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Sample records for cleft mutated reverse

  1. Mutations in PHF8 are associated with X linked mental retardation and cleft lip/cleft palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laumonnier, F; Holbert, S; Ronce, N; Faravelli, F; Lenzner, S; Schwartz, CE; Lespinasse, J; Van Esch, H; Lacombe, D; Goizet, C; Tuy, FPD; van Bokhoven, H; Fryns, JP; Chelly, J; Ropers, HH; Moraine, C; Hamel, BCJ; Briault, S

    2005-01-01

    Truncating mutations were found in the PHF8 gene ( encoding the PHD finger protein 8) in two unrelated families with X linked mental retardation (XLMR) associated with cleft lip/ palate (MIM 300263). Expression studies showed that this gene is ubiquitously transcribed, with strong expression of the

  2. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Kang, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant malformation syndrome characterized by orofacial clefting (OFC) and lower lip pits. The clinical presentation of VWS is variable and can present as an isolated OFC, making it difficult to distinguish VWS cases from individuals with non...

  3. Reverse mutations in the fragile X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.T.; Houck, G.E. Jr.; Ding, Xiaohua [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States)

    1996-08-09

    Three females were identified who have apparent reversal of fragile X premutations. Based on haplotype analysis of nearby markers, they were found to have inherited a fragile X chromosome from their premutation carrier mothers, and yet had normal size FMR1 repeat alleles. The changes in repeat sizes from mother to daughter was 95 to 35 in the first, 145 to 43 in the second, and 82 to 33 in the third. In the first family, mutations of the nearby microsatellites FRAXAC2 and DXS548 were also observed. In the other two, only mutations involving the FMR1 repeats were found. We suggest differing mutational mechanisms such as gene conversion versus DNA replication slippage may underlie such reversions. We estimate that such revertants may occur among 1% or less of premutation carrier offspring. Our results indicate that women identified to be carriers by linkage should be retested by direct DNA analysis. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Mutational analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog gene in 220 newborns with oral clefts in a South American (ECLAMC) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orioli, Iêda M; Vieira, Alexandre R; Castilla, Eduardo E; Ming, Jeffrey E; Muenke, Maximilian

    2002-02-15

    Oral clefts generally have a multifactorial etiology. A number of genes contribute to the formation of the face and palate. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur in pedigrees with autosomal dominant holoprosencephaly due to mutations in Sonic Hedgehog (SHH). In addition, animal models have shown that SHH is involved in face development. We thus examined the human SHH gene in 220 newborn infants with nonsyndromic oral clefts registered by the Estudio Colaborativo Latinoamericano de Malformaciones Congenitas: ECLAMC (Latin American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations). We found 15 variant bands in 13 patients with oral clefts, representing five different base changes, all of which were found by sequencing to represent silent polymorphisms. Four occurred in introns. The alteration occurring in an exon, Ser190Ser, may create a consensus sequence for the 3'splice site 6 bp downstream of the original consensus sequence. Thus, we did not identify any clearly disease-causing mutation in SHH in these patients, and conclude that SHH mutations are not a frequent cause of isolated oral clefts in humans.

  5. Novel FGFR1 and KISS1R Mutations in Chinese Kallmann Syndrome Males with Cleft Lip/Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome (KS is characterized by isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH with anosmia and is sometimes associated with cleft lip/palate (CLP. In order to describe the clinical features, genetic etiology, and treatment outcome of KS males with CLP, we performed genetic screening for 15 known causal IHH genes (KAL1, FGFR1, NELF, FGF8, CHD7, WDR11, SEMA3A, KISS1R, KISS1, PROKR2, PROK2, TAC3, TACR3, GNRH1, and GNRHR in four KS with CLP patients and six IHH patients without CLP. Two novel heterozygous missense mutations in FGFR1, (NM_001174066: c.776G>A (p.G259E and (NM_001174066: c.358C>T (p.R120C, were identified in a 23-year-old KS male with cleft lip and an 18-year-old KS patient with cleft lip and palate, dental agenesis, and high arched palate, respectively. These two mutations were not presented in their healthy parents and 200 normal controls. One novel heterozygous missense mutation in KISS1R, (NM_032551: c.587C>A (p.P196H, was identified in an 18-year-old KS male with cleft lip and dental agenesis who developed sperm after being treated with gonadotropin. This mutation was also presented in his healthy father and grandfather. These results have implications for the diagnosis, genetic counseling, and treatment of KS and CLP males with mutations in FGFR1 gene.

  6. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health conditions > Cleft lip and cleft palate Cleft lip and cleft palate E-mail to a friend Please fill ... repair cleft lip and palate. What are cleft lip and cleft palate? Cleft lip is a birth defect in ...

  7. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allory, Yves; Beukers, Willemien; Sagrera, Ana

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the gene coding for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been described and proposed to activate gene expression. OBJECTIVES: To investigate TERT mutation frequency, spectrum, association with expression and clinical outcome, and potential ...

  8. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  9. A new modified forked flap and a reverse V shaped flap for secondary correction of bilateral cleft lip nasal deformities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Wei; ZHAO Zhen-min; YIN Ning-bei; SONG Tao; LI Hai-dong; WU Di; GAO Feng; WANG Xin-gang

    2011-01-01

    Background The columella,nasal tip,lip relationship in the bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity remains a great challenge for plastic surgeon.An esthetically satisfying result is difficult to obtain.A subset of patients with bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity still require columellar lengthening and nasal correction and philtrial construction.This study aimed to provide a new method based on the forked flap to improve the final appearance of these patients.Methods A technique to correct this deformity is described.This consists of (1) a newly modified forked flap including the orbicularis oris muscle and nasalis muscle along the whole flap for columellar lengthening,(2) a reverse V shaped flap from the lower portion of the columella and the prolabium for normal size phitrum construction,(3) inserting the vermilion portion of the forked flap and advancing the nasal floor medially and anteriorly to lengthen and maintain the nasal septum side of the columella for proper tip positioning,(4) open rhinoplasty,allowing definitive repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages,(5) reconstruction of the orbicularis orismuscle as required,and (6) the flaring nostril floor advancing medially and constructing the sill.Results This technique was applied to 15 cases of secondary bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity.All the flaps took without signs of partial necrosis.In all cases,the nasal tip was projected forward with adequate columella elongation,and the height of the prolabium was added with normal size philtrial dimensions.Conclusions This method makes maximum use of the tissue containing the scar in the lip and limits tissues in the lower portion of the columella and the prolabium for adequate columella elongation and reconstruction with normal size philtrial dimensions.It is a very reasonable and useful method in correction of secondary bilateral cleft lip nasal deformities.

  10. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations in Korean melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Chung, Kee Yang; Shin, Sang Joon; Rha, Sun Young; Tsao, Hensin

    2017-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the reverse transcriptase component of the telomeric complex, which synthesizes terminal DNA to protect chromosomal ends and to maintain genomic integrity. In melanoma, mutation in TERT promoter region is a common event and theses promoter variants have been shown to be associated with increased gene expression, decreased telomere length and poorer outcome. In this study, we determined the frequency of TERT promoter mutation in 88 Korean primary melanoma patients and aimed to see the association of TERT promoter mutation status to other major molecular features, such as BRAF, NRAS, KIT mutations and correlate with clinicopathological features. In our study, acral melanoma (n=46, 52.3%) was the most common type. Overall, TERT promoter mutation was observed in 15 cases (17%) with ten c. -124C>T altertions and five c. -146C>T alterations. None of our samples showed CC>TT mutation which is considered pathognomonic of UV induction. Among the 46 acral melanoma patients, 5 patients (10.9%) harbored TERT promoter mutation. Tumors with TERT promoter mutation showed significantly greater Breslow thickness compared to WT tumors (P=0.039). A combined analysis for the presence of TERT promoter and BRAF mutations showed that patients with both TERT promoter and BRAF mutation showed decreased survival compared with those with only TERT promoter mutation, only BRAF mutation, or without mutations in either TERT promoter or BRAF (P=0.035). Our data provides additional evidence that UV-induced TERT promoter mutation frequencies vary depending on melanoma subtype, but preserves its prognostic value.

  11. Reverse mutation in fragile X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antinolo, G.; Borrego, S.; Cabeza, J.C. [Hospital Universitario, Sevilla (Spain)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of familial mental retardation, with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,500 in males and 1/2,500 in females. The clinical expression includes moderate to severe mental retardation, macroorchidism, dysmorphic facial features and behavior disturbances. In 1991, the FMR-1 gene was isolated from the region of the fragile X site. The fragile X phenotype has been found, in most cases, to be characterized at the molecular level by expansion of a (CGG){sub n} repeat and hypermethylation of a CpG island identified in the 5{prime}-UTR of the FMR-1 gene. It has been proposed, and some evidence has been shown, that germ cells carry only premutation alleles and that expansion occurs at a postzygotic stage. A few cases of reduction of the (CGG){sub n} repeat in fragile X syndrome have been reported. These reductions were from a larger premutation to a smaller premutation, in female-to-male transmission, from full mutation to a mosaic pattern, reduction from mosaic full-mutation/premutation females or regression from premutation to normal. We present here the novel observation of a phenotypically normal female carrying a nonmosaic full-mutation allele in somatic cells who transmits a premutation allele to her daughter. This daughter has three mosaic offspring with the full mutation and the premutation. Two of them are monozygotic (MZ) twins sharing a concordant mutation pattern. They are monoamniotic monochorionic, which indicates a late form of twinning. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Identification of germline mutations in the cancer predisposing gene CDH1 in patients with orofacial clefts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, I.P.; Figueiredo, J.; Rooij, I.A. van; Simoes-Correia, J.; Post, R.S. van der; Melo, S.; Seruca, R.; Carels, C.E.L.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFC) are among the most common birth defects worldwide. The etiology of non-syndromic OFC is still largely unknown. During embryonic development, the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin, encoded by CDH1, is highly expressed in the median edge epithelium of the palate. Furthermore, in

  13. Identification of germline mutations in the cancer predisposing gene CDH1 in patients with orofacial clefts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, I.P.; Figueiredo, J.; Rooij, I.A. van; Simoes-Correia, J.; Post, R.S. van der; Melo, S.; Seruca, R.; Carels, C.E.L.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFC) are among the most common birth defects worldwide. The etiology of non-syndromic OFC is still largely unknown. During embryonic development, the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin, encoded by CDH1, is highly expressed in the median edge epithelium of the palate. Furthermore, in

  14. Viral fitness: relation to drug resistance mutations and mechanisms involved: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth R; Arts, Eric J; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2007-03-01

    Nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors constitute the backbone of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. One of the major obstacles in achieving the long-term efficacy of anti-HIV-1 therapy is the development of resistance. The advent of resistance mutations is usually accompanied by a change in viral replicative fitness. This review focuses on the most common nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated mutations and their effects on HIV-1 replicative fitness. Recent studies have explained the two main mechanisms of resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and their role in HIV-1 replicative fitness. The first involves mutations directly interfering with binding or incorporation and seems to impact replicative fitness more adversely than the second mechanism, which involves enhanced excision of the newly incorporated analogue. Further studies have helped explain the antagonistic effects between amino acid substitutions, K65R, L74V, M184V, and thymidine analogue mutations, showing how viral replicative fitness influences the evolution of thymidine analogue resistance pathways. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations impact HIV-1 replicative fitness to a lesser extent than protease resistance mutations. The monitoring of viral replicative fitness may help in the management of HIV-1 infection in highly antiretroviral-experienced individuals.

  15. Cleft palate and ADULT phenotype in a patient with a novel TP63 mutation suggests lumping of EEC/LM/ADULT syndromes into a unique entity: ELA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Paolo; Garelli, Emanuela; Isidori, Ilenia; Mencarelli, Amedea; Carando, Adriana; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Donti, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    Acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome is a rare condition belonging to the group of ectodermal dysplasias caused by TP63 mutations. Its clinical phenotype is similar to ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate (EEC) and limb-mammary syndrome (LMS), and differs from these disorders mainly by the absence of cleft lip and/or palate. We report on a 39-year-old patient who was found to be heterozygous for a c.401G > T (p.Gly134Val) de novo mutation of TP63. This patient had the ADULT phenotype associated with cleft palate. Our findings, rather than extend the clinical spectrum of ADULT syndrome, suggest that cleft palate can no longer be considered an element for differential diagnosis for ADULT, EEC, and LMS. Our data, added to other reports on overlapping phenotypes, support the combining of these three phenotypes into a unique entity that we propose to call "ELA syndrome," which is an acronym of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate, limb-mammary, and ADULT syndromes.

  16. Mutations in HYAL2, Encoding Hyaluronidase 2, Cause a Syndrome of Orofacial Clefting and Cor Triatriatum Sinister in Humans and Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina M A Muggenthaler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orofacial clefting is amongst the most common of birth defects, with both genetic and environmental components. Although numerous studies have been undertaken to investigate the complexities of the genetic etiology of this heterogeneous condition, this factor remains incompletely understood. Here, we describe mutations in the HYAL2 gene as a cause of syndromic orofacial clefting. HYAL2, encoding hyaluronidase 2, degrades extracellular hyaluronan, a critical component of the developing heart and palatal shelf matrix. Transfection assays demonstrated that the gene mutations destabilize the molecule, dramatically reducing HYAL2 protein levels. Consistent with the clinical presentation in affected individuals, investigations of Hyal2-/- mice revealed craniofacial abnormalities, including submucosal cleft palate. In addition, cor triatriatum sinister and hearing loss, identified in a proportion of Hyal2-/- mice, were also found as incompletely penetrant features in affected humans. Taken together our findings identify a new genetic cause of orofacial clefting in humans and mice, and define the first molecular cause of human cor triatriatum sinister, illustrating the fundamental importance of HYAL2 and hyaluronan turnover for normal human and mouse development.

  17. Mutations in HYAL2, Encoding Hyaluronidase 2, Cause a Syndrome of Orofacial Clefting and Cor Triatriatum Sinister in Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, S. Naimul; Mark, Brian; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Patton, Michael A.; Ishida, Miho; Sharma, Sanjay; Faqeih, Eissa; Blakley, Brian; Jackson, Mike; Lees, Melissa; Dolinsky, Vernon; Cross, Leroy; Stanier, Philip; Salter, Claire; Baple, Emma L.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    Orofacial clefting is amongst the most common of birth defects, with both genetic and environmental components. Although numerous studies have been undertaken to investigate the complexities of the genetic etiology of this heterogeneous condition, this factor remains incompletely understood. Here, we describe mutations in the HYAL2 gene as a cause of syndromic orofacial clefting. HYAL2, encoding hyaluronidase 2, degrades extracellular hyaluronan, a critical component of the developing heart and palatal shelf matrix. Transfection assays demonstrated that the gene mutations destabilize the molecule, dramatically reducing HYAL2 protein levels. Consistent with the clinical presentation in affected individuals, investigations of Hyal2-/- mice revealed craniofacial abnormalities, including submucosal cleft palate. In addition, cor triatriatum sinister and hearing loss, identified in a proportion of Hyal2-/- mice, were also found as incompletely penetrant features in affected humans. Taken together our findings identify a new genetic cause of orofacial clefting in humans and mice, and define the first molecular cause of human cor triatriatum sinister, illustrating the fundamental importance of HYAL2 and hyaluronan turnover for normal human and mouse development. PMID:28081210

  18. Purifying selection, drift and reversible mutation with arbitrarily high mutation rates

    OpenAIRE

    Charlesworth, Brian; Jain, Kavita

    2014-01-01

    Some species exhibit very high levels of DNA sequence variability; there is also evidence for the existence of heritable epigenetic variants that experience state changes at a much higher rate than sequence variants. In both cases, the resulting high diversity levels within a population (hyperdiversity) mean that standard population genetics methods are not trustworthy. We analyze a population genetics model that incorporates purifying selection, reversible mutations, and genetic drift, assum...

  19. Loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter disrupts an ETS-1 binding site and leads to cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiazhou; Cheng, Yibin; Yuan, Jia; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-02-01

    The cleft palate only (CPO) is a common congenital defect with complex etiology in humans. The molecular etiology of the CPO remains unknown. Here, we report a loss-of-function mutation in X-linked TBX22 gene (T-box 22) in a six-generation family of the CPO with obvious phenotypes of both cleft palate and hyper-nasal speech. We identify a functional -73G>A mutation in the promoter of TBX22, which is located at the core-binding site of transcription factor ETS-1 (v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequence around the -73G>A mutation site is specific in primates. The mutation was detected in all five affected male members cosegregating with the affected phenotype and heterozygote occurred only in some unaffected females of the family, suggesting an X-linked transmission of the mutation in the family. The -73G>A variant is a novel single nucleotide mutation. Cell co-transfections indicated that ETS-1 could activate the TBX22 promoter. Moreover, EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that the allele A disrupts the binding site of ETS-1, thus markedly decreases the activity of the TBX22 promoter, which is likely to lead to the birth defect of the CPO without ankyloglossia. These results suggest that a loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter may cause the cleft palate through disruption of TBX22-ETS-1 pathway.

  20. Reversion of a live porcine reproductive and respiratory virus vaccine investigated by parallel mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette S.; Oleksiewicz, Martin B; Forsberg, R

    2001-01-01

    of these parallel mutations were direct reversions to the parental VR2332 sequence and were situated in a papain-like cysteine protease domain and in the helicase domain. The remaining parallel mutations might be seen as second-site compensatory mutations for one or more of the mutations that accumulated...

  1. Reversion of a live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine investigated by parallel mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette S.; Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Forsberg, R.

    2001-01-01

    of these parallel mutations were direct reversions to the parental VR2332 sequence and were situated in a papain-like cysteine protease domain and in the helicase domain. The remaining parallel mutations mig ht be seen as second-site compensatory mutations for one or more of the mutations that accumulated...

  2. X-linked CHARGE-like Abruzzo-Erickson syndrome and classic cleft palate with ankyloglossia result from TBX22 splicing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauws, E; Peskett, E; Boissin, C; Hoshino, A; Mengrelis, K; Carta, E; Abruzzo, M A; Lees, M; Moore, G E; Erickson, R P; Stanier, P

    2013-04-01

    X-linked cleft palate (CPX) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the TBX22 transcription factor and is known to exhibit phenotypic variability, usually involving either a complete, partial or submucous cleft palate, with or without ankyloglossia. This study hypothesized a possible involvement of TBX22 in a family with X-linked, CHARGE-like Abruzzo-Erickson syndrome, of unknown etiology. The phenotype extends to additional features including sensorineural deafness and coloboma, which are suggested by the Tbx22 developmental expression pattern but not previously associated in CPX patients. A novel TBX22 splice acceptor mutation (c.593-5T>A) was identified that tracked with the phenotype in this family. A novel splice donor variant (c.767+5G>A) and a known canonical splice donor mutation (c.767+1G>A) affecting the same exon were identified in patients with classic CPX phenotypes and were comparatively analyzed using both in silico and in vitro splicing studies. All three variants were predicted to abolish normal mRNA splicing and an in vitro assay indicated that use of alternative splice sites was a likely outcome. Collectively, the data showed the functional effect of several novel intronic splice site variants but most importantly confirms that TBX22 is the gene underlying Abruzzo-Erickson syndrome, expanding the phenotypic spectrum of TBX22 mutations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Purifying selection, drift, and reversible mutation with arbitrarily high mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Brian; Jain, Kavita

    2014-12-01

    Some species exhibit very high levels of DNA sequence variability; there is also evidence for the existence of heritable epigenetic variants that experience state changes at a much higher rate than sequence variants. In both cases, the resulting high diversity levels within a population (hyperdiversity) mean that standard population genetics methods are not trustworthy. We analyze a population genetics model that incorporates purifying selection, reversible mutations, and genetic drift, assuming a stationary population size. We derive analytical results for both population parameters and sample statistics and discuss their implications for studies of natural genetic and epigenetic variation. In particular, we find that (1) many more intermediate-frequency variants are expected than under standard models, even with moderately strong purifying selection, and (2) rates of evolution under purifying selection may be close to, or even exceed, neutral rates. These findings are related to empirical studies of sequence and epigenetic variation.

  4. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when a baby's lip or mouth do not form properly. They ... during pregnancy. A baby can have a cleft lip, a cleft palate, or both. A cleft lip happens if ...

  5. 40 CFR 799.9510 - TSCA bacterial reverse mutation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... somatic cells are involved in tumor formation in humans and experimental animals. The bacterial reverse..., for example highly bactericidal compounds (e.g. certain antibiotics) and those which are thought...

  6. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described...

  7. SURGICAL METHODS OF CLEFT LIP, CLEFT PALATE AND COMBINED CLEFT LIP WITH CLEFT PALATE - OUR EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Polisetti Ravi; Durga Prasad; Soumya; Krishna Sasanka

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cleft lip and cleft palate is the most common congenital malformation of the face and its pattern varies with geography world wide. This study was done in 67 patients presenting to Department of ENT, Santhiram Medical College, Nandyal with cleft deformities to assess the surgical outcome of cleft lip, cleft palate and combined cleft lip cleft palate cases.

