WorldWideScience

Sample records for cleveland

  1. 77 FR 36331 - Noise Exposure Maps; Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Noise Exposure Maps; Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, OH AGENCY: Federal Aviation... determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the City of Cleveland for Cleveland Hopkins... International Airport under Part 150 in conjunction with the noise exposure map, and that this program will...

  2. Building an engaged workforce at Cleveland Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrnchak JM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M PatrnchakCleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Employee engagement is widely recognized as a critical factor in organizational performance. This article examines an ongoing cultural development initiative at Cleveland Clinic designed to significantly increase employee engagement. Key components of this initiative include the introduction of serving leadership, new caregiver wellness and recognition programs, “Cleveland Clinic Experience” training focused on the institution’s core mission, and changes in the institutional vocabulary. Since 2008, the results include a dramatic improvement in engagement, as measured by the Gallup Q12 survey, with parallel improvements in patient satisfaction, as measured by the clinic's scores on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS survey. In addition to a discussion of the key components of the clinic’s engagement initiative, the article provides a partial review of the literature focused on employee engagement as well as a summary of “lessons learned” that may serve as a guide for others facing the challenge of increasing employee engagement in large, mature health care institutions.Keywords: health care, employee engagement, culture change, hospital performance, patient satisfaction

  3. 78 FR 16910 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Cleveland-Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... for noise abatement, land use planning and program management on and off the airport were evaluated... Cleveland, Ohio under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et seq. (formerly the Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act, hereinafter referred to as ``the Act'') and 14 CFR part 150 (hereinafter referred to...

  4. Cleveland School Vouchers: Where the Students Come from.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Zach

    This report presents data on the Ohio Department of Education's Cleveland Scholarship and Tutoring program, examining where students who receive school vouchers attended school before entering the program. Overall, 33 percent of these students previously attended private schools, and 21 percent previously attended Cleveland public schools. The…

  5. Segregation Levels in Cleveland Public Schools and the Cleveland Voucher Program. School Choice Issues in the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Examining the widespread claims that private schools have high segregation levels and vouchers will lead to greater segregation, this study finds that both assertions are empirically unsupportable. Private schools participating in Cleveland's voucher program are much less segregated than Cleveland's public schools. This means that students using…

  6. 77 FR 3500 - Hugo Boss Cleveland, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Cleveland, Inc., Brooklyn, Ohio. The notice was published in the Federal Register on May 5, 2010 (75 FR... Employment and Training Administration Hugo Boss Cleveland, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment... location of Hugo Boss Cleveland, Inc. had their wages reported under a separate unemployment insurance...

  7. 76 FR 66250 - Television Broadcasting Services; Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Cleveland, OH AGENCY: Federal Communications... CFR 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. Federal... Community Television of Ohio License, LLC (``Community Television''), the licensee of station WJW...

  8. Jurassic sedimentation in the Cleveland Basin : a review

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    This review combines two Presidential Addresses (2005, 2006) and aims to provides an up-to-date overview of the stratigraphy and sedimentation of the Jurassic sequence of the Cleveland Basin (Yorkshire), including poorly known data from the western outcrop. These fascinating rocks have been the focus of geological research since the 18th Century and have had a profound influence on the development of the geological sciences. Throughout the 20th Century, the excellent coastal exposures have ac...

  9. Developing a leadership pipeline: the Cleveland Clinic experience

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Caryl A.; Barss, Christina; Stoller, James K

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of health care requires excellent leadership to address the challenges of access, quality, and cost of care. Because competencies to lead differ from clinical or research skills, there is a compelling need to develop leaders and create a talent pipeline, perhaps especially in physician-led organizations like Cleveland Clinic. In this context, we previously reported on a cohort-based physician leadership development course called Leading in Health Care and, in the current report...

  10. Natural fractures in a United Kingdom shale reservoir analog, Cleveland Basin, northeast England.

    OpenAIRE

    Imber, Jonathan; Armstrong, Howard; Clancy, Sarah; Daniels, Susan; Herringshaw, Liam; McCaffrey, Ken; Rodrigues, Joel; Trabucho-Alexandre, Joao; Warren, Cassandra

    2014-01-01

    Faults and fractures within the well-exposed Lower Jurassic Cleveland Ironstone and Whitby Mudstone formations may provide insights into the tectonic history of gas-prospective, Mississippian shale in northern England. Sub-vertical opening mode fractures occur throughout the Cleveland Basin. Bed-parallel fractures, some of which contain blocky calcite fills, occur preferentially within well-bedded, clay-rich mudstones of the Cleveland Ironstone and Whitby Mudstone formations at Jet Wyke and P...

  11. How Cleveland Clinic used TDABC to improve value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Christopher J; Hopkins, Mike; Kimmel, Benjamin M; Koberna, Stephanie; Montie, Carrie A

    2014-06-01

    Cleveland Clinic partnered with Harvard Business School to conduct a pilot project to explore the differences between time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) and relative value unit costing. The goal was to determine whether TDABC could improve the accuracy of cost information and identify value-improvement opportunities for two types of heart-value procedures. Using TDABC, leaders gained a detailed look into process steps that could be consolidated, reduced, or performed with a lower cost mix of personnel. PMID:24968630

  12. 76 FR 5840 - The Basic Aluminum Castings Co., Cleveland, OH; Notice of Revised Determination on Reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... was published in the Federal Register on November 3, 2010 (75 FR 67773). Workers at the subject firm... Employment and Training Administration The Basic Aluminum Castings Co., Cleveland, OH; Notice of Revised... Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of The Basic Aluminum Castings Co., Cleveland,...

  13. Overview of investigations into pulmonary hemorrhage among infants in Cleveland, Ohio.

    OpenAIRE

    Dearborn, D. G.; Yike, I.; Sorenson, W G; Miller, M.J.; Etzel, R A

    1999-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage was diagnosed in 37 infants in the Cleveland, Ohio, area between 1993 and 1998. This rare disorder has been related to 12 deaths, including 7 originally thought to be sudden infant death syndrome. Thirty of the infants were African American, all of whom lived in a limited geographic area of eastern metropolitan Cleveland, an area of older housing stock. An investigation led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found an association with househol...

  14. Flow Analysis of the Cleveland Clinic Centrifugal Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Golding, Leonard A. R.; Smith, William A.; Horvath, David; Medvedev, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    An implantable ventricular assist rotordynamic blood pump is being developed by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in cooperation with the NASA Lewis Research Center. At the nominal design condition, the pump provides blood flow at the rate of 5 liters per minute at a pressure rise of 100 mm of mercury and a rotative speed of 3000 RPM. Bench testing of the centrifugal pump in a water/glycerin mixture has provided flow and pressure data at several rotative speeds. A one-dimensional empirical based pump flow analysis computer code developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used in the design process to simulate the flow in the primary centrifugal pump stage. The computer model was used to size key impeller and volute geometric parameters that influence pressure rise and flow. Input requirements to the computer model include a simple representation of the pump geometry. The model estimates the flow conditions at the design and at off-design operating conditions at the impeller leading and trailing edges and the volute inlet and exit. The output from the computer model is compared to flow and pressure data obtained from bench testing.

  15. Artifacts Bring Grover Cleveland's Presidency to Life in the First Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macken, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The author's school is located in Caldwell, New Jersey, which has the honor of being the birthplace of President Grover Cleveland. She wanted her students to connect that legacy to their study of the presidency. She knew that first graders are kinesthetic learners who love stories. She decided to combine excellent children's literature with…

  16. Calculating the Weather: Deductive Reasoning and Disciplinary "Telos" in Cleveland Abbe's Rhetorical Transformation of Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdik, Zoltan P.; Platt, Carrie Anne; Meister, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the rhetorical basis of a major paradigm change in meteorology, from a focus on inductive observation to deductive, mathematical reasoning. Analysis of Cleveland Abbe's "The Physical Basis of Long-Range Weather Forecasts" demonstrates how in his advocacy for a new paradigm, Abbe navigates the tension between piety to tradition…

  17. Grassroots Journalism in the City: Cleveland's Neighborhood Newspapers. Monograph No. 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffres, Leo W.; And Others

    The first section of this monograph on community newspapers describes the patterns and trends of "grassroots journalism" in the Cleveland, Ohio, area. Based on interviews with 37 newspaper editors, the following topics are covered: origins and history, goals, organization and structure, method of production, advertising, content, audience, and…

  18. From IDs to Ice Cream to "I, Claudius": Security Is in the Cards at Cleveland Hill Union Free School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of plastic identity badges with photographs and barcodes issued to all administrators, teachers, staff members, and students in grades 6-12 at the Cleveland Hill Union Free School District in Cheektowaga, New York. (PKP)

  19. Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area

    OpenAIRE

    Flachs, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    While the benefits of healthy eating and greenspace development have been well documented, the social impact of urban and community gardens remain less studied. This paper explores the social and cultural effects of urban gardening in the greater Cleveland area. Gardening is shown to have a multitude of motivating factors, including economic, environmental, political, social, and nutritional. While analyzing the impact that gardens have on community building, identity, and food security, s...

  20. Reflective Writing in the Competency-Based Curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, exce...

  1. Detecting hidden volcanic explosions from Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Alaska with infrasound and ground-couples airwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Slivio; Fee, David; Haney, Matthew; Schneider, David

    2012-01-01

    In Alaska, where many active volcanoes exist without ground-based instrumentation, the use of techniques suitable for distant monitoring is pivotal. In this study we report regional-scale seismic and infrasound observations of volcanic activity at Mt. Cleveland between December 2011 and August 2012. During this period, twenty explosions were detected by infrasound sensors as far away as 1827 km from the active vent, and ground-coupled acoustic waves were recorded at seismic stations across the Aleutian Arc. Several events resulting from the explosive disruption of small lava domes within the summit crater were confirmed by analysis of satellite remote sensing data. However, many explosions eluded initial, automated, analyses of satellite data due to poor weather conditions. Infrasound and seismic monitoring provided effective means for detecting these hidden events. We present results from the implementation of automatic infrasound and seismo-acoustic eruption detection algorithms, and review the challenges of real-time volcano monitoring operations in remote regions. We also model acoustic propagation in the Northern Pacific, showing how tropospheric ducting effects allow infrasound to travel long distances across the Aleutian Arc. The successful results of our investigation provide motivation for expanded efforts in infrasound monitoring across the Aleutians and contributes to our knowledge of the number and style of vulcanian eruptions at Mt. Cleveland.

  2. Investigating the impact of local urban sources on total atmospheric mercury wet deposition in Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Event-based precipitation samples were collected at a downtown industrial and a predominantly upwind rural location in the Cleveland, Ohio metropolitan area from July 2009 through December 2010 to investigate the potential local total mercury (Hg) wet deposition enhancement in a ...

  3. 77 FR 68073 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Redefinition of the St. Louis, MO; Southern Missouri; Cleveland, OH; and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... that White Sands Missile Range. OPM announced these changes in interim (65 FR 48641) and final (65 FR... work in the Cleveland and Pittsburgh survey areas is insignificant; however, marginally more people... Mora Quay Rio Arriba Roosevelt San Miguel Santa Fe Socorro (Does not include White Sands Missile...

  4. 77 FR 25128 - Amended Land Management Plans for the Angeles, Cleveland, Los Padres, and San Bernardino National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... planning regulations (see 74 FR 67062, December 18, 2009 for more information on the prior planning rule... Diego River, West Fork, Westfork, White Ledge. Purpose and Need for Action The purpose of the proposed... agencies as well as tribes are invited to join as cooperators. Responsible Official Cleveland...

  5. Eruption of Alkaline Basalts Prior to the Calc-alkaline Lavas of Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Aleutian Arc, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, D. L.; Nicolaysen, K. P.

    2005-12-01

    Mt. Cleveland is a 1,730 m stratovolcano, located on Chuginadak Island, that has erupted at least 23 times historically, with the latest occurring in August 2005. Major, trace, and REE analyses of 63 samples from Mt. Cleveland, including 8 from proximal cinder cones and 4 from andesitic domes on the lower flanks, identify two distinct lava suites. Modern Cleveland (MC) basalts to dacites (50.5-66.7 wt.% SiO2) exhibit a calc-alkaline differentiation trend. Major element trends suggest crystal fractionation of plagioclase +/- ortho- and clinopyroxene in MC lavas and olivine in cinder cone deposits. Resorption textures on plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts and multiple populations of plagioclase predominate throughout the MC suite suggesting magma mixing is a major process at Cleveland. Frothy white xenoliths of plagioclase + quartz + biotite are encased in glass and erupted as small pumiceous fragments in 2001. The partial resorption of the xenocrysts indicates assimilation is also an active crustal process at Cleveland. MC trace element spider diagrams exhibit a typical arc pattern in which HFS elements including Nb are depleted, and Pb and LIL elements are enriched. Th/La, Sm/La, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopic ratios indicate both a North Pacific MORB and a sediment component in the source of modern Cleveland lavas, consistent with sediment flux estimates of 90 to 95 m3/m/yr and an updip sediment thickness of 1300 to 1400 meters. Average 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, 87Sr/86Sr, and 143Nd/144Nd values for the calc-alkaline suite are 18.93, 15.58, 0.70345, and 0.51303 respectively. The second suite consists of 3 olivine-rich, mildly alkaline basalts (48.5-49.4 wt.% SiO2), of older stratigraphic position than MC lavas representing deposits from an older phase of activity (ancestral Cleveland, AC). La/Yb, Sr/Y, and Th/Nb ratios indicate lower degrees of partial melting, relative to MC lavas, and suggests presence of garnet in the source region. The AC lavas, however, are

  6. Heavy metal contamination and burden sequestering in Cleveland area Brownfield soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a survey of heavy metal soil contamination in brownfields of Cleveland, Ohio. Brownfields are abandoned or underutilized industrial properties for which environmental concerns increase the difficulty of redevelopment. Brownfield soils often suffer from the problems of 'old contamination'?. This refers to contamination that is strongly partitioned onto (or otherwise associated with) the soil, and has 'aged' in ways that reinforced immobilization. The dominant phenomena appear to be mass migration into and sheltering by younger (overlying) sorbed mass. Sequestered mass burdens can be much more difficult to identify, quantify and remediate than conventional 'young' soil contamination. This paper presents results of soil contamination (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) from over 50 brownfield sites in the Cleveland area. Results are also presented for public areas (parks, school grounds, gardens) to help quantify the degree to which brownfield problems are shared by nearby public resources. Soils were analyzed by a 24 hr. 1N HCL screening extraction, and by a more comprehensive process developed to quantify heavy metal sequestering. Both theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented to illustrate how soil pulverizations may be used to overcome the problems of mass-transport-limited sequestering and chemical heterogeneity in soil samples. Results of surveys conducted to quantify 'clean background' and 'appropriate remediation triggers' for the heavy metals are also discussed. It is believed that one must consider the whole picture carefully before making decisions about 'voluntary action program' initiatives that tempt compromises between environmental quality and new commercial, industrial or residential use of brownfield sites. (author)

  7. Sound velocity profile from velocimeter cast by NOAA Navigation Response Team-4 for Cleveland field examination survey in Lake Erie on 17 October 2007 (NODC Accession 0036139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical oceanographic data were collected by NOAA Navigation Response Team-4 for Cleveland field examination survey in Lake Erie on 17 October 2007. Sound velocity...

  8. Community Development and Human Capital Loretta J Mester-President and CEO-Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland-2015 Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital, and Inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Mester, Loretta J.

    2015-01-01

    As president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Loretta J. Mester participates in the formulation of U.S. monetary policy, and oversees 950 employees in Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh who conduct economic research, supervise banking institutions, and provide payment services to commercial banks and the U.S. government. She assumed her role as president and CEO in June 2014.

  9. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities

  10. Beyond the GAO Cleveland study: client selection for home care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemain, T R

    1980-01-01

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) study of home care services in the Cleveland area is a prominent attempt to inform the selection of clients for these services. This paper critiques two major portions of the GAO study: the "break even" analysis relating level of client impairment to the comparative costs of care in home and institutional settings, and the analysis of risk of institutionalization as a function of client characteristics. Detailed review shows serious flaws in the GAO methodology which undermine the credibility of its estimates of relative service costs and risks of institutionalization. This paper proceeds to place the GAO study within a conceptual framework that permits more systematic consideration of the issue of client selection. Analysis of a model of institutionalization shows that the strategy recommended by GAO of targeting the highest risk individuals may be an inefficient way to use home care resources. Factors pertinent to client selection include not only risk of institutionalization but also level of private support, changes in risk and private support occasioned by an increase in public support, number of clients in the target group, and political attractiveness of the target group. PMID:10309874

  11. Volcanic gas emissions during active dome growth at Mount Cleveland, Alaska, August 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Cynthia; Kern, Christoph; Lyons, John; Kelly, Peter; Schneider, David; Wallace, Kristi; Wessels, Rick

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic gas emissions and chemistry data were measured for the first time at Mount Cleveland (1730 m) in the Central Aleutian arc, Alaska, on August 14-15, 2015 as part of the NSF-GeoPRISMS initiative, and co-funded by the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) and the USGS Alaska Volcano Observatory. The measurements were made in the month following two explosive events (July 21 and August 7, 2015) that destroyed a small dome (˜50x85 m), which had experienced episodic growth in the crater since November, 2014. These explosions resulted in the elevation of the aviation color code and alert level from Yellow/Advisory to Orange/Watch on July 21, 2015. Between the November, 2014 and July, 2015 dome-destroying explosions, the volcano experienced: (1) frequent periods of elevated surface temperatures in the summit region (based on Mid-IR satellite observations), (2) limited volcano-seismic tremor, (3) visible degassing as recorded in webcam images with occasionally robust plumes, and (4) at least one aseismic volcanic event that deposited small amounts of ash on the upper flanks of the volcano (detected by infrasound, observed visually and in Landsat 8 images). Intermittent plumes were also sometimes detectable up to 60 km downwind in Mid-IR satellite images, but this was not typical. Lava extrusion resumed following the explosion as indicated in satellite data by highly elevated Mid-IR surface temperatures, but was not identifiable in seismic data. By early-mid August, 2015, a new dome growing in the summit crater had reached 80 m across with temperatures of 550-600 C as measured on August 4 with a helicopter-borne thermal IR camera. A semitransparent plume extended several kilometers downwind of the volcano during the field campaign. A helicopter instrumented with an upward-looking UV spectrometer (mini DOAS) and a Multi-GAS was used to measure SO2 emission rates and in situ mixing ratios of H2O, CO2, SO2, and H2S in the plume. On August 14 and 15, 2015, a total of 14

  12. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician–scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Methods: Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1 theoretical knowledge, 2 bench research, 3 scientific writing, 4 mentorship, and 5 soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. Results: The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. Conclusion: The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  13. Three-dimensional geophysical anatomy of an active landslide in Lias Group mudrocks, Cleveland Basin, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Kuras, O.; Ford, J. R.; Gunn, D. A.; Meldrum, P. I.; Pennington, C. V. L.; Weller, A. L.; Hobbs, P. R. N.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2011-02-01

    A geoelectrical investigation of a slow moving earth slide-earth flow in Lower Jurassic Lias Group rocks of the Cleveland Basin, UK, is described. These mudrock slopes are particularly prone to failure and are a major source of lowland landslides in the UK, but few attempts have been made to spatially or volumetrically characterise the subsurface form of these slides. The primary aim of this study was to consider the efficacy of fully three-dimensional geoelectrical imaging for landslide investigation with reference to a geological setting typical of Lias Group escarpments. The approach described here included a reconnaissance survey phase using two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), resistivity mapping, self-potential (SP) profiling and mapping, followed by a detailed investigation of an area of the landslide using three-dimensional (3D) ERT and self-potential tomography (SPT). Interpretation of the geophysical data sets was supported by surface observations (aerial LiDAR and differential GPS geomorphological surveys) and intrusive investigations (boreholes and auger holes). The initial phase of the study revealed the existence of a strong SP signature at the site consistent with a streaming potential source and established the relationships between the main geological units, the geomorphologic expression of the landslide, and the resistivity of the materials in and around the study area. The 3D SPT model generated during the second phase of the study indicated drainage patterns across the landslide and preferential flow from the low permeability mud rocks into the underlying more permeable sandstone formation. Because of favourable resistivity contrasts between the clay-rich Whitby Mudstone Formation landslide material and the underlying Staithes Sandstone Formation, the volumetric 3D ERT image allowed a number of surface and subsurface landslide features to be identified and spatially located. These included the lateral extent of slipped

  14. Escherichia coli Concentrations in the Mill Creek Watershed, Cleveland, Ohio, 2001-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Amie M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Mill Creek in Cleveland, Ohio, receives discharges from combined-sewer overflows (CSOs) and other sanitary-sewage inputs. These discharges affect the water quality of the creek and that of its receiving stream, the Cuyahoga River. In an effort to mitigate this problem, the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District implemented a project to eliminate or control (by reducing the number of overflows) all of the CSOs in the Mill Creek watershed. This study focused on monitoring the microbiological water quality of the creek before and during sewage-collection system modifications. Routine samples were collected semimonthly from August 2001 through September 2004 at a site near a U.S. Geological Survey stream gage near the mouth of Mill Creek. In addition, event samples were collected September 19 and 22, 2003, when rainfall accumulations were 0.5 inches (in.) or greater. Concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) were determined and instantaneous discharges were calculated. Streamflow and water-quality characteristics were measured at the time of sampling, and precipitation data measured at a nearby precipitation gage were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Concentrations of E. coli were greater than Ohio's single-sample maximum for primary-contact recreation (298 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100 mL)) in 84 percent of the routine samples collected. In all but one routine sample E. coli concentrations in samples collected when instantaneous streamflows were greater than 20 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) were greater than Ohio's single-sample maximum. When precipitation occurred in the 24-hour period before routine sample collection, concentrations were greater than the maximum in 89 percent of the samples as compared to 73 percent when rainfall was absent during the 24 hours prior to routine sample collection. Before modifications to the sewage-collection system in the watershed began, E. coli concentrations in Mill Creek

  15. Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) Methodologies for School Facilities: A Case Study of the V. Sue Cleveland High School Post Occupancy Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Marcel; Larroque, Andre; Maniktala, Nate

    2012-01-01

    The New Mexico Public School Facilities Authority (NMPSFA) is the agency responsible for administering state-funded capital projects for schools statewide. Post occupancy evaluation (POE) is the tool selected by NMPSFA for measuring project outcomes. The basic POE process for V. Sue Cleveland High School (VSCHS) consisted of a series of field…

  16. Late Pliensbachian-early Toarcian paleoenvironmental changes in the Cleveland Basin: new clues from high-resolution trace element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, N.; Ruhl, M.; Ullmann, C. V.; Korte, C.; Kemp, D. B.; Hesselbo, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The early Toarcian (~183 Ma ago) was characterized by massive carbon burial and a pronounced negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) in marine carbonate and marine and terrestrial organic matter. These features along with the high abundance of redox sensitive trace metals in that interval led to the recognition of a major oceanic anoxic event (OAE). More recently, an earlier companion of the early Toarcian CIE has been documented at the Pliensbachian/Toarcian (Pl/To) boundary in sections of NW Europe, but its expression in the sediment and possible causes are less constrained. One of the most studied areas for this interval is the Cleveland Basin, UK, which is well-studied for litho-, bio- and chemostratigraphy. Here, we present a new dataset of high-resolution element data produced by hand-held X-ray fluorescence analysis to test for the expression of redox-sensitive trace metals and detrital elements across the late Pliensbachian to middle Toarcian of the Cleveland Basin. The Pl/To boundary CIE is associated with low Total Organic Carbon (TOCagreement with previous findings and scenarios of basin restriction across and after the early Toarcian OAE (McArthur et al., 2008). An interval of maximum enrichment in these elements immediately after the CIE is a feature very similar to the recent observations of Hermoso et al. (2013) in the Paris Basin. This suggests a similar tempo of regional anoxia and black shale deposition in NW Europe. These results also shed light on the behaviour of elements associated with organic matter and the sulphur cycle such as Ni, Cu, Zn and As. Cu is well-correlated to the TOC whereas As shows an enrichment in the interval of black shale deposition after the CIE and two distinct correlation lines with sulphur, one before and during the event, and one after the CIE. This suggests that more As could be incorporated in pyrite in the Cleveland Basin after the CIE, because the availability of sulphur was more limited after the global anoxia

  17. Late Pliensbachian-early Toarcian paleoenvironmental changes in the Cleveland Basin: new clues from high-resolution trace element analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Ruhl, Micha; Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz;

    The early Toarcian (~183 Ma ago) was characterized by massive carbon burial and a pronounced negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE) in marine carbonate and marine and terrestrial organic matter. These features along with the high abundance of redox sensitive trace metals in that interval led to...... elements across the late Pliensbachian to middle Toarcian of the Cleveland Basin. The Pl/To boundary CIE is associated with low Total Organic Carbon (TOC<2%), a high degree of pyritization (S/Fe) and enrichments in Cu, Zn and Ni, which together suggest that water-mass restriction and anoxia occurred in.......J., 2008. Basinal restriction, black shales, Re-Os dating, and the Early Toarcian (Jurassic) oceanic anoxic event. Paleoceanography 23, PA4217, doi: 10.1029/2008PA001607....

  18. Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine: an innovative approach to medical education and the training of physician investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishleder, Andrew J; Henson, Lindsey C; Hull, Alan L

    2007-04-01

    Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine (CCLCM) is an innovative, five-year medical education track within Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (Case) with a focused mission to attract and educate a limited number of highly qualified persons who seek to become physician investigators. CCLCM curriculum governance, faculty appointments and promotions, and admissions committees are integrated with respective Case committees. The CCLCM curriculum is based on faculty-defined professional attributes that graduates are expected to develop. These attributes were used to create curricular and assessment principles that guided the development of an integrated basic science, clinical science, and research curriculum, conducted in an active learning environment. An organ-system approach is used to solidify an understanding of basic science discipline threads in the context of relevant clinical problems presented in PBL and case-based discussion formats. Clinical skills are introduced in the first year as part of the two-year longitudinal experience with a family practice or internal medicine physician. The research program provides all students with opportunities to learn and experience basic and translational research and clinical research before selecting a research topic for their 12- to 15-month master-level thesis project. All Case students participate in required and elective clinical curriculum after the second year, but CCLCM students return to the Cleveland Clinic on selected Friday afternoons for program-specific research and professionalism-learning activities. A unique portfolio-based assessment system is used to assess student achievements in nine competency areas, seven of which reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. PMID:17414197

  19. Childhood lead exposure and uptake in teeth in the Cleveland area during the era of leaded gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Norman, E-mail: nxr@case.edu [Department of Neurosciences (Emeritus), Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, 44106-4975 (United States); Zhang, Zhong-Fa, E-mail: zzhang@wistar.org [Center for Systems and Computational Biology, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19104 (United States); Sun, Jiayang, E-mail: jiayang@sun.cwru.edu [Center for Systems and Computational Biology, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19104 (United States); Ketterer, Michael E., E-mail: Michael.Ketterer@nau.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Arizona University, Box 5698, Flagstaff, Arizona, 86011-5698 (United States); Lalumandier, James A., E-mail: James.lalumandier@case.edu [School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, 44106-4905 (United States); Shulze, Richard A., E-mail: carbonvalleydental@gmail.com [School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, 44106-4905 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Childhood uptake of lead from exposure to atmospheric leaded gasoline in the United States has been studied using mainly blood lead levels. Since reliable blood lead techniques were used only after the peak use of leaded gasoline, the prior exposure history is unclear. The well-documented decline in blood lead levels after the mid-1970s could represent the continuation of a historic steady decline in exposure from many sources. Alternatively, the post-1970s decline might represent the declining phase of a unimodal rise and fall corresponding closely to usage of leaded gasoline. To assess these possibilities, lead concentration and 207Pb/206Pb isotope ratios were measured in the enamel of permanent molar teeth formed between 1936 and 1993 in mainly African-American donors who grew up in the Cleveland area. Tooth enamel preserves the lead concentration and isotope ratio that prevails during tooth formation. Historical trends in enamel lead concentration were significantly correlated with surrogates of atmospheric lead exposure: lead in sediments of two dated Lake Erie cores, and lead consumed in gasoline. About two-thirds of the total lead uptake into enamel in this period was attributable to leaded gasoline, and the remainder to other sources (e.g. paint). Enamel 207Pb/206Pb isotope ratios were similar to those of one lake sediment. Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlation in neighborhoods with higher levels of traffic, and including lake sediment data, accounted for 53% of the variation in enamel lead levels. Enamel lead concentration was highly correlated with reported African-American childhood blood levels. The extrapolated peak level of 48 {mu}g/dL (range 40 to 63) is associated with clinical and behavioral impairments, which may have implications for adults who were children during the peak gasoline lead exposure. In sum, leaded gasoline emission was the predominant source of lead exposure of African-American Cleveland children during the latter

  20. Childhood lead exposure and uptake in teeth in the Cleveland area during the era of leaded gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childhood uptake of lead from exposure to atmospheric leaded gasoline in the United States has been studied using mainly blood lead levels. Since reliable blood lead techniques were used only after the peak use of leaded gasoline, the prior exposure history is unclear. The well-documented decline in blood lead levels after the mid-1970s could represent the continuation of a historic steady decline in exposure from many sources. Alternatively, the post-1970s decline might represent the declining phase of a unimodal rise and fall corresponding closely to usage of leaded gasoline. To assess these possibilities, lead concentration and 207Pb/206Pb isotope ratios were measured in the enamel of permanent molar teeth formed between 1936 and 1993 in mainly African-American donors who grew up in the Cleveland area. Tooth enamel preserves the lead concentration and isotope ratio that prevails during tooth formation. Historical trends in enamel lead concentration were significantly correlated with surrogates of atmospheric lead exposure: lead in sediments of two dated Lake Erie cores, and lead consumed in gasoline. About two-thirds of the total lead uptake into enamel in this period was attributable to leaded gasoline, and the remainder to other sources (e.g. paint). Enamel 207Pb/206Pb isotope ratios were similar to those of one lake sediment. Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlation in neighborhoods with higher levels of traffic, and including lake sediment data, accounted for 53% of the variation in enamel lead levels. Enamel lead concentration was highly correlated with reported African-American childhood blood levels. The extrapolated peak level of 48 μg/dL (range 40 to 63) is associated with clinical and behavioral impairments, which may have implications for adults who were children during the peak gasoline lead exposure. In sum, leaded gasoline emission was the predominant source of lead exposure of African-American Cleveland children during the latter

  1. Evaluation of Psychometric Aspects of Cleveland Scale of Activity Daily Living in the Diagnosis of Dementia in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Noroozian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to design a valid questionnaire to the Iranian culture for dementia diagnosis and more specifically in its early stage.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Memory Clinic of Roozbeh Hospital and Iranian Alzheimer Association in Tehran in 2012. Among 235 subjects, there were 72 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, 137 patients with other types of dementia, and 26 subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI, which 107 of them were male. Moreover, 42 healthy subjects were selected as control group. We considered psychometric properties of the Cleveland Scale of Activity Daily Living (CSADL questionnaire and used standard making operations according to exploratory factor analysis.Results: Three factors were extracted: self-care (21 items, language skills (14 items, and planning (7 items. Convergent validity was 0.86 and cut off point for total, basic and instrumental scores respectively was 20, 3 and 20.Conclusion: It can be claimed that Persian Version of CSADL psychometric questionnaire has appropriate indicators and can serve as a useful tool for research in dementia and in its early stage. It can also enable the implementation of scientific research in academic and medical centers on dementia in general and Alzheimer's disease specifically in Iran.

  2. Quality of life after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis: an evaluation of diet and other factors using the Cleveland Global Quality of Life instrument.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J C

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Although functional results after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis are excellent, imperfections of function do occur. In this setting, quality-of-life assessment is an invaluable tool in determining overall therapeutic efficacy. We evaluated the impact of dietary restrictions, preoperative diagnosis (ulcerative colitis vs. familial adenomatous polyposis), and pregnancy (after pouch insertion) on quality of life. METHODS: After ethical approval, 64 patients were reviewed (mean age, 31 (range, 15-54) years). Long-term quality of life in patients after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis was assessed using the Cleveland Global Quality of Life instrument or Fazio score. The Cleveland Global Quality of Life score is a novel quality-of-life instrument specifically designed for patients with ileal pouches. Stool frequency and continence were recorded to establish the functional status of this group. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients (95.3 percent) complained of some form of dietary restriction and adopted a fixed dietary regimen. All such patients felt that a breach of this regimen would impinge significantly on their quality of life. Late eating and alcohol were associated with diarrhea, whereas smoking was not. Constipation was infrequently reported. The mean Cleveland Global Quality of Life score of patients with ulcerative colitis (0.81 +\\/- 0.13) was greater than that of patients with ulcerative colitis and a background of pouchitis (0.78 +\\/- 0.16; P = 0.042). Whereas postoperative stool frequency in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis was always higher than the preoperative level (4 vs. 2 movements per day; P = 0.04), the Cleveland Global Quality of Life score of this group was lower than that of ulcerative colitis patients (0.77 vs. 0.81; P = 0.047). The Cleveland Global Quality of Life score of females who had had pregnancies after pouch formation was 0.70, significantly lower (P = 0.039) than that of ulcerative colitis patients, although pouch function was

  3. Deregulation Impact in Negotiating a New Electrical Contract Between NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field and FirstEnergy Corp., Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Quyen T.; Zala, Laszlo F.

    2002-01-01

    The governor of the State of Ohio signed amended substitute Senate bill 3 on July 6, 1999, requiring Ohio's electric industry to change from a monopoly environment to a competitive electric environment for generation services. The start date for competitive retail generation services was set for January 1, 2001. This new deregulation law allowed all Ohioans to choose the supplier of generation service, but the transmission and distribution would remain regulated. It also required electric utilities to unbundle the three main components (generation, transmission, and distribution) and make other changes designed to produce a competitive electric generation market. While deregulation was taking shape, the NASA Glenn Research Center electrical contract with FirstEnergy Corp. of Cleveland, Ohio, was to expire on September 7, 1999. Glenn strategically evaluated and incorporated the impacts of electric deregulation in the negotiations. Glenn and FirstEnergy spent over a year in negotiations until the Glenn utility team and the FirstEnergy negotiating team came to an agreement in the fall of 2000, and a new contract became effective on January 1, 2001.

  4. Assistência circulatória com aparelho Heart Mate® na Cleveland Clinic Foundation: experiência inicial e futuras aplicações

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theófilo GAUZE

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estudar a experiência inicial em assistência circulatória ventricular esquerda com o aparelho pneumático implantável Heart Mate® 1000 IP, analisando suas características e aplicações clínicas. Material e Métodos: Entre dez/91 e set/94 (45 meses 33 pacientes em choque cardiogênico por miocardiopatia isquêmica ou dilatada foram assistidos, com esse aparelho, por um tempo de 0 a 153 dias (média de 76 dias, nos pacientes que chegaram a ser transplantados. O diagnóstico, o tempo de assintência circulatória, os parâmetros hemodinâmicos (índice cardíaco, gradiente transpulmonar, fração de ejeção do ventrículo direito, resistência vascular pulmonar e variação da área do ventrículo direito, assim como as complicações clínicas são apresentados e discutidos. Valores pré e pós implante são apresentados como média +/- desvio padrão e comparados por teste T pareado. Resultados: A melhora hemodinâmica foi estatisticamente significante (pPurpose: To study and evaluate the current use of the Heart Mate® 1000 IP LVAD at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Methods: Between Dec/91 and Sept/94 the Heart Mate pneumatic LVAD was implanted in 33 severely shocked patients. Multiple hemodynamic measurements were done in the OR during implant, 24 hours later and just before the heart transplant. Numbers are presented in mean (+/- standard deviation and compared by paired T-test. Clinical outcome and complications are discussed. Results: Hemodynamic parameters markedly improved after device implantation (statistically significant. Support time ranged from 0 to 153 days (mean 76 in the group that reached the transplant. There were 9 (15% deaths due to right ventricular failure, sepsis and multiple organ failure. No thromboembolic events occurred. Conclusion: Treatment with the Heart Mate improved clinical outcome in high risk patients. The results encourage its application as a new alternative therapy to heart failure.

  5. Evaluation of the technological feasibility, and cost of selected control alternatives necessary to meet the proposed Ohio SO/sub 2/ regulations for industrial boilers and processes. volume iii. Republic Steel Corporation, Cleveland district plant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, R.R.; Klemm, H.A.; Stanley, W.T.

    1976-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation by the GCA Corporation, GCA/Technology Division, of technological feasibility and cost of complying with the proposed Ohio sulfur dioxide regulation (40 FR 52410, November 10, 1975) at the Republic Steel Corporation's Cleveland District Plant. The Final USEPA Sulfur Dioxide Control Strategy for the State of Ohio Technical Support Documents, Vol. I and II (EPA 905/2-76-002) may be obtained from NTIS. After collecting necessary site and process specific data by means of a plant visit, it was concluded that emissions from Boiler D would have to be reduced, and coke oven gas desulfurization would be required. The technical feasibility and cost of the Sulfiban, Holmes-Stretford, and Dravo-Stills processes for coke oven gas desulfurization were evaluated. These and other control options such as using low sulfur coal were evaluated for Boiler D.

  6. Final Environmental Statement related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The information in this Final Environmental Statement is the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the construction and operation of the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2, located on Lake Erie in Lake County, about 11 km (7 mi) northeast of Painesville, Ohio. The first assessment was the Final Environmental Statement related to the construction of the plant issued in April 1974, prior to issuance of the construction permits (CPRR-148 and CPPR-149). Plant construction for Unit 1 is currently about 83% complete, and Unit 2 about 43% complete. Fuel loading for Units 1 and 2 currently estimated by the licensee (Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company) for November 1983, with Unit 2 fuel load scheduled for May 1987. The present assessment is the result of the NRC staff review of the activities associated with the proposed operation of the plant

  7. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Kolthoff Landfill in Cleveland, Ohio. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 5, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Kolthoff Landfill site in Cleveland, Ohio, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  8. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Cleveland County, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  9. 76 FR 54377 - Safety Zone; Cleveland National Air Show, Lake Erie, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... 13563, Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review, and does not require an assessment of potential costs... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...-2011-0795 and are available online by going to http://www.regulations.gov , inserting USCG-2011-0795...

  10. Fire Hydrants, Fire Hydrants Shapefile, Published in unknown, Cleveland County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Fire Hydrants dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'Fire Hydrants Shapefile'. Data by this publisher are often provided in State Plane coordinate system;...

  11. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  12. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CLEVELAND COUNTY, ARKANSAS, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  13. Floodplain Mapping or Redelineation Submission for Cleveland County OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  14. Cleveland Metropolitan School District Human Ware Audit: Findings and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osher, David; Poirier, Jeffrey M.; Dwyer, Kevin P.; Hicks, Regenia; Brown, Leah J.; Lampron, Stephanie; Rodriguez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Children and youth require safe and supportive schools and communities if they are to succeed in school and thrive. These needs are particularly great for children who struggle with the impacts of chronic poverty, lead poisoning and lead effect, community and media violence, drugs and alcohol, trauma and loss. There are many such students in…

  15. Communicating with graduate medical trainees: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Laura R; Stoller, James K

    2013-06-01

    Optimizing communication with graduate medical trainees is critical, as they contribute importantly to the mission of academic medical centres. Yet, communication is challenged by their complex schedules, geographic separation, and time constraints. Few studies have examined this issue to offer valuable solutions. Because traditional approaches are suboptimal, two communication tools were implemented: (1) a web-based intranet site called [graduate medical education] GME|com, and (2) an electronic newsletter, GME|com Headlines. The goals were to: (1) build a single repository of information relevant to trainees, programme directors, and coordinators, and (2) minimize their email burdens. A post-launch survey showed that >75 % of respondents indicated they visited the site and, of those, >90 % perceived value to the site. Analysis of use over the first year showed 39,377 visits (mean 108/day) and 93,785 pageviews. Sixty percent of users visited GME|com between 9 and 201 times and 18 % >201 times. A survey of programme directors from the 25 largest training programmes in the US confirmed the challenges of communicating with trainees and suboptimal results of current solutions. GME|com and Headlines represent complementary communication tools that have been well-received and frequently used. Future opportunities include assessing the association of GME|com use with increments in quality and patient safety. PMID:27023456

  16. Communicating with graduate medical trainees: the Cleveland Clinic experience

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwald, Laura R.; Stoller, James K

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing communication with graduate medical trainees is critical, as they contribute importantly to the mission of academic medical centres. Yet, communication is challenged by their complex schedules, geographic separation, and time constraints. Few studies have examined this issue to offer valuable solutions. Because traditional approaches are suboptimal, two communication tools were implemented: (1) a web-based intranet site called [graduate medical education] GME|com, and (2) an electr...

  17. Zoning Districts, Countywide Zoning Shapefile, Published in unknown, Cleveland County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'Countywide Zoning Shapefile'. Data by this publisher are often provided in State Plane coordinate...

  18. 33 CFR 165.906 - Lakeside Yacht Club in Cleveland Harbor, Cleveland, OH-regulated navigation areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Lakefront Airport landfill, or inside the “Lakeside Yacht Club docks,” defined as the docking area inside... enforced during the following times: (1) 11:00 p.m. n Fridays to 7:00 a.m. on Saturdays. (2) 11:00 p.m....

  19. F00539: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Cleveland, Ohio, 2007-10-23

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. Election Districts and Precincts, Voting Precinct Shapefile, Published in unknown, Cleveland County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Election Districts and Precincts dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. It is described as 'Voting Precinct Shapefile'....

  1. Grover Cleveland High School Project CAUSA 1984-1985. OEE Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    This program, Project CAUSA, provided instruction in English as a second language (ESL), native language arts, and content-area courses, in addition to a career and vocational training program focused on office and computer skills, to a selected group of 141 Hispanic and Italian immigrant students of limited English proficiency (LEP). Students…

  2. Solar heating experiment on the Grover Cleveland School, Boston, Massachusetts. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-07-15

    This report presents quantitative and qualitative data obtained during the first full year's operation of an industrial type, solar heating system of pilot plant scale. A brief description of the system is given and operational data for the system is provided along with information on maintenance history, various relevant experiences, individual investigations and experiments, and problem areas which were experienced. (WDM)

  3. Outcomes for patients with dementia from the Cleveland Alzheimer's Managed Care Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P A; Bass, D M; Looman, W J; McCarthy, C A; Eckert, S

    2004-01-01

    This investigation evaluates effects of care consultation delivered within a partnership between a managed health care system and Alzheimer's Association chapter. Care consultation is a multi-component telephone intervention in which Association staff work with patients and caregivers to identify personal strengths and resources within the family, health plan, and community. The primary hypothesis is that care consultation will decrease utilization of managed care services and improve psychosocial outcomes. A secondary modifying-effects hypothesis posits benefits will be greater for patients with more severe memory impairment. The sample is composed of managed care patients whose medical records indicate a diagnosis of dementia or memory loss. Patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group, which was offered care consultation in addition to usual managed care services, or to a control group, which was offered only usual managed care services. Data come from two in-person interviews with patients, and medical and administrative records. Results supporting the primary hypothesis show intervention group patients feel less embarrassed and isolated because of their memory problems and report less difficulty coping. Findings consistent with the modifying-effects hypothesis show intervention group patients with more severe impairment have fewer physician visits, are less likely to have an emergency department visit or hospital admission, are more satisfied with managed care services, and have decreased depression and strain. PMID:14690867

  4. Oxidation of high-temperature intermetallics; Proceedings of the Workshop, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 22, 23, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobstein, Toni (Editor); Doychak, Joseph (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of aerospace structures-applicable intermetallic compounds discusses the influence of reactive-element additions on the oxidation of Ni3Al base alloys, the effect of Ni3Al oxidation below 850 C on fracture behavior, the oxidation of FeAl + Hf, Zr, and B, the synergistic effect of Al and Si on the oxidation resistance of Fe alloys, and pack cementation coatings of Cr-Al on Fe, Ni, and Co alloys. Also discussed are the formation of alumina on Nb- and Ti-base alloys, the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminide alloys, silicide coatings for refractory metals, the oxidation of chromium disilicide, and the oxidation behavior of nickel beryllides.

  5. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2013, county, Cleveland County, OK, Current Address Ranges Relationship File

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  6. 76 FR 56638 - Safety Zone; Head of the Cuyahoga, Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... safety zone is necessary to protect spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with a rowing... rowing regattas. Based on recent accidents that have occurred in other Captain of the Port zones, the Captain of the Port Buffalo, has determined a rowing regatta presents significant risks to public...

  7. 33 CFR 165.903 - Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... at Fado's Restaurant. (2) One hundred (100) feet downriver to one hundred (100) feet upriver from 41..., 81 degrees 42′27.6″ W, which is the north point of the pier at Shooter's Restaurant on the Cuyahoga... degrees 29′18.8″ N, 81 degrees 42′02.3W) downriver to the chain link fence at the upriver end of...

  8. Ion nitriding; Proceedings of the International Conference, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 15-17, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The present conference discusses plasma-assisted surface coating/modification processes, the applications to date of ion nitriding, the effects of nitrogen on metal surfaces, ion nitriding mechanisms in Cr, Al and Cr + Al-containing 1040 steel, ion nitriding of Al and its alloys, life enhancement for forging dies, novel anode plasma nitriding developments, and a comparative study of the pulsed and dc ion-nitriding behavior in specimens with blind holes. Also discussed are the influence of heating method on ion nitriding, surface hardening of marage steels by ion nitriding without core hardness reduction, plasma nitriding of nodular cast iron sput gears, NbN composites for superconductors, the carburization of tungsten in a glow discharge methane plasma, economic considerations concerning plasma nitriding, and the corrosion properties obtained by ion nitriding.

  9. Welfare Reform in Cleveland: Implementation, Effects, and Experiences of Poor Families and Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Thomas; Coulton, Claudia; London, Andrew; Polit, Denise; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Scott, Ellen; Verma, Nandita

    A study assessed Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) implementation and effects in Cuyahoga County between 1992-2000. It used field research, surveys and interviews of current and former welfare recipients, state and county welfare and employment records, and indicators of social and economic trends. Findings indicated Cuyahoga County…

  10. Hillcrest Hospital campaigns in competitive Cleveland. Focus is on cardiovascular, cancer and pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvin, J D

    2001-01-01

    In suburban Mayfield Heights, Ohio, Hillcrest Hospital faced down competition by focusing advertising on three areas: cardiology, pediatric care and cancer treatment. It adopted the tagline, "Close to home" and used direct mail to inform the community about its facilities and invite residents to a series of open houses. Print ads, TV and billboards continued to reinforce the theme. PMID:11467198

  11. 77 FR 57116 - Cleveland J. Enmon, Jr., M.D.; Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... accompanying lumbar impressions as ``very minor,'' and in Dr. Kennedy's opinion, these lumbar impressions did... had only a ``mild disc bulge and mild bilateral foraminal stenosis,'' findings which do not...

  12. FINAL DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  13. Vascular Flora of a Riparian Site on the Canadian River, Cleveland County, Oklahoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lacy Burgess; Bruce W. Hoagland

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the results of an inventory of the vascular plants from a riparian site in central Oklahoma. One hundred and sixty-three species of vascular plants in 131 genera and 45 families were collected. The most species were collected from the families Asteraceae (32) and Poaceae (26). Fifty-eight species were annuals, 97 perennials, and 8 biennials. Eight species of woody plants were present. Twenty-nine species, or 18% of the flora, were exotic to Oklahoma. No species listed as ...

  14. 75 FR 14459 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Western Reserve Historical Society... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Western Reserve Historical Society,...

  15. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Published in unknown, Cleveland County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in State Plane coordinate system; in a Not...

