 emission rates had dropped below 100 t/d (down from 180 t/d measured in April 2014). Mount Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcano were visited in August 2015 as part of an NSF-funded ship-based research expedition in the Central Aleutian Arc. At Mount Cleveland, inclement weather prohibited the collection of a lengthy time-series of SO2 camera imagery, but the limited data that was collected shows an emission rate of several hundred t/d. At Shishaldin, several hours of continuous imagery was acquired from a location 5 km east of the summit vent. The time series shows an SO2 emission rate of

  16. Encyclopedia of Energy. Six-Volume Set, 1-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, C. [Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Boston University, Boston (United States); Ayres, R. [INSEAD, Fontainebleau (France); Costanza, R. [University of Vermont, Vermont (United States); Goldemberg, J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ilic, M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Carnegie (United States); Jochem, E. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, R. [Boston University, Boston (United States); Lovins, A. [Rocky Mountain Institute, Colorado (United States); Munasinghe, M. [Munasinghe Institute of Development, Colombo (Sri Lanka); Pachauri, R. [Tata Energy Research Institute, New Delhi (India); Pardo, C. [Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan (Mexico); Peterson, P. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Schipper, L. [World Resources Institute, Washington, DC (United States); Slade, M. [Warwick University, Coventry (United Kingdom); Smil, V. [University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada); Worrell, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)] (eds.)

    2004-03-01

    An invaluable resource for all academics, researchers and students either working in or conducting research in the energy and related environmental fields. In recent years, our usage and understanding of different types of energy has grown at a tremendous rate. The editor-in-chief, Cutler Cleveland and his international team of associate editors have brought together approximately 400 authors, to produce the Encyclopedia of Energy. This highly topical reference draws together all aspects of energy, covering a wealth of areas throughout the natural, social and engineering sciences. The Encyclopedia of Energy will provide easily accessible information about all aspects of energy, with articles written by leading international authorities. It will not only be indispensable for students and researchers, but also for policy makers, energy and environmental consultants, and all those working in business corporations and non-governmental organisations whose activities relate to energy and the environment.

  17. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  18. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  19. Compilation and Analysis of 20- and 30-GHz Rain Fade Events at the ACTS NASA Ground Station: Statistics and Model Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    Since the beginning of the operational phase of the NASA Research Center's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS), signal-fade measurements have been recorded at the NASA Ground Station located in Cleveland, Ohio, with the use of the 20- and 30-GHz beacon signals. Compilations of the daily data have been statistically analyzed on a monthly and yearly basis. Such analyses have yielded relevant parameters as (1) cumulative monthly and yearly probability distributions of signal attenuation by rain, (2) attenuation duration versus attenuation threshold probabilities, and (3) rate-of-fade probabilities. Not only are such data needed for a realistic data base to support the design and performance analysis of future satellite systems, but they are necessary to assess predictions made with the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model.

  20. CFD Modeling of Free-Piston Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Gedeon, David; Simon, Terrence W.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is funding Cleveland State University (CSU) to develop a reliable Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code that can predict engine performance with the goal of significant improvements in accuracy when compared to one-dimensional (1-D) design code predictions. The funding also includes conducting code validation experiments at both the University of Minnesota (UMN) and CSU. In this paper a brief description of the work-in-progress is provided in the two areas (CFD and Experiments). Also, previous test results are compared with computational data obtained using (1) a 2-D CFD code obtained from Dr. Georg Scheuerer and further developed at CSU and (2) a multidimensional commercial code CFD-ACE+. The test data and computational results are for (1) a gas spring and (2) a single piston/cylinder with attached annular heat exchanger. The comparisons among the codes are discussed. The paper also discusses plans for conducting code validation experiments at CSU and UMN.

  1. 肠造口治疗的全球化发展概况%Enterostomal therapy nursing world wide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia Blackley

    2003-01-01

    @@ 造口治疗(enterostomal therapy, ET)是基于患者、家属、专业医护人员以及社会大众对健康护理的不断需求而发展起来的.1958年美国医生 Turnbull和他的一个回肠造口患者 Norma N. Gill在克里夫兰医学中心(Cleveland Clinic)开始了造口治疗护理的临床实践,并于1961年在该中心设立了正式的造口治疗教育项目,使其成为一门专业的医学护理学科,这是现代造口治疗护理的起源.

  2. The Evaluation and Implementation of a Water Containment System to Support Aerospace Flywheel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trase, Larry M.

    2002-01-01

    High-energy flywheel systems for aerospace power storage and attitude control applications are being developed because of the potential for increasing the energy density and reducing operational costs. A significant challenge facing the development of the test hardware is containment of the rotating elements in the event of a failure during the development and qualification stages of testing. This containment is critical in order to ensure the safety of the test personnel and the facility. A containment system utilizing water as the containment media is presented. Water containment was found to be a low cost, flexible, and highly effective containment system. Ballistic test results and analytical results are discussed along with a description of a flywheel test facility that was designed and built utilizing the water containment system at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio.

  3. Heaven on Earth: Swedenborgian Correspondences in the Plan of Chicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Schaffer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Hudson Burnham, the Chicago architect and city planner, is recognized for his work on the development of American tall office building; for the construction of World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893; and for his city plans for Washington, D.C., Cleveland, San Francisco, and Chicago. He is also remembered for the quote “Make no little plans.” What is not recalled is his Swedenborgian faith nor how it influenced his work. Emanuel Swedenborg was a Swedish scientist and engineer who, beginning in the mid 1730s, underwent a spiritual awakening. The focus of his work changed to the mystical aspects of human experience. He believed that all Christian churches were dead and in need of revitalization and the key to revitalization was to be found in a new interpretation of scripture. His followers founded the Church of the New Jerusalem, sometimes referred to as the New Church or the Swedenborgian Church.

  4. Enhancing the US Power Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Alexander

    2010-05-31

    The primary motivation for this set of research activities was to develop a foundation in several aspects of power in order to position Cleveland State University to lead a multiuniversity effort to secure funding for enhanced power system projects and to be able to eventually secure a NASA Space Power Systems Center status through the competitive bidding process. This was accomplished by focusing on these major project areas, (1) the design of the next generation nuclear-electric power generation system, (2) the design of a distributed, fault-tolerant, and modular power system, and (3) the development of the dynamics and control of active magnetic bearings for flywheel energy storage without using conventional sensors.

  5. Large File Transfers from Space Using Multiple Ground Terminals and Delay-Tolerant Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Paulsen, Phillip; Stewart, Dave; Eddy, Wesley; McKim, James; Taylor, John; Lynch, Scott; Heberle, Jay; Northam, James; Jackson, Chris; Wood, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    We use Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) to break control loops between space-ground communication links and ground-ground communication links to increase overall file delivery efficiency, as well as to enable large files to be proactively fragmented and received across multiple ground stations. DTN proactive fragmentation and reactive fragmentation were demonstrated from the UK-DMC satellite using two independent ground stations. The files were reassembled at a bundle agent, located at Glenn Research Center in Cleveland Ohio. The first space-based demonstration of this occurred on September 30 and October 1, 2009. This paper details those experiments. Communication, delay-tolerant networking, DTN, satellite, Internet, protocols, bundle, IP, TCP.

  6. Cancer Stem Cells: Targeting the Roots of Cancer, Seeds of Metastasis, and Sources of Therapy Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno-Cruz, Valery; Kibria, Golam; Liu, Xia; Doherty, Mary; Junk, Damian J.; Guan, Dongyin; Hubert, Chris; Venere, Monica; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Alvarado, Alvaro; Caplan, Arnold I.; Rich, Jeremy; Gerson, Stanton L.; Lathia, Justin; Liu, Huiping

    2015-01-01

    With the goal to remove the roots of cancer, eliminate metastatic seeds, and overcome therapy resistance, the 2014 inaugural International Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) Conference at Cleveland, OH, convened together over 320 investigators, including 55 invited world-class speakers, 25 short oral presenters, and 100 poster presenters, to gain an in-depth understanding of CSCs and explore therapeutic opportunities targeting CSCs. The meeting enabled intriguing discussions on several topics including: genetics and epigenetics; cancer origin and evolution; microenvironment and exosomes; metabolism and inflammation; metastasis and therapy resistance; single cell and heterogeneity; plasticity and reprogramming; as well as other new concepts. Reports of clinical trials targeting CSCs emphasized the urgent need for strategically designing combinational CSC-targeting therapies against cancer. PMID:25604264

  7. Thermal Analysis of Cryogenic Hydrogen Liquid Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congiardo, Jared F.; Fortier, Craig R. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    During launch for the new Space Launch System (SLS) liquid hydrogen is bleed through the engines during replenish, pre-press, and extended pre-press to condition the engines prior to launch. The predicted bleed flow rates are larger than for the shuttle program. A consequence of the increased flow rates is having liquif hydrogen in the vent system, which the facilities was never designed to handle. To remedy the problem a liquid separator is being designed in the system to accumulated the liquid propellant and protect the facility flare stack (which can only handle gas). The attached document is a presentation of the current thermalfluid analysis performed for the separator and will be presented at the Thermal and Fluid Analysis Workshop (NASA workshop) next week in Cleveland, Ohio.

  8. Forensic Evidence in Homicide Investigations and Prosecutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Tom; Regoeczi, Wendy

    2015-09-01

    Even though forensic evidence is collected at virtually every homicide scene, only a few studies have examined its role in investigation and prosecution. This article adds to the literature by providing the results of a study of 294 homicide cases (315 victims) occurring in Cleveland, Ohio, between 2008 and 2011. Through a logistic regression on open versus closed cases, the collection of knives, administration of gunshot residue (GSR) kits, and clothing at the scene were positively and significantly related to case closures, while collection of ballistics evidence and DNA evidence were statistically significant in the opposite direction. With regard to analysis, the clearance rate for cases with probative results (i.e., matches or exclusions) was 63.1% compared to a closure rate of 56.3% for cases without probative results. However, only 23 cases had probative results prior to arrest compared to 128 cases with probative results after arrest.

  9. Implementation of a virtual link between power system testbeds at Marshall Spaceflight Center and Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreswamy, Rajiv

    1990-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) owns and operates a space station module power management and distribution (SSM-PMAD) testbed. This system, managed by expert systems, is used to analyze and develop power system automation techniques for Space Station Freedom. The Lewis Research Center (LeRC), Cleveland, Ohio, has developed and implemented a space station electrical power system (EPS) testbed. This system and its power management controller are representative of the overall Space Station Freedom power system. A virtual link is being implemented between the testbeds at MSFC and LeRC. This link would enable configuration of SSM-PMAD as a load center for the EPS testbed at LeRC. This connection will add to the versatility of both systems, and provide an environment of enhanced realism for operation of both testbeds.

  10. LANDSAT monitoring of Lake Erie for phycocyanin content in cyanobacteria blooms from 06/2006-10/2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Robert

    An algorithm for mapping phycocyanin content (PC) in lake water from LANDSAT TM satellite data was derived in the past from Western Lake Erie data for July 1, 2000, and found to be robust when applied to a withheld LANDSAT TM and in situ water data set for September 27, 2000 (Vincent et al, 2004). This same algorithm was applied to LANDSAT 5 data of Path 20 Row 31 (Toledo Frame) and Path 19 Row 31 (Cleveland Frame) in Western Lake Erie on overpass dates with less than 30 This work was funded by NOAA Contract Award NA06OAR4600197. Reference Vincent, R.K., X. Qin, R. M. L. McKay, J.Miner, K. Czajkowski, J. Savino, and T. Bridgeman, Phycocyanin Detection from LANDSAT TM Data for Mapping Cyanobacterial Blooms in Lake Erie, Remote Sensing of Environment, Vol. 89, No. 3, pp 381-392, 2004.

  11. Visualizing and evaluating the growth of multi-institutional collaboration based on research network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jake; Pelfrey, Clara; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Research collaboration plays an important role in scientific productivity and academic innovation. Multi-institutional collaboration has become a vital approach for integrating multidisciplinary resources and expertise to enhance biomedical research. There is an increasing need for analyzing the effect of multi-institutional research collaboration. In this paper, we present a collaboration analysis pipeline based on research networks constructed from publication co-authorship relationship. Such research networks can be effectively used to render and analyze large-scale institutional collaboration. The co-authorship networks of the Cleveland Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative (CTSC) were visualized and analyzed. SciVal Expert™ was used to extract publication data of the CTSC members. The network was presented in informative and aesthetically appealing diagrams using the open source visualization package Gephi. The analytic result demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, and it also indicates the substantial growth of research collaboration among the CTSC members crossing its partner institutions.

  12. 拉丁语对古英语词汇的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白伟峰

    2012-01-01

      According to the 19th century histories of the English language, Latin influences upon early English vocabulary are considered to be classified into two periods, including continental borrowing and the Christianizing of Britain. From the points of views of Earl R. Anderson, a professor of Cleveland State University, words borrowed from Latin into Continental Germanic before the fifth century A.D. mostly belong to the semantic fields of commerce and military activity; words borrowed during the seventh century, when the Anglo-Saxons gradually adopted Christianity, mostly belong to the semantic fields of religion, literacy and education, etc. This article tries to analyze how Latin influences Old English vocabulary in various ways respectively.

  13. Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, James M.; Hall, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To help increase the capacity and efficiency of the nation s airports, a secure wideband wireless communications system is proposed for use on the airport surface. This paper provides an overview of the research and development process for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). AeroMACS is based on a specific commercial profile of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 standard known as Wireless Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access or WiMAX (WiMax Forum). The paper includes background on the need for global interoperability in air/ground data communications, describes potential AeroMACS applications, addresses allocated frequency spectrum constraints, summarizes the international standardization process, and provides findings and recommendations from the world s first AeroMACS prototype implemented in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

  14. The all-new 2. 5 V6-24 valve engine from Ford. Pt. 1. Der neue DOHC-24-Ventil-V6-Motor mit 2,5 l Hubraum fuer den Ford Mondeo. T. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menne, R.J.; Coventry, B.D.; Rechs, M.; Klauke, J.

    The 2.5 V6 is an all-new aluminium engine, produced in Cleveland in the USA. It supplements the range of 4-valve gasoline engines for Ford's worldcar, the Mondeo in Europe and the Contour/Mystique in the US. Ford did not compromise on the basic layout of the engine, it features for example a 60 degree cylinder bank angle for optimum balancing and port-deactivation, which allows excellent 4-valve performance and at the same time demonstrates superior low end torque. Friction reduction was an important design objective train. Emphasis was also put on the reduction of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) of the powertrain as a whole. The result is an extremely compact and light powertrain, most suitable for its application in front wheel driven cars. This article describes in some detail the concept of the engine and its important design features. (orig./HW)

  15. Impact of a new condensed toluene mechanism on air quality model predictions in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A new condensed toluene mechanism is incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling system. Model simulations are performed using the CB05 chemical mechanism containing the existing (base and the new toluene mechanism for the western and eastern US for a summer month. With current estimates of tropospheric emission burden, the new toluene mechanism increases monthly mean daily maximum 8-h ozone by 1.0–3.0 ppbv in Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Cleveland, northeastern US, and Detroit compared to that with the base toluene chemistry. It reduces model mean bias for ozone at elevated observed ozone concentrations. While the new mechanism increases predicted ozone, it does not enhance ozone production efficiency. A sensitivity study suggests that it can further enhance ozone if elevated toluene emissions are present. While it increases in-cloud secondary organic aerosol substantially, its impact on total fine particle mass concentration is small.

  16. Impact of a new condensed toluene mechanism on air quality model predictions in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A new condensed toluene mechanism is incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling system. Model simulations are performed using the CB05 chemical mechanism containing the existing (base and the new toluene mechanism for the western and eastern US for a summer month. With current estimates of tropospheric emission burden, the new toluene mechanism increases monthly mean daily maximum 8-h ozone by 1.0–3.0 ppbv in Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Cleveland, northeastern US, and Detroit compared to that with the base toluene chemistry. It reduces model mean bias for ozone at elevated observed ozone mixing ratios. While the new mechanism increases predicted ozone, it does not enhance ozone production efficiency. Sensitivity study suggests that it can further enhance ozone if elevated toluene emissions are present. While changes in total fine particulate mass are small, predictions of in-cloud SOA increase substantially.

  17. Rorschach assessment of psychological functioning in sexually abused girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, M; Shapiro, J P; Martone, M W; Kassem, L

    1991-02-01

    We measured psychological functioning in a group of 79 Black females between the ages of 5 and 16 and a comparison group of nonabused girls using the Rorschach. In addition to Exner's (1985) Comprehensive System, the Elizur (1949) Rorschach Content Test Scale (RCT), the Mutuality of Autonomy Scale (MOA; Urist, 1977; Urist & Shill, 1982), and the Barrier and Penetration Scales (Fisher & Cleveland, 1968) were used. Sexually abused girls were found to show more disturbed thinking, to experience a higher level of stress relative to their adaptive abilities, to describe human relationships more negatively, and to show more preoccupation with sexuality than the comparison group. The distress experienced by the victimized children was more related to internal mediating variables then to abuse characteristics. Sexually abused girls who are cognitively and emotionally active also experienced high levels of distress compared to abused girls who are psychologically constricted. PMID:2002437

  18. Surgical techniques in type A dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed T; Svensson, Lars G

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a surgical emergency that must be urgently managed, with the primary goal of restoring flow to the dominant true lumen in the downstream aorta. Our preference at the Cleveland Clinic is for an open distal anastomosis technique without aortic clamping, as it permits more accurate approximation of dissected layers and more homeostatically secure anastomosis. During this procedure we employ right axillary end-to-side graft perfusion, followed by deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and antegrade brain perfusion. The distal anastomosis is performed without felt strips or glue. Critical to achieving a successful outcome is meticulous de-airing of the arch, diligent myocardial protection, and a water-tight anastomosis prior to discontinuing cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:27386412

  19. Coptotermes gestroi (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in Brazil: possible origins inferred by mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C; Fontes, L R; Bueno, O C; Martins, V G

    2010-09-01

    The Asian subterranean termite, Coptotermes gestroi, originally from northeast India through Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Indonesian archipelago, is a major termite pest introduced in several countries around the world, including Brazil. We sequenced the mitochondrial COII gene from individuals representing 23 populations. Phylogenetic analysis of COII gene sequences from this and other studies resulted in two main groups: (1) populations of Cleveland (USA) and four populations of Malaysia and (2) populations of Brazil, four populations of Malaysia, and one population from each of Thailand, Puerto Rico, and Key West (USA). Three new localities are reported here, considerably enlarging the distribution of C. gestroi in Brazil: Campo Grande (state of Mato Grosso do Sul), Itajaí (state of Santa Catarina), and Porto Alegre (state of Rio Grande do Sul).

  20. Concurrent and Collaborative Engineering Implementation in an R and D Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelRosario, Ruben; Davis, Jose M.; Keys, L. Ken

    2003-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering (CE), and Collaborative Engineering (or Collaborative Product Development - CPD) have emerged as new paradigms with significant impact in the development of new products and processes. With documented and substantiated success in the automotive and technology industries CE and, most recently, CPD are being touted as innovative management philosophies for many other business sectors including Research and De- velopment. This paper introduces two independent research initiatives conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio investigating the application of CE and CPD in an RdiD environment. Since little research has been conducted in the use of CE and CPD in sectors other than the high mass production manufacturing, the objective of these independent studies is to provide a systematic evaluation of the applicability of these paradigms (concur- rent and collaborative) in a low/no production, service environment, in particular R&D.

  1. Overview 2004 of NASA Stirling-Convertor CFD-Model Development and Regenerator R&D Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy C.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Demko, Rikako

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on accomplishments in 2004 in development of Stirling-convertor CFD model at NASA GRC and via a NASA grant, a Stirling regenerator-research effort being conducted via a NASA grant (a follow-on effort to an earlier DOE contract), and a regenerator-microfabrication contract for development of a "next-generation Stirling regenerator." Cleveland State University is the lead organization for all three grant/contractual efforts, with the University of Minnesota and Gedeor Associates as subcontractors. Also, the Stirling Technology Co. and Sunpower, Inc. are both involved in all three efforts, either as funded or unfunded participants. International Mezzo Technologies of Baton Rouge, LA is the regenerator fabricator for the regenerator-microfabrication contract. Results of the efforts in these three areas are summarized.

  2. Real time outdoor exposure testing of solar cell modules and component materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, E.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Plastic samples, solar cell modules, and sub-modules were exposed at test sites in Florida, Arizona, Puerto Rico, and Cleveland, Ohio, in order to determine materials suitable for use in solar cell modules with a proposed 20-year lifetime. Various environments were encountered including subtropical, subtropical with a sea air atmosphere, desert, rain forest, normal urban, and urban-polluted. The samples were exposed for periods up to six months. Materials found not suitable were polyurethane, polyester, Kapton, Mylar, and UV-stabilized Lexan. Suitable materials were acrylic, FEP-A, and glass. The results of exposure of polyvinylidene fluoride were dependent on the specific formulation, but several types appear suitable. RTV silicone rubber (clear) appears to pick up and hold dirt both as a free film and as a potting medium for modules. The results indicate that dirt accumulation and cleanability are important factors in the selection of solar cell module covers and encapsulants.

  3. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  4. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-08-14

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  5. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  6. Conflict Probe Concepts Analysis in Support of Free Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Anthony W.; Schwab, Robert W.; Geels, Timothy J.; Shakarian, Arek

    1997-01-01

    This study develops an operational concept and requirements for en route Free Flight using a simulation of the Cleveland Air Route Traffic Control Center, and develops requirements for an automated conflict probe for use in the Air Traffic Control (ATC) Centers. In this paper, we present the results of simulation studies and summarize implementation concepts and infrastructure requirements to transition from the current air traffic control system to mature Free Right. The transition path to Free Flight envisioned in this paper assumes an orderly development of communications, navigation, and surveillance (CNS) technologies based on results from our simulation studies. The main purpose of this study is to provide an overall context and methodology for evaluating airborne and ground-based requirements for cooperative development of the future ATC system.

  7. Small Engine Technology (SET) Task 24 Business and Regional Aircraft System Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Lysbeth

    2003-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Engines & Systems, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International Inc., documenting work performed during the period June 1999 through December 1999 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Small Engine Technology (SET) Program, Contract No. NAS3-27483, Task Order 24, Business and Regional Aircraft System Studies. The work performed under SET Task 24 consisted of evaluating the noise reduction benefits compared to the baseline noise levels of representative 1992 technology aircraft, obtained by applying different combinations of noise reduction technologies to five business and regional aircraft configurations. This report focuses on the selection of the aircraft configurations and noise reduction technologies, the prediction of noise levels for those aircraft, and the comparison of the noise levels with those of the baseline aircraft.

  8. Astronomy in the Digital Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Lindblom, J.; Terzian, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Digital Universe is an Internet project whose mission is to provide free, accurate, unbiased information covering all aspects of human knowledge, and to inspire humans to learn, make use of, and expand this knowledge. It is planned to be a decades long effort, inspired by the Encyclopedia Galactica concept popularized by Carl Sagan, and is being developed by the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation. A worldwide network of experts is responsible for selecting content featured within the Digital Universe. The first publicly available content is the Encyclopedia of Earth, a Boston University project headed by Prof. Cutler Cleveland, which will be part of the Earth Portal. The second major content area will be an analogous Encyclopedia of the Cosmos to be part of the Cosmos Portal. It is anticipated that this will evolve into a major resource for astronomy education. Authors and topic editors are now being recruited for the Encyclopedia of the Cosmos.

  9. Langston Hughes and his poem “Harlem”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝红

    2005-01-01

    James Langston Hughes was born February 1. 1902, in Joplin, Missouri. His parents divorced when he was a small child, and his father moved to Mexico. He was raised by his Grandmother until he was thirteen, when he moved to Lincoln,Illinois, to live with his mother and her husband, eventually settling in Cleveland, Ohio. It was in I,incoln, Illinois, that Hughes began writing poetry. Following graduation, he spent a year in Mexico and a year at Columbia University. During these years, he held old jobs as an assistant cook, launderer, and a busboy, and traveled to Africa and Europe working as a seaman. In November 1924, he moved to Washington,

  10. Employees' perceptions of justice in performance appraisals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasset, Frøydis; Marnburg, Einar; Furunes, Trude

    2010-05-01

    Of all the tasks undertaken by human resource managers, performance appraisals (PAs) are one of the most unpopular among employees (Meyer 1991, Murphy and Cleveland 1995, Holbrook 2002, Jackman and Strober 2003). As PA guides and plans show (Fletcher 2004, CatalystOne 2010), PAs can be implemented in similar ways in organisations throughout Europe and developed countries elsewhere. But, if employees perceive PA processes as unfair, they may reject the usefulness and validity of the information they receive and so may not be motivated to change behaviour. This article concerns perceptions of organisational justice and explains the results of a study of perceived fairness in PAs among nurses and auxiliary nurses in Norway's municipal health service.

  11. Management and outcomes for patients with TTP: analysis of 100 cases at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Shruti; Carcioppolo, Desiree; Zhang, Li; McCrae, Keith R

    2013-07-01

    The advent of plasma exchange has led to a dramatic improvement in the survival of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), though approximately 10% of patients still die and a third suffer relapses. Clinical features that identify poor risk patients have not been clearly identified. We reviewed 100 patients who were treated for a first episode of TTP at the Cleveland Clinic between 2000 and 2012 to identify factors predictive of poor outcomes. On multivariate analysis, increasing age, especially age > 60 (RR: 7.08, 95% CI: 2.15-23.39, P = 0.002), severe neurological symptoms at presentation (RR: 18.37, 95% CI: I4.19-80.13, P  5% was an independent predictor of adverse renal outcomes (need for dialysis and progression to chronic kidney disease). These variables may be useful for risk stratification and identification of patients who could potentially benefit from early institution of adjunctive therapy. PMID:23605996

  12. Forensic Evidence in Homicide Investigations and Prosecutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Tom; Regoeczi, Wendy

    2015-09-01

    Even though forensic evidence is collected at virtually every homicide scene, only a few studies have examined its role in investigation and prosecution. This article adds to the literature by providing the results of a study of 294 homicide cases (315 victims) occurring in Cleveland, Ohio, between 2008 and 2011. Through a logistic regression on open versus closed cases, the collection of knives, administration of gunshot residue (GSR) kits, and clothing at the scene were positively and significantly related to case closures, while collection of ballistics evidence and DNA evidence were statistically significant in the opposite direction. With regard to analysis, the clearance rate for cases with probative results (i.e., matches or exclusions) was 63.1% compared to a closure rate of 56.3% for cases without probative results. However, only 23 cases had probative results prior to arrest compared to 128 cases with probative results after arrest. PMID:26174557

  13. Television documentaries lifting hospital, medical center profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    The nation's hospitals and medical centers are enjoying the legacy of TV audiences' addiction to medical dramas. Cable television has met the challenge with documentary coverage of real live hospitals. The medium offers many benefits and few disadvantages for those marketing managers with the courage to welcome camera crews. Lynn Hopkins Cantwell is director of public relations and marketing for Children's National Medical Center, Washington, D.C., which was covered in a seven-instrument "Lifeline" documentary for the Discovery Channel. James G. Gosky is director of communications for The MetroHealth System, Cleveland, which was the subject of two installments of "Trauma: Life in th ER," produced for the Learning Channel. These marketing pros describe the myriad details they faced when their respective hospitals went "on camera." Among the key factors were good communications with all constituents, attention to detail, and follow-up. PMID:11209289

  14. Multi-objective decision-making under uncertainty: Fuzzy logic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Terry L.

    1995-01-01

    Fuzzy logic allows for quantitative representation of vague or fuzzy objectives, and therefore is well-suited for multi-objective decision-making. This paper presents methods employing fuzzy logic concepts to assist in the decision-making process. In addition, this paper describes software developed at NASA Lewis Research Center for assisting in the decision-making process. Two diverse examples are used to illustrate the use of fuzzy logic in choosing an alternative among many options and objectives. One example is the selection of a lunar lander ascent propulsion system, and the other example is the selection of an aeration system for improving the water quality of the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland, Ohio. The fuzzy logic techniques provided here are powerful tools which complement existing approaches, and therefore should be considered in future decision-making activities.

  15. A novel colloid probe preparation method based on chemical etching technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Several fundamental problems in hydrophobic force measurements using atomic force microscope (AFM) are discussed in this paper. A novel method for colloid probe preparation based on chemical etching technology is proposed, which is specially fit for the unique demands of hydrophobic force measurements by AFM. The features of three different approaches for determining spring constants of rectangular cantilevers, including geometric dimension, Cleveland and Sader methods are compared. The influences of the sizes of the colloids on the measurements of the hydrophobic force curves are investigated. Our experimental results showed that by selecting colloid probe with proper spring constant and tip size, the hydrophobic force and the complete hydrophobic interaction force curve can be measured by using AFM.

  16. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2, (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 4 to the Safety Evaluation Report on the application filed by the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company on behalf of itself and as agent for the Duquesne Light Company, the Ohio Edison Company, the Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company (the Central Area Power Coordination Group or CAPCO), as applicants and owners, for a license to operate the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lake County, Ohio. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement Nos. 1, 2 and 3 to that report

  17. Chronologie de la vie et des œuvres de Constance Fenimore Woolson Chronology of Constance Fenimore Woolson’s Life and Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Hayat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Français1840Constance Fenimore Woolson est née à Claremont, New Hampshire (5 mars. Elle était le sixième enfant de Charles Jarvis et de Hannah Cooper Pomeroy Woolson. Elle était, par sa mère, une petite-nièce de James Fenimore Cooper.Automne 1840Les Woolson déménagent à Cleveland, Ohio, après le décès de trois de leurs filles, atteintes de la scarlatine. Enfant et jeune fille, Constance voyage en Ohio, dans le Wisconsin et en Nouvelle Angleterre.Eté 1855Elle découvre l’île de Mackinac dans l...

  18. What is quality and how much does it really matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodside, A G

    1991-12-01

    Perhaps no single word has appeared more often in health care literature during the last 12 months than "quality." Designing and marketing high quality health care services is likely to be a strategic issue through the 1990s. The purpose of this commentary is to describe why the adoption of a three-component definition of quality may be useful for designing strategies for continual quality improvements, as well as to suggest the principal ways quality should be assessed. Answers to the question, "How much does quality really matter?" are examined. The commentary is based on the keynote address presented at the 1991 Health Care Consumer Buying Guides Conference in Cleveland, Ohio, sponsored by the Academy for Health Services Marketing.