  8. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xunjun; Guo, Xiuchan; Chen, Yao; Chen, Guorong; Ma, Yin; Huang, Kate; Zhang, Yuning; Zhao, Qiongya; Winkler, Cheryl A.; An, Ping; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations are among the most frequent noncoding somatic mutations in multiple cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical and pathological implications of TERT promoter mutations in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC have not been resolved. To investigate TERT promoter mutations, protein expression, and their clinical-pathological implications, we sequenced the TERT promoter region for hotspot mutations in HCC tissues and performed immunostaining for TERT protein expression from HBV-associated HCC in Chinese patients. Of 276 HCC tumor DNA samples sequenced, 85 (31%) carried TERT promoter mutations. TERT promoter mutations were more frequent in those with low α-fetoprotein (AFP) serum levels (p = 0.03), advanced age (p = 0.04), and in those lacking HCC family history (p = 0.02), but were not correlated with HCC stages and grades. TERT protein levels were higher in HCC (n = 28) compared to normal liver tissues (n = 8) (p =0.001), but did not differ between mutated and non-mutated tumor tissues. In conclusion, TERT promoter mutations are common somatic mutations in HCC of Han Chinese with HBV infection. Detection of TERT promoter mutations in those with low levels of AFP may aid diagnosis of HCC with atypical presentation. PMID:27056898

  9. Novel homozygous mutation, c.400C>T (p.Arg134*), in the PVRL1 gene underlies cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome in an Asian patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazue; Hayashi, Ryota; Fujita, Hideki; Kubota, Masaya; Kondo, Mai; Shimomura, Yutaka; Niizeki, Hironori

    2015-07-01

    Cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations of the poliovirus receptor-like 1 (PVRL1) gene encoding nectin-1. Nectin-1 is a cell-cell adhesion molecule that is important for the initial step in the formation of adherens junctions and tight junctions; it is expressed in keratinocytes, neurons, and the developing face and palate. Clinical manifestations comprise a unique facial appearance with cleft lip/palate, ectodermal dysplasia, cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and/or toes, and in some cases, mental retardation. We present the first report, to our knowledge, of an Asian individual with cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome with a novel PVRL1 mutation. A 7-year-old Japanese boy, the first child of a consanguineous marriage, showed hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with sparse, brittle, fine, dry hair and hypodontia, the unique facial appearance with cleft lip/palate, cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and mild mental retardation. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the hair demonstrated pili torti and pili trianguli et canaliculi. Mutation analysis of exon 2 of PVRL1 revealed a novel homozygous nonsense mutation, c.400C>T (p.Arg134*). His parents were heterozygous for the mutant alleles. All four PVRL1 mutations identified in cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome to date, including this study, resulted in truncated proteins that lack the transmembrane domain and intracellular domain of nectin-1, which is necessary to initiate the cell-cell adhesion process.

  10. Reversible congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in patients with CHD7, FGFR1 or GNRHR mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeva-Maria Laitinen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH is a rare cause for delayed or absent puberty. These patients may recover from HH spontaneously in adulthood. To date, it is not possible to predict who will undergo HH reversal later in life. Herein we investigated whether Finnish patients with reversal of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH have common phenotypic or genotypic features. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Thirty-two male HH patients with anosmia/hyposmia (Kallmann Syndrome, KS; n = 26 or normal sense of smell (nHH; n = 6 were enrolled (age range, 18-61 yrs. The patients were clinically examined, and reversal of HH was assessed after treatment withdrawal. KAL1, FGFR1, FGF8, PROK2, PROKR2, CHD7, WDR11, GNRHR, GNRH1, KISS1R, KISS1, TAC3, TACR3, and LHβ were screened for mutations. Six HH patients (2 KS, 4 nHH were verified to have reversal of HH. In the majority of cases, reversal occurred early in adulthood (median age, 23 yrs; range, 21-39 yrs. All had spontaneous testicular growth while on testosterone replacement therapy (TRT. One nHH subject was restarted on TRT due to a decline in serum T. Two reversal variants had a same GNRHR mutation (R262Q, which was accompanied by another GNRHR mutation (R139H or del309F. In addition, both of the KS patients had a mutation in CHD7 (p.Q51X or FGFR1 (c.91+2T>A. CONCLUSIONS: Considerable proportion of patients with HH (8% of KS probands may recover in early adulthood. Spontaneous testicular enlargement during TRT was highly suggestive for reversal of HH. Those with the GNRHR mutation R262Q accompanied by another GNRHR mutation may be prone to reversal, although even patients with a truncating mutation in CHD7 or a splice-site mutation in FGFR1 can recover. We recommend that all adolescents and young adults with congenital HH should be informed on the possibility of reversal.

  11. [Bacterial reverse mutation test and micronucleus test of fucoxanthin oil from microalgae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iio, Kumiko; Okada, Yumika; Ishikura, Masaharu

    2011-01-01

    Fucoxanthin-containing oil extracted from microalga, Chaetoseros sp., was subjected to genotoxicity studies, the bacterial reverse mutation test and the micronucleus test in mice. The number of revertant colonies in fucoxanthin oil-treated plates of all strains tested was less than twice the number of colonies in the negative control, regardless of the presence of the metabolic activator in the bacterial reverse mutation test. In the micronucleus test, 500, 1,000, 2,000 mg/kg body weight of fucoxanthin oil was administered orally to mice. There was no significant increase in micronucleus frequency in bone marrow cells. These results suggest that fucoxanthin oil does not exhibit genotoxicity.

  12. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis.

  13. Semi-automated, reverse-hybridization detection of multiple mutations causing hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegshäuser, Gernot; Halsall, David; Rauscher, Bettina; Oberkanins, Christian

    2007-06-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially fatal nutritional disease that is caused by mutations in the liver isoenzyme of fructoaldolase (aldolase B). Our aim was to evaluate a diagnostic assay capable of simultaneously analyzing three-point mutations and a small deletion in the aldolase B (ALDOB) gene. The test under investigation is based on multiplex DNA amplification and hybridization to membrane strips presenting a parallel array of allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. We used the novel reverse-hybridization (RH) protocol to analyze 54 individuals previously genotyped by direct sequencing. RH genotyping for ALDOB mutations Delta4E4, A149P, A174D, and N334K was in complete concordance with results obtained by DNA sequencing. The procedure is rapid (<6h) and may be automated to a large extent. The RH assay tested in this study represents an accurate and robust screening tool to identify common ALDOB mutations.

  14. Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... commonly are called “orofacial clefts”. What is Cleft Lip? The lip forms between the fourth and seventh ...

  15. Dynamics of a sex-linked deleterious mutation in populations subject to sex reversal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku Karhunen

    Full Text Available The heterogametic sex chromosomes (i.e. mammalian Y and avian W do not usually recombine with the homogametic sex chromosomes which is known to lead into rapid degeneration of Y and W due to accumulation of deleterious mutations. On the other hand, some 96% of amphibian species have homomorphic, i.e. non-degenerate Y chromosomes. Nicolas Perrin's fountain-of-youth hypothesis states that this is a result of recombination between X and Y chromosomes in sex-reversed individuals. In this study, I model the consequences of such recombination for the dynamics of a deleterious mutation occurring in Y chromosomes. As expected, even relatively low levels of sex reversal help to purge deleterious mutations. However, the population-dynamic consequences of this depend on the type of selection that operates on the population undergoing sex reversal. Under fecundity selection, sex reversal can be beneficial for some parameter values, whereas under survival selection, it seems to be always harmful.

  16. Laryngotracheoesophageal clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychowsky, Julie E; Rahbar, Reza

    2016-06-01

    Laryngotracheoesophageal clefts are rare congenital anomalies of the aerodigestive tract. Patients may present with airway and/or swallowing impairments. An approach to evaluation and management is presented. Important pearls for conservative and surgical management are discussed. Open versus endoscopic surgical techniques are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in Reversion of Resistance Mutations to Wild-Type under Structured Treatment Interruption and Related Increase in Replication Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Agnes C.; Baxter, John; Weidler, Jodi; Lie, Yolanda; Lawrence, Jody; Kim, Rose; Bates, Michael; Coakley, Eoin; Chappey, Colombe

    2011-01-01

    Background The CPCRA 064 study examined the effect of structured treatment interruption (STI) of up to 4 months followed by salvage treatment in patients failing therapy with multi-drug resistant HIV. We examined the relationship between the reversion rate of major reverse transcriptase (RT) resistance-associated mutations and change in viral replication capacity (RC). The dataset included 90 patients with RC and genotypic data from virus samples collected at 0 (baseline), 2 and 4 months of STI. Principal Findings Rapid shift towards wild-type RC was observed during the first 2 months of STI. Median RC increased from 47.5% at baseline to 86.0% at 2 months and to 97.5% at 4 months. Between baseline and 2 months of STI, T215F had the fastest rate of reversion (41%) and the reversion of E44D and T69D was associated with the largest changes in RC. Among the most prevalent RT mutations, M184V had the fastest rate of reversion from baseline to 2 months (40%), and its reversion was associated with the largest increase in RC. Most rates of reversion increased between 2 months and 4 months, but the change in RC was more limited as it was already close to 100%. The highest frequency of concurrent reversion was found for L100I and K103N. Mutagenesis tree models showed that M184V, when present, was overall the first mutation to revert among all the RT mutations reported in the study. Conclusion Longitudinal analysis of combined phenotypic and genotypic data during STI showed a large amount of variability in prevalence and reversion rates to wild-type codons among the RT resistance-associated mutations. The rate of reversion of these mutations may depend on the extent of RC increase as well as the co-occurring reversion of other mutations belonging to the same mutational pathway. PMID:21297946

  18. Bilateral microform cleft lip

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, David; Attard Montalto, Simon; Grech, Victor E.

    2006-01-01

    Microform cleft lip (MCL), also called congenital healed cleft lip or cleft lip "frustré", is a rare congenital anomaly. MCL has been described as having the characteristic appearance of a typical cleft lip which has been corrected in utero. We present a girl with bilateral microform cleft lip associated with a preauricular sinus and bilateral camptodactyly.

  19. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help you find community and financial resources and education. For your child You can support your child in many ways: Focus on your child as a person, not on the cleft. Point out positive qualities in others that don't involve physical ...

  20. The sequence spectrum of frameshift reversions obtained with a novel adaptive mutation assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Heidenreich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on the mechanisms of adaptive mutagenesis in resting, i.e. non-replicating cells relies on appropriate mutation assays. Here we provide a novel procedure for the detection of frameshift-reverting mutations in yeast. Proliferation of non-reverted cells in this assay is suppressed by the lack of a fermentable carbon source. The test allele was constructed in a way that the reversions mimic microsatellite instability, a condition often found in cancer cells. We show the cell numbers during these starvation conditions and provide a DNA sequence spectrum of a representative set of revertants. The data in this article support the publication "Glucose starvation as a selective tool for the study of adaptive mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (Heidenreich and Steinboeck, 2016 [1].

  1. Resistance mutations against dolutegravir in HIV integrase impair the emergence of resistance against reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maureen; Mesplède, Thibault; Quashie, Peter K; Moïsi, Daniela; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-03-27

    Among 1222 antiretroviral-naive patients who received dolutegravir (DTG) as part of first-line therapy, none has developed resistance against this compound after 48-96 weeks of follow-up. Moreover, only four occurrences of virological failure with resistance mutations have been documented in previously drug-experienced patients who received DTG as a first time integrase inhibitor as a component of a second-line regimen. The R263K integrase resistance mutation was observed in two of these individuals who received suboptimal background regimens. We have previously selected mutations at position R263K, G118R, H51Y, and E138K as being associated with low-level resistance to DTG. Now, we sought to investigate the facility with which resistance on the part of R263K-containing viruses might develop. We tested the ability of DTG-resistant viruses containing either the R263K or G118R and/or H51Y mutations to develop further resistance against several reverse transcriptase inhibitors during in-vitro selection experiments. Our results show that DTG-resistant viruses are impaired in their ability to acquire further resistance to each of nevirapine and lamivudine as a consequence of their relative inability to develop resistance mutations associated with these two compounds. Our findings provide an explanation for the fact that no individual has yet progressed to virological failure with resistance mutations associated with dolutegravir in clinical trials in which patients received dolutegravir together with an optimized background regimen.

  2. Cancer-Specific Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT Promoter Mutations: Biological and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulated evidence has pointed to a key role of telomerase in carcinogenesis. As a RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA at the end of linear chromosomes, and attenuates or prevents telomere erosion associated with cell divisions. By lengthening telomeres, telomerase extends cellular life-span or even induces immortalization. Consistent with its functional activity, telomerase is silent in most human normal somatic cells while active only in germ-line, stem and other highly proliferative cells. In contrast, telomerase activation widely occurs in human cancer and the enzymatic activity is detectable in up to 90% of malignancies. Recently, hotspot point mutations in the regulatory region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT gene, encoding the core catalytic component of telomerase, was identified as a novel mechanism to activate telomerase in cancer. This review discusses the cancer-specific TERT promoter mutations and potential biological and clinical significances.

  3. Preclinical test: bacterial reverse mutation test for {sup 18}F-fluorocholine produced in CDTN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Bruno M.; Bispo, Ana Carolina A.; Campos, Danielle C.; Silva, Juliana B., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.br, E-mail: acab@cdtn.br, E-mail: dcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvajb@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The choline labeled with fluorine-18 (18FCH) is being considered as a great importance radiopharmaceutical due to its effective detection of many type of malignant neoplasm. The research related to {sup 18}F-fluorocholine synthesis in CDTN was initiated in 2010. In order to obtain clinical research approval, as well as to register {sup 18}FCH for marketing, safety and efficacy preclinical testing are required. The present work evaluated the {sup 18}FCH genotoxic potential through the bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test) using Salmonella typhimurium TA-98, TA-100, TA-1535 and TA-1537 strains and Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA strain. The reverse mutation test in bacteria for fluorcolina was conducted in two stages. Initially the method was applied to 'cold' fluorocholine molecule (19FCH). Subsequently, the decayed product of {sup 18}FCH synthesis was evaluated. The first step was performed in order to examine the FCH molecule mutagenicity. The second was carried out to determine the mutagenic potential of final product. All strains were tested in triplicate for each exposure concentration, in the presence and absence of metabolic activation (S-9 mix - 10%). There were no statistically significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed {sup 18}FCH or {sup 19}FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in significant increases in revertant colonies rate for any strains tested after their exposure to decayed {sup 18}FCH or {sup 19}FCH. The number of revertant colonies in positive controls was significantly higher than that observed in negative controls. Based on results of this assay, {sup 18}FCH and {sup 19}FCH, at tested doses, were found to be non-mutagenic in bacterial reverse mutation test. (author)

  4. Dynamics of a Sex-Linked Deleterious Mutation in Populations Subject to Sex Reversal

    OpenAIRE

    Markku Karhunen

    2011-01-01

    The heterogametic sex chromosomes (i.e. mammalian Y and avian W) do not usually recombine with the homogametic sex chromosomes which is known to lead into rapid degeneration of Y and W due to accumulation of deleterious mutations. On the other hand, some 96% of amphibian species have homomorphic, i.e. non-degenerate Y chromosomes. Nicolas Perrin's fountain-of-youth hypothesis states that this is a result of recombination between X and Y chromosomes in sex-reversed individuals. In this study, ...

  5. Tessier 30 facial cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal C Bhattacharyya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible and complete duplication of the tongue is reported here. Median cleft of the lower lip, mandible and bifid tongue with ankyloglossia is reported in the literature, but complete duplication of the tongue as part of the Tessier 30 cleft is not yet reported.

  6. Tessier 30 facial cleft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Nirmal C.; Kalita, Kabita; Gogoi, Manoj; Deuri, Pradip K.

    2012-01-01

    A case of midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible and complete duplication of the tongue is reported here. Median cleft of the lower lip, mandible and bifid tongue with ankyloglossia is reported in the literature, but complete duplication of the tongue as part of the Tessier 30 cleft is not yet reported. PMID:22529554

  7. Development of elvitegravir resistance and linkage of integrase inhibitor mutations with protease and reverse transcriptase resistance mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Winters

    Full Text Available Failure of antiretroviral regimens containing elvitegravir (EVG and raltegravir (RAL can result in the appearance of integrase inhibitor (INI drug-resistance mutations (DRMs. While several INI DRMs have been identified, the evolution of EVG DRMs and the linkage of these DRMs with protease inhibitor (PI and reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI DRMs have not been studied at the clonal level. We examined the development of INI DRMs in 10 patients failing EVG-containing regimens over time, and the linkage of INI DRMs with PI and RTI DRMs in these patients plus 6 RAL-treated patients. A one-step RT-nested PCR protocol was used to generate a 2.7 kB amplicon that included the PR, RT, and IN coding region, and standard cloning and sequencing techniques were used to determine DRMs in 1,277 clones (mean 21 clones per time point. Results showed all patients had multiple PI, NRTI, and/or NNRTI DRMs at baseline, but no primary INI DRM. EVG-treated patients developed from 2 to 6 strains with different primary INI DRMs as early as 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, predominantly as single mutations. The prevalence of these strains fluctuated and new strains, and/or strains with new combinations of INI DRMs, developed over time. Final failure samples (weeks 14 to 48 typically showed a dominant strain with multiple mutations or N155H alone. Single N155H or multiple mutations were also observed in RAL-treated patients at virologic failure. All patient strains showed evidence of INI DRM co-located with single or multiple PI and/or RTI DRMs on the same viral strand. Our study shows that EVG treatment can select for a number of distinct INI-resistant strains whose prevalence fluctuates over time. Continued appearance of new INI DRMs after initial INI failure suggests a potent, highly dynamic selection of INI resistant strains that is unaffected by co-location with PI and RTI DRMs.

  8. Combining mutations in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with mutations in the HIV-1 polypurine tract affects RNase H cleavages involved in PPT utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Mary Jane; Julias, John G; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Alvord, W Gregory; Arnold, Eddy; Hughes, Stephen H

    2006-05-10

    The RNase H cleavages that generate and remove the polypurine tract (PPT) primer during retroviral reverse transcription must be specific to generate linear viral DNAs that are suitable substrates for the viral integrase. To determine if specific contacts between reverse transcriptase (RT) and the PPT are a critical factor in determining the cleavage specificity of RNase H, we made HIV-1 viruses containing mutations in RT and the PPT at the locations of critical contacts between the protein and the nucleic acid. The effects on titer and RNase H cleavage suggest that combining mutations in RT with mutations in the PPT affect the structure of the protein of the RT/nucleic acid complex in ways that affect the specificity and the rate of PPT cleavage. In contrast, the mutations in the PPT (alone) and RT (alone) affect the specificity of PPT cleavage but have much less effect on the overall rate of cleavage.

  9. Reversible severe combined immunodeficiency phenotype secondary to a mutation of the proton-coupled folate transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzutzky, Arturo; Crompton, Brian; Bergmann, Anke K.; Giliani, Silvia; Baxi, Sachin; Martin, Madelena; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary folate malabsorption is a rare inborn error of metabolism due to mutations in the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). Clinical presentation of PCFT deficiency may mimic severe combined immune deficiency (SCID). We report a 4-month-old female who presented with failure to thrive, normocytic anemia, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and systemic cytomegalovirus infection. Immunological evaluation revealed hypogammaglobulinemia, absent antibody responses, and lack of mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferative responses. However, the absolute number and distribution of lymphocyte subsets, including naïve T cells and recent thymic emigrants, were normal, arguing against primary SCID. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid folate levels were undetectable. A homozygous 1082-1G>A mutation of the PCFT gene was found, resulting in skipping of exon 3. Parenteral folinic acid repletion resulted in normalization of anemia, humoral and cellular immunity, and full clinical recovery. PCFT mutations should be considered in infants with SCID-like phenotype, as the immunodeficiency is reversible with parenteral folinic acid repletion. PMID:19740703

  10. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correct a physical defect caused by a cleft lip or cleft palate, which occur once in every 600 live ... recommend additional treatment for complications caused by cleft lip and cleft palate. Additional treatments may include: • Surgery to correct ...

  11. Subunit-specific mutational analysis of residue N348 in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzio, Jessica; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2011-08-22

    N348I in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) confers resistance to zidovudine (AZT) and nevirapine. Biochemical studies demonstrated that N348I indirectly increases AZT resistance by decreasing the frequency of secondary ribonuclease H (RNase H) cleavages that reduce the RNA/DNA duplex length of the template/primer (T/P) and diminish the efficiency of AZT-monophosphate (MP) excision. By contrast, there is some discrepancy in the literature in regard to the mechanisms associated with nevirapine resistance: one study suggested that it is due to decreased inhibitor binding while others suggest that it may be related to the decreased RNase H cleavage phenotype. From a structural perspective, N348 in both subunits of RT resides distal to the enzyme's active sites, to the T/P binding tract and to the nevirapine-binding pocket. As such, the structural mechanisms associated with the resistance phenotypes are not known. Using a novel modelled structure of RT in complex with an RNA/DNA T/P, we identified a putative interaction between the β14-β15 loop in the p51 subunit of RT and the RNA template. Substitution of the asparagine at codon 348 in the p51 subunit with either isoleucine or leucine abrogated the observed protein-RNA interaction, thus, providing a possible explanation for the decreased RNase H phenotype. By contrast, alanine or glutamine substitutions exerted no effect. To validate this model, we introduced the N348I, N348L, N348A and N348Q mutations into RT and purified enzymes that contained subunit-specific mutations. N348I and N348L significantly decreased the frequency of secondary RNase H cleavages and increased the enzyme's ability to excise AZT-MP. As predicted by the modelling, this phenotype was due to the mutation in the p51 subunit of RT. By contrast, the N348A and N348Q RTs exhibited RNase H cleavage profiles and AZT-MP excision activities similar to the wild-type enzyme. All N348 mutant RTs exhibited decreased nevirapine susceptibility, although the N

  12. Subunit-specific mutational analysis of residue N348 in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radzio Jessica

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N348I in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT confers resistance to zidovudine (AZT and nevirapine. Biochemical studies demonstrated that N348I indirectly increases AZT resistance by decreasing the frequency of secondary ribonuclease H (RNase H cleavages that reduce the RNA/DNA duplex length of the template/primer (T/P and diminish the efficiency of AZT-monophosphate (MP excision. By contrast, there is some discrepancy in the literature in regard to the mechanisms associated with nevirapine resistance: one study suggested that it is due to decreased inhibitor binding while others suggest that it may be related to the decreased RNase H cleavage phenotype. From a structural perspective, N348 in both subunits of RT resides distal to the enzyme's active sites, to the T/P binding tract and to the nevirapine-binding pocket. As such, the structural mechanisms associated with the resistance phenotypes are not known. Results Using a novel modelled structure of RT in complex with an RNA/DNA T/P, we identified a putative interaction between the β14-β15 loop in the p51 subunit of RT and the RNA template. Substitution of the asparagine at codon 348 in the p51 subunit with either isoleucine or leucine abrogated the observed protein-RNA interaction, thus, providing a possible explanation for the decreased RNase H phenotype. By contrast, alanine or glutamine substitutions exerted no effect. To validate this model, we introduced the N348I, N348L, N348A and N348Q mutations into RT and purified enzymes that contained subunit-specific mutations. N348I and N348L significantly decreased the frequency of secondary RNase H cleavages and increased the enzyme's ability to excise AZT-MP. As predicted by the modelling, this phenotype was due to the mutation in the p51 subunit of RT. By contrast, the N348A and N348Q RTs exhibited RNase H cleavage profiles and AZT-MP excision activities similar to the wild-type enzyme. All N348 mutant RTs exhibited decreased

  13. A novel c.1037C > G (p.Ala346Gly mutation in TP63 as cause of the ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate (EEC syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Ucela Alves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly – ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate (EEC syndrome (OMIM 604292 is a rare disorder determined by mutations in the TP63 gene. Most cases of EEC syndrome are associated to mutations in the DNA binding domain (DBD region of the p63 protein. Here we report on a three-generation Brazilian family with three individuals (mother, son and grandfather affected by EEC syndrome, determined by a novel mutation c.1037C > G (p.Ala346Gly. The disorder in this family exhibits a broad spectrum of phenotypes: two individuals were personally examined, one presenting the complete constellation of EEC syndrome manifestations and the other presenting an intermediate phenotype; the third affected, a deceased individual not examined personally and referred to by his daughter, exhibited only the split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM. Our findings contribute to elucidate the complex phenotype-genotype correlations in EEC syndrome and other related TP63-mutation syndromes. The possibility of the mutation c.1037C > G being related both to acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT syndrome and SHFM is also raised by the findings here reported.