  16. Empowering Communities for Environmental Decision-Making : Innovative Partnerships in Cleveland (USA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Edwards (Arthur)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this chapter, we discuss the relation between public innovation and the empowerment of local communities. Specifically, we explore the significance of cooperative public innovation efforts for the capability of local communities to participate in environmental decision-making, focusin

  17. 75 FR 18451 - Safety and Security Zones; Tall Ships Challenge 2010, Great Lakes; Cleveland, OH; Bay City, MI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... related material must be received by the Coast Guard on or before May 12, 2010. ADDRESSES: You may submit... submitting material to the docket, call Renee V. Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone...

  18. Correlation of finite element free vibration predictions using random vibration test data. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element analysis is regularly used during the engineering cycle of mechanical systems to predict the response to static, thermal, and dynamic loads. The finite element model (FEM) used to represent the system is often correlated with physical test results to determine the validity of analytical results provided. Results from dynamic testing provide one means for performing this correlation. One of the most common methods of measuring accuracy is by classical modal testing, whereby vibratory mode shapes are compared to mode shapes provided by finite element analysis. The degree of correlation between the test and analytical mode shapes can be shown mathematically using the cross orthogonality check. A great deal of time and effort can be exhausted in generating the set of test acquired mode shapes needed for the cross orthogonality check. In most situations response data from vibration tests are digitally processed to generate the mode shapes from a combination of modal parameters, forcing functions, and recorded response data. An alternate method is proposed in which the same correlation of analytical and test acquired mode shapes can be achieved without conducting the modal survey. Instead a procedure is detailed in which a minimum of test information, specifically the acceleration response data from a random vibration test, is used to generate a set of equivalent local accelerations to be applied to the reduced analytical model at discrete points corresponding to the test measurement locations. The static solution of the analytical model then produces a set of deformations that once normalized can be used to represent the test acquired mode shapes in the cross orthogonality relation. The method proposed has been shown to provide accurate results for both a simple analytical model as well as a complex space flight structure.

  19. "Young Rebels Flee Psychology": Individual Intelligence, Race and Foster Children in Cleveland, Ohio between the World Wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines foster child case records to understand how intelligence testing was used by guidance counsellors and social workers to negotiate welfare resources with poor youths in the early twentieth century. Psychological testing justified racial hierarchy in a scientific language suited for a rational professional bureaucracy. Yet, it…

  20. Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senor at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time sohare applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community.

  1. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites remedial action program. Radiological survey of the Harshaw Chemical Company, Cleveland, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the MED/AEC era, the Harshaw Chemical Company processed large quantities of normal uranium to produce both oxide and fluoride compounds. This work was done under contract to MED and its successor, AEC. Records indicated that at the time the AEC contract was terminated, the facility was decontaminated by Harshaw and released from AEC control in 1960. However, a search of AEC records indicated that documentation was insufficient to determine whether the decontamination work was adequate by current guidelines. Hence, a radiological assessment of the site ws initiated in 1976. The entire grounds and all buildings were surveyed using surface survey instruments to detect surface contamination and radiation detectors to determine general radiation levels. Extensive surface contamination was found throughout the site. While the major contamination was found in Plant C, significant levels of contamination also were found in 16 other buildings and at 32 exterior locations. The contaminating material seemed to be normal uranium exclusively. Air samples were taken at numerous indoor locations throughout the site, but no elevated levels of radon were detected. This was as expected since normal uranium has been separated from radium and hence radon levels are very low. Several soil samples were taken from around the site. Analyses of these samples indicated extensive soil contamination, as well as suspected contamination of the river bed in the vicinity of the plant outfall. Scheduled subsurface investigation of the site, as well as of the river bed and sewer system, have not been conducted. Levels of contamination at this site are significantly above guidelines for release of the site for unrestricted use. 57 figures, 7 tables

  2. System Identification of Damped Truss-Like Space Structures. Ph.D. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ., Mar. 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Sasan

    1995-01-01

    A spacecraft payload flown on a launch vehicle experiences dynamic loads. The dynamic loads are caused by various phenomena ranging from the start-up of the launch vehicle engine to wind gusts. A spacecraft payload should be designed to meet launch vehicle dynamic loads. One of the major steps taken towards determining the dynamic loads is to correlate the finite element model of the spacecraft with the test results of a modal survey test. A test-verified finite element model of the spacecraft should possess the same spatial properties (stiffness, mass, and damping) and modal properties (frequencies and mode shapes) as the test hardware representing the spacecraft. The test-verified and correlated finite element model of the spacecraft is then coupled with the finite element model of the launch vehicle for analysis of loads and stress. Modal survey testing, verification of a finite element model, and modification of the finite element model to match the modal survey test results can easily be accomplished if the spacecraft structure is simple. However, this is rarely the case. A simple structure here is defined as a structure where the influence of nonlinearity between force and displacement (uncertainty in a test, for example, with errors in input and output), and the influence of damping (structural, coulomb, and viscous) are not pronounced. The objective of this study is to develop system identification and correlation methods with the focus on the structural systems that possess nonproportional damping. Two approaches to correct the nonproportional damping matrix of a truss structure were studied, and have been implemented on truss-like structures such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's space station truss. The results of this study showed nearly 100 percent improvement of the correlated eigensystem over the analytical eigensystem. The first method showed excellent results with up to three modes used in the system identification process. The second method could handle more modes, but required more computer usage time, and the results were less accurate than those of the first method.

  3. Multi-dimensional modeling of a thermal energy storage canister. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ., Dec. 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic Power Module being developed for Space Station Freedom uses a eutectic mixture of LiF-CaF2 phase change material (PCM) contained in toroidal canisters for thermal energy storage. Presented are the results from heat transfer analyses of a PCM containment canister. One and two dimensional finite difference computer models are developed to analyze heat transfer in the canister walls, PCM, void, and heat engine working fluid coolant. The modes of heat transfer considered include conduction in canister walls and solid PCM, conduction and pseudo-free convection in liquid PCM, conduction and radiation across PCM vapor filled void regions, and forced convection in the heat engine working fluid. Void shape, location, growth or shrinkage (due to density difference between the solid and liquid PCM phases) are prescribed based on engineering judgment. The PCM phase change process is analyzed using the enthalpy method. The discussion of the results focuses on how canister thermal performance is affected by free convection in the liquid PCM and void heat transfer. Characterizing these effects is important for interpreting the relationship between ground-based canister performance (in 1-g) and expected on-orbit performance (in micro-g). Void regions accentuate canister hot spots and temperature gradients due to their large thermal resistance. Free convection reduces the extent of PCM superheating and lowers canister temperatures during a portion of the PCM thermal charge period. Surprisingly small differences in canister thermal performance result from operation on the ground and operation on-orbit. This lack of a strong gravity dependency is attributed to the large contribution of container walls in overall canister energy redistribution by conduction.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: MECP2-related severe neonatal encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hospital: Seizures Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Intellectual Disability Cleveland Clinic: Microcephaly in Children Cleveland Clinic: Sleep Apnea Disease InfoSearch: Encephalopathy, neonatal ...

  5. Intraoperative radiation therapy with the photon radiosurgery system in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer: retrospective review of the Cleveland clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer often require multimodality treatment. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is a focal approach which aims to improve local control. We retrospectively reviewed 42 patients treated with IORT following definitive resection of a locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer from 2000–2009. All patients were treated with the Intrabeam® Photon Radiosurgery System (PRS). A dose of 5 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 1 cm (surface dose range: 13.4-23.1, median: 14.4 Gy). Median survival times were calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Of 42 patients, 32 had recurrent disease (76%) while 10 had locally advanced disease (24%). Eighteen patients (43%) had tumors fixed to the sidewall. Margins were positive in 19 patients (45%). Median follow-up after IORT was 22 months (range 0.2-101). Median survival time after IORT was 34 months. The 3-year overall survival rate was 49% (43% for recurrent and 65% for locally advanced patients). Local recurrence was evaluable in 34 patients, of whom 32% failed. The 1-year local recurrence rate was 16%. Distant metastasis was evaluable in 30 patients, of whom 60% failed. The 1-year distant metastasis rate was 32%. No intraoperative complications were attributed to IORT. Median duration of IORT was 35 minutes (range: 14–39). Median discharge time after surgery was 7 days (range: 2–59). Hydronephrosis after IORT occurred in 10 patients (24%), 7 of whom had documented concomitant disease recurrence. The Intrabeam® PRS appears to be a safe technique for delivering IORT in rectal cancer patients. IORT with PRS marginally increased operative time, and did not appear to prolong hospitalization. Our rates of long-term toxicity, local recurrence, and survival rates compare favorably with published reports of IORT delivery with other methods

  6. To remediate or not: A case study of Co-60 contamination at the Southerly Waste Water Treatment Plant, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SWWTP was identified as being contaminated with 60Co (t1/2=5.27 a) in early 1991. The cobalt was apparently disposed of into the sanitary sewer system by a licensee of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission during the mid- to late 1970s. It is not known if this material was disposed of illegally or as a part of licensed activities. It appears as though the contamination resulted from a single, large discharge of 60Co from a licensed facility. However, this facility also reported periodic, permitted discharges into the sanitary sewer system while licensed by the NRC. The radioactive material was relatively immobile and heterogeneously deposited around the site at the SWWTP. In the case of the SWWTP, the regulators exercised restraint in requiring only a partial remediation of this site at a much lower cost than full remediation would have necessitated. However, given the very small risk posed by this site, it is likely that even this remediation was excessive and likely generated more risk than was abated. The most cost-effective risk reduction measure to have taken at this site would have been institutional controls, which would have generated almost exactly the same degree of risk reduction at about 1-2% of the cost of partial remediation

  7. Geologic Map of the Kings Mountain and Grover Quadrangles, Cleveland and Gaston Counties, North Carolina, and Cherokee and York Counties, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, J. Wright, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This geologic map of the Kings Mountain and Grover 7.5-min quadrangles, N.C.-S.C., straddles a regional geological boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes. The Kings Mountain sequence (informal name) on the western flank of the Carolina terrane in this area includes the Neoproterozoic Battleground and Blacksburg Formations. The Battleground Formation has a lower part consisting of metavolcanic rocks and interlayered schist and an upper part consisting of quartz-sericite phyllite and schist interlayered with quartz-pebble metaconglomerate, aluminous quartzite, micaceous quartzite, manganiferous rock, and metavolcanic rocks. The Blacks-burg Formation consists of phyllitic metasiltstone interlayered with thinner units of marble, laminated micaceous quartzite, hornblende gneiss, and amphibolite. Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont terrane include muscovite-biotite gneiss, muscovite schist, and amphibolite. The Kings Mountain sequence has been intruded by metatonalite and metatrondhjemite (Neoproterozoic), metagabbro and metadiorite (Paleozoic?), and the High Shoals Granite (Pennsylvanian). Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont in this area have been intruded by the Toluca Granite (Ordovician?), the Cherryville Granite and associated pegmatite (Mississippian), and spodumene pegmatite (Mississippian). Diabase dikes (early Jurassic) are locally present throughout the area. Ductile fault zones of regional scale include the Kings Mountain and Kings Creek shear zones. In this area, the Kings Mountain shear zone forms the boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes, and the Kings Creek shear zone separates the Battleground Formation from the Blacksburg Formation. Structural styles change across the Kings Mountain shear zone from steeply dipping layers, foliations, and folds on the southeast to gently and moderately dipping layers, foliations, and recumbent folds on the northwest. Mineral assemblages in the Kings Mountain sequence show a westward decrease from upper amphibolite facies (sillimanite zone) near the High Shoals Granite in the eastern side of the map area to upper greenschist (epidote-amphibolite) facies in the south-central part of the area near the Kings Mountain shear zone. Amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages in the Inner Piedmont terrane increase in grade from the kyanite zone near the Kings Mountain shear zone to the sillimanite zone in the northwestern part of the map area. Surficial deposits include alluvium in the stream valleys and colluvium along ridges and steep slopes. These quadrangles are unusual in the richness and variety of the mineral deposits that they contain, which include spodumene (lithium), cassiterite (tin), mica, feldspar, silica, clay, marble, kyanite and sillimanite, barite, manganese, sand and gravel, gold, pyrite, and iron.

  8. X ray attenuation measurements for high-temperature materials characterization and in-situ monitoring of damage accumulation. Ph. D. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ. , 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y.

    1992-03-01

    The scope of this dissertation is to develop and apply x ray attenuation measurement systems that are capable of: (1) characterizing density variations in high-temperature materials, e.g., monolithic ceramics, ceramic and intermetallic matrix composites, and (2) noninvasively monitoring damage accumulation and failure sequences in ceramic matrix composites under room temperature tensile testing. This dissertation results in the development of: (1) a point scan digital radiography system, and (2) an in-situ x ray material testing system. Radiographic evaluation before, during, and after loading shows the effect of preexisting volume flaws on the fracture behavior of composites. Results show that x ray film radiography can monitor damage accumulation during tensile loading. Matrix cracking, fiber matrix debonding, fiber bridging, and fiber pullout are imaged throughout the tensile loading of the specimens. Further in-situ radiography is found to be a practical technique for estimating interfacial shear strength between the silicon carbide fibers and the reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix. It is concluded that pretest, in-situ, and post test x ray imaging can provide for greater understanding of ceramic matrix composite mechanical behavior.

  9. AIAA/USAF/NASA/OAI Symposium on Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization, 4th, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 21-23, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1 & 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The papers presented at the symposium cover aerodynamics, design applications, propulsion systems, high-speed flight, structures, controls, sensitivity analysis, optimization algorithms, and space structures applications. Other topics include helicopter rotor design, artificial intelligence/neural nets, and computational aspects of optimization. Papers are included on flutter calculations for a system with interacting nonlinearities, optimization in solid rocket booster application, improving the efficiency of aerodynamic shape optimization procedures, nonlinear control theory, and probabilistic structural analysis of space truss structures for nonuniform thermal environmental effects.

  10. Profile of teriparatide in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sikon, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Andrea Sikon1, Pelin Batur21Cleveland Clinic Lerner COM, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Cleveland Clinic Lerner COM, Cleveland Clinic Independence, Independence, OH, USAAbstract: One out of every 2 women within postmenopause are at risk of fracture due to osteoporosis. Fortunately, a growing arsenal of therapies is becoming available to treat this disease and prevent fracture. A new class of anabolic agents has emerged within the last decade that brought with it a new concept in osteo...

  11. A coping and communication support intervention tailored to older patients diagnosed with late-stage cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Hannum Rose; Rosanne Radziewicz; Bowman, Karen F.; Elizabeth E O′Toole

    2008-01-01

    Julia Hannum Rose1,2,3, Rosanne Radziewicz4, Karen F Bowman5, Elizabeth E O’Toole11Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Louis Stokes Cleveland VAMC-GRECC, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Center for Health Care Research and Policy, Case at MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 4Department of Nursing, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 5Department of Sociology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: As our society a...

  12. 77 FR 10803 - Intent of Preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Assessment, To Open a Public Scoping Period...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... opportunity to offer relief to landside corridors that suffer from traffic congestion, excessive air emissions.... Horizon Science Academy 6-8 p.m. Cleveland High School: 6000 South Marginal Road, Cleveland, OH 44103....

  13. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Cancer Institute: Pancreatic Cancer National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Educational Resources (9 links) Boston Children's Hospital Cleveland Clinic: Cancer of the Pancreas Cleveland Clinic: Pancreatitis Disease InfoSearch: ...

  14. Rotator cuff repair: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Amini MH.; Ricchetti ET; Iannotti JP; Derwin KA

    2015-01-01

    Michael H Amini,1 Eric T Ricchetti,1 Joseph P Iannotti,1 Kathleen A Derwin2 1Orthopaedic and Rheumatologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Each year, 250,000 rotator cuff repairs are performed in the United States at a cost of $3 billion. Despite advancements in repair techniques and rehabilitation, 20%–70% of repairs continue to under...

  15. Rotator cuff repair: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Derwin, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Michael H Amini,1 Eric T Ricchetti,1 Joseph P Iannotti,1 Kathleen A Derwin2 1Orthopaedic and Rheumatologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Each year, 250,000 rotator cuff repairs are performed in the United States at a cost of $3 billion. Despite advancements in repair techniques and rehabilitation, 20%–70% of repairs continue to u...

  16. Proposal of Afipia gen. nov., with Afipia felis sp. nov. (formerly the cat scratch disease bacillus), Afipia clevelandensis sp. nov. (formerly the Cleveland Clinic Foundation strain), Afipia broomeae sp. nov., and three unnamed genospecies.

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, D. J.; Hollis, D G; Moss, C W; English, C K; Hall, G. S.; Vincent, J.; Radosevic, J; Birkness, K A; W.F. Bibb; Quinn, F D

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of phenotypic characterization and DNA relatedness determinations, the genus Afipia gen. nov., which contains six species, is described. The type species is Afipia felis sp. nov. (the cat scratch disease bacillus). Afipia clevelandensis sp. nov., Afipia broomeae sp. nov., and three unnamed not associated with cat-borne disease. All but one strain (Afipia genospecies 3) were isolated from human wound and respiratory sources. All Afipia species are gram-negative, oxidase-positive, ...

  17. "Rabbim Cleveland Dedi": Sağlık Turizmi-İnsan Hakları İlişkisi Üzerine Başlangıç Notları

    OpenAIRE

    Gemalmaz, H. Burak; Ertan, İzzet Mert

    2015-01-01

    Sağlığın bir kamu hizmetinden ticari faaliyetin konusuna dönüştüğü son yıllarda, insan hakları hukuku bakımından tartışmaya açık olgulardan biri sağlık turizmidir. Sağlık turizmi kişinin mukim olduğu ülke dışındaki bir başka ülkeye sağlık hizmeti almak üzere seyahat etmesi olarak tanımlanabilir ve temel nitelikteki acil ya da olağan/rutin operasyonlar ve ameliyatlar; isteğe bağlı operasyonlar ve tıbbi müdahaleler ile termal turizm olarak üç kategoride değerlendirilebilir. Bir dizi insan hakkı...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: optic atrophy type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... optic atrophy type 1 frequently have problems with color vision that make it difficult or impossible to distinguish ... and Prevention: Vision Loss Fact Sheet Cleveland Clinic: Color Blindness Cleveland Clinic: Coping with Vision Loss Cleveland Clinic: Optic Atrophy Disease InfoSearch: Optic ...

  19. Suture-related keratitis following cataract surgery caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Tarabishy, Ahmad B; Thomas L Steinemann

    2010-01-01

    Ahmad B Tarabishy1, Thomas L Steinemann21Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Cornea and External Eye Disease, MetroHealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: A 54-year old-man presented with a two-day history of severe pain and decreased vision. Examination revealed a corneal ulcer associated with a loose suture from cataract surgery done approximately two years ago. The suture was removed and the patient was started on topic ant...

  20. Characterizing joint effects of spatial extent, temperature magnitude and duration of heat waves and cold spells over Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lhotka, Ondřej; Kyselý, Jan

    Darmsatdt : EUMETSAT, 2014, 2014. s. 120-120. [International Congress of Biometeorology /20th/. 28.09.2014–02.10.2014, Cleveland] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://sheridan.geog.kent.edu/icb2014/ICB20Cleveland.pdf

  1. Invisible Ink in Teacher Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Emily; Walsh, Kate

    2010-01-01

    When the Cleveland, Ohio, school board had to make radical cuts in its budget last spring, it was forced to eliminate 540 teaching jobs. There wasn't a whole lot of mystery about "which" teachers among Cleveland's 3,500-member teaching force would be the ones to lose their jobs. The state's hard-and-fast seniority rule--last hired, first…

  2. Heat-related morbidity and mortality for ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davídkovová, Hana; Plavcová, Eva; Kyncl, J.; Kříž, B.; Kyselý, Jan

    Darmsatdt: EUMETSAT, 2014. s. 128-128. [International Congress of Biometeorology /20th/. 28.09.2014–02.10.2014, Cleveland] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://sheridan.geog.kent.edu/icb2014/ICB20Cleveland.pdf

  3. 75 FR 52014 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ..., Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is... control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN... with the Cherokee Tribes. The Cherokee are represented by the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern...

  4. The Supreme Court and Vouchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Charles J.; Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the facts and state and federal constitutional law related to "Zelman v. Simons-Harris," a Cleveland school-voucher case before the United States Supreme Court. Argues that the Court will likely uphold the constitutionality of the Cleveland voucher program, finding that it does not advance religion in violation of the First Amendment.…

  5. Heat- and cold-related cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in urban and rural populations in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Aleš; Kyselý, Jan

    Darmsatdt: EUMETSAT, 2014. s. 169-169. [International Congress of Biometeorology /20th/. 28.09.2014–02.10.2014, Cleveland] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://sheridan.geog.kent.edu/icb2014/ICB20Cleveland.pdf

  6. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station RECON Erie, Cleveland (CLV), by Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-24 to 2015-10-31 (NODC Accession 0123652)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0123652 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  7. Compact Wireless BioMetric Monitoring and Real Time Processing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZIN Technologies in collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation will use their combined experience and research and development expertise to develop a new...

  8. Bear Capture. Research, and Request for Consideraton of Releases of Bears at Dahomey NWR in 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A series of memos and correspondences concerning the capture of a bear in Cleveland, MS and release on Dahomey NWR along with graduate research on bears from...

  9. EVALUATION OF DNA INTEGRITY USING TUNEL AND COMET ASSAY IN HUMAN SEMEN: IMMEDIATE- VERSUS DELAYED-FREEZING

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVALUATION OF DNA INTEGRITY USING TUNEL AND COMET ASSAY IN HUMAN SEMEN: IMMEDIATE- VERSUS DELAYED-FREEZING K. Young,* L. Xun,* S. Rothmann,? S. Perreault, ? W. Robbins**University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; ?Fertility Solutions Inc., Cleveland, ...

  10. Mean annual runoff, precipitation, and evapotranspiration in the glaciated northeastern United States, 1951-80

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Two maps, compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale, depict mean annual runoff, precipitation, and evapotranspiration in the part of the United States east of Cleveland, Ohio...

  11. US-Wahl 2016: Von Reagan träumen – aufwachen mit Trump

    OpenAIRE

    Brühwiler, Claudia Franziska

    2016-01-01

    Die grosse Rebellion blieb aus, dem Protokoll wurde Folge geleistet: Die Republikanische Partei krönte an ihrem Konvent in Cleveland, Ohio, den politischen Neuling, Unternehmer und Reality-TV-Star Donald J. Trump zu ihrem offiziellen Kandidaten.

  12. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Published on Dec 12, 2012 Do you have sleep apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure ( ... suggested video will automatically play next. Up Next Sleep Apnea Treatment - PAP Therapy - Duration: 13:44. Cleveland ...

  13. Plaadid / Berk Vaher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaher, Berk, 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Uutest plaatidest James Last "The Gentleman Of Music", Koufax "Social Life", Pixie Twins "Valgus ja varjud", Cleveland Watkiss "Victory's Happy Songbook", Hannah "Ballaadid", "Red Hot + Riot", Foo Fighters "One By One", Pearl Jam "Riot Act"

  14. 77 FR 48170 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Research Institute; TRW Automotive US, LLC; Union College; University Hospital of Cleveland; Virginia... of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and... Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C....

  15. Weight-Loss Surgery May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes in Long Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... persistent weight loss, [and] reduction in diabetes and cardiovascular medications at five years," study author Dr. Philip Schauer said in the news release. Schauer is a bariatric surgeon at the Cleveland Clinic. However, the researchers noted ...

  16. 76 FR 18779 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... Service Rd. 520, Creede, 11000219 INDIANA Porter County Solomon Enclave, 901, 903, 907 E. Lake Front Dr...-2121 Ontario St., Cleveland, 94000591 PENNSYLVANIA Pike County Grey, Zane, House (Boundary...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mutations in other genes, studies have identified the mechanisms that lead to ALS. Some gene mutations lead ... PubMed Ling SC, Polymenidou M, Cleveland DW. Converging mechanisms in ALS and FTD: disrupted RNA and protein ...

  18. They Don't Hire the Uglies

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Vocational Journal, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A brief report on the findings of a study of hiring practices in Cleveland found male concepts of beauty to be an influential factor, with women personnel directors as susceptible as their male counterparts. (Author)

  19. Display graphic depicting the effects of 'Noise Induced Hearing Loss' (NIHL), created as

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Display graphic depicting the effects of 'Noise Induced Hearing Loss' (NIHL), created as part of a Cleveland Institute of Art, Bachelor of Fine Arts thesis project in cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory

  20. 78 FR 13905 - Government-Owned Inventions, Available for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... Center at Lewis Field, Code 21-14, Cleveland, OH 44135; telephone (216) 433-5754; fax (216) 433-6790... Etching of Silicon Carbide; NASA Case No.: LEW-18674-1: Polymer Electrolyte-Based Sensors; NASA Case...

  1. 76 FR 50494 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ...-1865 MPS) Address Restricted, Broadwater, 11000619 NEW YORK New York County Fourth Church of Christ..., 11000622 Rowan County Christ Episcopal Church, 3430 Old US 70, Cleveland, 11000623 OREGON Douglas...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Miller-Dieker syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allows the abdominal organs to protrude through the navel. People with Miller-Dieker syndrome may also have ... Disorders and Stroke: Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research Educational Resources (4 links) Cleveland Clinic: Lissencephaly Disease ...

  3. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infantile Psychomotor Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on child development outcomes were studied prospectively in an obstetric unit of a large US urban teaching hospital at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.

  4. Libraries in Ohio: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AVE CINCINNATI, OH 45220-2489 513-862-2433 MERCY HEALTH PARTNERS WESTERN HILLS LIBRARY SERVICES 22240LIB 3131 ... OH 45238 513-389-5118 http://www.e-mercy.com Cleveland BENJAMIN ROSE LIBRARY LIBRARY ILL 11900 ...

  5. Virginia Tech's Michael Duncan receives civil engineering award

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2010-01-01

    J. Michael Duncan, Virginia Tech University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Via Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is the 2010 recipient of the G. Brooks Earnest Award and Lecture from the American Society of Civil Engineers' Cleveland Section.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9 links) American Heart Association Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Cleveland Clinic Disease InfoSearch: Jervell Lange-Nielsen syndrome ... and Advocacy Resources (5 links) Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) National Association of the Deaf National Organization for ...

  7. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture radar studies of Alaska volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles W., Jr.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Power, John A.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Masterlark, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we summarize our recent InSAR studies of 13 Alaska volcanoes, including New Trident, Okmok, Akutan, Kiska, Augustine, Westdahl, Peulik, Makushin, Seguam, Shishaldin, Pavlof, Cleveland, and Korovin volcanoes.

  8. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Published on Dec 12, 2012 Do you have sleep apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure ( ... suggested video will automatically play next. Up next Sleep Apnea Treatment - PAP Therapy - Duration: 13:44. Cleveland ...

  9. 77 FR 4582 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Cook County Lathrop, Julia C., Homes, Bounded by Clyburn, & N. Damen Aves., N. Leavitt St., & Chicago R..., & Library Aves., & W. 25th St., Cleveland, 12000031 Shaker Farm Historic District, Roughly bounded...

  10. Update on the rational use of tositumomab and iodine-131 tositumomab radioimmunotherapy for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Burdick, Michael J; Macklis, Roger M.

    2009-01-01

    Michael J Burdick, Roger M MacklisDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Targeted radioimmunotherapy in non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma (NHL) offers an efficacious therapy and minimal toxicity compared to conventional chemotherapy. Iodine 131 tositumomab (131I-TST) is a murine monoclonal antibody against the CD20 cell surface protein and is directly covalently conjugated to 131I, a radioactiv...

  11. A technology-enabled adherence enhancement system for people with bipolar disorder: results from a feasibility and patient acceptance analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sajatovic M; Davis MS; Cassidy KA; Nestor J; Sams J; Fuentes-Casiano E

    2015-01-01

    Martha Sajatovic,1 Michael S Davis,2 Kristin A Cassidy,3 Joseph Nestor,2 Johnny Sams,3 Edna Fuentes-Casiano3 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurological and Behavioral Outcomes Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2MedicaSafe, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA Objective: As...

  12. Metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney: therapeutic role of bevacizumab

    OpenAIRE

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    Ronald M BukowskiCleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, CCF Lerner College of Medicine of CWRU Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: The biology and pathogenesis of clear cell carcinoma of the kidney has been extensively investgated, and the role of von Hipple-Landau gene inactivation and tumor associated angiogenesis is now recognized. Development of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and phase 3 clinical trials utilizing this class of agents has produced a new treatment paradigm for patie...

  13. Treatment and prevention of mania in bipolar I disorder: focus on aripiprazole

    OpenAIRE

    Muzina, David J.

    2009-01-01

    David J MuzinaCenter for Mood Disorders Treatment and Research, Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Aripiprazole is a second-generation antipsychotic with a unique pharmacologic receptor profile that has efficacy in the treatment and prevention of mania in bipolar I disorder. This article reviews the evidence supporting treatment of adults with bipolar I disorder using aripiprazole as monotherapy or adjunctively during acute mania and its utility as an intra...

  14. Clinical and economic outcomes after surgical aortic valve replacement in Medicare patients

    OpenAIRE

    Clark MA; Duhay FG; Thompson AK; Keyes MJ; Svensson LG; Bonow RO; Stockwell BT; Cohen DJ

    2012-01-01

    Mary Ann Clark,1 Francis G Duhay,2 Ann K Thompson,2 Michelle J Keyes,3 Lars G Svensson,4 Robert O Bonow,5 Benjamin T Stockwell,3 David J Cohen61The Neocure Group LLC, Washington, DC, 2Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, Irvine, CA, 3The Burgess Group LLC, Alexandria, VA, 4Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 5Center for Cardiovascular Innovation, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL...

  15. Management of side effects associated with sunitinib therapy for patients with renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Schwandt1; Wood, Laura S.; Brian Rini; Robert Dreicer1,2

    2009-01-01

    Anita Schwandt1, Laura S Wood1, Brian Rini1,2, Robert Dreicer1,21Department of Solid Tumor Oncology; 2Taussig Cancer Institute and the Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute; Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: Advances in the understanding of the biology of renal cell carcinoma have led to recent approval of several new agents including drugs that target vascular endothelial growth factor. Sunitinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor which interferes with multiple intra...

  16. Critical appraisal of axitinib in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari J.; Hussain SA; Ansari A; Glaholm J

    2013-01-01

    Jawaher Ansari,1 Syed A Hussain,2 Asif Ansari,3 John Glaholm41Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK; 2Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; 3Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; 4University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UKAbstract: A growing understanding of the biology of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has led to the development and US Food and Drug Administration approval of seven new molecular targ...

  17. Angiotensin II receptor blockers in the prevention of complications from atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Eide, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Gerald V Naccarelli,1 Frank Peacock21Penn State Heart and Vascular institute, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA; 2Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially due to ischemic stroke. The occurrence of AF leads to atrial electrical and structural remodeling. The renin-angiotensin system appears to play a role in the development of atr...

  18. Biologics in the management of psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Korman, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Jennifer D Bahner1, Lauren Y Cao2, Neil J Korman11Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease for which there exist topical, ultraviolet, systemic, and biologic treatments. Biologic agents selectively interfere with the immune mechanisms responsible for psoriasis. Etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab target tum...

  19. A pilot study: portable out-of-center sleep testing as an early sleep apnea screening tool in acute ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Chernyshev OY; McCarty DE; Moul DE; Liendo C; Caldito GC; Munjampalli SK; Kelley RE; Chesson Jr AL

    2015-01-01

    Oleg Y Chernyshev,1 David E McCarty,1 Douglas E Moul,2 Cesar Liendo,1 Gloria C Caldito,1 Sai K Munjampalli,1 Roger E Kelley,3 Andrew L Chesson Jr1 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center at Shreveport, LA 2Sleep Disorders Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3Department of Neurology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA Introduction: Prompt diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is cr...

  20. The Mobi-C cervical disc for one-level and two-level cervical disc replacement: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvin MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Matthew D Alvin,1,2 Thomas E Mroz1,3,41Cleveland Clinic Center for Spine Health, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 4Department of Neurological Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA is a novel motion-preserving procedure that is an alternative to fusion. The Mobi-C disc prosthesis, one of many Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved devices for CDA, is the only FDA-approved prosthesis for two-level CDA. Hence, it may allow for improved outcomes compared with multilevel fusion procedures.Purpose: To critically assess the available literature on CDA with the Mobi-C prosthesis, with a focus on two-level CDA.Methods: All clinical articles involving the Mobi-C disc prosthesis for CDA through September 1, 2014 were identified on Medline. Any paper that presented Mobi-C CDA clinical results was included. Study design, sample size, length of follow-up, use of statistical analysis, quality of life outcome scores, conflict of interest, and complications were recorded.Results: Fifteen studies were included that investigated Mobi-C CDA, only one of which was a level Ib randomized control trial. All studies included showed non-inferiority of one-level Mobi-C CDA to one-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF. Only one study analyzed outcomes of one-level versus two-level Mobi-C CDA, and only one study analyzed two-level Mobi-C CDA versus two-level ACDF. In comparison with other cervical disc prostheses, the Mobi-C prosthesis is associated with higher rates of heterotopic ossification (HO. Studies with conflicts of interest reported lower rates of HO. Adjacent segment degeneration or disease, along with other complications, were not assessed in most studies.Conclusion: One-level Mobi-C CDA is non-inferior, but not superior, to one-level ACDF for patients

  1. Parenteral clevidipine for the acute control of blood pressure in the critically ill patient: a review

    OpenAIRE

    W Frank Peacock IV; Angeles, Jorge E; Karina M Soto; et al.

    2009-01-01

    W Frank Peacock IV1, Jorge E Angeles2, Karina M Soto2, Philip D Lumb3,  Joseph Varon41The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Facultad de Medicina, Tijuana, México; 3Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospita...

  2. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  3. 76 FR 20598 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Control of Emissions of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... significant problem with the prior version is the definition of ``photochemically reactive material,'' which... internal combustion engines. The rules were submitted as part of the attainment strategy in the Cleveland... photochemically reactive materials or the need to determine or document materials as being...

  4. Relative Deprivation, Rising Expectations, and Black Militancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeles, Ronald P.

    1976-01-01

    Investigates the role of relative deprivation (RD) and rising expectations (RE) as mediating variables between social structure and black militancy through secondary analyses of survey data of blacks living in Cleveland and Miami in the late 1960s. Alternative explanations and implications derived from the present data and the theories for the…

  5. An Experiment with WWW Interactive Learning in University Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, David R.; Wolff, Francis G.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses an exploration with the use of interactive learning on the Web in an Introduction to C Programming Course taught at Cleveland State University, and compares the results with the same course taught during a previous semester using no interactive Web instruction. (Author/AEF)

  6. Tell It to the Mayor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Mayoral control of public schools is nothing new. Boston pioneered the practice in 1992, replacing elected school committee members with mayoral appointees. Since then, a dozen urban districts--including Cleveland, Chicago, New York City, and Washington, D.C.--have undergone a similar change in school governance that has shifted some or most of…

  7. Langston Hughes and his poem "Harlem"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝红

    2005-01-01

    @@ James Langston Hughes was born February 1,1902, in Joplin, Missouri. His parents divorced when he was a small child, and his father moved to Mexico. He was raised by his Grandmother until he was thirteen, when he moved to Lincoln,Illinois, to live with his mother and her husband, eventually settling in Cleveland, Ohio.

  8. Telnet Cornucopia: Interactive Access to Information Resource Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Judi

    1992-01-01

    Describes various resources accessed through Telnet software that are available through the Internet for use in elementary and secondary education. Highlights include the National Public Telecomputing Network's Cleveland Freenet; Washington University's SERVICES gateway; and Wide Area Information Server (WAIS) programs. (LRW)

  9. School Vouchers: Examining the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnoy, Martin

    This study reviews recent empirical research on the effect of school vouchers on student achievement (particularly for low-income minorities attending private schools) and the effect of the threat of vouchers on low-performing public schools. The study examines the Milwaukee voucher experiment, the Cleveland voucher program, and new voucher…

  10. 78 FR 98 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Announcement of Application From a Hospital Requesting Waiver for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... Application From a Hospital Requesting Waiver for Organ Procurement Service Area AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... that a hospital must notify the designated OPO (for the service area in which it is located) of... service area in which the hospital is located: Bolivar Medical Center in Cleveland, Mississippi,...

  11. Nature in the City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbert, Mary Lou

    1981-01-01

    Describes a science program developed by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, "Nature in the City," in which students and teachers learn together about the natural community surrounding their school. Includes program's rationale, list of "adventures," and methods. Discusses strategies of Sherlock Holmes'"adventure" focusing on animal tracks…

  12. Somatostatin and dopamine receptors as molecular targets for the medical treatment of Cushing’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Bruin (Christiaan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHarvey Williams Cushing (1869-1939) was born as the 10th child of a well-educated, puritanical medical family in Cleveland (figure 1). He attended Yale University, graduated cum laude from Harvard Medical School and was trained as a general surgeon at Johns Hopkins under the famous but d

  13. A Collaborative, Ongoing University Strategic Planning Framework: Process, Landmines, and Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Susan E. Kogler; Thomas, Edward G.; Keller, Lawrence F.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the strategic planning process at Cleveland State University, a large metropolitan state university in Ohio. A faculty-administrative team used a communicative planning approach to develop a collaborative, ongoing, bottom-up, transparent strategic planning process. This team then spearheaded the process through plan…

  14. A Preliminary Study of Classroom Motivators and De-Motivators from a Motivation-Hygiene Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katt, James A.; Condly, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    This study seeks to begin answering two simple questions: "What motivates our students?" and its corollary, "What prevents our students from being motivated?" The motivation-hygiene theory (F. Herzberg, "Work and the nature of man," World Publishing, Cleveland, OH, 1966), a well-tested theory from organizational psychology, holds that people's…

  15. Religious Socialization and Benevolence: A Study among American Pentecostals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores benevolent action among Pentecostals in the USA using a congregational questionnaire survey of worshippers among the Church of God (Cleveland, TN) (N = 1522). The influence of religiosity and the socialization of a perceived relationship of love with God (Godly Love) are explored, while controlling for background variables. The…

  16. 75 FR 21353 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... Workplace, Inc., Kalispell, MT TA-W-71,824: Neenah Paper FR, LLC., Ripon, CA TA-W-72,043: Carmeuse... Staffmasters, Cleveland, NC, November 27, 2008 TA-W-73,194: Beam Global Spirits and Wine, Leased Workers from... Division, Indianapolis, IN TA-W-73,131: Android Wixom, Wixom, MI TA-W-73,168; Riverside Mechanical,...

  17. The Use and Acceptance of Sexually Aggressive Tactics in College Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentin, Jennifer B.; Gidycz, Christine A.

    2007-01-01

    This study extended the findings of Cleveland, Koss, and Lyon's (1999) research on rape tactics to a sample of college men by examining the use and acceptance of sexually aggressive tactics. Participants included 297 male undergraduate students who filled out instruments assessing for a history of sexual aggression and other personality…

  18. Reflection of Foster Parents on Caring for Foster and Adopted Children and Their Suggestions to Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Fabrykowski, Krystyna; Helinski, Monica; Buchstein, Fred

    2009-01-01

    In this research project we investigated the process of adoption of foster children by foster parents and the foster parents' ideas of how to help foster children going through the process of adoption or those who have been adopted. We sent questionnaires to 200 foster parents living in the Cleveland area, but just 23 foster parents replied.…

  19. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tv 17,864 views 4:39 Sleep Apnea Treatment - PAP Therapy - Duration: 13:44. Cleveland Clinic 113,619 views ... 36 Choosing a CPAP Mask for Sleep Apnea Treatment - Duration: 4:37. TheLankyLefty27 128,902 views 4: ...

  20. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Published on Dec 12, 2012 Do you have sleep apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure ( ... 39. ReVu tv 22,703 views 4:39 Sleep Apnea Treatment - PAP Therapy - Duration: 13:44. Cleveland ...

  1. The Work of a Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2012-01-01

    If there's one message that Joan Hillsman wants to get across to music directors, it's this: Teaching is a lifetime commitment. Hillsman is a longtime music educator, African-American music historian, author, consultant, music producer, clinician, radio show host, and current member of the Academic Board of the James Cleveland Gospel Music…

  2. 32 CFR 726.4 - Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to determine the mental capability of a member to manage his financial affairs. (3) A finding of... concerning his mental health, is accurate and complete. (5) The requirement to convene a competency board... report to the Defense Finance and Accounting Service-Cleveland Center, Office of Continuing...

  3. Validation of a Method for Measuring Medical Students' Critical Reflections on Professionalism in Gross Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Drake, Richard L.; Szostek, Jason H.; Reed, Darcy A.; Lachman, Nirusha; McBride, Jennifer M.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Improving professional attitudes and behaviors requires critical self reflection. Research on reflection is necessary to understand professionalism among medical students. The aims of this prospective validation study at the Mayo Medical School and Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine were: (1) to develop and validate a new instrument for…

  4. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cleft Lip / Cleft Palate Bottle Feeding Cleveland Clinic: Cleft Lip & Palate Surgery Genetic Testing Registry: Siderius X-linked mental ... PJ, Schofield CJ. PHF8, a gene associated with cleft lip/palate and mental retardation, encodes for an Nepsilon-dimethyl ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: McKusick-Kaufman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH Scientists Educational Resources (5 links) Cleveland Clinic: Congenital Hand Differences Disease InfoSearch: McKusick Kaufman syndrome MalaCards: mckusick-kaufman syndrome March of Dimes: Genital and Urinary Tract Defects Orphanet: McKusick-Kaufman syndrome Patient Support and ...

  6. 75 FR 52982 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... date 72,956 Jasper Chair Company...... Jasper, IN November 19, 2008. 73,302 Wolfe Dye & Bleach Works.... Chemical Process Research and Development Pilot Plant. 73,796 Keane, Inc., Teachers Denver, CO March 26.../ Tyler, TX Plumbing Division, North Plant. 73,110 Robin Industries, Inc., Cleveland, OH...

  7. John Carroll University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  8. Preparing Administrators and Faculty of Cuyahoga Community College for a More Active Role in Implementing the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppley, George

    This five-part report discusses the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of 1973 (CETA), explains how it operates locally through the Cleveland Area Western Reserve Manpower Consortium (CAWRMC), and specifies ways in which Cuyahoga Community College (CCC) can play a greater role in the CETA system. Part I describes existing federal manpower…

  9. Workplace Literacy Partnership Program. December 1994-November 1997. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyter-Escalona, Margaret

    The Worker Education Program (WEP) provided workplace programs for 1,000 members of the Union of Needletrades, Industrial, and Textile Employees (UNITE) in Chicago, Cleveland, and Cincinnati. It was sponsored by a partnership among the Chicago Teachers' Center of Northeastern Illinois University, the Central States Joint Board of UNITE, and…

  10. The importance of structure in decisionmaking

    OpenAIRE

    Jerry L. Jordan

    1992-01-01

    Should the economics profession be judged on its ability to predict the economy's twists and turns? Not according to Cleveland Federal Reserve Bank President Jerry L. Jordan, who argues that an economist's real contribution lies not in eliminating the uncertainties of the marketplace, but in providing a proper framework for discussing and evaluating those uncertainties.

  11. Death Education and Attitudes toward Euthanasia and Terminal Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagi, Mostafa H.; Lazerine, Neil G.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzed attitudes of 614 Protestant and Catholic Cleveland clergy toward terminal illness and euthanasia. Clergy responses revealed that, although eager to prolong life, terminally ill patients feared prolonged illness more than death. The controversial nature of euthanasia became more apparent with clergy who had more training in death…

  12. Association of Research Self-Efficacy with Medical Student Career Interests, Specialization, and Scholarship: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, S. Beth; Prayson, Richard A.; Dannefer, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal…

  13. Cuyahoga County Early Childhood Initiative Evaluation: Phase II Final Report. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Rob; Coulton, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Since mid-1999, a bold initiative has been underway in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, to improve the well-being of the youngest members of the greater Cleveland community. A community-wide initiative targeting children from birth through age five and their families was launched in July 1999, and in the following 5 years demonstrated substantial success in…

  14. Working Close to Home. WIRE-Net's Hire Locally Program. Workforce Development Report to the Field. Field Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Patricia; Proscio, Tony

    In 1986, three neighborhood development organizations in Cleveland, Ohio, created the Westside Industrial Retention Network (WIRE-Net) to retain manufacturing jobs on the city's West Side. In 1989, WIRE-Net launched its Hire Locally program, which was designed to provide local business with candidates judged to be effective workers and help…

  15. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Published on Dec 12, 2012 Do you have sleep apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure ( ... 5:05. ApneaTreatmentCenter 38,307 views 5:05 Sleep Apnea Treatment - PAP Therapy - Duration: 13:44. Cleveland ...

  16. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Published on Dec 12, 2012 Do you have sleep apnea and use a continuous positive airway pressure ( ... 39. ReVu tv 54,618 views 4:39 Sleep Apnea Treatment - PAP Therapy - Duration: 13:44. Cleveland ...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1162 - Regulation for bicycle use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities described in paragraph (f) of this section of feeder bikeways to bridges, on-bridge bikeways... deems it necessary, for a public comment period prior to the effective date of his response. (f... Government Center; (13) Porter Square, Cambridge to Columbus Park, Boston; (14) Cleveland Circle...

  18. Vacant urban lot soils and their potential to support ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    AimsUrban soils are the basis of many ecosystem services in cities. Here, we examine formerly residential vacant lot soils in Cleveland, Ohio and Detroit, Michigan, USA for their potential to provide multiple ecosystem services. We examine two key contrasts: 1) differences betwee...

  19. Global risks to U.S. monetary policy

    OpenAIRE

    Owen F. Humpage

    2007-01-01

    We recently invited four international economists to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland to discuss global developments and to help us identify and understand the key international risks that these developments present for U.S. monetary policy. This Commentary develops a key macroeconomic concern that emerged from our conversations.

  20. It Takes More Than a Hero: School Restructuring in Ohio under the No Child Left Behind Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    This report describes Ohio's school restructuring efforts under the No Child Left Behind Act, including findings from interviews with state officials and case studies of nine schools in four school districts: Cincinnati Public Schools, Cleveland Metropolitan School District, Mansfield City Schools, and Mount Vernon City Schools. Key findings from…

  1. Air pollution and emergency department visits for asthma among Ohi Medicaid recipients, 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the effects of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3) particulate matter of 10), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) on asthmatics ages 5-34 years enrolled in Medicaid i Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Columbus, OH (N=5416). Our study period was fo the summer months, June-August, from July 1, 1991 to June 30, 1996. W preformed Poisson regression analyses for the number of daily emergency department (ED) visits for asthma in each city and on the aggregate dat controlling for time trends and minimum temperature. We found a 12% increase likelihood of an asthma ED visit per 50 μg/m3 increase in PM10 i Cleveland [95% confidence interval (CI)=0-27%] and a 35% increase per 5 μg/m3 increase in SO2 in Cincinnati (95% CI=9-21%). When data wer analyzed for all three cities combined, the risk of an ED visit increased fo all pollutant increases and specifically by 12% (95% CI=1-23%) per 5 μg/m3 increase in SO2. Attributable risk estimates show a five time greater impact on Cleveland over Cincinnati or Columbus. Between 1991 an 1996, air pollutants in Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Columbus increased E visits for asthmatics enrolled in Medicaid

  2. The U.S. Supreme Court and the Politics of Vouchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Brian L.

    2004-01-01

    On June 27, 2002, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in "Zelman v. Simmons-Harris" was promulgated by the justices. The case involved the constitutionality of Ohio's Pilot Project Scholarship Program, which provides tuition aid for certain students in the Cleveland City School District to attend participating public or private (religious and…

  3. Do the Math: Course Redesign's Impact on Learning and Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, John; Faulkner, Jerry; Hite, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The math department at Cleveland State Community College embarked upon course redesign in 2008. As a result of this project, student engagement, learning, and success rates have increased dramatically. By including both developmental and college level math courses in the redesign, the department has been able to implement innovative scheduling and…

  4. 76 FR 18893 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Organic Compound Emission Control Measures for Lithographic and Letterpress Printing in Cleveland AGENCY... volatile organic compound (VOC) rule. These rule revisions specify compliance dates for subject facilities... solution. In EPA's December 30, 2010, proposal (75 FR 82363), we present a detailed legal and...