  19. Coptotermes gestroi (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in Brazil: possible origins inferred by mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C; Fontes, L R; Bueno, O C; Martins, V G

    2010-09-01

    The Asian subterranean termite, Coptotermes gestroi, originally from northeast India through Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Indonesian archipelago, is a major termite pest introduced in several countries around the world, including Brazil. We sequenced the mitochondrial COII gene from individuals representing 23 populations. Phylogenetic analysis of COII gene sequences from this and other studies resulted in two main groups: (1) populations of Cleveland (USA) and four populations of Malaysia and (2) populations of Brazil, four populations of Malaysia, and one population from each of Thailand, Puerto Rico, and Key West (USA). Three new localities are reported here, considerably enlarging the distribution of C. gestroi in Brazil: Campo Grande (state of Mato Grosso do Sul), Itajaí (state of Santa Catarina), and Porto Alegre (state of Rio Grande do Sul). PMID:20924414

  20. Cross-National Applicability of a Parsimonious Measure of Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin

    2016-04-01

    Durvasula and Lysonski's paper presented a shorter version of the Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture Scale (hereafter AGCC), which was developed by Cleveland and Laroche to address scarcity of measurements that determined how individuals acquired and became a part of the emerging global consumer culture. The following critique discusses a few concerns and three major shortcomings of the paper, including skewed sample frame and incorrect choice of countries for assessing cross-national applicability of the scale, not discussing the differences in the means of the seven distinct dimensions of AGCC across the four nations studied by the authors, and absence of any critical review of existing consumer acculturation scales vis-à-vis AGCC. PMID:27154377

  1. Periocular granuloma annulare: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Katherine; Bhalla, Rohan; Mesinkovska, Natasha A; Piliang, Melissa P; Tamburro, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a granulomatous dermatosis that rarely presents on the face and is extremely uncommon in the periocular region. We report our experience with the presentation and management of GA lesions on the eyelids of a 17-year-old girl. We performed a review of published literature and identified 13 cases of pediatric periocular GA. One additional case was identified upon review of all pediatric GA cases at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Review of these cases suggests that periocular GA is a benign condition that spontaneously regresses within a few months. GA nodules have a predilection for the upper eyelids. A greater incidence is noted in African American children. Awareness of the self-resolving nature of this condition can prevent unnecessary surgical excisions in affected children. PMID:23551387

  2. US Department of Energy first annual clean coal technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first public review of the US DOE/Industry co-funded program to demonstrate the commercial readiness of Clean Coal Technologies (CCT) was held at Cleveland, Ohio Sept. 22--24, 1992. The objectives were to provide electric utilities, independent power producers, and potential foreign users information on the DOE-supported CCT projects including status, results, and technology performance potential; to further understanding of the institutional, financial, and technical considerations in applying CCTs to Clean Air Act compliance strategies; to discuss to export market, financial and institutional assistance, and the roles of government and industry in pursuing exports of CCTs; and to facilitate meetings between domestic and international attendees to maximize export opportunities

  3. Insights into an Award-Winning Summer Internship Program: The First Six Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashou, Anthony; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in 2008, the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program in reproductive research and writing has trained 114 students from 23 states within the United States and 10 countries worldwide. Its fundamental goal is to inspire pre-medical and medical students to embrace a career as a physician-scientist. During this intensive course, established scientists and clinicians train interns in the essential principles and fundamental concepts of bench research and scientific writing. Over the first six years (2008~2013), interns have collectively published 98 research articles and performed 12 bench research projects on current and emerging topics in reproductive medicine. Interns have also developed and honed valuable soft skills including time management, communication and presentation skills, as well as life values, which all enhance personal and professional satisfaction. Program graduates are able to recognize the value of medical research and its potential to impact patient care and gain insight into their own career pathway. Between 2011 and 2014, the internship program was thrice awarded a Scholarship in Teaching Award by Case Western Reserve School of Medicine for its innovative teaching approach and positive impact on medical education and student careers. This report highlights the demographics, logistics, implementation, feedback, and results of the first six years of the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, OH, USA). This may be helpful to other research and academic institutions considering implementing a similar program. In addition, it creates awareness among potential physician-scientists of what the world of research has to offer in both scientific writing and bench research. Finally, it may stimulate further discussion regarding narrowing the gap between physicians and scientists and refinement of the current program. PMID:27169124

  4. Natalizumab for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Rudick

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Richard A Rudick1, Michael A Panzara21Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Biogen Idec, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USAAbstract: Natalizumab is an α4-integrin antagonist approved as monotherapy for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS, based on demonstrated efficacy in the pivotal AFFIRM study (N = 942. Natalizumab monotherapy reduced risk of disability progression by 42%–54% and annualized relapse rate by 68% during a period of 2 years. Natalizumab was also associated with significant reductions in number of T2-hyperintense, gadolinium-enhancing, and T1-hypointense lesions and in volume of T2-hyperintense lesions (all p < 0.001 on magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, natalizumab-treated patients in AFFIRM experienced significant improvements from baseline in the physical and mental components of the Short Form-36 (p ≤ 0.01 and a 35% reduction in risk of clinically significant vision loss (p = 0.008 vs placebo. Natalizumab was well tolerated in phase 3 studies. Common adverse events were generally mild and included headache, fatigue, urinary tract infections, and arthralgia. Serious adverse events were similar between treatment groups. The incidence of serious hypersensitivity reactions associated with natalizumab was <1%. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy was a rare complication of treatment, observed in 2 patients with MS who received natalizumab plus interferon β-1a. The robust clinical benefits of natalizumab, including benefits on patient-reported quality of life, make it an important addition to disease-modifying therapies available to patients with relapsing MS.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, natalizumab, α4-integrin antagonist

  5. Insights into an Award-Winning Summer Internship Program: The First Six Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashou, Anthony; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in 2008, the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program in reproductive research and writing has trained 114 students from 23 states within the United States and 10 countries worldwide. Its fundamental goal is to inspire pre-medical and medical students to embrace a career as a physician-scientist. During this intensive course, established scientists and clinicians train interns in the essential principles and fundamental concepts of bench research and scientific writing. Over the first six years (2008~2013), interns have collectively published 98 research articles and performed 12 bench research projects on current and emerging topics in reproductive medicine. Interns have also developed and honed valuable soft skills including time management, communication and presentation skills, as well as life values, which all enhance personal and professional satisfaction. Program graduates are able to recognize the value of medical research and its potential to impact patient care and gain insight into their own career pathway. Between 2011 and 2014, the internship program was thrice awarded a Scholarship in Teaching Award by Case Western Reserve School of Medicine for its innovative teaching approach and positive impact on medical education and student careers. This report highlights the demographics, logistics, implementation, feedback, and results of the first six years of the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, OH, USA). This may be helpful to other research and academic institutions considering implementing a similar program. In addition, it creates awareness among potential physician-scientists of what the world of research has to offer in both scientific writing and bench research. Finally, it may stimulate further discussion regarding narrowing the gap between physicians and scientists and refinement of the current program.

  6. A nomogram to predict the probability of passing the American Board of Internal Medicine examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Brateanu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background : Although the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM certification is valued as a reflection of physicians’ experience, education, and expertise, limited methods exist to predict performance in the examination. Purpose : The objective of this study was to develop and validate a predictive tool based on variables common to all residency programs, regarding the probability of an internal medicine graduate passing the ABIM certification examination. Methods : The development cohort was obtained from the files of the Cleveland Clinic internal medicine residents who began training between 2004 and 2008. A multivariable logistic regression model was built to predict the ABIM passing rate. The model was represented as a nomogram, which was internally validated with bootstrap resamples. The external validation was done retrospectively on a cohort of residents who graduated from two other independent internal medicine residency programs between 2007 and 2011. Results : Of the 194 Cleveland Clinic graduates used for the nomogram development, 175 (90.2% successfully passed the ABIM certification examination. The final nomogram included four predictors: In-Training Examination (ITE scores in postgraduate year (PGY 1, 2, and 3, and the number of months of overnight calls in the last 6 months of residency. The nomogram achieved a concordance index (CI of 0.98 after correcting for over-fitting bias and allowed for the determination of an estimated probability of passing the ABIM exam. Of the 126 graduates from two other residency programs used for external validation, 116 (92.1% passed the ABIM examination. The nomogram CI in the external validation cohort was 0.94, suggesting outstanding discrimination. Conclusions : A simple user-friendly predictive tool, based on readily available data, was developed to predict the probability of passing the ABIM exam for internal medicine residents. This may guide program directors’ decision

  7. Using MODIS data for understanding changes in seagrass meadow health: a case study in the Great Barrier Reef (Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petus, Caroline; Collier, Catherine; Devlin, Michelle; Rasheed, Michael; McKenna, Skye

    2014-07-01

    Stretching more than 2000 km along the Queensland coast, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBR) shelters over 43,000 square km of seagrass meadows. Despite the status of marine protected area and World Heritage listing of the GBR, local seagrass meadows are under stress from reduced water quality levels; with reduction in the amount of light available for seagrass photosynthesis defined as the primary cause of seagrass loss throughout the GBR. Methods have been developed to map GBR plume water types by using MODIS quasi-true colour (hereafter true colour) images reclassified in function of their dominant colour. These data can be used as an interpretative tool for understanding changes in seagrass meadow health (as defined in this study by the seagrass area and abundance) at different spatial and temporal scales. We tested this method in Cleveland Bay, in the northern GBR, where substantial loss in seagrass area and biomass was detected by annual monitoring from 2007 to 2011. A strong correlation was found between bay-wide seagrass meadow area and biomass and exposure to turbid Primary (sediment-dominated) water type. There was also a strong correlation between the changes of biomass and area of individual meadows and exposure of seagrass ecosystems to Primary water type over the 5-year period. Seagrass meadows were also grouped according to the dominant species within each meadow, irrespective of location within Cleveland Bay. These consolidated community types did not correlate well with the exposure to Primary water type, and this is likely to be due to local environmental conditions with the individual meadows that comprise these groupings. This study proved that remote sensing data provide the synoptic window and repetitivity required to investigate changes in water quality conditions over time. Remote sensing data provide an opportunity to investigate the risk of marine-coastal ecosystems to light limitation due to increased water turbidity when in situ

  8. Evolution of transversus abdominis plane infiltration techniques for postsurgical analgesia following abdominal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadsden J

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Gadsden,1 Sabry Ayad,2 Jeffrey J Gonzales,3 Jaideep Mehta,4 Jan Boublik,5 Jacob Hutchins6,7 1Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3Department of Anesthesiology, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, CO, 4Department of Anesthesiology, UT Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, 5Department of Anesthesiology, NYU Langone Medical Center – Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY, 6Department of Anesthesiology, 7Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP infiltration is a regional anesthesia technique that has been demonstrated to be effective for management of postsurgical pain after abdominal surgery. There are several different clinical variations in the approaches used for achieving analgesia via TAP infiltration, and methods for identification of the TAP have evolved considerably since the landmark-guided technique was first described in 2001. There are many factors that impact the analgesic outcomes following TAP infiltration, and the various nuances of this technique have led to debate regarding procedural classification of TAP infiltration. Based on our current understanding of fascial and neuronal anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall, as well as available evidence from studies assessing local anesthetic spread and cutaneous sensory block following TAP infiltration, it is clear that TAP infiltration techniques are appropriately classified as field blocks. While the objective of peripheral nerve block and TAP infiltration are similar in that both approaches block sensory response in order to achieve analgesia, the technical components of the two procedures are different. Unlike peripheral nerve block, which involves identification or stimulation of a specific nerve or nerve plexus, followed by

  9. Infantile nystagmus syndrome: Broadening the high-foveation-quality field with contact lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Taibbi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Taibbi1,4,5, Zhong I Wang1,3, Louis F Dell’Osso1–31The Daroff-Dell’Osso Ocular Motility Laboratory, Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and CASE Medical School; 2Department of Neurology; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 4Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Unit, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy; 5University of Milan, Milan, ItalyAbstract: We investigated the effects of contact lenses in broadening and improving the high-foveation-quality field in a subject with infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS. A high-speed, digitized video system was used for the eye-movement recording. The subject was asked to fixate a far target at different horizontal gaze angles with contact lenses inserted. Data from the subject while fixating at far without refractive correction and at near (at a convergence angle of 60 PD, were used for comparison. The eXpanded Nystagmus Acuity Function (NAFX was used to evaluate the foveation quality at each gaze angle. Contact lenses broadened the highfoveation-quality range of gaze angles in this subject. The broadening was comparable to that achieved during 60 PD of convergence although the NAFX values were lower. Contact lenses allowed the subject to see “more” (he had a wider range of high-foveation-quality gaze angles and “better” (he had improved foveation at each gaze angle. Instead of being contraindicated by INS, contact lenses emerge as a potentially important therapeutic option. Contact lenses employ afferent feedback via the ophthalmic division of the V cranial nerve to damp INS slow phases over a broadened range of gaze angles. This supports the proprioceptive hypothesis of INS improvement.Keywords: contact lenses, infantile nystagmus, visual function

  10. Modifying the Bank Erosion Hazard Index (BEHI) protocol for rapid assessment of streambank erosion in northeastern Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sara E; Drenten, Deanna M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the source of pollution in a stream is vital to preserving, restoring, and maintaining the stream's function and habitat it provides. Sediments from highly eroding streambanks are a major source of pollution in a stream system and have the potential to jeopardize habitat, infrastructure, and stream function. Watershed management practices throughout the Cleveland Metroparks attempt to locate and inventory the source and rate the risk of potential streambank erosion to assist in formulating effect stream, riparian, and habitat management recommendations. The Bank Erosion Hazard Index (BEHI), developed by David Rosgen of Wildland Hydrology is a fluvial geomorphic assessment procedure used to evaluate the susceptibility of potential streambank erosion based on a combination of several variables that are sensitive to various processes of erosion. This protocol can be time consuming, difficult for non-professionals, and confined to specific geomorphic regions. To address these constraints and assist in maintaining consistency and reducing user bias, modifications to this protocol include a "Pre-Screening Questionnaire", elimination of the Study Bank-Height Ratio metric including the bankfull determination, and an adjusted scoring system. This modified protocol was used to assess several high priority streams within the Cleveland Metroparks. The original BEHI protocol was also used to confirm the results of the modified BEHI protocol. After using the modified assessment in the field, and comparing it to the original BEHI method, the two were found to produce comparable BEHI ratings of the streambanks, while significantly reducing the amount of time and resources needed to complete the modified protocol. PMID:25742064

  11. Using MODIS data for understanding changes in seagrass meadow health: a case study in the Great Barrier Reef (Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petus, Caroline; Collier, Catherine; Devlin, Michelle; Rasheed, Michael; McKenna, Skye

    2014-07-01

    Stretching more than 2000 km along the Queensland coast, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBR) shelters over 43,000 square km of seagrass meadows. Despite the status of marine protected area and World Heritage listing of the GBR, local seagrass meadows are under stress from reduced water quality levels; with reduction in the amount of light available for seagrass photosynthesis defined as the primary cause of seagrass loss throughout the GBR. Methods have been developed to map GBR plume water types by using MODIS quasi-true colour (hereafter true colour) images reclassified in function of their dominant colour. These data can be used as an interpretative tool for understanding changes in seagrass meadow health (as defined in this study by the seagrass area and abundance) at different spatial and temporal scales. We tested this method in Cleveland Bay, in the northern GBR, where substantial loss in seagrass area and biomass was detected by annual monitoring from 2007 to 2011. A strong correlation was found between bay-wide seagrass meadow area and biomass and exposure to turbid Primary (sediment-dominated) water type. There was also a strong correlation between the changes of biomass and area of individual meadows and exposure of seagrass ecosystems to Primary water type over the 5-year period. Seagrass meadows were also grouped according to the dominant species within each meadow, irrespective of location within Cleveland Bay. These consolidated community types did not correlate well with the exposure to Primary water type, and this is likely to be due to local environmental conditions with the individual meadows that comprise these groupings. This study proved that remote sensing data provide the synoptic window and repetitivity required to investigate changes in water quality conditions over time. Remote sensing data provide an opportunity to investigate the risk of marine-coastal ecosystems to light limitation due to increased water turbidity when in situ

  12. Implementing change in respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2010-06-01

    Though people are generally averse to change, change and innovation are critically important in respiratory care to maintain scientific and clinical progress. This paper reviews the issue of change in respiratory care. I summarize several available models of organizational and personal change (ie, those of Kotter and of Silversin and Kornacki, and the Intentional Change Theory of Boyatzis), review the characteristics of change-avid respiratory therapy departments, offer an example of a change effort in respiratory care (implementation of respiratory care protocols) and then analyze this change effort as it took place at one institution, the Cleveland Clinic, using these models. Finally, I present the results of an analysis of change-avid respiratory therapy departments and offer some suggestions regarding change management for the profession and for individual respiratory care clinicians. Common features of theories of organizational change include developing a sense of urgency, overcoming resistance, developing a guiding coalition, and involving key stakeholders early. With the understanding that change efforts may seem unduly "clean" and orderly in retrospect, the models help explain the sustainable success of efforts to implement the Respiratory Therapy Consult Service at the Cleveland Clinic. By implication, these models offer value in planning change efforts prospectively. Further analysis of features of change-avid respiratory therapy departments indicates 11 highly desired features, of which four that especially characterize change-avid departments include: having an up-to-date leadership team; employee involvement in change; celebrating wins; and an overall sense of progressiveness in the department. This analysis suggests that understanding and embracing change is important. To anchor change in our profession, greater attention should be given to developing a pipeline of respiratory care clinicians who, by virtue of their advanced training, have the skills

  13. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel NH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nirali H Patel,1 Sarah K Romero,2 David C Kaelber31Division of Emergency Medicine, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, OH, USA; 2Division of Emergency Medicine, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Departments of Information Services, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, The MetroHealth System and School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: Hypertension (HTN in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%-5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1 safely lower blood pressure, and (2 treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3 identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8

  14. Bringing the Future Within Reach: Celebrating 75 Years of the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, has been making the future for 75 years. The center's work with aircraft engines, high-energy fuels, communications technology, electric propulsion, energy conversion and storage, and materials and structures has been, and continues to be, crucial to both the Agency and the region. Glenn has partnered with industry, universities, and other agencies to continually advance technologies that are propelling the nation's aerospace community into the future. Nonetheless these continued accomplishments would not be possible without the legacy of our first three decades of research, which led to over one hundred R&D 100 Awards, three Robert J. Collier Trophies, and an Emmy. Glenn, which is located in Cleveland, Ohio, is 1 of 10 NASA field centers, and 1 of only 3 that stem from an earlier research organization-the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Glenn began operation in 1942 as the NACA Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory (AERL). In 1947 the NACA renamed the lab the Flight Propulsion Laboratory to reflect the expansion of the research. In September 1948, following the death of the NACA's Director of Aeronautics, George Lewis, the NACA rededicated the lab as the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. On 1 October 1958, the lab was incorporated into the new NASA space agency and was renamed the NASA Lewis Research Center. Following John Glenn's return to space on the space shuttle, on 1 March 1999 the center name was changed once again, becoming the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center.

  15. EDITORIAL: Commercial opportunities for neural engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoto, James

    2008-03-01

    Research and academic professionals in neural engineering know well the promise the field offers for advancing our understanding of basic neuroscience and devising new therapies for treating neurological diseases and disorders. But there is also considerable commercial opportunity for new start-up companies in several areas of neural engineering. The neurotechnology industry, which includes firms that manufacture neuromodulation devices, neural prostheses, neurorehabilitation systems, and neurosensing devices, is forecast to grow to grow from 3.6 billion this year to 8.8 billion in 2012, according to a recently published market research study from Neurotech Reports. In recent years, there have been several successful spinoffs of neurotechnology startup firms that originated with research at universities and clinical institutions. In many cases, the academic researchers who invented the new technology or product innovation have stayed on with their startup firms after receiving funding from venture capital firms, or after going public. Among the most successful neurotechnology industry spinoffs in recent years were: Cyberkinetics Inc., Foxborough, MA, a manufacturer of brain-computer interface devices based on research at Brown University. John Donoghue, a professor and chairman of the department of neuroscience at Brown University and executive director of the brain science program at Brown, founded the company in 2001 and remains on board as the chief scientific officer. Synapse Biomedical, Inc., Oberlin, OH, a manufacturer of diaphragm pacing systems, based on research at Case Western Reserve University. Raymond Onders, director of minimal invasive surgery and associate professor at University Hospital Case Medical Center in Cleveland, was the primary researcher. He was helped by J. Thomas Mortimer, professor emeritus of biomedical engineering at Case, and it was Mortimer who came up with the name NeuRx for the device. Onders performed his first surgical implant

  16. Status of Water Levels and Selected Water-Quality Conditions in the Sparta-Memphis Aquifer in Arkansas and the Status of Water Levels in the Sparta Aquifer in Louisiana, Spring 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T.P.; Jones, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    potentiometric contour encircles the three pumping centers. Seven smaller depressions are evident on the 2005 Sparta-Memphis potentiometric-surface map located in Webster and Winn Parishes, Louisiana, and Calhoun, Cleveland, western Columbia, Desha, and Lafayette Counties, Arkansas. The depression in Calhoun County initially was shown in the 1996-1997 potentiometric surface. The depression in Desha County initially was shown in the 1999 potentiometric surface. The depressions in Webster and Winn Parishes were shown as early as 1975. The depressions in Cleveland, western Columbia, and Lafayette Counties initially were shown in the 2003 potentiometric surface. A map of differences in water-level measurements between 2001 and 2005 was constructed using the difference between water-level measurements from 294 wells in Arkansas and 29 wells in Louisiana. The difference in water levels between 2001 and 2005 ranged from -30.1 to 44.6 feet. The largest rise of 44.6 feet in water level measured was in Union County in Arkansas. The largest decline of 30.1 feet in water level measured was in Columbia County in Arkansas. Areas with a general rise in water levels in Arkansas are shown in Arkansas, Columbia, Craighead, Jefferson, Prairie, and the western half of Union Counties. The area around west-central Union County had rises as much as 44.6 feet, with seven wells showing a rise of 20 feet or greater, which is an annual rise of 5 feet or greater. Areas in Arkansas with a general decline in water level are shown in western Bradley, eastern Calhoun, Cleveland, Cross, Desha, Drew, Lafayette, Lee, Lincoln, Lonoke, Poinsett, and the eastern half of Union Counties. In Louisiana, the water-level difference map showed a general rise in water levels in northern Claiborne, northern Webster, and northwestern Union Parishes mainly because of a decrease in industrial withdrawals in southern Arkansas, particularly Union County. Another rise in water level was indicated in western

  17. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro,1 Barbara A Plitnick,1 Anna Lok,1 Geoffrey E Jones,1 Patricia Higgins,2,3 Thomas R Hornick,3,4 Mark S Rea1 1Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA; 2School of Nursing, 3School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 4Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD, with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. Methods: The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level “bluish-white” lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light–dark and rest–activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest–activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. Results: The lighting intervention significantly (P<0.05 decreased global sleep scores from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The lighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light–dark and rest–activity patterns, suggesting an increase

  18. Advanced Offshore Wind Turbine/Foundation Concept for the Great Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Windpower, Nautica [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States); Marrone, Joseph [OCC COWI, Vancouver (Canada); Wagner, Thomas [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States)

    2013-08-29

    This project investigated a conceptual 2-bladed rotor wind turbine design and assessed its feasibility for installation in the Great Lakes. The levelized cost of energy was used for this purpose. A location in Lake Erie near the coast of Cleveland, Ohio was selected as the application site. The loading environment was defined using wind and wave data collected at a weather station in Lake Erie near Cleveland. In addition, the probability distributions of the annual significant wave height and wind speed were determined. A model of the dependence of the above two quantities was also developed and used in the study of wind turbine system loads. Loads from ice floes and ridges were also included.The NREL 5 MW 3-bladed rotor wind turbine concept was used as the baseline design. The proposed turbine design employs variable pitch blade control with tip-brakes and a teeter mechanism. The rotor diameter, rated power and the tower dimensions were selected to closely match those of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine.A semi-floating gravity base foundation was designed for this project primarily to adapt to regional logistical constraints to transport and install the gravity base foundation. This foundation consists of, from bottom to top, a base plate, a buoyancy chamber, a taper zone, a column (with ice cone), and a service platform. A compound upward-downward ice cone was selected to secure the foundation from moving because of ice impact.The turbine loads analysis was based on International ElectroTechnical Committee (IEC) Standard 61400-1, Class III winds. The NREL software FAST was the primary computational tool used in this study to determine all design load cases. An initial set of studies of the dynamics of wind turbines using Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) demonstrated that FAST and ADAMS load predictions were comparable. Because of its relative simplicity and short run times, FAST was selected for this study. For ice load calculations, a method

  19. T10B9 monoclonal antibody: A short-acting nonstimulating monoclonal antibody that spares γδ T-cells and treats and prevents cellular rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Waid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thomas H Waid1, John S Thompson1, Maria Siemionow2, Stephen A Brown1 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 2Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: T10B9.1A-31/MEDI-500 is a nonmitogenic immunoglobulin M kappa murine monoclonal antibody (mAb directed against the alpha-beta (αβ heterodimer of the T-lymphocyte receptor complex. The hybridoma was first produced by fusing spleen cells from BALB/C mice immunized with human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes with SP2/O-Ag14 mutant myeloma cells. The mAb is produced and purified using multistep ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatography protocols. T10B9 has been used successfully to treat acute cellular rejection in renal transplantation and as an immunosuppression induction agent in heart and simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation. Because T10B9 is nonmitogenic and causes minimal cytokine release, both treatment of rejection and induction of immunosuppression were accomplished with significantly fewer and milder untoward effects (cytokine release syndrome than its comparator OKT3. Since T10B9 is directed against the αβ heterodimer of the CD3 epitope, it spares the gamma delta (γδ region. These gamma delta (γδ T cells have a unique role in the immune response controlling many serious human diseases and perhaps facilitating the development of immunologic tolerance. T10B9 has a relatively short duration of action, depleting T cells for only 10 to 14 days, unlike the protracted depletion seen with thymoglobulin and Campath-1H. There is no B-lymphocyte depletion with T10B9 as there is with both of the aforementioned reagents. The lack of prolonged lymphocyte depletion may account for less infection observed with T10B9 treatment.Keywords: T10B9.1A-31, γδ T-cell, monoclonal antibody, Campath-1H, thymoglobulin, OKT3

  20. A technology-enabled adherence enhancement system for people with bipolar disorder: results from a feasibility and patient acceptance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajatovic M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Martha Sajatovic,1 Michael S Davis,2 Kristin A Cassidy,3 Joseph Nestor,2 Johnny Sams,3 Edna Fuentes-Casiano3 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurological and Behavioral Outcomes Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2MedicaSafe, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA Objective: As poor medication adherence is common in bipolar disorder (BD, technology-assisted approaches may help to monitor and enhance adherence. This study evaluated preliminary feasibility, patient satisfaction and effects on adherence, BD knowledge, and BD symptoms associated with the use of a multicomponent technology-assisted adherence enhancement system. Methods: This prospective study tested the system in five BD patients over a 15-day period. System components included: 1 an automated pill cap with remote monitoring sensor; 2 a multimedia adherence enhancement program; and 3 a treatment incentive program. This study evaluated system usability, patient satisfaction and effects on adherence (Morisky scale, knowledge (treatment knowledge test [TKT], and symptoms (internal state scale [ISS]. Results: Mean age of the sample was 62 years, 4/5 (80% Caucasian, and 4/5 (80% single/divorced or widowed. Most participants (4/5, 80% were on a single BD medication. Participants had BD for an average of 21 years. Challenges included attaching the pill sensor to standard pharmacy bottles for individuals using very large pill containers or those with multiday pill boxes. Three of five (60% individuals completed the full 15-day period. Usability scores were high overall. Mean Morisky scores improved. Means on all four subscales of the ISS were all in the direction of improvement. On the TKT, there was a 40% increase in mean scores. Conclusion: A multicomponent technology-assisted BD

  1. Interstitial Cystitis – Elucidation of Psychophysiologic and Autonomic Characteristics (the ICEPAC Study: design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelimsky T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Chelimsky,1 Gisela Chelimsky,1 N Patrick McCabe,2 Megan Louttit,3 Adonis Hijaz,3 Sangeeta Mahajan,3 Tatiana Sanses,3 CA Tony Buffington,4 Bradford Fenton,5 Thomas Janicki,3 Sarah Ialacci,2 Elias Veizi,3 Di Zhang,2 Firouz Daneshgari,2,3 Robert Elston,2 Jeffrey Janata2,31The Medical College of Wisconsin, Departments of Neurology and Gastroenterology, Milwaukee, WI, 2Case Western Reserve University, Department of Neurology, Cleveland, OH, 3University Hospitals Case Medical Center, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, 4The Ohio State University, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Columbus, OH, 5Summa Health System, Department of Gynecology, Akron, OH, USABackground and purpose: Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS is relatively common and associated with severe pain, yet effective treatment remains elusive. Research typically emphasized the bladder's role, but given the high presence of systemic comorbidities, the authors hypothesized a pathophysiologic nervous system role. This paper reports the methodology and approach to study the nervous system in women with IC/BPS. The study compares neurologic, urologic, gynecologic, autonomic, gastrointestinal, and psychological features of women with IC/BPS, their female relatives, women with myofascial pelvic pain (MPP, and healthy controls to elucidate the role of central and peripheral processing.Methods and results: In total, 228 women (76 IC/BPS, 76 MPP, 38 family members, and 38 healthy controls will be recruited. Subjects undergo detailed screening, structured neurologic examination of limbs and pelvis, tender point examination, autonomic testing, electrogastrography, and assessment of comorbid functional dysautonomias. Interpreters are blinded to subject classification. Psychological and stress response characteristics are examined with assessments of stress, trauma history, general psychological function, and stress response quantification. As of December 2012, data

  2. A single-arm, investigator-initiated study of the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of intravitreal aflibercept injection in subjects with exudative age-related macular degeneration previously treated with ranibizumab or bevacizumab (ASSESS study: 12-month analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh RP

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rishi P Singh, Sunil K Srivastava, Justis P Ehlers, Fabiana Q Silva, Rumneek Bedi, Andrew P Schachat, Peter K Kaiser Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Summary statement: In subjects with active exudative age-related macular degeneration, treating with a fixed intravitreal aflibercept injection dosing regimen for 12 months demonstrated improved anatomic and vision endpoints from baseline.Purpose: Switching therapies in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD may offer an advantage for some patients. This study evaluates the efficacy of intravitreal aflibercept injection (IAI in subjects previously treated with ranibizumab and/or bevacizumab.Methods: Subjects (n=26 were given monthly 2 mg of IAI for 3 months, followed by 2 mg once in every 2 months for up to 12 months. The mean absolute change from baseline in central subfield thickness (CST measured by optical coherence tomography and the mean change from baseline in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA early treatment in diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS letter score were obtained. Additionally, the percentage of subjects who gained or lost ≥15 letters of vision and the percentage of subjects who are 20/40 or better or 20/200 or worse were evaluated.Results: There was a mean decrease in CST of -50.3  µm (P<0.001 and a mean increase in ETDRS BCVA of +9.2 letters (P<0.001. Twenty-seven percent of subjects experienced a  ≥15-letter improvement in visual acuity, and no subject lost ≥3 lines of vision from baseline. Fifty percent of subjects were 20/40 or better, and 11.5% of subjects were 20/200 or worse at month 12.Conclusion: Fixed IAI dosing regimen for 12 months demonstrated improved anatomic and vision endpoints in subjects with active exudative AMD. Keywords: aflibercept, age-related macular degeneration, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, vascular endothelial growth factors