  14. Cleft Palate Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... available in English , Spanish , and Mandarin ! Information on Cleft Lip and Palate Our booklets and factsheets address a variety of issues related to cleft lip and palate, such as speech, hearing, genetics, and what to ...

  15. Cleft lip repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100010.htm Cleft lip repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... abnormal opening in the middle of the upper lip. A cleft palate is an opening in the roof of ...

  16. Current and upcoming approaches to exploit the reversibility of epigenetic mutations in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahi, Fahimeh; van Kruchten, Michel; Martinet, Nadine; Hospers, Geke A P; Rots, Marianne G

    2014-07-29

    DNA methylation and histone modifications are important epigenetic modifications associated with gene (dys)regulation. The epigenetic modifications are balanced by epigenetic enzymes, so-called writers and erasers, such as DNA (de)methylases and histone (de)acetylases. Aberrant epigenetic alterations have been associated with various diseases, including breast cancer. Since aberrant epigenetic modifications are potentially reversible, they might represent targets for breast cancer therapy. Indeed, several drugs have been designed to inhibit epigenetic enzymes (epi-drugs), thereby reversing epigenetic modifications. US Food and Drug Administration approval has been obtained for some epi-drugs for hematological malignancies. However, these drugs have had very modest anti-tumor efficacy in phase I and II clinical trials in breast cancer patients as monotherapy. Therefore, current clinical trials focus on the combination of epi-drugs with other therapies to enhance or restore the sensitivity to such therapies. This approach has yielded some promising results in early phase II trials. The disadvantage of epi-drugs, however, is genome-wide effects, which may cause unwanted upregulation of, for example, pro-metastatic genes. Development of gene-targeted epigenetic modifications (epigenetic editing) in breast cancer can provide a novel approach to prevent such unwanted events. In this context, identification of crucial epigenetic modifications regulating key genes in breast cancer is of critical importance. In this review, we first describe aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications as two important classes of epigenetic mutations in breast cancer. Then we focus on the preclinical and clinical epigenetic-based therapies currently being explored for breast cancer. Finally, we describe epigenetic editing as a promising new approach for possible applications towards more targeted breast cancer treatment.

  17. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  18. α-Hexylcinnamaldehyde inhibits the genotoxicity of environmental pollutants in the bacterial reverse mutation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Silvia; Mazzanti, Gabriela; Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Di Sotto, Antonella

    2014-12-26

    The antimutagenicity of α-hexylcinnamaldehyde (1), a semisynthetic and more stable derivative of cinnamaldehyde, was evaluated against common environmental pollutants in the bacterial reverse mutation assay. The pre-, co-, and post-treatment protocols were applied to assess the involvement of desmutagenic and/or bioantimutagenic mechanisms. Compound 1 (9-900 μM) produced a strong antimutagenicity (>40% inhibition) in the Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain against the nitroarenes 2-nitrofluorene and 1-nitropyrene in almost all experimental conditions. A strong inhibition was also reached against the nitroarene 1,8-dinitropyrene and the arylamine 2-aminoanthracene in the cotreatment at the highest concentrations tested. In order to evaluate if an inhibition of bacterial nitroreductase (NR) and O-acetyltransferase (OAT) could be involved in the antimutagenicity of 1 against nitroarenes, the substance was further tested against 1-nitropyrene (activated by both NR and OAT) in TA98NR and TA98 1,8-DNP strains (lacking the NR and OAT enzymes, respectively). Although both desmutagenic and bioantimutagenic mechanisms appear mostly involved in the antimutagenicity of 1, based on data obtained in the TA98NR strain, applying the pretreatment protocol, compound 1 seems to act as an inhibitor of the OAT-mediated mutagen bioactivation. These results provide justification for further studies on 1 as a possible chemopreventive agent.

  19. Cleft Lip and Palate (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or genes that cause cleft palate or cleft lip. Clefts happen more often in children of Asian, Latino, ... with a facial birth defect like a cleft lip or cleft palate. Related Health Problems As you might imagine, ...

  20. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a leber hereditary optic neuropathy patient with mitochondrial DNA 11778G>A point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Yuwei; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Fang; Yang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xinqing; Jia, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disorder that primarily affects the optic nerve. We report a case of reduced visual acuity secondary to optic atrophy in a 13-year-old boy. Transient seizures developed subsequently. Serial magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Ragged red fibers were not detected on skeletal muscle biopsy. A 11778G>A mitochondrial DNA point mutation was identified in the lymphocytes isolated from peripheral blood. His younger brother was a carrier with the same mutation. The presentation of this case is unusual documenting LHON in association with PRES.

  1. Cleft lip and palate repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002979.htm Cleft lip and palate repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cleft lip and cleft palate repair is surgery to fix birth defects ...

  2. Combinations of mutations in the connection domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase: assessing the impact on nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Soumi; Fransen, Signe; Paxinos, Ellen E; Stawiski, Eric; Huang, Wei; Petropoulos, Christos J

    2010-05-01

    Recent reports have described the effect of mutations in the connection and RNase H domains of reverse transcriptase (RT) on nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI and NNRTI, respectively) resistance in the presence of thymidine analog resistance mutations (TAMs) and NNRTI mutations (J. H. Brehm, D. Koontz, J. D. Meteer, V. Pathak, N. Sluis-Cremer, and J. W. Mellors, J. Virol. 81:7852-7859, 2007; K. A. Delviks-Frankenberry, G. N. Nikolenko, R. Barr, and V. K. Pathak, J. Virol. 81:6837-6845, 2007; G. N. Nikolenko, K. A. Delviks-Frankenberry, S. Palmer, F. Maldarelli, M. J. Fivash, Jr., J. M. Coffin, and V. K. Pathak, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104:317-322, 2007; G. N. Nikolenko, S. Palmer, F. Maldarelli, J. W. Mellors, J. M. Coffin, and V. K. Pathak, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102:2093-2098, 2005; and S. H. Yap, C. W. Sheen, J. Fahey, M. Zanin, D. Tyssen, V. D. Lima, B. Wynhoven, M. Kuiper, N. Sluis-Cremer, P. R. Harrigan, and G. Tachedjian, PLoS Med. 4:e335, 2007). In the present study, novel mutations in the connection domain of RT (T369I/V), first identified in patient-derived viruses, were characterized, and their effects on NNRTI and NNRTI susceptibility were determined. Furthermore, the effect of N348I on NRTI and NNRTI resistance was confirmed. HIV-1 with either N348I or T369I/V demonstrated reduced susceptibility to nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz (EFV), delaviridine (DLV), and zidovudine (ZDV) compared to wild-type HIV-1. However, HIV-1 with T369I and N348I demonstrated 10- to 60-fold resistance to these same drugs. In clinical samples, these two connection domain RT mutations were predominantly observed in viruses containing TAMs and NNRTI mutations and did not alter the susceptible-resistant classifications of these samples. Introduction of T369I, N348I, or T369I/N348I also reduced replication capacity (RC). These observations suggest that it may be of scientific interest to test these mutations against new NNRTI

  3. MSX1 and orofacial clefting with and without tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto, A; Moreno, L M; Krahn, K; King, S; Lidral, A C

    2006-06-01

    MSX1 has been considered a strong candidate for orofacial clefting, based on mouse expression studies and knockout models, as well as association and linkage studies in humans. MSX1 mutations are also causal for hereditary tooth agenesis. We tested the hypothesis that individuals with orofacial clefting with or without tooth agenesis have MSX1 coding mutations by screening 33 individuals with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and 19 individuals with both orofacial clefting and tooth agenesis. Although no MSX1 coding mutations were identified, the known 101C > G variant occurred more often in subjects with both CL/P and tooth agenesis (p = 0.0008), while the *6C-T variant was found more often in CL/P subjects (p = 0.001). Coding mutations in MSX1 are not the cause of orofacial clefting with or without tooth agenesis in this study population. However, the significant association of MSX1 with both phenotypes implies that MSX1 regulatory elements may be mutated.

  4. Association of telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations with clinicopathological features and prognosis of thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su X

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Xingyun Su,1 Xiaoxia Jiang,1 Weibin Wang,1 Haiyong Wang,1 Xin Xu,2 Aihui Lin,1 Xiaodong Teng,3 Huiling Wu,4 Lisong Teng1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, 2Department of Medical Oncology, 3Department of Pathology, 4Department of Plastic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The clinicopathological and prognostic significance of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter mutations have been widely investigated in thyroid cancer; however, the results are still discrepant. Systematic searches were performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Ovid, and the Cochran Library databases for relevant articles prior to April 2016. Mutation rates were synthesized by R statistical software. The odds ratio or standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval was pooled by Stata. A total of 22 studies with 4,907 cases were included in this meta-analysis. TERT promoter mutations tended to present in aggressive histological types including poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (33.37%, anaplastic thyroid cancer (38.69%, and tall-cell variant papillary thyroid cancer (30.23%. These promoter mutations were likely to exist in older patients and males and were well associated with larger tumor size, extrathyroidal extension, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, advanced tumor stage, disease recurrence/persistence, and mortality. In addition, TERT promoter mutations (especially C228T tended to coexist with BRAFV600E mutation, which indicated more aggressive tumor behavior. Therefore, TERT promoter mutations may be promising biomarkers for early diagnosis, risk stratification, prognostic prediction, and management of thyroid cancer. Keywords: TERT promoter mutations, thyroid cancer, clinicopathological features, prognosis, BRAFV600E mutation

  5. Association of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Promoter Mutations with the Prognosis of Glioma Patients: a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Youqian; Liu, Hongwei; Tao, Yingqun

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have found that telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) has vital roles in the development of malignant diseases including glioma. The occurrence of TERT promoter mutations in gliomas is frequent. So far, several studies on the association between TERT promoter mutations and prognosis of gliomas had been published, but the conclusion was still not uncertain. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to assess the association between TERT promoter mutations and survival of glioma patients by pooling data from published studies. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched for articles on the association between TERT promoter mutations and survival of glioma patients until June 30, 2015. Hazard ratios (HR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were utilized to analyze the prognosis of glioma patients with TERT promoter mutations. Heterogeneity of included studies was assessed using Cochrane's Q test and I (2) method. Eleven studies with a total of 3,444 glioma patients were finally included into the meta-analysis. Nine studies reported the HRs adjusting for other confounding factors. Meta-analysis of total 11 studies suggested that TERT promoter mutations were significantly associated with worse prognosis of patients with gliomas (HR = 2.07, 95% CI = 1.58-2.71, P promoter mutations were independently associated with worse prognosis of patients with gliomas (HR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.72-3.01, P promoter mutation is a promising biomarker for predicting worse prognosis for patients with gliomas. More prospective well-designed cohort studies are needed to further validate its prognostic role in gliomas.

  6. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Cleft Lip or Cleft Palate en español Labio leporino y paladar hendido Tilt your head back a bit and look in the mirror. Do you see the way your nose connects to your upper lip? Now open your mouth. Do you see the ...

  7. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug-Resistance Mutations and Polymorphisms in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase, Protease, and gp41 Sequences Among Recent Seroconverters in Southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Rosińska, Magdalena; Kruszyński, Piotr; Bratosiewicz-Wąsik, Jolanta; Wojtyczka, Robert; Janiec, Janusz; Szetela, Bartosz; Beniowski, Marek; Bociąga-Jasik, Monika; Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Wąsik, Tomasz J; The Cascade Collaboration In EuroCoord, And

    2017-02-07

    BACKGROUND Monitoring of drug resistance-related mutations among patients with recent HIV-1 infection offers an opportunity to describe current patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations. MATERIAL AND METHODS Of 298 individuals newly diagnosed from March 2008 to February 2014 in southern Poland, 47 were deemed to have recent HIV-1 infection by the limiting antigen avidity immunoassay. Proviral DNA was amplified and sequenced in the reverse transcriptase, protease, and gp41 coding regions. Mutations were interpreted according to the Stanford Database algorithm and/or the International Antiviral Society USA guidelines. TDR mutations were defined according to the WHO surveillance list. RESULTS Among 47 patients with recent HIV-1 infection only 1 (2%) had evidence of TDR mutation. No major resistance mutations were found, but the frequency of strains with ≥1 accessory resistance-associated mutations was high, at 98%. Accessory mutations were present in 11% of reverse transcriptase, 96% of protease, and 27% of gp41 sequences. Mean number of accessory resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease sequences was higher in viruses with no compensatory mutations in the gp41 HR2 domain than in strains with such mutations (p=0.031). CONCLUSIONS Despite the low prevalence of strains with TDR mutations, the frequency of accessory mutations was considerable, which may reflect the history of drug pressure among transmitters or natural viral genetic diversity, and may be relevant for future clinical outcomes. The accumulation of the accessory resistance mutations within the pol gene may restrict the occurrence of compensatory mutations related to enfuvirtide resistance or vice versa.

  8. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug-Resistance Mutations and Polymorphisms in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase, Protease, and gp41 Sequences Among Recent Seroconverters in Southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Rosińska, Magdalena; Kruszyński, Piotr; Bratosiewicz-Wąsik, Jolanta; Wojtyczka, Robert; Janiec, Janusz; Szetela, Bartosz; Beniowski, Marek; Bociąga-Jasik, Monika; Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Wąsik, Tomasz J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Monitoring of drug resistance-related mutations among patients with recent HIV-1 infection offers an opportunity to describe current patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations. Material/Methods Of 298 individuals newly diagnosed from March 2008 to February 2014 in southern Poland, 47 were deemed to have recent HIV-1 infection by the limiting antigen avidity immunoassay. Proviral DNA was amplified and sequenced in the reverse transcriptase, protease, and gp41 coding regions. Mutations were interpreted according to the Stanford Database algorithm and/or the International Antiviral Society USA guidelines. TDR mutations were defined according to the WHO surveillance list. Results Among 47 patients with recent HIV-1 infection only 1 (2%) had evidence of TDR mutation. No major resistance mutations were found, but the frequency of strains with ≥1 accessory resistance-associated mutations was high, at 98%. Accessory mutations were present in 11% of reverse transcriptase, 96% of protease, and 27% of gp41 sequences. Mean number of accessory resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease sequences was higher in viruses with no compensatory mutations in the gp41 HR2 domain than in strains with such mutations (p=0.031). Conclusions Despite the low prevalence of strains with TDR mutations, the frequency of accessory mutations was considerable, which may reflect the history of drug pressure among transmitters or natural viral genetic diversity, and may be relevant for future clinical outcomes. The accumulation of the accessory resistance mutations within the pol gene may restrict the occurrence of compensatory mutations related to enfuvirtide resistance or vice versa. PMID:28167814

  9. Medical Sequencing of Candidate Genes for Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic or isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P occurs in wide geographic distribution with an average birth prevalence of 1/700. We used direct sequencing as an approach to study candidate genes for CL/P. We report here the results of sequencing on 20 candidate genes for clefts in 184 cases with CL/P selected with an emphasis on severity and positive family history. Genes were selected based on expression patterns, animal models, and/or role in known human clefting syndromes. For seven genes with identified coding mutations that are potentially etiologic, we performed linkage disequilibrium studies as well in 501 family triads (affected child/mother/father. The recently reported MSX1 P147Q mutation was also studied in an additional 1,098 cleft cases. Selected missense mutations were screened in 1,064 controls from unrelated individuals on the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH diversity cell line panel. Our aggregate data suggest that point mutations in these candidate genes are likely to contribute to 6% of isolated clefts, particularly those with more severe phenotypes (bilateral cleft of the lip with cleft palate. Additional cases, possibly due to microdeletions or isodisomy, were also detected and may contribute to clefts as well. Sequence analysis alone suggests that point mutations in FOXE1, GLI2, JAG2, LHX8, MSX1, MSX2, SATB2, SKI, SPRY2, and TBX10 may be rare causes of isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and the linkage disequilibrium data support a larger, as yet unspecified, role for variants in or near MSX2, JAG2, and SKI. This study also illustrates the need to test large numbers of controls to distinguish rare polymorphic variants and prioritize functional studies for rare point mutations.

  10. Medical sequencing of candidate genes for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre R Vieira

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonsyndromic or isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P occurs in wide geographic distribution with an average birth prevalence of 1/700. We used direct sequencing as an approach to study candidate genes for CL/P. We report here the results of sequencing on 20 candidate genes for clefts in 184 cases with CL/P selected with an emphasis on severity and positive family history. Genes were selected based on expression patterns, animal models, and/or role in known human clefting syndromes. For seven genes with identified coding mutations that are potentially etiologic, we performed linkage disequilibrium studies as well in 501 family triads (affected child/mother/father. The recently reported MSX1 P147Q mutation was also studied in an additional 1,098 cleft cases. Selected missense mutations were screened in 1,064 controls from unrelated individuals on the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH diversity cell line panel. Our aggregate data suggest that point mutations in these candidate genes are likely to contribute to 6% of isolated clefts, particularly those with more severe phenotypes (bilateral cleft of the lip with cleft palate. Additional cases, possibly due to microdeletions or isodisomy, were also detected and may contribute to clefts as well. Sequence analysis alone suggests that point mutations in FOXE1, GLI2, JAG2, LHX8, MSX1, MSX2, SATB2, SKI, SPRY2, and TBX10 may be rare causes of isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and the linkage disequilibrium data support a larger, as yet unspecified, role for variants in or near MSX2, JAG2, and SKI. This study also illustrates the need to test large numbers of controls to distinguish rare polymorphic variants and prioritize functional studies for rare point mutations.

  11. Mutations in the Primer Grip of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Impair Proviral DNA Synthesis and Virion Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiang; Ottmann, Michele; Pechoux, Christine; Le Grice, Stuart; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the effects of mutating highly conserved residues in the primer grip domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) on virus formation and infectivity. Among a series of RT mutant viruses, three (M230A, L234D, and W239A) were found to be noninfectious or very poorly infectious. Our data indicate that these mutations in RT caused severe defects in proviral DNA synthesis. Interestingly, assembly and maturation of mutant virus M230A were similar to those of the wild type, while mutants L234D and W239A showed impaired maturation. The immature morphology of RT mutants L234D and W239A is due at least in part to premature cleavage of the gag-pol precursor, prior to virion budding, indicating that intracellular stability of Pr160gag-pol is of key importance during virus assembly. PMID:9696874

  12. [Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations in the tumors of human endocrine organs: Biological and prognostic value].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanova, L S; Volganova, K S; Abrosimov, A Y U

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the data available in the literature has shown that telomerase reverse transcriptase TERT promoter may serve as promising markers of malignancy, aggressive disease course, and poor prognosis for malignant tumors of endocrine organs. Considering the established association of mutations with tumors having a poor prognosis (high-grade and anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid), it is reasonable to perform prognostic-value investigations in a group of low-grade thyroid carcinomas that may occasionally recur and may be resistant to radioactive iodine therapy, i.e. can demonstrate a poor course and prognosis. TERT promoter mutations may be a specific marker of the clinically aggressive forms of adrenocortical carcinoma, but the determination of its diagnostic value calls for additional investigations that will have the larger number cases and establish the association with clinical features and survival rates.

  13. Molecular contribution to cleft palate production in cleft lip mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yasunori; Taya, Yuji; Saito, Kan; Fujita, Kazuya; Aoba, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Taku

    2014-05-01

    Cleft palate following cleft lip may include a developmental disorder during palatogenesis. CL/Fr mice fetuses, which develop cleft lip and palate spontaneously, have less capability for in vivo cell proliferation in palatal mesenchyme compared with CL/Fr normal fetuses. In order to know the changes of signaling molecules contributing to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip, the mRNA expression profiles were compared in palatal shelves oriented vertically (before elevation) in CL/Fr fetuses with or without cleft lip. The changes in mRNA profile of cleft palate morphogenesis were presented in a microarray analysis, and genes were restricted to lists contributing to cleft palate development in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip. Four candidate genes (Ywhab, Nek2, Tacc1 and Frk) were linked in a gene network that associates with cell proliferation (cell cycle, MAPK, Wnt and Tgf beta pathways). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR highlighted the candidate genes that significantly changed in CL/Fr fetuses with cleft lip (Ywhab, Nek2 and Tacc1). The results of these molecular contributions will provide useful information for a better understanding of palatogenesis in cleft palate following cleft lip. Our data indicated the genetic contribution to cleft palate morphogenesis following cleft lip.

  14. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not associated with mutations in aquaporin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiello, Marcelo; Muralidharan, Rajanandini; Sun, David; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2015-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by acute reversible subcortical vasogenic edema that is typically bilateral and self-limiting. It preferentially affects posterior regions of the brain. Clinical manifestations include encephalopathy, seizures, headache, and cortical blindness. PRES may be precipitated by hypertensive crises such as eclampsia and by immunosuppressive agents. The pathophysiology of PRES is incompletely understood. Disordered cerebral autoregulation leading to protein and fluid extravasation is thought to be important.(1) Other theories implicate endothelial dysfunction or vasospasm.(2).