  5. 78 FR 52784 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-26

    ... & Ardmore Aves., Fort Wayne, 13000720 Daviess County McCall Farmstead, 4914 E. 800 N., Plainville, 13000721...-1960 MPS) Roughly bounded by W. 5th, 8th & 7th Aves., Cleveland & Roosevelt Sts., gary, 13000722...) Roughly bounded by Washington St., 37th, 35th, Jefferson & Madison Aves., Gary, 13000723 Marion...

  6. The Nonculture of Poverty among Black Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Murray

    1972-01-01

    Although the culture of poverty may be applicable to the barrios of South America, this study of the aspirations, expectations, and attitudes toward protest of Negro youths in Cleveland refutes the validity of this theory for lower-class urban Americans. (Author)

  7. Trends in the levels of halogenated flame retardants in the Great Lakes atmosphere over the period 2005-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang-Ying; Salamova, Amina; Venier, Marta; Hites, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    Air (vapor and particle phase) samples were collected every 12days at five sites near the North American Great Lakes from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2013 as a part of the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN). The concentrations of 35 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and eight other halogenated flame retardants were measured in each of the ~1,300 samples. The levels of almost all of these flame retardants, except for pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), and Dechlorane Plus (DP), were significantly higher in Chicago, Cleveland, and Sturgeon Point. The concentrations of PBEB and HBB were relatively high at Eagle Harbor and Sturgeon Point, respectively, and the concentrations of DP were relatively high at Cleveland and Sturgeon Point, the two sites closest to this compound's production site. The data were analyzed using a multiple linear regression model to determine significant temporal trends in these atmospheric concentrations. The concentrations of PBDEs were decreasing at the urban sites, Chicago and Cleveland, but were generally unchanging at the remote sites, Sleeping Bear Dunes and Eagle Harbor. The concentrations of PBEB were decreasing at almost all sites except for Eagle Harbor, where the highest PBEB levels were observed. HBB concentrations were decreasing at all sites except for Sturgeon Point, where HBB levels were the highest. DP concentrations were increasing with doubling times of 3-9years at all sites except those closest to its source (Cleveland and Sturgeon Point). The levels of 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (TBE) were unchanging at the urban sites, Chicago and Cleveland, but decreasing at the suburban and remote sites, Sturgeon Point and Eagle Harbor. The atmospheric concentrations of 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EHTBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromophthalate (BEHTBP) were increasing at almost every site with doubling times of 3-6years. PMID:27160856

  8. A coping and communication support intervention tailored to older patients diagnosed with late-stage cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hannum Rose

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Julia Hannum Rose1,2,3, Rosanne Radziewicz4, Karen F Bowman5, Elizabeth E O’Toole11Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Louis Stokes Cleveland VAMC-GRECC, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Center for Health Care Research and Policy, Case at MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 4Department of Nursing, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 5Department of Sociology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: As our society ages, increasing numbers of older Americans will be diagnosed and eventually will die of cancer. To date, psycho-oncology interventions for advanced cancer patients have been more successful in reaching younger adult age groups and generally have not been designed to respond to the unique needs and preferences of older patients. Theories and research on successful aging (Baltes and Baltes 1990; Baltes 1997, health information processing style (Miller 1995; Miller et al 2001 and non-directive client-centered therapy (Rogers 1951, 1967, have guided the development of a coping and communication support (CCS intervention. Key components of this age-sensitive and tailored intervention are described, including problem domains addressed, intervention strategies used and the role of the CCS practitioner. Age group comparisons in frequency of contact, problems raised and intervention strategies used during the first six weeks of follow up indicate that older patients were similar to middle-aged patients in their level of engagement, problems faced and intervention strategies used. Middle-aged patients were more likely to have problems communicating with family members at intervention start up and practical problems as well in follow up contacts. This is the first intervention study specifically designed to be age sensitive and to examine age differences in engagement from the early treatment phase for late-stage cancer through end of life. This tailored intervention is

  9. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441). Supplement No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 8 to the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0887) on the application filed by the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company on behalf of itself and as agent for the Duquesne Light Company, the Ohio Edison Company, the Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company (the Central Area Power Coordination Group or CAPCO), as applicants and owners, for a license to operate the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units and 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lake County, Ohio, approximately 35 miles northeast of Cleveland, Ohio. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that has not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement Nos. 1 through 7 to that report

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441). Supplement No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 5 to the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0887) on the application filed by the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company on behalf of itself and as agent for the Duquesne Light Company, the Ohio Edison Company, The Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company (the Central Area Power Coordination Group or CAPCO), as applicants and owners, for a license to operate the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lake County, Ohio, approximately 35 miles northeast of Cleveland, Ohio. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement Nos. 1 through 4 to that report

  11. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441). Supplement No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 7 to the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0887) on the application filed by the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company on behalf of itself and as agent for the Duquesne Light Company, the Ohio Edison Company, the Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company (the Central Area Power Coordination Group or CAPCO), as applicants and owners, for a license to operate the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket No. 50-440 and 50-441) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lake County, Ohio, approximately 35 miles northeast of Cleveland, Ohio. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement Nos. 1 through 6 to that report

  12. The emerging role of bexarotene in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tousi B

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Babak Tousi Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brian Health, Neurological Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: In 2012, a novel approach to the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease was introduced, heralding a wave of excitement in the field of dementia. Bexarotene, a retinoid X receptor agonist, was shown to reverse neurodegeneration, improve cognition, and decrease levels of amyloid-ß in transgenic mice expressing familial Alzheimer disease mutations. Since then, there has been widespread discussion about bexarotene, as well as a number of follow-up studies. Bexarotene is a unique compound, as it is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for other purposes and there are reasonable data to justify its mechanism of action in dementia. This review discusses these studies and the emerging role of bexarotene in the clinical field of Alzheimer’s dementia. Keywords: repurposing, ApoE-targeted mice, amyloid, therapy, dementia

  13. Update on the rational use of tositumomab and iodine-131 tositumomab radioimmunotherapy for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Burdick

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Burdick, Roger M MacklisDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Targeted radioimmunotherapy in non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma (NHL offers an efficacious therapy and minimal toxicity compared to conventional chemotherapy. Iodine 131 tositumomab (131I-TST is a murine monoclonal antibody against the CD20 cell surface protein and is directly covalently conjugated to 131I, a radioactive β and γ emitter. While initially approved for use in relapsed, refractory, or transformed low grade B-cell NHL, investigational uses with promising results include autologous stem cell transplant, intermediate grade NHL, and the frontline management of indolent NHL. This review summarizes the 131I-TST literature on mechanism of action, treatment indications, treatment delivery, efficacy, investigational uses, and future prospects.Keywords: tositumomab, radioimmunotherapy, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Bexxar

  14. Treatment and prevention of mania in bipolar I disorder: focus on aripiprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Muzina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available David J MuzinaCenter for Mood Disorders Treatment and Research, Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Aripiprazole is a second-generation antipsychotic with a unique pharmacologic receptor profile that has efficacy in the treatment and prevention of mania in bipolar I disorder. This article reviews the evidence supporting treatment of adults with bipolar I disorder using aripiprazole as monotherapy or adjunctively during acute mania and its utility as an intramuscular agent for agitation in manic patients. Results from one of the longest bipolar maintenance trials which support aripiprazole as a prophylactic mood stabilizer, specifically against manic relapses, will be discussed as well as a post-hoc analysis that suggests efficacy for rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Safety and tolerability issues, patient-focused perspectives and aripiprazole’s place in therapy for bipolar mania will be covered.Keywords: bipolar disorder, mania, prevention, aripiprazole, rapid cycling

  15. Anhedonia and cognitive function in adults with MDD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntyre, Roger S; Woldeyohannes, Hanna O; Soczynska, Joanna K;

    2015-01-01

    variability in self-reported cognitive function correlates with anhedonia. METHOD: A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from (N=369) participants with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR)-defined diagnosis of MDD who were enrolled...... in the International Mood Disorders Collaborative Project (IMDCP) between January 2008 and July 2013. The IMDCP is a collaborative research platform at the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, and the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. Measures of cognitive function...... and self-rated cognitive dysfunction remained significant after adjusting for illness severity (r=0.162, p=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results provide empirical data for the testable hypothesis that anhedonia and self-reported cognitive function in MDD are correlated yet dissociable domains...

  16. The Impact of Vouchers on the Science and Mathematics Achievement of Elementary Students in a Majority African American Public School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Patricia A.; Boone, William J.; Metcalf, Kim K.

    In many settings, the issue of publicly funded vouchers for students is being discussed. This article presents the results of evaluating test data from students living within the city boundaries of Cleveland, Ohio. In Cleveland, a limited number of low - socioeconomic status students can receive publicly funded vouchers. Data were analyzed using multivariate and univariate techniques. The results suggest that (a) students who did not return to the scholarship program from third to fourth grade exhibited lower achievement levels than those who remained in the program, (b) scholarship students who continued in the scholarship program from third to fourth grade continue to be very much like their public school counterparts, and (c) the effects of the program on scholarship students' academic performance are slightly positive but are mediated by the schools they attend. This study is important because vouchers may or may not provide a mechanism by which the participation of underrepresented groups in science and mathematics can be increased.

  17. A High Temperature Cyclic Oxidation Data Base for Selected Materials Tested at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic oxidation test results for some 1000 high temperature commercial and experimental alloys have been collected in an EXCEL database. This database represents over thirty years of research at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The data is in the form of a series of runs of specific weight change versus time values for a set of samples tested at a given temperature, cycle time, and exposure time. Included on each run is a set of embedded plots of the critical data. The nature of the data is discussed along with analysis of the cyclic oxidation process. In addition examples are given as to how a set of results can be analyzed. The data is assembled on a read-only compact disk which is available on request from Materials Durability Branch, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  18. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441). Supplement No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 6 to the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0887) on the application filed by the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company on behalf of itself and as agent for the Duquesne Light Company, the Ohio Edison Company, the Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company (the Central Area Power Coordination Group or CAPCO), as applicants and owners, for a license to operate the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-540 and 50-441), has been prepared by the Office of the Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lake County, Ohio, approximately 35 miles northeast of Cleveland, Ohio. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement Nos. 1 through 5 to that report

  19. Design of a TRW entrained combustion system Lovett unit no. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1980's a technology was developed which permits the firing of high-ash, medium sulfur coals with resultant low SOx, NOx and particulate emissions. The concept is based on the complete combustion of pulverized coal in suspension (entrainment) under substoichiometric conditions. This technology advanced through evolutionary stages beginning with small test rigs eventually scaling up to a 50 MMBtu/hr industrial boiler located in Cleveland, OH. The Cleveland test facility (CTF) has been operated for over 9,000 hours to optimize equipment design, operating modes and to evaluate a wide range of coals. The fuels tested have included coals of varying sulfur contents (0.5 to 3.0%), low to high ash (5 to 30%), low to high volatiles (9 to 35%), and medium to high ash fusion temperature(s) (T250) of 2200 to 2900 degrees F. This paper presents the program which has advanced the technology in a number of respects

  20. Carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin levels in residents living in industrial and nonindustrial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woebkenberg, N.R.; Mostardi, R.A.; Ely, D.L.; Worstell, D.

    1981-12-01

    Carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin concentrations were compared in residents living in an industrial (Cleveland, Ohio) and a nonindustrial community (Elyria, Ohio). Carboxyhemoglobin levels were significantly higher among both male and female smokers and nonsmokers in Cleveland as compared to their counterparts in Elyria. Male smokers at both sites had significantly higher carboxyhemoglobin values than did the females. Methemoglobin levels were significantly higher in the nonindustrial site for all breakdowns even though ambient NO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 3/ levels were higher in the industrial site. The high methemoglobin levels are attributed to the higher nitrate levels in the drinking water in the nonindustrial city. In the industrial city, both male and female smokers had significantly higher methemoglobin values than nonsmokers. These differences were not found in the nonindustrial site. It is suggested that methemoglobin has physiological importance and in combination with carboxyhemoglobin elevated values could be a health factor.

  1. Does plasmin have anticoagulant activity?

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Hoover-Plow

    2010-01-01

    Jane Hoover-PlowJoseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Lerner Research Institute Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USAAbstract: The coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways regulate hemostasis and thrombosis, and an imbalance in these pathways may result in pathologic hemophilia or thrombosis. The plasminogen system is the primary proteolytic pathway for fibrinolysis, but also has important proteolytic functions in cell ...

  2. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  3. Financial education: what is it and what makes it so important?

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Hopley

    2003-01-01

    Financial literacy is essential. By enabling people to make sound, knowledgeable decisions, it increases their prosperity and that of their communities. The Community Affairs Department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland surveyed financial institutions and community economic development organizations in the Fourth Federal Reserve District to find out how they design, deliver, and evaluate their financial education programs-and which methods have been most successful. This report shares ...

  4. 2003 Environmental Assessment Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Hopley

    2003-01-01

    The Community Affairs Office of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland conducted an environmental assessment survey in early 2003 to better understand current trends affecting access to capital and credit in low- and moderate-income communities. Topics of interest included trends affecting financial institutions' ability to serve the credit needs of individuals and businesses; community reinvestment needs; local or regional economic conditions that are affecting community reinvestment and econ...

  5. Opportunities for the CTEI: disentangling frequency and quality in evaluating teaching behaviours

    OpenAIRE

    Schonrock-Adema, J.; Boendermaker, P.M.; Remmelts, P.

    2012-01-01

    Students’ perceptions of teaching quality are vital for quality assurance purposes. An increasingly used, department-independent instrument is the (Cleveland) clinical teaching effectiveness instrument (CTEI). Although the CTEI was developed carefully and its validity and reliability confirmed, we noted an opportunity for improvement given an intermingling in its rating scales: the labels of the answering scales refer to both frequency and quality of teaching behaviours. Our aim was to invest...

  6. Differential activation of JAK enzymes in rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmune disorders by pro-inflammatory cytokines: potential drug targets

    OpenAIRE

    Malemud, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Charles J MalemudArthritis Research Laboratory, Division of Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Although several pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-12/IL-23, IL-17, IL-2, interferon, and the anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-4/IL-13, IL-10, and IL-22, all activate the Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, in autoimmune disorders, ...

  7. Regional Resilience in the Face of Foreclosures: Evidence from Six Metropolitan Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Todd Swanstrom; Karen Chapple; Dan Immergluck

    2009-01-01

    Based on approximately fifty interviews, along with analysis of data and newspaper coverage, this report compares local responses to surging foreclosures in three pairs of regions with similar housing markets and foreclosure-related challenges (St. Louis/Cleveland, East Bay/Riverside, and Chicago/Atlanta). The authors examine the choices made by leaders and organizations both to prevent foreclosures and to reduce their negative spillovers (neighborhood stabilization). Resilience is defined as...

  8. Progress on the Design and Development of the Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Horvath, David J.; Mielke, Nicole; Shiose, Akira; Kuban, Barry; Goodin, Mark; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Golding, Leonard A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Cleveland Clinic’s continuous-flow total artificial heart has one motor and one rotating assembly supported by a hydrodynamic bearing. The right hydraulic output is self regulated by passive axial movement of the rotating assembly to balance itself with the left output. The purpose of this article is to present progress in four areas of development: the automatic speed control system, self-regulation to balance right/left inlet pressures and flows, hemolysis testing using calf blood, and coup...

  9. Ion Engine and Tank 6 at Electric Propulsion Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    Ion engine and Tank 6 at the Electric Propulsion Laboratory - EPL. This facility is located at the Lewis Research Center, now the John H. Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The Ion engine is the power system that carried Deep Space 1 on its innerplanetary mission in the late 1990s, but the idea was decades old by that time and much research had already been conducted at Lewis.

  10. Effective supervision and the evolving financial services industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jerry L. Jordan

    2001-01-01

    Technology, market consolidation, international competition, and new legislation are changing the face of the financial services industry. How are the agencies responsible for ensuring the safety and soundness of our financial system responding? This Commentary is adapted from a keynote address given by Jerry L. Jordan, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, at the 111th Annual Meeting of the Ohio Bankers association in May 2001.

  11. Community organizations in the foreclosure crisis: the failure of neoliberal civil society

    OpenAIRE

    McQuarrie, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the prehistory of the foreclosure crisis in Cleveland, Ohio, in order to understand the effectiveness of civil society organizations in mitigating its impact on the city’s neighborhoods. Social theorists and movement activists have often postulated civil society as an authentic and voluntaristic realm in which we constitute and act on shared values. The voluntary nature of civil society organizations also, it is argued, make them more responsive, adaptable, and effective i...

  12. International Business in Academia: The State of the Field

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G Hawkins

    1984-01-01

    The following article is based on the Presidential Address delivered by Robert G. Hawkins of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at the 19 October 1984 meeting of the Academy of International Business in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. Hawkins assesses the success (and failure) of the field of international business study in its 3 objectives—education, research, and the ability to influence policy making—and comes to conclusions and recommendations for the future.© 1984 JIBS. Journal of International Busin...

  13. Flying Saucer? Aliens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    No, it's not a flying saucer, it is the domed top to a 70 foot long vacuum tank at the Lewis Research Center's Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio. The three technicians shown here in protective clothing had just emerged from within the tank where they had been cleaning in the toxic mercury atmosphere, left after ion engine testing in the tank. Lewis has since been renamed the John H. Glenn Research Center.

  14. Maternal Work Hours and Adolescents’ School Outcomes Among Low-Income Families in Four Urban Counties

    OpenAIRE

    Gennetian, Lisa A.; LOPOO, LEONARD M.; LONDON, ANDREW S.

    2008-01-01

    We examine how changes in maternal work hours affect adolescent children’s school participation and performance outcomes using data from interviews in 1998 and 2001 with approximately 1,700 women who, in May 1995, were welfare-reliant, single mothers of adolescents living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty in Cuyahoga (Cleveland), Los Angeles, Miami-Dade, and Philadelphia counties. Analyses control for a broad array of mothers’ characteristics, including their psychological and physical...

  15. Engineering Aspects in Blood Pump Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Leonard; Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    NASA turbomachinery computer codes assisted in the design of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's centrifugal bladed blood pump. The codes were originally developed for the aerospace industry, but are applicable to the blood pump because of a high degree of synergy with this application. Traditional turbomachinery design criteria were used in the design of the blood pump centrifugal impeller and volute casing. The fluid dynamic performance of the blood pump is meeting the engineering design goals of flow rate and pressure rise.

  16. Bone densitometry at a district general hospital: evaluation of service by doctors and patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Madhok, R; Kirby, P.; Fordham, J.; Stamp, P.; Green, S.; Cooper, C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess doctors' and patients' views about a district general hospital bone densitometry service and to examine existing practice to influence future provision. DESIGN--Three postal surveys: (a) of doctors potentially using the service, (b) of patients undergoing a bone densitometry test during a six month period, and (c) of the referring doctors of the patients undergoing the test. SETTING--Bone densitometry service at South Cleveland Hospital, Middlesbrough and two district hea...

  17. Quantification of Siderophore and Hemolysin from Stachybotrys chartarum Strains, Including a Strain Isolated from the Lung of a Child with Pulmonary Hemorrhage and Hemosiderosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vesper, Stephen J.; Dearborn, Dorr G.; Elidemir, Okan; Haugland, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    A strain of Stachybotrys chartarum was recently isolated from the lung of a pulmonary hemorrhage and hemosiderosis (PH) patient in Texas (designated the Houston strain). This is the first time that S. chartarum has been isolated from the lung of a PH patient. In this study, the Houston strain and 10 strains of S. chartarum isolated from case (n = 5) or control (n = 5) homes in Cleveland were analyzed for hemolytic activity, siderophore production, and relatedness as measured by random amplifi...

  18. Stachylysin May Be a Cause of Hemorrhaging in Humans Exposed to Stachybotrys chartarum

    OpenAIRE

    Vesper, Stephen J.; Vesper, Mary Jo

    2002-01-01

    Stachybotrys chartarum is a toxigenic fungus that has been associated with human health concerns such as nasal bleeding in adults and pulmonary hemosiderosis (PH) in infants. Seven of eight strains of S. chartarum isolated from homes of infants with PH in Cleveland, Ohio, and the strain from the lung of an infant with PH in Texas produced stachylysin in tryptic soy broth (TSB), whereas only one out of eight strains isolated from control homes produced stachylysin. However, all strains produce...

  19. Study of Toxin Production by Isolates of Stachybotrys chartarum and Memnoniella echinata Isolated during a Study of Pulmonary Hemosiderosis in Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, Bruce B.; Sorenson, W G; Hintikka, Eeva-Liisa; Nikulin, Marjo; Zhou, Yihong; Jiang, Jian; Wang, Shengun; Hinkley, Simon; Etzel, Ruth A.; Dearborn, D.

    1998-01-01

    A cluster of cases of pulmonary hemosiderosis among infants was reported in Cleveland, Ohio, during 1993 and 1994. These unusual cases appeared only in infants ranging in age from 1 to 8 months and were characterized by pulmonary hemorrhage, which caused the babies to cough up blood. A case-control study identified major home water damage (from plumbing leaks, roof leaks, or flooding) as a risk factor for development of pulmonary hemorrhage in these infants. Because of an interest in the poss...

  20. Workshop on entrepreneurial finance: a summary

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy Dunne; Scott Shane; Thomson, James B.

    2009-01-01

    This Policy Discussion Paper summarizes papers that were presented at the Workshop on Entrepreneurial Finance, which was held March 12?13, 2009, at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. Researchers presented new empirical research that exploits data sets on entrepreneurial activity that are based on broad and representative data samples. Papers in the workshop focused primarily on analyses of the sources and structure of start-up finance, including the importance of bank lending, venture cap...

  1. Speaking Stata: Smoothing in various directions

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas J. Cox

    2005-01-01

    Identifying patterns in bivariate data on a scatterplot remains a ba- sic statistical problem, with special flavor when both variables are on the same footing. Ideas of double, diagonal, and polar smoothing inspired by Cleveland and McGill’s 1984 paper in the Journal of the American Statistical Association are revisited with various examples from environmental datasets. Double smooth- ing means smoothing both y given x and x given y. Diagonal smoothing means smoothing based on the sum and dif...

  2. Role of extended release quetiapine in the management of bipolar disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Al Jurdi, Rayan K.; Dixit, Lena A; Martha Sajatovic

    2010-01-01

    Rayan K Al Jurdi1,2, Lena A Dixit1, Martha Sajatovic3 1Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Houston, Texas, USA; 2South Central Mental Illness Research and Clinical Core, Department of Veterans Affairs, Houston, Texas; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Atypical antipsychotics have become a widely utilized component of the bipolar disorder treatment armamentarium, with approximately 45% of bipolar patie...

  3. The Impact of Landfills on Residential Property Values

    OpenAIRE

    Alan K. Reichert; Michael Small; Sunil Mohanty

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of five municipal landfills on residential property values in a major metropolitan area (Cleveland, Ohio). The study concludes that landfills will likely have an adverse impact upon housing values when the landfill is located within several blocks of an expensive housing area. The negative impact is between 5.5%-7.3% of market value depending upon the actual distance from the landfill. For less expensive, older areas the landfill effect is ...

  4. Evaluation of an automated single-channel sleep staging algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Y; Loparo KA; Kelly, Van; Kaplan RF

    2015-01-01

    Ying Wang,1 Kenneth A Loparo,1,2 Monica R Kelly,3 Richard F Kaplan1 1General Sleep Corporation, Euclid, OH, 2Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 3Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: We previously published the performance evaluation of an automated electroencephalography (EEG)-based single-channel sleep–wake detection algorithm called Z-ALG used by the Zmachine® sleep mon...

  5. Acculturation to the global consumer culture: A generational cohort comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, Jason; Moore, Marguerite; Doherty, Anne Marie; Alexander, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    While on a global scale consumers are becoming more homogeneous, as a result of the increasingly globalized marketplace, researchers suggest that consumers within individual countries are becoming more culturally heterogeneous. Consequently, M. Cleveland and J. Laroche (2007. Acculturation to the global consumer culture: Scale development and research paradigm. Journal of Business Research, 60, 249–259) advocate segmenting consumers acrossmarkets on the basis of acculturation to the global co...

  6. Clinical management of behavioral characteristics of Prader–Willi syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Alan Y; Anastasia Dimitropoulos

    2010-01-01

    Alan Y Ho, Anastasia DimitropoulosDepartment of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder caused by an abnormality on the long arm of chromosome 15 (q11–q13) that results in a host of phenotypic characteristics, dominated primarily by hyperphagia and insatiable appetite. Characteristic behavioral disturbances in PWS include excessive interest in food, skin picking, difficult...

  7. The effects of inflation on wage adjustments in firm-level data: grease or sand?

    OpenAIRE

    Groshen, Erica L.; Mark E. Schweitzer

    1994-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of inflation on wage changes made by firms in a unique thirty-seven-year panel of occupations and employers drawn from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Community Salary Survey (CSS). Our analysis first identifies two relative prices embedded in wage changes and, second, draws inferences about the costs and benefits of inflation from the adjustments in these relative prices. Typically, firms manage employer-wide wage adjustments (controlling for occupational...

  8. Python Engine Installed in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    An engine mechanic checks instrumentation prior to an investigation of engine operating characteristics and thrust control of a large turboprop engine with counter-rotating propellers under high-altitude flight conditions in the 20-foot-dianieter test section of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Cleveland, Ohio, now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  9. Improving empathy of physicians through guided reflective writing

    OpenAIRE

    Anita D. Misra-Hebert; J. Harry Isaacson; Martin Kohn; Alan L. Hull; Mohammadreza Hojat; Papp, Klara K.; Leonard Calabrese

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to explore how guided reflective writing could evoke empathy and reflection in a group of practicing physicians. Methods: Total participants recruited included 40 staff physicians at Cleveland Clinic, a tertiary care academic medical center. Twenty physicians (intervention group) were assigned to participate in a 6-session faculty development program introducing narrative medicine and engaging in guided reflective writing. Ten physicians (comparison group 1...

  10. Validating a model of team collaboration at the North American Aerospace Defense Command using selected transcripts from September 11, 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, David A.

    2008-01-01

    On September 11, 2001, during an exercise at the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), air traffic controllers in New York, Boston, Washington and Cleveland discovered that four American commercial airliners had been hijacked. Initially, the officials at NORAD's North East Air Defense Sector (NEADS) were confused as to whether the hijackings were real world or part of an exercise. The goal of this thesis is to investigate the teamwork and collaboration that occurred between NE...

  11. Team collaboration of the Northeast Air Defense Sector and Federal Aviation Administration during the September 11, 2001 attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Socias, Luis F.

    2008-01-01

    The tragic events of September 11, 2001, brought about changes in the procedures for interagency collaboration. That day air traffic controllers in New York, Boston, Washington, and Cleveland were scrambling due to the hijacking of four American commercial airliners. In their efforts to bring order to chaos the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in communication with Northeast Air Defense Sector (NEADS) and North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) scrambled fighter aircraft to ...

  12. Differential Patient-Caregiver Opinions of Treatment and Care For Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Amy Y.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the differences of opinion between cancer patients and caregivers with regard to treatment and care decisions. 184 advanced lung cancer patients and 171 primary caregivers were recruited as a convenience sample from clinics in Cleveland, Ohio. A telephone interview was conducted to collect data using a semi-structured questionnaire. Nonparametric tests and regression analysis were performed. The findings showed that patients and caregivers reported significant disagreement...

  13. Dr René Favaloro (1923-2000) Rene Favaloro MD (1923-2000)

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Morán V

    2000-01-01

    René Favaloro MD, was born in La Plata, Argentina, in July 1923. He studied medicine in La Plata and made his cardiology residence in the Cleveland Clinic, where he developed coronary bypass surgery for the treatment of ischemic heart disease. At the present time, this surgical procedure is a well recognized therapy for coronary artery disease that has benefited millions of patients. Back in Argentina, he founded in 1992 the Institute of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery that had an impor...

  14. Regional resilience in the face of foreclosures: Evidence from six metropolitan areas

    OpenAIRE

    Swanstrom, Todd; Chapple, Karen; Immergluck, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Based on approximately fifty interviews, along with analysis of data and newspaper coverage, this report compares local responses to surging foreclosures in three pairs of regions with similar housing markets and foreclosure-related challenges (St. Louis/Cleveland, East Bay/Riverside, and Chicago/Atlanta). The authors examine the choices made by leaders and organizations both to prevent foreclosures and to reduce their negative spillovers (neighborhood stabilization). Resilience is defined as...

  15. Effect of genistein on basal jejunal chloride secretion in R117H CF mice is sex and route specific

    OpenAIRE

    Rayyan E; Polito S; Leung L; Bhakta A; Kang J; Willey J; Mansour W; Drumm ML; Al-Nakkash L

    2015-01-01

    Esa Rayyan,1 Sarah Polito,1 Lana Leung,1 Ashesh Bhakta,1 Jonathan Kang,1 Justin Willey,1 Wasim Mansour,1 Mitchell L Drumm,2 Layla Al-Nakkash11Department of Physiology, Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, USA; 2Pediatric Pulmonology Division, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from the loss or reduction in function of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein) chloride ...

  16. Stoma care is our affair for the senior citizens everywhere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Coyle

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available The first reported colostomy was in 1776 and it was a caecostomy, or opening into the caecum. This was the first attempt to surgically help the problem of an imperforate anus. The first stomatherapist was a patient in the Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, U.S.A. Now there are 22 countries in the world with qualified stomatherapists. Stomatherapy was founded in South Africa in 1958 and in England in 1967.

  17. Learning to Fly: The Wright Brothers' Adventure. A Guide for Educators and Students with Activities in Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, R.; Benson, T.; Galica, C.; McCredie, P.

    2003-01-01

    This guide was produced by the NASA Glenn Research Center Office of Educational Programs in Cleveland, OH, and the NASA Aerospace Educational Coordinating Committee. It includes activity modules for students, including the history of the Wright Brothers and their family in Dayton, Ohio and flight experimentation in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Student activities such as building models of the Wright Brothers glider and writing press releases of the initial flight are included.

  18. Prevention of cervical, vaginal, and vulval cancers: role of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (6, 11, 16, 18) recombinant vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Lina Diaz

    2010-01-01

    Maria Lina DiazSection of Ambulatory Gynecology Cleveland Clinic Florida Weston, Florida, USAAbstract: The relationship between the human papillomavirus (HPV) and malignancies of the uterine cervix, vagina, and vulva has been established. The development of a quadrivalent HPV recombinant prophylactic vaccine represents the first time in history that primary prevention of these cancers is offered to girls and women. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV subtypes in cervical cancers has been the most...

  19. Interview with Paul DeMarinis

    OpenAIRE

    Ouzounian, Gascia

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, the American electronic media artist Paul DeMarinis (b. 1948, Cleveland, Ohio, USA) has created works that re-imagine modes of communication and reinvent the technologies that enable communication. His works (see Table 1) have taken shape as recordings, performances, electronic inventions, and site-specific and interactive installations; many are considered landmarks in the histories of electronic music and media art. Paul DeMarinis pioneered live performance with compu...

  20. Impact of a new condensed toluene mechanism on air quality model predictions in the US

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwar, G.; K. W. Appel; A. G. Carlton; Mathur, R.; K. Schere; Zhang, R.; MAJEED, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A new condensed toluene mechanism is incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling system. Model simulations are performed using the CB05 chemical mechanism containing the existing (base) and the new toluene mechanism for the western and eastern US for a summer month. With current estimates of tropospheric emission burden, the new toluene mechanism increases monthly mean daily maximum 8-h ozone by 1.0–3.0 ppbv in Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Cleveland, northeaste...

  1. Impact of a new condensed toluene mechanism on air quality model predictions in the US

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwar, G.; K. W. Appel; A. G. Carlton; Mathur, R.; K. Schere; Zhang, R.; MAJEED, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new condensed toluene mechanism is incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling system. Model simulations are performed using the CB05 chemical mechanism containing the existing (base) and the new toluene mechanism for the western and eastern US for a summer month. With current estimates of tropospheric emission burden, the new toluene mechanism increases monthly mean daily maximum 8-h ozone by 1.0–3.0 ppbv in Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Cleveland, northeaste...

  2. Fetal alcohol exposure and development of the integument

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Larry

    2016-01-01

    William D Longhurst,1 Jordan Ernst,2 Larry Burd3 1Center for Emergency Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USA; 3Department of Pediatrics, North Dakota Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Center, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USA Background: The physiology of fetal alcohol exposure changes across ges...

  3. Renal manifestations of genetic mitochondrial disease

    OpenAIRE

    O’Toole JF

    2014-01-01

    John F O'Toole Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, MetroHealth Medical System, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Mitochondrial diseases can be related to mutations in either the nuclear or mitochondrial genome. Childhood presentations are commonly associated with renal tubular dysfunction, but renal involvement is less commonly reported outside of this age-group. Mitochondrial diseases are notable for the significant...

  4. Final report : breastfeeding and maternal smoking, breastfeeding and substance misuse : a review of programs/interventions nationwide.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudzik, Alanna E.F.

    2014-01-01

    Two areas of maternal and child health were identified as important contributors to the health of the local populations of Middlesbrough and Redcar/Cleveland. These areas were maternal smoking (in pregnancy and the postpartum) and breastfeeding and maternal substance misuse (drugs and alcohol) and breastfeeding. The goal of the consultancy was to identify programs or interventions from around the UK that have been designed to deal with these two issues, to evaluate outcom...

  5. Three myths about central banks

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey P. Miller

    2002-01-01

    Do central banks control the business cycle? Should price stability be their only monetary policy goal? Do politicians give up a degree of power and gain nothing personally when they grant central banks independence? This Commentary argues that none of these widely held notions is true. The Commentary is based on a speech presented to participants at the conference on the Origins and Evolution of Central Banking, sponsored by the Central Bank Institute of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland...

  6. A Boost for the Emerging Field of RNA Nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Girish C.; Haque, Farzin; Tor, Yitzhak; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Isambert, Hervé; Guo, Peixuan; John J. Rossi; Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This Nano Focus article highlights recent advances in RNA nanotechnology as presented at the First International Conference of RNA Nanotechnology and Therapeutics, which took place in Cleveland, OH, USA (October 23–25, 2010) (http://www.eng.uc.edu/nanomedicine/RNA2010/), chaired by Peixuan Guo and co-chaired by David Rueda and Scott Tenenbaum. The conference was the first of its kind to bring together more than 30 invited speakers in the frontier of RNA nanotechnology from France, Sweden, Sou...

  7. Making Wireless Work: A Look at What Hospitals Are Doing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockley, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Three events in January 2016 did a terrific job of capturing the essence of wireless technology in healthcare today, putting the expectations, innovations, and problems in the limelight. In glitzy Las Vegas, more than 150,000 people flocked to CES (formerly the Consumer Electronics Show) and the colocated Digital Health Summit. An equally engaged crowd of 1,000+ health information technology (IT) and healthcare technology management (HTM) professionals gathered in Cleveland for the IHE North American Connectathon. PMID:27046683

  8. Enzyme immunoassay for rabies antibody in hybridoma culture fluids and its application to differentiation of street and laboratory strains of rabies virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J S; Sumner, J. W.; Roumillat, L. F.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive enzyme immunoassay is described for detecting rabies antibody in hybridoma culture fluids. Glass fiber filter disks were used to immobilize gamma-irradiated mouse neuroblastoma cells infected with street or laboratory strains of rabies virus. Bound rabies-specific antibody was detected by reaction with horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin G. The assay was performed in a 96-well filtration device developed by Cleveland et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. ...

  9. Association between Hyperprolactinemia and Granulomatous Mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Blake, Cassann N; Carlson, Diane L

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) is a relatively uncommon inflammatory breast lesion with multiple suggested etiologies. Although most GM cases show association with lactation and pregnancy, a minority of cases have been linked to hyperprolactinemia caused by either dopamine antagonist medications or with intracranial lesions, such as pituitary adenoma. The goal of this study is to review the GM cases reported in the literature with a specific emphasis on those cases associated with hyperprolactinemia and prolactinomas and to identify cases of GM seen at the Cleveland Clinic Florida which demonstrate co-occurrences of GM and intracranial lesions. CoPath and Epic data bases at Cleveland Clinic Florida were searched for cases describing inflammatory breast lesions in patients with pituitary pathology. Chart reviews were conducted and pertinent medical history was extracted for case reports. H&E-stained paraffin-embedded sections retrieved from Cleveland Clinic Florida pathology storage were evaluated by light microscopy. Four cases showing a co-occurrence of GM and hyperprolactinemia were consequently identified. A prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma was present in two of the three GM cases. The third case demonstrated a concomitant craniopharyngioma, which was also associated with a rise in serum prolactin. This phenomenon was presumably attributable to compression, resulting in compromised transport of dopamine to the adenohypophysis and subsequent disinhibition of prolactin secretion by lactotrophs. The fourth patient with GM had a similar history of elevated prolactin. Classical histopathological features of GM were found in all four cases, including noncaseating granulomas, multinucleated giant cells, epithelioid histiocytes, and chronic inflammation. Intriguingly, complete resolution of inflammatory breast lesions along with normalization of prolactin levels occurred following the surgical excision of the craniopharyngioma, suggesting that intracranial lesion

  10. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streit JJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan J Streit,1 Yousef Shishani,1 Mark Rodgers,2 Reuben Gobezie1 1The Cleveland Shoulder Institute, 2Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, USA Background: Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Methods: Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Results: Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Conclusion: Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body. Keywords: biceps tendinitis, biceps tendinopathy, tenosynovium, anterior shoulder pain, long head biceps

  11. Interior View of Drafting Room in ERB

    Science.gov (United States)

    1942-01-01

    Interior view of Drafting Room in Engine Research Building showing men at work at the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory. This building was considered the research heart of NACA Lewis. It was built by the Sam W. Emerson Company and was completed in 1942. It is a multipurpose flexible space covering more than 4.25 acres and can be changed according to research priorities. The Aircraft Engine Research Center, Cleveland Ohio, is now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  12. Proposed solar neutrino experiment using 81Br(nu,e-)81Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has now been shown that it is feasible to measure the 7Be neutrino source in the sun by using the reaction 81Br(nu,e-)81Kr in a radiochemical experiment. Such an experiment would be quite similar to the Davis, Cleveland, and Rowley method for measuring the 8B neutrino using 37Cl(nu,e-)37Ar except that the resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) method (instead of decay counting) would be employed to count the 2 x 105-yr 81Kr atoms

  13. Proposed solar neutrino experiment using 81Br(ν,e-)81Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has now been show that it is feasible to measure the 7Be neutrino source in the sun by using the reaction 81Br(ν,e-)81Kr in a radiochemical experiment. Such an experiment would be quite similar to the Davis, Cleveland, and Rowley method for measuring the 8B neutrino using 37Cl(ν,e-)37Ar except that the resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) method (instead of decay counting) would be employed to count the 2 x 105-yr 81Kr atoms

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, Volume 44, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes the issuances received in October 1996. Issuances are from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors' Decisions. 15 issuances were received and are abstracted individually in the database: Louisiana Energy Services, U.S. Enrichment Corporation, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation, James L. Shelton, Juan Guzman, Northern States Power Company, TESTCO Inc., Washington Public Power Supply System, all nuclear plants, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Duke Power Company, Florida Power Corporation, and Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (2 issuances). No issuances were received from the the Administrative Law Judges or the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking

  15. The NASA Lewis Research Center's Expendable Launch Vehicle Program: An Economic Impact Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates the economic impact of the Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) Expendable Launch Vehicle Program (ELVP) on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures ELVP's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they "ripple" throughout the economy. The study uses regional economic multipliers based on input-output models to estimate the effect of ELVP spending on the Northeast Ohio economy.

  16. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the March 1996 listing of NRC issuances. Included are: (1) NRC orders granting Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company's petition for review of the ASLB order LBP-95-17, (2) NRC orders relating to the potential disqualification of two commissioners in the matter of the decommissioning of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (3) ASLB orders pertaining to the Oncology Services Corporation, (4) ASLB orders pertaining to the Radiation Oncology Center, (5) ASLB orders pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and (6) Director's decision pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station

  17. The Financial Stress Index: Identification of Systemic Risk Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Oet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a financial stress measure for the United States, the Cleveland Financial Stress Index (CFSI. The index is based on publicly available data describing a six-market partition of the financial system comprising credit, funding, real estate, securitization, foreign exchange, and equity markets. This paper improves upon existing stress measures by objectively selecting between several index weighting methodologies across a variety of monitoring frequencies through comparison against a volatility-based benchmark series. The resulting measure facilitates the decomposition of stress to identify disruptions in specific markets and provides insight into historical stress regimes.

  18. Results of the Workshop on Two-Phase Flow, Fluid Stability and Dynamics: Issues in Power, Propulsion, and Advanced Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, John; Rame, Enrique; Kassemi, Mohammad; Singh, Bhim; Motil, Brian

    2003-01-01

    The Two-phase Flow, Fluid Stability and Dynamics Workshop was held on May 15, 2003 in Cleveland, Ohio to define a coherent scientific research plan and roadmap that addresses the multiphase fluid problems associated with NASA s technology development program. The workshop participants, from academia, industry and government, prioritized various multiphase issues and generated a research plan and roadmap to resolve them. This report presents a prioritization of the various multiphase flow and fluid stability phenomena related primarily to power, propulsion, fluid and thermal management and advanced life support; and a plan to address these issues in a logical and timely fashion using analysis, ground-based and space-flight experiments.

  19. Cable condition monitoring program at Perry Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of polymeric materials, particularly cable insulation materials due to aging effects have long been a concern in the nuclear power industry. Industry qualification testing programs and research testing by the national laboratories have attempted to resolve this concern through design basis event tests preceded by simulated aging. As a final step ion resolving this concern through a systematic and disciplined technical program, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co, (CEI) in 1983, initiated a long term in-situ, cable condition monitoring program at its Perry Nuclear Power Plant (PNPP). This paper provides a snap shot of this program as of today

  20. Test Results From a Simulated High-Voltage Lunar Power Transmission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, Arthur; Hervol, David

    2008-01-01

    The Alternator Test Unit (ATU) in the Lunar Power System Facility (LPSF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio was modified to simulate high-voltage transmission capability. The testbed simulated a 1 km transmission cable length from the ATU to the LPSF using resistors and inductors installed between the distribution transformers. Power factor correction circuitry was used to compensate for the reactance of the distribution system to improve the overall power factor. This test demonstrated that a permanent magnet alternator can successfully provide high-frequency ac power to a lunar facility located at a distance.

  1. Test Results from a Simulated High Voltage Lunar Power Transmission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, Arthur; Hervol, David

    2008-01-01

    The Alternator Test Unit (ATU) in the Lunar Power System Facility (LPSF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH was modified to simulate high voltage transmission capability. The testbed simulated a 1 km transmission cable length from the ATU to the LPSF using resistors and inductors installed between the distribution transformers. Power factor correction circuitry was used to compensate for the reactance of the distribution system to improve the overall power factor. This test demonstrated that a permanent magnet alternator can successfully provide high frequency AC power to a lunar facility located at a distance.

  2. Non-Equilibrium Plasma Applications for Water Purification Supporting Human Spaceflight and Terrestrial Point-of-Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.; Foster, John E.; Adamovsky, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    2016 NASA Glenn Technology Day Panel Presentation on May 24, 2016. The panel description is: Environmental Impact: NASA Glenn Water Capabilities Both global water scarcity and water treatment concerns are two of the most predominant environmental issues of our time. Glenn researchers share insights on a snow sensing technique, hyper spectral imaging of Lake Erie algal blooms, and a discussion on non-equilibrium plasma applications for water purification supporting human spaceflight and terrestrial point-of-use. The panel moderator will be Bryan Stubbs, Executive Director of the Cleveland Water Alliance.

  3. In Memoriam: Professor Kathryn R. Heidt

    OpenAIRE

    Harry M. Flechtner

    2006-01-01

    What is most notable about the life and the career of Professor Kathryn R. Heidt is not that it was tragically cut short by her death on May 24, 2005, but that she was able to achieve so much, both personally and professionally, in the too-brief time allotted to her. After receiving her bachelor’s degree from Penn State and her J.D. from Cleveland State College of Law, Professor Heidt clerked for two years for the Honorable John T. Patton of the Ohio Court of Appeals before becoming an ...

  4. The type material of Mantodea (praying mantises deposited in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Svenson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The collection of Mantodea of the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, includes 26 holotypes, 7 allotypes, 4 lectotypes, 23 paratypes, and 1 paralectotype. Four type specimens were designated as lectotypes within this work. Highly accurate measurement data, high resolution images of specimens and labels, verbatim label data, georeferenced coordinates, original and newly assigned database codes, and bibliographic data are presented for all primary types. Label data for all paratype specimens in the collection are provide in tabular form. The location of the USNM collection has been moved to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History as a loan under the Off-site Enhancement Program.

  5. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of Oklahoma Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Oklahoma for a renewal of Operating License R-53 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Oklahoma and is located on the campus in Norman, Cleveland County, Oklahoma. The staff concludes that the Aerojet General Nucleonics (AGN) reactor facility can continue to be operated by University of Oklahoma without endangering the health and safety of the public

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, Volume 44, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received in October 1996. Issuances are from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors` Decisions. 15 issuances were received and are abstracted individually in the database: Louisiana Energy Services, U.S. Enrichment Corporation, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation, James L. Shelton, Juan Guzman, Northern States Power Company, TESTCO Inc., Washington Public Power Supply System, all nuclear plants, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Duke Power Company, Florida Power Corporation, and Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (2 issuances). No issuances were received from the the Administrative Law Judges or the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

  7. General aviation internal combustion engine research programs at NASA-Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An update is presented of non-turbine general aviation engine programs underway at the NASA-Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The program encompasses conventional, lightweight diesel and rotary engines. Its three major thrusts are: (a) reduced SFC's; (b) improved fuels tolerance; and (c) reducing emissions. Current and planned future programs in such areas as lean operation, improved fuel management, advanced cooling techniques and advanced engine concepts, are described. These are expected to lay the technology base, by the mid to late 1980's, for engines whose life cycle fuel costs are 30 to 50% lower than today's conventional engines.

  8. Large Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresher, R. W. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The proceedings of a workshop held in Cleveland, July 28-30, 1981 are described. The workshop emphasized recent experience in building and testing large propeller-type wind turbines, expanding upon the proceedings of three previous DOE/NASA workshops at which design and analysis topics were considered. A total of 41 papers were presented on the following subjects: current and advanced large wind turbine systems, rotor blade design and manufacture, electric utility activities, research and supporting technology, meteorological characteristics for design and operation, and wind resources assessments for siting.

  9. A Survey of Jet Aircraft PM by TEM in APEX III

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    Based upon field testing during the NASA led APEX III campaign conducted in November 2005 at the NASA Glenn Research Center in coordination with Continental Airlines and Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. This paper reports observations of particulate emissions collected from a suite of jet engine aircraft to assess differences and similarities in soot macro- micro- and nanostructure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aggregates are compact, primary particle sizes varied and nanostructure mixed. Comparisons are made to more familiar laboratory flame-generated soot as a well-studied point of reference. Results are interpreted in terms of turbulence interacting with the different stages of particle formation and growth.