  3. Bulgecin A as a β-lactam enhancer for carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates containing various resistance mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skalweit MJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Marion J Skalweit,1–5 Mei Li2 1Department of Medicine, 2Research Section, 3Infectious Diseases Section, Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans, 4Department of Medicine, 5Department of Biochemistry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Genetic screening of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PSDA and Acinetobacter ­baumannii (ACB reveals genes that confer increased susceptibility to β-lactams when disrupted, suggesting novel drug targets. One such target is lytic transglycosylase. Bulgecin A (BlgA is a natural product of Pseudomonas mesoacidophila and a lytic transglycosolase inhibitor that works synergistically with β-lactams targeting PBP3 for Enterobacteriaceae. BlgA also weakly inhibits di-Zn2+ metallo-β-lactamases like L1 of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We hypothesized that because of its unique mechanism of action, BlgA could restore susceptibility to carbapenems in carbapenem-resistant PSDA (CR-PSDA and carbapenem-resistant ACB, as well as ACB resistant to sulbactam. A BlgA-containing extract was prepared using a previously published protocol. CR-PSDA clinical isolates demonstrating a variety of carbapenem resistance mechanisms (VIM-2 carbapenemases, efflux mechanisms, and AmpC producer expression were characterized with agar dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC testing and polymerase chain reaction. Growth curves using these strains were prepared using meropenem, BlgA extract, and meropenem plus BlgA extract. A concentrated Blg A extract combined with low concentrations of meropenem, was able to inhibit the growth of clinical strains of CR-PSDA for strains that had meropenem MICs ≥8 mg/L by agar dilution, and a clinical strain of an OXA-24 producing ACB that had a meropenem MIC >32 mg/L and intermediate ampicillin/sulbactam susceptibility. Similar experiments were conducted on a TEM-1 producing ACB strain resistant to sulbactam. BlgA with ampicillin/sulbactam inhibited the growth

  4. Parenteral clevidipine for the acute control of blood pressure in the critically ill patient: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Frank Peacock IV

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available W Frank Peacock IV1, Jorge E Angeles2, Karina M Soto2, Philip D Lumb3,  Joseph Varon41The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Facultad de Medicina, Tijuana, México; 3Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital/Texas Heart Institute, Houston, Texas, USAAbstract: Clevidipine is a new calcium channel blocker of the dihydropyridine class that is characterized by its ultra-short onset of action, vascular selectivity, small volume of distribution and extremely high clearance that coupled together result in an extremely short half-life of approximately 1 minute therefore permitting a rapid titration to the desired effect. Structurally similar to other dihydropyridines, clevidipine has an extra ester link that allows its rapid hydrolization to its inactive carboxylic acid metabolite in blood and extravascular tissues. Clevidipine’s metabolites are then primarily eliminated through urine and fecal pathways. Clevidipine does not affect cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes and no clinically significant drug interactions have been determined. In trials like the ESCAPE trials, ECLIPSE, and VELOCITY, clevidipine demonstrated a significant improvement in the management of acute hypertension when compared to placebo as shown in both ESCAPE trials. The ECLIPSE trial compared clevidipine to other drugs currently used in the management of acute hypertension, such as sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerine and nicardipine; clevidipine was superior to all three agents; in providing blood pressure support, safety and tolerability clevidipine also showed a significant reduction in mortality rate (4.7% vs 1.7%, P = 0.0445 when compared to sodium nitroprusside. In the VELOCITY trial clevidipine demonstrated a reduction in blood pressure of 6

  5. A pilot study: portable out-of-center sleep testing as an early sleep apnea screening tool in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev OY

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oleg Y Chernyshev,1 David E McCarty,1 Douglas E Moul,2 Cesar Liendo,1 Gloria C Caldito,1 Sai K Munjampalli,1 Roger E Kelley,3 Andrew L Chesson Jr1 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center at Shreveport, LA 2Sleep Disorders Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3Department of Neurology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA Introduction: Prompt diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA after acute ischemic stroke (AIS is critical for optimal clinical outcomes, but in-laboratory conventional polysomnograms (PSG are not routinely practical. Though portable out-of-center type III cardiopulmonary sleep studies (out-of-center cardiopulmonary sleep testing [OCST] are widely available, these studies have not been validated in patients who have recently suffered from AIS. We hypothesized that OCST in patients with AIS would yield similar results when compared to conventional PSG. Methods: Patients with AIS had simultaneous type III OCST and PSG studies performed within 72 hours from symptom onset. The accuracy of OCST was compared to PSG using: chi-square tests, receiver operatory characteristic curves, Bland–Altman plot, paired Student's t-test/Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and calculation of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV. Results: Twenty-one out of 23 subjects with AIS (age 61±9.4 years; 52% male; 58% African-American successfully completed both studies (9% technical failure. Nearly all (95% had Mallampati IV posterior oropharynx; the mean neck circumference was 16.8±1.6 in. and the mean body mass index (BMI was 30±7 kg/m2. The apnea hypopnea index (AHI provided by OCST was similar to that provided by PSG (19.8±18.0 vs 22.0±22.7, respectively; P=0.49. On identifying subjects by OCST with an AHI ≥5 on PSG, OCST had the following parameters: sensitivity 100%, specificity 85.7%, PPV 93%, and NPV 100%. On identifying

  6. Health care's service fanatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life. PMID:23898737

  7. Investigation of the Utilization of Modern Industrial Methods, Processes, Ergonomics, and the Internet in the Scientific Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Spencer S., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    On Oct. 1, 2001 Cleveland State University and NASA Glenn Research Center embarked on the above named cooperative agreement. Because NASA's research facilities often exhibit instances where the failure to use state-of-the-art technologies and methods to improve on outmoded systems of interface and control, and this runs contrary to the NASA philosophy of "faster, better, and cheaper", it was deemed an ideal opportunity for this collaboration. The main objectives of the proposed effort were to research and investigate the use of the latest technologies, methods, techniques, etc. which pertain to control and interface with industrial and research systems and facilities. The work was done in large part at NASA Glenn Research Center, using selected research facilities as real-world laboratories; such as certain Microgravity Science Division and Space Station projects. Microgravity Science Division at Glenn Research Center designs and builds experiments to be flown on the Space Shuttle and eventually on the International Space Station. Economy of space, weight, complexity, data storage, ergonomics, and many other factors present problems that also exist in industry. Many of the solutions can come from the same areas of study mentioned above.

  8. Health assessment for Carter Lee Lumber Company, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IND016395899. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-06

    The Carter Lee Lumber Company (the site), located at 1621 West Washington Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, has been selling lumber products since 1873. About 1971, Carter Lee bought 2-3 acres of land behind its original property from the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, and St. Louis Railway Corporation, a subsidiary of Penn Central. According to Carter Lee, the railway company, in addition to other unknown individuals, dumped unknown quantities of liquid wastes from tank trucks and railroad cars onto the ground and into a 14-foot deep trench on the property. Surface soil samples were collected in July 1985 by EPA from the trench area where dumping was alleged to have occurred. These samples were contaminated with heavy metals and PHAs at low levels. No sub-surface samples were taken. No air monitoring has been performed. No ground-water samples have been taken. No samples for possible surface water runoff have been taken. Based on the information reviewed, the Indiana State Board of Health has concluded that this site is of potential health concern because of the potential risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse human health effects.

  9. LTCS (Laser Thermal Control System) Test Supporting the Improvement of DeCoM (Deepak Condenser Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop, Cleveland OH. NCTS 19701-14. On Dec 2013 a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) test was performed as part of the integral Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS). During the balance portion of this testing it was noticed that the LHP was not going to be able to maintain temperature on the operational thermal mass. The test was stopped. After multiple meetings with the LTCS designers, LHP experts (in house and external) it was concluded that gravity was preventing the control heaters to maintain control on the reservoir. A heater was installed onto the liquid return line as part of the fix. After implementing the fix on the liquid return line, the test on May 2014 proved that the system works in vertical orientation using the liquid line heater. Through this testing, the correlation of the Deepak Condenser Model (DeCoM) was possible. This paper describes how well DeCoM predicts the condenser behavior in comparison to the test results of LTCS test.

  10. Blood and war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2010-09-01

    In 1894 Ulsterman and pathologist Almroth Wright described the citation of blood. Twenty-one years later it was introduced into wartime and clinical practice. Harvard Medical School had a large part in providing Colonel Andrew Fullerton, later Professor of Surgery, Queen's Belfast, with the intellectual and practical help for the Allies to deploy blood on the post-Somme Western Front and in Salonika. The key investigators and clinicians were Americans and Canadians who with Fullerton and Wright instructed the Allies. The key enablers were two Harvard-trained surgeons surnamed Robertson-Oswald H. ("Robby") and L. Bruce (no relation). Physician Roger I. Lee of Harvard, surgeon George W Crile of Cleveland, Peyton Rous of the Rockefeller Institute and Richard Lewisohn of Mount Sinai Hospital, both located in the Upper East Side of New York City, played key roles.By Armistice in 1918, indirect citrated nutrient-enhanced blood transfusion was widely used by the Allies. Geoffrey Keynes was taught the techniques of blood transfusion by Dr. Benjamin Harrison Alton of Harvard at a Casualty Clearing Station near Albert at the time of the Battle of Passchendaele. Professor "Robby" Robertson, DSO, Sir Geoffrey Keynes and Sir Thomas Houston established blood banking.

  11. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  12. Commentary: Recommendations and remaining questions for health care leadership training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2013-01-01

    Effective leadership is critical for optimizing cost, access, and quality in health care. Creating a pipeline of effective health care leaders requires developing leadership competencies that differ from the usual criteria of clinical and scientific excellence by which physicians have traditionally been promoted to leadership positions. Specific competencies that differentiate effective leaders from average leaders, especially emotional intelligence and its component abilities, are essential for effective leadership.Adopting a long-standing practice from successful corporations, some health care institutions, medical societies, and business schools now offer leadership programs that address these differentiating leadership competencies. The author draws on experience with such programs through the Cleveland Clinic Academy to provide recommendations for health care leadership training and to identify unanswered questions about such programs.The author recommends that such training should be broadly available to all health care leadership communities (i.e., nurses, administrators, and physicians). A progressive curriculum, starting with foundational concepts and extending to coaching and feedback opportunities through experiential learning, recognizes the challenge of becoming an effective leader and the long time line needed to do so. Linking leadership courses to continuing medical education and to graduate credit opportunities is appealing to participants. Other recommendations focus on the importance of current leaders' involvement in nominating emerging leaders for participation, embedding leadership development discussions in faculty's professional reviews, and blending discussion of frameworks and theory with practical, experiential lessons. The author identifies questions about the benefits of formal health care leadership training that remain to be answered.

  13. Making the grade in a portfolio-based system: student performance and the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student) and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P) students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG) students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG). Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student's perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade) reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement. PMID:23565103

  14. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines. Phase III Final Report for the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Under Phase III of NASA Research Announcement contract NAS3-03124, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated and tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. The team for this effort consisted of Cleveland State University, Gedeon Associates, Sunpower Inc. and International Mezzo Technologies. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator was made from a low-conductivity material. Also, the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator s low flow resistance; thus, the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) are included. The report also includes recommendations for further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  15. 1986 James B. Macelwane Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, Peter J.; Stolper, Edward M.

    I can think of few things more pleasurable than introducing a young scientist whose research has enhanced his visibility to such an extent that his or her image is clearly distinguishable from among the large number of young scientists publishing excellent research these days.Normally, the recipient of a young scientist award is in a state approaching shock, with mixed feelings of pride and humility and appreciation for all those who guided him or her on the way. For Ed Stolper, however, the situation is different, and he is sitting here quite calmly. Although he is only 33 years old, his image shines brightly enough that it has received attention previously—He was awarded the Clarke Medal of the Geochemical Society in 1985, and he shared the Newcomb Cleveland Prize in 1985 with Sally Rigden and Tom Ahrens for the best 1984 paper in Science. Today it is the Macelwane Award of the American Geophysical Union, and there are still several tomorrows before his age disqualifies him as a young scientist, making it necessary for him to start getting down to serious, mature research.

  16. Considerations for The Instruction Of Research Methodologies In Graduate-Level Distance Education Degree Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cleveland-INNERS

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerations for The Instruction Of Research Methodologies In Graduate-Level Distance Education Degree Programs Tom JONES, Ph.D. Associate Professor Centre for Distance Education Athabasca University, CANADA M. Cleveland-INNERS, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Centre for Distance Education Athabasca University, CANADA ABSTRACT The growth of basic and applied research activity in distance education requires redirection on several fronts, including the instruction of research methods in the education of graduate students. The majority of graduate students in distance education are practitioners whose goals range from carrying out original research to acquiring the concepts and skills necessary to become a practitioner. We argue that the best foundation for achieving both of those goals in distance education is developed by means of an understanding and internalization of sound research design methodologies, primarily acquired by formal instruction, and that an emphasis on research in graduate programs in distance education will encourage theory development. This paper presents the rationale for a general curricular model that attempts to address the sets of research competencies for graduate students in graduate-level distance education programs while at the same time moving students toward an appreciation and understanding of the epistemological foundations for social science research.

  17. Making the grade in a portfolio-based system: student performance and the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy S. Nowacki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG. Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student’s perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement.

  18. Significance of population centers as sources of gaseous and dissolved PAHs in the lower Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Carrie A; Khairy, Mohammed A; Muir, Derek C G; Lohmann, Rainer

    2014-07-15

    Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were used to measure concentrations of gaseous and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the air and water throughout the lower Great Lakes during summer and fall of 2011. Atmospheric Σ15PAH concentrations ranged from 2.1 ng/m3 in Cape Vincent (NY) to 76.4 ng/m3 in downtown Cleveland (OH). Aqueous Σ18PAH concentrations ranged from 2.4 ng/L at an offshore Lake Erie site to 30.4 ng/L in Sheffield Lake (OH). Gaseous PAH concentrations correlated strongly with population within 3-40 km of the sampling site depending on the compound considered, suggesting that urban centers are a primary source of gaseous PAHs (except retene) in the lower Great Lakes region. The significance of distant population (within 20 km) versus local population (within 3 km) increased with subcooled liquid vapor pressure. Most dissolved aqueous PAHs did not correlate significantly with population, nor were they consistently related to river discharge, wastewater effluents, or precipitation. Air-water exchange calculations implied that diffusive exchange was a source of phenanthrene to surface waters, while acenaphthylene volatilized out of the lakes. Comparison of air-water fluxes with temperature suggested that the significance of urban centers as sources of dissolved PAHs via diffusive exchange may decrease in warmer months.

  19. Coordination of Swarmed Unmanned Ground Vehicles using Self Organization Mapping with Generic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Shekhar

    2009-03-01

    The methodologies for path planning for individual UGVs have been well studied and modeled. The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) is an example of such study. However, there is no reliable method of communication among swarmed UGVs. The author along with other collaborators, Dr. Wei Cao of NASA Research Center and Dr. James Burghart of Cleveland State University, proposes a Master-slave approach for the coordinated management of UGVs using Neural Networks. SOM is used to work with GA to update the patterns of UGVs for coordination among themselves and with ground station(s). One (or more) UGV with advanced computational power and virtual link to other ground stations serves as the Master. SOM and GA reside on the Master as well as ground stations. All other UGVs behave as slaves. The individual UGVs conducts its own or grouped path planning. Using Matlab,, the prototype version of SOM and GA for swamed UGVs was simulated and tested with an advanced multi-UGV system. The author will present the results followed by the outlook for the future work.

  20. Does plasmin have anticoagulant activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Hoover-Plow

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-PlowJoseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Lerner Research Institute Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USAAbstract: The coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways regulate hemostasis and thrombosis, and an imbalance in these pathways may result in pathologic hemophilia or thrombosis. The plasminogen system is the primary proteolytic pathway for fibrinolysis, but also has important proteolytic functions in cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation, metalloproteinase activation, and hormone processing. Several studies have demonstrated plasmin cleavage and inactivation of several coagulation factors, suggesting plasmin may be not only be the primary fibrinolytic enzyme, but may have anticoagulant properties as well. The objective of this review is to examine both in vitro and in vivo evidence for plasmin inactivation of coagulation, and to consider whether plasmin may act as a physiological regulator of coagulation. While several studies have demonstrated strong evidence for plasmin cleavage and inactivation of coagulation factors FV, FVIII, FIX, and FX in vitro, in vivo evidence is lacking for a physiologic role for plasmin as an anticoagulant. However, inactivation of coagulation factors by plasmin may be useful as a localized anticoagulant therapy or as a combined thrombolytic and anticoagulant therapy.Keywords: thrombosis, anticoagulant, cardiovascular disease, plasminogen’s protease, blood

  1. Implementing a low-starch biscuit-free diet in zoo gorillas: the impact on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Less, E H; Lukas, K E; Bergl, R; Ball, R; Kuhar, C W; Lavin, S R; Raghanti, M A; Wensvoort, J; Willis, M A; Dennis, P M

    2014-01-01

    In the wild, western lowland gorillas consume a diet high in fiber and low in caloric density. In contrast, many gorillas in zoos consume a diet that is high-calorie and low in fiber. Some items commonly used in captive gorilla diets contain high levels of starch and sugars, which are minimal in the natural diet of gorillas. There is a growing concern that captive gorillas may qualify as obese. Furthermore, the leading cause of death for adult male gorillas in zoos is heart disease. In humans, a diet that is high in simple carbohydrates is associated with both obesity and the incidence of heart disease. In response to these issues, we implemented a biscuit-free diet (free of biscuits and low in fruit) and measured serum biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance pre- and post-diet change at three institutions: North Carolina Zoological Garden, Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, and Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. We also added a resistant starch supplement to gorilla diets at two of the above institutions. We anticipated that these diet changes would positively affect biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance. Both diet manipulations led to a reduction in insulin. Resistant starch also decreased overall serum cholesterol levels. Future research will examine these health changes in a greater number of individuals to determine if the results remain consistent with these preliminary findings.

  2. My 65 years in acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2001-05-01

    My entry into acoustics began as research assistant to Professor F. V. Hunt at Harvard University. I received my doctorate in 1940 and directed the Electro-Acoustic Laboratory at Harvard from October 1940 until September 1945. In 1947, I became a tenured associate professor at MIT, and, with Richard H. Bolt, formed the consulting firm Bolt and Beranek, that later included Robert B. Newman, becoming BBN. My most significant contributions before 1970 were design of wedge-lined anechoic chambers, systemization of noise reduction in ventilation systems, design of the world's largest muffler for the testing of supersonic jet engines at NASA's Lewis Laboratory in Cleveland, speech interference level, NC noise criterion curves, heading New York Port Authority's noise study that resulted in mufflers on jet aircraft, and steep aircraft climb procedures, and publishing books titled, Acoustical Measurements, Acoustics, Noise Reduction, Noise and Vibration Control, and Music, Acoustics and Architecture. As President of BBN, I supervised the formation of the group that built and operated the ARPANET (1969), which, when split in two (using TCP/IP protocol) became the INTERNET (1984). Since then, I have written two books on Concert Halls and Opera Houses and have consulted on four concert halls and an opera house.

  3. Long-Term Dynamics of Small Bodies in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Steve (Technical Monitor); Holman, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics program Prof. Norm Murray (CITA) and I have been conducting investigations of the long-term dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system. This grant, and its predecessor NAG5-7761, supported travel for collaboration by the Investigators and also supports Murray during an annual one month visit to the CfA for further collaboration. In the course of this grant we made a number of advances in solar system dynamics. For example, we developed an analytic model for the origin and consequence of chaos associated with three-body resonances in the asteroid belt. This has been shown to be important for the delivery of near Earth objects. We later extended this model to three-body resonances among planets. We were able to show that the numerically identified chaos among the outer planets results from a three-body resonance involving Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The resulting paper was awarded the 1999 Newcomb Cleveland award from the AAAS. This award singles out one paper published in Science each year for distinction. This grant has also supported, in part, my participate in other solar system dynamics projects. The results from those collaborations are also listed.

  4. Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Development. Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Blake, Kara M.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-30

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy projects are not well understood, and regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. To examine the environmental risks associated with OSW developments in the U.S. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) focused on the following four priority research areas in FY 2012: • Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) - Followed project developments on the two OSW projects that PNNL screened in FY 2011 for environmental consequence: Fishermen’s Energy off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ and LEEDCo. near Cleveland, OH in Lake Erie. • Tethys - Developed a smart knowledge base which houses environmental research, data and information pertaining to OSW energy: • Technical Assessment - Produced a new software to create an automated process of identifying and differentiating between flying organism such as birds and bats by using thermal imagery; and • North Atlantic Right Whales - Developed an environmental risk management system to mitigate the impacts on North Atlantic Right Whales (NARW) during installation and piledriving stages of OSW developments. By identifying and addressing the highest priority environmental risks for OSW devices and associated installations the ERES process assists project proponents, regulators, and stakeholders to engage in the most efficient and effective siting and permitting pathways.

  5. Improving empathy of physicians through guided reflective writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita D. Misra-Hebert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was designed to explore how guided reflective writing could evoke empathy and reflection in a group of practicing physicians. Methods: Total participants recruited included 40 staff physicians at Cleveland Clinic, a tertiary care academic medical center. Twenty physicians (intervention group were assigned to participate in a 6-session faculty development program introducing narrative medicine and engaging in guided reflective writing. Ten physicians (comparison group 1 received the assigned course reading materials but did not participate in the course sessions. Ten physicians (comparison group 2 neither received the reading materials nor participated in the sessions. Qualitative analysis of the physicians' reflective writings was performed to identify major themes. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy was administered three times during the course. Results: Qualitative analysis of physicians' writings showed themes of both compassionate solidarity and detached concern. Exploration of negative emotions occurred more frequently than positive ones. The most common writing style was case presentation. A total of 36 staff physicians completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy. Results of statistical analysis suggested an improvement in empathy in the intervention group at the end of the course (p < 0 .05. Conclusions: These results suggest a faculty development program using guided narrative writing can promote reflection and may enhance empathy among practicing physicians. These findings should encourage medical educators to design additional strategies for enhancing reflection and empathic behavior in trainees and specifically practicing physicians who can role model these behaviors to achieve the ultimate goal of improving the quality of patient care.

  6. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118. PMID:27088040

  7. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu John

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n=34; control group, n=24. Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  8. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turboalternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  9. Deregulation, Distrust, and Democracy: State and Local Action to Ensure Equitable Access to Healthy, Sustainably Produced Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Lindsay F

    2015-01-01

    Environmental, public health, alternative food, and food justice advocates are working together to achieve incremental agricultural subsidy and nutrition assistance reforms that increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables. When it comes to targeting food and beverage products for increased regulation and decreased consumption, however, the priorities of various food reform movements diverge. This article argues that foundational legal issues, including preemption of state and local authority to protect the public's health and welfare, increasing First Amendment protection for commercial speech, and eroding judicial deference to legislative policy judgments, present a more promising avenue for collaboration across movements than discrete food reform priorities around issues like sugary drinks, genetic modification, or organics. Using the Vermont Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) Labeling Act litigation, the Kauai GMO Cultivation Ordinance litigation, the New York City Sugary Drinks Portion Rule litigation, and the Cleveland Trans Fat Ban litigation as case studies, I discuss the foundational legal challenges faced by diverse food reformers, even when their discrete reform priorities diverge. I also 'explore the broader implications of cooperation among groups that respond differently to the "irrationalities" (from the public health perspective) or "values" (from the environmental and alternative food perspective) that permeate public risk perception for democratic governance in the face of scientific uncertainty.

  10. Controls and Health Management Technologies for Intelligent Aerospace Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2004-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges through the concept of an Intelligent Engine. The key enabling technologies for an Intelligent Engine are the increased efficiencies of components through active control, advanced diagnostics and prognostics integrated with intelligent engine control to enhance component life, and distributed control with smart sensors and actuators in an adaptive fault tolerant architecture. This paper describes the current activities of the Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch in the areas of active component control and propulsion system intelligent control, and presents some recent analytical and experimental results in these areas.

  11. Initial crisis risk communications: A success story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, S.B. (TECH-PLAN, Olney, MD (United States)); Traverso, D.K. (Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co., Perry, OH (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Federal regulations require nuclear facilities to be prepared for the risk communication aspects of a catastrophic emergency. Thus, all nuclear plants have provisions for a Joint Public Information Center (JPIC). The JPICs are designed to handle more than 300 media for 24 hours a day; to coordinate information among utility, federal, state, and local agencies; to provide spokespersons; etc. For a large-scale emergency, JPICs can work very well. However, some utilities - indeed, most companies - appear to have only two modes of emergency communication response: normal staff and JPIC. Experience has shown that normal staffing is inadequate to handle the risk communication response for media-intensive low-level emergencies and for the initial stages of an escalating emergency. It is clear that initial response will determine how well a company fares in its overall emergency response and in its long-term relations with the media and public. A solution to this risk communication challenge was developed by Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company's Perry Nuclear Plant - the Public Information Response Team. Using existing facilities and staff - only one of whom works regularly with the media - the Perry plant proactively manages its initial risk communication response.

  12. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Frontiers of High-Pressure Research

    CERN Document Server

    Etters, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The role of high pressure experiments in the discovery of supercon­ ducting materials with a T. above liquid nitrogen temperature has demon­ strated the importance of such experiments. The same role holds true in the tailoring of materials for optoelectronic devices. In addition, much progress has been made recently in the search for metallic hydro­ gen, and the application of high pressure in polymer research has brought forth interesting results. These facts together with the suc­ cess of previous small size meetings (such as the "First International Conference on the Physics of Solids at High Pressure", held in 1965 in Tucson, Arizona, U. S. A. ; "High Pressure and Low Temperature Physics", held in 1977 in Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. ; and "Physics of Solids Under High Pressure", held in 1981 in bad Honnef, Germany), motivated us to organize a workshop with emphasis on the newest results and trends in these fields of high pressure research. Furthermore, it was intended to mix experienced and young scien�...

  13. Terrestrial photovoltaic power systems with sunlight concentration. Annual progress report, January 1, 1975--December 31, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, C.E.

    1976-01-31

    This annual report is for the second year of a program to investigate the characteristics of the components and the total system using sunlight concentrated onto solar cells. The second year was primarily to experimentally investigate the conclusions of the first year of analytical studies. Cells have been fabricated that are designed for different intensities. Typically the efficiency of a cell will increase from its 11 percent at AM1 peak to efficiency at the designed concentration level and return to its initial efficiency at about 3 times its designed concentration level. The developed cells have been tested under high intensity simulators and in concentrated sunlight and have shown to have the predicted response. The experimental testing of passive cooling limitations for cooling cells with just finned arrangements in the back of the cell has been completed in the controlled environment of a wind tunnel. These experiments have confirmed the heat transfer coefficients that had been used in the analytical studies. Testing was done to collect heat transfer coefficients for actual wind conditions and these data show good agreement with the controlled wind tunnel data. Four photovoltaic/concentrator system experiments have been started with CR of about 3, 10, 25, and 100. System analysis has indicated that photovoltaic concentration systems may be attractive in low solar irradiation areas such as Cleveland.

  14. Trends in Marine Turtle Strandings along the East Queensland, Australia Coast, between 1996 and 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaylene Flint

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In-water monitoring of marine vertebrates is usually expensive while the use of stranding data can be used to provide a cost-effective estimation of disease and mortality. Strandings for Queensland are recorded in a web based database (StrandNet managed by the Queensland Government’s Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (EHP. Data recorded in StrandNet from the east coast of Queensland between 1996 and 2013 were investigated for patterns of stranding. Significant trends in Queensland over this time were (i an increase in the number of animals reported stranded within this study site; (ii a species (loggerhead and green marine turtles prevalence; (iii a seasonal effect on different age classes stranding with most overall strandings occurring between August and November; and (iv stranding hotspots (Moreton Bay, Hervey Bay, Rockhampton region, and Cleveland Bays persisting throughout the study timeframe. This study suggested that intervention strategies, such as rehabilitation, should be able to be focussed on periods of heightened importance and specific localities to minimize health risks and contribute to sustainable use of resources.

  15. Driving Organic Molecule Crystalliztion with Surface Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Jessica; Trovato, Gianfranco

    This work examines how surface reconstructions can drive crystallization of organic molecules via self-assembly. Organic electronic molecules have low conductivities compared to inorganic materials, but crystallizing these polymers increases their conductivity. This project uses surface reconstructions with periodically repeating topographies to drive the crystallization process. The samples are grown by placing a drop of a dilute PEDOT solution on the clean Si(001)-(2x1) or Si(111)-(7x7) surface reconstruction and heating the surface up to both evaporate the solvent and promote diffusion of the polymer to the thermodynamically defined lowest energy position. The resulting samples are characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with respect to their crystallinity and electronic properties. Of particular interest is whether there is a preferential location for the PEDOT molecule to adsorb and whether there are any conformational changes upon adsorption that modify the HOMO-LUMO gap. This work is being done in a new pan-style RHK-STM enclosed in a glovebox at Cleveland State University. The glovebox has O2 and H2O levels of less than 1ppm. This allows for sample preparation and imaging in a controlled environment that is free from contamination.

  16. The density-driven circulation of the coastal hypersaline system of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamena, Gerry G; Martins, Flávio; Ridd, Peter V

    2016-04-15

    The coastal hypersaline system of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in the dry season, was investigated for the first time using a 3D baroclinic model. In the shallow coastal embayments, salinity increases to c.a. 1‰ above typical offshore salinity (~35.4‰). This salinity increase is due to high evaporation rates and negligible freshwater input. The hypersalinity drifts longshore north-westward due to south-easterly trade winds and may eventually pass capes or headlands, e.g. Cape Cleveland, where the water is considerably deeper (c.a. 15m). Here, a pronounced thermohaline circulation is predicted to occur which flushes the hypersalinity offshore at velocities of up to 0.08m/s. Flushing time of the coastal embayments is around 2-3weeks. During the dry season early summer, the thermohaline circulation reduces and therefore, flushing times are predicted to be slight longer due to the reduced onshore-offshore density gradient compared to that in the dry season winter period.