  15. Association between genes on chromosome 4p16 and non-syndromic oral clefts in four populations

    OpenAIRE

    Ingersoll, Roxann G.; Hetmanski, Jacqueline; Park, Ji-Wan; Fallin, M Daniele; McIntosh, Iain; Wu-Chou, Yah-Huei; Chen, Philip K; Yeow, Vincent; Chong, Samuel S; Cheah, Felicia; Sull, Jae Woong; Jee, Sun Ha; Wang, Hong; Wu, Tao; Murray, Tanda

    2010-01-01

    Isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate and cleft palate are among the most common human birth defects. Several candidate gene studies on MSX1 have shown significant association between markers in MSX1 and risk of oral clefts, and re-sequencing studies have identified multiple mutations in MSX1 in a small minority of cases, which may account for 1–2% of all isolated oral clefts cases. We explored the 2-Mb region around MSX1, using a marker map of 393 single nucleotide polymorphisms (S...

  16. Screening for hereditary fructose intolerance mutations by reverse dot-blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, J; Tolan, D R

    1999-02-01

    An assay is described which is useful for genetic screening of the two most prevalent mutations that cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Both mutations lie within exon 5 of the aldolase B gene. Amplification of exon 5 from genomic DNA isolated from peripheral lymphocytes using biotinylated aldolase B-specific primers yields a biotin-tagged probe. This probe is hybridized to complementary poly(dT)-tailed allele specific oligonucleotides (ASOs) that are bound to a nylon membrane. The length of the ASOs, the amount bound to the membrane and the time of hybridization are optimized for discrimination of all four alleles under the same hybridization conditions. Detection of biotinylated amplified DNA is performed by creating an avidin-alkaline phosphatase complex and visualization by chemiluminescence. This assay can rapidly detect the two mutations, A149P and A174D, which cause >70% of HFI worldwide, and offers a rapid and sensitive assay that is much less invasive for the diagnosis of this often difficult to diagnose disorder.

  17. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  18. The syndrome of pit of the lower lip and its association with cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna Kaul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Van der Woude syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant developmental malformation usually associated with lower lip pits, cleft lip and palate. These congenital lip pits appear, clinically, as a malformation in the vermilion border of the lip, with or without excretion. Obligate carriers of this dominant mutation may have lip pits alone, cleft(s alone, clefts and pits or neither. Here, we present a case report of a 10 year-old male patient with Van der Woude syndrome and a brief literature on its treatment modalities.

  19. FOXE1 association with both isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and isolated cleft palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lina M.; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Bullard, Steve A.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Busch, Tamara D.; Machida, Junichiro; Johnson, Marla K.; Brauer, David; Krahn, Katherine; Daack-Hirsch, Sandy; L'Heureux, Jamie; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Rivera, Dora; López, Ana Maria; Moreno, Manuel A.; Hing, Anne; Lammer, Edward J.; Jones, Marilyn; Christensen, Kaare; Lie, Rolv T.; Jugessur, Astanand; Wilcox, Allen J.; Chines, Peter; Pugh, Elizabeth; Doheny, Kim; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Lidral, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are a common complex birth defect caused by genetic and environmental factors and/or their interactions. A previous genome-wide linkage scan discovered a novel locus for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) at 9q22–q33. To identify the etiologic gene, we undertook an iterative and complementary fine mapping strategy using family-based CL/P samples from Colombia, USA and the Philippines. Candidate genes within 9q22–q33 were sequenced, revealing 32 new variants. Concurrently, 397 SNPs spanning the 9q22–q33 2-LOD-unit interval were tested for association. Significant SNP and haplotype association signals (P = 1.45E − 08) narrowed the interval to a 200 kb region containing: FOXE1, C9ORF156 and HEMGN. Association results were replicated in CL/P families of European descent and when all populations were combined the two most associated SNPs, rs3758249 (P = 5.01E − 13) and rs4460498 (P = 6.51E − 12), were located inside a 70 kb high linkage disequilibrium block containing FOXE1. Association signals for Caucasians and Asians clustered 5′ and 3′ of FOXE1, respectively. Isolated cleft palate (CP) was also associated, indicating that FOXE1 plays a role in two phenotypes thought to be genetically distinct. Foxe1 expression was found in the epithelium undergoing fusion between the medial nasal and maxillary processes. Mutation screens of FOXE1 identified two family-specific missense mutations at highly conserved amino acids. These data indicate that FOXE1 is a major gene for CL/P and provides new insights for improved counseling and genetic interaction studies. PMID:19779022

  20. The strains recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471) can be certified as non-genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Yamada, Masami; Awogi, Takumi; Hakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial reverse mutation test, commonly called Ames test, is used worldwide. In Japan, the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are regulated under the Cartagena Domestic Law, and organisms obtained by self-cloning and/or natural occurrence would be exempted from the law case by case. The strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471), have been considered as non-GMOs because they can be constructed by self-cloning or naturally occurring bacterial strains, or do not disturb the biological diversity. The present article explains the reasons why these tester strains should be classified as non-GMOs.

  1. Laryngeal cleft type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo de Assis Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The clinical itinerary and the institution of conservative therapy in a case of laryngeal cleft type 1 refers to a child born by cesarean section, Apgar 9 and 10, a history of placental nd abruption in the 2 month of pregnancy, with respiratory nd distress on the 2 day of life and difficulty in breast feeding mothers. Presented evidence of aspiration pneumonia. The videodeglutogram showed aspiration of large amounts of material contrasted during swallowing. In bronchoscopy was visualized formation of threadlike small slit making the diagnosis of laryngeal cleft. We then decided, by institution of conservative treatment with enteral nutrition training and thickened with swallowing.

  2. Branchial cleft cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Nahata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity.

  3. Mechanisms associated with HIV-1 resistance to acyclovir by the V75I mutation in reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokov, Egor P; Obikhod, Aleksandr; Massud, Ivana; Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Brichacek, Beda; Balzarini, Jan; McGuigan, Christopher; Derudas, Marco; Margolis, Leonid; Schinazi, Raymond F; Götte, Matthias

    2009-08-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that the anti-herpetic drug acyclovir (ACV) also displays antiviral activity against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The triphosphate form of ACV is accepted by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), and subsequent incorporation leads to classical chain termination. Like all approved nucleoside analogue RT inhibitors (NRTIs), the selective pressure of ACV is associated with the emergence of resistance. The V75I mutation in HIV-1 RT appears to be dominant in this regard. By itself, this mutation is usually not associated with resistance to currently approved NRTIs. Here we studied the underlying biochemical mechanism. We demonstrate that V75I is also selected under the selective pressure of a monophosphorylated prodrug that was designed to bypass the bottleneck in drug activation to the triphosphate form (ACV-TP). Pre-steady-state kinetics reveal that V75I discriminates against the inhibitor at the level of catalysis, whereas binding of the inhibitor remains largely unaffected. The incorporated ACV-monophosphate (ACV-MP) is vulnerable to excision in the presence of the pyrophosphate donor ATP. V75I compromises binding of the next nucleotide that can otherwise provide a certain degree of protection from excision. Collectively, the results of this study suggest that ACV is sensitive to two different resistance pathways, which warrants further investigation regarding the detailed resistance profile of ACV. Such studies will be crucial in assessing the potential clinical utility of ACV and its derivatives in combination with established NRTIs.

  4. Distinctive Drug-resistant Mutation Profiles and Interpretations of HIV-1 Proviral DNA Revealed by Deep Sequencing in Reverse Transcriptase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Qian Qian; SHAO Yi Ming; MA Li Ying; LI Zhen Peng; ZHAO Hai; PAN Dong; WANG Yan; XU Wei Si; XING Hui; FENGYi; JIANG Shi Bo

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate distinctive features in drug-resistant mutations(DRMs) and interpretations for reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) between proviral DNA and paired viral RNA in HIV-1-infected patients. MethodsForty-three HIV-1-infected individuals receiving first-line antiretroviral therapy were recruited to participate in a multicenter AIDS Cohort Study in Anhui and Henan Provinces in China in 2004. Drug resistance genotyping was performed by bulk sequencing and deep sequencing on the plasma and whole blood of 77 samples, respectively. Drug-resistance interpretation was compared between viral RNA and paired proviral DNA. ResultsCompared with bulk sequencing, deep sequencing could detect more DRMs and samples with DRMs in both viral RNA and proviral DNA. The mutations M184I and M230I were more prevalent in proviral DNA than in viral RNA (Fisher’s exact test,P ConclusionCompared with viral RNA, the distinctive information of DRMsand drug resistance interpretations for proviral DNA could be obtained by deep sequencing, which could provide more detailed and precise information for drug resistance monitoring and the rational design of optimal antiretroviral therapy regimens.

  5. Evidence against the reversion of mutation in the Haemophilus influenzae phage HP1c1 by preinfection treatment of host cells or phage with MNNG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boling, M.E.; Kimball, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    N-Methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) causes reversion of a temperature-sensitive mutation in a bacteriophage of Haemophilus influenzae if exposure to the mutagen takes place after infection but before lysis. However, neither pre-infection treatment of the phage DNA, host cells, or both will cause reversion. The reasons for this are discussed in relation to the somewhat different results in the Escherichia coli lambda phage system and in relation to error-prone repair and replication processes.

  6. A novel reverse-genetic approach (SIMF) identifies Mutator insertions in new Myb genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, P D; Grotewold, E

    2000-11-01

    We have developed a new strategy designated SIMF (Systematic Insertional Mutagenesis of Families), to identify DNA insertions in many members of a gene family simultaneously. This method requires only a short amino acid sequence conserved in all members of the family to make a degenerate oligonucleotide, and a sequence from the end of the DNA insertion. The SIMF strategy was successfully applied to the large maize R2R3 Myb family of regulatory genes, and Mutator insertions in several novel Myb genes were identified. Application of this technique to identify insertions in other large gene families could significantly decrease the effort involved in screening at the same time for insertions in all members of groups of genes that share a limited sequence identity.

  7. Water-Restructuring Mutations Can Reverse the Thermodynamic Signature of Ligand Binding to Human Carbonic Anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jerome M; Kang, Kyungtae; Sastry, Madhavi; Sherman, Woody; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Whitesides, George M

    2017-03-27

    This study uses mutants of human carbonic anhydrase (HCAII) to examine how changes in the organization of water within a binding pocket can alter the thermodynamics of protein-ligand association. Results from calorimetric, crystallographic, and theoretical analyses suggest that most mutations strengthen networks of water-mediated hydrogen bonds and reduce binding affinity by increasing the enthalpic cost and, to a lesser extent, the entropic benefit of rearranging those networks during binding. The organization of water within a binding pocket can thus determine whether the hydrophobic interactions in which it engages are enthalpy-driven or entropy-driven. Our findings highlight a possible asymmetry in protein-ligand association by suggesting that, within the confines of the binding pocket of HCAII, binding events associated with enthalpically favorable rearrangements of water are stronger than those associated with entropically favorable ones. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Applying reversible mutations of nodulation and nitrogen-fixation genes to study social cheating in Rhizobium etli-legume interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jun; Zheng, Huiming; Katzianer, David S; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Mutualisms are common in nature, though these symbioses can be quite permeable to cheaters in situations where one individual parasitizes the other by discontinuing cooperation yet still exploits the benefits of the partnership. In the Rhizobium-legume system, there are two separate contexts, namely nodulation and nitrogen fixation processes, by which resident Rhizobium individuals can benefit by cheating. Here, we constructed reversible and irreversible mutations in key nodulation and nitrogen-fixation pathways of Rhizobium etli and compared their interaction with plant hosts Phaseolus vulgaris to that of wild type. We show that R. etli reversible mutants deficient in nodulation factor production are capable of intra-specific cheating, wherein mutants exploit other Rhizobium individuals capable of producing these factors. Similarly, we show that R. etli mutants are also capable of cheating inter-specifically, colonizing the host legume yet contributing nothing to the partnership in terms of nitrogen fixation. Our findings indicate that cheating is possible in both of these frameworks, seemingly without damaging the stability of the mutualism itself. These results may potentially help explain observations suggesting that legume plants are commonly infected by multiple bacterial lineages during the nodulation process.

  9. Persistent induction of somatic reversions of the pink-eyed unstable mutation in F1 mice born to fathers irradiated at the spermatozoa stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Kazunori; Shimura, Tsutomu; Taga, Masataka; Uematsu, Norio; Gondo, Yoichi; Ohtaki, Megu; Kominami, Ryo; Niwa, Ohtsura

    2002-06-01

    Untargeted mutation and delayed mutation are features of radiation-induced genomic instability and have been studied extensively in tissue culture cells. The mouse pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) mutation is due to an intragenic duplication of the pink-eyed dilution locus and frequently reverts back to the wild type in germ cells as well as in somatic cells. The reversion event can be detected in the retinal pigment epithelium as a cluster of pigmented cells (eye spot). We have investigated the reversion p(um) in F1 mice born to irradiated males. Spermatogonia-stage irradiation did not affect the frequency of the reversion in F1 mice. However, 6 Gy irradiation at the spermatozoa stage resulted in an approximately twofold increase in the number of eye spots in the retinal pigment epithelium of F1 mice. Somatic reversion occurred for the paternally derived p(un) alleles. In addition, the reversion also occurred for the maternally derived, unirradiated p(un) alleles at a frequency equal to that for the paternally derived allele. Detailed analyses of the number of pigmented cells per eye spot indicated that the frequency of reversion was persistently elevated during the proliferation cycle of the cells in the retinal pigment epithelium when the male parents were irradiated at the spermatozoa stage. The present study demonstrates the presence of a long-lasting memory of DNA damage and the persistent up-regulation of recombinogenic activity in the retinal pigment epithelium of the developing fetus.

  10. Stability of reverse headgear treatment in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with crossbite%单侧完全性唇腭裂前方牵引治疗后的稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李巍然; 傅振; 王爱萍; 周琳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the stability of unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with crossbite after reverse headgear treatment Methods 18 unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with anterior crossbite before growth spurt were treated with reverse headgear and followed after treatment for (2.71± 0.77) years.The average age of the patients was (9.63±1.24) years before treatment.All patients had positive overjet after treatment.12 patients remained in the study after two years' of follow-up.Cephalograms of before (T0),after (T1) reverse headgear treatment and at least two years follow-up(T2) were taken for each patient.9 angular and 15 linear measurements were analyzed.Paired t test and stepwise regression were done to compare the differences in dentofacial structures.Results NA-PA decreased by 2.92°±3.52° (P<0.05)、OJ decreased by (2.83±3.83) mm (P<0.05),and L1-TL,B-TL,Po-TL increased by (1.38±4.22) mm (P<0.05),(1.29±4.85) mm (P<0.05),(1.79±5.18) mm (P<0.05) after two years' follow up.The measurement of facial height (N-ME,ANS-ME,S-GO) increased by (5.33±3.11) mm (P<0.01),(5.42±2.61) mm (P< 0.01) and (5.25±3.79) mm (P<0.01) during the follow up.After 2.71±0.77 years' follow up the SNA,ANB,NA-PA,U1-SN,Y-axis,MP-SN remained larger and the L1-MP,OP-SN,and UL-U1 were smaller than that of pretreatment.Compared to that of the pretreatment U1-TL,A-TL and overjet increased by (5.38±2.79) mm (P<0.01)、(3.13±1.60) mm (P<0.01)、(4.78±2.96) mm (P<0.01) when recalled.While LT-TL,B-TL,PO-TL,UL-EL showed no significant difference compared to pretreatment.Overjet relapse amount (T2-T1) was chosen as the dependent factor,the predict equation was:20.43-1.172OJT1-T0-0.548 L1-T1-T0-0.229U6-PPT1-T0 (R2 =0.969).Conclusions Relapse after reverse headgear treatment in UCLP patients was mainly due to the excessive growth of mandible during pubertal period,and the maxillary forward movement caused by treatment remained stable.%目的 通过对

  11. Temperature-dependent sex-reversal by a transformer-2 gene-edited mutation in the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Female to male sex reversal was achieved in an emerging agricultural insect pest, Drosophila suzukii, by creating a temperature-sensitive point mutation in the sex-determination gene, transformer-2 (tra-2) using CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/ CRISPR-associated) hom...

  12. Reverse mutation of the virulence-associated S2 gene does not cause an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus strain to revert to pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu; Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Ma, Jian; Han, Xiu-E; Zhao, Li-Ping; Shen, Rong-Xian; Xiang, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2013-09-01

    The contribution of S2 accessory gene of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) to the virulence of pathogenic strains was investigated in the present study by reverse mutation of all four consensus S2 mutation sites in an attenuated EIAV proviral strain, FDDV3-8, to the corresponding sequences of a highly pathogenic strain DV117. The S2 reverse-mutated recombinant strain FDDVS2r1-2-3-4 replicated with similar kinetics to FDDV3-8 in cultivated target cells. In contrast to the results of other studies of EIAV with dysfunctional S2, reverse mutation of S2 only transiently and moderately increased the plasma viral load of inoculated horses, and induction of transient immunosuppression did not boost viral pathogenicity. In addition, inoculation of FDDVS2r1-2-3-4 induced partial protection to a challenge pathogenic virus. These results suggest that the attenuated EIAV vaccine strain with multiple mutations in multiple genes will not easily revert to a virulent phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutations in the Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Genes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 from Antiretroviral Naïve and Treated Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Bure

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is challenged by the emergence of resistance-associated mutations in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1. In this study, resistance associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT and protease (PR genes in antiretroviral therapy (ART  naïve and treated HIV-1 infected pediatric patients from North India were evaluated. Genotyping was successfully performed in 46 patients (30 ART naive and 16 treated for the RT gene and in 53 patients (27 ART naive and 26 treated for PR gene and mutations were identified using Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database. A major drug resistant mutation in RT gene, L74I (NRTI, and two such mutations, K101E and G190A (NNRTI, were observed in two ART naïve patients, while M184V was detected in two ART treated patients. Overall, major resistance associated mutations in RT gene were observed in nine (30% and seven (36% of ART naïve and treated children respectively. Minor mutations were identified in PR gene in five children. Few non-clade C viral strains (≈30% were detected, although subtype C was most predominant. The screening of ART naïve children for mutations in HIV-1 RT and protease genes, before and after initiation of ART is desirable for drug efficacy and good prognosis.

  14. Reverse Transcriptase drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 Subtype C infected patients on ART in Karonga District, Malawi

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bansode, Vijay B

    2011-10-13

    Abstract Background Drug resistance testing before initiation of, or during, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not routinely performed in resource-limited settings. High levels of viral resistance circulating within the population will have impact on treatment programs by increasing the chances of transmission of resistant strains and treatment failure. Here, we investigate Drug Resistance Mutations (DRMs) from blood samples obtained at regular intervals from patients on ART (Baseline-22 months) in Karonga District, Malawi. One hundred and forty nine reverse transcriptase (RT) consensus sequences were obtained via nested PCR and automated sequencing from blood samples collected at three-month intervals from 75 HIV-1 subtype C infected individuals in the ART programme. Results Fifteen individuals showed DRMs, and in ten individuals DRMs were seen from baseline samples (reported to be ART naïve). Three individuals in whom no DRMs were observed at baseline showed the emergence of DRMs during ART exposure. Four individuals who did show DRMs at baseline showed additional DRMs at subsequent time points, while two individuals showed evidence of DRMs at baseline and either no DRMs, or different DRMs, at later timepoints. Three individuals had immune failure but none appeared to be failing clinically. Conclusion Despite the presence of DRMs to drugs included in the current regimen in some individuals, and immune failure in three, no signs of clinical failure were seen during this study. This cohort will continue to be monitored as part of the Karonga Prevention Study so that the long-term impact of these mutations can be assessed. Documenting proviral population is also important in monitoring the emergence of drug resistance as selective pressure provided by ART compromises the current plasma population, archived viruses can re-emerge

  15. Psychological issues in cleft lip and cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa Avinash

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vocational and social issues affect rehabilitation and development of patients with cleft lip and cleft palate. However, psychological problems like lowered self esteem and difficulties in social interaction have also been noted in them. Not many pediatric reconstructive surgery teams have a psychiatrist on their panel. It is likely that psychological problems are higher in incidence than literature actually suggests. Hence it is very essential that such cases are identified by the surgical team to maximize positive outcome of surgery and rehabilitation. This study discusses psychological issues revolving around cleft lip and cleft palate along with lacunae in many psychological research studies.

  16. Cleft Lip Repair, Nasoalveolar Molding, and Primary Cleft Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuskute, Aditi A; Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-11-01

    Cleft lip and palate are the fourth most common congenital birth defect. Management requires multidisciplinary care owing to the complexity of these clefts on midface growth, dentition, Eustachian tube function, and lip and nasal cosmesis. Repair requires planning, but can be performed systematically to reduce variability of outcomes. The use of primary rhinoplasty at the time of cleft lip repair can improve nose symmetry and reduce nasal deformity. Use of nasoalveolar molding ranging from lip taping to the use of preoperative infant orthopedics has played an important role in improving functional and cosmetic results of cleft lip repair.

  17. Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000004.htm Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge To use the sharing ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 8. Read More Cleft lip and palate Cleft lip and palate repair Review Date 5/9/ ...

  18. Cleft lip in oculodentodigital dysplasia suggests novel roles for connexin43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, K; Ishiguchi, M; Aikawa, T; Kimata, M; Kishi, N; Fujimaki, T; Murakami, A; Kogo, M

    2012-07-01

    Oculodentodigital Dysplasia (ODDD) is a rare syndrome involving anomalies in eye, tooth, and digit formation, caused by mutations in CX43/GJA1. In addition to classic dental features, ODDD includes oral and craniofacial accessory symptoms such as characteristic facial appearance and cleft palate. However, there have been no reports of ODDD accompanied by cleft lip. Herein we report, for the first time, a male, sporadic, Asian proband presenting bilateral cleft lip. By direct sequence analysis, our proband was diagnosed as having ODDD with a heterozygous mutation, codon 142 G>A in GJA1 and CX43E48K. We excluded the possibility of pathogenic mutations in B3GALTL, BMP4, TFAP2A, PVRL1, IRF6, and MSX1. To address how CX43/GJA1 is related to cleft lip, we performed immunohistochemistry using mouse and human mid-facial tissue. CX43 expression was detected in the nasal compartment and nasal and maxillary processes at murine developmental stage E12.5. Furthermore, CX43 expression was found in the epithelial tissue inside the human subepithelial cleft lip that completes epithelial fusion. Therefore, we suggest that CX43/GJA1 is involved in lip formation. Our case report of ODDD with a bilateral cleft lip suggests that CX43/GJA1 might be a novel candidate gene for syndromic cleft lip.