  10. Arthritis in the buff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the significance of radiologic perturbations in articular diseases is facilitated by correlation with its representation in intact macerated skeletons (from the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History). Classic skeletal involvement is illustrated grossly and radiographically for the following conditions: rheumatoid arthritis calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive (Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis) diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and infectious arthritis. Distribution and lesion character is reviewed. Visualization of the gross bone lesion ''in the buff'' provides clear explanation of its radiologic appearance and facilitates the transition from x-ray image to the pathophysiology proposed in the interpretation

  11. 《A Running Hero》精读

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪华英

    2005-01-01

    Jesse Owens was born in Alabama.His real name was James Cleveland Owens.The nickname“Jessecame from his initials,J.C.As a child Owens liked to run.He was quite fast.In college he was on the track team.He won many races.In one track meet,he broke three world recordsand tied a fourth.He did it all in less than one hour。But his greatest moment came after college.It was the Summer Olympic Games of 1936.The games wereheld in Germany.Adolf Hitler ruled Germany.Hitler believed Germans were the best athletes.He wan...

  12. MET targeted therapy for lung cancer: clinical development and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Y

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Yan Feng,1,2 Patrick C Ma1–31Translational Hematology and Oncology Research, 2Solid Tumor Oncology, 3Aerodigestive Oncology Translational Research, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: MET, the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor, has been identified as a novel promising target in various human malignancies, including lung cancer. Research studies have demonstrated that MET signaling plays important physiologic roles in embryogenesis and early development, whereas its deregulation from an otherwise quiescent signaling state in mature adult tissues can lead to upregulated cell proliferation, survival, scattering, motility and migration, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. The MET pathway can be activated through ligand (hepatocyte growth factor, HGF or MET receptor overexpression, genomic amplification, MET mutations, and alternative splicing. A number of novel therapeutic agents that target the MET/hepatocyte growth factor pathway have been tested in early-phase clinical studies with promising results. Phase III studies of MET targeting agents have recently been initiated. This paper will review the MET signaling pathway and biology in lung cancer, and the recent clinical development and advances of MET/hepatocyte growth factor targeting agents. Emphasis will be placed on discussing various unanswered issues and key strategies needed to optimize further clinical development of MET targeting personalized lung cancer therapy.Keywords: MET, HGF, lung cancer, targeted therapy

  13. Radioimmunoguided imaging of prostate cancer foci with histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have previously presented a technique that fuses ProstaScint and pelvic CT images for the purpose of designing brachytherapy that targets areas at high risk for treatment failure. We now correlate areas of increased intensity seen on ProstaScint-CT fusion images to biopsy results in a series of 7 patients to evaluate the accuracy of this technique in localizing intraprostatic disease. Methods and Materials: The 7 patients included in this study were evaluated between June 1998 and March 29, 1999 at Metrohealth Medical Center and University Hospitals of Cleveland in Cleveland, Ohio. ProstaScint and CT scans of each patient were obtained before transperineal biopsy and seed implantation. Each patient's prostate gland was biopsied at 12 separate sites determined independently of Prostascint-CT scan results. Results: When correlated with biopsy results, our method yielded an overall accuracy of 80%: with a sensitivity of 79%, a specificity of 80%, a positive predictive value of 68%, and a negative predictive value of 88%. Conclusion: The image fusion of the pelvic CT scan and ProstaScint scan helped identify foci of adenocarcinoma within the prostate that correlated well with biopsy results. These data may be useful to escalate doses in regions containing tumor by either high-dose rate or low-dose rate brachytherapy, as well as by external beam techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

  14. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome. Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection. Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups. BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829). PMID:27149496

  15. Potential role of gabapentin and extended- release gabapentin in the management of menopausal hot flashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Manisha Yadav, Judith Volkar Center for Specialized Women’s Health, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA Abstract: About 80% of postmenopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flashes and night sweats – symptoms that are associated with sleep disruption and can lead to fatigue and mood changes. Moreover, hot flashes can be embarrassing for women, causing difficulties at work and in their social lives. Many therapies have been advocated for relief of vasomotor symptoms, but only hormone therapy has been US Food and Drug Administration approved. However, after the Women's Health Initiative Study suggested that there was a correlation between hormone therapy and increased risk for breast cancer and cardiovascular events, many women stopped taking hormone therapy, and many do not want to initiate it. Hormone therapy is also contraindicated in certain women, such as those with a history of hormone-stimulated cancer like breast and uterine cancer. Gabapentin (Neurontin has shown efficacy in relieving vasomotor symptoms and is used as off-label for this indication. A new extended-release formulation of gabapentin has also shown efficacy in treating hot flashes and improving sleep quality with possibly fewer side effects than regular gabapentin. Keywords: Hot flushes, vasomotor symptoms, postmenopausal, hormone-sensitive cancer, non-hormonal therapy, gastric-retentive, Breeze

  16. Metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney: therapeutic role of bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M Bukowski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ronald M BukowskiCleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, CCF Lerner College of Medicine of CWRU Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: The biology and pathogenesis of clear cell carcinoma of the kidney has been extensively investgated, and the role of von Hipple-Landau gene inactivation and tumor associated angiogenesis is now recognized. Development of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and phase 3 clinical trials utilizing this class of agents has produced a new treatment paradigm for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC. One of the active regimens identified is the combination of bevacizumab and interferon-α. Recently published reports provided evidence of the clinical and biologic activity of this therapy. The current manuscript reviews the background and rationale for the activity of bevacizumab in RCC, and results from recent clinical trials with this agent alone or in combination with targeted agents or cytokines. The role of this therapy in contrast to other targeted agents is reviewed, and the potential utility as well as questions raised by recent studies are discussed.Keywords: metastatic renal cell carcinoma, bevacizumab, interferon-α

  17. Is the radiographic appearance of the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint representative of its true anatomical structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanicola, Shawn M; Arnold, Thomas B; Osher, Lawrence

    2002-10-01

    The medial cuneiforms and first metatarsals were identified in 515 randomly selected specimens at the Hamman-Todd osteology collection in the Cleveland Museum of Natural History in Cleveland, Ohio, and the transverse plane angulation of the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint was determined by direct measurement of the selected bones. Medial cuneiforms were subsequently separated into three categories corresponding to the amount of measured obliquity. The first tarsometatarsal joint was reassembled, and the paired medial cuneiforms and first metatarsals were radiographed at different declination angles in inverted, everted, and rectus positions. Radiographic evaluation revealed discordance between the appearance of atavism and true atavism in the cuneiform. Specifically, it was determined that the position of the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint significantly influenced the appearance of atavism in the cuneiform. It is concluded that the position of the first ray in an anteroposterior radiograph can produce the appearance of an increased obliquity angle of the medial cuneiform, resulting in an inaccurate representation of the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint. (J Am Podiatr Med Assoc 92(9): 491-498, 2002) PMID:12381798

  18. Clinical and pharmacologic aspects of blinatumomab in the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portell CA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Craig A Portell, Candice M Wenzell, Anjali S Advani Leukemia Program, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adults remains a challenging disease to treat, and novel therapies are needed. Precursor-B ALL comprises 80% of cases, and the CD19 antigen is expressed in nearly all precursor-B ALL patients. Bispecific T-cell-engaging antibodies are novel bioengineered proteins. The bispecific T-cell-engaging antibody blinatumomab engages polyclonal T cells to CD19-expressing B cells. By binding to both CD3 and CD19, blinatumomab physically brings these T cells in close proximity to malignant B cells and potentiates T-cell-induced cytotoxic cell kill. Blinatumomab requires continuous intravenous infusion due to its short half-life, the need for continuous exposure for the drug to exert sufficient efficacy, and lessened toxicity. A phase II trial of B-cell ALL patients with persistent or relapsed minimal residual disease demonstrated an 80% rate of complete molecular remission. Cytokine-release syndrome and central nervous system events, such as seizures and encephalopathy, are reversible toxicities. Promising results in B-cell ALL with minimal residual disease have led to further evaluation of this drug in newly diagnosed and relapsed B-cell ALL. Keywords: blinatumomab, B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, CD19, BiTE antibodies

  19. Lung transplantation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: patient selection and special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane CR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available C Randall Lane, Adriano R Tonelli Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Lung transplantation is one of the few treatments available for end-stage COPD with the potential to improve survival and quality of life. The selection of candidates and timing of listing present challenges, as COPD tends to progress fairly slowly, and survival after lung transplantation remains limited. Though the natural course of COPD is difficult to predict, the use of assessments of functional status and multivariable indices such as the BODE index can help identify which patients with COPD are at increased risk for mortality, and hence which are more likely to benefit from lung transplantation. Patients with COPD can undergo either single or bilateral lung transplantation. Although many studies suggest better long-term survival with bilateral lung transplant, especially in younger patients, this continues to be debated, and definitive recommendations about this cannot be made. Patients may be more susceptible to particular complications of transplant for COPD, including native lung hyperinflation, and development of lung cancer. Keywords: emphysema, pulmonary hypertension, mortality, prognosis, outcomes, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

  20. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery: The Interim Report of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer.Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome.Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection.Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups.BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829). PMID:27149496

  1. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feza Y Karakayali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. Materials and Methods: In 10 patients treated with TAMIS for benign and malignant rectal tumors, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function was evaluated with anorectal manometry and Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. Results: The mean distance of the tumors from the anal verge was 5.6 cm, and mean tumor diameter was 2.6 cm. All resection margins were tumor free. There was no difference in preoperative and 3-week postoperative anorectalmanometry findings; only mean minimum rectal sensory volume was lower at 3 weeks after surgery. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all patients except one which resolved by 6 weeks after surgery.The mean postoperative follow-up was 28 weeks without any recurrences. Conclusion: Transanal minimally invasive surgery is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of rectal tumors and can be performed without impairing anorectal functions.

  2. Visualization of Air Particle Dynamics in an Engine Inertial Particle Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jason; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are regularly deployed around the world in support of military, civilian and humanitarian efforts. Due to their unique mission profiles, these advanced UAVs utilize various internal combustion engines, which consume large quantities of air. Operating these UAVs in areas with high concentrations of sand and dust can be hazardous to the engines, especially during takeoff and landing. In such events, engine intake filters quickly become saturated and clogged with dust particles, causing a substantial decrease in the UAVs' engine performance and service life. Development of an Engine Air Particle Separator (EAPS) with high particle separation efficiency is necessary for maintaining satisfactory performance of the UAVs. Inertial Particle Separators (IPS) have been one common effective method but they experience complex internal particle-laden flows that are challenging to understand and model. This research employs an IPS test rig to simulate dust particle separation under different flow conditions. Soda lime glass spheres with a mean diameter of 35-45 microns are used in experiments as a surrogate for airborne particulates encountered during flight. We will present measurements of turbulent flow and particle dynamics using flow visualization techniques to understand the multiphase fluid dynamics in the IPS device. This knowledge can contribute to design better performing IPS systems for UAVs. Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio, 44115.

  3. CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; and (4) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Consolidation of the team of stakeholders; Move the site for the commercial demonstration to LTV Steel, Cleveland, Ohio; Permitting for new site; Site specific engineering; Cost update of the project as it relates to the Cleveland location; FETC update; DCAA audit; and Updated endorsement of Calderon process by Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA, Region 5

  4. Update on quetiapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder: results from the BOLDER studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Gajwani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prashant Gajwani1, David J Muzina2, David E Kemp3, Keming Gao1, Joseph R Calabrese11Case Western Reserve University (CWRU School of Medicine, 2Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of CWRU, 3Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: The essential features of bipolar affective disorder involve the cyclical occurrence of high (manic or hypomanic episodes and low mood states. Depressive episodes in both bipolar I and II disorder are more numerous and last for longer duration than either manic or hypomanic episodes. In addition depressive episodes are associated with higher morbidity and mortality. While multiple agents, including all 5 atypical antipsychotics, have demonstrated efficacy and earned US FDA indication for manic phase of bipolar illness, the acute treatment of bipolar depression is less well-studied. The first treatment approved by the US FDA for acute bipolar depression was the combination of the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine and the antidepressant fluoxetine. Recently, quetiapine monotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of depressive episodes associated with both bipolar I and II disorder and has earned US FDA indication for the same.Keywords: bipolar disorder, quetiapine, BOLDER studies

  5. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wotman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Wotman1, Catherine A Demko1, Kristin Victoroff1, Joseph J Sudano2, James A Lalumandier11Department of Community Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Center of Health Care Research and Policy, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction.Keywords: dental practice, dental practice core activities, direct observation of dental practice, Dental Davis Observation Code, dentist, hygienist patient behaviors

  6. Lightweight Aggregate Made from Dredged Material in Green Roof Construction for Stormwater Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available More than 1.15 million cubic meters (1.5 million cubic yards of sediment require annual removal from harbors and ports along Ohio’s Lake Erie coast. Disposing of these materials into landfills depletes land resources, while open water placement of these materials deteriorates water quality. There are more than 14,000 acres of revitalizing brownfields in Cleveland, U.S., many containing up to 90% impervious surface, which does not allow “infiltration” based stormwater practices required by contemporary site-based stormwater regulation. This study investigates the potential of sintering the dredged material from the Harbor of Cleveland in Lake Erie to produce lightweight aggregate (LWA, and apply the LWA to green roof construction. Chemical and thermal analyses revealed the sintered material can serve for LWA production when preheated at 550 °C and sintered at a higher temperature. Through dewatering, drying, sieving, pellet making, preheating, and sintering with varying temperatures (900–1100 °C, LWAs with porous microstructures are produced with specific gravities ranging from 1.46 to 1.74, and water absorption capacities ranging from 11% to 23%. The water absorption capacity of the aggregate decreases as sintering temperature increases. The LWA was incorporated into the growing media of a green roof plot, which has higher water retention capacity than the conventional green roof system.

  7. Idelalisib therapy of indolent B-cell malignancies: chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic or follicular lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madanat YF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yazan F Madanat,1 Mitchell R Smith,2 Alexandru Almasan,3 Brian T Hill2 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, 3Department of Cancer Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, small lymphocytic lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma are indolent B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that mainly affect an older population. Although the majority of patients in need of treatment derive significant benefit from conventional chemotherapeutic agents as well as monoclonal antibodies, less toxic and more effective treatments are needed. Novel agents that inhibit the B-cell receptor signaling pathway have shown promising outcomes in these disorders. Idelalisib is a potent selective oral inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase delta and has shown significant clinical activity in B-cell malignancies. In this review, we summarize the clinical trial data using idelalisib as monotherapy or in combination with rituximab for the treatment of relapsed/refractory disease. The adverse effect profile includes autoimmune disorders such as transaminitis, colitis, and pneumonitis. Given the efficacy and manageable toxicity profile of idelalisib, it is being increasingly incorporated into the management of indolent B-cell malignancies. Keywords: idelalisib, PI3Kδ inhibitors, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, follicular lymphoma

  8. Historical and Critical Review on Biophysical Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigüzel, Yekbun

    2016-07-01

    Biophysical economics is initiated with the long history of the relation of economics with ecological basis and biophysical perspectives of the physiocrats. It inherently has social, economic, biological, environmental, natural, physical, and scientific grounds. Biological entities in economy like the resources, consumers, populations, and parts of production systems, etc. could all be dealt by biophysical economics. Considering this wide scope, current work is a “biophysical economics at a glance” rather than a comprehensive review of the full range of topics that may just be adequately covered in a book-length work. However, the sense of its wide range of applications is aimed to be provided to the reader in this work. Here, modern approaches and biophysical growth theory are presented after the long history and an overview of the concepts in biophysical economics. Examples of the recent studies are provided at the end with discussions. This review is also related to the work by Cleveland, “Biophysical Economics: From Physiocracy to Ecological Economics and Industrial Ecology” [C. J. Cleveland, in Advances in Bioeconomics and Sustainability: Essay in Honor of Nicholas Gerogescu-Roegen, eds. J. Gowdy and K. Mayumi (Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, England, 1999), pp. 125-154.]. Relevant parts include critics and comments on the presented concepts in a parallelized fashion with the Cleveland’s work.

  9. Healing leadership: the serving leader's impact on patient outcomes in a clinical environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andenoro A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Chris Nagel1, Anthony C Andenoro21Medical Operations – Continuous Improvement, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH; 2Department of Organizational Leadership, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA, USAAbstract: The future of health care is a topic that has significant importance to patients and caregivers alike for generations to come. As the health care industry becomes more complex, leadership and the examination of how to most effectively apply it to meet efficiency standards and optimize the patient experience will become paramount. Through this paper the authors provide the foundation for meeting this need through an innovative and socially adept framework that identifies the critical character attributes of a serving leader and the powerful impact that serving leaders can have on patient outcomes in the health care setting. This framework is grounded in a leadership theoretical foundation and contextually examined through qualitative methods. As the business of health care becomes more complex and more competitive, finding ways to improve processes and create healing environments conducive to improved patient outcomes will differentiate average health care and excellent health care in the future. This paper provides the impetus for successfully addressing these needs through the development of serving leaders, and three specific characteristics: emotional care, presence, and awareness.Keywords: servant leadership, health care, patient outcomes

  10. Assessment and monitoring of patients receiving chemotherapy for multiple myeloma: strategies to improve outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiman B

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Beth Faiman, Jason Valent Department of Hematologic Oncology and Blood Disorders, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Improved understanding as to the biology of multiple myeloma (MM and the bone marrow microenvironment has led to the development of new drugs to treat MM. This explosion of new and highly effective drugs has led to dramatic advances in the management of MM and underscores the need for supportive care. Impressive and deep response rates to chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies, and small molecule drugs provide hope of a cure or prolonged remission for the majority of individuals. For most patients, long-term, continuous therapy is often required to suppress the malignant plasma cell clone, thus requiring clinicians to become more astute in assessment, monitoring, and intervention of side effects as well as monitoring response to therapy. Appropriate diagnosis and monitoring strategies are essential to ensure that patients receive the appropriate chemotherapy and supportive therapy at relapse, and that side effects are appropriately managed to allow for continued therapy and adherence to the regimen. Multiple drugs with complex regimens are currently available with varying side effect profiles. Knowledge of the drugs used to treat MM and the common adverse events will allow for preventative strategies to mitigate adverse events and prompt intervention. The purpose of this paper is to review updates in the diagnosis and management of MM, and to provide strategies for assessment and monitoring of patients receiving chemotherapy for MM. Keywords: multiple myeloma, treatment, symptoms, assessment, monitoring, symptom management, targeted therapies

  11. Biologics in the management of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Bahner

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer D Bahner1, Lauren Y Cao2, Neil J Korman11Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease for which there exist topical, ultraviolet, systemic, and biologic treatments. Biologic agents selectively interfere with the immune mechanisms responsible for psoriasis. Etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab target tumor necrosis factor-alpha and have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Alefacept and efalizumab target T lymphocytes, are effective in the treatment of psoriasis, but are not approved for psoriatic arthritis. Finally, ustekinumab and ABT-874 target interleukin-12 and interleukin-23, and they have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of psoriasis. The objective of this review is to present efficacy and safety data from randomized controlled trials of the biologic agents in the treatment of psoriasis.Keywords: biologics, psoriasis, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-12/23

  12. Engaging doctors in the health care revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas H; Cosgrove, Toby

    2014-06-01

    A health care revolution is under way, and doctors must be part of it. But many are deeply anxious and angry about the transformation, fearing loss of autonomy, respect, and income. Given their resistance, how can health system Leaders engage them in redesigning care? In this article, Dr. Thomas H. Lee, Press Ganey's chief medical officer, and Dr. Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, describe a framework they've developed for encouraging buy-in. Adapting Max Weber's "typology of motives," and applying behavioral economics and other motivational principles, they describe four tactics leadership must apply in concert: engaging doctors in a noble shared purpose; addressing their economic self-interest; leveraging their desire for respect; and appealing to their sense of tradition. Drawing from experiences at the Mayo Clinic, Geisinger Health System, Partners HealthCare, the Cleveland Clinic, Ascension Health, and others, the authors show how the four motivational levers work together to bring this critical group of stakeholders on board. PMID:25051859

  13. Research and Technology 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for developing and transferring critical technologies that address national priorities in aeropropulsion and space applications in partnership with U.S. industries, universities, and Government institutions. As NASA s designated Lead Center for Aeropropulsion, our role is to develop, verify, and transfer aeropropulsion technologies to U.S. industry. As NASA s designated Center of Excellence in Turbomachinery, our role is to develop new and innovative turbomachinery technology to improve the reliability, performance, efficiency and affordability, capacity, and environmental compatibility of future aerospace vehicles. We also maintain a science and technology development role in aeropropulsion, communications, space power and onboard propulsion, and microgravity fluid physics and combustion. We are committed to enabling non-aerospace U.S. industries to benefit directly from the technologies developed through our programs to maximize the benefit to the Nation and the return on each taxpayer s investment. In addition, we are aggressively pursuing continuous improvement in our management and business practices and striving for diversity in our workforce as together we push the edge of technology in space and aeronautics. The Lewis Research Center is a unique facility located in an important geographical area, the southwest corner of Cleveland, Ohio. Situated on 350 acres of land adjacent to the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Lewis comprises more than 140 buildings that include 24 major facilities and over 500 specialized research and test facilities. Additional facilities are located at Plum Brook Station, which is about 50 miles west of Cleveland. Over 3700 people staff Lewis, including civil service employees and support service contractors. Over half of them are scientists and engineers, who plan, conduct or oversee, and report on our research tasks and projects. They are assisted by technical specialists, skilled

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor amplification does not have prognostic significance in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There have been conflicting reports in the literature regarding the prognostic significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The purpose of this study is to determine the prognostic significance of EGFR amplification in patients with GBM treated at Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of GBM patients treated with surgery at Cleveland Clinic Foundation was performed. Amplification of EGFR was evaluated with fluorescence in situ hybridization in a total of 107 patients diagnosed between December 1995 and May 2003. In addition to EGFR status, various prognostic factors were evaluated to determine the factors that influenced survival and radiographic response rate. The median follow-up was 9 months. Results: The overall median survival was 9.8 months, with a 1-year survival of 40%. Of the 107 patients in whom EGFR status was evaluated, 36 (33.6%) were found to have EGFR amplification. On multivariate analysis, median survival was found to be significantly improved for patients with age <60 (12.6 months vs. 8 months, p = 0.0061), patients with Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70 (12.1 months vs. 4.4 months, p < 0.0001), patients who had undergone subtotal resection or gross total resection (11.1 months vs. 4.1 months, p = 0.002), and patients who received a radiation dose ≥60 Gy compared with no radiation (12.7 months vs. 3 months, p < 0.0001). There was no association of EGFR amplification with survival. When stratified by age (<60 vs. ≥60), EGFR status still did not reach statistical significance in predicting for survival. For the 81 patients who had radiographic follow-up, the 1-year overall local control was 14%. On univariate analysis, only treatment with radiation (<60 Gy vs. ≥60 Gy vs. no radiation, p = 0.03) was found to predict for improved local control. Treatment with radiation did not remain statistically significant on multivariate

  15. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  16. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  17. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  18. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  19. A novel colloid probe preparation method based on chemical etching technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Several fundamental problems in hydrophobic force measurements using atomic force microscope (AFM) are discussed in this paper. A novel method for colloid probe preparation based on chemical etching technology is proposed, which is specially fit for the unique demands of hydrophobic force measurements by AFM. The features of three different approaches for determining spring constants of rectangular cantilevers, including geometric dimension, Cleveland and Sader methods are compared. The influences of the sizes of the colloids on the measurements of the hydrophobic force curves are investigated. Our experimental results showed that by selecting colloid probe with proper spring constant and tip size, the hydrophobic force and the complete hydrophobic interaction force curve can be measured by using AFM.

  20. Controlling hazardous energy sources (lockout/tagout)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Manuel B.

    1991-01-01

    The minimum requirements as established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard 29 CFR 1910.147 are discussed for preventing the unexpected operation of equipment or release of energy which could cause injury to personnel, damage to equipment, harm to the environment, or loss or compromise of test data. Safety requirements both for government and contractor personnel are explained for potentially hazardous energy sources during work operations at LeRC (Cleveland and Plum Brook Stations). Basic rules are presented to ensure protection against harmful exposures, and baseline implementation requirements are discussed from which detailed lockout/tagout procedures can be developed for individual equipment items. Examples of energy sources covered by this document include electrical, pneumatic, mechanical, chemical, cryogenic, thermal, spring tension/compression suspended or moving loads, and other potentially hazardous sources. Activities covered by this standard include, but are not limited to, construction, maintenance, installation, calibration, inspection, cleaning, or repair.

  1. High-Speed Rainbow Schlieren Visualization of an Oscillating Helium Jet Undergoing Gravitational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptuch, Peter A.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow schlieren deflectometry combined with high-speed digital imaging was used to study buoyancy effects on flow structure of a helium jet discharged vertically into air. The experimental data were taken using the 2.2-sec drop tower facility at the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The test conditions pertained to jet Reynolds number of 490 and jet Richardson number of 0.11, for which buoyancy is often considered unimportant. Experimental results show global oscillations at a frequency of 27 Hz in Earth gravity. In microgravity, the jet oscillations vanished and the jet width increased. Results provide a direct physical evidence of the importance of buoyancy on the flow structure of low-density gas jets at a Richardson number considered too small to account for gravity.

  2. Determination of the static spring constant of electrically-driven quartz tuning forks with two freely oscillating prongs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quartz tuning forks have become popular in nanotechnology applications, especially as sensors for scanning probe microscopy. The sensor’s spring constant and the oscillation amplitude are required parameters to evaluate the tip-sample forces; however, there is certain controversy within the research community as to how to arrive at a value for the static spring constant of the device when working in shear mode. Here, we present two different methods based on finite element simulations, to determine the value of the spring constant of the sensors: the amplitude and Cleveland methods. The results obtained using these methods are compared to those using the geometrical method, and show that the latter overestimates the spring constant of the device. (paper)

  3. Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-02-01

    Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

  4. Langston Hughes and his poem “Harlem”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝红

    2005-01-01

    James Langston Hughes was born February 1. 1902, in Joplin, Missouri. His parents divorced when he was a small child, and his father moved to Mexico. He was raised by his Grandmother until he was thirteen, when he moved to Lincoln,Illinois, to live with his mother and her husband, eventually settling in Cleveland, Ohio. It was in I,incoln, Illinois, that Hughes began writing poetry. Following graduation, he spent a year in Mexico and a year at Columbia University. During these years, he held old jobs as an assistant cook, launderer, and a busboy, and traveled to Africa and Europe working as a seaman. In November 1924, he moved to Washington,

  5. 17th Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Phillip (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The 17th Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology (SPRAT XVII) Conference was held September 11-13, 2001, at the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI) in Cleveland, Ohio. The SPRAT conference, hosted by the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center, brought together representatives of the space photovoltaic community from around the world to share the latest advances in space solar technology. This year's conference continued to build on many of the trends shown in SPRAT XVI; the use of new high-efficiency cells for commercial use and the development of novel array concepts such as Boeing's Solar Tile concept. In addition, new information was presented on space environmental interactions with solar arrays.

  6. Multi-objective decision-making under uncertainty: Fuzzy logic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Terry L.

    1995-01-01

    Fuzzy logic allows for quantitative representation of vague or fuzzy objectives, and therefore is well-suited for multi-objective decision-making. This paper presents methods employing fuzzy logic concepts to assist in the decision-making process. In addition, this paper describes software developed at NASA Lewis Research Center for assisting in the decision-making process. Two diverse examples are used to illustrate the use of fuzzy logic in choosing an alternative among many options and objectives. One example is the selection of a lunar lander ascent propulsion system, and the other example is the selection of an aeration system for improving the water quality of the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland, Ohio. The fuzzy logic techniques provided here are powerful tools which complement existing approaches, and therefore should be considered in future decision-making activities.

  7. Healing mysteries: An interview with Howard Hall, PhD, PsyD. Interview by Sheldon Lewis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Dr Howard Hall is an associate professor in the department of pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and an attending doctor in the division of behavioral pediatrics at Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr Hall holds a PhD in Experimental Psychology from Princeton University and a PsyD in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University. He has conducted research and taught courses in clinical and multicultural psychology and maintains a clinical practice using hypnosis and other mind-body approaches to healing at CWRU. Howard Hall has been recognized as a leader in the field of clinical psychoneuroimmunology and conducted pioneering research on the effects of hypnosis on immune responses. In recent years, he has studied energy-based rapid wound healing as demonstrated by Sufi practitioners. Recently, Sheldon Lewis, Editor-in-Chief of Advances in Mind-Body Medicine, spoke with Dr Hall about his work. PMID:20671340

  8. Compilation and Analysis of 20- and 30-GHz Rain Fade Events at the ACTS NASA Ground Station: Statistics and Model Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    Since the beginning of the operational phase of the NASA Research Center's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS), signal-fade measurements have been recorded at the NASA Ground Station located in Cleveland, Ohio, with the use of the 20- and 30-GHz beacon signals. Compilations of the daily data have been statistically analyzed on a monthly and yearly basis. Such analyses have yielded relevant parameters as (1) cumulative monthly and yearly probability distributions of signal attenuation by rain, (2) attenuation duration versus attenuation threshold probabilities, and (3) rate-of-fade probabilities. Not only are such data needed for a realistic data base to support the design and performance analysis of future satellite systems, but they are necessary to assess predictions made with the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model.

  9. CFD Modeling of Free-Piston Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Gedeon, David; Simon, Terrence W.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is funding Cleveland State University (CSU) to develop a reliable Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code that can predict engine performance with the goal of significant improvements in accuracy when compared to one-dimensional (1-D) design code predictions. The funding also includes conducting code validation experiments at both the University of Minnesota (UMN) and CSU. In this paper a brief description of the work-in-progress is provided in the two areas (CFD and Experiments). Also, previous test results are compared with computational data obtained using (1) a 2-D CFD code obtained from Dr. Georg Scheuerer and further developed at CSU and (2) a multidimensional commercial code CFD-ACE+. The test data and computational results are for (1) a gas spring and (2) a single piston/cylinder with attached annular heat exchanger. The comparisons among the codes are discussed. The paper also discusses plans for conducting code validation experiments at CSU and UMN.

  10. Implementation of a virtual link between power system testbeds at Marshall Spaceflight Center and Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreswamy, Rajiv

    1990-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) owns and operates a space station module power management and distribution (SSM-PMAD) testbed. This system, managed by expert systems, is used to analyze and develop power system automation techniques for Space Station Freedom. The Lewis Research Center (LeRC), Cleveland, Ohio, has developed and implemented a space station electrical power system (EPS) testbed. This system and its power management controller are representative of the overall Space Station Freedom power system. A virtual link is being implemented between the testbeds at MSFC and LeRC. This link would enable configuration of SSM-PMAD as a load center for the EPS testbed at LeRC. This connection will add to the versatility of both systems, and provide an environment of enhanced realism for operation of both testbeds.

  11. LANDSAT monitoring of Lake Erie for phycocyanin content in cyanobacteria blooms from 06/2006-10/2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Robert

    An algorithm for mapping phycocyanin content (PC) in lake water from LANDSAT TM satellite data was derived in the past from Western Lake Erie data for July 1, 2000, and found to be robust when applied to a withheld LANDSAT TM and in situ water data set for September 27, 2000 (Vincent et al, 2004). This same algorithm was applied to LANDSAT 5 data of Path 20 Row 31 (Toledo Frame) and Path 19 Row 31 (Cleveland Frame) in Western Lake Erie on overpass dates with less than 30 This work was funded by NOAA Contract Award NA06OAR4600197. Reference Vincent, R.K., X. Qin, R. M. L. McKay, J.Miner, K. Czajkowski, J. Savino, and T. Bridgeman, Phycocyanin Detection from LANDSAT TM Data for Mapping Cyanobacterial Blooms in Lake Erie, Remote Sensing of Environment, Vol. 89, No. 3, pp 381-392, 2004.

  12. Advanced sleep phase in adolescents born preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Anna Maria; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Rosen, Carol; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E; Taveras, Elsie M; Redline, Susan

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate whether sleep patterns and quality differed between adolescents born preterm and term, and to further explore whether differences in sleep patterns were explained by differences in mediating factors such as mood, behavior, or socioeconomic status. Five hundred and one 16- to 19-year-old children in the longitudinal Cleveland Children's Sleep and Health Study cohort underwent overnight polysomnography (PSG), wore wrist actigraphs, and completed sleep logs for 1 week. The modified Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale, and the Adolescent Sleep-Wake Scale were used to further assess sleep. Adolescents born preterm demonstrated significantly (p parenting styles on children's sleep. PMID:24283662

  13. 拉丁语对古英语词汇的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白伟峰

    2012-01-01

      According to the 19th century histories of the English language, Latin influences upon early English vocabulary are considered to be classified into two periods, including continental borrowing and the Christianizing of Britain. From the points of views of Earl R. Anderson, a professor of Cleveland State University, words borrowed from Latin into Continental Germanic before the fifth century A.D. mostly belong to the semantic fields of commerce and military activity; words borrowed during the seventh century, when the Anglo-Saxons gradually adopted Christianity, mostly belong to the semantic fields of religion, literacy and education, etc. This article tries to analyze how Latin influences Old English vocabulary in various ways respectively.

  14. Astronomy in the Digital Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, Bernard M.; Lindblom, J.; Terzian, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Digital Universe is an Internet project whose mission is to provide free, accurate, unbiased information covering all aspects of human knowledge, and to inspire humans to learn, make use of, and expand this knowledge. It is planned to be a decades long effort, inspired by the Encyclopedia Galactica concept popularized by Carl Sagan, and is being developed by the non-profit Digital Universe Foundation. A worldwide network of experts is responsible for selecting content featured within the Digital Universe. The first publicly available content is the Encyclopedia of Earth, a Boston University project headed by Prof. Cutler Cleveland, which will be part of the Earth Portal. The second major content area will be an analogous Encyclopedia of the Cosmos to be part of the Cosmos Portal. It is anticipated that this will evolve into a major resource for astronomy education. Authors and topic editors are now being recruited for the Encyclopedia of the Cosmos.

  15. Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, James M.; Hall, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To help increase the capacity and efficiency of the nation s airports, a secure wideband wireless communications system is proposed for use on the airport surface. This paper provides an overview of the research and development process for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). AeroMACS is based on a specific commercial profile of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 standard known as Wireless Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access or WiMAX (WiMax Forum). The paper includes background on the need for global interoperability in air/ground data communications, describes potential AeroMACS applications, addresses allocated frequency spectrum constraints, summarizes the international standardization process, and provides findings and recommendations from the world s first AeroMACS prototype implemented in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

  16. Conflict Probe Concepts Analysis in Support of Free Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Anthony W.; Schwab, Robert W.; Geels, Timothy J.; Shakarian, Arek

    1997-01-01

    This study develops an operational concept and requirements for en route Free Flight using a simulation of the Cleveland Air Route Traffic Control Center, and develops requirements for an automated conflict probe for use in the Air Traffic Control (ATC) Centers. In this paper, we present the results of simulation studies and summarize implementation concepts and infrastructure requirements to transition from the current air traffic control system to mature Free Right. The transition path to Free Flight envisioned in this paper assumes an orderly development of communications, navigation, and surveillance (CNS) technologies based on results from our simulation studies. The main purpose of this study is to provide an overall context and methodology for evaluating airborne and ground-based requirements for cooperative development of the future ATC system.

  17. Engines and innovation: Lewis Laboratory and American propulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Virginia Parker

    1991-01-01

    This book is an institutional history of the NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1940, when Congress authorized funding for a third laboratory for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, through the 1980s. The history of the laboratory is discussed in relation to the development of American propulsion technology, with particular focus on the transition in the 1940s from the use of piston engines in airplanes to jet propulsion and that from air-breathing engines to rocket technology when the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958. The personalities and research philosophies of the people who shaped the history of the laboratory are discussed, as is the relationship of Lewis Research Center to the Case Institute of Technology.

  18. Overview 2004 of NASA Stirling-Convertor CFD-Model Development and Regenerator R&D Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy C.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Demko, Rikako

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on accomplishments in 2004 in development of Stirling-convertor CFD model at NASA GRC and via a NASA grant, a Stirling regenerator-research effort being conducted via a NASA grant (a follow-on effort to an earlier DOE contract), and a regenerator-microfabrication contract for development of a "next-generation Stirling regenerator." Cleveland State University is the lead organization for all three grant/contractual efforts, with the University of Minnesota and Gedeor Associates as subcontractors. Also, the Stirling Technology Co. and Sunpower, Inc. are both involved in all three efforts, either as funded or unfunded participants. International Mezzo Technologies of Baton Rouge, LA is the regenerator fabricator for the regenerator-microfabrication contract. Results of the efforts in these three areas are summarized.

  19. Differential patient-caregiver opinions of treatment and care for advanced lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Amy Y; Zyzanski, Stephen J; Siminoff, Laura A

    2010-04-01

    This study examined the differences of opinion between cancer patients and caregivers with regard to treatment and care decisions. 184 advanced lung cancer patients and 171 primary caregivers were recruited as a convenience sample from hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio. A telephone interview was conducted to collect data using a semi-structured questionnaire. Nonparametric tests and regression analysis were performed. The findings showed that patients and caregivers reported significant disagreement on three main issues: trade-off between treatment side effects and benefits; reporting treatment side effects to physicians, and hospice care. Caregivers were more concerned about patient's quality of life and more willing to discuss hospice issues than were patients (p caregivers (p caregiver disagreement about treatment and care decisions and its significant adverse impact on both patients and caregivers. PMID:20137849

  20. Management and outcomes for patients with TTP: analysis of 100 cases at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Shruti; Carcioppolo, Desiree; Zhang, Li; McCrae, Keith R

    2013-07-01

    The advent of plasma exchange has led to a dramatic improvement in the survival of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), though approximately 10% of patients still die and a third suffer relapses. Clinical features that identify poor risk patients have not been clearly identified. We reviewed 100 patients who were treated for a first episode of TTP at the Cleveland Clinic between 2000 and 2012 to identify factors predictive of poor outcomes. On multivariate analysis, increasing age, especially age > 60 (RR: 7.08, 95% CI: 2.15-23.39, P = 0.002), severe neurological symptoms at presentation (RR: 18.37, 95% CI: I4.19-80.13, P  5% was an independent predictor of adverse renal outcomes (need for dialysis and progression to chronic kidney disease). These variables may be useful for risk stratification and identification of patients who could potentially benefit from early institution of adjunctive therapy. PMID:23605996

  1. Forensic Evidence in Homicide Investigations and Prosecutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Tom; Regoeczi, Wendy

    2015-09-01

    Even though forensic evidence is collected at virtually every homicide scene, only a few studies have examined its role in investigation and prosecution. This article adds to the literature by providing the results of a study of 294 homicide cases (315 victims) occurring in Cleveland, Ohio, between 2008 and 2011. Through a logistic regression on open versus closed cases, the collection of knives, administration of gunshot residue (GSR) kits, and clothing at the scene were positively and significantly related to case closures, while collection of ballistics evidence and DNA evidence were statistically significant in the opposite direction. With regard to analysis, the clearance rate for cases with probative results (i.e., matches or exclusions) was 63.1% compared to a closure rate of 56.3% for cases without probative results. However, only 23 cases had probative results prior to arrest compared to 128 cases with probative results after arrest. PMID:26174557

  2. If we build it, we will come: a model for community-led change to transform neighborhood conditions to support healthy eating and active living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Vedette R; Seeholzer, Eileen L; Leon, Janeen B; Chappelle, Sandra Byrd; Sehgal, Ashwini R

    2015-06-01

    Neighborhoods affect health. In 3 adjoining inner-city Cleveland, Ohio, neighborhoods, residents have an average life expectancy 15 years less than that of a nearby suburb. To address this disparity, a local health funder created the 2010 to 2013 Francis H. Beam Community Health Fellowship to develop a strategic community engagement process to establish a Healthy Eating & Active Living (HEAL) culture and lifestyle in the neighborhoods. The fellow developed and advanced a model, engaging the community in establishing HEAL options and culture. Residents used the model to identify a shared vision for HEAL and collaborated with community partners to create and sustain innovative HEAL opportunities. This community-led, collaborative model produced high engagement levels (15% of targeted 12 000 residents) and tangible improvements in the neighborhood's physical, resource, and social environments. PMID:25880943

  3. NASA Lunar Dust Filtration and Separations Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Stocker, Dennis P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a 2.5-day workshop, entitled "NASA Lunar Dust Filtration and Separations Workshop" at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio, on November 18 to 20, 2008. The purpose of the workshop was to address the issues and challenges of particulate matter removal from the cabin atmospheres in the Altair lunar lander, lunar habitats, and in pressurized rovers. The presence of lunar regolith dust inside the pressurized volumes was a theme of particular interest. The workshop provided an opportunity for NASA, industry experts, and academia to identify and discuss the capabilities of current and developing air and gas particulate matter filtration and separations technologies as they may apply to NASA s needs. A goal of the workshop was to provide recommendations for strategic research areas in cabin atmospheric particulate matter removal and disposal technologies that will advance and/or supplement the baseline approach for these future lunar surface exploration missions.

  4. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2, (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 4 to the Safety Evaluation Report on the application filed by the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company on behalf of itself and as agent for the Duquesne Light Company, the Ohio Edison Company, the Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company (the Central Area Power Coordination Group or CAPCO), as applicants and owners, for a license to operate the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-440 and 50-441), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Lake County, Ohio. This supplement reports the status of certain issues that had not been resolved at the time of publication of the Safety Evaluation Report and Supplement Nos. 1, 2 and 3 to that report

  5. Enhancing the US Power Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Alexander

    2010-05-31

    The primary motivation for this set of research activities was to develop a foundation in several aspects of power in order to position Cleveland State University to lead a multiuniversity effort to secure funding for enhanced power system projects and to be able to eventually secure a NASA Space Power Systems Center status through the competitive bidding process. This was accomplished by focusing on these major project areas, (1) the design of the next generation nuclear-electric power generation system, (2) the design of a distributed, fault-tolerant, and modular power system, and (3) the development of the dynamics and control of active magnetic bearings for flywheel energy storage without using conventional sensors.

  6. Coptotermes gestroi (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in Brazil: possible origins inferred by mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C; Fontes, L R; Bueno, O C; Martins, V G

    2010-09-01

    The Asian subterranean termite, Coptotermes gestroi, originally from northeast India through Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Indonesian archipelago, is a major termite pest introduced in several countries around the world, including Brazil. We sequenced the mitochondrial COII gene from individuals representing 23 populations. Phylogenetic analysis of COII gene sequences from this and other studies resulted in two main groups: (1) populations of Cleveland (USA) and four populations of Malaysia and (2) populations of Brazil, four populations of Malaysia, and one population from each of Thailand, Puerto Rico, and Key West (USA). Three new localities are reported here, considerably enlarging the distribution of C. gestroi in Brazil: Campo Grande (state of Mato Grosso do Sul), Itajaí (state of Santa Catarina), and Porto Alegre (state of Rio Grande do Sul). PMID:20924414

  7. Rorschach assessment of psychological functioning in sexually abused girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, M; Shapiro, J P; Martone, M W; Kassem, L

    1991-02-01

    We measured psychological functioning in a group of 79 Black females between the ages of 5 and 16 and a comparison group of nonabused girls using the Rorschach. In addition to Exner's (1985) Comprehensive System, the Elizur (1949) Rorschach Content Test Scale (RCT), the Mutuality of Autonomy Scale (MOA; Urist, 1977; Urist & Shill, 1982), and the Barrier and Penetration Scales (Fisher & Cleveland, 1968) were used. Sexually abused girls were found to show more disturbed thinking, to experience a higher level of stress relative to their adaptive abilities, to describe human relationships more negatively, and to show more preoccupation with sexuality than the comparison group. The distress experienced by the victimized children was more related to internal mediating variables then to abuse characteristics. Sexually abused girls who are cognitively and emotionally active also experienced high levels of distress compared to abused girls who are psychologically constricted. PMID:2002437

  8. Small Engine Technology (SET) Task 24 Business and Regional Aircraft System Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Lysbeth

    2003-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Engines & Systems, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International Inc., documenting work performed during the period June 1999 through December 1999 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Small Engine Technology (SET) Program, Contract No. NAS3-27483, Task Order 24, Business and Regional Aircraft System Studies. The work performed under SET Task 24 consisted of evaluating the noise reduction benefits compared to the baseline noise levels of representative 1992 technology aircraft, obtained by applying different combinations of noise reduction technologies to five business and regional aircraft configurations. This report focuses on the selection of the aircraft configurations and noise reduction technologies, the prediction of noise levels for those aircraft, and the comparison of the noise levels with those of the baseline aircraft.

  9. Radioactivity in surface and coastal waters of the British Isles, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction: discharges of [liquid, solid] radioactive waste; methods of analysis and of presentation and interpretation of results; British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) Sellafield, Cumbria (the fish and shellfish consumption pathway; external exposure; porphyra/ laverbread pathway; other surveys); Springfields, Lancashire; Capenhurst, Cheshire; Chapelcross, Dumfriesshire); United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorset; Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establish-ment, Caithness); nuclear power stations operated by the electricity boards (Berkeley, Gloucestershire and Oldbury, Avon; Bradwell, Essex; Dungeness, Kent; Hartlepool, Cleveland; Heysham, Lancashire; Hinkley Point, Somerset; Hunterston, Ayrshire; Sizewell, Suffolk; Trawsfynydd, Gwynedd; Wylfa, Gwynedd; naval establishments; Amersham International plc; Channel Islands monitoring; summary and conclusions. (U.K.)

  10. Impact of a new condensed toluene mechanism on air quality model predictions in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A new condensed toluene mechanism is incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling system. Model simulations are performed using the CB05 chemical mechanism containing the existing (base and the new toluene mechanism for the western and eastern US for a summer month. With current estimates of tropospheric emission burden, the new toluene mechanism increases monthly mean daily maximum 8-h ozone by 1.0–3.0 ppbv in Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Cleveland, northeastern US, and Detroit compared to that with the base toluene chemistry. It reduces model mean bias for ozone at elevated observed ozone concentrations. While the new mechanism increases predicted ozone, it does not enhance ozone production efficiency. A sensitivity study suggests that it can further enhance ozone if elevated toluene emissions are present. While it increases in-cloud secondary organic aerosol substantially, its impact on total fine particle mass concentration is small.

  11. Impact of a new condensed toluene mechanism on air quality model predictions in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A new condensed toluene mechanism is incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling system. Model simulations are performed using the CB05 chemical mechanism containing the existing (base and the new toluene mechanism for the western and eastern US for a summer month. With current estimates of tropospheric emission burden, the new toluene mechanism increases monthly mean daily maximum 8-h ozone by 1.0–3.0 ppbv in Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Cleveland, northeastern US, and Detroit compared to that with the base toluene chemistry. It reduces model mean bias for ozone at elevated observed ozone mixing ratios. While the new mechanism increases predicted ozone, it does not enhance ozone production efficiency. Sensitivity study suggests that it can further enhance ozone if elevated toluene emissions are present. While changes in total fine particulate mass are small, predictions of in-cloud SOA increase substantially.

  12. Concurrent and Collaborative Engineering Implementation in an R and D Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelRosario, Ruben; Davis, Jose M.; Keys, L. Ken

    2003-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering (CE), and Collaborative Engineering (or Collaborative Product Development - CPD) have emerged as new paradigms with significant impact in the development of new products and processes. With documented and substantiated success in the automotive and technology industries CE and, most recently, CPD are being touted as innovative management philosophies for many other business sectors including Research and De- velopment. This paper introduces two independent research initiatives conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio investigating the application of CE and CPD in an RdiD environment. Since little research has been conducted in the use of CE and CPD in sectors other than the high mass production manufacturing, the objective of these independent studies is to provide a systematic evaluation of the applicability of these paradigms (concur- rent and collaborative) in a low/no production, service environment, in particular R&D.