  17. Plerixafor for autologous CD34+ cell mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Salman

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Huda Salman, Hillard M LazarusDivision of Hematology-Oncology, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: High-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic cells is a crucial treatment option for hematologic malignancy patients. Current mobilization regimes often do not provide adequate numbers of CD34+ cells. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and ligand SDF-1 are integrally involved in homing and mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Disruption of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis by the CXCR4 antagonist, plerixafor, has been demonstrated in Phase II and Phase III trials to improve mobilization when used in conjunction with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. This approach is safe with few adverse events and produces significantly greater numbers of CD34+ cells when compared to G-CSF alone. New plerixafor initiatives include use in volunteer donors for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant and in other disease targets.Keywords: plerixafor, autologous hematopoietic cell transplant, CD34, lymphoma, myeloma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF

  18. Prevention of cervical, vaginal, and vulval cancers: role of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (6, 11, 16, 18 recombinant vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lina Diaz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Maria Lina DiazSection of Ambulatory Gynecology Cleveland Clinic Florida Weston, Florida, USAAbstract: The relationship between the human papillomavirus (HPV and malignancies of the uterine cervix, vagina, and vulva has been established. The development of a quadrivalent HPV recombinant prophylactic vaccine represents the first time in history that primary prevention of these cancers is offered to girls and women. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV subtypes in cervical cancers has been the most studied, but prevalence has also been established for vaginal and vulvar cancers. Clinical trials demonstrate impressive efficacy in disease prevention as well as excellent safety and tolerability. The role the quadrivalent HPV recombinant vaccine promises to have in the reduction of gynecologic malignancies will depend on various factors, including acceptance and accessibility of the vaccine, duration of immunity, and cross-protection against other oncogenic HPV subtypes. The HPV vaccine’s role in disease reduction will probably be viewed in the context of a strategy that involves continued secondary screening and lifestyle modification to reduce modifiable risk factors, along with widespread vaccination.Keywords: human papillomavirus, quadrivalent vaccine, cervical cancer, vaginal cancer, vulvar cancer

  19. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Linda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. Methods This course was developed and used at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and its associated preceptorship sites in the greater Cleveland area. Leaders of a two-year elective continuity experience at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine used adult learning principles to develop four interactive online modules presenting basics of office practice, difficult patient interviews, common primary care diagnoses, and disease prevention. They can be viewed at http://casemed.case.edu/cpcp/curriculum. Students completed surveys rating the content and technical performance of each module and completed a Generalist OSCE exam at the end of the course. Results Participating students rated all aspects of the course highly; particularly those related to charting and direct patient care. Additionally, they scored very well on the Generalist OSCE exam. Conclusion Students found the web-based modules to be valuable and to enhance their clinical learning. The blended learning model is a useful tool in designing web-based curriculum for enhancing the clinical curriculum of medical students.

  20. Research continues on zebra mussel control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers are working on many fronts to learn methods for controlling and combatting zebra mussels, a species of mussel that can attach to the inside of water intakes at hydroelectric and thermal power plants, and can reduce or block water flow. Biologists at the University of Toledo in Ohio report that compounds from the African soapberry plant called lemmatoxins are lethal to zebra mussels. In laboratory tests, researchers have determined 1 to 2 milligrams of purified lemmatoxins per liter will kill the mussels. In field tests, biologist Harold Lee flushed water through a mussel-infested pipe. He found that the berry extract killed mussels in four to eight hours, making continuous treatment of water intake pipes unnecessary, according to a report in New Scientists. The University of Toledo participated in another project, funded by the American Water Works Association Research Foundation. That project team included the cities of Toledo and Cleveland, Ohio, Finkbeiner, Pettis ampersand Strout, Ltd. consulting engineers, and researchers from Ohio's Case Western Reserve University. The team identified a chemical oxidant, sodium hypochlorite, as a cost-effective agent for controlling zebra mussels at water treatment plant intakes. Toledo has used the sodium hypochlorite and reports the chemical has cleared colonies of zebra mussels that had attached to the intake of its water treatment plant

  1. Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest Research Institute

    2013-11-25

    The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

  2. Ethical Discourse about the Modification of Food for Therapeutic Purposes: How Patients with Gastrointestinal Diseases View the Good, the Bad, and the Healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Krista L; Geller, Gail; Marshall, Patricia; Tilburt, Jon; Mercer, Marybeth; Brinich, Margaret A; Highland, Janelle; Farrell, Ruth M; Sharp, Richard R

    2012-07-01

    BACKGROUND: Researchers have the potential to utilize genetic modification (GM) technologies to create a hybrid of "food" and "medicine" that may challenge traditional understandings of what is "natural". Moral and ethical concerns are likely to arise in any discussion of these therapeutic foods and will affect the integration of products into clinical care and daily life. This study examined how patients with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) diseases view probiotics as future bioengineered therapeutic foods. METHODS: A multi-site qualitative study consisting of focus groups with chronic GI diseases was conducted at Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic, and Johns Hopkins University RESULTS: We conducted twenty-two focus groups with 136 patients with major GI diseases between March and August 2009. GI patients associated the term "natural" with concepts of diminished risk and morally "good"; conversely, patients associated the term "unnatural" with things that are "risky," "foreign", and morally "bad". Readily available unmodified probiotics were more commonly described as "natural" while genetically modified probiotics were more commonly labeled as "unnatural" and "risky". However, patients acknowledged that not all natural products are safe, nor are unnatural products always harmful. CONCLUSIONS: If GI patient perspectives are indicative of public perceptions of therapeutic foods, our findings suggest that the potential benefits and risks of clinical and public health initiatives employing therapeutic foods will be understood in moralistic terms. Bioethicists and others should be sensitive to the implicit normative appeals that are often embedded in the language of what is "natural" and "unnatural". PMID:22773953

  3. An Engine Research Program Focused on Low Pressure Turbine Aerodynamic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Wyzykowski, John; Chiapetta, Santo; Adamczyk, John

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive test program was performed in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland Ohio using a highly instrumented Pratt and Whitney Canada PW 545 turbofan engine. A key objective of this program was the development of a high-altitude database on small, high-bypass ratio engine performance and operability. In particular, the program documents the impact of altitude (Reynolds Number) on the aero-performance of the low-pressure turbine (fan turbine). A second objective was to assess the ability of a state-of-the-art CFD code to predict the effect of Reynolds number on the efficiency of the low-pressure turbine. CFD simulation performed prior and after the engine tests will be presented and discussed. Key findings are the ability of a state-of-the art CFD code to accurately predict the impact of Reynolds Number on the efficiency and flow capacity of the low-pressure turbine. In addition the CFD simulations showed the turbulent intensity exiting the low-pressure turbine to be high (9%). The level is consistent with measurements taken within an engine.

  4. Deregulation, Distrust, and Democracy: State and Local Action to Ensure Equitable Access to Healthy, Sustainably Produced Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Lindsay F

    2015-01-01

    Environmental, public health, alternative food, and food justice advocates are working together to achieve incremental agricultural subsidy and nutrition assistance reforms that increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables. When it comes to targeting food and beverage products for increased regulation and decreased consumption, however, the priorities of various food reform movements diverge. This article argues that foundational legal issues, including preemption of state and local authority to protect the public's health and welfare, increasing First Amendment protection for commercial speech, and eroding judicial deference to legislative policy judgments, present a more promising avenue for collaboration across movements than discrete food reform priorities around issues like sugary drinks, genetic modification, or organics. Using the Vermont Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) Labeling Act litigation, the Kauai GMO Cultivation Ordinance litigation, the New York City Sugary Drinks Portion Rule litigation, and the Cleveland Trans Fat Ban litigation as case studies, I discuss the foundational legal challenges faced by diverse food reformers, even when their discrete reform priorities diverge. I also 'explore the broader implications of cooperation among groups that respond differently to the "irrationalities" (from the public health perspective) or "values" (from the environmental and alternative food perspective) that permeate public risk perception for democratic governance in the face of scientific uncertainty. PMID:26591820

  5. Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrik, Michael [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ruhl, Robert [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels. Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

  6. Determinations of the OER and RBE for therapeutic neutron beams generated by p+→Be or d+→Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical trials with neutrons as an alternative to x-rays for the treatment of cancer are underway but have been difficult because (1) the depth dose or dose-rate has been inadequate with the more compact machines which are more common in major hospitals; or (2) the larger cyclotrons which produce more energetic charged particle beams and, consequently, better depth doses and shorter treatment times are located in physics departments frequently remote from major hospitals. The new generation of neutron therapy machines in the US will be hospital-based cyclotrons, having good percentage depth doses, a high output and an isocentric mount, made possible by changing the neutron production process from deuterons on beryllium to protrons on beryllium. The experiments using Chinese hamster V79 cells described here were performed at the Cleveland NASA cyclotron where the physical and biological properties of a 43-MeV p+→Be neutron beam are being studied with a view to using this modality for patient treatment. Questions involving RBE and OER of the beam are examined in this paper

  7. CROSS-NATIONAL APPLICABILITY OF A PARSIMONIOUS MEASURE OF ACCULTURATION TO GLOBAL CONSUMER CULTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durvasula, Srinivas; Lysonski, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Cleveland and Laroche presented a scale to measure Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture. This measure was the first attempt to gauge consumer mindsets regarding their adaptation to global consumerism. Because this scale consisted of 57 scale items, applying such a lengthy scale can lead to response fatigue. Past research has also suggested that as more items are added to a scale, the informational value of each additional item is marginal. As an alternative, a shorter version of the Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture Scale is presented. The psychometric properties of this scale were verified via multiple group confirmatory factor analysis. A four-country investigation of young adults in China (n = 126; M age = 22.24 yr., SD = 3.63), New Zealand (n = 196; M age = 20.12 yr., SD = 4.12), Nigeria (n = 146; M age = 23.09 yr., SD = 3.80), and the United States (n = 120; M age = 21.67 yr., SD = 4.26) provides support for the cross-national applicability of the proposed parsimonious measure. Limitations and extensions are discussed. PMID:26030207

  8. An aerial radiological survey of the former Chemetron factory site and surrounding area, Newburgh Heights, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period April 15--27, 1991, over an area surrounding the former location of a Chemetron Corporation factory and an associated disposal site. The area surveyed is situated in Newburgh Heights, Ohio, 3 kilometers south of Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the gamma ray environment of the former factory and dump site and surrounding area. Contour maps showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level were constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. The exposure rates measured within the survey region were generally uniform and typical of natural background: 3--7 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), excluding an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 μR/h. Enhanced exposure rates not attributable to natural background were measured over three areas within the survey region. Two areas, both within the boundary of a sewage processing plant, showed evidence of cobalt-60 (60CO). A third area, measured over a chemical factory, showed evidence of thorium-232 (232Th). Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized ionization chamber measurements were obtained at seven locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements are in agreement with the aerial data

  9. Chamber and field evaluations of air pollution tolerances of urban trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnosky, D.F.

    1981-04-01

    Results are presented for a study of the relative air pollution tolerances of 32 urban-tree cultivars as determined by both chamber fumigations and field exposures. Tolerances to ozone and sulfur dioxide, alone and in combination, were determined using short-term, acute doses administered while the plants were inside a plastic fumigation chamber located inside the Cary Arboretum greenhouses. In a follow-up study still underway, representatives of the same cultivars were outplanted at four locations in the greater New York City area. To date, only oxidant-type injury has been observed on trees in the field plots. Cultivars tolerant to all chamber and field exposures were Acer platanoides Cleveland, Crimson King, Emerald Queen, Jade Glen, and Summershade; Acer rubrum Autumn Flame and Red Sunset; Acer saccharum Green Mountain and Temple's Upright; Fagus sylvatica Rotundifolia; Fraxinus pennsylvanica Summit; and Ginkgo biloba Fastigate and Sentry. Cultivars sensitive to ozone as determined by the chamber and field tests and that may serve as bioindicators of the presence of ozone were Gleditsia triacanthos inermis imperial and Platanus acerifolia Bloodgood.

  10. Talking with members of the globalization of materials R&D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byko, Maureen

    2006-03-01

    The Committee on Globalization of Materials Research and Development was appointed by the U.S. National Research Council in December 2003. Its charge: to assess the status and impacts of the globalization of materials R&D. The 12-member committee, which included representatives from both U.S. and international academia and industry, published its findings in August 2005 in the form of a report Globalization of Materials R&D —Time for a National Strategy. To gain some perspective on the report's findings, JOM spoke with representatives of the committee, retired from Alcoa; Gordon Geiger, director of the engineering management program and professor of industrial engineering at the University of Arizona; Jennie Hwang, president of H-Technologies Group in Cleveland. Ohio: and Michael Jaffe, director, Medical Device Concept Laboratory of New Jersey Institute of Technology and associate research professor at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey. See the sidebar for a listing of the committee's recommendations. The interviews were conducted by e-mail and telephone; respondents chose which questions to answer.

  11. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  12. Monitoring Local Strain in a Thermal Barrier Coating System Under Thermal Mechanical Gas Turbine Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manero, Albert; Sofronsky, Stephen; Knipe, Kevin; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M.; Raghavan, Seetha; Bartsch, Marion

    2015-07-01

    Advances in aircraft and land-based turbine engines have been increasing the extreme loading conditions on traditional engine components and have incited the need for improved performance with the use of protective coatings. These protective coatings shield the load-bearing super alloy blades from the high-temperature combustion gases by creating a thermal gradient over their thickness. This addition extends the life and performance of blades. A more complete understanding of the behavior, failure mechanics, and life expectancy for turbine blades and their coatings is needed to enhance and validate simulation models. As new thermal-barrier-coated materials and deposition methods are developed, strides to effectively test, evaluate, and prepare the technology for industry deployment are of paramount interest. Coupling the experience and expertise of researchers at the University of Central Florida, The German Aerospace Center, and Cleveland State University with the world-class synchrotron x-ray beam at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratory, the synergistic collaboration has yielded previously unseen measurements to look inside the coating layer system for in situ strain measurements during representative service loading. These findings quantify the in situ strain response on multilayer thermal barrier coatings and shed light on the elastic and nonelastic properties of the layers and the role of mechanical load and internal cooling variations on the response. The article discusses the experimental configuration and development of equipment to perform in situ strain measurements on multilayer thin coatings and provides an overview of the achievements thus far.

  13. Results From the Physics of Colloids Experiment on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, David; Bailey, Arthur; Manley, Suliana; Prasad, Vikram; Christianson, Rebecca; Sankaran, Subramanian; Doherty, Michael; Jankovsky, Amy; Lorik, Tibor; Shiley, William

    2002-12-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment was accommodated within International Space Station (ISS) EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack 2 and was remotely operated from early June 2001 until February 2002 from NASA Glenn Research Center's Telescience Support Center (TSC) in Cleveland, Ohio, and from the remote site at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. PCS was launched on 4/19/2001 on Space Shuttle STS-100. The experiment was activated on 5/31/2001. The entire experimental setup performed remarkably well, and accomplished 2400 hours of science operations on-orbit. The sophisticated instrumentation in PCS is capable of dynamic and static light scattering from 11 to 169 degrees, Bragg scattering over the range from 10 to 60 degrees, dynamic and static light scattering at low angles from 0.3 to 6.0 degrees, and color imaging. The long duration microgravity environment on the ISS facilitated extended studies on the growth and coarsening characteristics of binary crystals. The de-mixing of the colloid-polymer critical-point sample was also studied as it phase-separated into two phases. Further, aging studies on a col-pol gel, gelation rate studies in extremely low concentration fractal gels over several days, and studies on a glass sample, all provided valuable information. Several exciting and unique aspects of these results are discussed here.

  14. Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Don (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International, Inc., documenting work performed during the period December 2004 through August 2007 for the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Revolutionary Aero-Space Engine Research (RASER) Program, Contract No. NAS3-01136, Task Order 8, Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I. The NASA Task Manager was Dr. Joe Grady of the NASA Glenn Research Center. The NASA Contract Officer was Mr. Albert Spence of the NASA Glenn Research Center. This report is for a test program in which NASA funded engine validations of integrated technologies that reduce aircraft engine noise. These technologies address the reduction of engine fan and jet noise, and noise associated with propulsion/airframe integration. The results of these tests will be used by NASA to identify the engineering tradeoffs associated with the technologies that are needed to enable advanced engine systems to meet stringent goals for the reduction of noise. The objectives of this program are to (1) conduct system engineering and integration efforts to define the engine test-bed configuration; (2) develop selected noise reduction technologies to a technical maturity sufficient to enable engine testing and validation of those technologies in the FY06-07 time frame; (3) conduct engine tests designed to gain insight into the sources, mechanisms and characteristics of noise in the engines; and (4) establish baseline engine noise measurements for subsequent use in the evaluation of noise reduction.

  15. Liquid Methane/Liquid Oxygen Propellant Conditioning Feed System (PCFS) Test Rigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaff, A.; Grasl, S.; Nguyen, C.; Hockenberry S.; Schubert, J.; Arrington, L.; Vasek, T.

    2008-01-01

    As part of their Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) program, NASA has embarked upon an effort to develop chemical rocket engines which utilize non-toxic, cryogenic propellants such as liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4). This effort includes the development and testing of a 100 lbf Reaction Control Engine (RCE) that will be used to evaluate the performance of a LO2/LCH4 rocket engine over a broad range of propellant temperatures and pressures. This testing will take place at NASA-Glenn Research Center's (GRC) Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) test facility in Cleveland, OH, and is currently scheduled to begin in late 2008. While the initial tests will be performed at sea level, follow-on testing will be performed at NASA-GRC's Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS) for altitude testing. In support of these tests, Sierra Lobo, Inc. (SLI) has designed, developed, and fabricated two separate portable propellant feed systems under the Propellant Conditioning and Feed System (PCFS) task: one system for LCH4, and one for LO2. These systems will be capable of supplying propellants over a large range of conditions from highly densified to several hundred pounds per square inch (psi) saturated. This paper presents the details of the PCFS design and explores the full capability of these propellant feed systems.

  16. Recurrent laryngeal nerve pathology in spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchino, J V; Tucker, H M

    1978-08-01

    Since it was first described in 1871, spasmodic (spastic) dysphonia has been considered a disease of psychogenic origin. Unsupported theories of possible organic etiology have appeared sporadically in the literature. In 1976 sectioning of the recurrent laryngeal nerve for patients with this disease was reported with resultant improvement in voice production. This was attempted because the spasmodic dysphonic has, in effect, already compensated vocal cords bilaterally. It was reasoned, therefore, that if one of these was paralyzed the patient would immediately be converted to a state approximating that of well-compensated unilateral vocal cord paralysis which situation, as is well known, usually carries with it a fairly good voice. A controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of this surgical approach has been undertaken at the Cleveland Clinic during the past year. In an attempt to elucidate the possible organic etiology of spasmodic dysphonia, a section of nerve was removed in every case and examined by both light and electron microscopy. Special stains for myelin were also used on the light microscopy specimens. Demyelinization has been found in most of the cases examined by electron microscopy. Possible correlation between this disease entity and other cranial nerve syndromes of unknown etiology is noted. Such conditions as trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, belpharospasm, hemifacial spasm, and even possibly Bell's palsy may exhibit a similar etiology.

  17. Significance of population centers as sources of gaseous and dissolved PAHs in the lower Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Carrie A; Khairy, Mohammed A; Muir, Derek C G; Lohmann, Rainer

    2014-07-15

    Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were used to measure concentrations of gaseous and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the air and water throughout the lower Great Lakes during summer and fall of 2011. Atmospheric Σ15PAH concentrations ranged from 2.1 ng/m3 in Cape Vincent (NY) to 76.4 ng/m3 in downtown Cleveland (OH). Aqueous Σ18PAH concentrations ranged from 2.4 ng/L at an offshore Lake Erie site to 30.4 ng/L in Sheffield Lake (OH). Gaseous PAH concentrations correlated strongly with population within 3-40 km of the sampling site depending on the compound considered, suggesting that urban centers are a primary source of gaseous PAHs (except retene) in the lower Great Lakes region. The significance of distant population (within 20 km) versus local population (within 3 km) increased with subcooled liquid vapor pressure. Most dissolved aqueous PAHs did not correlate significantly with population, nor were they consistently related to river discharge, wastewater effluents, or precipitation. Air-water exchange calculations implied that diffusive exchange was a source of phenanthrene to surface waters, while acenaphthylene volatilized out of the lakes. Comparison of air-water fluxes with temperature suggested that the significance of urban centers as sources of dissolved PAHs via diffusive exchange may decrease in warmer months. PMID:24918966

  18. Selection and evaluation of blood- and tribologically compatible journal bearing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S F; Calabrese, S J; Malanoski, S B; Golding, L R; Smith, W A; Hamby, M

    1997-01-01

    A critical issue in the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF) Innovative Ventricular Assist System (IVAS) blood pump is the selection of materials for the blood-lubricated journal bearing. Under normal operating conditions, the journal bearing geometry creates a thick blood film that separates the rotating and stationary surfaces. However, since start-up and certain transients could cause temporary contact, the material pair selected for these surfaces must be both tribologically and blood compatible. Combinations of two biocompatible alloys were tested: a titanium-zirconium-niobium alloy (Ti-13Zr-13Nb) and a zirconium-niobium alloy (Zr-2.5Nb). A standard pin-on-disk tester was used, with the contact surfaces lubricated by glycerol/saline mixtures simulating the viscosity range of blood. One test series evaluated start-up conditions; the other modeled a high-speed rub that might occur if the fluid film broke down. Results showed that the preoxidized Zr-2.5Nb pin/Ti-13Zr-13Nb disk combination was superior at all sliding velocities; a self-mated Zr-2.5Nb pair also showed promise. The oxide film on a self-mated Ti-13Zr-13Nb pair, and a Ti-13Zr-13Nb pin and Zr-2.5Nb disk combination did not show adequate wear life. More work remains to explain distinct performance differences of certain combinations, with more data needed on mechanical properties of thin, hard coatings on softer metal substrates. PMID:9360116

  19. Phenotype Information Retrieval for Existing GWAS Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipanah, Neda; Lin, Ko-Wei; Venkatesh, Vinay; Farzaneh, Seena; Kim, Hyeon-Eui

    2013-01-01

    The database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) is archiving the results of different Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). dbGaP has a multitude of phenotype variables, but they are not harmonized across studies. We proposed a method to standardize phenotype variables by classifying similar variables based on semantic distances. We first extracted variables description, enriched them using domain knowledge, and computed the distances among them. We used clustering techniques to classify the most similar variables. We used domain experts to audit clusters, annotated the clusters with appropriate labels, and used re-clustering to build a semantically-driven Genotypes and Phenotypes (sdGaP) ontology using the UMLS semantic network and metathesaurus. The sdGaP ontology allowed us to expand user queries and retrieve information using a semantic metric called density measure (DM). We illustrated the potential improvement of information retrieval using the sdGaP ontology in one search scenario using the variables from the Cleveland Family Study.

  20. Attitudes of Catholic and Protestant clergy on euthanasia and abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagi, M H; Pugh, M D; Lazerine, N G

    1981-01-01

    The attitudes of a random sample of 614 Catholic and Protestant clergymen from the Cleveland area were analyzed in relation to the following: 1) acceptance of euthanasia; 2) the establishment of legal guidelines; and 3) the similarity between euthanasia and abortion. In general the clergy were not opposed to all forms of euthanasia. They tended to make strong distinctions between passive and active euthanasia. Active euthanasia was highly unacceptable to the clergy, but they viewed passive euthanasia more favorably. There was a definite ranking in priority of the different circumstances under which the termination of life-supporting techniques would be acceptable to the clergy. Also significant was the fact that they did not tend to evaluate the issues surrounding euthanasia completely from a spiritual, or sacred perspective. Both Protestants and Catholics tended to approve of passive euthanasia, but they highly disapproved of active euthanasia. Catholics were significantly more opposed to both forms of euthanasia. In general conservative Protestants were more opposed to passive euthanasia on most dimensions than were Catholics. Both Catholic and Protestant clergy showed fear that official approval of types of euthanasia would spread into abuses. Although spiritually oriented clergy tended to show somewhat less unfavorable views on euthanasia when compared with abortion, generally, appreciable differences or role types on this particular sub-dimension was lacking.

  1. Performance of Passive Samplers Analyzed by Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy to Measure PM10-2.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas M; Sawvel, Eric J; Willis, Robert; West, Roger R; Casuccio, Gary S

    2016-07-19

    We report on the precision and accuracy of measuring PM10-2.5 and its components with particles collected by passive aerosol samplers and analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Passive samplers were deployed for week-long intervals in triplicate and colocated with a federal reference method sampler at three sites and for 5 weeks in summer 2009 and 5 weeks in winter 2010 in Cleveland, OH. The limit of detection of the passive method for PM10-2.5 determined from blank analysis was 2.8 μg m(-3). Overall precision expressed as root-mean-square coefficient of variation (CVRMS) improved with increasing concentrations (37% for all samples, n = 30; 19% for PM10-2.5 > 10 μg m(-3), n = 9; and 10% for PM10-2.5 > 15 μg m(-3), n = 4). The linear regression of PM10-2.5 measured passively on that measured with the reference sampler exhibited an intercept not statistically different than zero (p = 0.46) and a slope not statistically different from unity (p = 0.92). Triplicates with high CVs (CV > 40%, n = 5) were attributed to low particle counts (and mass concentrations), spurious counts attributed to salt particles, and Al-rich particles. This work provides important quantitative observations that can help guide future development and use of passive samplers for measuring atmospheric particulate matter. PMID:27300163

  2. Microstructure and Macrosegregation Study of Directionally Solidified Al-7Si Samples Processed Terrestrially and Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angart, Samuel; Erdman, R. G.; Poirier, David R.; Tewari, S.N.; Grugel, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    This talk reports research that has been carried out under the aegis of NASA as part of a collaboration between ESA and NASA for solidification experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus has been on the effect of convection on the microstructural evolution and macrosegregation in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys during directional solidification (DS). The DS-experiments have been carried out under 1-g at Cleveland State University (CSU) and under low-g on the International Space Station (ISS). The thermal processing-history of the experiments is well defined for both the terrestrially-processed samples and the ISS-processed samples. We have observed that the primary dendrite arm spacings of two samples grown in the low-g environment of the ISS show good agreement with a dendrite-growth model based on diffusion controlled growth. The gravity-driven convection (i.e., thermosolutal convection) in terrestrially grown samples has the effect of decreasing the primary dendrite arm spacings and causes macrosgregation. In order to process DS-samples aboard the ISS, dendritic-seed crystals have to partially remelted in a stationary thermal gradient before the DS is carried out. Microstructural changes and macrosegregation effects during this period are described.

  3. A comparison of density of Insight and Ektaspeed plus dental x-ray films using automatic and manual processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the film density of Insight dental X-ray film (Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY, USA) with that of Ektaspeed Plus film (Eastman Kodak) under manual and automatic processing conditions. Insight and wedge on the film under the three different exposure times. The exposed films were processed by both manual and automatic ways. The Base plus fog density and the optical density and the optical density made by exposing step wedge were calculated using a digital densitometer (model 07-443, Victoreen Inc, Cleveland, Ohio, USA). The optical densities of the Insight and Ektaspeed film versus thickness of aluminum wedge at the same exposure time were plotted on the graphs. Statistical analyses were applied for comparing the optical densities of the two films. The film density of both Insight films and Ektaspeed Plus films under automatic processing condition was significantly higher over the manual processing. The film density of Insight over Ektaspeed Plus film. To take the full advantage of reducing exposure time, Insight film should be processed automatically

  4. My Most Memorable AAS Meeting-December 1957, Butler University, Indianapolis, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, F. K.

    1999-05-01

    My attendance at AAS meetings began with the 46th meeting in September 1931 at the brand new Perkins Observatory. This was the first semester of my junior year at Indiana University. Professor Wilbur Cogshall, my astronomy professor, took me to the meeting, and paid my expenses for dormitory accommodations and meals. Hence, my attendance at AAS meetings covers a span of nearly 68 years. There have been so many "memorable" meetings that it is hard to pick just one. However, the 99th meeting in December 1957 at Butler University in Indianapolis, a joint meeting with the AAAS, is memorable because I was in a wheel chair and using crutches, following an injury to my right knee cap. I was a member of the AAAS Committee to select the "best paper" presented at the meeting to receive the Newcomb Cleveland Prize, and Martin Schwarzschild's first report of results from Project Stratoscope was on the program. I showed up at the Committee meeting in my wheel chair, and nominated Martin's paper for the "best paper" award. The Committee asked a lot of questions and then approved the paper by a unanimous vote. The wheel chair and crutches obviously played a role in convincing the Committee that I had strong feelings about the merits of Martin's paper. Allan Sandage was the Warner Prize Lecturer, and reported on the current status of his revision of the cosmic distance scale. Hubble's 1936 distances needed to be increased by a factor of five to ten.

  5. Results From the John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium. A Success Story for NASA and Northeast Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Barna, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium was established by NASA in 2002 to formulate and implement an integrated, interdisciplinary research program to address risks faced by astronauts during long-duration space missions. The consortium is comprised of a preeminent team of Northeast Ohio institutions that include Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, The National Center for Space Exploration Research, and the NASA Glenn Research Center. The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium research is focused on fluid physics and sensor technology that addresses the critical risks to crew health, safety, and performance. Effectively utilizing the unique skills, capabilities and facilities of the consortium members is also of prime importance. Research efforts were initiated with a general call for proposals to the consortium members. The top proposals were selected for funding through a rigorous, peer review process. The review included participation from NASA's Johnson Space Center, which has programmatic responsibility for NASA's Human Research Program. The projects range in scope from delivery of prototype hardware to applied research that enables future development of advanced technology devices. All of the projects selected for funding have been completed and the results are summarized. Because of the success of the consortium, the member institutions have extended the original agreement to continue this highly effective research collaboration through 2011.

  6. Comparison of diaphyseal growth between the Libben Population and the Hamann-Todd chimpanzee sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, S W; Russell, K F; Lovejoy, C O

    1996-01-01

    The differences in limb lengths and proportions between humans and chimpanzees are widely known. Humans have relatively shorter forelimbs and longer hind limbs than chimpanzees. Humans have a longer period of long bone formation than chimpanzees. Recent advances in estimating age-at-death in chimpanzees from their dentition have allowed us to reexamine long bone growth in chimpanzees using their skeletal remains and compare it with similar data for humans. A chronological normalization procedure allowing direct interspecific comparison of long bone growth is presented. The preadult chimpanzee sample (n = 43) is from the Hamann-Todd Osteological Collection from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. All human specimens (n = 202) are from the late Woodland Libben Population currently housed at Kent State University. Relying on these cross-sectional data, we conclude that both species elongate their femora at similar absolute (length per unit time) but different relative (length relative to normalized dental age) rates. The species differ in the absolute growth rate of the humerus but share a common normalized rate of growth. Forelimb segment proportion differences between species are due to differential elongation rates of the segments. Hind limb diaphyseal proportions are the same in both species, which suggests that changes in segment length are proportional. Therefore, alternative developmental mechanisms exist in these closely related species which can produce changes in limb length. PMID:8928724

  7. Introduction and Overview of the Industrial Interactive Panel Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, David

    2014-03-01

    A unique industrial panel covering the challenges and needs of various industries and how being innovative is important. The session involves two invited industry speakers (24 minutes each) who will set the stage for the interactive round table panel session. The Panel, led by moderator Mark Bernius (Morgan Advanced Materials), consists of the two invited speakers plus an additional five industry panelists. The first thirty minutes of the panel session has the five additional panelists introducing themselves and their work/company. These introductions could include what they or their company does, sharing one or two technical highlights, listing some challenges or needs for physicists, and what innovation breakthroughs are needed in their industries. The final hour of the session will be highly interactive with questions to the panel coming from the moderator, the audience, and the panelists themselves. Questions that might be addressed include: how physicists are or could be critical in advancing innovation; how can AIP/APS/FIAP help industry get the physics help they need to be innovative (knowledge, the right staff, etc.); what role can students and post docs play in advancing industry's mission; etc. We invite you to participate in this interactive session and ask our industry experts your own interesting and challenging questions. The invited speakers are George Thompson, Intel, and Rick Watkins, Nike. The panel members also include Jason Cleveland, Asylum Research; Robert Doering, Texas Instruments; William Gallagher, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center; James Hollenhorst, Agilent Technologies; and Martin Poitzsch, Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  8. Changes in Occupational Radiation Exposures after Incorporation of a Real-time Dosimetry System in the Interventional Radiology Suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Sashi; Weir, Lori; Dowling, Dawn; Medich, David C

    2016-08-01

    A statistical pilot study was retrospectively performed to analyze potential changes in occupational radiation exposures to Interventional Radiology (IR) staff at Lawrence General Hospital after implementation of the i2 Active Radiation Dosimetry System (Unfors RaySafe Inc, 6045 Cochran Road Cleveland, OH 44139-3302). In this study, the monthly OSL dosimetry records obtained during the eight-month period prior to i2 implementation were normalized to the number of procedures performed during each month and statistically compared to the normalized dosimetry records obtained for the 8-mo period after i2 implementation. The resulting statistics included calculation of the mean and standard deviation of the dose equivalences per procedure and included appropriate hypothesis tests to assess for statistically valid differences between the pre and post i2 study periods. Hypothesis testing was performed on three groups of staff present during an IR procedure: The first group included all members of the IR staff, the second group consisted of the IR radiologists, and the third group consisted of the IR technician staff. After implementing the i2 active dosimetry system, participating members of the Lawrence General IR staff had a reduction in the average dose equivalence per procedure of 43.1% ± 16.7% (p = 0.04). Similarly, Lawrence General IR radiologists had a 65.8% ± 33.6% (p=0.01) reduction while the technologists had a 45.0% ± 14.4% (p=0.03) reduction.