  19. Mutation in TERMINAL FLOWER1 reverses the photoperiodic requirement for flowering in the wild strawberry Fragaria vesca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Elli A; Mouhu, Katriina; Albani, Maria C; Kurokura, Takeshi; Rantanen, Marja; Sargent, Daniel J; Battey, Nicholas H; Coupland, George; Elomaa, Paula; Hytönen, Timo

    2012-07-01

    Photoperiodic flowering has been extensively studied in the annual short-day and long-day plants rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), whereas less is known about the control of flowering in perennials. In the perennial wild strawberry, Fragaria vesca (Rosaceae), short-day and perpetual flowering long-day accessions occur. Genetic analyses showed that differences in their flowering responses are caused by a single gene, SEASONAL FLOWERING LOCUS, which may encode the F. vesca homolog of TERMINAL FLOWER1 (FvTFL1). We show through high-resolution mapping and transgenic approaches that FvTFL1 is the basis of this change in flowering behavior and demonstrate that FvTFL1 acts as a photoperiodically regulated repressor. In short-day F. vesca, long photoperiods activate FvTFL1 mRNA expression and short days suppress it, promoting flower induction. These seasonal cycles in FvTFL1 mRNA level confer seasonal cycling of vegetative and reproductive development. Mutations in FvTFL1 prevent long-day suppression of flowering, and the early flowering that then occurs under long days is dependent on the F. vesca homolog of FLOWERING LOCUS T. This photoperiodic response mechanism differs from those described in model annual plants. We suggest that this mechanism controls flowering within the perennial growth cycle in F. vesca and demonstrate that a change in a single gene reverses the photoperiodic requirements for flowering.

  20. Clefting in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, F.; Schur, W.

    NASA's effort to develop a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, focuses on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. It has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired stable state instead. Hoop stress considerations in the pumpkin design leads to choosing the lowest possible bulge radius, while robust deployment is favored by a large bulge radius. Some qualitative understanding of design aspects on undesired equilibria in pumpkin balloons has been obtained via small-scale balloon testing. Poorly deploying balloons have clefts, but most gores away from the cleft deploy uniformly. In this paper, we present models for pumpkin balloons with clefts. Long term success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and means for quantitative assessment of measures that prevent their occurrence. This paper attempts to determine numerical thresholds of design parameters that distinguish between properly deploying designs and improperly deploying designs by analytically investigating designs in the vicinity of criticality. Design elements which may trigger the onset undesired equilibria and remedial measures that ensure deployment are discussed.

  1. nr0b1 (DAX1) mutation in zebrafish causes female-to-male sex reversal through abnormal gonadal proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sijie; Zhang, Hefei; Wang, Fenghua; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Gang

    2016-09-15

    Sex determinations are diverse in vertebrates. Although many sex-determining genes and pathways are conserved, the mechanistic roles of these genes and pathways in the genetic sex determination are not well understood. DAX1 (encoded by the NR0B1 gene) is a vertebrate specific orphan nuclear receptor that regulates gonadal development and sexual determination. In human, duplication of the NR0B1 gene leads to male-to-female sex reversal. In mice, Nr0b1 shows both pro-testis and anti-testis functions. We generated inheritable nr0b1 mutation in the zebrafish and found the nr0b1 mutation caused homozygous mutants to develop as fertile males due to female-to-male sex reversal. The nr0b1 mutation did not increase Caspase-3 labeling nor tp53 expression in the developing gonads. Introduction of a tp53 mutation into the nr0b1 mutant did not rescue the sex-reversal phenotype. Further examination revealed reduction in cell proliferation and abnormal somatic cell differentiation in the nr0b1 mutant gonads at the undifferentiated and bi-potential ovary stages. Together, our results suggest nr0b1 regulates somatic cell differentiation and cell proliferation to ensure normal sex development in the zebrafish.

  2. Genetic determinants of facial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark...

  3. Craniofacial clefting and sutural dystopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M H; Edwards, T J; David, D J

    1991-07-01

    Sutural anomalies in conjunction with craniofacial clefting are unusual. A case of median frontal clefting is presented in which there was an absence of a normal metopic suture and replacement by paramedian frontal sutures. The association of an underlying brain anomaly, with attendant surgical difficulties, is noted, as are the radiological techniques of preoperative diagnosis.

  4. Late detection of cleft palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanny, K H; de Vries, I A C; Haverkamp, S J; Oomen, K P Q; Penris, W M; Eijkemans, M J C; Kon, M; Mink van der Molen, A B; Breugem, C C

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate only (CPO) is a common congenital malformation, and most patients are diagnosed within the first weeks after birth. Late diagnosis of the cleft palate (CP) could initially result in feeding and growth impairment, and subsequently speech and hearing problems later in life. The purpose of

  5. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene of HIV-1 isolates from Northern Indian patients: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta Choudhury, Shubhasree; Chaudhury, Alok K; Kalra, Rajesh; Andrabi, Raiees; Wig, Naveet; Biswas, Ashutosh; Bala, Manju; Luthra, Kalpana

    2010-04-01

    The viral reverse transcriptase gene was amplified from the plasma of 27 drug-naïve and five drug-experienced HIV patients in Northern India. Follow-up samples of naïve patients after antiretroviral therapy initiation were collected in six patients at 3 months and three patients at 6 months. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two new recombinant forms, CRF_CH and CRF_CK, and an accessory non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation E138A, not previously reported from India. The major DRMs found in two 6-month follow-up samples were absent in their baseline blood samples. This is the first follow-up study to determine anti-retroviral drug resistance mutations in Indian HIV patients.

  6. Analysis of evolution and virological characteristics of rtI233V mutations in the hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ling YE

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the evolution of rtI233V mutation in the reverse transcriptase domain of hepatitis B virus (HBV and its association with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV resistance. Methods The rate of detection of rtI233V mutation in 9830 patients with chronic HBV infection was analyzed. HBV reverse transcriptase genes isolated from serial serum samples of two patients were amplified by nested PCR, and clonal sequencing (>20 clones/sample was performed to analyze the evolution of rtI233V mutations. The replica of pTriEx-HBV1.1 vectors harboring wild-type and mutant strains (rtI233V, rtN236T, rtI233V+rtN236T were respectively constructed and transiently transfected into HepG2 cells. Media containing serial concentrations of lamivudine (LAM, ADV, entecavir (ETV, or tenofovir (TDF were used to treat the cells. Then HBV DNA in the supernatants was quantitatively determined by real-time PCR in order to analyze HBV mutants' replication competence and phenotypic characteristics under the drug pressures. Results The detection rate of rtI233V mutation in 9830 nucleos(tide analogues-treated patients was 0.28% (28/9830, including 0.19% (19 patients with rtI233V individual mutation and 0.09% (9 patients with rtI233V mutation combining with rtN236T or other mutations. All of the patients had rtI233V had ADV exposure history: 16 (57.1% of them received ADV monotherapy for over six months, and 12(42.9% of them received ADV combined sequential therapy for over 12 months. Replication competence and phenotypic resistance analysis showed rtI233V and wild-type strains had similar viral replication competence, while rtN236T exhibited significantly lower replication competence compared with wild-type strains. rtI233V strains remained sensitive to LAM, ADV, ETV, and TDF and showed little influence on drug resistance when combined with rtN236T, but it showed ability to restore the defected replication capacity of rtN236T strains. Conclusions  The rtI233V mutation

  7. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  8. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noriko; Funato; Masataka; Nakamura; Hiromi; Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis.

  9. Pre-existing mutations in reverse transcriptase of hepatitis B virus in treatment-naive Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xu

    Full Text Available High rate of viral replication and lacking of proofreading activity in hepatitis B virus (HBV polymerase lead to the generation of mutations in HBV virus. Mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT region of HBV polymerase are demonstrated to be strongly associated with drug resistance during antiviral treatment. However, the presence of mutations as well as its clinical significance in treatment-naïve hepatitis patients (defined as pre-existing mutations need to be further investigated. In the present study, a total of 168 serum samples from treatment-naive chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients were collected, and the RT region of HBV polymerase was sequenced. The results showed that pre-existing mutations in the RT region of HBV polymerase were detected in 43 of 168 (25.6% treatment-naive CHB patients within which there were no well-characterized primary nucleotide analogs (NAs resistance sites. Three dominant sites at rt191, rt207 and rt226 were found mutant in 7(16.28%, 8(18.60%, and 14(32.56% samples respectively among these 43 patients. No significant correlation was found between pre-existing mutations and gender, age, HBV genotype, ALT, HBeAg or HBV DNA loads. However, patients with pre-existing RT mutations under HBeAg sero-negative status exhibited decreased HBV DNA loads, which contributed to the decreased HBV DNA loads in the total HBeAg sero-negative patients. The above investigation indicated that there was a prevalence of pre-existing mutations in RT region of HBV polymerase which might affect the serum HBV DNA level in treatment-naive CHB patients. Its effects on the occurrence of NAs resistance and the prognosis after treatment need to be further investigated.

  10. Reverse genetic screen for loss-of-function mutations uncovers a frameshifting deletion in the melanophilin gene accountable for a distinctive coat color in Belgian Blue cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanbo; Sartelet, Arnaud; Tamma, Nico; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2016-02-01

    In the course of a reverse genetic screen in the Belgian Blue cattle breed, we uncovered a 10-bp deletion (c.87_96del) in the first coding exon of the melanophilin gene (MLPH), which introduces a premature stop codon (p.Glu32Aspfs*1) in the same exon, truncating 94% of the protein. Recessive damaging mutations in the MLPH gene are well known to cause skin, hair, coat or plumage color dilution phenotypes in numerous species, including human, mice, dog, cat, mink, rabbit, chicken and quail. Large-scale array genotyping undertaken to identify p.Glu32Aspfs*1 homozygous mutant animals revealed a mutation frequency of 5% in the breed and allowed for the identification of 10 homozygous mutants. As expression of a colored coat requires at least one wild-type allele at the co-dominant Roan locus encoded by the KIT ligand gene (KITLG), homozygous mutants for p.Ala227Asp corresponding with the missense mutation were excluded. The six remaining colored calves displayed a distinctive dilution phenotype as anticipated. This new coat color was named 'cool gray'. It is the first damaging mutation in the MLPH gene described in cattle and extends the already long list of species with diluted color due to recessive mutations in MLPH and broadens the color palette of gray in this breed.

  11. The effects of alternate polypurine tracts (PPTs) and mutations of sequences adjacent to the PPT on viral replication and cleavage specificity of the Rous sarcoma virus reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kevin W; Oh, Jangsuk; Alvord, W Gregory; Hughes, Stephen H

    2008-09-01

    We previously reported that a mutant Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) with an alternate polypurine tract (PPT), DuckHepBFlipPPT, had unexpectedly high titers and that the PPT was miscleaved primarily at one position following a GA dinucleotide by the RNase H of reverse transcriptase (RT). This miscleavage resulted in a portion of the 3' end of the PPT (5'-ATGTA) being added to the end of U3 of the linear viral DNA. To better understand the RNase H cleavage by RSV RT, we made a number of mutations within the DuckHepBFlipPPT and in the sequences adjacent to the PPT. Deleting the entire ATGTA sequence from the DuckHepBFlipPPT increased the relative titer to wild-type levels, while point mutations within the ATGTA sequence reduced the relative titer but had minimal effects on the cleavage specificity. However, mutating a sequence 5' of ATGTA affected the relative titer of the virus and caused the RNase H of RSV RT to lose the ability to cleave the PPT specifically. In addition, although mutations in the conserved stretch of thymidine residues upstream of the PPT did not affect the relative titer or cleavage specificity, the mutation of some of the nucleotides immediately upstream of the PPT did affect the titer and cleavage specificity. Taken together, our studies show that the structure of the PPT in the context of the cognate RT, rather than a specific sequence, is important for the proper cleavage by RSV RT.

  12. A reversion of an IL2RG mutation in combined immunodeficiency providing competitive advantage to the majority of CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Taco W; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; Barendregt, Barbara H; Klarenbeek, Paul; aan de Kerk, Daan J; Baars, Paul A; Jansen, Machiel H; de Vries, Niek; van Lier, René A W; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in the common gamma chain (γc, CD132, encoded by the IL2RG gene) can lead to B(+)T(-)NK(-) X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, as a consequence of unresponsiveness to γc-cytokines such as interleukins-2, -7 and -15. Hypomorphic mutations in CD132 may cause combined immunodeficiencies with a variety of clinical presentations. We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a 6-year-old boy with normal lymphocyte counts, who suffered from recurrent pneumonia and disseminated mollusca contagiosa. Since proliferative responses of T cells and NK cells to γc -cytokines were severely impaired, we performed IL2RG gene analysis, showing a heterozygous mutation in the presence of a single X-chromosome. Interestingly, an IL2RG reversion to normal predominated in both naïve and antigen-primed CD8(+) T cells and increased over time. Only the revertant CD8(+) T cells showed normal expression of CD132 and the various CD8(+) T cell populations had a different T-cell receptor repertoire. Finally, a fraction of γδ(+) T cells and differentiated CD4(+)CD27(-) effector-memory T cells carried the reversion, whereas NK or B cells were repeatedly negative. In conclusion, in a patient with a novel IL2RG mutation, gene-reverted CD8(+) T cells accumulated over time. Our data indicate that selective outgrowth of particular T-cell subsets may occur following reversion at the level of committed T progenitor cells.

  13. [Cleft lip and palate--problematic cleft speech].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortis-Dzierzbicka, M A

    1999-01-01

    The early restoration of facial and palatal morphology in patients with cleft of lip and/or palate provides the anatomical base for good speech outcome. The author gives the up todate overview of the main problems concerning cleft speech, such as velopalatal insufficiency and typical articulation errors. The article describes the modern methods for the evaluation of VPI and current trends in treatment modalities for VPI.

  14. Benzo(a)pyrene and X-rays induce reversions of the pink-eyed unstable mutation in the retinal pigment epithelium of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, A J; Kosaras, B; Sidman, R L; Schiestl, R H

    2000-12-20

    The pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) mutation is the result of a 70kb tandem duplication within the murine p gene. Homologous deletion/recombination of the locus to wild-type occurs spontaneously in embryos and results in pigmented spots in the fur and eye that persist for life. Such deletion events are also inducible by a variety of DNA damaging agents, as we have observed previously with the fur spot assay. Here, we describe the use of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye to detect reversion events induced with two differently acting agents. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) induces a high frequency, and X-ray exposure a more modest increase, of p(un) reversion in both the fur and the eye. The eye-spot assay requires fewer mice for significant results than the fur spot assay. Previous work had elucidated the cell proliferation pattern in the RPE and a position effect variegation phenotype in the pattern of p(un) reversions, which we have confirmed. Acute exposure to B(a)P or X-rays resulted in an increased frequency of reversion events. The majority of the spontaneous reversions lie toward the periphery of the RPE whereas induced events are found more centrally, closer to the optic nerve head. The induced distribution corresponds to the major sites of cell proliferation in the RPE at the time of exposure, and further advocates the proposal that dividing cells are at highest risk to develop deletions.

  15. Bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Arun; Nandini R.

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral cleft lip nose deformity is a multi-factorial and complex deformity which tends to aggravate with growth of the child, if not attended surgically. The goals of primary bilateral cleft lip nose surgery are, closure of the nasal floor and sill, lengthening of the columella, repositioning of the alar base, achieving nasal tip projection, repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, and reorienting the nares from horizontal to oblique position. The multiplicity of procedures in the li...

  16. Preferential associations between oral clefts and other major congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rittler, Monica; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Bermejo, Eva; Cocchi, Guido; Correa, Adolfo; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Danderfer, Ron; De Vigan, Catherine; De Walle, Hermien; da Graca Dutra, Maria; Hirahara, Fumiki; Luisa Martinez-Frias, Maria; Merlob, Paul; Mutchinick, Osvaldo; Ritvanen, Annukka; Robert-Gnansia, Elisabeth; Scarano, Gioacchino; Siffel, Csaba; Stoll, Claude; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To identify preferential associations between oral clefts (CL = cleft lip only, CLP = cleft lip with cleft palate, CP = cleft palate) and nonoral cleft anomalies, to interpret them on clinical grounds, and, based on the patterns of associated defects, to establish whether CL and CLP are

  17. HIV reverse transcriptase gene mutations in anti-retroviral treatment naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanakrishnan, K; Kasthuri, A; Amsavathani, S K; Sumathi, G

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to find out the mutational variations of reverse transcriptase (RT) gene of HIV, after the traditional drug usage among anti-retroviral therapy naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS. HIV Reactive patients, who were exposed for indigenous medicines such as Siddha, Ayurveda etc., for a minimum period of 6 months were taken for this study. Among 40 patients, two samples (5.55%) demonstrated high-level mutational resistance variations for nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) and non-NRTI. The predominant polymorphisms detected were K122E (91.7%), V60I (91.7%), V35T (89%), Q207E (89%), D177E (89%), T200A (86.1%), S48T (83.33%), K173A (80.6%).

  18. Argon laser photocoagulation of cyclodialysis clefts after cataract surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, B. [Univ. of Lund, Dept. of Ophthalmology, Lund (Sweden)

    1995-06-01

    Three patients with cyclodialysis clefts, hypotony and hypotonic retinopathy subsequent to cataract surgery were treated with argon laser photocoagulation. The hypotony was reversed in each patient and their visual acuity was normalized. Laser photocoagulation is a noninvasive treatment that can be repeated easily and safely. The complications of the treatment are minor. A hypertensive episode commonly occurs in the early postoperative period. (au) 8 refs.

  19. DNA diagnosis of the fragile X syndrome in a series of 236 mentally retarded subjects and evidence for a reversal of mutation in the FMR-1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van den; Vries, B.B.A. de; Bakker, P.L.G.; Deelen, W.H.; Graaff, E. de; Hemel, J.O. van; Oostra, B.A.; Niermeijer, M.F.; Halley, D.J.J. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1994-07-15

    The cloning of the FMR-1 gene and the identification of an expanded CGG repeat in DNA of fragile X patients has made reliable DNA diagnosis feasible. Southern blotting and PCR assays of the CGG repeat in an unselected series of 236 mentally retarded subjects resulted in the identification of 10 new fragile X families. Reevaluation of previously assessed fragile X families resulted in the first observation of the presence of a reversal of mutation in the FMR-1 gene. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  1. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  2. Cleft lip and palate genetics and application in early embryological development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenli; Serrano, Maria; Miguel, Symone San; Ruest, L Bruno; Svoboda, Kathy K H

    2009-10-01

    The development of the head involves the interaction of several cell populations and coordination of cell signalling pathways, which when disrupted can cause defects such as facial clefts. This review concentrates on genetic contributions to facial clefts with and without cleft palate (CP). An overview of early palatal development with emphasis on muscle and bone development is blended with the effects of environmental insults and known genetic mutations that impact human palatal development. An extensive table of known genes in syndromic and non-syndromic CP, with or without cleft lip (CL), is provided. We have also included some genes that have been identified in environmental risk factors for CP/L. We include primary and review references on this topic.

  3. Risk of Oral Clefts in Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Dorthe; Bille, Camilla; Petersen, Inge

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Small studies have indicated that twinning increases the risk of oral cleft. METHODS:: We used data from a Danish national population-based cohort study to investigate whether twinning was associated with isolated oral cleft, and to estimate the twin probandwise concordance rate...... and heritability. Twins (207 affected/130,710) and singletons (7766 affected/4,798,526) born from 1936 through 2004 in Denmark were ascertained by linkage among the Danish Facial Cleft Database, the Danish Twin Registry, and the Civil Registration System. We computed oral cleft prevalence and prevalence proportion...... ratio for twins versus singletons, stratified for 3 subphenotypes. Probandwise concordance rates and heritability for twins were estimated for 2 phenotypes-cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate (CP). RESULTS:: The prevalence of oral cleft was 15.8 per 10,000 twins and 16.6 per...

  4. Understanding Cleft and Craniofacial Team Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Spotlight Fundraising Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area Team Disclaimer States: ...

  5. A Novel Mutation in the CYP11B1 Gene Causes Steroid 11β-Hydroxylase Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with Reversible Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Alqahtani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH due to steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency is the second most common form of CAH, resulting from a mutation in the CYP11B1 gene. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency results in excessive mineralcorticoids and androgen production leading to hypertension, precocious puberty with acne, enlarged penis, and hyperpigmentation of scrotum of genetically male infants. In the present study, we reported 3 male cases from a Saudi family who presented with penile enlargement, progressive darkness of skin, hypertension, and cardiomyopathy. The elder patient died due to heart failure and his younger brothers were treated with hydrocortisone and antihypertensive medications. Six months following treatment, cardiomyopathy disappeared with normal blood pressure and improvement in the skin pigmentation. The underlying molecular defect was investigated by PCR-sequencing analysis of all coding exons and intron-exon boundary of the CYP11B1 gene. A novel biallelic mutation c.780 G>A in exon 4 of the CYP11B1 gene was found in the patients. The mutation created a premature stop codon at amino acid 260 (p.W260∗, resulting in a truncated protein devoid of 11β-hydroxylase activity. Interestingly, a somatic mutation at the same codon (c.779 G>A, p.W260∗ was reported in a patient with papillary thyroid cancer (COSMIC database. In conclusion, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation in the CYP11B1 gene that causes classic steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficient CAH. Cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure can be reversed by early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Comparison of periodontal status among patients with cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip along with a cleft in palate and alveolus

    OpenAIRE

    Boloor Vinita; Thomas Biju

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives : A healthy periodontium is an important prerequisite for unhindered dentition and long-term oral health. In cleft subjects, especially in those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP), maintenance of oral hygiene is a difficult task for the patients because of the patent oro-nasal communication. Crowding of teeth in cleft patients is a common finding, especially in those with CLAP and those with cleft palate (CP). In the case of multiple tooth-malpositions , tran...