  13. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on monolithic refractory metal alloys and on metal matrix composites is being conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, in support of advanced space power systems. The overall philosophy of the research is to develop and characterize new high-temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites (Gr/Cu) for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites (W/NB) for fuel containment and structural supports) considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications

  14. Cross-National Applicability of a Parsimonious Measure of Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin

    2016-04-01

    Durvasula and Lysonski's paper presented a shorter version of the Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture Scale (hereafter AGCC), which was developed by Cleveland and Laroche to address scarcity of measurements that determined how individuals acquired and became a part of the emerging global consumer culture. The following critique discusses a few concerns and three major shortcomings of the paper, including skewed sample frame and incorrect choice of countries for assessing cross-national applicability of the scale, not discussing the differences in the means of the seven distinct dimensions of AGCC across the four nations studied by the authors, and absence of any critical review of existing consumer acculturation scales vis-à-vis AGCC. PMID:27154377

  15. Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) Prototype Radio - Generation 2 Flight Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishac, Joseph A.; Iannicca, Dennis C.; Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center conducted a series of flight tests for the purpose of evaluating air-to-ground communications links for future unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). The primary objective of the test effort was to evaluate the transition of the aircraft communications from one ground station to the next, and to monitor data flow during the "hand-off" event. To facilitate the testing, ground stations were installed at locations in Cleveland, Ohio and Albany, Ohio that each provides line-of-sight radio communications with an overflying aircraft. This report describes results from the flight tests including flight parameters, received signal strength measurements, data latency times, and performance observations for the air-to-ground channel.

  16. Large File Transfers from Space Using Multiple Ground Terminals and Delay-Tolerant Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Paulsen, Phillip; Stewart, Dave; Eddy, Wesley; McKim, James; Taylor, John; Lynch, Scott; Heberle, Jay; Northam, James; Jackson, Chris; Wood, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    We use Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) to break control loops between space-ground communication links and ground-ground communication links to increase overall file delivery efficiency, as well as to enable large files to be proactively fragmented and received across multiple ground stations. DTN proactive fragmentation and reactive fragmentation were demonstrated from the UK-DMC satellite using two independent ground stations. The files were reassembled at a bundle agent, located at Glenn Research Center in Cleveland Ohio. The first space-based demonstration of this occurred on September 30 and October 1, 2009. This paper details those experiments. Communication, delay-tolerant networking, DTN, satellite, Internet, protocols, bundle, IP, TCP.

  17. A perspective view of industrial disasters: (was Chernobyl the worst?)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper surveys past industrial disasters and answers the question: ''was Chernobyl the worst?''. The disasters with which Chernobyl is compared are: Oppau, Germany (1921), Cleveland, U.S.A. (1944), Lugwigshafen (1948), Aberfan, U.K. (1966), Seveso, Italy (1976), Three Mile Island, U.S.A., (1979), Mississauga, Canada (1979), Mexico City, Mexico (1984), Bhopal, India (1984) and Basle, Switzerland (1986). Immediate fatalities as a measure of disaster, delayed fatalities, physical injuries as a measure, individual and societal shock, long term public anxiety, disruption of way of life, environmental damage, and property damage and other financial loss, are all discussed. The survey shows that if dominant criteria are those of death and injury then Chernobyl was not the worst. However, if environmental damage, financial loss, creation of public anxiety and disruption of way of life were dominant criteria, then Chernobyl could be rated the worst. (UK)

  18. Thermal Analysis of Cryogenic Hydrogen Liquid Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congiardo, Jared F.; Fortier, Craig R. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    During launch for the new Space Launch System (SLS) liquid hydrogen is bleed through the engines during replenish, pre-press, and extended pre-press to condition the engines prior to launch. The predicted bleed flow rates are larger than for the shuttle program. A consequence of the increased flow rates is having liquif hydrogen in the vent system, which the facilities was never designed to handle. To remedy the problem a liquid separator is being designed in the system to accumulated the liquid propellant and protect the facility flare stack (which can only handle gas). The attached document is a presentation of the current thermalfluid analysis performed for the separator and will be presented at the Thermal and Fluid Analysis Workshop (NASA workshop) next week in Cleveland, Ohio.

  19. US Department of Energy first annual clean coal technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first public review of the US DOE/Industry co-funded program to demonstrate the commercial readiness of Clean Coal Technologies (CCT) was held at Cleveland, Ohio Sept. 22--24, 1992. The objectives were to provide electric utilities, independent power producers, and potential foreign users information on the DOE-supported CCT projects including status, results, and technology performance potential; to further understanding of the institutional, financial, and technical considerations in applying CCTs to Clean Air Act compliance strategies; to discuss to export market, financial and institutional assistance, and the roles of government and industry in pursuing exports of CCTs; and to facilitate meetings between domestic and international attendees to maximize export opportunities

  20. Encyclopedia of Energy. Six-Volume Set, 1-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, C. [Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Boston University, Boston (United States); Ayres, R. [INSEAD, Fontainebleau (France); Costanza, R. [University of Vermont, Vermont (United States); Goldemberg, J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ilic, M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Carnegie (United States); Jochem, E. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, R. [Boston University, Boston (United States); Lovins, A. [Rocky Mountain Institute, Colorado (United States); Munasinghe, M. [Munasinghe Institute of Development, Colombo (Sri Lanka); Pachauri, R. [Tata Energy Research Institute, New Delhi (India); Pardo, C. [Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan (Mexico); Peterson, P. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Schipper, L. [World Resources Institute, Washington, DC (United States); Slade, M. [Warwick University, Coventry (United Kingdom); Smil, V. [University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada); Worrell, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)] (eds.)

    2004-03-01

    An invaluable resource for all academics, researchers and students either working in or conducting research in the energy and related environmental fields. In recent years, our usage and understanding of different types of energy has grown at a tremendous rate. The editor-in-chief, Cutler Cleveland and his international team of associate editors have brought together approximately 400 authors, to produce the Encyclopedia of Energy. This highly topical reference draws together all aspects of energy, covering a wealth of areas throughout the natural, social and engineering sciences. The Encyclopedia of Energy will provide easily accessible information about all aspects of energy, with articles written by leading international authorities. It will not only be indispensable for students and researchers, but also for policy makers, energy and environmental consultants, and all those working in business corporations and non-governmental organisations whose activities relate to energy and the environment.

  1. Periocular granuloma annulare: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Katherine; Bhalla, Rohan; Mesinkovska, Natasha A; Piliang, Melissa P; Tamburro, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a granulomatous dermatosis that rarely presents on the face and is extremely uncommon in the periocular region. We report our experience with the presentation and management of GA lesions on the eyelids of a 17-year-old girl. We performed a review of published literature and identified 13 cases of pediatric periocular GA. One additional case was identified upon review of all pediatric GA cases at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Review of these cases suggests that periocular GA is a benign condition that spontaneously regresses within a few months. GA nodules have a predilection for the upper eyelids. A greater incidence is noted in African American children. Awareness of the self-resolving nature of this condition can prevent unnecessary surgical excisions in affected children. PMID:23551387

  2. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel NH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nirali H Patel,1 Sarah K Romero,2 David C Kaelber31Division of Emergency Medicine, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, OH, USA; 2Division of Emergency Medicine, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Departments of Information Services, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, The MetroHealth System and School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: Hypertension (HTN in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%-5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1 safely lower blood pressure, and (2 treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3 identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8

  3. Natalizumab for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Rudick

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Richard A Rudick1, Michael A Panzara21Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Biogen Idec, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USAAbstract: Natalizumab is an α4-integrin antagonist approved as monotherapy for patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS, based on demonstrated efficacy in the pivotal AFFIRM study (N = 942. Natalizumab monotherapy reduced risk of disability progression by 42%–54% and annualized relapse rate by 68% during a period of 2 years. Natalizumab was also associated with significant reductions in number of T2-hyperintense, gadolinium-enhancing, and T1-hypointense lesions and in volume of T2-hyperintense lesions (all p < 0.001 on magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, natalizumab-treated patients in AFFIRM experienced significant improvements from baseline in the physical and mental components of the Short Form-36 (p ≤ 0.01 and a 35% reduction in risk of clinically significant vision loss (p = 0.008 vs placebo. Natalizumab was well tolerated in phase 3 studies. Common adverse events were generally mild and included headache, fatigue, urinary tract infections, and arthralgia. Serious adverse events were similar between treatment groups. The incidence of serious hypersensitivity reactions associated with natalizumab was <1%. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy was a rare complication of treatment, observed in 2 patients with MS who received natalizumab plus interferon β-1a. The robust clinical benefits of natalizumab, including benefits on patient-reported quality of life, make it an important addition to disease-modifying therapies available to patients with relapsing MS.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, natalizumab, α4-integrin antagonist

  4. Using MODIS data for understanding changes in seagrass meadow health: a case study in the Great Barrier Reef (Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petus, Caroline; Collier, Catherine; Devlin, Michelle; Rasheed, Michael; McKenna, Skye

    2014-07-01

    Stretching more than 2000 km along the Queensland coast, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBR) shelters over 43,000 square km of seagrass meadows. Despite the status of marine protected area and World Heritage listing of the GBR, local seagrass meadows are under stress from reduced water quality levels; with reduction in the amount of light available for seagrass photosynthesis defined as the primary cause of seagrass loss throughout the GBR. Methods have been developed to map GBR plume water types by using MODIS quasi-true colour (hereafter true colour) images reclassified in function of their dominant colour. These data can be used as an interpretative tool for understanding changes in seagrass meadow health (as defined in this study by the seagrass area and abundance) at different spatial and temporal scales. We tested this method in Cleveland Bay, in the northern GBR, where substantial loss in seagrass area and biomass was detected by annual monitoring from 2007 to 2011. A strong correlation was found between bay-wide seagrass meadow area and biomass and exposure to turbid Primary (sediment-dominated) water type. There was also a strong correlation between the changes of biomass and area of individual meadows and exposure of seagrass ecosystems to Primary water type over the 5-year period. Seagrass meadows were also grouped according to the dominant species within each meadow, irrespective of location within Cleveland Bay. These consolidated community types did not correlate well with the exposure to Primary water type, and this is likely to be due to local environmental conditions with the individual meadows that comprise these groupings. This study proved that remote sensing data provide the synoptic window and repetitivity required to investigate changes in water quality conditions over time. Remote sensing data provide an opportunity to investigate the risk of marine-coastal ecosystems to light limitation due to increased water turbidity when in situ

  5. Insights into an Award-Winning Summer Internship Program: The First Six Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashou, Anthony; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2016-01-01

    Since its inception in 2008, the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program in reproductive research and writing has trained 114 students from 23 states within the United States and 10 countries worldwide. Its fundamental goal is to inspire pre-medical and medical students to embrace a career as a physician-scientist. During this intensive course, established scientists and clinicians train interns in the essential principles and fundamental concepts of bench research and scientific writing. Over the first six years (2008~2013), interns have collectively published 98 research articles and performed 12 bench research projects on current and emerging topics in reproductive medicine. Interns have also developed and honed valuable soft skills including time management, communication and presentation skills, as well as life values, which all enhance personal and professional satisfaction. Program graduates are able to recognize the value of medical research and its potential to impact patient care and gain insight into their own career pathway. Between 2011 and 2014, the internship program was thrice awarded a Scholarship in Teaching Award by Case Western Reserve School of Medicine for its innovative teaching approach and positive impact on medical education and student careers. This report highlights the demographics, logistics, implementation, feedback, and results of the first six years of the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, OH, USA). This may be helpful to other research and academic institutions considering implementing a similar program. In addition, it creates awareness among potential physician-scientists of what the world of research has to offer in both scientific writing and bench research. Finally, it may stimulate further discussion regarding narrowing the gap between physicians and scientists and refinement of the current program. PMID:27169124

  6. "We Freeze to Please": A History of NASA's Icing Research Tunnel and the Quest for Flight Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, William M.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of ice on wings and other control surfaces of airplanes is one of the oldest and most vexing problems that aircraft engineers and scientists continue to face. While no easy, comprehensive answers exist, the staff at NASAs Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at the Glenn Research Center in Cleveland has done pioneering work to make flight safer for experimental, commercial, and military customers. The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) initiated government research on aircraft icing in the 1930s at its Langley facility in Virginia. Icing research shifted to the NACA's Cleveland facility in the 1940s. Initially there was little focus on icing at either location, as these facilities were more concerned with aerodynamics and engine development. With several high-profile fatal crashes of air mail carriers, however, the NACA soon realized the need for a leading research facility devoted to icing prevention and removal. The IRT began operation in 1944 and, despite renovations and periodic attempts to shut it down, has continued to function productively for almost 60 years. In part because icing has proved so problematic over time, IRT researchers have been unusually open-minded in experimenting with a wide variety of substances, devices, and techniques. Early icing prevention experiments involved grease, pumping hot engine exhaust onto the wings, glycerin soap, mechanical and inflatable "boots," and even corn syrup. The IRT staff also looked abroad for ideas and later tried a German and Soviet technique of electromagnetism, to no avail. More recently, European polymer fluids have been more promising. The IRT even periodically had "amateur nights" in which a dentist's coating for children's teeth proved unequal to the demands of super-cooled water droplets blown at 100 miles per hour. Despite many research dead-ends, IRT researchers have achieved great success over the years. They have developed important computer models, such as the LEWICE software

  7. The NASA Lewis Research Center: An Economic Impact Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), established in 1941, is one of ten NASA research centers in the country. It is situated on 350 acres of land in Cuyahoga County and occupies more than 140 buildings and over 500 specialized research and test facilities. Most of LeRC's facilities are located in the City of Cleveland; some are located within the boundaries of the cities of Fairview Park and Brookpark. LeRC is a lead center for NASA's research, technology, and development in the areas of aeropropulsion and selected space applications. It is a center of excellence for turbomachinery, microgravity fluid and combustion research, and commercial communication. The base research and technology disciplines which serve both aeronautics and space areas include materials and structures, instrumentation and controls, fluid physics, electronics, and computational fluid dynamics. This study investigates LeRC's economic impact on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures LeRC's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they 'ripple' throughout the economy. To fully explain LeRC's overall impact on the region, its contributions in the areas of technology transfer and education are also examined. The study uses a highly credible and widely accepted research methodology. First, regional economic multipliers based on input-output models were used to estimate the effect of LERC spending on the Northeast Ohio economy. Second, the economic models were complemented by interviews with industrial, civic, and university leaders to qualitatively assess LeRC's impact in the areas of technology transfer and education.

  8. Bringing the Future Within Reach: Celebrating 75 Years of the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, has been making the future for 75 years. The center's work with aircraft engines, high-energy fuels, communications technology, electric propulsion, energy conversion and storage, and materials and structures has been, and continues to be, crucial to both the Agency and the region. Glenn has partnered with industry, universities, and other agencies to continually advance technologies that are propelling the nation's aerospace community into the future. Nonetheless these continued accomplishments would not be possible without the legacy of our first three decades of research, which led to over one hundred R&D 100 Awards, three Robert J. Collier Trophies, and an Emmy. Glenn, which is located in Cleveland, Ohio, is 1 of 10 NASA field centers, and 1 of only 3 that stem from an earlier research organization-the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Glenn began operation in 1942 as the NACA Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory (AERL). In 1947 the NACA renamed the lab the Flight Propulsion Laboratory to reflect the expansion of the research. In September 1948, following the death of the NACA's Director of Aeronautics, George Lewis, the NACA rededicated the lab as the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. On 1 October 1958, the lab was incorporated into the new NASA space agency and was renamed the NASA Lewis Research Center. Following John Glenn's return to space on the space shuttle, on 1 March 1999 the center name was changed once again, becoming the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center.

  9. Insights into an Award-Winning Summer Internship Program: The First Six Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashou, Anthony; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in 2008, the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program in reproductive research and writing has trained 114 students from 23 states within the United States and 10 countries worldwide. Its fundamental goal is to inspire pre-medical and medical students to embrace a career as a physician-scientist. During this intensive course, established scientists and clinicians train interns in the essential principles and fundamental concepts of bench research and scientific writing. Over the first six years (2008~2013), interns have collectively published 98 research articles and performed 12 bench research projects on current and emerging topics in reproductive medicine. Interns have also developed and honed valuable soft skills including time management, communication and presentation skills, as well as life values, which all enhance personal and professional satisfaction. Program graduates are able to recognize the value of medical research and its potential to impact patient care and gain insight into their own career pathway. Between 2011 and 2014, the internship program was thrice awarded a Scholarship in Teaching Award by Case Western Reserve School of Medicine for its innovative teaching approach and positive impact on medical education and student careers. This report highlights the demographics, logistics, implementation, feedback, and results of the first six years of the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, OH, USA). This may be helpful to other research and academic institutions considering implementing a similar program. In addition, it creates awareness among potential physician-scientists of what the world of research has to offer in both scientific writing and bench research. Finally, it may stimulate further discussion regarding narrowing the gap between physicians and scientists and refinement of the current program. PMID:27169124

  10. Evolution of transversus abdominis plane infiltration techniques for postsurgical analgesia following abdominal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadsden J

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Gadsden,1 Sabry Ayad,2 Jeffrey J Gonzales,3 Jaideep Mehta,4 Jan Boublik,5 Jacob Hutchins6,7 1Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3Department of Anesthesiology, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, CO, 4Department of Anesthesiology, UT Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, 5Department of Anesthesiology, NYU Langone Medical Center – Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY, 6Department of Anesthesiology, 7Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP infiltration is a regional anesthesia technique that has been demonstrated to be effective for management of postsurgical pain after abdominal surgery. There are several different clinical variations in the approaches used for achieving analgesia via TAP infiltration, and methods for identification of the TAP have evolved considerably since the landmark-guided technique was first described in 2001. There are many factors that impact the analgesic outcomes following TAP infiltration, and the various nuances of this technique have led to debate regarding procedural classification of TAP infiltration. Based on our current understanding of fascial and neuronal anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall, as well as available evidence from studies assessing local anesthetic spread and cutaneous sensory block following TAP infiltration, it is clear that TAP infiltration techniques are appropriately classified as field blocks. While the objective of peripheral nerve block and TAP infiltration are similar in that both approaches block sensory response in order to achieve analgesia, the technical components of the two procedures are different. Unlike peripheral nerve block, which involves identification or stimulation of a specific nerve or nerve plexus, followed by

  11. Modifying the Bank Erosion Hazard Index (BEHI) protocol for rapid assessment of streambank erosion in northeastern Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sara E; Drenten, Deanna M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the source of pollution in a stream is vital to preserving, restoring, and maintaining the stream's function and habitat it provides. Sediments from highly eroding streambanks are a major source of pollution in a stream system and have the potential to jeopardize habitat, infrastructure, and stream function. Watershed management practices throughout the Cleveland Metroparks attempt to locate and inventory the source and rate the risk of potential streambank erosion to assist in formulating effect stream, riparian, and habitat management recommendations. The Bank Erosion Hazard Index (BEHI), developed by David Rosgen of Wildland Hydrology is a fluvial geomorphic assessment procedure used to evaluate the susceptibility of potential streambank erosion based on a combination of several variables that are sensitive to various processes of erosion. This protocol can be time consuming, difficult for non-professionals, and confined to specific geomorphic regions. To address these constraints and assist in maintaining consistency and reducing user bias, modifications to this protocol include a "Pre-Screening Questionnaire", elimination of the Study Bank-Height Ratio metric including the bankfull determination, and an adjusted scoring system. This modified protocol was used to assess several high priority streams within the Cleveland Metroparks. The original BEHI protocol was also used to confirm the results of the modified BEHI protocol. After using the modified assessment in the field, and comparing it to the original BEHI method, the two were found to produce comparable BEHI ratings of the streambanks, while significantly reducing the amount of time and resources needed to complete the modified protocol. PMID:25742064

  12. Targeting the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in glioblastoma: the emerging role of MET signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JK

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Ku Lee,1,2,* Kyeung Min Joo,3 Jeongwu Lee,4 Yeup Yoon,5,* Do-Hyun Nam2,5 1Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 3Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 4Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 5Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common human primary brain malignancy and has a dismal prognosis. Aggressive treatments using maximal surgical resection, radiotherapy, and temozolomide result in median survival of only 14.6 months in patients with GBM. Numerous clinical approaches using small molecule inhibitors have shown disappointing results because of the genetic heterogeneity of GBM. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a crucial biological process occurring in the early development stages of many species. However, cancer cells often obtain the ability to invade and metastasize through the EMT, which triggers the scattering of cells. The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/MET signaling pathway is indicative of the EMT during both embryogenesis and the invasive growth of tumors, because HGF potently induces mesenchymal transition in epithelial-driven cells. Activation of MET signaling or co-overexpression of HGF and MET frequently represents aggressive growth and poor prognosis of various cancers, including GBM. Thus, efforts to treat cancers by inhibiting MET signaling using neutralizing antibodies or small molecule inhibitors have progressed during the last decade. In this review, we discuss HGF/MET signaling in the development of diseases

  13. A web implementation: the good and the not-so-good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsneider, C; Piraino, D; Fuerst, M

    2001-06-01

    E-commerce, e-mail, e-greeting, e-this, and e-that everywhere you turn there is a new "e" word for an internet or Web application. We, at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, have been "e-nlightened" and will discuss in this report the implementation of a web-based radiology information system (RIS) in our radiology division or "e-radiology" division. The application, IDXRad Version 10.0 from IDX Corp, Burlington, VT, is in use at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and has both intranet (for use in Radiology) and internet (referring physician viewing) modules. We will concentrate on the features of using a web browser for the application's front-end, including easy prototyping for screen review, easier mock-ups of demonstrations by vendors and developers, and easier training as more people become web-addicted. Project communication can be facilitated with an internal project web page, and use of the web browser can accommodate quicker turnaround of software upgrades as the software code is centrally located. Compared with other technologies, including client/server, there is a smaller roll out cost when using a standard web browser. However, the new technology requires a change and changes are never implemented without challenges. A seasoned technologist using a legacy system can enter data quicker using function keys than using a graphical user interface and pointing and clicking through a series of pop-up windows. Also, effective use of a web browser depends on intuitive design for it to be easily implemented and accepted by the user. Some software packages will not work on both of the popular web browsers and then are tailored to specific release levels. As computer-based patient records become a standard, patient confidentiality must be enforced. The technical design and application security features that support the web-based software package will be discussed. Also web technologies have their own implementation issues. PMID:11442081

  14. A nomogram to predict the probability of passing the American Board of Internal Medicine examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Brateanu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background : Although the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM certification is valued as a reflection of physicians’ experience, education, and expertise, limited methods exist to predict performance in the examination. Purpose : The objective of this study was to develop and validate a predictive tool based on variables common to all residency programs, regarding the probability of an internal medicine graduate passing the ABIM certification examination. Methods : The development cohort was obtained from the files of the Cleveland Clinic internal medicine residents who began training between 2004 and 2008. A multivariable logistic regression model was built to predict the ABIM passing rate. The model was represented as a nomogram, which was internally validated with bootstrap resamples. The external validation was done retrospectively on a cohort of residents who graduated from two other independent internal medicine residency programs between 2007 and 2011. Results : Of the 194 Cleveland Clinic graduates used for the nomogram development, 175 (90.2% successfully passed the ABIM certification examination. The final nomogram included four predictors: In-Training Examination (ITE scores in postgraduate year (PGY 1, 2, and 3, and the number of months of overnight calls in the last 6 months of residency. The nomogram achieved a concordance index (CI of 0.98 after correcting for over-fitting bias and allowed for the determination of an estimated probability of passing the ABIM exam. Of the 126 graduates from two other residency programs used for external validation, 116 (92.1% passed the ABIM examination. The nomogram CI in the external validation cohort was 0.94, suggesting outstanding discrimination. Conclusions : A simple user-friendly predictive tool, based on readily available data, was developed to predict the probability of passing the ABIM exam for internal medicine residents. This may guide program directors’ decision

  15. Implementing change in respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K

    2010-06-01

    Though people are generally averse to change, change and innovation are critically important in respiratory care to maintain scientific and clinical progress. This paper reviews the issue of change in respiratory care. I summarize several available models of organizational and personal change (ie, those of Kotter and of Silversin and Kornacki, and the Intentional Change Theory of Boyatzis), review the characteristics of change-avid respiratory therapy departments, offer an example of a change effort in respiratory care (implementation of respiratory care protocols) and then analyze this change effort as it took place at one institution, the Cleveland Clinic, using these models. Finally, I present the results of an analysis of change-avid respiratory therapy departments and offer some suggestions regarding change management for the profession and for individual respiratory care clinicians. Common features of theories of organizational change include developing a sense of urgency, overcoming resistance, developing a guiding coalition, and involving key stakeholders early. With the understanding that change efforts may seem unduly "clean" and orderly in retrospect, the models help explain the sustainable success of efforts to implement the Respiratory Therapy Consult Service at the Cleveland Clinic. By implication, these models offer value in planning change efforts prospectively. Further analysis of features of change-avid respiratory therapy departments indicates 11 highly desired features, of which four that especially characterize change-avid departments include: having an up-to-date leadership team; employee involvement in change; celebrating wins; and an overall sense of progressiveness in the department. This analysis suggests that understanding and embracing change is important. To anchor change in our profession, greater attention should be given to developing a pipeline of respiratory care clinicians who, by virtue of their advanced training, have the skills

  16. Zero-Gravity Locomotion Simulators: New Ground-Based Analogs for Microgravity Exercise Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perusek, Gail P.; DeWitt, John K.; Cavanagh, Peter R.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Gilkey, Kelly M.

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining health and fitness in crewmembers during space missions is essential for preserving performance for mission-critical tasks. NASA's Exercise Countermeasures Project (ECP) provides space exploration exercise hardware and monitoring requirements that lead to devices that are reliable, meet medical, vehicle, and habitat constraints, and use minimal vehicle and crew resources. ECP will also develop and validate efficient exercise prescriptions that minimize daily time needed for completion of exercise yet maximize performance for mission activities. In meeting these mission goals, NASA Glenn Research Center (Cleveland, OH, USA), in collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio, USA), has developed a suite of zero-gravity locomotion simulators and associated technologies to address the need for ground-based test analog capability for simulating in-flight (microgravity) and surface (partial-gravity) exercise to advance the health and safety of astronaut crews and the next generation of space explorers. Various research areas can be explored. These include improving crew comfort during exercise, and understanding joint kinematics and muscle activation pattern differences relative to external loading mechanisms. In addition, exercise protocol and hardware optimization can be investigated, along with characterizing system dynamic response and the physiological demand associated with advanced exercise device concepts and performance of critical mission tasks for Exploration class missions. Three zero-gravity locomotion simulators are currently in use and the research focus for each will be presented. All of the devices are based on a supine subject suspension system, which simulates a reduced gravity environment by completely or partially offloading the weight of the exercising test subject s body. A platform for mounting treadmill is positioned perpendicularly to the test subject. The Cleveland Clinic Zero-g Locomotion Simulator (ZLS) utilizes a

  17. Sulfur dioxide emissions from Alaskan volcanoes quantified using an ultraviolet SO_{2} camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Werner, Cynthia; Kelly, Peter; Brewer, Ian; Ketner, Dane; Paskievitch, John; Power, John

    2016-04-01

    Alaskan volcanoes are difficult targets for direct gas measurements as they are extremely remote and their peaks are mostly covered in ice and snow throughout the year. This makes access extremely difficult. In 2015, we were able to make use of an ultraviolet SO2 camera to quantify the SO2 emissions from Augustine Volcano, Redoubt Volcano, Mount Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcano in the Aleutian Arc. An airborne gas survey performed at Augustine Volcano in April 2015 found that the SO2 emission rate from the summit area was below 10 tonnes per day (t/d). SO2 camera measurements were performed two months later (June 2015) from a snow-free area just 100 meters from the fumarole on the south side of Augustine's summit dome to maximize camera sensitivity. Though the visible appearance of the plume emanating from the fumarole was opaque, the SO2 emissions were only slightly above the 40 ppmṡm detection limit of the SO2 camera. Still, SO2 could be detected and compared to coincident MultiGAS measurements of SO2, CO2 and H2S. At Redoubt Volcano, SO2 camera measurements were conducted on 13 June 2015 from a location 2 km to the north of the final 72x106 m3 dome extruded during the 2009 eruption. Imagery was collected of the plume visibly emanating from the top of the dome. Preliminary evaluation of the imagery and comparison with a coincident, helicopter-based DOAS survey showed that SO2 emission rates had dropped below 100 t/d (down from 180 t/d measured in April 2014). Mount Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcano were visited in August 2015 as part of an NSF-funded ship-based research expedition in the Central Aleutian Arc. At Mount Cleveland, inclement weather prohibited the collection of a lengthy time-series of SO2 camera imagery, but the limited data that was collected shows an emission rate of several hundred t/d. At Shishaldin, several hours of continuous imagery was acquired from a location 5 km east of the summit vent. The time series shows an SO2 emission rate of

  18. Detection and Modeling of a Meteotsunami in Lake Erie During a High Wind Event on May 27, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. J.; Schwab, D. J.; Lombardy, K. A.; LaPlante, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    On May 27, 2012, a mesoscale convective system moved southeast across the central basin of Lake Erie (the shallowest of the Great Lakes) causing an increase in surface wind speed from 3 to 15 m/s over a few minutes. Although no significant pressure change was observed during this period (+1 mbar), the storm resulted in 3 reported edge waves on the southern shore (5 minutes apart), with wave heights up to 7 feet (2.13 m). Witnesses along the coast reported that the water receded before the waves hit, the only warning of the impending danger. After impact on the southern shore, several individuals were stranded in the water near Cleveland, Ohio. Fortunately, there were no fatalities or serious injury as a result of the edge waves. The storm event yielded two separate but similar squall line events that impacted the southern shore of Lake Erie several hours apart. The first event had little impact on nearshore conditions, however, the second event (moving south-eastward at 21.1 m/s or 41 knots), resulted in 7 ft waves near Cleveland as reported above. The thunderstorms generated three closely packed outflow boundaries that intersected the southern shore of Lake Erie between 1700 and 1730 UTC. The outflow boundaries were followed by a stronger outflow at 1800 UTC. Radial velocities on the WSR-88D in Cleveland, Ohio indicated the winds were stronger in the second outflow boundary. The radar indicated winds between 20.6 and 24.7 m/s (40 and 48 knots) within 240 meters (800 feet) above ground level. In order to better understand the storm event and the cause of the waves that impacted the southern shore, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Lake Erie has been developed using the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The model is being developed as part of the Great Lakes Coastal Forecasting (GLCFS), a set of experimental real-time pre-operational hydrodynamic models run at the NOAA Great Lakes Research Laboratory that forecast currents, waves, temperature, and

  19. Status of Water Levels and Selected Water-Quality Conditions in the Sparta-Memphis Aquifer in Arkansas and the Status of Water Levels in the Sparta Aquifer in Louisiana, Spring 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T.P.; Jones, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    potentiometric contour encircles the three pumping centers. Seven smaller depressions are evident on the 2005 Sparta-Memphis potentiometric-surface map located in Webster and Winn Parishes, Louisiana, and Calhoun, Cleveland, western Columbia, Desha, and Lafayette Counties, Arkansas. The depression in Calhoun County initially was shown in the 1996-1997 potentiometric surface. The depression in Desha County initially was shown in the 1999 potentiometric surface. The depressions in Webster and Winn Parishes were shown as early as 1975. The depressions in Cleveland, western Columbia, and Lafayette Counties initially were shown in the 2003 potentiometric surface. A map of differences in water-level measurements between 2001 and 2005 was constructed using the difference between water-level measurements from 294 wells in Arkansas and 29 wells in Louisiana. The difference in water levels between 2001 and 2005 ranged from -30.1 to 44.6 feet. The largest rise of 44.6 feet in water level measured was in Union County in Arkansas. The largest decline of 30.1 feet in water level measured was in Columbia County in Arkansas. Areas with a general rise in water levels in Arkansas are shown in Arkansas, Columbia, Craighead, Jefferson, Prairie, and the western half of Union Counties. The area around west-central Union County had rises as much as 44.6 feet, with seven wells showing a rise of 20 feet or greater, which is an annual rise of 5 feet or greater. Areas in Arkansas with a general decline in water level are shown in western Bradley, eastern Calhoun, Cleveland, Cross, Desha, Drew, Lafayette, Lee, Lincoln, Lonoke, Poinsett, and the eastern half of Union Counties. In Louisiana, the water-level difference map showed a general rise in water levels in northern Claiborne, northern Webster, and northwestern Union Parishes mainly because of a decrease in industrial withdrawals in southern Arkansas, particularly Union County. Another rise in water level was indicated in western

  20. Nanotetrac targets integrin αvβ3 on tumor cells to disorder cell defense pathways and block angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis PJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul J Davis,1,2 Hung-Yun Lin,2,3 Thangirala Sudha,2 Murat Yalcin,2,4 Heng-Yuan Tang,2 Aleck Hercbergs,5 John T Leith,6 Mary K Luidens,1 Osnat Ashur-Fabian,7,8 Sandra Incerpi,9 Shaker A Mousa2 1Department of Medicine, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, USA; 2Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, USA; 3PhD Program for Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Physiology, Veterinary Medicine Faculty, Uludag University, Gorukle, Bursa, Turkey; 5Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 6Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center, Narragansett, RI, USA; 7Translational Hemato-oncology Laboratory, Hematology Institute and Blood Bank, Meir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba, Israel; 8Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; 9Department of Sciences, University of Roma Tre, Rome, Italy Abstract: The extracellular domain of integrin αvβ3 contains a receptor for thyroid hormone and hormone analogs. The integrin is amply expressed by tumor cells and dividing blood vessel cells. The proangiogenic properties of thyroid hormone and the capacity of the hormone to promote cancer cell proliferation are functions regulated nongenomically by the hormone receptor on αvβ3. An L-thyroxine (T4 analog, tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac, blocks binding of T4 and 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 by αvβ3 and inhibits angiogenic activity of thyroid hormone. Covalently bound to a 200 nm nanoparticle that limits its activity to the cell exterior, tetrac reformulated as Nanotetrac has additional effects mediated by αvβ3 beyond the inhibition of binding of T4 and T3 to the integrin. These actions of Nanotetrac include disruption of transcription of cell survival pathway genes, promotion of apoptosis by multiple mechanisms, and interruption

  1. A technology-enabled adherence enhancement system for people with bipolar disorder: results from a feasibility and patient acceptance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajatovic M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Martha Sajatovic,1 Michael S Davis,2 Kristin A Cassidy,3 Joseph Nestor,2 Johnny Sams,3 Edna Fuentes-Casiano3 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurological and Behavioral Outcomes Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2MedicaSafe, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA Objective: As poor medication adherence is common in bipolar disorder (BD, technology-assisted approaches may help to monitor and enhance adherence. This study evaluated preliminary feasibility, patient satisfaction and effects on adherence, BD knowledge, and BD symptoms associated with the use of a multicomponent technology-assisted adherence enhancement system. Methods: This prospective study tested the system in five BD patients over a 15-day period. System components included: 1 an automated pill cap with remote monitoring sensor; 2 a multimedia adherence enhancement program; and 3 a treatment incentive program. This study evaluated system usability, patient satisfaction and effects on adherence (Morisky scale, knowledge (treatment knowledge test [TKT], and symptoms (internal state scale [ISS]. Results: Mean age of the sample was 62 years, 4/5 (80% Caucasian, and 4/5 (80% single/divorced or widowed. Most participants (4/5, 80% were on a single BD medication. Participants had BD for an average of 21 years. Challenges included attaching the pill sensor to standard pharmacy bottles for individuals using very large pill containers or those with multiday pill boxes. Three of five (60% individuals completed the full 15-day period. Usability scores were high overall. Mean Morisky scores improved. Means on all four subscales of the ISS were all in the direction of improvement. On the TKT, there was a 40% increase in mean scores. Conclusion: A multicomponent technology-assisted BD

  2. T10B9 monoclonal antibody: A short-acting nonstimulating monoclonal antibody that spares γδ T-cells and treats and prevents cellular rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Waid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thomas H Waid1, John S Thompson1, Maria Siemionow2, Stephen A Brown1 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 2Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: T10B9.1A-31/MEDI-500 is a nonmitogenic immunoglobulin M kappa murine monoclonal antibody (mAb directed against the alpha-beta (αβ heterodimer of the T-lymphocyte receptor complex. The hybridoma was first produced by fusing spleen cells from BALB/C mice immunized with human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes with SP2/O-Ag14 mutant myeloma cells. The mAb is produced and purified using multistep ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatography protocols. T10B9 has been used successfully to treat acute cellular rejection in renal transplantation and as an immunosuppression induction agent in heart and simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation. Because T10B9 is nonmitogenic and causes minimal cytokine release, both treatment of rejection and induction of immunosuppression were accomplished with significantly fewer and milder untoward effects (cytokine release syndrome than its comparator OKT3. Since T10B9 is directed against the αβ heterodimer of the CD3 epitope, it spares the gamma delta (γδ region. These gamma delta (γδ T cells have a unique role in the immune response controlling many serious human diseases and perhaps facilitating the development of immunologic tolerance. T10B9 has a relatively short duration of action, depleting T cells for only 10 to 14 days, unlike the protracted depletion seen with thymoglobulin and Campath-1H. There is no B-lymphocyte depletion with T10B9 as there is with both of the aforementioned reagents. The lack of prolonged lymphocyte depletion may account for less infection observed with T10B9 treatment.Keywords: T10B9.1A-31, γδ T-cell, monoclonal antibody, Campath-1H, thymoglobulin, OKT3

  3. Interstitial Cystitis – Elucidation of Psychophysiologic and Autonomic Characteristics (the ICEPAC Study: design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelimsky T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Chelimsky,1 Gisela Chelimsky,1 N Patrick McCabe,2 Megan Louttit,3 Adonis Hijaz,3 Sangeeta Mahajan,3 Tatiana Sanses,3 CA Tony Buffington,4 Bradford Fenton,5 Thomas Janicki,3 Sarah Ialacci,2 Elias Veizi,3 Di Zhang,2 Firouz Daneshgari,2,3 Robert Elston,2 Jeffrey Janata2,31The Medical College of Wisconsin, Departments of Neurology and Gastroenterology, Milwaukee, WI, 2Case Western Reserve University, Department of Neurology, Cleveland, OH, 3University Hospitals Case Medical Center, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, 4The Ohio State University, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Columbus, OH, 5Summa Health System, Department of Gynecology, Akron, OH, USABackground and purpose: Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS is relatively common and associated with severe pain, yet effective treatment remains elusive. Research typically emphasized the bladder's role, but given the high presence of systemic comorbidities, the authors hypothesized a pathophysiologic nervous system role. This paper reports the methodology and approach to study the nervous system in women with IC/BPS. The study compares neurologic, urologic, gynecologic, autonomic, gastrointestinal, and psychological features of women with IC/BPS, their female relatives, women with myofascial pelvic pain (MPP, and healthy controls to elucidate the role of central and peripheral processing.Methods and results: In total, 228 women (76 IC/BPS, 76 MPP, 38 family members, and 38 healthy controls will be recruited. Subjects undergo detailed screening, structured neurologic examination of limbs and pelvis, tender point examination, autonomic testing, electrogastrography, and assessment of comorbid functional dysautonomias. Interpreters are blinded to subject classification. Psychological and stress response characteristics are examined with assessments of stress, trauma history, general psychological function, and stress response quantification. As of December 2012, data

  4. A single-arm, investigator-initiated study of the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of intravitreal aflibercept injection in subjects with exudative age-related macular degeneration previously treated with ranibizumab or bevacizumab (ASSESS study: 12-month analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh RP

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rishi P Singh, Sunil K Srivastava, Justis P Ehlers, Fabiana Q Silva, Rumneek Bedi, Andrew P Schachat, Peter K Kaiser Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Summary statement: In subjects with active exudative age-related macular degeneration, treating with a fixed intravitreal aflibercept injection dosing regimen for 12 months demonstrated improved anatomic and vision endpoints from baseline.Purpose: Switching therapies in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD may offer an advantage for some patients. This study evaluates the efficacy of intravitreal aflibercept injection (IAI in subjects previously treated with ranibizumab and/or bevacizumab.Methods: Subjects (n=26 were given monthly 2 mg of IAI for 3 months, followed by 2 mg once in every 2 months for up to 12 months. The mean absolute change from baseline in central subfield thickness (CST measured by optical coherence tomography and the mean change from baseline in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA early treatment in diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS letter score were obtained. Additionally, the percentage of subjects who gained or lost ≥15 letters of vision and the percentage of subjects who are 20/40 or better or 20/200 or worse were evaluated.Results: There was a mean decrease in CST of -50.3  µm (P<0.001 and a mean increase in ETDRS BCVA of +9.2 letters (P<0.001. Twenty-seven percent of subjects experienced a  ≥15-letter improvement in visual acuity, and no subject lost ≥3 lines of vision from baseline. Fifty percent of subjects were 20/40 or better, and 11.5% of subjects were 20/200 or worse at month 12.Conclusion: Fixed IAI dosing regimen for 12 months demonstrated improved anatomic and vision endpoints in subjects with active exudative AMD. Keywords: aflibercept, age-related macular degeneration, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, vascular endothelial growth factors

  5. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro,1 Barbara A Plitnick,1 Anna Lok,1 Geoffrey E Jones,1 Patricia Higgins,2,3 Thomas R Hornick,3,4 Mark S Rea1 1Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA; 2School of Nursing, 3School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 4Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD, with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. Methods: The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level “bluish-white” lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light–dark and rest–activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest–activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. Results: The lighting intervention significantly (P<0.05 decreased global sleep scores from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The lighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light–dark and rest–activity patterns, suggesting an increase

  6. A pilot study: portable out-of-center sleep testing as an early sleep apnea screening tool in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev OY

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oleg Y Chernyshev,1 David E McCarty,1 Douglas E Moul,2 Cesar Liendo,1 Gloria C Caldito,1 Sai K Munjampalli,1 Roger E Kelley,3 Andrew L Chesson Jr1 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center at Shreveport, LA 2Sleep Disorders Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3Department of Neurology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA Introduction: Prompt diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA after acute ischemic stroke (AIS is critical for optimal clinical outcomes, but in-laboratory conventional polysomnograms (PSG are not routinely practical. Though portable out-of-center type III cardiopulmonary sleep studies (out-of-center cardiopulmonary sleep testing [OCST] are widely available, these studies have not been validated in patients who have recently suffered from AIS. We hypothesized that OCST in patients with AIS would yield similar results when compared to conventional PSG. Methods: Patients with AIS had simultaneous type III OCST and PSG studies performed within 72 hours from symptom onset. The accuracy of OCST was compared to PSG using: chi-square tests, receiver operatory characteristic curves, Bland–Altman plot, paired Student's t-test/Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and calculation of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV. Results: Twenty-one out of 23 subjects with AIS (age 61±9.4 years; 52% male; 58% African-American successfully completed both studies (9% technical failure. Nearly all (95% had Mallampati IV posterior oropharynx; the mean neck circumference was 16.8±1.6 in. and the mean body mass index (BMI was 30±7 kg/m2. The apnea hypopnea index (AHI provided by OCST was similar to that provided by PSG (19.8±18.0 vs 22.0±22.7, respectively; P=0.49. On identifying subjects by OCST with an AHI ≥5 on PSG, OCST had the following parameters: sensitivity 100%, specificity 85.7%, PPV 93%, and NPV 100%. On identifying

  7. Student Outreach With Renewable Energy Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Eric B. (Technical Monitor); Buffinger, D.; Fuller, C.; Kalu, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Student Outreach with Renewable Energy Technology (SORET) program is a joint grant that involves a collaboration between three HBCU's (Central State University, Savannah State University, and Wilberforce University) and NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The overall goal of the grant is to increase the interest of minority students in the technical disciplines, to encourage participating minority students to continue their undergraduate study in these disciplines, and to promote graduate school to these students. As a part of SORET, Central State University has developed an undergraduate research associates program over the past two years. As part of this program, students are required to take special laboratory courses offered at Wilberforce University that involve the application of renewable energy systems. The course requires the students to design, construct, and install a renewable energy project. In addition to the applied renewable energy course, Central State University provided four undergraduate research associates the opportunity to participate in summer internships at Texas Southern University (Renewable Energy Environmental Protection Program) and the Cleveland African-American Museum (Renewable Energy Summer Camp for High School Students) an activity co sponsored by NASA and the Cleveland African-American Museum. Savannah State University held a high school summer program with a theme of the Direct Impact of Science on Our Every Day Lives. The purpose of the institute was to whet the interest of students in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET) by demonstrating the effectiveness of science to address real world problems. The 2001 institute involved the design and installation of a PV water pumping system at the Center for Advanced Water Technology and Energy Systems at Savannah State. Both high school students and undergraduates contributed to this project. Wilberforce University has used NASA support to provide

  8. Parenteral clevidipine for the acute control of blood pressure in the critically ill patient: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Frank Peacock IV

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available W Frank Peacock IV1, Jorge E Angeles2, Karina M Soto2, Philip D Lumb3,  Joseph Varon41The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Facultad de Medicina, Tijuana, México; 3Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital/Texas Heart Institute, Houston, Texas, USAAbstract: Clevidipine is a new calcium channel blocker of the dihydropyridine class that is characterized by its ultra-short onset of action, vascular selectivity, small volume of distribution and extremely high clearance that coupled together result in an extremely short half-life of approximately 1 minute therefore permitting a rapid titration to the desired effect. Structurally similar to other dihydropyridines, clevidipine has an extra ester link that allows its rapid hydrolization to its inactive carboxylic acid metabolite in blood and extravascular tissues. Clevidipine’s metabolites are then primarily eliminated through urine and fecal pathways. Clevidipine does not affect cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes and no clinically significant drug interactions have been determined. In trials like the ESCAPE trials, ECLIPSE, and VELOCITY, clevidipine demonstrated a significant improvement in the management of acute hypertension when compared to placebo as shown in both ESCAPE trials. The ECLIPSE trial compared clevidipine to other drugs currently used in the management of acute hypertension, such as sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerine and nicardipine; clevidipine was superior to all three agents; in providing blood pressure support, safety and tolerability clevidipine also showed a significant reduction in mortality rate (4.7% vs 1.7%, P = 0.0445 when compared to sodium nitroprusside. In the VELOCITY trial clevidipine demonstrated a reduction in blood pressure of 6

  9. Advanced Offshore Wind Turbine/Foundation Concept for the Great Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Windpower, Nautica [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States); Marrone, Joseph [OCC COWI, Vancouver (Canada); Wagner, Thomas [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States)

    2013-08-29

    This project investigated a conceptual 2-bladed rotor wind turbine design and assessed its feasibility for installation in the Great Lakes. The levelized cost of energy was used for this purpose. A location in Lake Erie near the coast of Cleveland, Ohio was selected as the application site. The loading environment was defined using wind and wave data collected at a weather station in Lake Erie near Cleveland. In addition, the probability distributions of the annual significant wave height and wind speed were determined. A model of the dependence of the above two quantities was also developed and used in the study of wind turbine system loads. Loads from ice floes and ridges were also included.The NREL 5 MW 3-bladed rotor wind turbine concept was used as the baseline design. The proposed turbine design employs variable pitch blade control with tip-brakes and a teeter mechanism. The rotor diameter, rated power and the tower dimensions were selected to closely match those of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine.A semi-floating gravity base foundation was designed for this project primarily to adapt to regional logistical constraints to transport and install the gravity base foundation. This foundation consists of, from bottom to top, a base plate, a buoyancy chamber, a taper zone, a column (with ice cone), and a service platform. A compound upward-downward ice cone was selected to secure the foundation from moving because of ice impact.The turbine loads analysis was based on International ElectroTechnical Committee (IEC) Standard 61400-1, Class III winds. The NREL software FAST was the primary computational tool used in this study to determine all design load cases. An initial set of studies of the dynamics of wind turbines using Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) demonstrated that FAST and ADAMS load predictions were comparable. Because of its relative simplicity and short run times, FAST was selected for this study. For ice load calculations, a method

  10. Case-matched Comparison of Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Proctectomy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rencuzogullari, Ahmet; Gorgun, Emre; Costedio, Meagan; Aytac, Erman; Kessler, Hermann; Abbas, Maher A; Remzi, Feza H

    2016-06-01

    The present study reports an early institutional experience with robotic proctectomy (RP) and outcome comparison with laparoscopic proctectomy (LP) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients who underwent either RP or LP during proctocolectomy for IBD between January 2010 and June 2014 were matched (1:1) and reviewed. Twenty-one patients undergoing RP fulfilled the study criteria and were matched with an equal number of patients who had LP. Operative time was longer (304 vs. 213 min, P=0.008) and estimated blood loss was higher in the RP group (360 vs. 188 mL, P=0.002). Conversion rates (9.5% vs. 14.3%, P>0.99), time to first bowel movement(2.29±1.53 vs. 2.79±2.26, P=0.620), and hospital length stay(7.85±6.41 vs. 9.19±7.47 d, P=0.390) were similar in both groups. No difference was noted in postoperative complications, ileal pouch to anal canal anastomosis-related outcomes, Cleveland Global Quality of Life, and Short Form-12 health survey outcomes between RP and LP. Our good results with standard laparoscopy are unlikely to be improved with robotics in proctectomy cases. Potential benefits of robotic approach for completion proctectomy warrant further investigation as experience grows with robotics. PMID:27258914

  11. Health assessment for Carter Lee Lumber Company, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IND016395899. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-06

    The Carter Lee Lumber Company (the site), located at 1621 West Washington Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, has been selling lumber products since 1873. About 1971, Carter Lee bought 2-3 acres of land behind its original property from the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago, and St. Louis Railway Corporation, a subsidiary of Penn Central. According to Carter Lee, the railway company, in addition to other unknown individuals, dumped unknown quantities of liquid wastes from tank trucks and railroad cars onto the ground and into a 14-foot deep trench on the property. Surface soil samples were collected in July 1985 by EPA from the trench area where dumping was alleged to have occurred. These samples were contaminated with heavy metals and PHAs at low levels. No sub-surface samples were taken. No air monitoring has been performed. No ground-water samples have been taken. No samples for possible surface water runoff have been taken. Based on the information reviewed, the Indiana State Board of Health has concluded that this site is of potential health concern because of the potential risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse human health effects.