  9. Design and Fabrication of a Dielectric Total Internal Reflecting Solar Concentrator and Associated Flux Extractor for Extreme High Temperature (2500K) Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soules, Jack A.; Buchele, Donald R.; Castle, Charles H.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1997-01-01

    The Analex Corporation, under contract to the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), Cleveland, Ohio, recently evaluated the feasibility of utilizing refractive secondary concentrators for solar heat receivers operating at temperatures up to 2500K. The feasibility study pointed out a number of significant advantages provided by solid single crystal refractive devices over the more conventional hollow reflective compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs). In addition to the advantages of higher concentration ratio and efficiency, the refractive concentrator, when combined with a flux extractor rod, provides for flux tailoring within the heat receiver cavity. This is a highly desirable, almost mandatory, feature for solar thermal propulsion engine designs presently being considered for NASA and Air Force thermal applications. Following the feasibility evaluation, the NASA-LeRC, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and Analex Corporation teamed up to design, fabricate, and test a refractive secondary concentrator/flux extractor system for potential use in the NASA-MSFC "Shooting Star" flight experiment. This paper describes the advantages and technical challenges associated with the design methodologies developed and utilized and the material and fabrication limitations encountered.

  10. Summary of U.S. Geological Survey studies conducted in cooperation with the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, central Oklahoma, 2011–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, William J.; Becker, Carol J.; Ryter, Derek W.; Smith, S. Jerrod

    2016-01-19

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted hydrologic studies and published three U.S. Geological Survey scientific investigations reports in cooperation with the Citizen Potawatomi Nation from 2011 to 2014 to characterize the quality and quantity of water resources. The study areas of those reports consisted of approximately 960 square miles in parts of three counties in central Oklahoma. This study area has multiple abundant sources of water, being underlain by three principal aquifers (alluvial/terrace, Central Oklahoma, and Vamoosa-Ada), being bordered by two major rivers (North Canadian and Canadian), and having several smaller drainages including the Little River in the central part of the study area and Salt Creek in the southeastern part of the study area. The Central Oklahoma aquifer (also referred to as the “Garber-Wellington aquifer”) underlies approximately 3,000 square miles in central Oklahoma in parts of Cleveland, Logan, Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties and much of the study area. Water from these aquifers is used for municipal, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supplies.

  11. Interprofessional Flight Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfes, Celeste M; Rowe, Amanda S

    2016-01-01

    The Dorothy Ebersbach Academic Center for Flight Nursing in Cleveland, OH, holds an annual flight camp designed for master's degree nursing students in the acute care nurse practitioner program, subspecializing in flight nursing at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University. The weeklong interprofessional training is also open to any health care provider working in an acute care setting and focuses on critical care updates, trauma, and emergency care within the critical care transport environment. This year, 29 graduate nursing students enrolled in a master's degree program from Puerto Rico attended. Although the emergency department in Puerto Rico sees and cares for trauma patients, there is no formal trauma training program. Furthermore, the country only has 1 rotor wing air medical transport service located at the Puerto Rico Medical Center in San Juan. Flight faculty and graduate teaching assistants spent approximately 9 months planning for their participation in our 13th annual flight camp. Students from Puerto Rico were extremely pleased with the learning experiences at camp and expressed particular interest in having more training time within the helicopter flight simulator.

  12. Simulation and Control Lab Development for Power and Energy Management for NASA Manned Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Beach, Raymond F.; Soeder, James F.; McNelis, Nancy B.; May, Ryan; Dever, Timothy P.; Trase, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The development of distributed hierarchical and agent-based control systems will allow for reliable autonomous energy management and power distribution for on-orbit missions. Power is one of the most critical systems on board a space vehicle, requiring quick response time when a fault or emergency is identified. As NASAs missions with human presence extend beyond low earth orbit autonomous control of vehicle power systems will be necessary and will need to reliably function for long periods of time. In the design of autonomous electrical power control systems there is a need to dynamically simulate and verify the EPS controller functionality prior to use on-orbit. This paper presents the work at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio where the development of a controls laboratory is being completed that will be utilized to demonstrate advanced prototype EPS controllers for space, aeronautical and terrestrial applications. The control laboratory hardware, software and application of an autonomous controller for demonstration with the ISS electrical power system is the subject of this paper.

  13. Recent Advances and Applications in Cryogenic Propellant Densification Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    This purpose of this paper is to review several historical cryogenic test programs that were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Cleveland, Ohio over the past fifty years. More recently these technology programs were intended to study new and improved denser forms of liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) cryogenic rocket fuels. Of particular interest are subcooled cryogenic propellants. This is due to the fact that they have a significantly higher density (eg. triple-point hydrogen, slush etc.), a lower vapor pressure and improved cooling capacity over the normal boiling point cryogen. This paper, which is intended to be a historical technology overview, will trace the past and recent development and testing of small and large-scale propellant densification production systems. Densifier units in the current GRC fuels program, were designed and are capable of processing subcooled LH2 and L02 propellant at the X33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) scale. One final objective of this technical briefing is to discuss some of the potential benefits and application which propellant densification technology may offer the industrial cryogenics production and end-user community. Density enhancements to cryogenic propellants (LH2, LO2, CH4) in rocket propulsion and aerospace application have provided the opportunity to either increase performance of existing launch vehicles or to reduce the overall size, mass and cost of a new vehicle system.

  14. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) Aquifer, Oklahoma, 1987 to 2009, and simulation of available water in storage, 2010-2059

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Ryter, Derek; Neel, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Magers, Jessica S.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma. The study area for this investigation was the extent of the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Water from the Central Oklahoma aquifer is used for public, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supply. With the exception of Oklahoma City, all of the major communities in central Oklahoma rely either solely or partly on groundwater from this aquifer. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area, incorporating parts of Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties, has a population of approximately 1.2 million people. As areas are developed for groundwater supply, increased groundwater withdrawals may result in decreases in long-term aquifer storage. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, investigated the hydrogeology and simulated groundwater flow in the aquifer using a numerical groundwater-flow model. The purpose of this report is to describe an investigation of the Central Oklahoma aquifer that included analyses of the hydrogeology, hydrogeologic framework of the aquifer, and construction of a numerical groundwater-flow model. The groundwater-flow model was used to simulate groundwater levels and for water-budget analysis. A calibrated transient model was used to evaluate changes in groundwater storage associated with increased future water demands.

  15. Ninth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Barbara (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Ninth Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 98) was held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio from August 31 to September 4, 1998. The theme for the hands-on training workshop and conference was "Integrating Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer into the Design Process." Highlights of the workshop (in addition to the papers published herein) included an address by the NASA Chief Engineer, Dr. Daniel Mulville; a CFD short course by Dr. John D. Anderson of the University of Maryland; and a short course by Dr. Robert Cochran of Sandia National Laboratories. In addition, lectures and hands-on training were offered in the use of several cutting-edge engineering design and analysis-oriented CFD and Heat Transfer tools. The workshop resulted in international participation of over 125 persons representing aerospace and automotive industries, academia, software providers, government agencies, and private corporations. The papers published herein address issues and solutions related to the integration of computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer into the engineering design process. Although the primary focus is aerospace, the topics and ideas presented are applicable to many other areas where these and other disciplines are interdependent.

  16. Role of extended release quetiapine in the management of bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan K Al Jurdi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Rayan K Al Jurdi1,2, Lena A Dixit1, Martha Sajatovic3 1Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Houston, Texas, USA; 2South Central Mental Illness Research and Clinical Core, Department of Veterans Affairs, Houston, Texas; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Atypical antipsychotics have become a widely utilized component of the bipolar disorder treatment armamentarium, with approximately 45% of bipolar patients prescribed atypicals. Over the last decade all atypical drugs except for clozapine have received a Food and Drug Administration (FDA bipolar indication. In October 2008, the FDA approved quetiapine XR monotherapy for the treatment of acute depressive episodes of bipolar disorder and acute manic or mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder based on two placebo-control trials. Quetiapine was also approved as adjunct therapy with lithium and divalproex for the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes as well as maintenance of bipolar I disorder. In contrast to immediate release quetiapine which may require a twice-daily regimen, the XR formulation is intended for once-daily administration. This drug profile of quetiapine XR will address chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, safety and tolerability and clinical trials in bipolar disorder.Keywords: quetiapine XR, bipolar disorder

  17. Electronic nicotine delivery system landscape in licensed tobacco retailers: results of a county-level survey in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brame, L S; Mowls, D S; Damphousse, K E; Beebe, L A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) have recently emerged as a component of the tobacco retail environment. The aims of this study were to describe the availability, types of ENDS and placement of ENDS relative to traditional tobacco products at franchised licensed tobacco retailers and non-franchised licensed tobacco retailers. Design Observational study. Setting Franchised and non-franchised tobacco retailers in Cleveland County, Oklahoma, USA. Primary and secondary outcome measures The number of stores selling ENDS, the variability in brands of ENDS sold, the location of the ENDS within the retailers, the quantity of ENDS sold compared with traditional tobacco products, and the presence of outdoor signage. Results Data from 57 randomly sampled tobacco retailers were used to describe the presence of ENDS at independent non-franchised and franchised tobacco retailers. The overwhelming majority (90%) of licensed tobacco retailers sold ENDS, and differences were observed between franchised and non-franchised stores. 45 of the 51 retailers (88%) selling ENDS had them placed at the point of sale. 2 of the 21 franchised retailers (9.5%) had ENDS placed at ≤3½ feet above floor level compared to none of the 30 non-franchised retailers (0%). Conclusions This small study is the first to characterise ENDS within the tobacco retail environment in a county in Oklahoma, USA. The results from this study demonstrate the complexity of the tobacco retail landscape and generate questions for future studies regarding the incorporation and placement of ENDS in tobacco retail environments. PMID:27266774

  18. Official Portrait of Astronaut Neil Armstrong

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Neil Armstrong, donned in his space suit, poses for his official Apollo 11 portrait. Armstrong began his flight career as a naval aviator. He flew 78 combat missions during the Korean War. Armstrong joined the NASA predecessor, NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics), as a research pilot at the Lewis Laboratory in Cleveland and later transferred to the NACA High Speed Flight Station at Edwards AFB, California. He was a project pilot on many pioneering high speed aircraft, including the 4,000 mph X-15. He has flown over 200 different models of aircraft, including jets, rockets, helicopters, and gliders. In 1962, Armstrong was transferred to astronaut status. He served as command pilot for the Gemini 8 mission, launched March 16, 1966, and performed the first successful docking of two vehicles in space. In 1969, Armstrong was commander of Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing mission, and gained the distinction of being the first man to land a craft on the Moon and the first man to step on its surface. Armstrong subsequently held the position of Deputy Associate Administrator for Aeronautics, NASA Headquarters Office of Advanced Research and Technology, from 1970 to 1971. He resigned from NASA in 1971.

  19. Performance Gains of Propellant Management Devices for Liquid Hydrogen Depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents background, experimental design, and preliminary experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to investigate the parameters that affect liquid acquisition device (LAD) performance in a liquid hydrogen (LH2) propellant tank, to mitigate risk in the final design of the LAD for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission, and to provide insight into optimal LAD operation for future LH2 depots. Preliminary test results show an increase in performance and screen retention over the low reference LH2 bubble point value for a 325 2300 screen in three separate ways, thus improving fundamental LH2 LAD performance. By using a finer mesh screen, operating at a colder liquid temperature, and pressurizing with a noncondensible pressurant gas, a significant increase in margin is achieved in bubble point pressure for LH2 screen channel LADs.

  20. Commentary: Recommendations and remaining questions for health care leadership training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2013-01-01

    Effective leadership is critical for optimizing cost, access, and quality in health care. Creating a pipeline of effective health care leaders requires developing leadership competencies that differ from the usual criteria of clinical and scientific excellence by which physicians have traditionally been promoted to leadership positions. Specific competencies that differentiate effective leaders from average leaders, especially emotional intelligence and its component abilities, are essential for effective leadership.Adopting a long-standing practice from successful corporations, some health care institutions, medical societies, and business schools now offer leadership programs that address these differentiating leadership competencies. The author draws on experience with such programs through the Cleveland Clinic Academy to provide recommendations for health care leadership training and to identify unanswered questions about such programs.The author recommends that such training should be broadly available to all health care leadership communities (i.e., nurses, administrators, and physicians). A progressive curriculum, starting with foundational concepts and extending to coaching and feedback opportunities through experiential learning, recognizes the challenge of becoming an effective leader and the long time line needed to do so. Linking leadership courses to continuing medical education and to graduate credit opportunities is appealing to participants. Other recommendations focus on the importance of current leaders' involvement in nominating emerging leaders for participation, embedding leadership development discussions in faculty's professional reviews, and blending discussion of frameworks and theory with practical, experiential lessons. The author identifies questions about the benefits of formal health care leadership training that remain to be answered. PMID:23267224

  1. Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix.

  2. Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix

  3. Preparedness for epidemic disease or bioterrorism: minimum cost planning for the location and staffing of urban point-of-dispensing centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, William M; Chen, Jen-Yi; Tukel, Oya I

    2014-01-01

    Urban health authorities in the United States have been charged with developing plans for providing the infrastructure necessary to dispense prophylactic medications to their populations in the case of epidemic disease outbreak or bioterrorist attack. However, no specific method for such plans has been prescribed. This article formulates and demonstrates the use of an integer programming technique for helping to solve a part of the dispensing problem faced by cities, namely that of providing the federally required infrastructure at minimum cost, using their limited time and resources. Specifically, the technique minimizes the number of point-of-dispensing (POD) centers while covering every resident in all the census tracts within the city's jurisdiction. It also determines the optimal staffing requirement in terms of the number of nurses at each POD. This article includes a demonstration of the model using real data from Cleveland, OH, a mid-sized US city. Examples are provided of data and computational results for a variety of input parameter values such as population throughput rate, POD capacities, and distance limitations. The technique can be readily adapted to a wide range of urban areas.

  4. Impact of vulvovaginal health on postmenopausal women: a review of surveys on symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish SJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sharon J Parish,1 Rossella E Nappi,2 Michael L Krychman,3 Susan Kellogg-Spadt,4 James A Simon,5 Jeffrey A Goldstein,6 Sheryl A Kingsberg7 1Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo University, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 3Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship Medicine and Clinical Faculty University of California Irvine, Newport Beach and Irvine, CA, USA; 4Pelvic and Sexual Health Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Obstetrics and Gynecology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; 6Novo Nordisk Inc, Princeton, NJ, USA; 7Departments of Reproductive Biology and Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Several recent, large-scale studies have provided valuable insights into patient perspectives on postmenopausal vulvovaginal health. Symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy, which include dryness, irritation, itching, dysuria, and dyspareunia, can adversely affect interpersonal relationships, quality of life, and sexual function. While approximately half of postmenopausal women report these symptoms, far fewer seek treatment, often because they are uninformed about hypoestrogenic postmenopausal vulvovaginal changes and the availability of safe, effective, and well-tolerated treatments, particularly local vaginal estrogen therapy. Because women hesitate to seek help for symptoms, a proactive approach to conversations about vulvovaginal discomfort would improve diagnosis and treatment. Keywords: health care professional, hypoactive sexual desire disorder, local vaginal estrogen therapy, quality of life, urinary tract infection, vulvovaginal atrophy

  5. Clinical management of behavioral characteristics of Prader–Willi syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Y Ho

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alan Y Ho, Anastasia DimitropoulosDepartment of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder caused by an abnormality on the long arm of chromosome 15 (q11–q13 that results in a host of phenotypic characteristics, dominated primarily by hyperphagia and insatiable appetite. Characteristic behavioral disturbances in PWS include excessive interest in food, skin picking, difficulty with a change in routine, temper tantrums, obsessive and compulsive behaviors, and mood fluctuations. Individuals with PWS typically have intellectual disabilities (borderline to mild/moderate mental retardation and exhibit a higher overall behavior disturbance compared to individuals with similar intellectual disability. Due to its multisystem disorder, family members, caregivers, physicians, dieticians, and speech-language pathologists all play an important role in the management and treatment of symptoms in an individual with PWS. This article reviews current research on behavior and cognition in PWS and discusses management guidelines for this disorder.Keywords: Prader–Willi syndrome; neurodevelopment, hyperphagia, disability

  6. Preserving fertility in young patients with lymphoma: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel B

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bansari Patel, Brooke V Rossi Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Fertility preservation affords patients the ability to reproduce after the initial diagnosis and management of such malignancies as Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Certain chemotherapy regimens and pelvic radiotherapy confer a high-risk of subsequent gonadal compromise in both males and females. Fortunately, early counseling and initiation of fertility-preservation strategies promptly after diagnosis enable patients to maintain hope for future reproduction. Well-established methods for fertility preservation include embryo and oocyte cryopreservation in females and sperm cryopreservation in males. These methods enable patients to utilize assisted reproductive technologies, including in vitro fertilization, at the time of desired childbearing in order to ensure genetic offspring. As most of these modalities are not feasible in some patient populations, including prepubescent patients, newer methods of fertility preservation must be created to ensure the ability to produce genetic offspring in lymphoma patients. This review provides insights into the impact of gonadotoxic treatment on ovarian and testicular function, and highlights current modalities in fertility preservation in both males and females. Keywords: fertility preservation, lymphoma, ART, egg freezing

  7. White flight or flight from poverty?

    CERN Document Server

    Jego, C; Jego, Charles; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon of White flight is often illustrated by the case of Detroit whose population dropped from 1.80 million to 0.95 million between 1950 and 2000 while at the same time its Black and Hispanic component grew from 30 percent to 85 percent. But is this case really representative? The present paper shows that the phenomenon of White flight is in fact essentially a flight from poverty. As a confirmation, we show that the changes in White or Black populations are highly correlated which means that White flight is always paralleled by Black flight (and Hispanic flight as well). This broader interpretation of White flight accounts not only for the case of northern cities such as Cincinnati, Cleveland or Detroit, but for all population changes at county level, provided the population density is higher than a threshold of about 50 per square-kilometer which corresponds to moderately urbanized areas (as can be found in states like Indiana or Virginia for instance).

  8. The Measurement and Prediction of Combustible Properties of Dimethylacetamide (DMAc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Dong-Myeong [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The usage of the correct combustion characteristic of the treated substance for the safety of the process is critical. For the safe handling of dimethylacetamide (DMAc) being used in various ways in the chemical industry, the flash point and the autoignition temperature (AIT) of DMAc was experimented. And, the lower explosion limit of DMAc was calculated by using the lower flash point obtained in the experiment. The flash points of DMAc by using the Setaflash and Pensky-Martens closed-cup testers measured 61 .deg. C and 65 .deg. C, respectively. The flash points of DMAc by using the Tag and Cleveland automatic open cup testers are measured 68 .deg. C and 71 .deg. C. The AIT of DMAc by ASTM 659E tester was measured as 347 .deg. C. The lower explosion limit by the measured flash point 61 .deg. C was calculated as 1.52 vol%. It was possible to predict lower explosion limit by using the experimental flash point or flash point in the literature.

  9. Oil prices and financial stress: A volatility spillover analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines whether there is a volatility transmission between oil prices and financial stress by means of the volatility spillover test. We employ WTI crude oil prices and Cleveland financial stress index for the period 1991–2014 and divide the sample into pre-crisis, in-crisis, and post-crisis periods due to the downward trend in oil price in 2008. The volatility model estimations indicate that oil prices and financial stress index are dominated by long-run volatility. The volatility spillover causality test supports evidence on risk transfer from oil prices to financial stress before the crisis and from financial stress to oil prices after the crisis. The impulse response analysis shows that the volatility transmission pattern has similar dynamics before and after the crisis and is characterized by higher and long-lived effects during the crisis. Our results have implications for both policy makers and investors, and for future work. -- Highlights: •Volatility spillover between oil prices and financial stress index is examined. •Analysis is conducted for sub-periods: pre-crisis, in-crisis, and post-crisis •Oil prices spill on financial stress before the crisis, but spillover reversed after the crisis. •Volatility transmission pattern has similar dynamics before and after the crisis. •Implications for investors and policy makers are discussed

  10. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 4 of 6: ON-LINE, NON-DESTRUCTIVE MECHANICAL PROPERTY MEASUREMENT USING LASER-ULTRASOUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre' Moreau; Martin Lord; Daniel Levesqure; Marc Dubois; Jean Bussiere; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Christian Padioleau; Guy Lamouche; Teodor Veres; Martin Viens; Harold Hebert; Pierre Basseras; Cheng-Kuei Jen

    2001-03-31

    The goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility to measure the mechanical properties, such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation, strain hardening exponent and plastic strain ratio parameters, of low carbon steel sheets on the production line using laser ultrasound. The ultrasound generated by the developed apparatus travels mostly back and forth in the thickness of the steel sheet. By measuring the time delay between two echoes, and the relative amplitude of these two echoes, one can measure ultrasound velocity and attenuation. These are governed by the microstructure: grain size, crystallographic texture, dislocations, etc. Thus, by recording the time behavior of the ultrasonic signal, one can extract microstructural information. These microstructural information together with the modified Hall-Petch equation allow measurement of the mechanical properties. Through laboratory investigations with a laboratory laser ultrasound system, followed by the installation of a prototype system at LTV Steel Company's No.1 Inspection Line in Cleveland, all target mechanical properties of ultra low carbon (ULC), low carbon (LC) and high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel sample lots were measured meeting or nearly meeting all the target accuracies. Thus, the project realized its goal to demonstrate that the mechanical properties of low carbon steel sheets can be measured on-line using laser ultrasound

  11. Load converter interactions with the secondary system in the Space Station Freedom power management and distribution DC test bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Ramon C.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LeRC in Cleveland, Ohio, is responsible for the design, development, and assembly of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Electrical Power System (EPS). In order to identify and understand system level issues during the SSF Program design and development phases, a system Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) DC test bed was assembled. Some of the objectives of this test bed facility are the evaluation of, system efficiency, power quality, system stability, and system protection and reconfiguration schemes. In order to provide a realistic operating scenario, dc Load Converter Units are used in the PMAD dc test bed to characterize the user interface with the power system. These units are dc to dc converters that provide the final system regulation before power is delivered to the load. This final regulation is required on the actual space station because the majority of user loads will require voltage levels different from the secondary bus voltage. This paper describes the testing of load converters in an end to end system environment (from solar array to loads) where their interactions and compatibility with other system components are considered. Some of the system effects of interest that are presented include load converters transient behavior interactions with protective current limiting switchgear, load converters ripple effects, and the effects of load converter constant power behavior with protective features such as foldback.

  12. Cine club

    CERN Multimedia

    Ciné club

    2015-01-01

    Thursday 5 February 2015 at 20:00 CERN Council Chamber Stranger Than Paradise     Directed by Jim Jarmusch - USA, 1984, 89 minutes A self-styled New York hipster is paid a surprise visit by his younger cousin from Budapest. From initial hostility and indifference a small degree of affection grows between the two. Along with a friend, they eventually end up visiting their aunt in the wastelands of Cleveland and then proceed to Florida where they lose all their money gambling before unwittingly gaining a fortune. Original version English; French subtitles   Thursday 12 February 2015 at 20:00 CERN Council Chamber Down by Law     Directed by Jim Jarmusch - USA, 1986, 107 minutes DJ Zack and pimp Jack end up in prison for being too laid-back to avoid being framed for crimes they didn't commit. They end up sharing a cell with eccentric Italian optimist Roberto, whose limited command of the English language is both entertaining and infuri...

  13. The Continued Evaluation of Voucher Impact on the Achievement of Elementary Students in a Majority African American Public School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Kim K.; Boone, William J.; Legan, Natalie A.; Paul, Kelli M.

    Vouchers for students in urban school districts may promote the increased participation of underrepresented groups in the fields of science and engineering in at least two ways: (a) by optimizing the achievement of students who use vouchers and (b) by expanding the scope of educational and curricular options available to students. Presently, nearly 5,000 children in Cleveland, Ohio, attend private schools with publicly funded vouchers. This study presents the results of evaluating the achievement of a cohort of these students from the fall of first grade to the spring of fourth grade. For public school students, first grade seems to be a time during which they catch up with peers who attend private schools with vouchers. The analysis of data using adjusted measures suggests no differences in achievement from first grade to fourth grade with respect to achievement in many content areas. The use of unadjusted measures suggests possible differences with respect to fourth grade reading (with voucher students performing at a statistically higher level than their peers). The present data set neither clearly supports nor refutes the use of vouchers.

  14. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology Workshop. Volume 2: Roundtable Discussion of Technology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology Workshop was held April 28 to 30, 1987, at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The major objective of the workshop was to identify future NASA needs for technology concerning the management of subcritical cryogenic fluids in the low-gravity space environment. In addition, workshop participants were asked to identify those technologies which will require in-space experimentation and thus are candidates for inclusion in the flight experiment being defined at Lewis. The principal application for advanced fluid management technology is the Space-Based Orbit Transfer Vehicle (SBOTV) and its servicing facility, the On-Orbit Cryogenic Fuel Depot (OOCFD). Other potential applications include the replenishment of cryogenic coolants (with the exception of superfluid helium), reactants, and propellants on board a variety of spacecraft including the space station and space-based weapon systems. The last day was devoted to a roundtable discussion of cryogenic fluid management technology requirements by 30 representatives from NASA, industry, and academia. This volume contains a transcript of the discussion of the eight major technology categories.

  15. THE ROLE OF THE POSTERIOR TIBIAL NERVE NEUROLISYS IN PERFORATED ORIGIN PLANTING DIABETES AND TROPHIC DIABETIC LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mazilu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is the primary complication that the most likely cause of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. It is one of the most important factors in the emergence planting ulceration in diabetic patients. Prevention of this complication is difficult, particularly because there is no reliable method to test the sensitivity of the plant. It supports the theory that the posterior tibial nerve is at risk of developing chronic compression due to edema. This hypothesis was supported by a comparative study conducted by Lee and Damien M. Dauphinée Doohi, using ultrasound on the ankle, resulting in the conclusion that the diameter of the tibial nerve in diabetic patients with neuropathy was significantly higher than in diabetic patients that did not have polyneuropathy (24.0 vs. 12 mm square. Solution in trying to resolve this problem belongs compression AL Dellon, who noted that after carpal tunnel decompression at hand (which belongs to George Phalen, MD, of Cleveland, Ohio in 1950 major improvements in the sensitivity of fingers hand, decided to try to make the same type of foot surgery and diabetic patients.

  16. The Social Toll of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Farmer

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD – ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease – has become one the most important chronic digestive disorders found in the younger population. As a result of the nature of the illness, with remission and exacerbation of the inflammatory process, there has been increasing concern regarding the costs, both financial and social, of IBD. There have been attempts to quantify disease activity and to assess the results of treatment and the ability of the patient to function in society. As a result, there has been an increased interest in the ‘social toll’ of IBD. Begi1ming in 1988, and using a direct interview technique, ambulatory patients with IBD were evaluated for quality of life at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Included were patients whose disease had been present for about 10 years, and both surgical and nonsurgical patients. The interview questionnaire consisted of 47 items in four categories: functional/economic, social/recreational, affect/life in general and medical/symptoms. Patients with ulcerative colitis had better quality of life than those with Crohn’s disease and patients without surgery had better quality of life than those who had undergone surgery. Over the ensuing five-year period, it was shown that quality of life measures are of value in assessing the results of medical and surgical therapy, and the measures frequently give information not usually obtained by physicians and have implications for quality assurance and outcome measurement.

  17. Pharmacologic management of the patient with disorders of the cardiovascular system. Infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowper, T R

    1996-07-01

    IE, although an infrequent event, remains a serious and frequently lethal complication in patients at risk. Oral microorganisms undoubtedly play a significant role in the development of IE in such patients. For example, in a retrospective review of prosthetic cardiac valve candidates (156) at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 15% were found to have at least one abscessed tooth, whereas approximately 17% were found to have severe (class IV) periodontal disease. Cardiac defects in conjunction with bacteremias from such dental pathoses clearly elevate the risk, although a small but increasing number of noncardiac conditions and behavioral patterns seem also to be able to induce susceptibility. Whether dental or other medical procedures are truly direct inducers of IE, however, remains to be proven and in all probability are only minor contributors overall. Despite its ubiquitous use, antibiotic prophylaxis has not been proven in human clinical trials, and its underlying rationale is arbitrary and questionable at best; nevertheless, its efficacy in animal models has led to the current human protocols. A more profitable strategy, and certainly an adjunctive one, should be to direct one's effort at eliminating oral pathology and educating and motivating patients at risk toward meticulous oral hygiene--an exhortation published many years before the advent of antibiotics and still undoubtedly the best recommendation today. PMID:8829048

  18. Transplant Ethics: Let's Begin the Conversation Anew : A Critical Look at One Institute's Experience with Transplant Related Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafran, David; Smith, Martin L; Daly, Barbara J; Goldfarb, David

    2016-06-01

    Standardizing consultation processes is increasingly important as clinical ethics consultation (CEC) becomes more utilized in and vital to medical practice. Solid organ transplant represents a relatively nascent field replete with complex ethical issues that, while explored, have not been systematically classified. In this paper, we offer a proposed taxonomy that divides issues of resource allocation from viable solutions to the issue of organ shortage in transplant and then further distinguishes between policy and bedside level issues. We then identify all transplant related ethics consults performed at the Cleveland Clinic (CC) between 2008 and 2013 in order to identify how consultants conceptually framed their consultations by the domains they ascribe to the case. We code the CC domains to those in the Core Competencies for Healthcare Consultation Ethics in order to initiate a broader conversation regarding best practices in these highly complex cases. A discussion of the ethical issues underlying living donor and recipient related consults ensues. Finally, we suggest that the ethical domains prescribed in the Core Competencies provide a strong starting ground for a common intra-disciplinary language in the realm of formal CEC. PMID:26055878

  19. Antenna Technology and other Radio Frequency (RF) Communications Activities at the Glenn Research Center in Support of NASA's Exploration Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA s Vision for Space Exploration outlines a very ambitious program for the next several decades of the Space Agency endeavors. Ahead is the completion of the International Space Station (ISS); safely flight the shuttle (STS) until 2010; develop and fly the Crew Exploration Vehicle (Orion) by no later than 2014; return to the moon by no later than 2020; extend human presence across the solar system and beyond; implement a sustainable and affordable human and robotic program; develop supporting innovative technologies, knowledge and infrastructure; and promote international and commercial participation in exploration. To achieve these goals, a series of enabling technologies must be developed or matured in a timely manner. Some of these technologies are: spacecraft RF technology (e.g., high power sources and large antennas which using surface receive arrays can get up to 1 Gbps from Mars), uplink arraying (reduce reliance on large ground-based antennas and high operation costs; single point of failure; enable greater data-rates or greater effective distance; scalable, evolvable, flexible scheduling), software define radio (i.e., reconfigurable, flexible interoperability allows for in flight updates open architecture; reduces mass, power, volume), and optical communications (high capacity communications with low mass/power required; significantly increases data rates for deep space). This presentation will discuss some of the work being performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, in antenna technology as well as other on-going RF communications efforts.