  7. An assessment of orofacial clefts in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyala Erick

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clefts of the lip (CL, the palate (CP, or both (CLP are the most common orofacial congenital malformations found among live births, accounting for 65% of all head and neck anomalies. The frequency and pattern of orofacial clefts in different parts of the world and among different human groups varies widely. Generally, populations of Asian or Native American origin have the highest prevalence, while Caucasian populations show intermediate prevalence and African populations the lowest. To date, little is known regarding the epidemiology and pattern of orofacial clefts in Tanzania. Methods A retrospective descriptive study was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre to identify all children with orofacial clefts that attended or were treated during a period of five years. Cleft lip and/or palate records were obtained from patient files in the Hospital's Departments of Surgery, Paediatrics and medical records. Age at presentation, sex, region of origin, type and laterality of the cleft were recorded. In addition, presence of associated congenital anomalies or syndromes was recorded. Results A total of 240 orofacial cleft cases were seen during this period. Isolated cleft lip was the most common cleft type followed closely by cleft lip and palate (CLP. This is a departure from the pattern of clefting reported for Caucasian and Asian populations, where CLP or isolated cleft palate is the most common type. The distribution of clefts by side showed a statistically significant preponderance of the left side (43.7% (χ2 = 92.4, p Conclusions Unilateral orofacial clefts were significantly more common than bilateral clefts; with the left side being the most common affected side. Most of the other findings did not show marked differences with orofacial cleft distributions in other African populations.

  8. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Surgery: Malpractice Litigation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin, Grant A; Brietzke, Scott E

    2017-01-01

      This study examined malpractice claims related to cleft lip and cleft palate surgery to identify common allegations and injuries and reviewed financial outcomes.   The WestlawNext legal database was analyzed for all malpractice lawsuits and settlements related to the surgical repair of cleft lip and palate.   Inclusion criteria included patients undergoing surgical repair of a primary cleft lip or palate or revision for complications of previous surgery. Data evaluated included patient demographics, type of operation performed, plaintiff allegation, nature of injury, and litigation outcomes.   A total of 36 cases were identified, with 12 unique cases from 1981 to 2006 meeting the inclusion criteria. Six cases (50%) were decided by a jury and six by settlement. Five cases involved complications related to the specific surgery, and the other seven were associated with any surgery and perioperative care of children and adults. Cleft palate repair (50%) was the most frequently litigated surgery. Postoperative negligent supervision was the most common allegation (42%) and resulted in a payout in each case (mean = $3,126,032). Death (42%) and brain injury (25%) were the most frequent injuries reported. Financial awards were made in nine cases (after adjusting for inflation, mean = $2,470,552, range = $0 to $7,704,585). The awards were significantly larger for brain injury than other outcomes ($4,675,395 versus $1,368,131 after adjusting for inflation, P = .0101).   Malpractice litigation regarding cleft lip and palate surgery is uncommon. However, significant financial awards involving perioperative brain injury have been reported.

  9. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7 weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.

  10. Met144Ala mutation of the copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans reverses the intramolecular electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Eady, Robert R; Sawers, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis has been employed to investigate the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 (T1) and type 2 (T2) copper sites in the Met144Ala Alcaligenes xylosoxidans nitrite reductase (AxCuNiR) mutant. This mutation increases the reduction potential of the T1 copper center...

  11. The case for addressing primary resistance mutations to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors to treat children born from mothers living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khady Kébé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV drug resistance mutations (DRMs was estimated in 25 untreated infants who were living with HIV-1, younger than 13 months and living in Senegal. Antiretroviral DRMs were detected in 8 of 25 (32% children. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI DRMs were present in all (100% children whose viruses harboured DRMs: K103N in 43%; Y181C, K101E and V106M each in 29%; and Y188L in 14%. The D67N thymidine-analogue mutation was observed in only two children whose mothers had received chemoprophylaxis of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT. The proportion of children whose viruses harboured DRMs was then 6.5-fold higher in children whose mother–child couples had received nevirapine (NVP-based chemoprophylaxis than in other couples without prophylaxis [7 of 13 (53.8% vs. 1 of 12 (8.3%]. These findings point to the absolute need to address primary resistance mutations in case of virological failure in young children treated by antiretroviral drugs, and to make more effective treatment regimens available to NVP-exposed infants living with HIV-1 in Senegal.

  12. [Team management of orofacial clefts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Borstlap-Engels, V M; Spauwen, P H; Borstlap, W A

    2000-11-01

    In the Netherlands 15 centres provide multidisciplinary care for cleft lip and palate patients. Usually the following disciplines participate in such teams: paediatrics, plastic and reconstructive surgery, orthodontics, genetics, social work or nursing, ENT, speech therapy, maxillofacial surgery, prosthetic dentistry, psychology and oral hygiene. An overview is given of the treatment protocol from birth until 20 years of age for a child with a complete UCLP or BCLP. It is concluded that properly designed prospective clinical trials are rare, resulting in a lack of evidence based care in the field of cleft lip and palate. Furthermore it should be investigated whether it is preferable to centralise the cleft care in less centres than the present 15 ones.

  13. Cleft lip: The historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The earliest documented history of cleft lip is based on a combination of religion, superstition, invention and charlatanism. While Greeks ignored their existence, Spartans and Romans would kill these children as they were considered to harbour evil spirits. When saner senses prevailed Fabricius ab Aquapendente (1537-1619 was the first to suggest the embryological basis of these clefts. The knowledge of cleft lip and the surgical correction received a big boost during the period between the Renaissance and the 19th century with the publication of Pierre Franco′s Petit Traite and Traite des Hernies in which he described the condition as "lievre fendu de nativite" (cleft lip present from birth. The first documented Cleft lip surgery is from China in 390 BC in an 18 year old would be soldier, Wey Young-Chi. Albucasis of Arabia and his fellow surgeons used the cautery instead of the scalpel and Yperman in 1854 recommended scarifying the margins with a scalpel before suturing them with a triangular needle dipped in wax. The repair was reinforced by passing a long needle through the two sides of the lip and fixing the shaft of the needle with a figure-of-eight thread over the lip. Germanicus Mirault can be credited to be the originator of the triangular flap which was later modified by C.W. Tennison in 1952 and Peter Randall in 1959. In the late 50s, Ralph Millard gave us his legendary ′cut as you go′ technique. The protruding premaxilla of a bilateral cleft lip too has seen many changes throughout the ages - from being discarded totally to being pushed back by wedge resection of vomer to finally being left to the orthodontists.

  14. TAR syndrome with orofacial clefting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midro, A; Hubert, E; Preferansow, J; Iwaszkiewicz-Pawłowska, A

    1993-01-01

    A case of TAR syndrome with bilateral cleft lip and palate is presented. Bilateral symmetric focomelia, normal thumbs among five fingers of hands, synostosis of IVth and Vth metacarpal bones and some defects of lower limbs with associated thrombocytopenia were noted. Dysmorphic facial features included hypertelorism, epicanthus, blue sclerae, broad nasal root, micrognathia, low-set ears, sparse blond hair. To our knowledge this patient represents an unusual association of TAR syndrome with orofacial clefting. A common background of TAR and Roberts/SC syndrome is suggested.

  15. Oral cleft prevention program (OCPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wehby George L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects with significant medical, psychosocial, and economic ramifications. Oral clefts have a complex etiology with genetic and environmental risk factors. There are suggestive results for decreased risks of cleft occurrence and recurrence with folic acid supplements taken at preconception and during pregnancy with a stronger evidence for higher than lower doses in preventing recurrence. Yet previous studies have suffered from considerable design limitations particularly non-randomization into treatment. There is also well-documented effectiveness for folic acid in preventing neural tube defect occurrence at 0.4 mg and recurrence with 4 mg. Given the substantial burden of clefting on the individual and the family and the supportive data for the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation as well as its low cost, a randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness of high versus low dose folic acid for prevention of cleft recurrence is warranted. Methods/design This study will assess the effect of 4 mg and 0.4 mg doses of folic acid, taken on a daily basis during preconception and up to 3 months of pregnancy by women who are at risk of having a child with nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without palate (NSCL/P, on the recurrence of NSCL/P. The total sample will include about 6,000 women (that either have NSCL/P or that have at least one child with NSCL/P randomly assigned to the 4 mg and the 0.4 mg folic acid study groups. The study will also compare the recurrence rates of NSCL/P in the total sample of subjects, as well as the two study groups (4mg, 0.4 mg to that of a historical control group. The study has been approved by IRBs (ethics committees of all involved sites. Results will be disseminated through publications and presentations at scientific meetings. Discussion The costs related to oral clefts are high, including long term psychological and socio-economic effects. This study

  16. Surgical treatment of cleft lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Domingues Miachon

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review of the literature on the surgical treatment of cleft lip, emphasizing the prevalence, complications associated with the treatment and the points of disagreement between authors. We conducted a literature cross-sectional search that analyzed publications in books, articles and on the databases SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online, PubMed, of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. We conclude that: 1 the severity of the cleft will indicate the technique presenting more advantages; 2 the different approaches indicate that there is no consensus on the optimal technique; and 3 the surgeon experience contributes to choosing the best option.

  17. Oral Clefts and Academic Performance in Adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Nicola G; Pedersen, Dorthe A; Pedersen, Jacob K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:   Early life exposure to anesthesia and surgery is suspected to associate with cognitive impairment later in life. We compared academic achievement among adolescents with cleft lip only (CL), cleft palate only (CP), and cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) with a noncleft control group......:   Oral cleft type rather than number and timing of anesthesia and operations associate to poorer academic performance. Although a potential neurotoxic effect due to anesthetic agents is not reflected in the data, it cannot be completely excluded....

  18. Adaptive evolution of malaria parasites in French Guiana: Reversal of chloroquine resistance by acquisition of a mutation in pfcrt.

    OpenAIRE

    Pelleau, Stéphane; Moss, Eli L; Dhingra, Satish K.; Volney, Béatrice; Casteras, Jessica; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Legrand, Eric; David A Fidock; Neafsey, Daniel E; Musset, Lise

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In regions with high malaria endemicity, the withdrawal of chloroquine (CQ) as first-line treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections has typically led to the restoration of CQ susceptibility through the reexpansion of the wild-type (WT) allele K76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at the expense of less fit mutant alleles carrying the CQ resistance (CQR) marker K76T. In low-transmission settings, such as South America, drug resistance mutations ...

  19. Adaptive evolution of malaria parasites in French Guiana: Reversal of chloroquine resistance by acquisition of a mutation in pfcrt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelleau, Stéphane; Moss, Eli L; Dhingra, Satish K; Volney, Béatrice; Casteras, Jessica; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Volkman, Sarah K; Wirth, Dyann F; Legrand, Eric; Fidock, David A; Neafsey, Daniel E; Musset, Lise

    2015-09-15

    In regions with high malaria endemicity, the withdrawal of chloroquine (CQ) as first-line treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections has typically led to the restoration of CQ susceptibility through the reexpansion of the wild-type (WT) allele K76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at the expense of less fit mutant alleles carrying the CQ resistance (CQR) marker K76T. In low-transmission settings, such as South America, drug resistance mutations can attain 100% prevalence, thereby precluding the return of WT parasites after the complete removal of drug pressure. In French Guiana, despite the fixation of the K76T allele, the prevalence of CQR isolates progressively dropped from >90% to <30% during 17 y after CQ withdrawal in 1995. Using a genome-wide association study with CQ-sensitive (CQS) and CQR isolates, we have identified a single mutation in pfcrt encoding a C350R substitution that is associated with the restoration of CQ susceptibility. Genome editing of the CQR reference strain 7G8 to incorporate PfCRT C350R caused a complete loss of CQR. A retrospective molecular survey on 580 isolates collected from 1997 to 2012 identified all C350R mutant parasites as being CQS. This mutation emerged in 2002 and rapidly spread throughout the P. falciparum population. The C350R allele is also associated with a significant decrease in piperaquine susceptibility in vitro, suggesting that piperaquine pressure in addition to potential fitness costs associated with the 7G8-type CQR pfcrt allele may have selected for this mutation. These findings have important implications for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of antimalarial drug resistance.

  20. A template-dependent dislocation mechanism potentiates K65R reverse transcriptase mutation development in subtype C variants of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Coutsinos

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have suggested that the K65R reverse transcriptase (RT mutation develops more readily in subtype C than subtype B HIV-1. We recently showed that this discrepancy lies partly in the subtype C template coding sequence that predisposes RT to pause at the site of K65R mutagenesis. However, the mechanism underlying this observation and the elevated rates of K65R development remained unknown. Here, we report that DNA synthesis performed with subtype C templates consistently produced more K65R-containing transcripts than subtype B templates, regardless of the subtype-origin of the RT enzymes employed. These findings confirm that the mechanism involved is template-specific and RT-independent. In addition, a pattern of DNA synthesis characteristic of site-specific primer/template slippage and dislocation was only observed with the subtype C sequence. Analysis of RNA secondary structure suggested that the latter was unlikely to impact on K65R development between subtypes and that Streisinger strand slippage during DNA synthesis at the homopolymeric nucleotide stretch of the subtype C K65 region might occur, resulting in misalignment of the primer and template. Consequently, slippage would lead to a deletion of the middle adenine of codon K65 and the production of a -1 frameshift mutation, which upon dislocation and realignment of the primer and template, would lead to development of the K65R mutation. These findings provide additional mechanistic evidence for the facilitated development of the K65R mutation in subtype C HIV-1.

  1. Rare craniofacial anomaly: Tessier no. 2 cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozek, C; Gundogan, H; Bilkay, U; Cankayali, R; Guner, U; Gurler, T; Songur, E

    2001-07-01

    Four cases of facial cleft that fit the anatomic description of the rare Tessier no. 2 cleft, with two patients having the no. 12 cleft extending to the cranium as no. 2 clefts, are presented. In all patients, clinical expressions of the anomaly were different. Thus, diverse surgical procedures were used in all cases. These cases and review of the literature help to define the soft-tissue and bony course of these clefts, and also emphasize the role of three-dimensional computed tomography scan imaging to show the bony cleft route. The diagnosis and treatment plan of the no. 2 cleft as well as its cranial counterpart are discussed in this report.

  2. Simulating clefts in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The geometry of a large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, such as a sphere, leads to very high film stresses. These stresses can be significantly reduced by using a tendon re-enforced lobed pumpkin-like shape. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin shape, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design, the constant bulge radius (CBR) design, CBA/CBR hybrids, and NASA’s recent constant stress (CS) design. Utilizing a hybrid CBA/CBR pumpkin design, Flight 555-NT in June 2006 formed an S-cleft and was unable to fully deploy. In order to better understand the S-cleft phenomenon, a series of inflation tests involving four 27-m diameter 200-gore pumpkin balloons were conducted in 2007. One of the test vehicles was a 1/3-scale mockup of the Flight 555-NT balloon. Using an inflation procedure intended to mimic ascent, the 1/3-scale mockup developed an S-cleft feature strikingly similar to the one observed in Flight 555-NT. Our analysis of the 1/3-scale mockup found it to be unstable. We compute asymmetric equilibrium configurations of this balloon, including shapes with an S-cleft feature.

  3. Incidence of Cleft Lip and Palate in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke; Galiwango, George; Hodges, Andrew

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the need for resources for cleft repairs in Uganda by determining the overall incidence of oral-facial clefts and the ratio of isolated cleft lip to isolated cleft palate to cleft lip and palate. Design: A 1-year prospective study was implemented

  4. Demographics of orofacial clefts in Canada from 2002 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavri, Sabrina; Forrest, Christopher R

    2013-03-01

    Objective : Orofacial clefts such as cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip and palate are the most frequent congenital anomalies of the head and neck. The purpose of this study was to determine the current demographics for orofacial clefts in Canada. Methods : A request for data from all Canadian provinces (excluding Quebec due to incompatibilities with provincial coding systems) for the fiscal years 2002-2003 to 2007-2008 was submitted to the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Variables evaluated included gender, cleft type, gestational age, birth weight, income quintile, and institution health region. Results : Over the period studied, the prevalence of orofacial clefts ranged from 11.0 to 15.3 per 10,000 live births (1 in 654 to 1 in 909 live births). The distribution of cleft types for live births with orofacial clefts was 17% for cleft lip, 41% for cleft palate, and 42% for cleft lip and palate, of which cleft lip and cleft lip and palate were male dominant (62% and 66% male, respectively) and cleft palate was female dominant (56% female). Saskatchewan and Manitoba had significantly higher cleft birthrates (P orofacial clefting compared with those with no cleft. Conclusions : Canada has one of the highest orofacial cleft birthrates in the world (prevalence of 12.7 per 10,000 live births, approximately 1 in 790 live births). This study presents an updated demographic of orofacial clefts in Canadian newborns and may be useful in predicting the burden of anticipated health care.

  5. Incidence of Cleft Lip and Palate in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke; Galiwango, George; Hodges, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the need for resources for cleft repairs in Uganda by determining the overall incidence of oral-facial clefts and the ratio of isolated cleft lip to isolated cleft palate to cleft lip and palate. Design: A 1-year prospective study was implemented i

  6. Incidence of Cleft Lip and Palate in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke; Galiwango, George; Hodges, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the need for resources for cleft repairs in Uganda by determining the overall incidence of oral-facial clefts and the ratio of isolated cleft lip to isolated cleft palate to cleft lip and palate. Design: A 1-year prospective study was implemented i

  7. Bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Arun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral cleft lip nose deformity is a multi-factorial and complex deformity which tends to aggravate with growth of the child, if not attended surgically. The goals of primary bilateral cleft lip nose surgery are, closure of the nasal floor and sill, lengthening of the columella, repositioning of the alar base, achieving nasal tip projection, repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, and reorienting the nares from horizontal to oblique position. The multiplicity of procedures in the literature for correction of this deformity alludes to the fact that no single procedure is entirely effective. The timing for surgical intervention and its extent varies considerably. Early surgery on cartilage may adversely affect growth and development; at the same time, allowing the cartilage to grow in an abnormal position and contributing to aggravation of deformity. Some surgeons advocate correction of deformity at an early age. However, others like the cartilages to grow and mature before going in for surgery. With peer pressure also becoming an important consideration during the teens, the current trend is towards early intervention. There is no unanimity in the extent of nasal dissection to be done at the time of primary lip repair. While many perform limited nasal dissection for the fear of growth retardation, others opt for full cartilage correction at the time of primary surgery itself. The value of naso-alveolar moulding (NAM too is not universally accepted and has now more opponents than proponents. Also most centres in the developing world have neither the personnel nor the facilities for the same. The secondary cleft nasal deformity is variable and is affected by the extent of the original abnormality, any prior surgeries performed and alteration due to nasal growth. This article reviews the currently popular methods for correction of nasal deformity associated with bilateral cleft lip, it′s management both at the time of cleft lip repair

  8. Selection bias in genetic-epidemiological studies of cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.; Holm, N.V.; Kock, K. (Odense Univ. (Denmark)); Olsen, J. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)); Fogh-Anderson, P.

    1992-09-01

    The possible impact of selection bias in genetic and epidemiological studies of cleft lip and palate was studied, using three nationwide ascertainment sources and an autopsy study in a 10% sample of the Danish population. A total of 670 cases were identified. Two national record systems, when used together, were found suitable for ascertaining facial cleft in live births. More than 95% ascertainment was obtained by means of surgical files for cleft lip (with or without cleft palate) without associated malformations/syndromes. However, surgical files could be a poor source for studying isolated cleft palate (CP) (only a 60% and biased ascertainment), and they cannot be used to study the prevalence of associated malformations or syndromes in facial cleft cases. The male:female ratio was 0.88 in surgically treated cases of CP and was 1.5 in nonoperated CP cases, making the overall sex ratio for CP 1.1 (95% confidence limits 0.86-1.4) The sex ratio for CP without associated malformation was 1.1 (95% confidence limits 0.84-1.6). One of the major test criteria in CP multifactorial threshold models (higher CP liability among male CP relatives) must be reconsidered, if other investigations confirm that a CP sex-ratio reversal to male predominance occurs when high ascertainment is achieved. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Storage Stability in Reversion Mutation of a Rice Line Devoid of LOX-1,2 Acquired by Ion Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jiayue; wu Jinhua; WU Yuejin; SONG Mei; WANG Xiangqin; LIU Binmei; YU Zengliang

    2009-01-01

    The effect of absence of lipoxygenase isoenzyme(LOX)on storage stability was investigated.Rice mutant 1297 without lipoxygenase isoenzyme-1(LOX-1) or lipoxygenase isoenzyme-2(LOX-2)generated by ion beam irradiation from Wanjian2090 and reversion mutant RMl297 with LOX-1 and LOX-2 were subjected to an accelerated-aging experiment.Shanyou63 (with LOX-1 and LOX-2)served as control.Results showed that the germination and dehydrogenase activity decreased while the electrical conductivity and free fatty acid content increased in all varieties with accelerated aging.In 1297 that lacked LOX-1 and 2,there were slight changes in germination,dehydrogenase activity, membrane permeability and free fatty acid content during the thirty-day accelerated-aging experiment.But in varieties with LOX-1 and LOX-2,significant changres were observed,suggesting that LOX-1,2 might be a definite factor which influenced seed lifespan.This study also indicates that ion beam irradiation may be used as mutagen to generate mutant and reversion mutants for biological study and could become a new direction In lon beam application.