  12. LTCS (Laser Thermal Control System) Test Supporting the Improvement of DeCoM (Deepak Condenser Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop, Cleveland OH. NCTS 19701-14. On Dec 2013 a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) test was performed as part of the integral Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS). During the balance portion of this testing it was noticed that the LHP was not going to be able to maintain temperature on the operational thermal mass. The test was stopped. After multiple meetings with the LTCS designers, LHP experts (in house and external) it was concluded that gravity was preventing the control heaters to maintain control on the reservoir. A heater was installed onto the liquid return line as part of the fix. After implementing the fix on the liquid return line, the test on May 2014 proved that the system works in vertical orientation using the liquid line heater. Through this testing, the correlation of the Deepak Condenser Model (DeCoM) was possible. This paper describes how well DeCoM predicts the condenser behavior in comparison to the test results of LTCS test.

  13. A preliminary assessment of the urban pollution in the Great Lakes region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trends in emissions of trace elements to the atmosphere in the Great Lakes region are compared with those of ambient concentrations observed in the urban areas of Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland and Toronto from 1982 to 1993. Lead emissions show a steady decrease throughout the region, whereas the emissions of Ni, Cr, Cu, Mn and Cd are following upward trends, and As emissions do not show substantial changes. The estimates by source category suggest that the emission of trace elements from iron-steel manufacturing, waste incineration and non-ferrous metal production are steadily increasing, whereas emissions from oil combustion are decreasing and that from coal combustion do not show significant changes since 1982. A trend analysis performed on the ambient concentration data from all the urban sites shows a steady decrease of Pb concentrations (3-20%/yr) in all the urban areas, whereas the level of other trace elements is following upward and downward trends depending upon the urban area and sample site locations

  14. Initial crisis risk communications: A success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal regulations require nuclear facilities to be prepared for the risk communication aspects of a catastrophic emergency. Thus, all nuclear plants have provisions for a Joint Public Information Center (JPIC). The JPICs are designed to handle more than 300 media for 24 hours a day; to coordinate information among utility, federal, state, and local agencies; to provide spokespersons; etc. For a large-scale emergency, JPICs can work very well. However, some utilities - indeed, most companies - appear to have only two modes of emergency communication response: normal staff and JPIC. Experience has shown that normal staffing is inadequate to handle the risk communication response for media-intensive low-level emergencies and for the initial stages of an escalating emergency. It is clear that initial response will determine how well a company fares in its overall emergency response and in its long-term relations with the media and public. A solution to this risk communication challenge was developed by Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company's Perry Nuclear Plant - the Public Information Response Team. Using existing facilities and staff - only one of whom works regularly with the media - the Perry plant proactively manages its initial risk communication response

  15. My 65 years in acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2001-05-01

    My entry into acoustics began as research assistant to Professor F. V. Hunt at Harvard University. I received my doctorate in 1940 and directed the Electro-Acoustic Laboratory at Harvard from October 1940 until September 1945. In 1947, I became a tenured associate professor at MIT, and, with Richard H. Bolt, formed the consulting firm Bolt and Beranek, that later included Robert B. Newman, becoming BBN. My most significant contributions before 1970 were design of wedge-lined anechoic chambers, systemization of noise reduction in ventilation systems, design of the world's largest muffler for the testing of supersonic jet engines at NASA's Lewis Laboratory in Cleveland, speech interference level, NC noise criterion curves, heading New York Port Authority's noise study that resulted in mufflers on jet aircraft, and steep aircraft climb procedures, and publishing books titled, Acoustical Measurements, Acoustics, Noise Reduction, Noise and Vibration Control, and Music, Acoustics and Architecture. As President of BBN, I supervised the formation of the group that built and operated the ARPANET (1969), which, when split in two (using TCP/IP protocol) became the INTERNET (1984). Since then, I have written two books on Concert Halls and Opera Houses and have consulted on four concert halls and an opera house.

  16. Coordination of Swarmed Unmanned Ground Vehicles using Self Organization Mapping with Generic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Shekhar

    2009-03-01

    The methodologies for path planning for individual UGVs have been well studied and modeled. The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) is an example of such study. However, there is no reliable method of communication among swarmed UGVs. The author along with other collaborators, Dr. Wei Cao of NASA Research Center and Dr. James Burghart of Cleveland State University, proposes a Master-slave approach for the coordinated management of UGVs using Neural Networks. SOM is used to work with GA to update the patterns of UGVs for coordination among themselves and with ground station(s). One (or more) UGV with advanced computational power and virtual link to other ground stations serves as the Master. SOM and GA reside on the Master as well as ground stations. All other UGVs behave as slaves. The individual UGVs conducts its own or grouped path planning. Using Matlab,, the prototype version of SOM and GA for swamed UGVs was simulated and tested with an advanced multi-UGV system. The author will present the results followed by the outlook for the future work.

  17. Long-Term Dynamics of Small Bodies in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Steve (Technical Monitor); Holman, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics program Prof. Norm Murray (CITA) and I have been conducting investigations of the long-term dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system. This grant, and its predecessor NAG5-7761, supported travel for collaboration by the Investigators and also supports Murray during an annual one month visit to the CfA for further collaboration. In the course of this grant we made a number of advances in solar system dynamics. For example, we developed an analytic model for the origin and consequence of chaos associated with three-body resonances in the asteroid belt. This has been shown to be important for the delivery of near Earth objects. We later extended this model to three-body resonances among planets. We were able to show that the numerically identified chaos among the outer planets results from a three-body resonance involving Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The resulting paper was awarded the 1999 Newcomb Cleveland award from the AAAS. This award singles out one paper published in Science each year for distinction. This grant has also supported, in part, my participate in other solar system dynamics projects. The results from those collaborations are also listed.

  18. Preserving fertility in young patients with lymphoma: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel B

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bansari Patel, Brooke V Rossi Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Fertility preservation affords patients the ability to reproduce after the initial diagnosis and management of such malignancies as Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Certain chemotherapy regimens and pelvic radiotherapy confer a high-risk of subsequent gonadal compromise in both males and females. Fortunately, early counseling and initiation of fertility-preservation strategies promptly after diagnosis enable patients to maintain hope for future reproduction. Well-established methods for fertility preservation include embryo and oocyte cryopreservation in females and sperm cryopreservation in males. These methods enable patients to utilize assisted reproductive technologies, including in vitro fertilization, at the time of desired childbearing in order to ensure genetic offspring. As most of these modalities are not feasible in some patient populations, including prepubescent patients, newer methods of fertility preservation must be created to ensure the ability to produce genetic offspring in lymphoma patients. This review provides insights into the impact of gonadotoxic treatment on ovarian and testicular function, and highlights current modalities in fertility preservation in both males and females. Keywords: fertility preservation, lymphoma, ART, egg freezing

  19. Terrestrial service environments for selected geographic locations. Final report. [1965--1974 data; to define solar array environment to aid in encapsulation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.E.; Carmichael, D.C.

    1976-06-24

    This report contains results obtained from analyses of climatic, precipitation, air pollution, and other environmental data for the years 1965 to 1974 at nine widely different geographic locations in the United States (Albuquerque, N.M.; Bismarck, N.D.; Boston, Mass.; Brownsville, TX.; Cleveland, OH; Fairbanks, AK; Los Angeles, CA; Miami, FL; and Phoenix, AZ). In addition to descriptive and diurnal statistics for 24 individual climatic variables, ''environmental cell'' statistics were computed to obtain the frequencies, durations, and transitions for the simultaneous occurrence of various combinations of environmental variables. Results are presented for the simultaneous occurrence of specific levels of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and insolation, in addition to representative results obtained for other combinations of variables. The results characterize the environmental conditions to which terrestrial solar arrays would be exposed over a 20-year lifetime, and serve to identify environmental factors and levels that can be used in testing candidate encapsulation materials and systems for such terrestrial exposures. An innovative methodology was applied to obtain these results for combinations of environmental variables. Because of its generality and demonstrated feasibility, it is concluded that the methodology also has broad applications to other testing programs.

  20. Multimodality bonchoscopic imaging of tracheopathica osteochondroplastica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, Henri; Murgu, Septimiu D.; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Brenner, Matt

    2009-05-01

    Results of a commercial optical coherence tomography system used as part of a multimodality diagnostic bronchoscopy platform are presented for a 61-year-old patient with central airway obstruction from tracheopathica osteochondroplastica. Comparison to results of white-light bronchoscopy, histology, and endobronchial ultrasound examination are accompanied by a discussion of resolution, penetration depth, contrast, and field of view of these imaging modalities. White-light bronchoscopy revealed irregularly shaped, firm submucosal nodules along cartilaginous structures of the anterior and lateral walls of the trachea, sparing the muscular posterior membrane. Endobronchial ultrasound showed a hyperechoic density of 0.4 cm thickness. optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed using a commercially available, compact time-domain OCT system (Niris System, Imalux Corp., Cleveland, Ohio) with a magnetically actuating probe (two-dimensional, front imaging, and inside actuation). Images showed epithelium, upper submucosa, and osseous submucosal nodule layers corresponding with histopathology. To our knowledge, this is the first time these commercially available systems are used as part of a multimodality bronchoscopy platform to study diagnostic imaging of a benign disease causing central airway obstruction. Further studies are needed to optimize these systems for pulmonary applications and to determine how new-generation imaging modalities will be integrated into a multimodality bronchoscopy platform.

  1. Investigation of the Utilization of Modern Industrial Methods, Processes, Ergonomics, and the Internet in the Scientific Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Spencer S., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    On Oct. 1, 2001 Cleveland State University and NASA Glenn Research Center embarked on the above named cooperative agreement. Because NASA's research facilities often exhibit instances where the failure to use state-of-the-art technologies and methods to improve on outmoded systems of interface and control, and this runs contrary to the NASA philosophy of "faster, better, and cheaper", it was deemed an ideal opportunity for this collaboration. The main objectives of the proposed effort were to research and investigate the use of the latest technologies, methods, techniques, etc. which pertain to control and interface with industrial and research systems and facilities. The work was done in large part at NASA Glenn Research Center, using selected research facilities as real-world laboratories; such as certain Microgravity Science Division and Space Station projects. Microgravity Science Division at Glenn Research Center designs and builds experiments to be flown on the Space Shuttle and eventually on the International Space Station. Economy of space, weight, complexity, data storage, ergonomics, and many other factors present problems that also exist in industry. Many of the solutions can come from the same areas of study mentioned above.

  2. Assessing The Potential Of Stratospheric Balloons For Planteary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, Tibor

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments in high altitude balloon platform capabilities, specifically long duration flights in excess of 50 days at over 100,000 ft and precision pointing with performance at the arc sec level or better have raised the question whether this platform can be utilized for high-value planetary science observations. In January of 2012 a workshop was held at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Oh to explore what planetary science can be achieved utilizing such a platform. Over 40 science concepts were identified by the scientists and engineers attending the workshop. Those ideas were captured and then posted to a public website for all interested planetary scientists to review and comment on. The results of the workshop, and subsequent community review, have demonstrated that this platform appears to have potential for high-value science at very competitive costs. Given these positive results, the assessment process was extended to include 1) examining, in more detail, the requirements for the gondola platform and the mission scenarios 2) identifying technical challenges and 3) developing one or more platform concepts in enough fidelity to enable accurate estimating of development and mission costs. Upon completion, assessment results will be provided to NASA’s planetary science division to help them determine whether to embark on science efforts utilizing this platform. The poster will provide the current status of the assessment efforts.

  3. Assessing the potential of stratospheric balloons for planetary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, T.; Hibbitts, K.; Young, E.; Landis, R.; Noll, K.; Baines, K.

    Recent developments in high altitude balloon platform capabilities, specifically long duration flights in excess of 50 days at over 100,000 ft and precision pointing with performance at the arc sec level or better have raised the question whether this platform can be utilized for high-value planetary science observations. In January of 2012 a workshop was held at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio to explore what planetary science can be achieved utilizing such a platform. Over 40 science concepts were identified by the scientists and engineers attending the workshop. Those ideas were captured and then posted to a public website for all interested planetary scientists to review and give their comments. The results of the workshop, and subsequent community review, have demonstrated that this platform appears to have potential for high-value science at very competitive costs. Given these positive results, the assessment process was extended to include 1) examining, in more detail, the requirements for the gondola platform and the mission scenarios 2) identifying technical challenges and 3) developing one or more platform concepts in enough fidelity to enable accurate estimating of development and mission costs. This paper provides a review of the assessment, a summary of the achievable science and the challenges to make that science a reality with this platform.

  4. Improving empathy of physicians through guided reflective writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita D. Misra-Hebert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was designed to explore how guided reflective writing could evoke empathy and reflection in a group of practicing physicians. Methods: Total participants recruited included 40 staff physicians at Cleveland Clinic, a tertiary care academic medical center. Twenty physicians (intervention group were assigned to participate in a 6-session faculty development program introducing narrative medicine and engaging in guided reflective writing. Ten physicians (comparison group 1 received the assigned course reading materials but did not participate in the course sessions. Ten physicians (comparison group 2 neither received the reading materials nor participated in the sessions. Qualitative analysis of the physicians' reflective writings was performed to identify major themes. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy was administered three times during the course. Results: Qualitative analysis of physicians' writings showed themes of both compassionate solidarity and detached concern. Exploration of negative emotions occurred more frequently than positive ones. The most common writing style was case presentation. A total of 36 staff physicians completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy. Results of statistical analysis suggested an improvement in empathy in the intervention group at the end of the course (p < 0 .05. Conclusions: These results suggest a faculty development program using guided narrative writing can promote reflection and may enhance empathy among practicing physicians. These findings should encourage medical educators to design additional strategies for enhancing reflection and empathic behavior in trainees and specifically practicing physicians who can role model these behaviors to achieve the ultimate goal of improving the quality of patient care.

  5. Assessment tools for urban catchments: developing biological indicators based on benthic macroinvertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, A.H.; Bressler, D.W.; Paul, M.J.; Barbour, M.T.; Rankin, E.T.; Carter, J.L.; Resh, V.H.

    2009-01-01

    Biological indicators, particularly benthic macroinvertebrates, are widely used and effective measures of the impact of urbanization on stream ecosystems. A multimetric biological index of urbanization was developed using a large benthic macroinvertebrate dataset (n = 1,835) from the Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area and then validated with datasets from Cleveland, Ohio (n = 79); San Jose, California (n = 85); and a different subset of the Baltimore data (n = 85). The biological metrics used to develop the multimetric index were selected using several criteria and were required to represent ecological attributes of macroinvertebrate assemblages including taxonomic composition and richness (number of taxa in the insect orders of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera), functional feeding group (number of taxa designated as filterers), and habit (percent of individuals which cling to the substrate). Quantile regression was used to select metrics and characterize the relationship between the final biological index and an urban gradient (composed of population density, road density, and urban land use). Although more complex biological indices exist, this simplified multimetric index showed a consistent relationship between biological indicators and urban conditions (as measured by quantile regression) in three climatic regions of the United States and can serve as an assessment tool for environmental managers to prioritize urban stream sites for restoration and protection.

  6. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  7. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118. PMID:27088040

  8. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu John

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n=34; control group, n=24. Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  9. Preparedness for epidemic disease or bioterrorism: minimum cost planning for the location and staffing of urban point-of-dispensing centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, William M; Chen, Jen-Yi; Tukel, Oya I

    2014-01-01

    Urban health authorities in the United States have been charged with developing plans for providing the infrastructure necessary to dispense prophylactic medications to their populations in the case of epidemic disease outbreak or bioterrorist attack. However, no specific method for such plans has been prescribed. This article formulates and demonstrates the use of an integer programming technique for helping to solve a part of the dispensing problem faced by cities, namely that of providing the federally required infrastructure at minimum cost, using their limited time and resources. Specifically, the technique minimizes the number of point-of-dispensing (POD) centers while covering every resident in all the census tracts within the city's jurisdiction. It also determines the optimal staffing requirement in terms of the number of nurses at each POD. This article includes a demonstration of the model using real data from Cleveland, OH, a mid-sized US city. Examples are provided of data and computational results for a variety of input parameter values such as population throughput rate, POD capacities, and distance limitations. The technique can be readily adapted to a wide range of urban areas. PMID:25350359

  10. Marketplace of memory: what the brain fitness technology industry says about us and how we can do better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel R; Whitehouse, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    In the therapeutic void created by over 20 failed Alzheimer's disease drugs during the past decade, a new marketplace of "brain fitness" technology products has emerged. Ranging from video games and computer software to mobile phone apps and hand-held devices, these commercial products promise to maintain and enhance the memory, concentration, visual and spatial skills, verbal recall, and executive functions of individual users. It is instructive to view these products as sociocultural objects deeply imbued with the values and ideologies of our age; consequently, this article offers a critique of the brain fitness technology marketplace while identifying limitations in the capacity of commercial products to realistically improve cognitive health. A broader conception of brain health is presented, going beyond the reductionism of the commercial brain fitness marketplace and asking how our most proximate relationships and local communities can play a role in supporting cognitive and psychosocial well-being. This vision is grounded in recent experiences at The Intergenerational School in Cleveland, OH, a multigenerational community-oriented learning environment that is implementing brain fitness technology in novel ways. PMID:21572161

  11. Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix.

  12. Antenna Technology and other Radio Frequency (RF) Communications Activities at the Glenn Research Center in Support of NASA's Exploration Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA s Vision for Space Exploration outlines a very ambitious program for the next several decades of the Space Agency endeavors. Ahead is the completion of the International Space Station (ISS); safely flight the shuttle (STS) until 2010; develop and fly the Crew Exploration Vehicle (Orion) by no later than 2014; return to the moon by no later than 2020; extend human presence across the solar system and beyond; implement a sustainable and affordable human and robotic program; develop supporting innovative technologies, knowledge and infrastructure; and promote international and commercial participation in exploration. To achieve these goals, a series of enabling technologies must be developed or matured in a timely manner. Some of these technologies are: spacecraft RF technology (e.g., high power sources and large antennas which using surface receive arrays can get up to 1 Gbps from Mars), uplink arraying (reduce reliance on large ground-based antennas and high operation costs; single point of failure; enable greater data-rates or greater effective distance; scalable, evolvable, flexible scheduling), software define radio (i.e., reconfigurable, flexible interoperability allows for in flight updates open architecture; reduces mass, power, volume), and optical communications (high capacity communications with low mass/power required; significantly increases data rates for deep space). This presentation will discuss some of the work being performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, in antenna technology as well as other on-going RF communications efforts.

  13. Significance of population centers as sources of gaseous and dissolved PAHs in the lower Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Carrie A; Khairy, Mohammed A; Muir, Derek C G; Lohmann, Rainer

    2014-07-15

    Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were used to measure concentrations of gaseous and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the air and water throughout the lower Great Lakes during summer and fall of 2011. Atmospheric Σ15PAH concentrations ranged from 2.1 ng/m3 in Cape Vincent (NY) to 76.4 ng/m3 in downtown Cleveland (OH). Aqueous Σ18PAH concentrations ranged from 2.4 ng/L at an offshore Lake Erie site to 30.4 ng/L in Sheffield Lake (OH). Gaseous PAH concentrations correlated strongly with population within 3-40 km of the sampling site depending on the compound considered, suggesting that urban centers are a primary source of gaseous PAHs (except retene) in the lower Great Lakes region. The significance of distant population (within 20 km) versus local population (within 3 km) increased with subcooled liquid vapor pressure. Most dissolved aqueous PAHs did not correlate significantly with population, nor were they consistently related to river discharge, wastewater effluents, or precipitation. Air-water exchange calculations implied that diffusive exchange was a source of phenanthrene to surface waters, while acenaphthylene volatilized out of the lakes. Comparison of air-water fluxes with temperature suggested that the significance of urban centers as sources of dissolved PAHs via diffusive exchange may decrease in warmer months. PMID:24918966

  14. Microarthroscopy System With Image Processing Technology Developed for Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Gynelle C.

    2001-01-01

    In a joint effort, NASA, Micro Medical Devices, and the Cleveland Clinic have developed a microarthroscopy system with digital image processing. This system consists of a disposable endoscope the size of a needle that is aimed at expanding the use of minimally invasive surgery on the knee, ankle, and other small joints. This device not only allows surgeons to make smaller incisions (by improving the clarity and brightness of images), but it gives them a better view of the injured area to make more accurate diagnoses. Because of its small size, the endoscope helps reduce physical trauma and speeds patient recovery. The faster recovery rate also makes the system cost effective for patients. The digital image processing software used with the device was originally developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center to conduct computer simulations of satellite positioning in space. It was later modified to reflect lessons learned in enhancing photographic images in support of the Center's microgravity program. Glenn's Photovoltaic Branch and Graphics and Visualization Lab (G-VIS) computer programmers and software developers enhanced and speed up graphic imaging for this application. Mary Vickerman at Glenn developed algorithms that enabled Micro Medical Devices to eliminate interference and improve the images.

  15. Liquid Methane/Liquid Oxygen Propellant Conditioning Feed System (PCFS) Test Rigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaff, A.; Grasl, S.; Nguyen, C.; Hockenberry S.; Schubert, J.; Arrington, L.; Vasek, T.

    2008-01-01

    As part of their Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) program, NASA has embarked upon an effort to develop chemical rocket engines which utilize non-toxic, cryogenic propellants such as liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid methane (LCH4). This effort includes the development and testing of a 100 lbf Reaction Control Engine (RCE) that will be used to evaluate the performance of a LO2/LCH4 rocket engine over a broad range of propellant temperatures and pressures. This testing will take place at NASA-Glenn Research Center's (GRC) Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) test facility in Cleveland, OH, and is currently scheduled to begin in late 2008. While the initial tests will be performed at sea level, follow-on testing will be performed at NASA-GRC's Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS) for altitude testing. In support of these tests, Sierra Lobo, Inc. (SLI) has designed, developed, and fabricated two separate portable propellant feed systems under the Propellant Conditioning and Feed System (PCFS) task: one system for LCH4, and one for LO2. These systems will be capable of supplying propellants over a large range of conditions from highly densified to several hundred pounds per square inch (psi) saturated. This paper presents the details of the PCFS design and explores the full capability of these propellant feed systems.

  16. Determinations of the OER and RBE for therapeutic neutron beams generated by p+→Be or d+→Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical trials with neutrons as an alternative to x-rays for the treatment of cancer are underway but have been difficult because (1) the depth dose or dose-rate has been inadequate with the more compact machines which are more common in major hospitals; or (2) the larger cyclotrons which produce more energetic charged particle beams and, consequently, better depth doses and shorter treatment times are located in physics departments frequently remote from major hospitals. The new generation of neutron therapy machines in the US will be hospital-based cyclotrons, having good percentage depth doses, a high output and an isocentric mount, made possible by changing the neutron production process from deuterons on beryllium to protrons on beryllium. The experiments using Chinese hamster V79 cells described here were performed at the Cleveland NASA cyclotron where the physical and biological properties of a 43-MeV p+→Be neutron beam are being studied with a view to using this modality for patient treatment. Questions involving RBE and OER of the beam are examined in this paper

  17. Clinical management of behavioral characteristics of Prader–Willi syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Y Ho

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alan Y Ho, Anastasia DimitropoulosDepartment of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder caused by an abnormality on the long arm of chromosome 15 (q11–q13 that results in a host of phenotypic characteristics, dominated primarily by hyperphagia and insatiable appetite. Characteristic behavioral disturbances in PWS include excessive interest in food, skin picking, difficulty with a change in routine, temper tantrums, obsessive and compulsive behaviors, and mood fluctuations. Individuals with PWS typically have intellectual disabilities (borderline to mild/moderate mental retardation and exhibit a higher overall behavior disturbance compared to individuals with similar intellectual disability. Due to its multisystem disorder, family members, caregivers, physicians, dieticians, and speech-language pathologists all play an important role in the management and treatment of symptoms in an individual with PWS. This article reviews current research on behavior and cognition in PWS and discusses management guidelines for this disorder.Keywords: Prader–Willi syndrome; neurodevelopment, hyperphagia, disability

  18. Comparison of diaphyseal growth between the Libben Population and the Hamann-Todd chimpanzee sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, S W; Russell, K F; Lovejoy, C O

    1996-01-01

    The differences in limb lengths and proportions between humans and chimpanzees are widely known. Humans have relatively shorter forelimbs and longer hind limbs than chimpanzees. Humans have a longer period of long bone formation than chimpanzees. Recent advances in estimating age-at-death in chimpanzees from their dentition have allowed us to reexamine long bone growth in chimpanzees using their skeletal remains and compare it with similar data for humans. A chronological normalization procedure allowing direct interspecific comparison of long bone growth is presented. The preadult chimpanzee sample (n = 43) is from the Hamann-Todd Osteological Collection from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. All human specimens (n = 202) are from the late Woodland Libben Population currently housed at Kent State University. Relying on these cross-sectional data, we conclude that both species elongate their femora at similar absolute (length per unit time) but different relative (length relative to normalized dental age) rates. The species differ in the absolute growth rate of the humerus but share a common normalized rate of growth. Forelimb segment proportion differences between species are due to differential elongation rates of the segments. Hind limb diaphyseal proportions are the same in both species, which suggests that changes in segment length are proportional. Therefore, alternative developmental mechanisms exist in these closely related species which can produce changes in limb length. PMID:8928724

  19. Role of extended release quetiapine in the management of bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan K Al Jurdi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Rayan K Al Jurdi1,2, Lena A Dixit1, Martha Sajatovic3 1Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Houston, Texas, USA; 2South Central Mental Illness Research and Clinical Core, Department of Veterans Affairs, Houston, Texas; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Atypical antipsychotics have become a widely utilized component of the bipolar disorder treatment armamentarium, with approximately 45% of bipolar patients prescribed atypicals. Over the last decade all atypical drugs except for clozapine have received a Food and Drug Administration (FDA bipolar indication. In October 2008, the FDA approved quetiapine XR monotherapy for the treatment of acute depressive episodes of bipolar disorder and acute manic or mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder based on two placebo-control trials. Quetiapine was also approved as adjunct therapy with lithium and divalproex for the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes as well as maintenance of bipolar I disorder. In contrast to immediate release quetiapine which may require a twice-daily regimen, the XR formulation is intended for once-daily administration. This drug profile of quetiapine XR will address chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, safety and tolerability and clinical trials in bipolar disorder.Keywords: quetiapine XR, bipolar disorder

  20. Echocardiographic image of an active human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Echocardiographic images provide quick, safe images of the heart as it beats. While a state-of-the art echocardiograph unit is part of the Human Research Facility on International Space Station, quick transmission of images and data to Earth is a challenge. NASA is developing techniques to improve the echocardiography available to diagnose sick astronauts as well as study the long-term effects of space travel on their health. Echocardiography uses ultrasound, generated in a sensor head placed against the patient's chest, to produce images of the structure of the heart walls and valves. However, ultrasonic imaging creates an enormous volume of data, up to 220 million bits per second. This can challenge ISS communications as well as Earth-based providers. Compressing data for rapid transmission back to Earth can degrade the quality of the images. Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation are working with NASA to develop compression techniques that meet imaging standards now used on the Internet and by the medical community, and that ensure that physicians receive quality diagnostic images.

  1. Driving Organic Molecule Crystalliztion with Surface Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Jessica; Trovato, Gianfranco

    This work examines how surface reconstructions can drive crystallization of organic molecules via self-assembly. Organic electronic molecules have low conductivities compared to inorganic materials, but crystallizing these polymers increases their conductivity. This project uses surface reconstructions with periodically repeating topographies to drive the crystallization process. The samples are grown by placing a drop of a dilute PEDOT solution on the clean Si(001)-(2x1) or Si(111)-(7x7) surface reconstruction and heating the surface up to both evaporate the solvent and promote diffusion of the polymer to the thermodynamically defined lowest energy position. The resulting samples are characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with respect to their crystallinity and electronic properties. Of particular interest is whether there is a preferential location for the PEDOT molecule to adsorb and whether there are any conformational changes upon adsorption that modify the HOMO-LUMO gap. This work is being done in a new pan-style RHK-STM enclosed in a glovebox at Cleveland State University. The glovebox has O2 and H2O levels of less than 1ppm. This allows for sample preparation and imaging in a controlled environment that is free from contamination.

  2. White flight or flight from poverty?

    CERN Document Server

    Jego, C; Jego, Charles; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon of White flight is often illustrated by the case of Detroit whose population dropped from 1.80 million to 0.95 million between 1950 and 2000 while at the same time its Black and Hispanic component grew from 30 percent to 85 percent. But is this case really representative? The present paper shows that the phenomenon of White flight is in fact essentially a flight from poverty. As a confirmation, we show that the changes in White or Black populations are highly correlated which means that White flight is always paralleled by Black flight (and Hispanic flight as well). This broader interpretation of White flight accounts not only for the case of northern cities such as Cincinnati, Cleveland or Detroit, but for all population changes at county level, provided the population density is higher than a threshold of about 50 per square-kilometer which corresponds to moderately urbanized areas (as can be found in states like Indiana or Virginia for instance).

  3. Fifth Annual Workshop on the Application of Probabilistic Methods for Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Victoria (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the 5th Annual FAA/Air Force/NASA/Navy Workshop on the Probabilistic Methods for Gas Turbine Engines hosted by NASA Glenn Research Center and held at the Holiday Inn Cleveland West. The history of this series of workshops stems from the recognition that both military and commercial aircraft engines are inevitably subjected to similar design and manufacturing principles. As such, it was eminently logical to combine knowledge bases on how some of these overlapping principles and methodologies are being applied. We have started the process by creating synergy and cooperation between the FAA, Air Force, Navy, and NASA in these workshops. The recent 3-day workshop was specifically designed to benefit the development of probabilistic methods for gas turbine engines by addressing recent technical accomplishments and forging new ideas. We accomplished our goals of minimizing duplication, maximizing the dissemination of information, and improving program planning to all concerned. This proceeding includes the final agenda, abstracts, presentations, and panel notes, plus the valuable contact information from our presenters and attendees. We hope that this proceeding will be a tool to enhance understanding of the developers and users of probabilistic methods. The fifth workshop doubled its attendance and had the success of collaboration with the many diverse groups represented including government, industry, academia, and our international partners. So, "Start your engines!" and utilize these proceedings towards creating safer and more reliable gas turbine engines for our commercial and military partners.

  4. Plerixafor for autologous CD34+ cell mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Salman

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Huda Salman, Hillard M LazarusDivision of Hematology-Oncology, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: High-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic cells is a crucial treatment option for hematologic malignancy patients. Current mobilization regimes often do not provide adequate numbers of CD34+ cells. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and ligand SDF-1 are integrally involved in homing and mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Disruption of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis by the CXCR4 antagonist, plerixafor, has been demonstrated in Phase II and Phase III trials to improve mobilization when used in conjunction with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. This approach is safe with few adverse events and produces significantly greater numbers of CD34+ cells when compared to G-CSF alone. New plerixafor initiatives include use in volunteer donors for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant and in other disease targets.Keywords: plerixafor, autologous hematopoietic cell transplant, CD34, lymphoma, myeloma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF

  5. Probability estimation with machine learning methods for dichotomous and multicategory outcome: applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Jochen; Liu, Yufeng; Diener, Hans-Christian; Holste, Theresa; Weimar, Christian; König, Inke R; Ziegler, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Machine learning methods are applied to three different large datasets, all dealing with probability estimation problems for dichotomous or multicategory data. Specifically, we investigate k-nearest neighbors, bagged nearest neighbors, random forests for probability estimation trees, and support vector machines with the kernels of Bessel, linear, Laplacian, and radial basis type. Comparisons are made with logistic regression. The dataset from the German Stroke Study Collaboration with dichotomous and three-category outcome variables allows, in particular, for temporal and external validation. The other two datasets are freely available from the UCI learning repository and provide dichotomous outcome variables. One of them, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation Heart Disease dataset, uses data from one clinic for training and from three clinics for external validation, while the other, the thyroid disease dataset, allows for temporal validation by separating data into training and test data by date of recruitment into study. For dichotomous outcome variables, we use receiver operating characteristics, areas under the curve values with bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals, and Hosmer-Lemeshow-type figures as comparison criteria. For dichotomous and multicategory outcomes, we calculated bootstrap Brier scores with 95% confidence intervals and also compared them through bootstrapping. In a supplement, we provide R code for performing the analyses and for random forest analyses in Random Jungle, version 2.1.0. The learning machines show promising performance over all constructed models. They are simple to apply and serve as an alternative approach to logistic or multinomial logistic regression analysis. PMID:24989843

  6. Breast fibroadenomas in adolescents: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Lee, Hooman T SoltanianDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Fibroadenomas are one of the most common benign tumors of the breast in the adolescent population. They account for 68% of all breast masses and 44%–94% of all biopsied breast lesions. Fibroadenomas can range from asymptomatic masses to painful and rapidly growing tumors that can cause significant esthetic distortions of the breast. Given the prevalence of fibroadenomas in the adolescent population and the psychosocial morbidity of finding a mass in the adolescent breast, it is imperative for physicians treating adolescent patients to be familiar and up to date with this disease process. The goal of this article is to provide a brief review of the classification, etiology, symptoms, initial work-up, and update on the management of breast fibroadenomas in the adolescent population.Keywords: breast mass, benign breast neoplasm, breast growth, breast development, breast asymmetry

  7. Considerations for The Instruction Of Research Methodologies In Graduate-Level Distance Education Degree Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cleveland-INNERS

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerations for The Instruction Of Research Methodologies In Graduate-Level Distance Education Degree Programs Tom JONES, Ph.D. Associate Professor Centre for Distance Education Athabasca University, CANADA M. Cleveland-INNERS, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Centre for Distance Education Athabasca University, CANADA ABSTRACT The growth of basic and applied research activity in distance education requires redirection on several fronts, including the instruction of research methods in the education of graduate students. The majority of graduate students in distance education are practitioners whose goals range from carrying out original research to acquiring the concepts and skills necessary to become a practitioner. We argue that the best foundation for achieving both of those goals in distance education is developed by means of an understanding and internalization of sound research design methodologies, primarily acquired by formal instruction, and that an emphasis on research in graduate programs in distance education will encourage theory development. This paper presents the rationale for a general curricular model that attempts to address the sets of research competencies for graduate students in graduate-level distance education programs while at the same time moving students toward an appreciation and understanding of the epistemological foundations for social science research.

  8. Making the grade in a portfolio-based system: student performance and the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy S. Nowacki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG. Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student’s perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement.

  9. Making the grade in a portfolio-based system: student performance and the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student) and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P) students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG) students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG). Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student's perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade) reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement. PMID:23565103

  10. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines. Phase III Final Report for the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Under Phase III of NASA Research Announcement contract NAS3-03124, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated and tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. The team for this effort consisted of Cleveland State University, Gedeon Associates, Sunpower Inc. and International Mezzo Technologies. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator was made from a low-conductivity material. Also, the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator s low flow resistance; thus, the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) are included. The report also includes recommendations for further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  11. A comparison of density of Insight and Ektaspeed plus dental x-ray films using automatic and manual processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the film density of Insight dental X-ray film (Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY, USA) with that of Ektaspeed Plus film (Eastman Kodak) under manual and automatic processing conditions. Insight and wedge on the film under the three different exposure times. The exposed films were processed by both manual and automatic ways. The Base plus fog density and the optical density and the optical density made by exposing step wedge were calculated using a digital densitometer (model 07-443, Victoreen Inc, Cleveland, Ohio, USA). The optical densities of the Insight and Ektaspeed film versus thickness of aluminum wedge at the same exposure time were plotted on the graphs. Statistical analyses were applied for comparing the optical densities of the two films. The film density of both Insight films and Ektaspeed Plus films under automatic processing condition was significantly higher over the manual processing. The film density of Insight over Ektaspeed Plus film. To take the full advantage of reducing exposure time, Insight film should be processed automatically

  12. Research continues on zebra mussel control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers are working on many fronts to learn methods for controlling and combatting zebra mussels, a species of mussel that can attach to the inside of water intakes at hydroelectric and thermal power plants, and can reduce or block water flow. Biologists at the University of Toledo in Ohio report that compounds from the African soapberry plant called lemmatoxins are lethal to zebra mussels. In laboratory tests, researchers have determined 1 to 2 milligrams of purified lemmatoxins per liter will kill the mussels. In field tests, biologist Harold Lee flushed water through a mussel-infested pipe. He found that the berry extract killed mussels in four to eight hours, making continuous treatment of water intake pipes unnecessary, according to a report in New Scientists. The University of Toledo participated in another project, funded by the American Water Works Association Research Foundation. That project team included the cities of Toledo and Cleveland, Ohio, Finkbeiner, Pettis ampersand Strout, Ltd. consulting engineers, and researchers from Ohio's Case Western Reserve University. The team identified a chemical oxidant, sodium hypochlorite, as a cost-effective agent for controlling zebra mussels at water treatment plant intakes. Toledo has used the sodium hypochlorite and reports the chemical has cleared colonies of zebra mussels that had attached to the intake of its water treatment plant

  13. Simulation and Control Lab Development for Power and Energy Management for NASA Manned Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Beach, Raymond F.; Soeder, James F.; McNelis, Nancy B.; May, Ryan; Dever, Timothy P.; Trase, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The development of distributed hierarchical and agent-based control systems will allow for reliable autonomous energy management and power distribution for on-orbit missions. Power is one of the most critical systems on board a space vehicle, requiring quick response time when a fault or emergency is identified. As NASAs missions with human presence extend beyond low earth orbit autonomous control of vehicle power systems will be necessary and will need to reliably function for long periods of time. In the design of autonomous electrical power control systems there is a need to dynamically simulate and verify the EPS controller functionality prior to use on-orbit. This paper presents the work at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio where the development of a controls laboratory is being completed that will be utilized to demonstrate advanced prototype EPS controllers for space, aeronautical and terrestrial applications. The control laboratory hardware, software and application of an autonomous controller for demonstration with the ISS electrical power system is the subject of this paper.

  14. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid bed retorting process. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, S.; Vego, A.; Stehn, J.; Taulbee, D.; Robl, T.; Hower, J.; Mahboub, K.; Robertson, R.; Hornsberger, P.; Oduroh, P.; Simpson, A.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis (shale oil production), gasification (synthesis gas production), and combustion of the spent oil shale for process heat. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The work completed this year involved several different areas. Basic studies of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors were carried out in fluidized and fixed bed reactors using both freshly generated shale oil vapors and model compounds. The design and fabrication of the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II reactor was completed and installation of the process components was initiated. The raw oil shale sample (Cleveland Member from Montgomery County, Kentucky) for the program was mined, prepared, characterized and stored. A preliminary study of KENTORT II-derived oil for possible paving applications was completed, and it was concluded that the shale exhibits acceptable properties as an asphalt recycling agent.

  15. Validation of an Adaptive Combustion Instability Control Method for Gas-Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing testing of an adaptive control method to suppress high frequency thermo-acoustic instabilities like those found in lean-burning, low emission combustors that are being developed for future aircraft gas turbine engines. The method called Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control, was previously tested in an experimental rig designed to simulate a combustor with an instability of about 530 Hz. Results published earlier, and briefly presented here, demonstrated that this method was effective in suppressing the instability. Because this test rig did not exhibit a well pronounced instability, a question remained regarding the effectiveness of the control methodology when applied to a more coherent instability. To answer this question, a modified combustor rig was assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The modified rig exhibited a more coherent, higher amplitude instability, but at a lower frequency of about 315 Hz. Test results show that this control method successfully reduced the instability pressure of the lower frequency test rig. In addition, due to a certain phenomena discovered and reported earlier, the so called Intra-Harmonic Coupling, a dramatic suppression of the instability was achieved by focusing control on the second harmonic of the instability. These results and their implications are discussed, as well as a hypothesis describing the mechanism of intra-harmonic coupling.

  16. Ethical Discourse about the Modification of Food for Therapeutic Purposes: How Patients with Gastrointestinal Diseases View the Good, the Bad, and the Healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Krista L; Geller, Gail; Marshall, Patricia; Tilburt, Jon; Mercer, Marybeth; Brinich, Margaret A; Highland, Janelle; Farrell, Ruth M; Sharp, Richard R

    2012-07-01

    BACKGROUND: Researchers have the potential to utilize genetic modification (GM) technologies to create a hybrid of "food" and "medicine" that may challenge traditional understandings of what is "natural". Moral and ethical concerns are likely to arise in any discussion of these therapeutic foods and will affect the integration of products into clinical care and daily life. This study examined how patients with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) diseases view probiotics as future bioengineered therapeutic foods. METHODS: A multi-site qualitative study consisting of focus groups with chronic GI diseases was conducted at Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic, and Johns Hopkins University RESULTS: We conducted twenty-two focus groups with 136 patients with major GI diseases between March and August 2009. GI patients associated the term "natural" with concepts of diminished risk and morally "good"; conversely, patients associated the term "unnatural" with things that are "risky," "foreign", and morally "bad". Readily available unmodified probiotics were more commonly described as "natural" while genetically modified probiotics were more commonly labeled as "unnatural" and "risky". However, patients acknowledged that not all natural products are safe, nor are unnatural products always harmful. CONCLUSIONS: If GI patient perspectives are indicative of public perceptions of therapeutic foods, our findings suggest that the potential benefits and risks of clinical and public health initiatives employing therapeutic foods will be understood in moralistic terms. Bioethicists and others should be sensitive to the implicit normative appeals that are often embedded in the language of what is "natural" and "unnatural". PMID:22773953

  17. An aerial radiological survey of the former Chemetron factory site and surrounding area, Newburgh Heights, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period April 15--27, 1991, over an area surrounding the former location of a Chemetron Corporation factory and an associated disposal site. The area surveyed is situated in Newburgh Heights, Ohio, 3 kilometers south of Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the gamma ray environment of the former factory and dump site and surrounding area. Contour maps showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level were constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. The exposure rates measured within the survey region were generally uniform and typical of natural background: 3--7 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), excluding an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 μR/h. Enhanced exposure rates not attributable to natural background were measured over three areas within the survey region. Two areas, both within the boundary of a sewage processing plant, showed evidence of cobalt-60 (60CO). A third area, measured over a chemical factory, showed evidence of thorium-232 (232Th). Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized ionization chamber measurements were obtained at seven locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements are in agreement with the aerial data

  18. Time-space Kriging to address the spatiotemporal misalignment in the large datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dong; Kumar, Naresh

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a Bayesian hierarchical spatiotemporal method of interpolation, termed as Markov Cube Kriging (MCK). The classical Kriging methods become computationally prohibitive, especially for large datasets due to the O(n(3)) matrix decomposition. MCK offers novel and computationally efficient solutions to address spatiotemporal misalignment, mismatch in the spatiotemporal scales and missing values across space and time in large spatiotemporal datasets. MCK is flexible in that it allows for non-separable spatiotemporal structure and nonstationary covariance at the hierarchical spatiotemporal scales. Employing MCK we developed estimates of daily concentration of fine particulates matter ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) at 2.5 km spatial grid for the Cleveland Metropolitan Statistical Area, 2000 to 2009. Our validation and cross-validation suggest that MCK achieved robust prediction of spatiotemporal random effects and underlying hierarchical and nonstationary spatiotemporal structure in air pollution data. MCK has important implications for environmental epidemiology and environmental sciences for exposure quantification and collocation of data from different sources, available at different spatiotemporal scales. PMID:24039539

  19. Interprofessional Flight Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfes, Celeste M; Rowe, Amanda S

    2016-01-01

    The Dorothy Ebersbach Academic Center for Flight Nursing in Cleveland, OH, holds an annual flight camp designed for master's degree nursing students in the acute care nurse practitioner program, subspecializing in flight nursing at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University. The weeklong interprofessional training is also open to any health care provider working in an acute care setting and focuses on critical care updates, trauma, and emergency care within the critical care transport environment. This year, 29 graduate nursing students enrolled in a master's degree program from Puerto Rico attended. Although the emergency department in Puerto Rico sees and cares for trauma patients, there is no formal trauma training program. Furthermore, the country only has 1 rotor wing air medical transport service located at the Puerto Rico Medical Center in San Juan. Flight faculty and graduate teaching assistants spent approximately 9 months planning for their participation in our 13th annual flight camp. Students from Puerto Rico were extremely pleased with the learning experiences at camp and expressed particular interest in having more training time within the helicopter flight simulator. PMID:27021671

  20. In Memoriam: Professor Kathryn R. Heidt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry M. Flechtner

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available What is most notable about the life and the career of Professor Kathryn R. Heidt is not that it was tragically cut short by her death on May 24, 2005, but that she was able to achieve so much, both personally and professionally, in the too-brief time allotted to her. After receiving her bachelor’s degree from Penn State and her J.D. from Cleveland State College of Law, Professor Heidt clerked for two years for the Honorable John T. Patton of the Ohio Court of Appeals before becoming an associate with the Philadelphia law firm Duane Morris & Heckscher. Opting for a change in her path in the law, she obtained an LL.M. from Yale Law School and began her distinguished academic career. Before joining the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh as a Professor of Law in 1995, Professor Heidt had served on the law faculty at Wayne State University Law School, and had been a visiting faculty member of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, the University of North Carolina School of Law, New York Law School, and the Law Faculty of the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands.