  20. Weather conditions prior to major outbreaks of meningococcol meningitis in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, C. G.

    1992-03-01

    Meningitis has been a notifiable disease in the United Kingdom for some 70 years. Only in recent years, stimulated by the work of the Meningitis Trust, has there been a more general awareness of the geographical distribution of cases, with certain locations being more prone than others to episodic outbreaks of the disease. In this paper we consider weather conditions prior to major outbreaks of meningitis in Hereford and Worcester, and Cleveland and the northwest Midlands. Possible causal links to air quality and large temporal changes of relative humidity are found from analysis of case data. However, whilst the diagnostic studies reported are encouraging, an independent test of the relative humidity gradient criterion using independent data for Gloucester was not successful. It is clear that meteorological and air quality data actually of the area from which the disease is reported must be analysed more fully to sustain or overrule the hypothesis proposed. In addition, the need for further clinical research into the likelihood of disease triggers generated by atmospheric smoke, dust and moisture is identified.

  1. Avaliação médica: o consumo na medicina e a mercantilização da saúde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Monteiro dos Santos Jr

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A Saúde vem sendo ameaçada pela colonização empresarial do médico que, iniciada dentro da Universidade, prolonga-se no ambiente de trabalho. Essa ação tem origem no ensino defasado da realidade científica e na asserção de tendências individualistas que expressam opiniões isoladas e não abalizadas, em geral induzidas pelas propagandas e investigações encomendadas para agitar o mercado no uso de aparelhos e produtos médico-farmacêuticos. OBJETIVO: Usar o ponto de vista do Cirurgião Geral e do Coloproctologista para comentar a mercantilização da saúde e a maneira como a Instituição Industrial, usando a empresa médica, age e modifica a ação do médico, contribuindo para o alto custo da Medicina. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: As bases serão os exames laboratoriais e as avaliações cardiovasculares pré-operatórias de rotina, usados para operações não cardíacas em pacientes cardiopatas. O material e o conteúdo para discussão foram extraídos do livro de Ivan Illich¹, do artigo de atualização de Coelho e col. ², do modelo proposto na Cleveland Clinic³ sobre avaliação pré-operatória e das normas estabelecidas pelo American College of Cardiology e pela American Heart Association4 para a orientação de avaliação médica mínima, necessária e suficiente, de pacientes cardiopatas, quando candidatos a tratamento cirúrgico de doenças em outros órgãos.BACKGROUND: The Health has been threatened by the physician's managerial colonization that, begun inside of the University, continues in the work environment. That action has origin of the teaching in disagreement with the scientific reality and in the assertion of individualistic tendencies expressing isolated and not-distinguished opinions, in general induced by the investigations requested to give rise to the market of drugs and devices disposable for physician and pharmacists. PURPOSE: The aim of this report is to use the General Surgeon's point of view

  2. Can A Smartphone Replace The Operative Note?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherall, Joseph; Oak, Sameer; Vega, Jose F.; Strnad, Greg; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A large portion of the body of orthopedic surgical research is conducted retrospectively, using the operative note as a main data source. Operative notes tend to infrequently report quantitative data, significantly limiting the precision with which research questions can be assessed (Scherer et al., 2003). Large scale surgical outcomes studies have identified specific surgical parameters as valid predictors of key surgical outcomes (Kaeding, Pedroza, Reinke, Huston, & Spindler, 2015). Thus, it is now feasible to develop a data capture system that collects more accurate, robust surgical data quickly and with lower cost than operative note dictation. The objectives of this study are as follows: 1. Develop a provider-friendly, evidence-based, data capture system for lower limb orthopedic surgeries.2. Assess the performance of the data capture system on the dimensions of agreement with operative note and implant log, consistency of data quality, and speed of provider input. Methods: A multidisciplinary team including administration, orthopedic surgery staff, and software development was assembled for the design of the surgical database. The database was developed in Redcap and user interfaces were created for Android and IOS operating systems. Branching logic was created to streamline provider data input. All data input was created with discrete fields. Cleveland Clinic owned I-Phones were used for surgeon data input. All surgeons at Cleveland Clinic Sports Health were included in the dataset. One hundred cases were randomly selected from the first four months of data collection (February- June 2015). Cases were limited to those undergoing ACL repair, meniscal repair, or both. Duplicate data on these 100 cases was collected via chart review. These two datasets were compared. Cohen’s Kappa statistic was used to assess agreement. Results: Table 1 shows the Kappa statistic and 95% confidence interval for agreement between the database and the chart review

  3. Research and Technology 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    to the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Glenn comprises more than 140 buildings, including 24 major facilities and over 500 specialized research and test facilities. Additional facilities are located at Plum Brook Station, which is about 50 miles west of Cleveland. Plum Brook Station has four large, major, world-class facilities for space research available for Government and industry programs. Knowledge is the end product of our activities. The R&T reports help make this knowledge fully available to potential users the aircraft engine industry, the space industry, the energy industry, the automotive industry, the aerospace industry, and others. It is organized so that a broad cross section of the community can readily use it. Each article begins with a short introductory paragraph that should prove valuable for the layperson. These articles summarize the progress made during the year in various technical areas and portray the technical and administrative support associated with Glenn s technology programs. We hope that this information is useful to all. If additional information is desired, readers are encouraged to contact the researchers identified at the end of each article and to visit Glenn on the World Wide Web at http://www.grc.nasa.gov.

  4. Case report of individual with cutaneous immunodeficiency and novel 1p36 duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatter AD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alyn D Hatter,1 David C Soler,2,3 Christine Curtis,4 Kevin D Cooper,1,2,3,5 Thomas S McCormick,2,31University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 2Department of Dermatology, 3The Murdough Family Center for Psoriasis, Case Western Reserve University, 4Cleveland Department of Pathology and Center for Human Genetics Laboratory, 5VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USAIntroduction: Crusted or Norwegian scabies is an infectious skin dermatopathology usually associated with an underlying immunodeficiency condition. It is caused when the mite Sarcoptes scabiei infects the skin, and the immune system is unable to control its spread, leading to a massive hyperinfestation with a simultaneous inflammatory and hyperkeratotic reaction. This is the first report of a novel 1p36 duplication associated with a recurrent infection of crusted scabies.Case report: We describe a 34-year-old patient with a cutaneous immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent crusted scabies infestation, diffuse tinea, and recurrent staphylococcal cellulitis, who we suspected had an undiagnosed syndrome. The patient also suffered from mental retardation, renal failure, and premature senescence. A cytogenetic fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed a 9.34 Mb duplication within the short (p arm of chromosome 1, precisely from 1p36.11 to 1p36.21, with an adjacent 193 kb copy gain entirely within 1p36.11. In addition, chromosome 4 had a 906 kb gain in 4p16.1 and chromosome 9 had a 81 kb copy gain in 9p24.3. Over 100 genes localized within these duplicated regions. Gene expression array revealed 82 genes whose expression changed >1.5-fold compared to a healthy age-matched skin control, but among them only the lipolytic enzyme arylacetamide deacetylase-like 3 was found within the duplicated 1p36 region of chromosome 1.Discussion: Although genetic duplications in the 1p36 region have been previously described, our report describes a novel duplicative variant within the 1p36 region. The

  5. Clinical and economic outcomes after surgical aortic valve replacement in Medicare patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark MA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mary Ann Clark,1 Francis G Duhay,2 Ann K Thompson,2 Michelle J Keyes,3 Lars G Svensson,4 Robert O Bonow,5 Benjamin T Stockwell,3 David J Cohen61The Neocure Group LLC, Washington, DC, 2Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, Irvine, CA, 3The Burgess Group LLC, Alexandria, VA, 4Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 5Center for Cardiovascular Innovation, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 6Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, USABackground: Aortic valve replacement (AVR is the standard of care for patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are suitable surgical candidates, benefiting both non-high-risk and high-risk patients. The purpose of this study was to report long-term medical resource use and costs for patients following AVR and validate our assumption that high-risk patients have worse outcomes and are more costly than non-high-risk patients in this population.Methods: Patients with aortic stenosis who underwent AVR were identified in the 2003 Medicare 5% Standard Analytic Files and tracked over 5 years to measure clinical outcomes, medical resource use, and costs. An approximation to the logistic EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation based on administrative data was used to assess surgical risk, with a computed logistic EuroSCORE > 20% considered high-risk.Results: We identified 1474 patients with aortic stenosis who underwent AVR, of whom 1222 (82.9% were non-high-risk and 252 (17.1% were high-risk. Among those who were non-high-risk, the mean age was 73.3 years, 464 (38.2% were women, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 7%, whereas in those who were high-risk, the mean age was 77.6 years, 134 (52.8% were women, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 37%. All-cause mortality was 33.2% for non-high-risk and 66.7% for high-risk patients at 5 years. Over this time period, non

  6. Seismicity pattern: an indicator of source region of volcanism at convergent plate margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špičák, Aleš; Hanuš, Václav; Vaněk, Jiří

    2004-04-01

    The results of detailed investigation into the geometry of distribution of earthquakes around and below the volcanoes Korovin, Cleveland, Makushin, Yake-Dake, Oshima, Lewotobi, Fuego, Sangay, Nisyros and Montagne Pelée at convergent plate margins are presented. The ISC hypocentral determinations for the period 1964-1999, based on data of global seismic network and relocated by Engdahl, van der Hilst and Buland, have been used. The aim of this study has been to contribute to the solution of the problem of location of source regions of primary magma for calc-alkaline volcanoes spatially and genetically related to the process of subduction. Several specific features of seismicity pattern were revealed in this context. (i) A clear occurrence of the intermediate-depth aseismic gap (IDAG) in the Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) below all investigated active volcanoes. We interpret this part of the subducted slab, which does not contain any teleseismically recorded earthquake with magnitude greater than 4.0, as a partially melted domain of oceanic lithosphere and as a possible source of primary magma for calc-alkaline volcanoes. (ii) A set of earthquakes in the shape of a seismically active column (SAC) seems to exists in the continental wedge below volcanoes Korovin, Makushin and Sangay. The seismically active columns probably reach from the Earth surface down to the aseismic gap in the Wadati-Benioff zone. This points to the possibility that the upper mantle overlying the subducted slab does not contain large melted domains, displays an intense fracturing and is not likely to represent the site of magma generation. (iii) In the continental wedge below the volcanoes Cleveland, Fuego, Nisyros, Yake-Dake, Oshima and Lewotobi, shallow seismicity occurs down to the depth of 50 km. The domain without any earthquakes between the shallow seismically active column and the aseismic gap in the Wadati-Benioff zone in the depth range of 50-100 km does not exclude the melting of the mantle

  7. Evaluation of nepafenac in prevention of macular edema following cataract surgery in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rishi Singh,1 Louis Alpern,2 Glenn J Jaffe,3 Robert P Lehmann,4 John Lim,5 Harvey J Reiser,6 Kenneth Sall,7 Thomas Walters,8 Dana Sager91Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 2The Cataract, Glaucoma, and Refractive Surgery Center, El Paso, TX, 3Duke Eye Center, Duke Reading Center, Duke University, Durham, NC, 4Lehmann Eye Center, Nacogdoches, TX, 5Houston Eye Associates, Houston, TX, 6Eye Care Specialists, Kingston, PA, 7Sall Research Medical Center, Artesia, CA, 8Texan Eye, Austin, TX, 9Alcon Research Ltd, Fort Worth, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate nepafenac ophthalmic suspension 0.1% (Nevanac®; Alcon Research Ltd in the prevention of macular edema following cataract surgery in diabetic retinopathy patients.Methods: This was a multicenter, randomized, double-masked, vehicle-controlled study of 263 adult diabetic patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy requiring cataract surgery. Patients were randomized (1:1 to instill nepafenac or vehicle three times daily beginning 1 day prior to surgery through day 90. Efficacy included the percentage of patients who developed macular edema (≥30% increase in central subfield macular thickness from baseline and the percentage of patients with decreases of more than five letters in best-corrected visual acuity from day 7 to 90.Results: A significantly lower percentage of patients in the nepafenac group developed macular edema relative to patients in the vehicle group (3.2% versus 16.7%; P < 0.001. A significantly lower percentage of patients in the nepafenac group had best-corrected visual acuity decreases of more than five letters relative to patients in the vehicle group on day 30 (P < 0.001, day 60 (P = 0.002, and day 90 (P = 0.006. The mean central subfield macular thickness and mean percent change from baseline in macular volume were also significantly lower in the nepafenac group versus the vehicle group at days 14 through 90 (P

  8. Little Rock and El Dorado 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangles and adjacent areas, Arkansas: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series Little Rock 10 x 20 quadrangle (Cleveland, Dallas, and Howard Counties do not have stream sediment analyses); the El Dorado 10 x 20 quadrangle (only Clark County has stream sediment analyses); the western part (Lonoke and Jefferson Counties) of Helena 10 x 20 quadrangle; the southern part (Franklin, Logan, Yell, Perry, Faulkner, and Lonoke Counties) of Russellville 10 x 20 quadrangle; and the southwestern corner (Ashley County) of the Greenwood 10 x 20 quadrangle. Stream samples were collected at 943 sites in the Little Rock quadrangle, 806 sites in the El Dorado quadrangle, 121 sites in the Helena area, 292 sites in the Russellville area, and 77 in the Greenwood area. Ground water samples were collected at 1211 sites in the Little Rock quadrangle, 1369 sites in the El Dorado quadrangle, 186 sites in the Helena area, 470 sites in the Russellville area, and 138 sites in the Greenwood area. Stream sediment and stream water samples were collected from small streams at nominal density of one site per 21 square kilometers in rural areas. Ground water samples were collected at a nominal density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Uranium concentrations in the sediments ranged from less than 0.1 ppM to 23.5 ppM with a mean of 1.7 ppM. The ground water uranium mean concentration is 0.113 ppB, and the uranium concentrations range from less than 0.002 ppB to 15.875 ppB. High ground water uranium values in the Ouachita Mountain region of the Little Rock quadrangle appear to be associated with Ordovician black shale units

  9. 1997 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Wallace, Kristi L.

    1999-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors over 40 historically active volcanoes along the Aleutian Arc. Twenty are seismically monitored and for the rest, the AVO monitoring program relies mainly on pilot reports, observations of local residents and ship crews, and daily analysis of satellite images. In 1997, AVO responded to eruptive activity or suspect volcanic activity at 11 volcanic centers: Wrangell, Sanford, Shrub mud volcano, Iliamna, the Katmai group (Martin, Mageik, Snowy, and Kukak volcanoes), Chiginagak, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Okmok, Cleveland, and Amukta. Of these, AVO has real-time, continuously recording seismic networks at Iliamna, the Katmai group, and Pavlof. The phrase “suspect volcanic activity” (SVA), used to characterize several responses, is an eruption report or report of unusual activity that is subsequently determined to be normal or enhanced fumarolic activity, weather-related phenomena, or a non-volcanic event. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) about the 1997 activity of 5 Russian volcanoes--Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Alaid (SVA). This report summarizes volcanic activity and SVA in Alaska during 1997 and the AVO response, as well as information on the reported activity at the Russian volcanoes. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a “significant” investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of reports throughout the year of steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1997 response record.

  10. The Advantage of Playing Home in NBA: Microscopic, Team-Specific and Evolving Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Haroldo V; Mukherjee, Satyam; Zeng, Xiao Han T

    2016-01-01

    The idea that the success rate of a team increases when playing home is broadly accepted and documented for a wide variety of sports. Investigations on the so-called "home advantage phenomenon" date back to the 70's and ever since has attracted the attention of scholars and sport enthusiasts. These studies have been mainly focused on identifying the phenomenon and trying to correlate it with external factors such as crowd noise and referee bias. Much less is known about the effects of home advantage in the "microscopic" dynamics of the game (within the game) or possible team-specific and evolving features of this phenomenon. Here we present a detailed study of these previous features in the National Basketball Association (NBA). By analyzing play-by-play events of more than sixteen thousand games that span thirteen NBA seasons, we have found that home advantage affects the microscopic dynamics of the game by increasing the scoring rates and decreasing the time intervals between scores of teams playing home. We verified that these two features are different among the NBA teams, for instance, the scoring rate of the Cleveland Cavaliers team is increased ≈0.16 points per minute (on average the seasons 2004-05 to 2013-14) when playing home, whereas for the New Jersey Nets (now the Brooklyn Nets) this rate increases in only ≈0.04 points per minute. We further observed that these microscopic features have evolved over time in a non-trivial manner when analyzing the results team-by-team. However, after averaging over all teams some regularities emerge; in particular, we noticed that the average differences in the scoring rates and in the characteristic times (related to the time intervals between scores) have slightly decreased over time, suggesting a weakening of the phenomenon. This study thus adds evidence of the home advantage phenomenon and contributes to a deeper understanding of this effect over the course of games. PMID:27015636

  11. Stirling technology development at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Mason, Lee S.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Stirling Technology Company (STC), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are developing a free-piston Stirling convertor for a high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) for NASA Space Science missions. The SRG is being developed for multimission use, including providing electric power for unmanned Mars rovers and deep space missions. NASA GRC is conducting an in-house technology project to assist in developing the convertor for space qualification and mission implementation. Recent testing of 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDC's) built by STC includes mapping of a second pair of TDC's, single TDC testing, and TDC electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility characterization on a non-magnetic test stand. Launch environment tests of a single TDC without its pressure vessel to better understand the convertor internal structural dynamics and of dual-opposed TDC's with several engineering mounting structures with different natural frequencies have recently been completed. A preliminary life assessment has been completed for the TDC heater head, and creep testing of the IN718 material to be used for the flight convertors is underway. Long-term magnet aging tests are continuing to characterize any potential aging in the strength or demagnetization resistance of the magnets used in the linear alternator (LA). Evaluations are now beginning on key organic materials used in the LA and piston/rod surface coatings. GRC is also conducting finite element analyses for the LA, in part to look at the demagnetization margin on the permanent magnets. The world's first known integrated test of a dynamic power system with electric propulsion was achieved at GRC when a Hall-effect thruster was successfully operated with a free-piston Stirling power source. Cleveland State University is developing a multi-dimensional Stirling computational fluid dynamics code to significantly improve Stirling loss predictions and assist in

  12. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 02: Evaluation of Dosimetric Variations in Partial Breast Seed Implant (PBSI) due to Patient Arm Position (Up vs. Down)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, E [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Long, K [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Husain, S [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Meyer, T [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    The planning for PBSI is done with the patient's ipsilateral arm raised, however, anatomical changes and variations are unavoidable as the patient resumes her daily activities, potentially resulting in significant deviations in implant geometry from the treatment plan. This study aims to quantify the impact of the ipsilateral arm position on the geometry and dosimetry of the implant at eight weeks, evaluated on post-plans using the MIM Symphony™ software (MIM Software, Cleveland, OH). The average dose metrics for the three patients treated at the TBCC thus far using rigid fusion and contour transfer for the arms up position were 76% for the CTV V100, 61% for the PTV V100, and 37% for the PTV V200; and for the arms down position 81% for the CTV V100, 64% for the PTV V100, and 42% for the PTV V200. Qualitative analysis of the post-implant CT for one of the three patients showed poor agreement between the seroma contour transferred from the pre-implant CT and the seroma visible on the post-implant CT. To obtain a clinically accurate plan for that patient, contour modifications were used, yielding improved dose metric averages for the arms-up position for all three patients of 87% for the CTV V100, 68% for the PTV V100, and 39% for the PTV V200. Overall, the data available shows that dosimetric parameters increase with the patient's arm down, both in terms of coverage and in terms of the hot spot, and accrual of more patients may confirm this in a larger population.

  13. Laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernias: Experience after 200 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelović Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Repair of hiatal hernias has been performed traditionally via open laparotomy or thoracotomy. Since first laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair in 1992, this method had a growing popularity and today it is the standard approach in experienced centers specialized for minimally invasive surgery. Objective. In the current study we present our experience after 200 consecutive laparoscopic hiatal hernia repairs. Methods. A retrospective cohort study included 200 patients who underwent elective laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair at the Department for Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery, Clinic for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade from April 2004 to December 2013. Results. Hiatal hernia types included 108 (54% patients with type I, 30 (15% with type III, 62 (31% with giant paraesophageal hernia, while 27 (13.5% patients presented with a chronic gastric volvulus. There were a total of 154 (77% Nissen fundoplications. In 26 (13% cases Nissen procedure was combined with esophageal lengthening procedure (Collis-Nissen, and in 17 (8.5% Toupet fundoplications was performed. Primary retroesophageal crural repair was performed in 164 (82% cases, Cleveland Clinic Foundation suture modification in 27 (13.5%, 4 (2% patients underwent synthetic mesh hiatoplasty, 1 (0.5% primary repair reinforced with pledgets, and 4 (2% autologous fascia lata graft reinforcement. Poor result with anatomic and symptomatic recurrence (indication for revisional surgery was detected in 5 patients (2.7%. Conclusion. Based on the result analysis, we found that laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair was a technically challenging but feasible technique, associated with good to excellent postoperative outcomes comparable to the best open surgery series.

  14. Changes in the volume of water in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer in the Delta, northwestern Mississippi, 1980-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, Office of Land and Water Resources, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service, estimated the volumetric changes of water in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer in northwestern Mississippi from 1980 through 1994. Volumetric changes of water in the alluvial aquifer were estimated for the entire Delta and for five selected areas within the Delta. The volume of water per square mile in the alluvial aquifer in the Delta changed from 17,886 acre-feet during fall 1980 to 17,719 acre-feet during fall 1994, a decrease in volume per square mile of 167 acre-feet. The minimum volume of water per square mile in the alluvial aquifer in the Delta during 1980-94 was 17,640 acre-feet during fall 1988. Of five selected areas within the Delta, an area near Cleveland in Bolivar County had the greatest change in volume of water in the alluvial aquifer. During fall 1980 this area had 20,790 acre-feet of water per square mile in the aquifer; by fall 1994, the volume had decreased to 19,947 acre-feet of water per square mile. An area located in the vicinity of the Sunflower-Leflore County line has within its boundaries a large cone of depression in the potentiometric surface of the alluvial aquifer. The volume of water per square mile in this area decreased from 17,857 acre-feet during fall 1980 to 17,075 acre-feet during fall 1994.

  15. Growth rate effects on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios constrained by belemnite calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    Multiple temperature proxies from single species are important to achieve robust palaeotemperature estimates. Besides the commonly employed oxygen isotope thermometer, also Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios perform well as proxies for calcification temperature in the shells of some species. While salinity changes affect the ratios of earth alkaline elements much less than the δ18O thermometer, metabolic effects may exert a strong control on the expression of element ratios. Such effects are hard to study because biomineralization experiments have to overcome large intraspecific variability and can hardly ever isolate the controls of a single parameter on shell geochemistry. The unique geometry of the belemnite rostrum constitutes an exception to this rule. Its shape, large size, and the visibility of growth increments as bands enable the analysis of multiple, correlatable, high resolution geochemical profiles in a single fossil. The effects of the growth rate variability amongst these profiles on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios has been tested here. Within a specimen of Passaloteuthis bisulcata (Early Toarcian, Cleveland Basin, UK), Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca data were obtained from four profiles. With respect to growth rate in the first profile, which was taken as a reference, the relative growth rates in the remaining three profiles varied by a factor of 0.9 to 2.7. Results suggest that relative growth rate is linearly correlated with Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, with a decrease of Mg/Ca by 8 % and increase of Sr/Ca by 6 % per 100 % increase in relative growth rate. The observed trends are consistent with abiogenic precipitation experiments and suggest that crystal precipitation rate exerts a significant, predictable control on the element distribution in biogenic calcite.

  16. Robust breathing signal extraction from cone beam CT projections based on adaptive and global optimization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ming; Wei, Jie; Li, Tianfang; Yuan, Yading; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of extracting respiratory signals from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections within the framework of the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) technique. Acquired prior to the radiotherapy treatment, CBCT projections were preprocessed for contrast enhancement by converting the original intensity images to attenuation images with which the AS image was created. An adaptive robust z-normalization filtering was applied to further augment the weak oscillating structures locally. From the enhanced AS image, the respiratory signal was extracted using a two-step optimization approach to effectively reveal the large-scale regularity of the breathing signals. CBCT projection images from five patients acquired with the Varian Onboard Imager on the Clinac iX System Linear Accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were employed to assess the proposed technique. Stable breathing signals can be reliably extracted using the proposed algorithm. Reference waveforms obtained using an air bellows belt (Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH) were exported and compared to those with the AS based signals. The average errors for the enrolled patients between the estimated breath per minute (bpm) and the reference waveform bpm can be as low as  -0.07 with the standard deviation 1.58. The new algorithm outperformed the original AS technique for all patients by 8.5% to 30%. The impact of gantry rotation on the breathing signal was assessed with data acquired with a Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, Canada) and found to be minimal on the signal frequency. The new technique developed in this work will provide a practical solution to rendering markerless breathing signal using the CBCT projections for thoracic and abdominal patients.

  17. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade Section in a Transonic Turbine Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to document the impact of incidence angle and Reynolds number variations on the three-dimensional flow field and midspan loss and turning of a two-dimensional section of a variable-speed power-turbine (VSPT) rotor blade. Aerodynamic measurements were obtained in a transonic linear cascade at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Steady-state data were obtained for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. At each angle, data were acquired at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number (based on axial chord) varying over an order-of-magnitude from 2.12×105 to 2.12×106. Data were obtained at the design exit Mach number of 0.72 and at a reduced exit Mach number of 0.35 as required to achieve the lowest Reynolds number. Midspan tota lpressure and exit flow angle data were acquired using a five-hole pitch/yaw probe surveyed on a plane located 7.0 percent axial-chord downstream of the blade trailing edge plane. The survey spanned three blade passages. Additionally, three-dimensional half-span flow fields were examined with additional probe survey data acquired at 26 span locations for two key incidence angles of +5.8deg and -36.7deg. Survey data near the endwall were acquired with a three-hole boundary-layer probe. The data were integrated to determine average exit total-pressure and flow angle as functions of incidence and flow conditions. The data set also includes blade static pressures measured on four spanwise planes and endwall static pressures.

  18. Orphan drugs in development for urea cycle disorders: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häberle J

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Häberle,1 Shawn E McCandless2 1Division of Metabolism and Children's Research Center, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Center for Human Genetics, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, and Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: The urea cycle disorders are caused by deficiency of one of the six hepatic enzymes or two transporters involved in detoxification of ammonia. The resulting hyperammonemia causes severe brain injury unless aggressive steps are taken to reduce the accumulation of ammonia, which is thought to be the most toxic metabolite. This review describes the current state of chronic management of urea cycle disorders, focusing on new and emerging therapies. Management strategies include the mainstay of treatment, namely dietary protein restriction and supplementation with l-arginine or l-citrulline. Several currently approved medications utilize and enhance alternative pathways of waste nitrogen excretion (sodium benzoate, sodium phenylacetate, sodium phenylbutyrate in several formulations, and glycerol phenylbutyrate, working through conjugation of the drug to either glycine (in the case of benzoate or glutamine, the products of which are excreted in the urine. Carglumic acid activates the first committed step of conversion of ammonia to urea, carbamoylphosphate synthetase, and thus effectively treats defective synthesis of the endogenous activator, N-acetylglutamate, whether due to genetic defects or biochemical inhibition of the N-acetylglutamate synthase enzyme. Approaches to neuroprotection during episodes of hyperammonemia are discussed, including the use of controlled hypothermia (brain cooling, as well as proposed, but as yet untested, pharmacologic therapies. Finally, cell-based therapies, including liver transplantation, infusion of fresh or cryopreserved hepatocytes, use of stem cells, and new approaches to gene

  19. The impact of global warming and anoxia on marine benthic community dynamics: an example from the Toarcian (Early Jurassic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Danise

    Full Text Available The Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Early Jurassic fossil record is an archive of natural data of benthic community response to global warming and marine long-term hypoxia and anoxia. In the early Toarcian mean temperatures increased by the same order of magnitude as that predicted for the near future; laminated, organic-rich, black shales were deposited in many shallow water epicontinental basins; and a biotic crisis occurred in the marine realm, with the extinction of approximately 5% of families and 26% of genera. High-resolution quantitative abundance data of benthic invertebrates were collected from the Cleveland Basin (North Yorkshire, UK, and analysed with multivariate statistical methods to detect how the fauna responded to environmental changes during the early Toarcian. Twelve biofacies were identified. Their changes through time closely resemble the pattern of faunal degradation and recovery observed in modern habitats affected by anoxia. All four successional stages of community structure recorded in modern studies are recognised in the fossil data (i.e. Stage III: climax; II: transitional; I: pioneer; 0: highly disturbed. Two main faunal turnover events occurred: (i at the onset of anoxia, with the extinction of most benthic species and the survival of a few adapted to thrive in low-oxygen conditions (Stages I to 0 and (ii in the recovery, when newly evolved species colonized the re-oxygenated soft sediments and the path of recovery did not retrace of pattern of ecological degradation (Stages I to II. The ordination of samples coupled with sedimentological and palaeotemperature proxy data indicate that the onset of anoxia and the extinction horizon coincide with both a rise in temperature and sea level. Our study of how faunal associations co-vary with long and short term sea level and temperature changes has implications for predicting the long-term effects of "dead zones" in modern oceans.

  20. Intergrated study of the Devonian-age black shales in eastern Ohio. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.D.; Struble, R.A.; Carlton, R.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Honeycutt, F.M.; Kingsbury, R.H.; Knapp, N.F.; Majchszak, F.L.; Stith, D.A.