  10. Secondary bone grafting for alveolar cleft in children with cleft lip or cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, Q.; Wu, G.; Deacon, S.A.; Chen, J.; Hu, H.; Zou, S.; Ye, Q.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary alveolar bone grafting has been widely used to reconstruct alveolar cleft. However, there is still some controversy. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness and safety of different secondary bone grafting methods. SEARCH STRATEGY: The final electronic and handsearches were car

  11. Comparison of periodontal status among patients with cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip along with a cleft in palate and alveolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boloor Vinita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : A healthy periodontium is an important prerequisite for unhindered dentition and long-term oral health. In cleft subjects, especially in those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP, maintenance of oral hygiene is a difficult task for the patients because of the patent oro-nasal communication. Crowding of teeth in cleft patients is a common finding, especially in those with CLAP and those with cleft palate (CP. In the case of multiple tooth-malpositions , transverse deficiency, arch length deficiency and primary cross-bite; periodontal trauma increases and is detrimental to periodontal health . According to literature, a critical periodontal situation was found in patients with CLAP. Hence a study was conducted to analyze the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL; those with cleft palate; and those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate. Materials and Methods: The present study consisted of 60 cleft subjects divided into 3 groups: those with cleft lip; those with cleft palate; and those with cleft lip, alveolus and palate. Subjects with permanent dentition were selected, and the clinical examination included determination of oral hygiene status using Oral Hygiene Index - Simplified (OHI-S index and periodontal status using community periodontal index (CPI. Results: Statistically significant increase in the periodontal disease in the CLAP group as compared with the other 2 groups, and the oral hygiene was seen to be generally poor with the CLAP group. Interpretation and Conclusion: Individuals with clefts are more prone to periodontal disease due to the presence of cleft, which causes retention of food in the defect sites and inability to maintain good oral hygiene; but the severity of periodontal disease is more if the defect is large and involving the lip, alveolus and palate.

  12. Mutations in the S gene and in the overlapping reverse transcriptase region in chronic hepatitis B Chinese patients with coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ding

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism underlying the coexistence of hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies to HBsAg in chronic hepatitis B patients remains unknown. Aims This research aimed to determine the clinical and virological features of the rare pattern. Methods A total of 32 chronic hepatitis B patients infected by HBV genotype C were included: 15 carrying both HBsAg and anti-HBs (group I and 17 solely positive for HBsAg (group II. S gene and reverse transcriptase region sequences were amplified, sequenced and compared with the reference sequences. Results The amino acid variability within major hydrophilic region, especially the “a” determinant region, and within reverse transcriptase for regions overlapping the major hydrophilic region in group I is significantly higher than those in group II. Mutation sI126S/T within the “a” determinant was the most frequent change, and only patients from group I had the sQ129R, sG130N, sF134I, sG145R amino acid changes, which are known to alter immunogenicity. Conclusions In chronic patients, the concurrent HBsAg/anti-HBs serological profile is associated with an increased aa variability in several key areas of HBV genome. Additional research on these genetic mutants are needed to clarify their biological significance for viral persistence.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions AEC syndrome ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... mouth (a cleft palate ), a split in the lip (a cleft lip ), or both. Cleft lip or cleft palate ...

  14. Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Volunteer Efforts Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Information for Parents & ... version of this factsheet, click here How does cleft lip/palate affect the teeth? A cleft of the lip, ...

  15. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here What treatment is available for adults with cleft lip and palate? Treatments currently available to infants and children with cleft lip and palate are also available to adults with clefts. Although ...

  16. Congenital Tracheal Stenosis in a Patient with Cleft Lip | Qureshi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital Tracheal Stenosis in a Patient with Cleft Lip. ... of the distal trachea, in addition to a right sided cleft lip without cleft palate. Management of CTS depends on several factors, with surgery being the definitive form of treatment.

  17. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here What treatment is available for adults with cleft lip and palate? Treatments currently available to infants and children with cleft lip and palate are also available to adults with clefts. Although ...

  18. FOXE1 Association with both Isolated Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate; and Isolated Cleft Palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno, Lina M; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Bullard, Steve A

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are a common complex birth defect caused by genetic and environmental factors and/or their interactions. A previous genome-wide linkage scan discovered a novel locus for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) at 9q22-q33. To identify the etiologic gene, we......) and rs4460498 (p=6.51E-12) were located inside a 70Kb high LD block containing FOXE1. Association signals for Caucasians and Asians clustered 5' and 3' of FOXE1, respectively. Isolated cleft palate (CP) was also associated indicating that FOXE1 plays a role in two phenotypes thought to be genetically...

  19. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  20. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  1. Cleft lip and palate: successful management trends

    OpenAIRE

    Bedon Rodriguez, Monica; universidad de manizales; Villota Gonzales, Luis Gerardo; Univerdidad de Manizales

    2011-01-01

    Cleft and palate is one of the most common congenital malformations, represents 2 - 3 % of these and is considered the most common craniofacial anomaly. Surgical repairof a patient with a cleft lip is not an emergency. Primary repair of cleft lip is done about 3 months old, consisting of a series of elective surgeries that are performed individualizingeach case as required by the patient. The aim of this review is to address the innovative treatment alternatives that are beingused in patients...

  2. Face facts: Genes, environment, and clefts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.C. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City IA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate provides an ideal, albeit complex, model for the study of human developmental anomalies. Clefting disorders show a mix of well-defined syndromic causes (many with single-gene or environmental etiologies) coupled with their more common presentation in the nonsyndromic form. This summary presents some insight into the genetic causes of, etiology of and animal models for cleft lip and/or palate. 79 refs.

  3. Reversal of Alzheimer's-like pathology and behavior in human APP transgenic mice by mutation of Asp664.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Veronica; Gorostiza, Olivia F; Banwait, Surita; Ataie, Marina; Logvinova, Anna V; Sitaraman, Sandhya; Carlson, Elaine; Sagi, Sarah A; Chevallier, Nathalie; Jin, Kunlin; Greenberg, David A; Bredesen, Dale E

    2006-05-02

    The deficits characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are believed to result, at least in part, from the neurotoxic effects of beta-amyloid peptides, a set of 39-43 amino acid fragments derived proteolytically from beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP also is cleaved intracytoplasmically at Asp-664 to generate a second cytotoxic peptide, APP-C31, but whether this C-terminal processing of APP plays a role in the pathogenesis of AD is unknown. Therefore, we compared elements of the Alzheimer's phenotype in transgenic mice modeling AD with vs. without a functional Asp-664 caspase cleavage site. Surprisingly, whereas beta-amyloid production and plaque formation were unaltered, synaptic loss, astrogliosis, dentate gyral atrophy, increased neuronal precursor proliferation, and behavioral abnormalities were completely prevented by a mutation at Asp-664. These results suggest that Asp-664 plays a critical role in the generation of Alzheimer-related pathophysiological and behavioral changes in human APP transgenic mice, possibly as a cleavage site or via protein-protein interactions.

  4. Dental anomalies in different cleft groups related to neural crest developmental fields contributes to the understanding of cleft aetiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Louise Claudius; Kjær, Inger; Mølsted, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    , radiographs, dental casts, and medical records. PATIENTS: Ninety individuals (30 cleft lip, 30 cleft palate, and 30 combined cleft lip and palate), aged 5-27 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Visual evaluation of tooth number and tooth morphology. RESULTS: Cleft lip: Dental deviations were predominantly observed...... in the frontonasal field. Supernumerary lateral incisors occurred significantly more often in cleft lip compared to other cleft types. Cleft palate: Dental deviations were observed in the maxillary and palatal fields indicating that both fields are involved in the development of cleft palate. Malformed roots were...... seen significantly more often in cleft palate. Combined cleft lip and palate: Number and type of dental deviations differed significantly from deviations in other cleft types, e.g. significantly more ageneses. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft lip seems to be caused by a disorder in neural crest migration...

  5. Laryngo-tracheo-oesophageal clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboulanger Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft (LC is a congenital malformation characterized by an abnormal, posterior, sagittal communication between the larynx and the pharynx, possibly extending downward between the trachea and the esophagus. The estimated annual incidence of LC is 1/10,000 to 1/20,000 live births, accounting for 0.2% to 1.5% of congenital malformations of the larynx. These incidence rates may however be underestimated due to difficulty in diagnosing minor forms and a high mortality rate in severe forms. A slightly higher incidence has been reported in boys than in girls. No specific geographic distribution has been found. Depending on the severity of the malformation, patients may present with stridor, hoarse cry, swallowing difficulties, aspirations, cough, dyspnea and cyanosis through to early respiratory distress. Five types of laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft have been described based on the downward extension of the cleft, which typically correlates with the severity of symptoms: Type 0 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft to Type 4 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft. LC is often associated with other congenital abnormalities/anomalies (16% to 68%, mainly involving the gastro-intestinal tract, which include laryngomalacia, tracheo-bronchial dyskinesia, tracheo-bronchomalacia (mostly in types 3 and 4, and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD. The syndromes most frequently associated with an LC are Opitz/BBB syndrome, Pallister Hall syndrome, VACTERL/VATER association, and CHARGE syndrome. Laryngeal clefts result from failure of fusion of the posterior cricoid lamina and abnormal development of the tracheo-esophageal septum. The causes of the embryological developmental anomalies leading to LC are not known but are thought to be multifactorial. LC appears to be mostly sporadic although some familial cases with suspected autosomal dominant transmission have been reported. The age of diagnosis depends mainly on the severity of

  6. [Cleft lip and palate in Campeche Mayas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, K M; Georges, E; Levy, B; Aguirre, A; Portilla, R J; Gaitán, C L; Leyva, E; Rodríguez, T

    1988-07-01

    It has been suggested that among American Indians, as in some genetically-related Asiatic ethnic groups, incidence of cleft lip and/or cleft palate is higher than among people of Caucasian extraction. Such hypothesis, plus growing demand for services observed at a center for the surgery of cleft lip and cleft palate in Campeche state, led the authors to undertake research among the Maya residents of that region. However, neither careful review of case histories nor field research performed in several Indian communities could confirm the hypothesis of a higher incidence among this ethnic community.

  7. Improving Informed Consent for Cleft Palate Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-22

    Cleft Palate; Jaw Abnormalities; Maxillofacial Abnormalities; Mouth Abnormalities; Congenital Abnormalities; Jaw Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Craniofacial Abnormalities; Musculoskeletal Abnormalities; Stomatognathic Diseases; Stomatognathic System Abnormalities

  8. Second type of first branchial cleft anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First branchial cleft fistula is a rare congenital malformation of the head and neck with an incidence of <8% of all branchial cleft defects. The patient presenting with discharging sinus in the neck with discharging ear should be investigated for a possible branchial cleft anomaly. Rarity and diverse presentation often lead to misdiagnosis and inadequate treatment. Recurrent infection and scarring make intraoperative identification of facial nerve made very difficult. We report a case of a 5-year-old boy with a first branchial cleft fistula, in which discharge was observed through the fistulous opening on the right side of the face and along the ear canal.

  9. Surgical correction of cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Rahul; Huppa, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Surgical cleft repair aims to restore function of the oro-nasal sphincter and oro-nasal soft tissues and re-establish the complex relationship between perioral and perinasal muscle rings without compromising subsequent mid-facial growth and development. Here we review the surgical anatomy of this region, optimal timing for surgical repair and current thinking on the use of surgical adjuncts. In addition, an overview of current surgical techniques available for the repair of cleft lip, cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency is presented. Finally, we briefly discuss nasal revision surgery and the use of osteotomy, including distraction osteogenesis in the cleft patient.

  10. Periodontal Status Among Patients With Cleft Lip (CL), Cleft Palate (CP) and Cleft Lip, Alveolus and Palate (CLAP) In Chennai, India. A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappan, N; John, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Long term health of the stomatognathic system as well as esthetic aspects is the therapeutic goals in patients with oro facial clefts. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) reporting to a hospital in Chennai, India. The study group consisted of 80 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group 1: patients with cleft lip (CL), Group 2: subjects with cleft palate (CP) and Group 3: subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate (CLAP). Community Periodontal Index for Treatment needs CPITN Index was recorded. Among the 80 study subjects, 51 (63.8%) were males and 29 (36.2%) were females. Among the 26 study subjects with cleft lip, 10 (38.5%) had healthy periodontium, 4 (15.4%) had bleeding on probing and 12 (46.1%) had calculus. Mean number of sextants coded for healthy and bleeding was maximum among the subjects with cleft palate. Mean number of sextants coded for calculus was maximum among the subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate. Prevalence of periodontal disease is high among patients with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (35%) than in Cleft lip (32.5%) and Cleft Palate (32.5%). Gingivitis and Calculus is predominantly high in patients with Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip respectively.

  11. Influence of lip closure on alveolar cleft width in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmelzle Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of surgery on growth and stability after treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate are topics still under discussion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of early lip closure on the width of the alveolar cleft using dental casts. Methods A total of 44 clefts were investigated using plaster casts, 30 unilateral and 7 bilateral clefts. All infants received a passive molding plate a few days after birth. The age at the time of closure of the lip was 2.1 month in average (range 1-6 months. Plaster casts were obtained at the following stages: shortly after birth, prior to lip closure, prior to soft palate closure. We determined the width of the alveolar cleft before lip closure and prior to soft palate closure measuring the alveolar cleft width from the most lateral point of the premaxilla/anterior segment to the most medial point of the smaller segment. Results After lip closure 15 clefts presented with a width of 0 mm, meaning that the mucosa of the segments was almost touching one another. 19 clefts showed a width of up to 2 mm and 10 clefts were still over 2 mm wide. This means a reduction of 0% in 5 clefts, of 1-50% in 6 clefts, of 51-99% in 19 clefts, and of 100% in 14 clefts. Conclusions Early lip closure reduces alveolar cleft width. In most cases our aim of a remaining cleft width of 2 mm or less can be achieved. These are promising conditions for primary alveolar bone grafting to restore the dental bony arch.

  12. Short mandible - a possible risk factor for cleft palate with/without a cleft lip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Darvann, Tron Andre; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objectives To estimate the influence of a short mandible on the risk of developing a cleft palate with/without a cleft lip (CP). Setting and sample population The retrospective sample consisted of 115 2-month-old Danish infants with CP, and 70 control infants with unilateral...... the risk of having a cleft palate. Results The mean mandibular length in the group with CP was about 4mm shorter than in the control group. Odds ratio (OR) was calculated to be 0.58 (95% confidence interval 0.48-0.68), implying that an individual's risk of cleft palate with/without a cleft lip increases...

  13. A comprehensive review of the genetic basis of cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvraj Singh Kohli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate (CLP are birth defects that affect the upper lip and the roof of the mouth. CLP has a multifactorial etiology, comprising both genetic and environmental factors. In this review we discuss the recent data on the etiology of cleft lip and palate. We conducted a search of the MEDLINE database (Entrez PubMed from January 1986 to December 2010 using the key words: ′cleft lip,′ ′cleft palate,′ ′etiology,′ and ′genetics.′ The etiology of CLP seems complex, with genetics playing a major role. Several genes causing syndromic CLP have been discovered. Three of them-T-box transcription factor-22 (TBX22, poliovirus receptor-like-1 (PVRL1, and interferon regulatory factor-6 (IRF6-are responsible for causing X-linked cleft palate, cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome, and Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes, respectively; they are also implicated in nonsyndromic CLP. The nature and functions of these genes vary widely, illustrating the high vulnerability within the craniofacial developmental pathways. The etiological complexity of nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate is also exemplified by the large number of candidate genes and loci. To conclude, although the etiology of nonsyndromic CLP is still largely unknown, mutations in candidate genes have been identified in a small proportion of cases. Determining the relative risk of CLP on the basis of genetic background and environmental influence (including smoking, alcohol use, and dietary factors will be useful for genetic counseling and the development of future preventive measures.

  14. Dental materials for cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Faiza; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham; Muhammad, Nawshad; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    Numerous bone and soft tissue grafting techniques are followed to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP) defects. In addition to the gold standard surgical interventions involving the use of autogenous grafts, various allogenic and xenogenic graft materials are available for bone regeneration. In an attempt to discover minimally invasive and cost effective treatments for cleft repair, an exceptional growth in synthetic biomedical graft materials have occurred. This study gives an overview of the use of dental materials to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP). The eligibility criteria for this review were case studies, clinical trials and retrospective studies on the use of various types of dental materials in surgical repair of cleft palate defects. Any data available on the surgical interventions to repair alveolar or palatal cleft, with natural or synthetic graft materials was included in this review. Those datasets with long term clinical follow-up results were referred to as particularly relevant. The results provide encouraging evidence in favor of dental and other related biomedical materials to fill the gaps in clefts of lip and palate. The review presents the various bones and soft tissue replacement strategies currently used, tested or explored for the repair of cleft defects. There was little available data on the use of synthetic materials in cleft repair which was a limitation of this study. In conclusion although clinical trials on the use of synthetic materials are currently underway the uses of autologous implants are the preferred treatment methods to date.

  15. Sub mucous cleft palate with fenestration

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sheerin; Garg, Ramneesh; Uppal, Sanjeev K.; Mittal, Rajinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital fenestration in sub mucous cleft palate is not a common identity. This patient is a 16-year-old female who presented with nasal speech. On examination, she had associated microform cleft lip with nasal deformity. Successful palatoplasty with intra velar veloplasty was done.

  16. Invariant properties of representations under cleft extensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to give the invariant properties of representations of algebras under cleft extensions over a semisimple Hopf algebra. Firstly, we explain the concept of the cleft extension and give a relation between the cleft extension and the crossed product which is the approach we depend upon. Then, by making use of them, we prove that over an algebraically closed field k, for a finite dimensional Hopf algebra H which is semisimple as well as its dual H*, the representation type of an algebra is an invariant property under a finite dimensional H-cleft extension . In the other part, we still show that over an arbitrary field k, the Nakayama property of a k-algebra is also an invariant property under an H -cleft extension when the radical of the algebra is H-stable.

  17. Diagnosis and management of traumatic cyclodialysis cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrini, Alex; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Martone, Gianluca; Tosi, Gian Marco; Caporossi, Aldo

    2008-07-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with hyphema, iridocyclitis, iridophacodonesis, and maculopathy after a contusive trauma. Ultrasound biomicroscopy identified a 90-degree cyclodialysis cleft with severe damage of the zonular fibers. Echographic B-scan examination revealed intravitreal hemorrhage and a 360-degree choroidal detachment. One month later, phacoemulsification was performed and a single-piece poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens was inserted into the ciliary sulcus, with the haptic rotated toward the cyclodialysis cleft area. Postoperatively, the visual acuity improved and the intraocular pressure returned to normal. Ultrasound biomicroscopy showed closure of the cleft by reattachment of the ciliary body to the scleral spur. Optical coherence tomography revealed complete resolution of the macular and choroidal folds. Ultrasound biomicroscopy is a useful method for appropriate management of traumatic cyclodialysis cleft. In cases of small cyclodialysis clefts, with the surgical method we describe, the lens haptics apply directional force toward the sclera, fostering adherence of the ciliary body fibers.

  18. X-linked genes and risk of orofacial clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Skare, Øivind; Lie, Rolv T

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects of complex etiology, with an excess of males among babies with cleft lip and palate, and an excess of females among those with cleft palate only. Although genes on the X chromosome have been implicated in clefting, there has been no association analysis...

  19. Incidence Assessment of MTHFR C677T and A1298C Polymorphisms in Iranian Non-syndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Ebadifar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim of the present study is to determine the incidence of MTHFR C677 T and A1298C muta-tions in Iranian patients with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Materials and methods. We screened 61 Iranian patients with cleft lip and/or cleft palate for mutations in the two alleles of MTHFR gene associated with cleft lip and/or palate: A1298C and C677T, using Polymerase Chain Reaction following by RFLP. Results. The 677T and 1298C homozygote genotypes showed a frequency of 36.1% and 11.4%, respectively. Combined genotype frequencies in newborns having oral clefts showed that the highest genotype was 677TT/1298AA (22.9% and 677TT/1298CC genotypes were not observed. Conclusion. The results showed that 65.6% of all patients had at least one T mutant allele in C677T and 58.9% C mutant allele for A1298C. According to the frequencies of homozygosity of mutant alleles, it could be said that MTHFRgenotype of 677TT shows a greater role in having oral clefts.

  20. Primary treatment for cleft lip and/or cleft palate in children in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yukari; Susami, Takafumi; Kochi, Shoko; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Takagi, Ritsuo; Tachimura, Takashi; Nakano, Yoko; Shibui, Takeo; Michi, Ken-ichi; Nishio, Juntaro; Hata, Yuiro

    2012-05-01

    To investigate current trends in primary treatment for children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate in Japan. Nationwide, retrospective study under the direction of the Academic Survey Committee of the Japanese Cleft Palate Association based on analysis of data obtained via a booklet-style questionnaire completed by institutions providing primary treatment for cleft lip and/or palate patients. PARTICIPANTS, PATIENTS: Patients were 4349 children undergoing primary repair for cleft lip and/or palate at 107 participating institutions between 1996 and 2000. Cleft type, laterality; use of infant palatal plate; and timing and technique of primary repair for cleft lip and/or palate were evaluated by cleft surgeons at 107 participating institutions. Of a total of 2874 patients with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only, infant palatal plates were used with 1087 (37.8%) and were not used with 1787 (62.2%). Primary unilateral lip repair was performed at the age of 2 to 6 months in more than 90% of patients. Bilateral cleft lip was treated by one-stage repair in 285 patients (44.5%) and by two-stage repair in 258 (40.2%). Primary one-stage palatal repair was performed in 2212 (76.9%) and two-stage palatal repair in 262 (9.1%) cleft palate patients. Information on treatment of the remaining 400 (14%) patients was unavailable. This investigation clarified current trends in primary treatment for cleft lip and/or palate in Japan. The results suggest the need for an increase in regional core hospitals and greater variation in treatment options.

  1. Parents' age and the risk of oral clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, C.; Skytthe, A.; Vach, W.

    2005-01-01

    . METHODS: Among the 1,489,014 live births in Denmark during 1973-1996, there were 1920 children with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 956 children with nonsyndromic cleft palate. We used logistic regression to assess the impact of parental age on the occurrence of cleft lip....... In a joint analysis, both maternal and paternal ages were associated with the risk of cleft lip with or without cleft palate, but the contribution of each was dependent on the age of the other parent. In the analysis of cleft palate only, the effect of maternal age disappeared, leaving only paternal age...