  1. CROSS-NATIONAL APPLICABILITY OF A PARSIMONIOUS MEASURE OF ACCULTURATION TO GLOBAL CONSUMER CULTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durvasula, Srinivas; Lysonski, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Cleveland and Laroche presented a scale to measure Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture. This measure was the first attempt to gauge consumer mindsets regarding their adaptation to global consumerism. Because this scale consisted of 57 scale items, applying such a lengthy scale can lead to response fatigue. Past research has also suggested that as more items are added to a scale, the informational value of each additional item is marginal. As an alternative, a shorter version of the Acculturation to Global Consumer Culture Scale is presented. The psychometric properties of this scale were verified via multiple group confirmatory factor analysis. A four-country investigation of young adults in China (n = 126; M age = 22.24 yr., SD = 3.63), New Zealand (n = 196; M age = 20.12 yr., SD = 4.12), Nigeria (n = 146; M age = 23.09 yr., SD = 3.80), and the United States (n = 120; M age = 21.67 yr., SD = 4.26) provides support for the cross-national applicability of the proposed parsimonious measure. Limitations and extensions are discussed. PMID:26030207

  2. Use of technology to track program outcomes in a diabetes self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Cinda S; Farmer-Dziak, Nancy; Cardwell, Pat; Snow, Sara

    2005-12-01

    The Diabetes Self-Management Education Program at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, OH, uses widely available technology to facilitate outcomes tracking and market the diabetes program. Baseline assessment data are entered directly into an Access database form (Microsoft, Inc, Seattle, WA). Quarterly, updated weight and lab data are downloaded into the database from the Epicare electronic medical record (Epic Systems Corp, Madison, WI). This system has enabled staff to track outcomes of program participants on an ongoing basis. To date, 438 patients have been entered into the program database, though complete clinical data are not available for all patients. Mean (+/-standard deviation) baseline body mass index of program participants was 35.8+/-9.1 (range 18.0 to 70.0, n=261). Mean (+/-standard deviation) baseline hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) for all patients was 9.5%+/-2.5%, range 4.5% to 18.3% (n=332). Median baseline HbA1c was 9.1%, and the median last available postprogram HbA1c was 7.5% (Pcharting system triggered by an HbA1c > 8.5% and recommending referral to the Diabetes Self-Management Education Program. Since implementation of the prompt, referrals to the program have increased 40%. PMID:16321600

  3. Results From the John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium. A Success Story for NASA and Northeast Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha M.; Barna, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium was established by NASA in 2002 to formulate and implement an integrated, interdisciplinary research program to address risks faced by astronauts during long-duration space missions. The consortium is comprised of a preeminent team of Northeast Ohio institutions that include Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, The National Center for Space Exploration Research, and the NASA Glenn Research Center. The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium research is focused on fluid physics and sensor technology that addresses the critical risks to crew health, safety, and performance. Effectively utilizing the unique skills, capabilities and facilities of the consortium members is also of prime importance. Research efforts were initiated with a general call for proposals to the consortium members. The top proposals were selected for funding through a rigorous, peer review process. The review included participation from NASA's Johnson Space Center, which has programmatic responsibility for NASA's Human Research Program. The projects range in scope from delivery of prototype hardware to applied research that enables future development of advanced technology devices. All of the projects selected for funding have been completed and the results are summarized. Because of the success of the consortium, the member institutions have extended the original agreement to continue this highly effective research collaboration through 2011.

  4. Risk of thromboembolic events in patients with prolactinomas compared with patients with nonfunctional pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, Sann Yu; Alkabbani, Abdulrahman; Hamrahian, Amir; Thorton, Julie N; Kennedy, Lawrence; Weil, Robert; Olansky, Leann; Doshi, Krupa; Makin, Vinne; Hatipoglu, Betul

    2013-12-01

    Prolactin has been proposed as a potent coactivator of platelet aggregation, possibly contributing to thromboembolic events. The objective of the study was to evaluate the relationship between prolactinoma and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Subjects were identified from a prospectively maintained pituitary database at the Cleveland Clinic. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 544 subjects: 347 patients with prolactinomas (prolactinoma group) and 197 patients with nonfunctional pituitary adenomas (control group). Main outcome measures were DVT, PE and CVA. We found that 19 (5.5%) patients in the prolactinoma group and five (2.5%) patients in the control group had documented DVT, PE, or CVA, but this difference was not significant (p = 0.109). However, the mean initial prolactin level was higher at the time of diagnosis among prolactinoma patients than among controls (815.23 ng/ml vs. 15.90 ng/ml; p treatment (with cabergoline, bromocriptine, pergolide and/or other drug) and 4 (5.6%) of 72 patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery had documented DVT, PE, or CVA, which suggests that dopaminergic therapy did not influence the risk of thromboembolic events. Hyperprolactinemia per se does not appear to predispose to a hypercoagulable state. PMID:23203499

  5. Chamber and field evaluations of air pollution tolerances of urban trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnosky, D.F.

    1981-04-01

    Results are presented for a study of the relative air pollution tolerances of 32 urban-tree cultivars as determined by both chamber fumigations and field exposures. Tolerances to ozone and sulfur dioxide, alone and in combination, were determined using short-term, acute doses administered while the plants were inside a plastic fumigation chamber located inside the Cary Arboretum greenhouses. In a follow-up study still underway, representatives of the same cultivars were outplanted at four locations in the greater New York City area. To date, only oxidant-type injury has been observed on trees in the field plots. Cultivars tolerant to all chamber and field exposures were Acer platanoides Cleveland, Crimson King, Emerald Queen, Jade Glen, and Summershade; Acer rubrum Autumn Flame and Red Sunset; Acer saccharum Green Mountain and Temple's Upright; Fagus sylvatica Rotundifolia; Fraxinus pennsylvanica Summit; and Ginkgo biloba Fastigate and Sentry. Cultivars sensitive to ozone as determined by the chamber and field tests and that may serve as bioindicators of the presence of ozone were Gleditsia triacanthos inermis imperial and Platanus acerifolia Bloodgood.

  6. Integrating wound care research into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chester H; Bogie, Kath M

    2007-10-01

    The process of integrating wound care research into clinical practice incorporates research methodology--i.e., the standardized practices, procedures, and rules by which research is performed--and an evidence-based approach. Using examples from the literature and clinician experience treating pressure ulcers in a 32-bed regional spinal cord injury unit in a tertiary referral center in Cleveland, Ohio, the authors describe this process and review the challenges faced by an interdisciplinary skin care team tasked with implementing evidence-based care. Additional considerations include determining the amount of current wound care that is evidence-based and whether wound prevention and care outcomes are improved through the use of evidence-based medicine. Five years after establishing the skin care team and implementing evidence-based care, improvements in care processes and short-term outcomes--specifically, pressure ulcer prevention and treatment protocols including documentation--have been realized. Studies to ascertain the effects of these changes on long-term outcomes are planned. PMID:17978411

  7. Recent Advances and Applications in Cryogenic Propellant Densification Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    This purpose of this paper is to review several historical cryogenic test programs that were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Cleveland, Ohio over the past fifty years. More recently these technology programs were intended to study new and improved denser forms of liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) cryogenic rocket fuels. Of particular interest are subcooled cryogenic propellants. This is due to the fact that they have a significantly higher density (eg. triple-point hydrogen, slush etc.), a lower vapor pressure and improved cooling capacity over the normal boiling point cryogen. This paper, which is intended to be a historical technology overview, will trace the past and recent development and testing of small and large-scale propellant densification production systems. Densifier units in the current GRC fuels program, were designed and are capable of processing subcooled LH2 and L02 propellant at the X33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) scale. One final objective of this technical briefing is to discuss some of the potential benefits and application which propellant densification technology may offer the industrial cryogenics production and end-user community. Density enhancements to cryogenic propellants (LH2, LO2, CH4) in rocket propulsion and aerospace application have provided the opportunity to either increase performance of existing launch vehicles or to reduce the overall size, mass and cost of a new vehicle system.

  8. Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest Research Institute

    2013-11-25

    The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

  9. Different Seed Selection and Conservation Practices for Fresh Market and Dried Chile Farmers in Aguascalientes, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Kraig H; de Jesús Luna-Ruíz, José; Gepts, Paul

    2010-12-01

    Different Seed Selection and Conservation Practices for Fresh Market and Dried Chile Farmers in Aguascalientes, Mexico. The process of selecting and saving seed is the most basic and oldest of agricultural practices. In today's modern and highly capital-intensive agriculture, seeds are often treated like another chemical input. This study sought to examine seed selection and saving practices among chile farmers in Aguascalientes, Mexico, where both industrial and traditional agriculture are practiced. We observed a clear division among farmers who plant chile peppers commercially. Sixty-eight chile pepper farmers were surveyed in order to document seed selection and saving practices. Fifteen respondents (22%) planted chile peppers destined for the fresh market and all utilized purchased commercial seed of F1 hybrid varieties. Fifty-three farmers (78%) planted chiles to be dried and either saved their own or purchased seeds that others had saved and selected. Farmers who saved their own seed sought to maintain an ideotype, rather than directionally select for certain traits, much like Cleveland et al. (2000) chronicled in central Mexican maize farmers. Farmers would benefit from a participatory plant-breeding program in order to maintain productive seed stock for the continued cultivation of dried chile pepper in the state. PMID:21212817

  10. Oil prices and financial stress: A volatility spillover analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines whether there is a volatility transmission between oil prices and financial stress by means of the volatility spillover test. We employ WTI crude oil prices and Cleveland financial stress index for the period 1991–2014 and divide the sample into pre-crisis, in-crisis, and post-crisis periods due to the downward trend in oil price in 2008. The volatility model estimations indicate that oil prices and financial stress index are dominated by long-run volatility. The volatility spillover causality test supports evidence on risk transfer from oil prices to financial stress before the crisis and from financial stress to oil prices after the crisis. The impulse response analysis shows that the volatility transmission pattern has similar dynamics before and after the crisis and is characterized by higher and long-lived effects during the crisis. Our results have implications for both policy makers and investors, and for future work. -- Highlights: •Volatility spillover between oil prices and financial stress index is examined. •Analysis is conducted for sub-periods: pre-crisis, in-crisis, and post-crisis •Oil prices spill on financial stress before the crisis, but spillover reversed after the crisis. •Volatility transmission pattern has similar dynamics before and after the crisis. •Implications for investors and policy makers are discussed

  11. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Linda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. Methods This course was developed and used at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and its associated preceptorship sites in the greater Cleveland area. Leaders of a two-year elective continuity experience at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine used adult learning principles to develop four interactive online modules presenting basics of office practice, difficult patient interviews, common primary care diagnoses, and disease prevention. They can be viewed at http://casemed.case.edu/cpcp/curriculum. Students completed surveys rating the content and technical performance of each module and completed a Generalist OSCE exam at the end of the course. Results Participating students rated all aspects of the course highly; particularly those related to charting and direct patient care. Additionally, they scored very well on the Generalist OSCE exam. Conclusion Students found the web-based modules to be valuable and to enhance their clinical learning. The blended learning model is a useful tool in designing web-based curriculum for enhancing the clinical curriculum of medical students.

  12. The Continued Evaluation of Voucher Impact on the Achievement of Elementary Students in a Majority African American Public School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Kim K.; Boone, William J.; Legan, Natalie A.; Paul, Kelli M.

    Vouchers for students in urban school districts may promote the increased participation of underrepresented groups in the fields of science and engineering in at least two ways: (a) by optimizing the achievement of students who use vouchers and (b) by expanding the scope of educational and curricular options available to students. Presently, nearly 5,000 children in Cleveland, Ohio, attend private schools with publicly funded vouchers. This study presents the results of evaluating the achievement of a cohort of these students from the fall of first grade to the spring of fourth grade. For public school students, first grade seems to be a time during which they catch up with peers who attend private schools with vouchers. The analysis of data using adjusted measures suggests no differences in achievement from first grade to fourth grade with respect to achievement in many content areas. The use of unadjusted measures suggests possible differences with respect to fourth grade reading (with voucher students performing at a statistically higher level than their peers). The present data set neither clearly supports nor refutes the use of vouchers.

  13. The Community Research Scholars Initiative: A Mid-Project Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, Jacqueline; Pike, Earl; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Fischer, Robert L; Collins, Cyleste

    2015-08-01

    Community organizations addressing health and human service needs generally have minimal capacity for research and evaluation. As a result, they are often inadequately equipped to independently carry out activities that can be critical for their own success, such as conducting needs assessments, identifying best practices, and evaluating outcomes. Moreover, they are unable to develop equitable partnerships with academic researchers to conduct community-based research. This paper reports on the progress of the Community Research Scholar Initiative (CRSI), a program that aims to enhance community research and evaluation capacity through training of selected employees from Greater Cleveland community organizations. The intensive 2-year CRSI program includes didactic instruction, fieldwork, multiple levels of community and academic engagement, leadership training, and a mentored research project. The first cohort of CRSI Scholars, their community organizations, and other community stakeholders have incorporated program lessons into their practices and operations. The CRSI program evaluation indicates: the importance of careful Scholar selection; the need to engage executive leadership from Scholar organizations; the value of a curriculum integrating classwork, fieldwork, and community engagement; and the need for continual scholar skill and knowledge assessment. These findings and lessons learned guide other efforts to enhance community organization research and evaluation capacity. PMID:26073663

  14. Comparison of different methods to calibrate torsional spring constant and photodetector for atomic force microscopy friction measurements in air and liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of atomic force microscopy cantilevers have been exhaustively calibrated by a number of techniques to obtain both normal and frictional force constants to evaluate the relative accuracy of the different methods. These were of either direct or indirect character--the latter relies on cantilever resonant frequencies. The so-called Sader [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] and Cleveland [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 403 (1993)] techniques are compared for the normal force constant calibration and while agreement was good, a systematic difference was observed. For the torsional force constants, all the techniques displayed a certain scatter but the agreement was highly encouraging. By far the simplest technique is that of Sader, and it is suggested in view of this validation that this method should be generally adopted. The issue of the photodetector calibration is also addressed since this is necessary to obtain the cantilever twist from which the torsional force is calculated. Here a technique of obtaining the torsional photodetector sensitivity by combining the direct and indirect methods is proposed. Direct calibration measurements were conducted in liquid as well as air, and a conversion factor was obtained showing that quantitative friction measurements in liquid are equally feasible provided the correct calibration is performed

  15. Comparison of different methods to calibrate torsional spring constant and photodetector for atomic force microscopy friction measurements in air and liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Torbjörn; Nordgren, Niklas; Rutland, Mark W.; Feiler, Adam

    2007-09-01

    A number of atomic force microscopy cantilevers have been exhaustively calibrated by a number of techniques to obtain both normal and frictional force constants to evaluate the relative accuracy of the different methods. These were of either direct or indirect character—the latter relies on cantilever resonant frequencies. The so-called Sader [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] and Cleveland [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 403 (1993)] techniques are compared for the normal force constant calibration and while agreement was good, a systematic difference was observed. For the torsional force constants, all the techniques displayed a certain scatter but the agreement was highly encouraging. By far the simplest technique is that of Sader, and it is suggested in view of this validation that this method should be generally adopted. The issue of the photodetector calibration is also addressed since this is necessary to obtain the cantilever twist from which the torsional force is calculated. Here a technique of obtaining the torsional photodetector sensitivity by combining the direct and indirect methods is proposed. Direct calibration measurements were conducted in liquid as well as air, and a conversion factor was obtained showing that quantitative friction measurements in liquid are equally feasible provided the correct calibration is performed.

  16. Load converter interactions with the secondary system in the Space Station Freedom power management and distribution DC test bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Ramon C.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LeRC in Cleveland, Ohio, is responsible for the design, development, and assembly of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Electrical Power System (EPS). In order to identify and understand system level issues during the SSF Program design and development phases, a system Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) DC test bed was assembled. Some of the objectives of this test bed facility are the evaluation of, system efficiency, power quality, system stability, and system protection and reconfiguration schemes. In order to provide a realistic operating scenario, dc Load Converter Units are used in the PMAD dc test bed to characterize the user interface with the power system. These units are dc to dc converters that provide the final system regulation before power is delivered to the load. This final regulation is required on the actual space station because the majority of user loads will require voltage levels different from the secondary bus voltage. This paper describes the testing of load converters in an end to end system environment (from solar array to loads) where their interactions and compatibility with other system components are considered. Some of the system effects of interest that are presented include load converters transient behavior interactions with protective current limiting switchgear, load converters ripple effects, and the effects of load converter constant power behavior with protective features such as foldback.

  17. Connecting the dots: interprofessional health education and delivery system redesign at the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Stuart C; Chokshi, Dave A; Bowen, Judith L; Rugen, Kathryn Wirtz; Cox, Malcolm

    2014-08-01

    Health systems around the United States are embracing new models of primary care using interprofessional team-based approaches in pursuit of better patient outcomes, higher levels of satisfaction among patients and providers, and improved overall value. Less often discussed are the implications of new models of care for health professions education, including education for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other professions engaged in primary care. Described here is the interaction between care transformation and redesign of health professions education at the largest integrated delivery system in the United States: the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Challenges and lessons learned are discussed in the context of a demonstration initiative, the VA Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education. Five sites, involving VA medical centers and their academic affiliates in Boise, Cleveland, San Francisco, Seattle, and West Haven, introduced interprofessional primary care curricula for resident physicians and nurse practitioner students beginning in 2011. Implementation struggles largely revolved around the operational logistics and cultural disruption of integrating educational redesign for medicine and nursing and facilitating the interface between educational and clinical activities. To realize new models for interprofessional teaching, faculty, staff, and trainees must understand the histories, traditions, and program requirements across professions and experiment with new approaches to achieving a common goal. Key recommendations for redesign of health professions education revolve around strengthening the union between interprofessional learning, team-based practice, and high-value care. PMID:24853198

  18. Cooking Dinner at Home--From the Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    It is well past quitting time, but you are still stuck in the office. Your spouse left work over an hour ago, but is caught in bumper-to-bumper traffic. As a result, neither of you were available to pick up your daughter on time from her soccer game. If your son hadn't gotten detention at school today, which also made him late for work, he could have picked her up. The next thing you know, it is already 8:30 at night, and your family members are finally all together under the same roof. No one has had a bite to eat since lunch, and dinner certainly isn't going to cook itself, or is it? For those who are all too familiar with this situation, it might be time to welcome the oven of the future into your homes: the ConnectIo Intelligent Oven, brought to you by TMIO, LLC, of Cleveland. Applying the same remote command and control concepts that NASA uses to run experiments on the International Space Station (ISS), ConnectIo allows its owners to cook dinner from the road, via a cell phone, personal digital assistant, or Internet connection.

  19. Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Development. Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Blake, Kara M.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-30

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy projects are not well understood, and regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. To examine the environmental risks associated with OSW developments in the U.S. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) focused on the following four priority research areas in FY 2012: • Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) - Followed project developments on the two OSW projects that PNNL screened in FY 2011 for environmental consequence: Fishermen’s Energy off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ and LEEDCo. near Cleveland, OH in Lake Erie. • Tethys - Developed a smart knowledge base which houses environmental research, data and information pertaining to OSW energy: • Technical Assessment - Produced a new software to create an automated process of identifying and differentiating between flying organism such as birds and bats by using thermal imagery; and • North Atlantic Right Whales - Developed an environmental risk management system to mitigate the impacts on North Atlantic Right Whales (NARW) during installation and piledriving stages of OSW developments. By identifying and addressing the highest priority environmental risks for OSW devices and associated installations the ERES process assists project proponents, regulators, and stakeholders to engage in the most efficient and effective siting and permitting pathways.

  20. THE ROLE OF THE POSTERIOR TIBIAL NERVE NEUROLISYS IN PERFORATED ORIGIN PLANTING DIABETES AND TROPHIC DIABETIC LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mazilu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is the primary complication that the most likely cause of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. It is one of the most important factors in the emergence planting ulceration in diabetic patients. Prevention of this complication is difficult, particularly because there is no reliable method to test the sensitivity of the plant. It supports the theory that the posterior tibial nerve is at risk of developing chronic compression due to edema. This hypothesis was supported by a comparative study conducted by Lee and Damien M. Dauphinée Doohi, using ultrasound on the ankle, resulting in the conclusion that the diameter of the tibial nerve in diabetic patients with neuropathy was significantly higher than in diabetic patients that did not have polyneuropathy (24.0 vs. 12 mm square. Solution in trying to resolve this problem belongs compression AL Dellon, who noted that after carpal tunnel decompression at hand (which belongs to George Phalen, MD, of Cleveland, Ohio in 1950 major improvements in the sensitivity of fingers hand, decided to try to make the same type of foot surgery and diabetic patients.

  1. Deregulation, Distrust, and Democracy: State and Local Action to Ensure Equitable Access to Healthy, Sustainably Produced Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Lindsay F

    2015-01-01

    Environmental, public health, alternative food, and food justice advocates are working together to achieve incremental agricultural subsidy and nutrition assistance reforms that increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables. When it comes to targeting food and beverage products for increased regulation and decreased consumption, however, the priorities of various food reform movements diverge. This article argues that foundational legal issues, including preemption of state and local authority to protect the public's health and welfare, increasing First Amendment protection for commercial speech, and eroding judicial deference to legislative policy judgments, present a more promising avenue for collaboration across movements than discrete food reform priorities around issues like sugary drinks, genetic modification, or organics. Using the Vermont Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) Labeling Act litigation, the Kauai GMO Cultivation Ordinance litigation, the New York City Sugary Drinks Portion Rule litigation, and the Cleveland Trans Fat Ban litigation as case studies, I discuss the foundational legal challenges faced by diverse food reformers, even when their discrete reform priorities diverge. I also 'explore the broader implications of cooperation among groups that respond differently to the "irrationalities" (from the public health perspective) or "values" (from the environmental and alternative food perspective) that permeate public risk perception for democratic governance in the face of scientific uncertainty. PMID:26591820

  2. Impact of vulvovaginal health on postmenopausal women: a review of surveys on symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish SJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sharon J Parish,1 Rossella E Nappi,2 Michael L Krychman,3 Susan Kellogg-Spadt,4 James A Simon,5 Jeffrey A Goldstein,6 Sheryl A Kingsberg7 1Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo University, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 3Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship Medicine and Clinical Faculty University of California Irvine, Newport Beach and Irvine, CA, USA; 4Pelvic and Sexual Health Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Obstetrics and Gynecology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; 6Novo Nordisk Inc, Princeton, NJ, USA; 7Departments of Reproductive Biology and Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Several recent, large-scale studies have provided valuable insights into patient perspectives on postmenopausal vulvovaginal health. Symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy, which include dryness, irritation, itching, dysuria, and dyspareunia, can adversely affect interpersonal relationships, quality of life, and sexual function. While approximately half of postmenopausal women report these symptoms, far fewer seek treatment, often because they are uninformed about hypoestrogenic postmenopausal vulvovaginal changes and the availability of safe, effective, and well-tolerated treatments, particularly local vaginal estrogen therapy. Because women hesitate to seek help for symptoms, a proactive approach to conversations about vulvovaginal discomfort would improve diagnosis and treatment. Keywords: health care professional, hypoactive sexual desire disorder, local vaginal estrogen therapy, quality of life, urinary tract infection, vulvovaginal atrophy

  3. Applying science and strategy to operating room workforce management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Victoria; Clinton, Christopher; Sagi, Harsha K; Kenney, Robert; Barsoum, Wael K

    2012-01-01

    The traditional means of planning nurse staffing for operating rooms are either poorly translated to the setting or do not provide decision makers with a platform to defend their needs, especially in an era of health care reform. The surgical operations department of the Cleveland Clinic initiated a quality improvement project aimed at applying a scientific method to operating room staffing. One goal was to provide a defensible plan for allocating direct caregiver positions. A second goal was to provide a quick and easy way for nurse managers and directors to track positions and graphically depict the effect of vacancies and orientation on their staffing budgets. Using an objective, scientific method allows position requests to be approved quickly and allows managers to feel much more comfortable functioning in a "lean" mode because they know needed positions will be approved quickly. Managers and directors also have found that graphically depicting numbers of vacant positions, as well as staff in orientation, could quickly relate a story visually rather than getting "bogged down" in narrative (often losing finance administrators along the way). PMID:23198610

  4. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2009-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Technologies of national importance, by Tsutomu Ohkubo, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan; Modeling and simulation advances brighten future nuclear power, by Hussein Khalil, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy and desalination projects, by Ratan Kumar Sinha, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India; A plant with simplified design, by John Higgins, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; A forward thinking design, by Ray Ganthner, AREVA; A passively safe design, by Ed Cummins, Westinghouse Electric Company; A market-ready design, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canada; Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, by Jacques Bouchard, French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France, and Ralph Bennett, Idaho National Laboratory; Innovative reactor designs, a report by IAEA, Vienna, Austria; Guidance for new vendors, by John Nakoski, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Road map for future energy, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria; and, Vermont's largest source of electricity, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Intelligent monitoring technology, by Chris Demars, Exelon Nuclear.

  5. Feasibility of human/robot cooperation in image-directed radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameduri, Scott A.; Newman, Wyatt S.; Weinhous, Martin S.; Glosser, Greg D.; Macklis, Roger

    1998-12-01

    Image-directed radiation therapy potentially offers significant improvement over current open-loop radiotherapy techniques. Utilizing real-time imaging of tumors, it may be possible to direct a treatment beam to achieve better localization of radiation dose. Since real-time imaging offers relatively poor fidelity, automated analysis of images is formidable. However, experienced physicians may take advantage of visual cues and knowledge of how cancer spreads to infer the location of tumors in partially occluded or otherwise ambiguous scenes. At the Cleveland Clinic, an image-directed radiation treatment system, consisting of a relatively compact linear accelerator manipulated by a 6 degree-of-freedom robot, is in use for treatment of brain tumors. This same system could be applied to teleoperated radiation treatment of non-stationary tumors. To evaluate the prospects for operator-interactive, image-directed therapy, a simulator was constructed to determine the effectiveness of emulated human-in-the-loop treatments. Early performance results based on video recordings of actual lung tumors show that image-directed treatment can offer significant improvements over current practice, motivating development of teleoperated treatment systems.

  6. Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix

  7. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Doerr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management.

  8. Monitoring Local Strain in a Thermal Barrier Coating System Under Thermal Mechanical Gas Turbine Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manero, Albert; Sofronsky, Stephen; Knipe, Kevin; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M.; Raghavan, Seetha; Bartsch, Marion

    2015-07-01

    Advances in aircraft and land-based turbine engines have been increasing the extreme loading conditions on traditional engine components and have incited the need for improved performance with the use of protective coatings. These protective coatings shield the load-bearing super alloy blades from the high-temperature combustion gases by creating a thermal gradient over their thickness. This addition extends the life and performance of blades. A more complete understanding of the behavior, failure mechanics, and life expectancy for turbine blades and their coatings is needed to enhance and validate simulation models. As new thermal-barrier-coated materials and deposition methods are developed, strides to effectively test, evaluate, and prepare the technology for industry deployment are of paramount interest. Coupling the experience and expertise of researchers at the University of Central Florida, The German Aerospace Center, and Cleveland State University with the world-class synchrotron x-ray beam at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratory, the synergistic collaboration has yielded previously unseen measurements to look inside the coating layer system for in situ strain measurements during representative service loading. These findings quantify the in situ strain response on multilayer thermal barrier coatings and shed light on the elastic and nonelastic properties of the layers and the role of mechanical load and internal cooling variations on the response. The article discusses the experimental configuration and development of equipment to perform in situ strain measurements on multilayer thin coatings and provides an overview of the achievements thus far.

  9. Developing a Planning Framework for Accessible and Sustained Urban Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Subramani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Food insecurity threatens communities across the Tamilnadu States, characterized by environmental degradation, decreasing agricultural land, rising social inequities, skewed communities, and public health issues. Urban agriculture provides an opportunity to counteract food system problems and empower individuals. Urban agriculture is broadly defined as food production in urban spaces. Despite its benefits, urban agriculture is threatened by institutional barriers. Urban agriculture is not fully supported by municipal laws and policies, making it vulnerable and impermanent. Therefore, developing and implementing planning policies, laws, and programs to support urban agriculture will establish its practices and support its benefits. Research focuses on broad policies, comprehensive plans, zoning ordinances, and organizational infrastructure. Samples are drawn from cities across the Tamilnadu States, including San Francisco, Chicago, Boston, Cleveland, Seattle, and Chicago. Discussion, comparison, and evaluation are based on public input and comment. Because of the very recent and ongoing nature of urban agriculture planning measures, discussed policies, laws, and programs are sometimes incomplete or in the process of being adopted. This thesis establishes opportunities, examples, and boundaries for developing an urban agriculture planning framework and potential nationwide municipal application.

  10. Terrestrial photovoltaic power systems with sunlight concentration. Annual progress report, January 1, 1975--December 31, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, C.E.

    1976-01-31

    This annual report is for the second year of a program to investigate the characteristics of the components and the total system using sunlight concentrated onto solar cells. The second year was primarily to experimentally investigate the conclusions of the first year of analytical studies. Cells have been fabricated that are designed for different intensities. Typically the efficiency of a cell will increase from its 11 percent at AM1 peak to efficiency at the designed concentration level and return to its initial efficiency at about 3 times its designed concentration level. The developed cells have been tested under high intensity simulators and in concentrated sunlight and have shown to have the predicted response. The experimental testing of passive cooling limitations for cooling cells with just finned arrangements in the back of the cell has been completed in the controlled environment of a wind tunnel. These experiments have confirmed the heat transfer coefficients that had been used in the analytical studies. Testing was done to collect heat transfer coefficients for actual wind conditions and these data show good agreement with the controlled wind tunnel data. Four photovoltaic/concentrator system experiments have been started with CR of about 3, 10, 25, and 100. System analysis has indicated that photovoltaic concentration systems may be attractive in low solar irradiation areas such as Cleveland.

  11. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Frontiers of High-Pressure Research

    CERN Document Server

    Etters, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The role of high pressure experiments in the discovery of supercon­ ducting materials with a T. above liquid nitrogen temperature has demon­ strated the importance of such experiments. The same role holds true in the tailoring of materials for optoelectronic devices. In addition, much progress has been made recently in the search for metallic hydro­ gen, and the application of high pressure in polymer research has brought forth interesting results. These facts together with the suc­ cess of previous small size meetings (such as the "First International Conference on the Physics of Solids at High Pressure", held in 1965 in Tucson, Arizona, U. S. A. ; "High Pressure and Low Temperature Physics", held in 1977 in Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A. ; and "Physics of Solids Under High Pressure", held in 1981 in bad Honnef, Germany), motivated us to organize a workshop with emphasis on the newest results and trends in these fields of high pressure research. Furthermore, it was intended to mix experienced and young scien�...

  12. Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrik, Michael [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ruhl, Robert [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels. Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

  13. Is there a relationship between proximity to industry and the occurrence of otitis media with effusion in school entrant children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtby, I; Elliott, K; Kumar, U

    1997-03-01

    In a study of the relationship between the prevalence of persistent otitis media with effusion (OME) in school entrant children in Redcar and Cleveland and the distance of the homes of these children from known industrial emission points, 1156 school entrant children were screened for the presence of persistent OME. The social disadvantage scores and map references were determined from the postcode area of each of the study entrants and map references were also obtained of known industrial emission points in the locality. Analyses were conducted on the association between the presence of OME and distance from emission sources and between the presence of OME and disadvantage score. A significantly greater proportion of study entrants with OME lived within 1000 meters of an industrial emission point than further away. However, there was no trend established between the proportion of study entrants with OME and increasing distance from an emissions source, nor was there any significant relationship established between the social disadvantage score of the areas of residence of the study entrants and the presence of OME. Further research is required to establish the effect of confounding variables on this relationship. PMID:9090283

  14. Implementing a low-starch biscuit-free diet in zoo gorillas: the impact on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Less, E H; Lukas, K E; Bergl, R; Ball, R; Kuhar, C W; Lavin, S R; Raghanti, M A; Wensvoort, J; Willis, M A; Dennis, P M

    2014-01-01

    In the wild, western lowland gorillas consume a diet high in fiber and low in caloric density. In contrast, many gorillas in zoos consume a diet that is high-calorie and low in fiber. Some items commonly used in captive gorilla diets contain high levels of starch and sugars, which are minimal in the natural diet of gorillas. There is a growing concern that captive gorillas may qualify as obese. Furthermore, the leading cause of death for adult male gorillas in zoos is heart disease. In humans, a diet that is high in simple carbohydrates is associated with both obesity and the incidence of heart disease. In response to these issues, we implemented a biscuit-free diet (free of biscuits and low in fruit) and measured serum biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance pre- and post-diet change at three institutions: North Carolina Zoological Garden, Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, and Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. We also added a resistant starch supplement to gorilla diets at two of the above institutions. We anticipated that these diet changes would positively affect biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance. Both diet manipulations led to a reduction in insulin. Resistant starch also decreased overall serum cholesterol levels. Future research will examine these health changes in a greater number of individuals to determine if the results remain consistent with these preliminary findings. PMID:24420273

  15. Comparison of Directionally Solidified Samples Solidified Terrestrially and Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angart, S.; Lauer, M.; Tewari, S. N.; Grugel, R. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports research that has been carried out under the aegis of NASA as part of a collaboration between ESA and NASA for solidification experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus has been on the effect of convection on the microstructural evolution and macrosegregation in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys during directional solidification (DS). Terrestrial DS-experiments have been carried out at Cleveland State University (CSU) and under microgravity on the International Space Station (ISS). The thermal processing-history of the experiments is well defined for both the terrestrially processed samples and the ISS-processed samples. As of this writing, two dendritic metrics was measured: primary dendrite arm spacings and primary dendrite trunk diameters. We have observed that these dendrite-metrics of two samples grown in the microgravity environment show good agreements with models based on diffusion controlled growth and diffusion controlled ripening, respectively. The gravity-driven convection (i.e., thermosolutal convection) in terrestrially grown samples has the effect of decreasing the primary dendrite arm spacings and causes macrosegregation. Dendrite trunk diameters also show differences between the earth- and space-grown samples. In order to process DS-samples aboard the ISS, the dendritic seed crystals were partially remelted in a stationary thermal gradient before the DS was carried out. Microstructural changes and macrosegregation effects during this period are described and have modeled.

  16. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) Aquifer, Oklahoma, 1987 to 2009, and simulation of available water in storage, 2010-2059

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Ryter, Derek; Neel, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Magers, Jessica S.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma. The study area for this investigation was the extent of the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Water from the Central Oklahoma aquifer is used for public, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supply. With the exception of Oklahoma City, all of the major communities in central Oklahoma rely either solely or partly on groundwater from this aquifer. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area, incorporating parts of Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties, has a population of approximately 1.2 million people. As areas are developed for groundwater supply, increased groundwater withdrawals may result in decreases in long-term aquifer storage. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, investigated the hydrogeology and simulated groundwater flow in the aquifer using a numerical groundwater-flow model. The purpose of this report is to describe an investigation of the Central Oklahoma aquifer that included analyses of the hydrogeology, hydrogeologic framework of the aquifer, and construction of a numerical groundwater-flow model. The groundwater-flow model was used to simulate groundwater levels and for water-budget analysis. A calibrated transient model was used to evaluate changes in groundwater storage associated with increased future water demands.

  17. Environmental fate of spinosad. 1. Dissipation and degradation in aqueous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Cheryl B; Bormett, Gary A; Saunders, Donald G; Powers, Fred L; McGibbon, Alec S; Reeves, Graham L; Rutherford, Laura; Balcer, Jesse L

    2002-05-22

    Spinosad is a bacterially derived insect control agent consisting of two active compounds, spinosyns A and D. The objective of this paper is to describe the environmental fate of spinosad in aquatic systems. To this end, several studies performed to meet regulatory requirements are used to study the fate and degradation in individual environmental media. Specifically, investigations of abiotic (hydrolysis and photolysis) and biotic (aerobic and anaerobic aquatic) processes are described. Understanding developed from the laboratory-based studies has been tested and augmented by an outdoor microcosm study. Understanding of aquatic fate is a building block for a complete environmental safety assessment of spinosad products (Cleveland, C. B.; Mayes, M. A.; Cryer, S. A. Pest Manag. Sci. 2001, 58, 70-84). From individual investigations, the following understanding of dissipation emerges: (1) Aqueous photolysis of spinosad is rapid (observed half-lives of spinosyn aglycon degradates. (3) Hydrolytic degradation involves loss of the forosamine sugar and water and reduction on the macrolide ring to a double bond at the 16,17-position. PMID:12009994

  18. Selection and evaluation of blood- and tribologically compatible journal bearing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S F; Calabrese, S J; Malanoski, S B; Golding, L R; Smith, W A; Hamby, M

    1997-01-01

    A critical issue in the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF) Innovative Ventricular Assist System (IVAS) blood pump is the selection of materials for the blood-lubricated journal bearing. Under normal operating conditions, the journal bearing geometry creates a thick blood film that separates the rotating and stationary surfaces. However, since start-up and certain transients could cause temporary contact, the material pair selected for these surfaces must be both tribologically and blood compatible. Combinations of two biocompatible alloys were tested: a titanium-zirconium-niobium alloy (Ti-13Zr-13Nb) and a zirconium-niobium alloy (Zr-2.5Nb). A standard pin-on-disk tester was used, with the contact surfaces lubricated by glycerol/saline mixtures simulating the viscosity range of blood. One test series evaluated start-up conditions; the other modeled a high-speed rub that might occur if the fluid film broke down. Results showed that the preoxidized Zr-2.5Nb pin/Ti-13Zr-13Nb disk combination was superior at all sliding velocities; a self-mated Zr-2.5Nb pair also showed promise. The oxide film on a self-mated Ti-13Zr-13Nb pair, and a Ti-13Zr-13Nb pin and Zr-2.5Nb disk combination did not show adequate wear life. More work remains to explain distinct performance differences of certain combinations, with more data needed on mechanical properties of thin, hard coatings on softer metal substrates. PMID:9360116

  19. An Engine Research Program Focused on Low Pressure Turbine Aerodynamic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Wyzykowski, John; Chiapetta, Santo; Adamczyk, John

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive test program was performed in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland Ohio using a highly instrumented Pratt and Whitney Canada PW 545 turbofan engine. A key objective of this program was the development of a high-altitude database on small, high-bypass ratio engine performance and operability. In particular, the program documents the impact of altitude (Reynolds Number) on the aero-performance of the low-pressure turbine (fan turbine). A second objective was to assess the ability of a state-of-the-art CFD code to predict the effect of Reynolds number on the efficiency of the low-pressure turbine. CFD simulation performed prior and after the engine tests will be presented and discussed. Key findings are the ability of a state-of-the art CFD code to accurately predict the impact of Reynolds Number on the efficiency and flow capacity of the low-pressure turbine. In addition the CFD simulations showed the turbulent intensity exiting the low-pressure turbine to be high (9%). The level is consistent with measurements taken within an engine.

  20. Pharmacologic management of the patient with disorders of the cardiovascular system. Infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowper, T R

    1996-07-01

    IE, although an infrequent event, remains a serious and frequently lethal complication in patients at risk. Oral microorganisms undoubtedly play a significant role in the development of IE in such patients. For example, in a retrospective review of prosthetic cardiac valve candidates (156) at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 15% were found to have at least one abscessed tooth, whereas approximately 17% were found to have severe (class IV) periodontal disease. Cardiac defects in conjunction with bacteremias from such dental pathoses clearly elevate the risk, although a small but increasing number of noncardiac conditions and behavioral patterns seem also to be able to induce susceptibility. Whether dental or other medical procedures are truly direct inducers of IE, however, remains to be proven and in all probability are only minor contributors overall. Despite its ubiquitous use, antibiotic prophylaxis has not been proven in human clinical trials, and its underlying rationale is arbitrary and questionable at best; nevertheless, its efficacy in animal models has led to the current human protocols. A more profitable strategy, and certainly an adjunctive one, should be to direct one's effort at eliminating oral pathology and educating and motivating patients at risk toward meticulous oral hygiene--an exhortation published many years before the advent of antibiotics and still undoubtedly the best recommendation today. PMID:8829048

  1. Cine club

    CERN Multimedia

    Ciné club

    2015-01-01

    Thursday 5 February 2015 at 20:00 CERN Council Chamber Stranger Than Paradise     Directed by Jim Jarmusch - USA, 1984, 89 minutes A self-styled New York hipster is paid a surprise visit by his younger cousin from Budapest. From initial hostility and indifference a small degree of affection grows between the two. Along with a friend, they eventually end up visiting their aunt in the wastelands of Cleveland and then proceed to Florida where they lose all their money gambling before unwittingly gaining a fortune. Original version English; French subtitles   Thursday 12 February 2015 at 20:00 CERN Council Chamber Down by Law     Directed by Jim Jarmusch - USA, 1986, 107 minutes DJ Zack and pimp Jack end up in prison for being too laid-back to avoid being framed for crimes they didn't commit. They end up sharing a cell with eccentric Italian optimist Roberto, whose limited command of the English language is both entertaining and infuri...

  2. Health care's service fanatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life. PMID:23898737

  3. Performance Gains of Propellant Management Devices for Liquid Hydrogen Depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents background, experimental design, and preliminary experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to investigate the parameters that affect liquid acquisition device (LAD) performance in a liquid hydrogen (LH2) propellant tank, to mitigate risk in the final design of the LAD for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission, and to provide insight into optimal LAD operation for future LH2 depots. Preliminary test results show an increase in performance and screen retention over the low reference LH2 bubble point value for a 325 2300 screen in three separate ways, thus improving fundamental LH2 LAD performance. By using a finer mesh screen, operating at a colder liquid temperature, and pressurizing with a noncondensible pressurant gas, a significant increase in margin is achieved in bubble point pressure for LH2 screen channel LADs.

  4. Transplant Ethics: Let's Begin the Conversation Anew : A Critical Look at One Institute's Experience with Transplant Related Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafran, David; Smith, Martin L; Daly, Barbara J; Goldfarb, David

    2016-06-01

    Standardizing consultation processes is increasingly important as clinical ethics consultation (CEC) becomes more utilized in and vital to medical practice. Solid organ transplant represents a relatively nascent field replete with complex ethical issues that, while explored, have not been systematically classified. In this paper, we offer a proposed taxonomy that divides issues of resource allocation from viable solutions to the issue of organ shortage in transplant and then further distinguishes between policy and bedside level issues. We then identify all transplant related ethics consults performed at the Cleveland Clinic (CC) between 2008 and 2013 in order to identify how consultants conceptually framed their consultations by the domains they ascribe to the case. We code the CC domains to those in the Core Competencies for Healthcare Consultation Ethics in order to initiate a broader conversation regarding best practices in these highly complex cases. A discussion of the ethical issues underlying living donor and recipient related consults ensues. Finally, we suggest that the ethical domains prescribed in the Core Competencies provide a strong starting ground for a common intra-disciplinary language in the realm of formal CEC. PMID:26055878

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contents include: Issuances of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission--Commonwealth Edison Company (Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1), Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Indian Point, Unit 2), Metropolitan Edison Company, et al. (Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1), Pacific Gas and Electric Company (Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), Pacific Gas and Electric Company (Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), Power Authority of the State of New York (Indian Point, Unit 3), Texas Utilities Generating Company, et al. (Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2); Issuances of Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards--Pacific Gas and Electric Company (Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), Philadelphia Electric Company, et al. (Peach Bottom Atomic Power Statin, Units 2 and 3), Metropolitan Edison Company, et al. (Three Mile Island Nuclear Statin, Unit No. 2), Public Service Electric and Gas Company (Hope Creek Generating Station, Units 1 and 2), The Toledo Edison Company, et al. (Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station, Units 2 and 3); Issuances of the Atomic Safety Licensing Boards--Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, et al. (Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), Commonwealth Edison Company (Dresden Station, Units 2 and 3), Houston Lighting and Power Company (Allens Creek Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1), Southern California Edison Company, et al. (San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Units 2 and 3), Texas Utilities Generating Company, et al. (Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2), Texas Utilities Generating Company, et al

  6. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 4 of 6: ON-LINE, NON-DESTRUCTIVE MECHANICAL PROPERTY MEASUREMENT USING LASER-ULTRASOUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre' Moreau; Martin Lord; Daniel Levesqure; Marc Dubois; Jean Bussiere; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Christian Padioleau; Guy Lamouche; Teodor Veres; Martin Viens; Harold Hebert; Pierre Basseras; Cheng-Kuei Jen

    2001-03-31

    The goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility to measure the mechanical properties, such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation, strain hardening exponent and plastic strain ratio parameters, of low carbon steel sheets on the production line using laser ultrasound. The ultrasound generated by the developed apparatus travels mostly back and forth in the thickness of the steel sheet. By measuring the time delay between two echoes, and the relative amplitude of these two echoes, one can measure ultrasound velocity and attenuation. These are governed by the microstructure: grain size, crystallographic texture, dislocations, etc. Thus, by recording the time behavior of the ultrasonic signal, one can extract microstructural information. These microstructural information together with the modified Hall-Petch equation allow measurement of the mechanical properties. Through laboratory investigations with a laboratory laser ultrasound system, followed by the installation of a prototype system at LTV Steel Company's No.1 Inspection Line in Cleveland, all target mechanical properties of ultra low carbon (ULC), low carbon (LC) and high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel sample lots were measured meeting or nearly meeting all the target accuracies. Thus, the project realized its goal to demonstrate that the mechanical properties of low carbon steel sheets can be measured on-line using laser ultrasound

  7. Obituary: Thomas C. Van Flandern (1940-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, David; Slabinski, Victor

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Thomas Charles Van Flandern, an expert in celestial mechanics and cosmology, died January 9, 2009 in Seattle, Washington, of colon cancer. He was 68. Van Flandern was an astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory from 1963 to 1983. He developed software to predict and analyze lunar occultations to improve lunar orbital and fundamental star catalog data. In later years he championed increasingly controversial theories. But his 1978 prediction that some asteroids have natural satellites, which was almost universally rejected, was verified when the Galileo spacecraft photographed Dactyl, a satellite of (243) Ida, during its flyby in 1993. Besides astronomy and computers, he had strong interests in biochemistry and nutrition, and he ran a business selling personal computers in the 1980s. Tom Van Flandern was born June 26, 1940 in Cleveland, Ohio, the first child of Robert F. Van Flandern and Anna Mary Haley. His father, a police officer, left the family when Tom Van Flandern was 5. His mother died when he was 16; he and his siblings then lived with their grandmother, Margery Jobe, until he went to college. Tom Van Flandern became interested in astronomy as a child. He used his first telescope, purchased with newspaper delivery earnings, to observe lunar occultations, and then learned how to predict them, sparking a life-long passion for dynamical astronomy. While attending St. Ignatius High School, Van Flandern and fellow student Thomas Petrie organized the Cleveland Moonwatch team to observe the first artificial satellites, the only team without an adult organizer. In 1958, Tom Van Flandern entered Xavier University where he led the Cincinnati Moonwatch team. He learned computer programming at a summer job with General Electric and wrote software to calculate "look angles" from orbital elements. The Cincinnati team became a top producer of observations using these predictions. Tom obtained a B.S. in mathematics from Xavier in 1962. He spent the next year at

  8. Research and Technology 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    to the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Glenn comprises more than 140 buildings, including 24 major facilities and over 500 specialized research and test facilities. Additional facilities are located at Plum Brook Station, which is about 50 miles west of Cleveland. Plum Brook Station has four large, major, world-class facilities for space research available for Government and industry programs. Knowledge is the end product of our activities. The R&T reports help make this knowledge fully available to potential users the aircraft engine industry, the space industry, the energy industry, the automotive industry, the aerospace industry, and others. It is organized so that a broad cross section of the community can readily use it. Each article begins with a short introductory paragraph that should prove valuable for the layperson. These articles summarize the progress made during the year in various technical areas and portray the technical and administrative support associated with Glenn s technology programs. We hope that this information is useful to all. If additional information is desired, readers are encouraged to contact the researchers identified at the end of each article and to visit Glenn on the World Wide Web at http://www.grc.nasa.gov.