    1982-09-01

    This integrated study of the Devonian-age shales in eastern Ohio by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey is part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The six areas of research included in the study are: (1) detailed stratigraphic mapping, (2) detailed structure mapping, (3) mineralogic and petrographic characterization, (4) geochemical characterization, (5) fracture trace and lineament analysis, and (6) a gas-show monitoring program. The data generated by the study provide a basis for assessing the most promising stratigraphic horizons for occurrences of natural gas within the Devonian shale sequence and the most favorable geographic areas of the state for natural gas exploration and should be useful in the planning and design of production-stimulation techniques. Four major radioactive units in the Devonian shale sequence are believed to be important source rocks and reservoir beds for natural gas. In order of potential for development as an unconventional gas resource, they are (1) lower and upper radioactive facies of the Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, (2) upper Olentangy Shale (Rhinestreet facies equivalent), (3) Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, and (4) lower Olentangy Shale (Marcellus facies equivalent). These primary exploration targets are recommended on the basis of areal distribution, net thickness of radioactive shale, shows of natural gas, and drilling depth to the radioactive unit. Fracture trends indicate prospective areas for Devonian shale reservoirs. Good geological prospects in the Devonian shales should be located where the fracture trends coincide with thick sequences of organic-rich highly radioactive shale.

  1. Approximate Entropies for Stochastic Time Series and EKG Time Series of Patients with Epilepsy and Pseudoseizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnalek, Brian; Zurcher, Ulrich; O'Dwyer, Rebecca; Kaufman, Miron

    2009-10-01

    A wide range of heart rate irregularities have been reported in small studies of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy [TLE]. We hypothesize that patients with TLE display cardiac dysautonomia in either a subclinical or clinical manner. In a small study, we have retrospectively identified (2003-8) two groups of patients from the epilepsy monitoring unit [EMU] at the Cleveland Clinic. No patients were diagnosed with cardiovascular morbidities. The control group consisted of patients with confirmed pseudoseizures and the experimental group had confirmed right temporal lobe epilepsy through a seizure free outcome after temporal lobectomy. We quantified the heart rate variability using the approximate entropy [ApEn]. We found similar values of the ApEn in all three states of consciousness (awake, sleep, and proceeding seizure onset). In the TLE group, there is some evidence for greater variability in the awake than in either the sleep or proceeding seizure onset. Here we present results for mathematically-generated time series: the heart rate fluctuations ξ follow the γ statistics i.e., p(ξ)=γ-1(k) ξ^k exp(-ξ). This probability function has well-known properties and its Shannon entropy can be expressed in terms of the γ-function. The parameter k allows us to generate a family of heart rate time series with different statistics. The ApEn calculated for the generated time series for different values of k mimic the properties found for the TLE and pseudoseizure group. Our results suggest that the ApEn is an effective tool to probe differences in statistics of heart rate fluctuations.

  2. 3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from oilseed rape (Brassica napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, P S; Kekwick, R G; Smith, C G; Sidebottom, C; Slabas, A R

    1992-04-01

    3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase (E.C. 1.1.1.100, alternatively known as beta-ketoacyl-[ACP] reductase), a component of fatty acid synthetase has been purified from seeds of rape by ammonium sulphate fractionation, Procion Red H-E3B chromatography, FPLC gel filtration and high performance hydroxyapatite chromatography. The purified enzyme appears on SDS-PAGE as a number of 20-30 kDa components and has a strong tendency to exist in a dimeric form, particularly when dithiothreitol is not present to reduce disulphide bonds. Cleveland mapping and cross-reactivity with antiserum raised against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase both indicate that the multiple components have similar primary structures. On gel filtration the enzyme appears to have a molecular mass of 120 kDa suggesting that the native structure is tetrameric. The enzyme has a strong preference for the acetoacetyl ester of acyl carrier protein (Km = 3 microM) over the corresponding esters of the model substrates N-acetyl cysteamine (Km = 35 mM) and CoA (Km = 261 microM). It is inactivated by dilution but this can be partly prevented by the inclusion of NADPH. Using an antiserum prepared against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase, the enzyme has been visualised inside the plastids of rape embryo and leaf tissues by immunoelectron microscopy. Amino acid sequencing of two peptides prepared by digestion of the purified enzyme with trypsin showed strong similarities with 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from avocado pear and the Nod G gene product from Rhizobium meliloti.

  3. Draft environmental statement related to construction of Erie Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2: (Docket Nos. STN 50-580 and STN 50-581)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action is the issuance of construction permits to the Ohio Edison Company, acting on behalf of itself, the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Duquesne Light Company, Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company, for the construction of the Erie Nuclear Plant Units 1 and 2, located in Erie County, Ohio. A total of 704 hectares (ha) (1740 acres) will be used for the Erie plant site. Construction-related activities on the primary site will disturb about 223 ha (551 acres). Approximately 641 ha (1584 acres) will be required for transmission line rights-of-way. The 3.86-km (2.4-mile) intake and discharge pipeline land corridor will involve alteration of approximately 13 ha (32 acres) of corridor and 1 ha (2.5 acres) for shore facilities. Also, 3.9 ha (9.6 acres) of lake bottom will be disturbed to provide 15-m-wide (50-ft-wide) trenches and an additional 15-m-wide (50-ft-wide) area for storage of excavated material for subsequent backfill for the 701-m (2300-ft) intake and 579-m (1900-ft) discharge lines. Plant construction will involve some community impacts. No residents will be displaced from the site property. Traffic on local roads will increase due to construction and commuting activities. The influx of construction workers' families (a peak work force of about 2700) is expected to cause no major housing or school problems. It is assumed that aquatic organisms entrained in the circulating water system will be killed due to thermal and mechanical shock. The maximum impact based on the population densities of phytoplankton and zooplankton organisms in the adjacent lake area will be the destruction of 0.1% of the entrainable organisms from the lake water. The entrainment of fish larvae will not constitute a significant impact on the lake fishery. 62 figs., 32 tabs

  4. Determinants of Dieting Behavior and Eating Disorders in High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Lillian Miller

    This study examines the prevalence and intensity of dieting behavior and the development of eating disorders in a sample of 1269 high school students from ten schools in the Greater Cleveland area. The sample includes four race-sex groups: black and white male and female students. Differences in dieting behavior between these groups are examined and, within each race-sex group, dieters and non-dieters are compared to see whether they differ in such factors as current weight and personal weight history, parental weights, socioeconomic class, religion, birth order, exercise and personality factors such as self-esteem and eating disorder measures. Data were collected using both self-administered questionnaires and in-depth interviews with a subsample of students. The study documents a higher prevalence of dieting and purging behavior than has been reported in other research. Forty-one percent of both black and white males, 61 percent of black females, and 77 percent of white females dieted and many purged, particularly black females who tended to use laxatives and diuretics and white females and males who tended to use vomiting. Dieters and non -dieters differed significantly in past experience with being overweight and in their current weights. At the time of the study 20 to 30 percent of the dieters were classifiable as overweight. While black and white male dieters and non-dieters were in agreement about ideal body weight, white female dieters and non-dieters wanted considerably lower weights than black female dieters and non-dieters. Ethnicity, as determined by socioeconomic class and religion, was not significantly related to dieting behavior, nor was birth order, a familial factor. It appeared that pervasive cultural pressures to attain an ideal figure affected all race-sex groups and led large percentages of the students to diet, even many who were already underweight.

  5. The Protein-Sparing Modified Fast Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Bakhach MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The protein-sparing modified fast (PSMF is a rigorous way of rapidly losing a large amount of weight. Although adult studies have shown the PSMF to be effective, data in adolescents are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of the PSMF in severely obese adolescents. Methods: 12 subjects who were evaluated in the Obesity Management Program at the Cleveland Clinic from 2011 to 2014 were included. The subjects were initiated on the PSMF after failing other conventional methods of weight loss. Once the goal weight was achieved, subjects were transitioned to the refeeding phase for weight maintenance. Results: Follow-up was scheduled at 3-month (11 patients and 6-month (6 patients intervals. At the 6-month follow-up visit, the average weight loss was 11.19 kg (95% confidence interval = -5.4, -27.8, P = .028, with average of 9.8% from baseline. Fifty percent of subjects had >5% weight loss and 20% had >10% weight loss. Four patients were lost to the follow-up (40%. An improvement was noted in total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein. Due to a small sample size these results were not statistically significant. Side effects reported by subjects were mild dehydration due to nausea (2 patients, decreased energy (1 patient, and transient labile mood (1 patient. No life-threatening side effects were reported. Conclusion: Our results show that the PSMF diet can be used as an effective and safe method in the outpatient setting for rapid weight loss in adolescents with severe obesity.

  6. Effectiveness of Shared Medical Appointments Versus Traditional Clinic Visits for Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everest, Erica; Akhtar, Sara; Sumego, Marianne; Zeizoun, Alaa; Worley, Sarah; Tang, Anne S; Dorsey, Allison; Smith, Ann; Schweiger, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Shared medical appointments began in the United States in 1996 to advance quality of care and enhance patients' ability to self-manage. Group visits gather patients with the same diagnosis for individual examinations followed by group education sessions taught by the provider. This leads to the opportunity to learn from the experiences of others. The Cleveland Clinic Department of Pediatric Endocrinology offers a shared medical appointment group for pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes called the ESCALAIT clinic (Enrichment Services and Care for Adolescents Living with Autoimmune Insulin Dependent Type 1 Diabetes). The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of traditional clinic visits with shared medical appointments for adolescents with type 1 diabetes in terms of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) improvement. Eighty ESCALAIT patients, aged 11 to 19 years were compared with 516 clinic controls of the same age. Visits were approximately 3 months apart for both patient groups. Changes in HbA1c between groups were calculated from the first to fourth visits. There was a statistically significant difference between the ESCALAIT clinic patients and the control patients. Our results revealed that the group visit patients had less improvement in HbA1c values at the last visit approximately 1 year later, but we would argue that the difference is not clinically significant. However, there were many benefits to shared medical appointment visits including increased access to care as well as peer support. Shared medical appointments are therefore a valid alternative to traditional clinic visits in this patient population. PMID:27367219

  7. Impact of heart rate and rhythm on radiation exposure in prospectively ECG triggered computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luecke, Christian, E-mail: neep@gmx.de [University of Leipzig – Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Strümpellstrasse 39, D-04289, Leipzig (Germany); Andres, Claudia; Foldyna, Borek [University of Leipzig – Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Strümpellstrasse 39, D-04289, Leipzig (Germany); Nagel, Hans Dieter [Wissenschaft and Technik für die Radiologie, Buchhholz i.d.N (Germany); Hoffmann, Janine; Grothoff, Matthias; Nitzsche, Stefan; Gutberlet, Matthias; Lehmkuhl, Lukas [University of Leipzig – Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Strümpellstrasse 39, D-04289, Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of different heart rates and arrhythmias on scanner performance, image acquisition and applied radiation exposure in prospectively ECG triggered computed tomography (pCT). Materials and methods: An ECG simulator (EKG Phantom 320, Müller and Sebastiani Elektronik GmbH, Munich, Germany) was used to generate different heart rhythms and arrhythmias: sinus rhythm (SR) at 45, 60, 75, 90 and 120/min, supraventricular arrhythmias (e.g. sinus arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation) and ventricular arrhythmias (e.g. ventricular extrasystoles), pacemaker-ECGs, ST-changes and technical artifacts. The analysis of the image acquisition process was performed on a 64-row multidetector CT (Brilliance, Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, USA). A prospectively triggered scan protocol as used for routine was applied (120 kV; 150 mA s; 0.4 s rotation and exposure time per scan; image acquisition predominantly in end-diastole at 75% R-R-interval, in arrythmias with a mean heart rate above 80/min in systole at 45% of the R-R-interval; FOV 25 cm). The mean dose length product (DLP) and its percentage increase from baseline (SR at 60/min) were determined. Result: Radiation exposure can increase significantly when the heart rhythm deviates from sinus rhythm. ECG-changes leading to a significant DLP increase (p < 0.05) were bifocal pacemaker (61%), pacemaker dysfunction (22%), SVES (20%), ventricular salvo (20%), and atrial fibrillation (14%). Significantly (p < 0.05) prolonged scan time (>8 s) could be observed in bifocal pacemaker (12.8 s), pacemaker dysfunction (10.7 s), atrial fibrillation (10.3 s) and sinus arrhythmia (9.3 s). Conclusion: In prospectively ECG triggered CT, heart rate and rhythm can provoke different types of scanner performance, which can significantly alter radiation exposure and scan time. These results might have an important implication for indication, informed consent and contrast agent injection protocols.

  8. Constraining the Spatial and Temporal Variability of Atmospheric Conditions to Explore the Infrasound Detection of Volcanic Eruptions in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzi, A. M.; Schwaiger, H. F.; Fee, D.; Haney, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Alaska's over 50 historically active volcanoes span 2,500 kilometers, and their eruptions pose great threats to the aviation industry. This makes both prompt observations of explosion onsets and changes in intensity a necessity. Due to their expansive range and remoteness, these volcanoes are predominantly monitored by local seismic networks, remote observations including satellite imagery and infrasound sensors. Infrasound is an especially crucial tool in this area because infrasound data collection is not obstructed by frequent cloud cover (as in satellite imagery) and infrasound waves can travel hundreds to thousands of kilometers. However, infrasound station coverage is relatively sparse and strong wind and temperature gradients in the atmosphere create multiple waveguides and shadow zones where the propagation of infrasound is enhanced and diminished, respectively. To accurately constrain volcanic source information and the long-range propagation of infrasound waves, a detailed characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of the atmosphere is vital. These properties can be constrained using a ground-to-space model similar to that of Drob et al. (2003) based upon varied meteorological observations and applied to infrasound waves to model the propagation of infrasound. Here we present the first results of a re-analysis system constructed by the Alaska Volcano Observatory to accurately characterize and model long-range infrasound propagation from volcanic eruptions. We select a number of case studies to examine infrasound detections (or lack thereof) from recent eruptions of Alaskan volcanoes, including the November 2014 eruption of Pavlof Volcano and July 2015 eruption of Cleveland Volcano. Detailed examination of the acoustic propagation conditions will provide additional insight into detection capability and eruption dynamics with future work aiming to implement real-time long-range infrasound propagation modeling.Drob, Douglas P., J. M. Picone

  9. Frequency Based Volcanic Activity Detection through Remotely Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, A. K.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing has proved to offer a useful and relatively inexpensive method for monitoring large areas where field work is logistically unrealistic, and potentially dangerous. Current sensors are able to detect the majority of explosive volcanic activity; those that tend to effect and represent larger scale changes in the volcanic systems, eventually relating to ash producing periods of extended eruptive activity, and effusive activity. As new spaceborne sensors are developed, the ability to detect activity improves so that a system to gauge the frequency of volcanic activity can be used as a useful monitoring tool. Four volcanoes were chosen for development and testing of a method to monitor explosive activity: Stromboli (Italy); Shishaldin and Cleveland (Alaska, USA); and Karymsky (Kamchatka, Russia). Each volcano studied had similar but unique signatures of pre-cursory and eruptive activity. This study has shown that this monitoring tool could be applied to a wide range of volcanoes and still produce useful and robust data. Our method deals specifically with the detection of small scale explosive activity. The method described here could be useful in an operational setting, especially at remote volcanoes that have the potential to impact populations, infrastructure, and the aviation community. A number of important factors will affect the validity of application of this method. They are: (1) the availability of a continuous and continually populated dataset; (2) appropriate and reasonable sensor resolutions; (3) a recorded history of the volcano's previous activity; and, if available, (4) some ground-based monitoring system. We aim to develop the method further to be able to capture and evaluate the frequency of other volcanic processes such as lava flows, phreatomagmatic eruptions and dome growth and collapse. The work shown here has served to illustrate the capability of this method and monitoring tool for use at remote, un-instrumented volcanoes.

  10. Attitudes Toward HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) Among African American Men Who Have Sex With Men: Concerns Underlying Reluctance to Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Lawrence, Janet S; Kelly, Jeffrey A; Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Owczarzak, Jill; Amirkhanian, Yuri A; Sitzler, Cheryl

    2015-06-01

    Contemporary antiretroviral therapy (ART) can produce viral suppression of HIV, maintain health, and prevent onward HIV transmission from infected persons to their sexual partners, giving rise to the concept of treatment as prevention. Successful implementation of test-and-treat strategies rests on the early detection of HIV infection through voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) followed by entry and retention in care, ART initiation and adherence, and subsequent viral suppression. In the United States, African American men who have sex with men (MSM) bear a disproportionate burden of HIV and have high rates of undetected and untreated HIV infection. However, little research has examined racial minority MSM's views about HIV testing. In this study, in-depth interviews were conducted with 96 key informants knowledgeable about racial minority MSM as well as 100 African American MSM community members in Milwaukee, Cleveland, and Miami. Most men in the sample were aware of the availability of testing and knew testing locations, but many voiced great personal ambivalence about being tested, feared knowing their HIV status, expressed concern about stigma and loss of confidentiality, and held beliefs indicative of medical mistrust. Participants did not spontaneously cite benefits of being tested, risk reduction behavior changes made as a consequence of testing, nor the benefits of testing to get early medical care for HIV infection. There is a gap between the public health field's perception of testing benefits and the beliefs about testing held by racial minority MSM in this sample. To increase the desired outcomes from VCT for minority MSM, VCT promotion should address the concerns of African American MSM and underscore the benefits of early entry into medical care. PMID:26010312

  11. Gefitinib in definitive management of esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer: a retrospective analysis of two clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, D P S; Rice, T W; Rybicki, L A; Rodriguez, C P; Videtic, G M M; Saxton, J P; Murthy, S C; Mason, D P; Phillips, B E; Tubbs, R R; Plesec, T; McNamara, M J; Ives, D I; Bodmann, J W; Adelstein, D J

    2015-01-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in resectable esophageal/gastroesophageal junction (E/GEJ) cancer is uncertain. Results from two Cleveland Clinic trials of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and surgery are updated and retrospectively compared, the second study differing only by the addition of gefitinib (G) to the treatment regimen. Eligibility required a diagnosis of E/GEJ squamous cell or adenocarcinoma, with an endoscopic ultrasound stage of at least T3, N1, or M1a (American Joint Committee on Cancer 6th). Patients in both trials received 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg/m(2) /day) and cisplatin (20 mg/m(2) /day) as continuous infusions over days 1-4 along with 30 Gy radiation at 1.5 Gy bid. Surgery followed in 4-6 weeks; identical CCRT was given 6-10 weeks later. The second trial added G, 250 mg/day, on day 1 for 4 weeks, and again with postoperative CCRT for 2 years. Preliminary results and comparisons have been previously published. Clinical characteristics were similar between the 80 patients on the G trial (2003-2006) and the 93 patients on the no-G trial (1999-2003). Minimum follow-up for all patients was 5 years. Multivariable analyses comparing the G versus no-G patients and adjusting for statistically significant covariates demonstrated improved overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.45-0.91, P = 0.012), recurrence-free survival (HR 0.61, 95% CI = 0.43-0.86, P = 0.006), and distant recurrence (HR 0.68, 95% CI = 0.45-1.00, P = 0.05), but not locoregional recurrence. Although this retrospective comparison can only be considered exploratory, it suggests that G may improve clinical outcomes when combined with CCRT and surgery in the definitive treatment of E/GEJ cancer.

  12. Probability of developing proximal deep-vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism after distal deep-vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brateanu, Andrei; Patel, Krishna; Chagin, Kevin; Tunsupon, Pichapong; Yampikulsakul, Pojchawan; Shah, Gautam V; Wangsiricharoen, Sintawat; Amah, Linda; Allen, Joshua; Shapiro, Aryeh; Gupta, Neha; Morgan, Lillie; Kumar, Rahul; Nielsen, Craig; Rothberg, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    Isolated distal deep-vein thrombosis (DDVT) of the lower extremities can be associated with subsequent proximal deep-vein thrombosis (PDVT) and/or acute pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to develop a model predicting the probability of developing PDVT and/or PE within three months after an isolated episode of DDVT. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with symptomatic DDVT confirmed by lower extremity vein ultrasounds between 2001-2012 in the Cleveland Clinic Health System. We reviewed all the ultrasounds, chest ventilation/perfusion and computed tomography scans ordered within three months after the initial DDVT to determine the incidence of PDVT and/or PE. A multiple logistic regression model was built to predict the rate of developing these complications. The final model included 450 patients with isolated DDVT. Within three months, 30 (7 %) patients developed an episode of PDVT and/or PE. Only two factors predicted subsequent thromboembolic complications: inpatient status (OR, 6.38; 95 % CI, 2.17 to 18.78) and age (OR, 1.02 per year; 95 % CI, 0.99 to 1.05). The final model had a bootstrap bias-corrected c-statistic of 0.72 with a 95 % CI (0.64 to 0.79). Outpatients were at low risk ( 10 %). Inpatients aged < 60 were at intermediate risk. We created a simple model that can be used to risk stratify patients with isolated DDVT based on inpatient status and age. The model might be used to choose between anticoagulation and monitoring with serial ultrasounds. PMID:26660731

  13. Success of Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Does Obesity Influence the Outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanunjaya R. Lakkireddy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF is an increasingly popular therapeutic option for symptomatic patients who have failed multiple antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs. Patients of higher body mass index often fail direct current cardioversion. The role of body mass index (BMI on the success of AF ablation is not well understood. Methods We prospectively studied 511 patients who underwent AF ablation at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation between 2002 and 2005. Patients were divided into four classes based on their BMI: Class I ( 25; Class II (25.1-30; Class III (30.1-35 and Class IV (>35. These groups were compared for baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Any recurrence of AF after 3 months of ablation was considered as failure. All classes were followed for at least 12 months and rates of failure were compared. Results Based on their BMI, 25% of patients were assigned to class I, 37% in class II, 21% in class III and 16% in class IV. Patients of higher classification (class III or IV were more likely to be male (p<0.001, diabetic (p<0.001, smokers (p=0.002, with coronary artery disease (=0.018, left atrial enlargement (p=0.015 and longstanding AF (p=0.007. Severity of obesity as measured by BMI had a direct correlation to early (p=0.05 and late (p=0.01 recurrence of AF. Conclusion Obesity is significantly associated with long-term AF recurrence after catheter ablation. Higher incidence of smoking & left atrial enlargement may possibly contribute to higher failure rates in this sub-group of patients.

  14. Advanced Technology Development for Stirling Convertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2004-01-01

    A high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) for use on potential NASA Space Science missions is being developed by the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Stirling Technology Company, and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). These missions may include providing spacecraft onboard electric power for deep space missions or power for unmanned Mars rovers. GRC is also developing advanced technology for Stirling convertors, aimed at substantially improving the specific power and efficiency of the convertor and the overall power system. Performance and mass improvement goals have been established for second- and thirdgeneration Stirling radioisotope power systems. Multiple efforts are underway to achieve these goals, both in-house at GRC and under various grants and contracts. The status and results to date for these efforts will be discussed in this paper. Cleveland State University (CSU) is developing a multi-dimensional Stirling computational fluid dynamics code, capable of modeling complete convertors. A 2-D version of the code is now operational, and validation efforts at both CSU and the University of Minnesota are complementing the code development. A screening of advanced superalloy, refractory metal alloy, and ceramic materials has been completed, and materials have been selected for creep and joining characterization as part of developing a high-temperature heater head. A breadboard characterization is underway for an advanced controller using power electronics for active power factor control with a goal of eliminating the heavy tuning capacitors that are typically needed to achieve near unity power factors. Key Stirling developments just initiated under recent NRA (NASA Research Announcement) awards will also be discussed. These include a lightweight convertor to be developed by Sunpower Inc. and an advanced microfabricated regenerator to be done by CSU.

  15. Factors influencing excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Souza Vilela

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Sleep deprivation in adolescents has lately become a health issue that tends to increase with higher stress prevalence, extenuating routines, and new technological devices that impair adolescents' bedtime. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the excessive sleepiness frequency and the factors that might be associated to it in this population. Methods: The cross-sectional study analyzed 531 adolescents aged 10–18 years old from two private schools and one public school. Five questionnaires were applied: the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire; the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children; the Brazilian Economic Classification Criteria; the General Health and Sexual Maturation Questionnaire; and the Physical Activity Questionnaire. The statistical analyses were based on comparisons between schools and sleepiness and non-sleepiness groups, using linear correlation and logistic regression. Results: Sleep deprivation was present in 39% of the adolescents; sleep deficit was higher in private school adolescents (p < 0.001, and there was a positive correlation between age and sleep deficit (p < 0.001; r = 0.337. Logistic regression showed that older age (p = 0.002; PR: 1.21 [CI: 1.07–1.36] and higher score level for sleep hyperhidrosis in the sleep disturbance scale (p = 0.02; PR: 1.16 [CI: 1.02–1.32] were risk factors for worse degree of sleepiness. Conclusions: Sleep deficit appears to be a reality among adolescents; the results suggest a higher prevalence in students from private schools. Sleep deprivation is associated with older age in adolescents and possible presence of sleep disorders, such as sleep hyperhidrosis.

  16. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Training Grant Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    2005-01-01

    The following section summarizes the impact of the Ohio Space Grant Consortium (OSGC) in Ohio and to NASA over the last four-year period (February 1, 2001 to April 30, 2005) and highlights the important accomplishments of the consortium. The strength of the OSGC network of universities, community colleges, government agencies, industry, and outreach affiliates is well-established and is growing. The OSGC Consortium Management Structure was designed and remains committed to using the talents and diversity of everyone within this collaborative network, and operational policies and procedures are such that all consortium members are active contributors resulting in quality OSGC programs in research, education and service, while receiving a relatively small amount of NASA funds. The number of quality activities, both on- and off-campus, and collaborations/partnerships that OSGC has established with NASA and government agencies, state and local government, educational institutions, and private industry, has been impressive. Further desired university affiliate expansion requires additional funds. Diversity is shown in the OSGC 12-member Executive Committee by the presence of three campus representatives from Central State University, Wilberforce University, and The Ohio State University (two underrepresented minority, one female). One additional female campus representative (Cleveland State University) is currently on sabbatical leave and a valuable alternate member attends. Other additional female and underrepresented minority members are on the larger OSGC Advisory committee. All committee members participate fully in all consortium management and policy decisions. The OSGC Executive Committee strives to achieve and communicate a culture of trust, respect, teamwork, open communication, creativity, and empowerment. These programs have shown results and impact by their visibility and importance to Ohio and to NASA, resulting in strategic alliances created throughout

  17. Final environmental statement: Related to the operation of Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-346)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action is the issuance of an operating license to the Toledo Edison Company and the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company for the startup and operation of the Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 (the station) located near Port Clinton in Ottawa County, Ohio. The total site area is 954 acres of which 160 acres have been removed from production of grain crops and converted to industrial use. Approximately 600 acres of the area is marshland which will be maintained as a wildlife refuge. The disturbance of the lake shore and lake bottom during construction of the station water intake and discharge pipes resulted in temporary turbidity, silting, and destruction of bottom organisms. Since completion of these activities, evidence of improvement in turbidity and transparency measurements, and the reestablishment of the bottom organism has been obtained. The cooling tower blowdown and service water which the station discharges to Lake Erie, via a submerged jet, will be heated no more than 20/degrees/F above the ambient lake water temperature. Although some small fish and plankton in the discharge water plume will be disabled as a result of thermal shock, exposure to chlorine and buffeting, few adult fish will be affected. The thermal plume resulting from the maximum thermal discharge is calculated to have an area of less than one acre within the 3/degrees/F isotherm (above lake ambient). Approximately 101 miles of transmission lines have been constructed, primarily over existing farmland, requiring about 1800 acres of land for the rights-of-way. Land use will essentially be unchanged since only the land required for the base of the towers is removed from production. Herbicides will not be used to maintain the rights-of-way. 14 figs., 34 refs

  18. Robust breathing signal extraction from cone beam CT projections based on adaptive and global optimization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ming; Wei, Jie; Li, Tianfang; Yuan, Yading; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-04-21

    We present a study of extracting respiratory signals from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections within the framework of the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) technique. Acquired prior to the radiotherapy treatment, CBCT projections were preprocessed for contrast enhancement by converting the original intensity images to attenuation images with which the AS image was created. An adaptive robust z-normalization filtering was applied to further augment the weak oscillating structures locally. From the enhanced AS image, the respiratory signal was extracted using a two-step optimization approach to effectively reveal the large-scale regularity of the breathing signals. CBCT projection images from five patients acquired with the Varian Onboard Imager on the Clinac iX System Linear Accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were employed to assess the proposed technique. Stable breathing signals can be reliably extracted using the proposed algorithm. Reference waveforms obtained using an air bellows belt (Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH) were exported and compared to those with the AS based signals. The average errors for the enrolled patients between the estimated breath per minute (bpm) and the reference waveform bpm can be as low as -0.07 with the standard deviation 1.58. The new algorithm outperformed the original AS technique for all patients by 8.5% to 30%. The impact of gantry rotation on the breathing signal was assessed with data acquired with a Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, Canada) and found to be minimal on the signal frequency. The new technique developed in this work will provide a practical solution to rendering markerless breathing signal using the CBCT projections for thoracic and abdominal patients. PMID:27008349

  19. Survey and analysis of selected jointly owned large-scale electric utility storage projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and document the issues surrounding the curtailment in commercialization of large-scale electric storage projects. It was sensed that if these issues could be uncovered, then efforts might be directed toward clearing away these barriers and allowing these technologies to penetrate the market to their maximum potential. Joint-ownership of these projects was seen as a possible solution to overcoming the major barriers, particularly economic barriers, of commercializaton. Therefore, discussions with partners involved in four pumped storage projects took place to identify the difficulties and advantages of joint-ownership agreements. The four plants surveyed included Yards Creek (Public Service Electric and Gas and Jersey Central Power and Light); Seneca (Pennsylvania Electric and Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company); Ludington (Consumers Power and Detroit Edison, and Bath County (Virginia Electric Power Company and Allegheny Power System, Inc.). Also investigated were several pumped storage projects which were never completed. These included Blue Ridge (American Electric Power); Cornwall (Consolidated Edison); Davis (Allegheny Power System, Inc.) and Kttatiny Mountain (General Public Utilities). Institutional, regulatory, technical, environmental, economic, and special issues at each project were investgated, and the conclusions relative to each issue are presented. The major barriers preventing the growth of energy storage are the high cost of these systems in times of extremely high cost of capital, diminishing load growth and regulatory influences which will not allow the building of large-scale storage systems due to environmental objections or other reasons. However, the future for energy storage looks viable despite difficult economic times for the utility industry. Joint-ownership can ease some of the economic hardships for utilites which demonstrate a need for energy storage.