  9. Evaluation of nepafenac in prevention of macular edema following cataract surgery in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rishi Singh,1 Louis Alpern,2 Glenn J Jaffe,3 Robert P Lehmann,4 John Lim,5 Harvey J Reiser,6 Kenneth Sall,7 Thomas Walters,8 Dana Sager91Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 2The Cataract, Glaucoma, and Refractive Surgery Center, El Paso, TX, 3Duke Eye Center, Duke Reading Center, Duke University, Durham, NC, 4Lehmann Eye Center, Nacogdoches, TX, 5Houston Eye Associates, Houston, TX, 6Eye Care Specialists, Kingston, PA, 7Sall Research Medical Center, Artesia, CA, 8Texan Eye, Austin, TX, 9Alcon Research Ltd, Fort Worth, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate nepafenac ophthalmic suspension 0.1% (Nevanac®; Alcon Research Ltd in the prevention of macular edema following cataract surgery in diabetic retinopathy patients.Methods: This was a multicenter, randomized, double-masked, vehicle-controlled study of 263 adult diabetic patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy requiring cataract surgery. Patients were randomized (1:1 to instill nepafenac or vehicle three times daily beginning 1 day prior to surgery through day 90. Efficacy included the percentage of patients who developed macular edema (≥30% increase in central subfield macular thickness from baseline and the percentage of patients with decreases of more than five letters in best-corrected visual acuity from day 7 to 90.Results: A significantly lower percentage of patients in the nepafenac group developed macular edema relative to patients in the vehicle group (3.2% versus 16.7%; P < 0.001. A significantly lower percentage of patients in the nepafenac group had best-corrected visual acuity decreases of more than five letters relative to patients in the vehicle group on day 30 (P < 0.001, day 60 (P = 0.002, and day 90 (P = 0.006. The mean central subfield macular thickness and mean percent change from baseline in macular volume were also significantly lower in the nepafenac group versus the vehicle group at days 14 through 90 (P

  10. Can A Smartphone Replace The Operative Note?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherall, Joseph; Oak, Sameer; Vega, Jose F.; Strnad, Greg; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A large portion of the body of orthopedic surgical research is conducted retrospectively, using the operative note as a main data source. Operative notes tend to infrequently report quantitative data, significantly limiting the precision with which research questions can be assessed (Scherer et al., 2003). Large scale surgical outcomes studies have identified specific surgical parameters as valid predictors of key surgical outcomes (Kaeding, Pedroza, Reinke, Huston, & Spindler, 2015). Thus, it is now feasible to develop a data capture system that collects more accurate, robust surgical data quickly and with lower cost than operative note dictation. The objectives of this study are as follows: 1. Develop a provider-friendly, evidence-based, data capture system for lower limb orthopedic surgeries.2. Assess the performance of the data capture system on the dimensions of agreement with operative note and implant log, consistency of data quality, and speed of provider input. Methods: A multidisciplinary team including administration, orthopedic surgery staff, and software development was assembled for the design of the surgical database. The database was developed in Redcap and user interfaces were created for Android and IOS operating systems. Branching logic was created to streamline provider data input. All data input was created with discrete fields. Cleveland Clinic owned I-Phones were used for surgeon data input. All surgeons at Cleveland Clinic Sports Health were included in the dataset. One hundred cases were randomly selected from the first four months of data collection (February- June 2015). Cases were limited to those undergoing ACL repair, meniscal repair, or both. Duplicate data on these 100 cases was collected via chart review. These two datasets were compared. Cohen’s Kappa statistic was used to assess agreement. Results: Table 1 shows the Kappa statistic and 95% confidence interval for agreement between the database and the chart review

  11. Avaliação médica: o consumo na medicina e a mercantilização da saúde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Monteiro dos Santos Jr

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A Saúde vem sendo ameaçada pela colonização empresarial do médico que, iniciada dentro da Universidade, prolonga-se no ambiente de trabalho. Essa ação tem origem no ensino defasado da realidade científica e na asserção de tendências individualistas que expressam opiniões isoladas e não abalizadas, em geral induzidas pelas propagandas e investigações encomendadas para agitar o mercado no uso de aparelhos e produtos médico-farmacêuticos. OBJETIVO: Usar o ponto de vista do Cirurgião Geral e do Coloproctologista para comentar a mercantilização da saúde e a maneira como a Instituição Industrial, usando a empresa médica, age e modifica a ação do médico, contribuindo para o alto custo da Medicina. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: As bases serão os exames laboratoriais e as avaliações cardiovasculares pré-operatórias de rotina, usados para operações não cardíacas em pacientes cardiopatas. O material e o conteúdo para discussão foram extraídos do livro de Ivan Illich¹, do artigo de atualização de Coelho e col. ², do modelo proposto na Cleveland Clinic³ sobre avaliação pré-operatória e das normas estabelecidas pelo American College of Cardiology e pela American Heart Association4 para a orientação de avaliação médica mínima, necessária e suficiente, de pacientes cardiopatas, quando candidatos a tratamento cirúrgico de doenças em outros órgãos.BACKGROUND: The Health has been threatened by the physician's managerial colonization that, begun inside of the University, continues in the work environment. That action has origin of the teaching in disagreement with the scientific reality and in the assertion of individualistic tendencies expressing isolated and not-distinguished opinions, in general induced by the investigations requested to give rise to the market of drugs and devices disposable for physician and pharmacists. PURPOSE: The aim of this report is to use the General Surgeon's point of view

  12. Associations between the 2007 Medicare reimbursement reduction for bone mineral density testing and osteoporosis drug therapy patterns of female Medicare beneficiaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SJ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sun Jung Kim,1,2 Joo Hun Lee,3 Sulgi Kim,4 Shunichi Nakagawa,5 Heather Bertelson,6 Julia Lam,7 Ji Won Yoo6,7 1Department of Public Health, 2Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 3Department of Media and Communication, Hanyang University College of Social Sciences, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA; 5Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; 6Department of Internal Medicine, Aurora Health Care, Milwaukee, WI, USA; 7Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA Objective: To examine how drug therapy patterns for osteoporosis have changed after the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS reimbursement reduction in 2007, in relation to follow-up bone mineral density (BMD testing status. Methods: We used a retrospective temporal shift design to examine changes in drug therapy patterns before (Phase 1: January 1, 2005–December 31, 2006 and after (Phase 2: July 1, 2007–June 30, 2009 the MPFS reimbursement reduction in 2007, Cleveland, OH, USA. Participants were osteoporotic older women in Phase 1 (n=1,340 and Phase 2 (n=1,437. The main outcomes were a adherence, b adjustment, c occurrence of an extended gap, and d restarting drug therapy after an extended gap. Follow-up BMD testing status by study phase and location were also analyzed. Results: BMD testing rates at physicians’ offices decreased from 64.5% in Phase 1 to 58.4% in Phase 2 (P=0.02; however, testing rates in hospital outpatient settings increased (from 20.8% to 24.5%. There were also decreases in drug therapy adjustment from 15.9% in Phase 1 to 11.6% in Phase 2 (odds ratio [OR]: 0.73; P<0.01 and in restarting drug therapy after an extended gap (55.4% in Phase 1 and 43.6% in Phase 2; OR: 0.76; P<0

  13. 1997 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Wallace, Kristi L.

    1999-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors over 40 historically active volcanoes along the Aleutian Arc. Twenty are seismically monitored and for the rest, the AVO monitoring program relies mainly on pilot reports, observations of local residents and ship crews, and daily analysis of satellite images. In 1997, AVO responded to eruptive activity or suspect volcanic activity at 11 volcanic centers: Wrangell, Sanford, Shrub mud volcano, Iliamna, the Katmai group (Martin, Mageik, Snowy, and Kukak volcanoes), Chiginagak, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Okmok, Cleveland, and Amukta. Of these, AVO has real-time, continuously recording seismic networks at Iliamna, the Katmai group, and Pavlof. The phrase “suspect volcanic activity” (SVA), used to characterize several responses, is an eruption report or report of unusual activity that is subsequently determined to be normal or enhanced fumarolic activity, weather-related phenomena, or a non-volcanic event. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) about the 1997 activity of 5 Russian volcanoes--Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Alaid (SVA). This report summarizes volcanic activity and SVA in Alaska during 1997 and the AVO response, as well as information on the reported activity at the Russian volcanoes. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a “significant” investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of reports throughout the year of steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1997 response record.

  14. Constraining the Spatial and Temporal Variability of Atmospheric Conditions to Explore the Infrasound Detection of Volcanic Eruptions in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzi, A. M.; Schwaiger, H. F.; Fee, D.; Haney, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Alaska's over 50 historically active volcanoes span 2,500 kilometers, and their eruptions pose great threats to the aviation industry. This makes both prompt observations of explosion onsets and changes in intensity a necessity. Due to their expansive range and remoteness, these volcanoes are predominantly monitored by local seismic networks, remote observations including satellite imagery and infrasound sensors. Infrasound is an especially crucial tool in this area because infrasound data collection is not obstructed by frequent cloud cover (as in satellite imagery) and infrasound waves can travel hundreds to thousands of kilometers. However, infrasound station coverage is relatively sparse and strong wind and temperature gradients in the atmosphere create multiple waveguides and shadow zones where the propagation of infrasound is enhanced and diminished, respectively. To accurately constrain volcanic source information and the long-range propagation of infrasound waves, a detailed characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of the atmosphere is vital. These properties can be constrained using a ground-to-space model similar to that of Drob et al. (2003) based upon varied meteorological observations and applied to infrasound waves to model the propagation of infrasound. Here we present the first results of a re-analysis system constructed by the Alaska Volcano Observatory to accurately characterize and model long-range infrasound propagation from volcanic eruptions. We select a number of case studies to examine infrasound detections (or lack thereof) from recent eruptions of Alaskan volcanoes, including the November 2014 eruption of Pavlof Volcano and July 2015 eruption of Cleveland Volcano. Detailed examination of the acoustic propagation conditions will provide additional insight into detection capability and eruption dynamics with future work aiming to implement real-time long-range infrasound propagation modeling.Drob, Douglas P., J. M. Picone

  15. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance – Part II: Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleiman, Mohamad [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kirchstetter, Thomas W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Berdahl, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gilbert, Haley E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quelen, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Marlot, Lea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Preble, Chelsea V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Montalbano, Amandine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rosseler, Olivier [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Akbari, Hashem [Concordia Univ., Montreal (Canada); Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Destaillats, Hugo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-09

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products₋single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles₋and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. In conclusion, this accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  16. Stirling technology development at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Mason, Lee S.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Stirling Technology Company (STC), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are developing a free-piston Stirling convertor for a high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) for NASA Space Science missions. The SRG is being developed for multimission use, including providing electric power for unmanned Mars rovers and deep space missions. NASA GRC is conducting an in-house technology project to assist in developing the convertor for space qualification and mission implementation. Recent testing of 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDC's) built by STC includes mapping of a second pair of TDC's, single TDC testing, and TDC electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility characterization on a non-magnetic test stand. Launch environment tests of a single TDC without its pressure vessel to better understand the convertor internal structural dynamics and of dual-opposed TDC's with several engineering mounting structures with different natural frequencies have recently been completed. A preliminary life assessment has been completed for the TDC heater head, and creep testing of the IN718 material to be used for the flight convertors is underway. Long-term magnet aging tests are continuing to characterize any potential aging in the strength or demagnetization resistance of the magnets used in the linear alternator (LA). Evaluations are now beginning on key organic materials used in the LA and piston/rod surface coatings. GRC is also conducting finite element analyses for the LA, in part to look at the demagnetization margin on the permanent magnets. The world's first known integrated test of a dynamic power system with electric propulsion was achieved at GRC when a Hall-effect thruster was successfully operated with a free-piston Stirling power source. Cleveland State University is developing a multi-dimensional Stirling computational fluid dynamics code to significantly improve Stirling loss predictions and assist in

  17. Resolution of torsional vibration issue for large turbine generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excitation of turbine generator torsional natural frequencies in the region near 120 Hz by electrical transients in the power system has resulted in blade failures for several large 1,800 rpm nuclear turbines. At Cleveland Electric's Perry Nuclear Power plant a combination of advanced measurement techniques and analyses were used to identify and resolve a potential torsional vibration problem without adverse impact on the plant availability. The Perry turbine generator consists of a high pressure turbine, three low pressure turbines with 43 inch last stage blades, and a 1,250 MWe four pole generator operating at 1,800 rpm. Torsional vibration measurements obtained from random vibration during operation were acquired just prior to the 1994 refueling outage. The measurements indicated that the 26th torsional mode of vibration was just under 120 Hz and within the range of frequencies for which the manufacturer recommends modifying the unit to shift the problem torsional natural frequency. Extensive analytical modeling was used to design a modification to shift the torsional natural frequencies away from 120 Hertz and the modification was implemented during the refueling outage without affecting outage critical path. An off-line ramp test and additional on-line monitoring performed at the conclusion of the outage confirmed that the on-line method provided accurate measurements of the torsional natural frequencies and demonstrated that, with the modification, the torsional natural frequencies were sufficiently removed from 120 Hertz to allow turbine generator operation. The modification, which involved brazing of the tie wires on all last stage blades, also significantly reduces the stress on the last stage blades that result from negative sequence currents, further increasing the operating margin of the turbine generator with respect to electrical transients and faults

  18. Implementation of an electronic surgical referral service. Collaboration, consensus and cost of the surgeon – general practitioner Delphi approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augestad KM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Knut Magne Augestad,1–3 Arthur Revhaug,1,3 Roar Johnsen,4 Stein-Olav Skrøvseth,2 Rolv-Ole Lindsetmo1,3 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, 2Department of Integrated Care and Telemedicine, University Hospital North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; 3Department of Colorectal Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; 4Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Background: Poor coordination between levels of care plays a central role in determining the quality and cost of health care. To improve patient coordination, systematic structures, guidelines, and processes for creating, transferring, and recognizing information are needed to facilitate referral routines. Methods: Prospective observational survey of implementation of electronic medical record (EMR-supported guidelines for surgical treatment. Results: One university clinic, two local hospitals, 31 municipalities, and three EMR vendors participated in the implementation project. Surgical referral guidelines were developed using the Delphi method; 22 surgeons and seven general practitioners (GPs needed 109 hours to reach consensus. Based on consensus guidelines, an electronic referral service supported by a clinical decision support system, fully integrated into the GPs' EMR, was developed. Fifty-five information technology personnel and 563 hours were needed (total cost 67,000 £ to implement a guideline supported system in the EMR for 139 GPs. Economical analyses from a hospital and societal perspective, showed that 504 (range 401–670 and 37 (range 29–49 referred patients, respectively, were needed to provide a cost-effective service. Conclusion: A considerable amount of resources were needed to reach consensus on the surgical referral guidelines. A structured approach by the Delphi method and close collaboration between IT personnel, surgeons and primary care physicians were needed to

  19. Hydrologic, Social, and Economic Efficacy of Green Infrastructure Credit Programs: Toward Citizen Stormwater Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, O. O.; Kertesz, R.; Rossman, L.; Shuster, W.

    2013-12-01

    Fostering 'citizen stormwater management', whereby citizens make stormwater management a part of their everyday lives, aims to improve the resilience of the urban water social-ecological system by reducing the load on the stormwater collection system through investment in natural and social capitals. A popular method of incentivizing citizen stormwater management is offering stormwater fee discounts as credits for the installation of green infrastructure onsite. Such installations, in effect, reduce the amount of impervious area by disconnecting them from the sewer system. We analyze 4 such programs (Portland OR, Cleveland OH, Fort Myers FL, and Lynchburg VA) which offer discounts to single family residences for installing rain gardens or bioinfiltration features. Findings indicate large variability in the hydrological, social, and economic efficacy of these programs. We assessed hydrologic efficacy using the Environmental Protection Agency's recently released Stormwater Calculator, a user-friendly model based on SWMM. Hydrologic efficacy was most sensitive to level of detail in administrative rules (i.e., specifics pertaining to soil drainage, slope), regional conditions (e.g., precipitation) and local conditions (e.g., soil, percent of impervious area treated). Social efficacy was measured by the accessibility of the programs to average citizens and varied from highly accessible programs, whereby municipalities had sufficient outreach efforts such that average residents could install their own green infrastructure, to programs with no outreach and contradictory rules which would require a professional engineer to navigate the process and install an eligible rain garden. Economic efficiency was largely dependent on the base stormwater fee (i.e., higher baseline bill results in higher discount and thus higher incentive to participate). From the perspective of a homeowner, they may receive a windfall (i.e., % runoff reduced urban water social-ecological system.

  20. [Is the introduction of innovative methods in cardiovascular diagnostics and therapy to quick?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, R

    2016-03-01

    Andreas Grüntzig can be regarded as the pioneer of modern cardiology. Based on the previous experiences of Charles Dotter in Portland, Oregon, and after many years of preparation as a young 38-year-old physician and consultant he carried out the first percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in a 38-year-old patient in Zurich in 1977, supported by the cardiac surgeons A. Senning and M. Turina. Despite high ranking publications and early preparedness to share his experiences the development of PTCA stagnated and was met with great scepticism. The technique was new, technically difficult and aimed at aortocoronary bypass surgery, which was itself still in its infancy 10 years after the introduction in Cleveland in 1968. Even after several years only two patients per week were admitted for treatment in Zurich. In a similar way the young cardiac surgeon H.R. Andersen was a pioneer in Denmark whose ideas and own experiments with a balloon catheter-assisted aortic valve implantation were not initially taken up by the leading companies of the time and publication of the data suffered lengthy delays. It took 10 years before Prof. A. Cribier in Rouen followed up his ideas and carried out the first valve implantation again in pioneer work after many years of preparation in 2002. Again, the new method for treatment of very old and high risk patients needed many years before it was accepted. The breakthrough only became possible when this new technique began to be used in cardiac surgery after the introduction of hybrid cardiac catheter operating rooms. Despite evidence-based studies innovative methods are not subject to the same criteria throughout Europe with respect to the timely introduction of innovative and validated procedures also in consideration of reimbursement and this has become an important initiative of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). PMID:26873914

  1. Optical coherence tomography using the Niris system in otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Marc; Armstrong, William B.; Djalilian, Hamid R.; Crumley, Roger L.; Kim, Jason H.; Nguyen, Quoc A.; Foulad, Allen I.; Ghasri, Pedram E.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To determine the feasibility and accuracy of the Niris Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) system in imaging of the mucosal abnormalities of the head and neck. The Niris system is the first commercially available OCT device for applications outside ophthalmology. Methods: We obtained OCT images of benign, premalignant and malignant lesions throughout the head and neck, using the Niris OCT imaging system (Imalux, Cleveland, OH). This imaging system has a tissue penetration depth of approximately 1-2mm, a scanning range of 2mm and a spatial depth resolution of approximately 10-20μm. Imaging was performed in the outpatient setting and in the operating room using a flexible probe. Results: High-resolution cross-sectional images from the oral cavity, nasal cavity, ears and larynx showed distinct layers and structures such as mucosa layer, basal membrane and lamina propria, were clearly identified. In the pathology images disruption of the basal membrane was clearly shown. Device set-up took approximately 5 minutes and the image acquisition was rapid. The system can be operated by the person performing the exam. Conclusions: The Niris system is non invasive and easy to incorporate into the operating room and the clinic. It requires minimal set-up and requires only one person to operate. The unique ability of the OCT offers high-resolution images showing the microanatomy of different sites. OCT imaging with the Niris device potentially offers an efficient, quick and reliable imaging modality in guiding surgical biopsies, intra-operative decision making, and therapeutic options for different otolaryngologic pathologies and premalignant disease.

  2. The impact of global warming and anoxia on marine benthic community dynamics: an example from the Toarcian (Early Jurassic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Danise

    Full Text Available The Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Early Jurassic fossil record is an archive of natural data of benthic community response to global warming and marine long-term hypoxia and anoxia. In the early Toarcian mean temperatures increased by the same order of magnitude as that predicted for the near future; laminated, organic-rich, black shales were deposited in many shallow water epicontinental basins; and a biotic crisis occurred in the marine realm, with the extinction of approximately 5% of families and 26% of genera. High-resolution quantitative abundance data of benthic invertebrates were collected from the Cleveland Basin (North Yorkshire, UK, and analysed with multivariate statistical methods to detect how the fauna responded to environmental changes during the early Toarcian. Twelve biofacies were identified. Their changes through time closely resemble the pattern of faunal degradation and recovery observed in modern habitats affected by anoxia. All four successional stages of community structure recorded in modern studies are recognised in the fossil data (i.e. Stage III: climax; II: transitional; I: pioneer; 0: highly disturbed. Two main faunal turnover events occurred: (i at the onset of anoxia, with the extinction of most benthic species and the survival of a few adapted to thrive in low-oxygen conditions (Stages I to 0 and (ii in the recovery, when newly evolved species colonized the re-oxygenated soft sediments and the path of recovery did not retrace of pattern of ecological degradation (Stages I to II. The ordination of samples coupled with sedimentological and palaeotemperature proxy data indicate that the onset of anoxia and the extinction horizon coincide with both a rise in temperature and sea level. Our study of how faunal associations co-vary with long and short term sea level and temperature changes has implications for predicting the long-term effects of "dead zones" in modern oceans.

  3. Geon deal triggers bloodbath in Goodrich stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stock market has not taken well to BFGoodrich's plans to sell half of its Geon vinyl business to the public in an initial public offering (IPO). Before the announcement of both the Geon offering and Clinton's economic plan, Goodrich stock was selling at about $54/share; a week later, it closed at $42.875. With 25.6 million shares, $285 million of market value, about one-quarter of the total, evaporated in response. As planned, the Geon offering is expected to raise $400 million-$450 million (net, after-tax). The company will redeploy the capital to grow its aerospace business, which focuses on aircraft maintenance and repair, by strategic acquisition. CEO John Ong says, 'We will use the proceeds to expand our specialty chemicals and aerospace businesses,' and the attractive opportunities are aerospace. 'There aren't any bargains in specialty chemicals now,' says Mark L. Parr, analyst at McDonald ampersand Co. Securities (Cleveland). If Goodrich makes only aerospace purchases, specialty chemicals could end up generating less than half of Goodrich's revenues and earnings, although the company expects strong specialty chemicals growth to 'maintain a balance' between the two business areas over the long term. 'Goodrich was never going to be the low-cost producer in PVC [polyvinyl chloride],' says Leonard Bogner, of Prudential Securities (New York), who thinks the move 'makes sense.' Goodrich, advised by Goldman Sachs (New York), apparently reasons that with the IPO market now strong, Wall Street bullish about PVC, and some strong acquisition candidates available in aerospace, it makes good sense to monetize Geon promptly. Some analysts agree: 'This is the point in the PVC cycle where the values tend to be highest, because the stock valuation runs well in advance of earnings,' says Parr

  4. TAL Performance and Mission Analysis in a CDL Capacitor Powered Direct-Drive Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrbud, Ivana; Rose, M. Frank; Oleson, Steve R.; Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1999-01-01

    The goals of this research are (1) to prove the concept feasibility of a direct-drive electric propulsion system, and (2) to evaluate the performance and characteristics of a Russian TAL (Thruster with Anode Layer) operating in a long-pulse mode, powered by a capacitor-based power source developed at Space Power Institute. The TAL, designated D-55, is characterized by an external acceleration zone and is powered by a unique chemical double layer (CDL) capacitor bank with a capacitance of 4 F at a charge voltage of 400 V. Performance testing of this power supply on the TAL was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, OH. Direct thrust measurements of the TAL were obtained at CDL power levels ranging from 450 to 1750 W. The specific impulse encompassed a range from 1150 s to 2200 s, yielding thruster system efficiencies between 50 and 60%. Preliminary mission analysis of the CDL direct-drive concept and other electric propulsion options was performed for the ORACLE spacecraft in 6am/6pm and 12am/12pm, 300 km sun-synchronous orbits. The direct-drive option was competitive with the other systems by increasing available net mass between 5 and 42% and reducing two-year system wet mass between 18 and 63%. Overall, the electric propulsion power requirements for the satellite solar array were reduced between 57 and 91% depending oil the orbit evaluated The direct-drive, CDL capacitor-based concept in electric propulsion thus promises to be a highly-efficient, viable alternative for satellite operations in specific near-Earth missions.

  5. Succession and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes, Frank V; Galford, Robert M

    2004-06-01

    Norman Windom, the chairman of Tiverton Media, may not know much about the world of popular music, but he does fancy himself a careful planner and a superb judge of managerial talent. That's why he's been grooming COO Sean Kinnane, a Wharton-minted numbers man, to take over an important division, Aleph Records, and one day Tiverton itself. But Derek Solomon, Aleph's 68-year-old CEO and founder, remains a creative force and a father figure to the label's artists. What's more, he's touchy about anything that might slow down Aleph's responses to the market's ever-shifting preferences--or that might call into question his indispensability. Though Sean dutifully participates in Tiverton's broad-based and elaborate executive development plan, he senses that Aleph's future leadership structure is uncertain. As impatient as he is ambitious, he announces that he's leaving Tiverton for more suitable pastures. Several of his associates, also unsure about their fate within Aleph, are following him out the door. In one fell swoop, they've torn Norman's proud succession plan apart. What kind of plan should the board adopt going forward? Commenting on this fictional case study are Francis N. Bonsignore, a senior vice president at Marsh & McLennan; Michelle L. Buck, a clinical associate professor of management and organizations at Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management; Jon Younger, who heads leadership development at National City Corporation, a financial holding company in Cleveland; and Thomas Leppert, the chairman and CEO of the Turner Corporation, a large construction company in Dallas. PMID:15202285

  6. Draft environmental statement related to construction of Erie Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2: (Docket Nos. STN 50-580 and STN 50-581)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action is the issuance of construction permits to the Ohio Edison Company, acting on behalf of itself, the Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Duquesne Light Company, Pennsylvania Power Company, and the Toledo Edison Company, for the construction of the Erie Nuclear Plant Units 1 and 2, located in Erie County, Ohio. A total of 704 hectares (ha) (1740 acres) will be used for the Erie plant site. Construction-related activities on the primary site will disturb about 223 ha (551 acres). Approximately 641 ha (1584 acres) will be required for transmission line rights-of-way. The 3.86-km (2.4-mile) intake and discharge pipeline land corridor will involve alteration of approximately 13 ha (32 acres) of corridor and 1 ha (2.5 acres) for shore facilities. Also, 3.9 ha (9.6 acres) of lake bottom will be disturbed to provide 15-m-wide (50-ft-wide) trenches and an additional 15-m-wide (50-ft-wide) area for storage of excavated material for subsequent backfill for the 701-m (2300-ft) intake and 579-m (1900-ft) discharge lines. Plant construction will involve some community impacts. No residents will be displaced from the site property. Traffic on local roads will increase due to construction and commuting activities. The influx of construction workers' families (a peak work force of about 2700) is expected to cause no major housing or school problems. It is assumed that aquatic organisms entrained in the circulating water system will be killed due to thermal and mechanical shock. The maximum impact based on the population densities of phytoplankton and zooplankton organisms in the adjacent lake area will be the destruction of 0.1% of the entrainable organisms from the lake water. The entrainment of fish larvae will not constitute a significant impact on the lake fishery. 62 figs., 32 tabs

  7. Extreme Environment Simulation - Current and New Capabilities to Simulate Venus and Other Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, Tibor; Vento, Dan; Lalli, Nick; Palinski, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Science, technology, and planetary mission communities have a growing interest in components and systems that are capable of working in extreme (high) temperature and pressure conditions. Terrestrial applications range from scientific research, aerospace, defense, automotive systems, energy storage and power distribution, deep mining and others. As the target environments get increasingly extreme, capabilities to develop and test the sensors and systems designed to operate in such environments will be required. An application of particular importance to the planetary science community is the ability for a robotic lander to survive on the Venus surface where pressures are nearly 100 times that of Earth and temperatures approach 500C. The scientific importance and relevance of Venus missions are stated in the current Planetary Decadal Survey. Further, several missions to Venus were proposed in the most recent Discovery call. Despite this interest, the ability to accurately simulate Venus conditions at a scale that can test and validate instruments and spacecraft systems and accurately simulate the Venus atmosphere has been lacking. This paper discusses and compares the capabilities that are known to exist within and outside the United States to simulate the extreme environmental conditions found in terrestrial or planetary surfaces including the Venus atmosphere and surface. The paper then focuses on discussing the recent additional capability found in the NASA Glenn Extreme Environment Rig (GEER). The GEER, located at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is designed to simulate not only the temperature and pressure extremes described, but can also accurately reproduce the atmospheric compositions of bodies in the solar system including those with acidic and hazardous elements. GEER capabilities and characteristics are described along with operational considerations relevant to potential users. The paper presents initial operating results and concludes

  8. Robust breathing signal extraction from cone beam CT projections based on adaptive and global optimization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ming; Wei, Jie; Li, Tianfang; Yuan, Yading; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of extracting respiratory signals from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections within the framework of the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) technique. Acquired prior to the radiotherapy treatment, CBCT projections were preprocessed for contrast enhancement by converting the original intensity images to attenuation images with which the AS image was created. An adaptive robust z-normalization filtering was applied to further augment the weak oscillating structures locally. From the enhanced AS image, the respiratory signal was extracted using a two-step optimization approach to effectively reveal the large-scale regularity of the breathing signals. CBCT projection images from five patients acquired with the Varian Onboard Imager on the Clinac iX System Linear Accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were employed to assess the proposed technique. Stable breathing signals can be reliably extracted using the proposed algorithm. Reference waveforms obtained using an air bellows belt (Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH) were exported and compared to those with the AS based signals. The average errors for the enrolled patients between the estimated breath per minute (bpm) and the reference waveform bpm can be as low as  -0.07 with the standard deviation 1.58. The new algorithm outperformed the original AS technique for all patients by 8.5% to 30%. The impact of gantry rotation on the breathing signal was assessed with data acquired with a Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, Canada) and found to be minimal on the signal frequency. The new technique developed in this work will provide a practical solution to rendering markerless breathing signal using the CBCT projections for thoracic and abdominal patients.

  9. Fully automated segmentation of carotid and vertebral arteries from contrast enhanced CTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisenaire, Olivier; Virmani, Sunny; Olszewski, Mark E.; Ardon, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    We propose a method for segmenting and labeling the main head and neck vessels (common, internal, external carotid, vertebral) from a contrast enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA) volume. First, an initial centerline of each vessel is extracted. Next, the vessels are segmented using 3D active objects initialized using the first step. Finally, the true centerline is identified by smoothly deforming it away from the segmented mask edges using a spline-snake. We focus particularly on the novel initial centerline extraction technique. It uses a locally adaptive front propagation algorithm that attempts to find the optimal path connecting the ends of the vessel, typically from the lowest image of the scan to the Circle of Willis in the brain. It uses a patient adapted anatomical model of the different vessels both to initialize and constrain this fast marching, thus eliminating the need for manual selection of seed points. The method is evaluated using data from multiple regions (USA, India, China, Israel) including a variety of scanners (10, 16, 40, 64-slice; Brilliance CT, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH, USA), contrast agent dose, and image resolution. It is fully successful in over 90% of patients and only misses a single vessel in most remaining cases. We also demonstrate its robustness to metal and dental artifacts and anatomical variability. Total processing time is approximately two minutes with no user interaction, which dramatically improves the workflow over existing clinical software. It also reduces patient dose exposure by obviating the need to acquire an unenhanced scan for bone suppression as this can be done by applying the segmentation masks.

  10. Perceptions of pathology informatics by non-informaticist pathologists and trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addie Walker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although pathology informatics (PI is essential to modern pathology practice, the field is often poorly understood. Pathologists who have received little to no exposure to informatics, either in training or in practice, may not recognize the roles that informatics serves in pathology. The purpose of this study was to characterize perceptions of PI by noninformatics-oriented pathologists and to do so at two large centers with differing informatics environments. Methods: Pathology trainees and staff at Cleveland Clinic (CC and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH were surveyed. At MGH, pathology department leadership has promoted a pervasive informatics presence through practice, training, and research. At CC, PI efforts focus on production systems that serve a multi-site integrated health system and a reference laboratory, and on the development of applications oriented to department operations. The survey assessed perceived definition of PI, interest in PI, and perceived utility of PI. Results: The survey was completed by 107 noninformatics-oriented pathologists and trainees. A majority viewed informatics positively. Except among MGH trainees, confusion of PI with information technology (IT and help desk services was prominent, even in those who indicated they understood informatics. Attendings and trainees indicated desire to learn more about PI. While most acknowledged that having some level of PI knowledge would be professionally useful and advantageous, only a minority plan to utilize it. Conclusions: Informatics is viewed positively by the majority of noninformatics pathologists at two large centers with differing informatics orientations. Differences in departmental informatics culture can be attributed to the varying perceptions of PI by different individuals. Incorrect perceptions exist, such as conflating PI with IT and help desk services, even among those who claim to understand PI. Further efforts by the PI community could

  11. Design of a power management and distribution system for a thermionic-diode powered spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.

    1996-01-01

    The Electrical Systems Development Branch of the Power Technology Division at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio is designing a Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) System for the Air Force's Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) Engine Ground Test Demonstration (EGD). The ISUS program uses solar-thermal propulsion to perform orbit transfers from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) and from LEO to Molnya. The ISUS uses the same energy conversion receiver to perform the LEO to High Earth Orbit (HEO) transfer and to generate on-orbit electric power for the payloads. On-orbit power generation is accomplished via two solar concentrators heating a dual-cavity graphite-core which has Thermionic Diodes (TMD's) encircling each cavity. The graphite core and concentrators together are called the Receiver and Concentrator (RAC). The TDM-emitters reach peak temperatures of approximately 2200K, and the TID-collectors are run at approximately 1000K. Because of the high Specific Impulse (I(sup sp)) of solar thermal propulsion relative to chemical propulsion, and because a common bus is used for communications, GN&C, power, etc., a substantial increase in payload weight is possible. This potentially allows for a stepdown in the required launch vehicle size or class for similar payload weight using conventional chemical propulsion and a separate spacecraft bus. The ISUS power system is to provide 1000W(sub e) at 28+/-6V(sub dc) to the payload/spacecraft from a maximum TID generation capability of 1070W(sub e) at 2200K. Producing power with this quality, protecting the spacecraft from electrical faults and accommodating operational constraints of the TID's are the responsibilities of the PMAD system. The design strategy and system options examined along with the proposed designs for the Flight and EGD configurations are discussed herein.

  12. Advanced Technology Development for Stirling Convertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2004-01-01

    A high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) for use on potential NASA Space Science missions is being developed by the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Stirling Technology Company, and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). These missions may include providing spacecraft onboard electric power for deep space missions or power for unmanned Mars rovers. GRC is also developing advanced technology for Stirling convertors, aimed at substantially improving the specific power and efficiency of the convertor and the overall power system. Performance and mass improvement goals have been established for second- and thirdgeneration Stirling radioisotope power systems. Multiple efforts are underway to achieve these goals, both in-house at GRC and under various grants and contracts. The status and results to date for these efforts will be discussed in this paper. Cleveland State University (CSU) is developing a multi-dimensional Stirling computational fluid dynamics code, capable of modeling complete convertors. A 2-D version of the code is now operational, and validation efforts at both CSU and the University of Minnesota are complementing the code development. A screening of advanced superalloy, refractory metal alloy, and ceramic materials has been completed, and materials have been selected for creep and joining characterization as part of developing a high-temperature heater head. A breadboard characterization is underway for an advanced controller using power electronics for active power factor control with a goal of eliminating the heavy tuning capacitors that are typically needed to achieve near unity power factors. Key Stirling developments just initiated under recent NRA (NASA Research Announcement) awards will also be discussed. These include a lightweight convertor to be developed by Sunpower Inc. and an advanced microfabricated regenerator to be done by CSU.

  13. Approximate Entropies for Stochastic Time Series and EKG Time Series of Patients with Epilepsy and Pseudoseizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnalek, Brian; Zurcher, Ulrich; O'Dwyer, Rebecca; Kaufman, Miron

    2009-10-01

    A wide range of heart rate irregularities have been reported in small studies of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy [TLE]. We hypothesize that patients with TLE display cardiac dysautonomia in either a subclinical or clinical manner. In a small study, we have retrospectively identified (2003-8) two groups of patients from the epilepsy monitoring unit [EMU] at the Cleveland Clinic. No patients were diagnosed with cardiovascular morbidities. The control group consisted of patients with confirmed pseudoseizures and the experimental group had confirmed right temporal lobe epilepsy through a seizure free outcome after temporal lobectomy. We quantified the heart rate variability using the approximate entropy [ApEn]. We found similar values of the ApEn in all three states of consciousness (awake, sleep, and proceeding seizure onset). In the TLE group, there is some evidence for greater variability in the awake than in either the sleep or proceeding seizure onset. Here we present results for mathematically-generated time series: the heart rate fluctuations ξ follow the γ statistics i.e., p(ξ)=γ-1(k) ξ^k exp(-ξ). This probability function has well-known properties and its Shannon entropy can be expressed in terms of the γ-function. The parameter k allows us to generate a family of heart rate time series with different statistics. The ApEn calculated for the generated time series for different values of k mimic the properties found for the TLE and pseudoseizure group. Our results suggest that the ApEn is an effective tool to probe differences in statistics of heart rate fluctuations.

  14. Berea Sandstone gas reservoirs in Portage County, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coogan, A.H.; Heath, L.L.

    1984-12-01

    The Mississippian Berea Sandstone is a reservoir for shallow gas in Randolph and Suffield townships of Portage County, Ohio. The Berea Sandstone is well known in Ohio from its outcrops at the outskirts of Cleveland. It is among the more productive formations in Ohio where it yields gas, oil, or gas and oil at moderate to very shallow depths. The great differences in reservoir quality, sandstone distribution, and producibility in Berea oil and gas fields are partly related to the use of the term Berea for several sandstone bodies that produce from different structural and stratigraphic settings. In Portage County, the Berea Sandstone is up to 60 ft (18 m) thick and has a porosity in the 15-25% range. The sand is white, medium to fine-grained quartz, poorly cemented, and without substantial shale interbeds. The reservoir lies below the Cap Berea, a gray, cemented thin bed at the base of the Sunbury Shale (driller's Coffee shale). In Portage County, the sand is currently interpreted as fluvial or deltaic. Within the field, thickness of the reservoir and hydrocarbon saturated zone varies little. Natural gas is produced from the top 30 ft (9 m) of the reservoir. The reservoir energy is water drive. The gas fields lie just updip from a steep structural terrace interpreted as a fault zone. The trap for the fields is anticlinal and the Sunbury Shale is the seal. New wells drilled into the reservoir at 400-500 ft (122-152 m) in depth produce gas without water. Initial open flow tested up to 1.0 MMCFGD at an initial reservoir pressure of about 80 psig (552 kPa).

  15. Safety and Efficacy of Permacol Injection in the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Jennifer; Ayantunde, Abraham; Praveen, Bandipalyam V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Permacol has been gaining popularity in recent times for the treatment of fecal incontinence (FI). This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of anal submucosal Permacol injection in the treatment of FI. Methods All consecutive patients who underwent Permacol injection for FI over a 3-year period were included. Patients' data relating to obstetric history, anorectal/pelvic operations, type of FI, preoperative anorectal physiology results and follow-up details for outcome measures were collected. Preoperative and postoperative Cleveland Clinic Florida Incontinence Scores (CCFISs) were noted. Patients were surveyed by using a telephone questionnaire to assess the quality of life and other outcome measures. Data were analysed using SPSS ver.19.0. Results Thirty patients (28 females and 2 males) with a median age of 67 years were included in the study. Of those patients, 37%, 50%, and 13% were noted to have passive, mixed and urge FI, respectively. Six of the patients (20%) had repeat Permacol injections, 5 of whom had sustained responses to the first Permacol injection for a mean of 11 months. There was a significant improvement in the CCFIS from a baseline median of 12.5, mean 12.8 interquartile range [IQR], 6–20), to a median of 3.5, mean 4.8 (IQR, 0–20), P patients surveyed by telephone 89% were satisfied with their overall experience and the improvement in their symptoms following Permacol injections. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that Permacol injection for the treatment of FI is safe and effective and has no associated major complications. However, the results are not permanent; consequently, a significant proportion of the patients with an initial response may require repeat injections.

  16. Preliminary MIPCC Enhanced F-4 and F-15 Preformance Characteristics for a First Stage Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloesel, Kurt J.; Clark, Casie M.

    2013-01-01

    Performance increases in turbojet engines can theoretically be achieved through Mass Injection Pre-Compressor Cooling (MIPCC), a process involving injecting water or oxidizer or both into an afterburning turbojet engine. The injection of water results in pre-compressor cooling, allowing the propulsion system to operate at high altitudes and Mach numbers. In this way, a MIPCC-enhanced turbojet engine could be used to power the first stage of a reusable launch vehicle or be integrated into an existing aircraft that could launch a 100-lbm payload to a reference 100-nm altitude orbit at 28 deg inclination. The two possible candidates for MIPCC flight demonstration that are evaluated in this study are the F-4 Phantom II airplane and the F-15 Eagle airplane (both of McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois), powered by two General Electric Company (Fairfield, Connecticut) J79 engines and two Pratt & Whitney (East Hartford, Connecticut) F100-PW-100 engines, respectively. This paper presents a conceptual discussion of the theoretical performance of each of these aircraft using MIPCC propulsion techniques. Trajectory studies were completed with the Optimal Trajectories by Implicit Simulation (OTIS) software (NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio) for a standard F-4 airplane and a standard F-15 airplane. Standard aircraft simulation models were constructed, and the thrust in each was altered in accordance with estimated MIPCC performance characteristics. The MIPCC and production aircraft model results were then reviewed to assess the feasibility of a MIPCC-enhanced propulsion system for use as a first-stage reusable launch vehicle; it was determined that the MIPCC-enhanced F-15 model showed a significant performance advantage over the MIPCC-enhanced F-4 model.

  17. Preliminary MIPCC Enhanced F-4 and F-15 Performance Characteristics for a First Stage Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloesel, Kurt J.

    2013-01-01

    Performance increases in turbojet engines can theoretically be achieved through Mass Injection Pre-Compressor Cooling (MIPCC), a process involving injecting water or oxidizer or both into an afterburning turbojet engine. The injection of water results in pre-compressor cooling, allowing the propulsion system to operate at high altitudes and Mach numbers. In this way, a MIPCC-enhanced turbojet engine could be used to power the first stage of a reusable launch vehicle or be integrated into an existing aircraft that could launch a 100-lbm payload to a reference 100-nm altitude orbit at 28 deg inclination. The two possible candidates for MIPCC flight demonstration that are evaluated in this study are the F-4 Phantom II airplane and the F-15 Eagle airplane (both of McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois), powered by two General Electric Company (Fairfield, Connecticut) J79 engines and two Pratt & Whitney (East Hartford, Connecticut) F100-PW-100 engines, respectively. This paper presents a conceptual discussion of the theoretical performance of each of these aircraft using MIPCC propulsion techniques. Trajectory studies were completed with the Optimal Trajectories by Implicit Simulation (OTIS) software (NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio) for a standard F-4 airplane and a standard F-15 airplane. Standard aircraft simulation models were constructed, and the thrust in each was altered in accordance with estimated MIPCC performance characteristics. The MIPCC and production aircraft model results were then reviewed to assess the feasibility of a MIPCC-enhanced propulsion system for use as a first-stage reusable launch vehicle; it was determined that the MIPCC-enhanced F-15 model showed a significant performance advantage over the MIPCC-enhanced F-4 model.

  18. Association of genetic loci with sleep apnea in European Americans and African-Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay R Patel

    Full Text Available Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is known to have a strong familial basis, no genetic polymorphisms influencing apnea risk have been identified in cross-cohort analyses. We utilized the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe to identify sleep apnea susceptibility loci. Using a panel of 46,449 polymorphisms from roughly 2,100 candidate genes on a customized Illumina iSelect chip, we tested for association with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI as well as moderate to severe OSA (AHI≥15 in 3,551 participants of the Cleveland Family Study and two cohorts participating in the Sleep Heart Health Study.Among 647 African-Americans, rs11126184 in the pleckstrin (PLEK gene was associated with OSA while rs7030789 in the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPAR1 gene was associated with AHI using a chip-wide significance threshold of p-value<2×10(-6. Among 2,904 individuals of European ancestry, rs1409986 in the prostaglandin E2 receptor (PTGER3 gene was significantly associated with OSA. Consistency of effects between rs7030789 and rs1409986 in LPAR1 and PTGER3 and apnea phenotypes were observed in independent clinic-based cohorts.Novel genetic loci for apnea phenotypes were identified through the use of customized gene chips and meta-analyses of cohort data with replication in clinic-based samples. The identified SNPs all lie in genes associated with inflammation suggesting inflammation may play a role in OSA pathogenesis.

  19. Comparison of Plasma and Urine Biomarker Performance in Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Schley

    Full Text Available New renal biomarkers measured in urine promise to increase specificity for risk stratification and early diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI but concomitantly may be altered by urine concentration effects and chronic renal insufficiency. This study therefore directly compared the performance of AKI biomarkers in urine and plasma.This single-center, prospective cohort study included 110 unselected adults undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass between 2009 and 2010. Plasma and/or urine concentrations of creatinine, cystatin C, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP, kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM1, and albumin as well as 15 additional biomarkers in plasma and urine were measured during the perioperative period. The primary outcome was AKI defined by AKIN serum creatinine criteria within 72 hours after surgery.Biomarkers in plasma showed markedly better discriminative performance for preoperative risk stratification and early postoperative (within 24h after surgery detection of AKI than urine biomarkers. Discriminative power of urine biomarkers improved when concentrations were normalized to urinary creatinine, but urine biomarkers had still lower AUC values than plasma biomarkers. Best diagnostic performance 4h after surgery had plasma NGAL (AUC 0.83, cystatin C (0.76, MIG (0.74, and L-FAPB (0.73. Combinations of multiple biomarkers did not improve their diagnostic power. Preoperative clinical scoring systems (EuroSCORE and Cleveland Clinic Foundation Score predicted the risk for AKI (AUC 0.76 and 0.71 and were not inferior to biomarkers. Preexisting chronic kidney disease limited the diagnostic performance of both plasma and urine biomarkers.In our cohort plasma biomarkers had higher discriminative power for risk stratification and early diagnosis of AKI than urine biomarkers. For preoperative risk stratification of AKI clinical models showed similar discriminative performance

  20. Toolbox for Urban Mobility Simulation: High Resolution Population Dynamics for Global Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, B. L.; Lu, W.; Liu, C.; Thakur, G.; Karthik, R.

    2015-12-01

    framework to assist decision makers at all levels - local, state, regional, and federal. Using Cleveland, Tennessee as an example, in this presentation, we illustrate how emerging cities could easily assess future land use scenario driven impacts on energy and environment utilizing such a capability.