  20. Canada's Dominion Astrophysical Observatory and the rise of 20th Century Astrophysics and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, James E.; Bohlender, David; Crabtree, Dennis

    2015-08-01

    Construction of Canada’s Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) commenced in 1914 with first light on 6 May 1918. Its varied, rich contributions to the astronomical heritage of the 20th century continue into the 21st century. The first major research observatory built with public funding on the West Coast of North America, it was Canada’s first ‘big science’ project. DAO welcomed scientists from around the world to use its 1.8m telescope designed by John Stanley Plaskett working in close collaboration with the Warner and Swasey Company of Cleveland, OH. Their original design was copied seven times around the globe, the last occasion being in the 1960s. From Day 1 the DAO welcomed the public for viewing and interaction with the small scientific staff whose early efforts would today be characterized as ‘Key Projects’. Those efforts included measuring the radial velocities of O and B stars that, interpreted through Oort’s ideas of differential rotation, determined the most reliable estimate of the size and mass of the Milky Way available until radio astronomical techniques emerged in the 1950s. The first organic molecule in interstellar space, CH, was discovered by a DAO astronomer. The first, very puzzling estimate of ~3K for the temperature of interstellar space was deduced from interstellar CN observations a year after interstellar CH and CN were discovered. DAO’s heritage of innovative instrumentation continues to the present day where expertise in optically efficient, mechanically stable spectrographs and adaptive optics are much in evidence at Mauna Kea’s CFHT, Gemini and Subaru observatories. In 2009 the DAO was designated a National Historic Site. This presentation will draw links between DAO, developments of Canadian astronomy and the emergence of Mauna Kea as an exceptional global astronomical reserve.

  1. Comparison of botox and lateral internal sphincterotomy treatment outcomes in chronic anal fissures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Dinç

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Both botox and lateral internal sfinkterotomi are treatment technics used in chronic anal fissure; provide the relaxation of anal sphincter and as a result of this, healing occurs. Aim of this study is to compare efficacy of botox and LIS treatment in chronic anal fissure and discussing with the literature. Methods: 60 of 66 patients who has chronic anal fissure, that we reached, treated but not healed with medical therapy, appealed to the Dr. Sami Ulus Hospital included the study. Gender, age, fissure localization, complaints (pain, bleeding, itching, constipation, complaint length, recurrences after treatment, continence conditions and complications of patients were registered. Results: Sixty patients were enrolled the study. Of the 60 patients; 38(63.3% were male and 22 (27.7% were female. Mean age of all patients was 35.93 ± 11.45 (21 -60. Pain was the common complaint of the all patients. 10 (32.3% recurrence were detected in botox treatment group (Group-I, only 1 (3.4% recurrence was in LIS group (Group-II. There was no complication as an incontinence in group-I but 3 cases with incontinence (10.39% were obtained in group-II. In the evaluation of these 3 cases by Cleveland Clinic Continence Scoring System, 2 cases classified as gas incontinence and 1 case as moderate fecal incontinence. Conclusion: Although botulinum toxin injection seen as an alternative treatment method with low complication rates such as incontinence, high recurrence is an important shortcoming of this technic. LIS performed by experienced surgeons remained the most popular treatment modality with low complication rates and great deal of healing success.

  2. The four things a service business must get right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Frances X

    2008-04-01

    Many of the management tools and techniques used in service businesses were designed to tackle the challenges of product companies. Although they are valuable to service managers, they aren't sufficient for success. In this article, Harvard Business School's Frei explains why and urges companies to add some new ones to the mix. After years of extensive research and analysis, she offers an approach for crafting a profitable service business based on four critical elements: the design of the offering, employee management, customer management, and the funding mechanism. Just like a product that's going to market, a service needs to be compellingly designed, and management must field a workforce capable of producing it at an attractive price. Additionally, however, service firms must manage their customers, who do not simply use the service but also can be integral to its production: Because customers' involvement as producers can wreak havoc on costs, companies must also develop creative ways to fund their distinctive offerings, by providing a self-service alternative, for example, or by offsetting expenses with operational savings. A close look at successful service businesses--Wal-Mart, Commerce Bank, the Cleveland Clinic, and others--reveals that effective integration of the four elements is key. There is no "right" way to combine them; the appropriate design of one depends upon the other three. If managers don't get all four pulling together, they risk pulling the enterprise apart. Incumbents can fend off attacks from highly focused upstarts by becoming multifocused--that is, by pursuing multiple niches through optimized service models rather than trying to cover the entire waterfront with one model. Shared services within a firm (functions such as HR and finance) can help, since they will enable it to generate economies of scale and experience across models. PMID:18435008

  3. Sleuthing classical statuary or the art of archaeo-geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herz, N.; Wenner, D.B.; Robinson, H.S.; Grimanis, A.P.

    1985-01-01

    A late Archaic Greek sculptured limestone head of Pan, dating between 500 and 475 B.C. is in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art (CM). Because of its date and being found on the north slope of the Acropolis, it was thought to be a surviving fragment of Miltiades' statue commemorating the victory over the Persians at Marathon. Other fragments of the statue are in the Acropolis Museum (AM). The authors analyzed samples from the CM and from two AM statues for stable isotopic ratios, for trace elements (TE) by INAA, for thermoluminescence (TL), and be electron microscopy (SEM). 13 TEs showed very close abundances in both AM pieces. Comparing the CM to the AMs, only three TEs were similar; the rest varied by factors of 2 to 5. TL measurements differed by 1.8% between the AM pieces, but over 14% from the CM. Stable isotopic ratios do not appear diagnostic. For AM1, AM2, and CM, delta/sup 13/C= +0.62, -0.08, +0.48; and delta/sup 18/O= -2.16, -1.51, -0.95. Examination by SEM showed the AM pieces to be shallow water oolitic microsparite with algae and Elphidium sp. with a range from Eocene-Recent. The CM piece showed some recrystallization with abundant deep water planktonic foraminera Globerigina sp. and Globeritella sp. as well as coccoliths datable as Lower Eocene. The geological map of Greece shows Neogene but no lower Tertiary in the area of Attica-Aegina, the presumed limestone source area for the Miltiades statue. Except for the inconclusive isotopic measurements, the data show the CM and AM pieces to be unrelated.

  4. Postoperative Single-Fraction Radiation for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification of the Elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) about the elbow has been described after surgery, trauma, and burns. Even limited deposits can lead to significant functional deficits. Little data exist regarding outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) after elbow surgery. We report here the Cleveland Clinic experience with single-fraction radiation following surgery to the elbow. The primary endpoint was the rate of new HO after RT. Secondary endpoints were range of motion, functional compromise, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 to July 2006, 36 patients underwent elbow surgery followed by single-fraction RT. Range of motion data were collected before and during surgery and at last follow-up. Radiographs were reviewed for persistent or new HO. Patient and treatment factors were analyzed for correlation with development of HO or functional compromise. Results: Median follow-up was 8.7 months, median age was 42 years, and 75% of patients were male. Twenty-six (72%) patients had HO prior to surgery. All patients had significant limitations in flexion/extension or pronation/supination at baseline. Thirty-one (86%) patients had prior elbow trauma, and 26 (72%) patients had prior surgery. RT was administered a median of 1 day postoperatively (range, 1-4 days). Thirty-four patients received 700 cGy, and 2 patients received 600 cGy. Three (8%) patients developed new HO after RT. All patients had improvement in range of motion from baseline. No patient or treatment factors were significantly associated with the development of HO or functional compromise. Conclusions: Single-fraction RT after surgery to the elbow is associated with favorable functional and radiographic outcomes.

  5. The expression of TRMT2A, a novel cell cycle regulated protein, identifies a subset of breast cancer patients with HER2 over-expression that are at an increased risk of recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubbs Raymond

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over-expression of HER2 in a subset of breast cancers (HER2+ is associated with high histological grade and aggressive clinical course. Despite these distinctive features, the differences in response of HER2+ patients to both adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy (e.g. trastuzumab suggests that unrecognized biologic and clinical diversity is confounding treatment strategies. Furthermore, the small but established risk of cardiac morbidity with trastuzumab therapy compels efforts towards the identification of biomarkers that might help stratify patients. Methods A single institution tissue array cohort assembled at the Clearview Cancer Institute of Huntsville (CCIH was screened by immunohistochemistry staining using a large number of novel and commercially available antibodies to identify those with a univariate association with clinical outcome in HER2+ patients. Staining with antibody directed at TRMT2A was found to be strongly associated with outcome in HER2+ patients. This association with outcome was tested in two independent validation cohorts; an existing staining dataset derived from tissue assembled at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF, and in a new retrospective study performed by staining archived paraffin blocks available at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI. Results TRMT2A staining showed a strong correlation with likelihood of recurrence at five years in 67 HER2+ patients from the CCIH discovery cohort (HR 7.0; 95% CI 2.4 to 20.1, p HER2+ patients from the CCF cohort (HR 3.6; 95% CI 1.3 to 10.2, p Conclusions Studies from three independent single institution cohorts support TRMT2A protein expression as a biomarker of increased risk of recurrence in HER2+ breast cancer patients. These results suggest that TRMT2A expression should be further studied in the clinical trial setting to explore its predictive power for response to adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy in combination with HER2 targeted

  6. Extreme organic carbon and pyrite burial during the Toarcian OAE and possible consequences for the marine trace metal inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, B. C.; Lyons, T. W.; Jenkyns, H.

    2008-12-01

    The Toarcian Ocean Anoxic Event (OAE) was a time of extreme perturbation of the global carbon cycle caused by large-scale burial of organic matter under anoxic to euxinic conditions and possibly large-scale methane release. However, many questions remain. Foremost among the remaining questions is the global versus local nature of the event. Unlike Cretaceous OAEs, the Toarcian lacks an available deep ocean record and, consequently, most studies have focused on geochemical data from stratigraphic sections in the north European epicontinental seaway (NEES). Underlying this concern is the observation that black shales within the NEES, assumed to have been deposited under euxinic conditions, show little or no enrichment in some redox-sensitive elements (e.g., Mo) beyond crustal concentrations. Since the nature of the connection between the NEES and open ocean is highly contested, muted metal enrichments can be interpreted as due to a drawdown of either global or local reservoirs. We present geochemical data from within and outside the NEES to test the global nature of the records preserved there. Carbon and sulfur isotope data (from both carbonate-associated sulfate and pyrite) from the NEES (Cleveland and Southern Germany sub-basins) and a carbonate platform on the margin of the Tethyan Ocean (Southern Italy) show parallel, positive excursions. This relationship suggests that burial of organic carbon and pyrite occurred on a scale that perturbed global budgets. Additionally, we will present stratigraphic geochemical data (DOP, Fe/Al, FeR/Fetotal, δ34Spyrite) to constrain the local redox conditions within the sub-basins of the NEES. These data will be compared with trace metal concentrations and isotope ratios to test whether enrichment patterns represent changes in local redox within the NEES or a drawdown of the global marine reservoir.

  7. Flagellated ectosymbiotic bacteria propel a eucaryotic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, S L

    1982-09-01

    A devescovinid flagellate from termites exhibits rapid gliding movements only when in close contact with other cells or with a substrate. Locomotion is powered not by the cell's own flagella nor by its remarkable rotary axostyle, but by the flagella of thousands of rod bacteria which live on its surface. That the ectosymbiotic bacteria actually propel the protozoan was shown by the following: (a) the bacteria, which lie in specialized pockets of the host membrane, bear typical procaryotic flagella on their exposed surface; (b) gliding continues when the devescovinid's own flagella and rotary axostyle are inactivated; (c) agents which inhibit bacterial flagellar motility, but not the protozoan's motile systems, stop gliding movements; (d) isolated vesicles derived from the surface of the devescovinid rotate at speeds dependent on the number of rod bacteria still attached; (e) individual rod bacteria can move independently over the surface of compressed cells; and (f) wave propagation by the flagellar bundles of the ectosymbiotic bacteria is visualized directly by video-enhanced polarization microscopy. Proximity to solid boundaries may be required to align the flagellar bundles of adjacent bacteria in the same direction, and/or to increase their propulsive efficiency (wall effect). This motility-linked symbiosis resembles the association of locomotory spirochetes with the Australian termite flagellate Mixotricha (Cleveland, L. R., and A. V. Grimstone, 1964, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci., 159:668-686), except that in our case propulsion is provided by bacterial flagella themselves. Since bacterial flagella rotate, an additional novelty of this system is that the surface bearing the procaryotic rotary motors is turned by the eucaryotic rotary motor within.

  8. Ash dispersal dynamics: state of the art and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, R.

    2013-05-01

    Volcanic ash, during dispersal and deposition, is among the major hazards from explosive eruptions. Volcanic ash fallout can disrupt communities downwind, interrupt surface transportation networks and lead to closure of airports. Airborne ash seriously threatens modern jet aircraft in flight. In several documented cases, encounters between aircraft and volcanic clouds have resulted in engine flameout and near crashes, so there is a need to accurately predict the trajectory of volcanic ash clouds in order to improve aviation safety and reduce economic losses. The ash clouds affect aviation even in distal regions, as demonstrated by several eruptions with far-range dispersal. Recent examples include Crater Peak 1992, Tungurahua 1999-2001, Mount Cleveland 2001, Chaitén 2008, Eyjafjallajökull 2010, Grimsvötn 2011, and Cordón-Caulle 2011. Amongst these, the April-May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland provoked the largest civil aviation breakdown. Accumulation of tephra can produce roof collapse, interruption of lifelines (roads, railways, etc.), disruption to airport operations, and damage to communications and electrical power lines. Deposition of ash decreases soil permeability, increases surface runoff, and promotes floods. Ash leaching can result in the pollution of water resources, damage to agriculture, pastures, and livestock, impinge on aquatic ecosystems, and alteration of the geochemical environment on the seafloor. Despite the potential big impact, the dispersal dynamics of volcanic ash is still an unsolved problem for volcanologists, which claims for fiture high level research. Here, a critical overview about models (field, experimental and numerical) for inversion of field data to gain insights on physics of dispersal of volcanic ash is proposed. A special focus is devoted to some physical parameters that are far from a satisfactory inversion (e.g. reconstruction of total grain size distribution), and clues for future research are suggested.

  9. Atherosclerotic lesions and mitochondria DNA deletions in brain microvessels: Implication in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gjumrakch Aliev

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gjumrakch Aliev1, Eldar Gasimov2, Mark E Obrenovich3, Kathryn Fischbach1, Justin C Shenk1, Mark A Smith3, George Perry3,41Department of Biology and 4College of Sciences, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA; 2Department of Histology and Embryology, Baku Medical University, Baku, Azerbaijan; 3Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: The pathogenesis that is primarily responsible for Alzheimer’s disease (AD and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA appears to involve chronic hypoperfusion. We studied the ultrastructural features of vascular lesions and mitochondria in brain vascular wall cells from human AD biopsy samples and two transgenic mouse models of AD, yeast artificial chromosome (YAC and C57B6/SJL Tg (+, which overexpress human amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP. In situ hybridization using probes for normal and 5 kb deleted human and mouse mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA was performed along with immunocytochemistry using antibodies against the Aβ peptide processed from AβPP, 8-hydroxy-2’-guanosine (8OHG, and cytochrome c oxidase (COX. More amyloid deposition, oxidative stress markers as well as mitochondrial DNA deletions and structural abnormalities were present in the vascular walls of the human AD samples and the AβPP-YAC and C57B6/SJL Tg (+ transgenic mice compared to age-matched controls. Ultrastructural damage in perivascular cells highly correlated with endothelial lesions in all samples. Therefore, pharmacological interventions, directed at correcting the chronic hypoperfusion state, may change the natural course of the development of dementing neurodegeneration.Keywords: atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, transgenic animals, brain hypoperfusion, vascular and mitochondrial lesions, electron microscopy

  10. Wide variation in hospital and physician payment rates evidence of provider market power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Paul B

    2010-11-01

    Wide variation in private insurer payment rates to hospitals and physicians across and within local markets suggests that some providers, particularly hospitals, have significant market power to negotiate higher-than-competitive prices, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Looking across eight health care markets--Cleveland; Indianapolis; Los Angeles; Miami; Milwaukee; Richmond, Va.; San Francisco; and rural Wisconsin--average inpatient hospital payment rates of four large national insurers ranged from 147 percent of Medicare in Miami to 210 percent in San Francisco. In extreme cases, some hospitals command almost five times what Medicare pays for inpatient services and more than seven times what Medicare pays for outpatient care. Variation within markets was just as dramatic. For example, the hospital with prices at the 25th percentile of Los Angeles hospitals received 84 percent of Medicare rates for inpatient care, while the hospital with prices at the 75th percentile received 184 percent of Medicare rates. The highest-priced Los Angeles hospital with substantial inpatient claims volume received 418 percent of Medicare. While not as pronounced, significant variation in physician payment rates also exists across and within markets and by specialty. Few would characterize the variation in hospital and physician payment rates found in this study to be consistent with a highly competitive market. Purchasers and public policy makers can address provider market power, or the ability to negotiate higher-than-competitive prices, through two distinct approaches. One is to pursue market approaches to strengthen competitive forces, while the other is to constrain payment rates through regulation. PMID:21117341

  11. Role of everolimus in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saby George

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Saby George1, Ronald M Bukowski21University of Texas Health Sciences Center, MC-8221, Division of Hematology and Oncology, San Antonio, Texas, USA; 2CCF Lerner College of Medicine Division of Hematology and Oncology, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: The therapeutic options in metastatic renal cell carcinoma have been recently expanded by the discovery of the VHL gene, the mutation of which is associated with development of clear cell carcinoma, and overexpression of the angiogenesis pathway, resulting in a very vascular tumor. This breakthrough in science led to the development of a variety of small molecules inhibiting the VEGF-dependent angiogenic pathway, such as sunitinib and sorafenib. These agents prolong overall and progression-free survival, respectively. The result was the development of robust front-line therapies which ultimately fail and are associated with disease progression. In this setting, there existed an unmet need for developing second-line therapies for patients with refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC. Everolimus (RAD 001 is an oral inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. The double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial of everolimus (RECORD-1 conducted in MRCC patients after progression on sunitinib or sorafenib, or both, demonstrated a progression-free survival benefit favoring the study drug (4.9 months vs 1.9 months, HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.43, P ≤ 0 0.001. Everolimus thus established itself as a standard of care in the second-line setting for patients with MRCC who have failed treatment with VEGF receptor inhibitors.Keywords: mTOR inhibitor, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, signal transduction inhibitor, renal cell carcinoma, targeted therapy

  12. Racial differences in the anatomical distribution of colorectal cancer:a study of differences between American and Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    San-Hua Qing; Kai-Yun Rao; Hui-Yong Jiang; Steven D.Wexner

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To compare the racial differences of anatomical distribution of colorectal cancer (CRC) and determine the association of age, gender and time with anatomical distribution between patients from America (white) and China (oriental).METHODS: Data was collected from 690 consecutive patients in Cleveland Clinic Florida, U.S.A. and 870consecutive patients in Nan Fang Hospital affiliated to the First Military Medical University, China over the past 11years from 1990 to 2000. All patients had colorectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed by histology and underwent surgery.RESULTS: The anatomical subsite distribution of tumor,age and gender were significantly different between white and oriental patients. Lesions in the proximal colon (P<0.001) were found in 36.3 % of white vs 26.0 % of oriental patients and cancers located in the distal colon and rectum in 63.7 % of white and 74 % of oriental patients (P<0.001). There was a trend towards the redistribution from distal colon and rectum to proximal colon in white males over time, especially in older patients (>80 years).No significant change of anatomical distribution occurred in white women and Oriental patients. The mean age at diagnosis was 69.0 years in white patients and 48.3 years in Oriental patients (P<0.001).CONCLUSION: This is the first study comparing the anatomical distribution of colorectal cancers in whites and Chinese patients. White Americans have a higher risk of proximal CRC and this risk increased with time. The proportion of white males with CRC also increased with time.Chinese patients were more likely to have distal CRC and developed the disease at a significantly earlier age than white patients. These findings have enhanced our understanding of the disease process of colorectal cancer in these two races.

  13. Geon deal triggers bloodbath in Goodrich stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stock market has not taken well to BFGoodrich's plans to sell half of its Geon vinyl business to the public in an initial public offering (IPO). Before the announcement of both the Geon offering and Clinton's economic plan, Goodrich stock was selling at about $54/share; a week later, it closed at $42.875. With 25.6 million shares, $285 million of market value, about one-quarter of the total, evaporated in response. As planned, the Geon offering is expected to raise $400 million-$450 million (net, after-tax). The company will redeploy the capital to grow its aerospace business, which focuses on aircraft maintenance and repair, by strategic acquisition. CEO John Ong says, 'We will use the proceeds to expand our specialty chemicals and aerospace businesses,' and the attractive opportunities are aerospace. 'There aren't any bargains in specialty chemicals now,' says Mark L. Parr, analyst at McDonald ampersand Co. Securities (Cleveland). If Goodrich makes only aerospace purchases, specialty chemicals could end up generating less than half of Goodrich's revenues and earnings, although the company expects strong specialty chemicals growth to 'maintain a balance' between the two business areas over the long term. 'Goodrich was never going to be the low-cost producer in PVC [polyvinyl chloride],' says Leonard Bogner, of Prudential Securities (New York), who thinks the move 'makes sense.' Goodrich, advised by Goldman Sachs (New York), apparently reasons that with the IPO market now strong, Wall Street bullish about PVC, and some strong acquisition candidates available in aerospace, it makes good sense to monetize Geon promptly. Some analysts agree: 'This is the point in the PVC cycle where the values tend to be highest, because the stock valuation runs well in advance of earnings,' says Parr

  14. Late life bipolar disorder evolving into frontotemporal dementia mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dols A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Annemiek Dols,1 Welmoed Krudop,2 Christiane Möller,2 Kenneth Shulman,3 Martha Sajatovic,4 Yolande AL Pijnenburg2 1Department of Old Age Psychiatry, GGZInGeest, 2Alzheimer Centre and Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 4Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA Objectives: Although bipolar disorder has been understood classically as a cyclic disease with full recovery between mood episodes, in the last decade, evidence has accumulated supporting progressive features. The clinical picture of advanced or end-stage bipolar disorder is heterogeneous with possible deficits in cognition and behavior, as illustrated by our case series.Cases: From our neuropsychiatric outpatient clinic, we describe four cases with bipolar disorder gradually developing a clinical syndrome, including apathy, disinhibition, loss of empathy, stereotypical behavior, and compulsiveness, fulfilling the criteria for possible behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. All cases were diagnosed with bipolar 1 disorder at least 10 years before the onset of the current symptoms, which were not due to recent mood episodes or switches of medication. In all cases, 3–7 years of follow-up yielded no progression. Repeated neuroimaging was within normal limits. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies were not supportive of underlying neurodegenerative pathology. C9orf72 mutation status was negative in all cases.Conclusion: Symptoms fitting the criteria for possible behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia may be present in end-stage of bipolar disorder. An alternative neurodegenerative nature seems unlikely based on repeated normal neuroimaging and the absence of clinical

  15. Artificial Heart Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussivand, Tofigh Varcaneh

    Flow characteristics within pneumatic, pulsatile, and pusher plate prosthetic hearts were studied. The blood pumps evaluated were duplicates of pumps used for in vivo calf and for clinical implantation at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Human dura mater bioprosthetic, caged disk, and Bjork-Shiley tilting disk valves were employed in the pumps. Dual camera video tape and synchronized still photography were used to study flow patterns. Diffused light and a planar laser source provided illumination. The laser light was fanned into a plane with a thickness of 0.2 mm to 10 mm. Magnesium oxide and Amberlite particles were used as tracers. Aqueous-glycerol, aqueous-sucrose solutions and mineral oil were used as blood analog fluids. Inflow, outflow, drive, and afterload pressures, diaphragm motion, cardiac output, and heart rate were measured and recorded. An electrical circuit was developed to synchronize pump diaphragm motion with captured images of flow trajectories. After digitizing the trajectories, velocities, global and local turbulence, and shear stresses were obtained. Disturbed and recirculating zones were identified. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed using data obtained from the digitization of flow trajectories. Simultaneous turbulence and stasis were observed during most phases of the cardiac cycles in all the pumps tested. A maximum Reynold's shear stress of 2889 dynes/cm ^2 occurred at 120 beats per minute (bpm). The peak velocity was 146 cm/sec during systole. The identified regions of recirculation, low velocity and disturbed flow were shown to correlate with thrombosed areas of explanted blood pumps. The maximum calculated turbulence intensity was 106 cm/sec which occurred at 120 bpm during systole.

  16. The Advantage of Playing Home in NBA: Microscopic, Team-Specific and Evolving Features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo V Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The idea that the success rate of a team increases when playing home is broadly accepted and documented for a wide variety of sports. Investigations on the so-called "home advantage phenomenon" date back to the 70's and ever since has attracted the attention of scholars and sport enthusiasts. These studies have been mainly focused on identifying the phenomenon and trying to correlate it with external factors such as crowd noise and referee bias. Much less is known about the effects of home advantage in the "microscopic" dynamics of the game (within the game or possible team-specific and evolving features of this phenomenon. Here we present a detailed study of these previous features in the National Basketball Association (NBA. By analyzing play-by-play events of more than sixteen thousand games that span thirteen NBA seasons, we have found that home advantage affects the microscopic dynamics of the game by increasing the scoring rates and decreasing the time intervals between scores of teams playing home. We verified that these two features are different among the NBA teams, for instance, the scoring rate of the Cleveland Cavaliers team is increased ≈0.16 points per minute (on average the seasons 2004-05 to 2013-14 when playing home, whereas for the New Jersey Nets (now the Brooklyn Nets this rate increases in only ≈0.04 points per minute. We further observed that these microscopic features have evolved over time in a non-trivial manner when analyzing the results team-by-team. However, after averaging over all teams some regularities emerge; in particular, we noticed that the average differences in the scoring rates and in the characteristic times (related to the time intervals between scores have slightly decreased over time, suggesting a weakening of the phenomenon. This study thus adds evidence of the home advantage phenomenon and contributes to a deeper understanding of this effect over the course of games.

  17. The Advantage of Playing Home in NBA: Microscopic, Team-Specific and Evolving Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Haroldo V; Mukherjee, Satyam; Zeng, Xiao Han T

    2016-01-01

    The idea that the success rate of a team increases when playing home is broadly accepted and documented for a wide variety of sports. Investigations on the so-called "home advantage phenomenon" date back to the 70's and ever since has attracted the attention of scholars and sport enthusiasts. These studies have been mainly focused on identifying the phenomenon and trying to correlate it with external factors such as crowd noise and referee bias. Much less is known about the effects of home advantage in the "microscopic" dynamics of the game (within the game) or possible team-specific and evolving features of this phenomenon. Here we present a detailed study of these previous features in the National Basketball Association (NBA). By analyzing play-by-play events of more than sixteen thousand games that span thirteen NBA seasons, we have found that home advantage affects the microscopic dynamics of the game by increasing the scoring rates and decreasing the time intervals between scores of teams playing home. We verified that these two features are different among the NBA teams, for instance, the scoring rate of the Cleveland Cavaliers team is increased ≈0.16 points per minute (on average the seasons 2004-05 to 2013-14) when playing home, whereas for the New Jersey Nets (now the Brooklyn Nets) this rate increases in only ≈0.04 points per minute. We further observed that these microscopic features have evolved over time in a non-trivial manner when analyzing the results team-by-team. However, after averaging over all teams some regularities emerge; in particular, we noticed that the average differences in the scoring rates and in the characteristic times (related to the time intervals between scores) have slightly decreased over time, suggesting a weakening of the phenomenon. This study thus adds evidence of the home advantage phenomenon and contributes to a deeper understanding of this effect over the course of games.

  18. Comparative effectiveness studies to improve clinical outcomes in end stage renal disease: the DEcIDE patient outcomes in end stage renal disease study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulware Ebony L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence is lacking to inform providers’ and patients’ decisions about many common treatment strategies for patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD. Methods/design The DEcIDE Patient Outcomes in ESRD Study is funded by the United States (US Agency for Health Care Research and Quality to study the comparative effectiveness of: 1 antihypertensive therapies, 2 early versus later initiation of dialysis, and 3 intravenous iron therapies on clinical outcomes in patients with ESRD. Ongoing studies utilize four existing, nationally representative cohorts of patients with ESRD, including (1 the Choices for Healthy Outcomes in Caring for ESRD study (1041 incident dialysis patients recruited from October 1995 to June 1999 with complete outcome ascertainment through 2009, (2 the Dialysis Clinic Inc (45,124 incident dialysis patients initiating and receiving their care from 2003–2010 with complete outcome ascertainment through 2010, (3 the United States Renal Data System (333,308 incident dialysis patients from 2006–2009 with complete outcome ascertainment through 2010, and (4 the Cleveland Clinic Foundation Chronic Kidney Disease Registry (53,399 patients with chronic kidney disease with outcome ascertainment from 2005 through 2009. We ascertain patient reported outcomes (i.e., health-related quality of life, morbidity, and mortality using clinical and administrative data, and data obtained from national death indices. We use advanced statistical methods (e.g., propensity scoring and marginal structural modeling to account for potential biases of our study designs. All data are de-identified for analyses. The conduct of studies and dissemination of findings are guided by input from Stakeholders in the ESRD community. Discussion The DEcIDE Patient Outcomes in ESRD Study will provide needed evidence regarding the effectiveness of common treatments employed for dialysis patients. Carefully planned dissemination strategies to the

  19. Toolbox for Urban Mobility Simulation: High Resolution Population Dynamics for Global Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, B. L.; Lu, W.; Liu, C.; Thakur, G.; Karthik, R.

    2015-12-01

    framework to assist decision makers at all levels - local, state, regional, and federal. Using Cleveland, Tennessee as an example, in this presentation, we illustrate how emerging cities could easily assess future land use scenario driven impacts on energy and environment utilizing such a capability.

  20. TAL Performance and Mission Analysis in a CDL Capacitor Powered Direct-Drive Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrbud, Ivana; Rose, M. Frank; Oleson, Steve R.; Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1999-01-01

    The goals of this research are (1) to prove the concept feasibility of a direct-drive electric propulsion system, and (2) to evaluate the performance and characteristics of a Russian TAL (Thruster with Anode Layer) operating in a long-pulse mode, powered by a capacitor-based power source developed at Space Power Institute. The TAL, designated D-55, is characterized by an external acceleration zone and is powered by a unique chemical double layer (CDL) capacitor bank with a capacitance of 4 F at a charge voltage of 400 V. Performance testing of this power supply on the TAL was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, OH. Direct thrust measurements of the TAL were obtained at CDL power levels ranging from 450 to 1750 W. The specific impulse encompassed a range from 1150 s to 2200 s, yielding thruster system efficiencies between 50 and 60%. Preliminary mission analysis of the CDL direct-drive concept and other electric propulsion options was performed for the ORACLE spacecraft in 6am/6pm and 12am/12pm, 300 km sun-synchronous orbits. The direct-drive option was competitive with the other systems by increasing available net mass between 5 and 42% and reducing two-year system wet mass between 18 and 63%. Overall, the electric propulsion power requirements for the satellite solar array were reduced between 57 and 91% depending oil the orbit evaluated The direct-drive, CDL capacitor-based concept in electric propulsion thus promises to be a highly-efficient, viable alternative for satellite operations in specific near-Earth missions.