  2. An Otorhinological study of patients with cleft lip and palate

    OpenAIRE

    Bariar, L. M.; Ahmad, Imran; Sharma, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    32 patients of cleft palate with or without cleft lip were subjected to otorhinological study from January 1998 to September 2000, with special attention to the rhinological anomalies, ear pathology, any deafness, discharge or any other findings relevant to the middle ear. Hearing loss and ear changes were not seen in any patient with cleft lip alone, hence these patients were not included in this study. These changes were confined to the patients with cleft palate only, with or without cleft...

  3. Cleft lip and/or palate: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farronato, G; Cannalire, P; Martinelli, G; Tubertini, I; Giannini, L; Galbiati, G; Maspero, C

    2014-04-01

    Aim of the review was to provide a literature overview of the birth defects of cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P). Through the use of the PubMed database items were collected that would provide information about the condition, leading to the discussion of the following topics: epidemiology, anatomical features, genetics, environmental factors, diagnosis and treatment. According to these data, the CL/P are the most common congenital malformations of the craniofacial region. There are different phenotypes and clinical features of this malformation, which differ according to the anatomical structures involved: cleft lip, cleft lip and cleft palate. The etiology is multifactorial and includes both genetic factors and environmental factors. For proper diagnosis and treatment it is important to complete a multidisciplinary approach to guide the patient from birth to the end of growth. Among the outstanding figures for the care of the anomaly are: the gynecologist, the pediatrician, the maxillofacial surgeon and orthodontist. Individuals with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate may experience problems in feeding, pronunciation, hearing and social integration, which can be corrected to a different extent by surgery, dental treatment, speech therapy and psychosocial interventions. Today the optimal treatment is difficult to find, because of the large variability of malformations and the subjective response of each patient to therapy.

  4. Implementing the Brazilian Database on Orofacial Clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lopes Monlleó

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. High-quality clinical and genetic descriptions are crucial to improve knowledge of orofacial clefts and support specific healthcare polices. The objective of this study is to discuss the potential and perspectives of the Brazilian Database on Orofacial Clefts. Methods. From 2008 to 2010, clinical and familial information on 370 subjects was collected by geneticists in eight different services. Data was centrally processed using an international system for case classification and coding. Results. Cleft lip with cleft palate amounted to 198 (53.5%, cleft palate to 99 (26.8%, and cleft lip to 73 (19.7% cases. Parental consanguinity was present in 5.7% and familial history of cleft was present in 26.3% subjects. Rate of associated major plus minor defects was 48% and syndromic cases amounted to 25% of the samples. Conclusions. Overall results corroborate the literature. Adopted tools are user friendly and could be incorporated into routine patient care. The BDOC exemplifies a network for clinical and genetic research. The data may be useful to develop and improve personalized treatment, family planning, and healthcare policies. This experience should be of interest for geneticists, laboratory-based researchers, and clinicians entrusted with OC worldwide.

  5. Short mandible - a possible risk factor for cleft palate with/without a cleft lip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Darvann, Tron Andre; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objectives To estimate the influence of a short mandible on the risk of developing a cleft palate with/without a cleft lip (CP). Setting and sample population The retrospective sample consisted of 115 2-month-old Danish infants with CP, and 70 control infants with unilateral...... incomplete cleft lip (UICL). Material and Methods Cephalometric X-rays were obtained. Mandibular length (L-m) was measured and corrected for body length (L-b) to remove influence of varying body length in the sample. Logistic regression was applied to the corrected mandibular length (L-mc) to calculate...... the risk of having a cleft palate. Results The mean mandibular length in the group with CP was about 4mm shorter than in the control group. Odds ratio (OR) was calculated to be 0.58 (95% confidence interval 0.48-0.68), implying that an individual's risk of cleft palate with/without a cleft lip increases...

  6. Reversal of learning deficits in hAPP transgenic mice carrying a mutation at Asp664: a role for early experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junli; Gorostiza, Olivia F; Tang, Huidong; Bredesen, Dale E; Galvan, Veronica

    2010-01-20

    In addition to the cleavages that generate amyloid-beta (Abeta), the Abeta-precursor protein (APP) is processed at Asp664, releasing a second toxic peptide (APP-C31). Transgenic mice otherwise identical to a well-characterized model of AD, PDAPP mice, but carrying a mutation that obliterates Asp664 show a reversal of AD-like deficits in memory and in non-cognitive components of behaviour in spite of accumulating high levels of Abeta. These results suggest that cleavage of APP at Asp664 plays a role in the generation of AD-like deficits, and that a major pathway of Abeta toxicity in vivo, or a pathway that crucially impinges on it, may depend on cleavage of APP at Asp664. Since young PDAPP(D664A) mice showed an akinetic phenotype when first required to swim, we trained a 3-month-old (mo) cohort to criterion (normal swimming), and briefly exposed it to the Morris water maze (MWM) environment prior to training at 7 mo, to avoid potentially confounding effects of the akinetic phenotype in MWM studies. Prior experience decreased floating in PDAPP(D664A) mice but not in PDAPP nor in non-Tg groups. While learning was restored in experienced PDAPP(D664A) mice, it was indistinguishable from both non-Tg as well as from PDAPP mice in naïve PDAPP(D664A) animals. Floating did not correlate with worse performance in naïve PDAPP(D664A) mice, suggesting that the contribution of prior experience to improved performance is related to its cognitive effects but not to non-cognitive components of behaviour. Our results suggest that early experience reduces the contribution of non-cognitive components of behaviour to performance, and may contribute to the restoration of learning at later ages in PDAPP(D664A) mice.

  7. Growth, nutritional, and gastrointestinal aspects of ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defect-cleft lip and/or palate (AEC) syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defect-cleft lip and/or palate (AEC), is a rare genetic disorder due to mutations in the TP63 gene. In the present study, we characterized the pattern of growth and body composition, and the nutritional and gastrointestinal aspects of children and adults (n = 18) affected ...

  8. Analysis of the p63 gene in classical EEC syndrome, related syndromes, and non-syndromic orofacial clefts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrow, L.L.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Daack-Hirsch, S.; Andersen, T.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Gorlin, R.; Murray, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    EEC syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with the cardinal signs of ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and orofacial clefts. EEC syndrome has been linked to chromosome 3q27 and heterozygous p63 mutations were detected in unrelated EEC families. In addition, homozygous p63 null mice exhibit cr

  9. The prevalence, penetrance, and expressivity of etiologic IRF6 variants in orofacial clefts patients from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowans, Lord Jephthah Joojo; Busch, Tamara D; Mossey, Peter A; Eshete, Mekonen A; Adeyemo, Wasiu L; Aregbesola, Babatunde; Donkor, Peter; Arthur, Fareed K N; Agbenorku, Pius; Olutayo, James; Twumasi, Peter; Braimah, Rahman; Oti, Alexander A; Plange-Rhule, Gyikua; Obiri-Yeboah, Solomon; Abate, Fikre; Hoyte-Williams, Paa E; Hailu, Taye; Murray, Jeffrey C; Butali, Azeez

    2017-03-01

    Orofacial clefts are congenital malformations of the orofacial region, with a global incidence of one per 700 live births. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) (OMIM:607199) gene has been associated with the etiology of both syndromic and nonsyndromic orofacial clefts. The aim of this study was to show evidence of potentially pathogenic variants in IRF6 in orofacial clefts cohorts from Africa. We carried out Sanger Sequencing on DNA from 184 patients with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts and 80 individuals with multiple congenital anomalies that presented with orofacial clefts. We sequenced all the nine exons of IRF6 as well as the 5' and 3' untranslated regions. In our analyses pipeline, we used various bioinformatics tools to detect and describe the potentially etiologic variants. We observed that potentially etiologic exonic and splice site variants were nonrandomly distributed among the nine exons of IRF6, with 92% of these variants occurring in exons 4 and 7. Novel variants were also observed in both nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (p.Glu69Lys, p.Asn185Thr, c.175-2A>C and c.1060+26C>T) and multiple congenital anomalies (p.Gly65Val, p.Lys320Asn and c.379+1G>T) patients. Our data also show evidence of compound heterozygotes that may modify phenotypes that emanate from IRF6 variants. This study demonstrates that exons 4 and 7 of IRF6 are mutational 'hotspots' in our cohort and that IRF6 mutants-induced orofacial clefts may be prevalent in the Africa population, however, with variable penetrance and expressivity. These observations are relevant for detection of high-risk families as well as genetic counseling. In conclusion, we have shown that there may be a need to combine both molecular and clinical evidence in the grouping of orofacial clefts into syndromic and nonsyndromic forms.

  10. Preoperative Cleft Lip Measurements and Maxillary Growth in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Gregory S; Tompson, Bryan D; Fisher, David M

    2016-11-01

    Maxillary growth in patients with cleft lip and palate is highly variable. The authors' aim was to investigate associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and maxillary growth determined cephalometrically in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (cUCLP). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Children with cUCLP. Preoperative cleft lip measurements were made at the time of primary cheiloplasty and available for each patient. Maxillary growth was evaluated on lateral cephalometric radiographs taken prior to any orthodontic treatment and alveolar bone grafting (8.5 ± 0.7 years). The presence of associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and cephalometric measures of maxillary growth was determined using regression analyses. In the 58 patients included in the study, the cleft lateral lip element was deficient in height in 90% and in transverse width in 81% of patients. There was an inverse correlation between cleft lateral lip height and transverse width with a β coefficient of -0.382 (P = .003). Patients with a more deficient cleft lateral lip height displayed a shorter maxillary length (β coefficient = 0.336; P = .010), a less protruded maxilla (β coefficient = .334; P = .008), and a shorter anterior maxillary height (β coefficient = 0.306; P = .020) than those with a less deficient cleft lateral lip height. Patients with cUCLP present with varying degrees of lateral lip hypoplasia. Preoperative measures of lateral lip deficiency are related to later observed deficiencies of maxillary length, protrusion, and height.

  11. Prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate in rural north-central guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Jorge; Lydick, Elaine A; Torres, Olga R; Owen, Karen K; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2015-05-01

    To estimate the number of new cases of cleft lip and cleft palate in the department (state) of Alta Verapaz, Guatemala, in 2012. Cross-sectional survey of midwives from communities identified through a two-stage cluster-sampling process. Midwives were asked how many babies they had delivered in the past year and how many of those newborns had various types of birth defects, as illustrated in pictures. Indigenous Mayan communities in rural north-central Guatemala. Midwives (n = 129) who had delivered babies in the previous year. Reports of babies born with cleft lip and cleft palate. A 1-year prevalence rate of 18.9 per 10,000 for cleft lip and 4.7 per 10,000 for cleft palate was estimated for Alta Verapaz. None of the cases of cleft lip also had cleft palate. The indigenous communities in north-central Guatemala might have a relatively high cleft lip prevalence rate compared with the global average.

  12. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovya George

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants (PIs often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

  13. Screening of Transforming Growth Factor Beta 3 and Jagged2 Genes in the Malay Population With Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip With or Without Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Norliana; Rahman, Normastura Abd; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Jaafar, Saidi

    2015-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of mutations in transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGFβ3) and Jagged2 genes and their association with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL±P) patients. Cross-sectional study on nonsyndromic CL±P and noncleft patients. Reconstructive clinic and outpatient dental clinic, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. Blood samples of 96 nonsyndromic CL±P and 96 noncleft subjects. Prevalence and association of mutations in TGFβ3 and Jagged2 genes with nonsyndromic CL±P. Most of the nonsyndromic CL±P patients (53.1%) had left unilateral CLP. There were slightly more females (56.6%) compared with males. The prevalence of the mutations in the TGFβ3 gene was 17.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.5, 24.5) and in the Jagged2 gene was 12.5% (95% CI: 5.5, 18.5), which was higher compared with the noncleft group. For the TGFβ3 gene, there was no mutation in the coding region in either of the groups. All variants were single nucleotide polymorphisms located within the intronic flanking region. Two variants were identified (g.15812T>G and g.15966A>G) in both nonsyndromic CL±P and noncleft patients. However, the association was not significant (P > .05). Three variants (g.19779C>T, g.19547G>A, and g.19712C>T) were identified in the Jagged2 gene among nonsyndromic CL±P and noncleft patients. Only g.19712C>T showed a significant association with nonsyndromic CL±P patients (P = .039). g.19712C>T might play a crucial role in the development of cleft lip and palate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the mutation found within intron 13 of the Jagged2 gene among nonsyndromic CL±P Malay patients.

  14. Maternal genes and facial clefts in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fetal conditions can in principle be affected by the mother's genotype working through the prenatal environment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genotypes for 1536 SNPs in 357 cleft candidate genes were available from a previous analysis in which we focused on fetal gene effects [1......]. After data-cleaning, genotypes for 1315 SNPs in 334 autosomal genes were available for the current analysis of maternal gene effects. Two complementary statistical methods, TRIMM and HAPLIN, were used to detect multi-marker effects in population-based samples from Norway (562 case-parent and 592 control......-parent triads) and Denmark (235 case-parent triads). We analyzed isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (iCL/P) and isolated cleft palate only (iCP) separately and assessed replication by looking for genes detected in both populations by both methods. In iCL/P, neither TRIMM nor HAPLIN detected more...

  15. BILATERAL TESSIER CLEFT 3: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tessier cleft 3 is a very rare congenital anomaly, (2 especially the bilateral form. Very few cases have been reported worldwide. (1,2 I report a case of bilateral Tessier cleft 3 presenting at the age of three months with clefts extending from philtral regions, undermining the nasal alar bases to the medial canthal areas bilaterally. There were bilateral complete alveolar clefts with mild protrusion of the pre-maxilla, but the rest of the maxilla including the palate was not involved. Surgical correction was started at the age of three months and completed at the age of one and half years in three stages. There was no intra-operative or postoperative complications and the final result was satisfactory.

  16. Dental Decay Phenotype in Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, B J; Cooper, M E; Wehby, G L; Resick, J M; Nidey, N L; Valencia-Ramirez, L C; Lopez-Palacio, A M; Rivera, D; Vieira, A R; Weinberg, S M; Marazita, M L; Moreno Uribe, L M

    2017-09-01

    Although children with oral clefts have a higher risk for dental anomalies when compared with the general population, prior studies have shown conflicting results regarding their dental decay risk. Also, few studies have assessed dental decay risk in unaffected relatives of children with clefts. Thus, the question of increased risk of dental decay in individuals with oral clefts or their unaffected relatives is still open for empirical investigation. This study characterizes dental decay in the largest international cohort to date of children with nonsyndromic clefts and their relatives, as compared with controls, and it addresses whether families with oral clefts have a significantly increased risk for dental decay versus the general population. A total of 3,326 subjects were included: 639 case probands, 1,549 unaffected relatives, and 1,138 controls. Decay was identified from in-person dental examinations or intraoral photographs. Case-control differences were tested with regression analysis. No significant differences were shown in percentage decayed and filled teeth and decayed teeth in the primary dentition (dft, dt) and permanent dentition (DFT, DT) in cases versus controls. In the cleft region, no significant differences were seen in primary or permanent decay (dt, DT) when compared with controls. No difference was found with regard to cleft type and percentage dft, dt, DFT, and DT in case probands. Nonsignificant differences were found in unaffected siblings and parents versus controls (primary and permanent dentitions). Collectively, these findings indicate that individuals with nonsyndromic oral clefts and their families do not have a higher dental decay risk as compared with the general population. These results suggest that either genetic or environmental factors underlying a higher susceptibility for dental anomalies do not increase caries risk or that the seemingly higher risk for dental decay associated with increased dental anomalies in case

  17. Prevalence of dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullo, R; Festa, V M; Rullo, R; Addabbo, F; Chiodini, P; Vitale, M; Perillo, L

    2015-09-01

    To examine the prevalence of different types of dental anomalies in children with nonsyndromic cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip-palate, and bilateral cleft lip-palate. A sample of 90 patients (aged 4-20 years) affected by isolated cleft lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate was examined. Cleft patients were classified into one of three groups according to cleft type: (1) Unilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, (2) Bilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, and (3) Cleft Lip. Intraoral exams, panoramic radiographs and dental casts, were used to analyse the prevalence of the various dental anomalies included in this study. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip and palate and bilateral cleft lip and palate. The congenital absence of the cleft-side lateral incisor was observed in 40% of the sample, and a total of 30% patients showed supernumerary teeth at the incisors region. Second premolar agenesis was found in 4.4% of patients, whereas in 18.9% of the sample there was an ectopic dental eruption. Lateral or central incisors rotation was noted in 31.1% of the sample, while shape anomaly, lateral incisor microdontia, and enamel hypoplasia were detected respectively in 25.6%, 5.6% and 18.9% of cleft patients. High prevalence of different dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate has been confirmed. This study, in particular, shows the presence of ectopic and rotated teeth in the cleft area.

  18. Cleft sidedness and congenitally missing teeth in patients with cleft lip and palate patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Jamilian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cleft sidedness, and the number of congenitally missing teeth in regard to cleft type and gender. Methods The charts, models, radiographs, and intraoral photographs of 201 cleft patients including 131 males with the mean age of 12.3 ± 4 years and 70 females with the mean age of 12.6 ± 3.9 years were used for the study. T test, Chi-square, and binomial tests were used for assessment of the data. Results and conclusions One hundred forty-eight of the subjects suffered from cleft lip and palate followed by 41 subjects who suffered from cleft lip and alveolus. Chi-square test did not show any significant difference between the genders. Binomial test showed that left-sided cleft was more predominant in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients (P < 0.001. This study also showed that the upper lateral incisors were the most commonly missing teeth in the cleft area.

  19. Effects of the K65R and K65R/M184V reverse transcriptase mutations in subtype C HIV on enzyme function and drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutsinos Dimitrios

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the effects of mutations K65R and K65R plus M184V on enzymatic function and mechanisms of drug resistance in subtype C reverse transcriptase (RT. Methods Recombinant subtype C HIV-1 RTs containing K65R or K65R+M184V were purified from Escherichia coli. Enzyme activities and tenofovir (TFV incorporation efficiency by wild-type (WT and mutant RTs of both subtypes were determined in cell-free assays. Efficiency of (- ssDNA synthesis and initiation by subtype C RTs was measured using gel-based assays with HIV-1 PBS RNA template and tRNA3Lys as primer. Single-cycle processivity was assayed under variable dNTP concentrations. Steady-state analysis was performed to measure the relative inhibitory capacity (ki/km of TFV-disphosphate (TFV-DP. ATP-dependent excision and rescue of TFV-or ZDV-terminated DNA synthesis was monitored in time-course experiments. Results The efficiency of tRNA-primed (-ssDNA synthesis by subtype C RTs was: WT > K65R > K65R+M184V RT. At low dNTP concentration, K65R RT exhibited lower activity in single-cycle processivity assays while the K65R+M184V mutant showed diminished processivity independent of dNTP concentration. ATP-mediated excision of TFV-or ZDV-terminated primer was decreased for K65R and for K65R+M184V RT compared to WT RT. K65R and K65R+M184V displayed 9.8-and 5-fold increases in IC50 for TFV-DP compared to WT RT. The Ki/Km of TFV was increased by 4.1-and 7.2-fold, respectively, for K65R and K65R+M184V compared to WT RT. Conclusion The diminished initiation efficiency of K65R-containing RTs at low dNTP concentrations have been confirmed for subtype C as well as subtype B. Despite decreased excision, this decreased binding/incorporation results in diminished susceptibility of K65R and K65R+M184 RT to TFV-DP.

  20. Somatic mosaicism caused by monoallelic reversion of a mutation in T cells of a patient with ADA-SCID and the effects of enzyme replacement therapy on the revertant phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada-Vélez, M; Vélez-Ortega, A; Orrego, J; Santisteban, I; Jagadeesh, J; Olivares, M; Olaya, N; Hershfield, M; Candotti, F; Franco, J

    2011-11-01

    Patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency exhibit spontaneous and partial clinical remission associated with somatic reversion of inherited mutations. We report a child with severe combined immunodeficiency (T-B- SCID) due to ADA deficiency diagnosed at the age of 1 month, whose lymphocyte counts including CD4+ and CD8+ T and NK cells began to improve after several months with normalization of ADA activity in Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), as a result of somatic mosaicism caused by monoallelic reversion of the causative mutation in the ADA gene. He was not eligible for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or gene therapy (GT); therefore he was placed on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with bovine PEG-ADA. The follow-up of metabolic and immunologic responses to ERT included gradual improvement in ADA activity in erythrocytes and transient expansion of most lymphocyte subsets, followed by gradual stabilization of CD4+ and CD8+ T (with naïve phenotype) and NK cells, and sustained expansion of TCRγδ+ T cells. This was accompanied by the disappearance of the revertant T cells as shown by DNA sequencing from PBL. Although the patient's clinical condition improved marginally, he later developed a germinal cell tumour and eventually died at the age of 67 months from sepsis. This case adds to our current knowledge of spontaneous reversion of mutations in ADA deficiency and shows that the effects of the ERT may vary among these patients, suggesting that it could depend on the cell and type in which the somatic mosaicism is established upon reversion.

  1. Newly emerging mutations in the matrix genes of the human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses reduce the detection sensitivity of real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Chang, Feng-Yee; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    New variants of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses were detected in Taiwan between 2012 and 2013. Some of these variants were not detected in clinical specimens using a common real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay that targeted the conserved regions of the viral matrix (M) genes. An analysis of the M gene sequences of the new variants revealed that several newly emerging mutations were located in the regions where the primers or probes of the real-time RT-PCR assay bind; these included three mutations (G225A, T228C, and G238A) in the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, as well as one mutation (C163T) in the A(H3N2) virus. These accumulated mismatch mutations, together with the previously identified C154T mutation of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and the C153T and G189T mutations of the A(H3N2) virus, result in a reduced detection sensitivity for the real-time RT-PCR assay. To overcome the loss of assay sensitivity due to mismatch mutations, we established a real-time RT-PCR assay using degenerate nucleotide bases in both the primers and probe and successfully increased the sensitivity of the assay to detect circulating variants of the human influenza A viruses. Our observations highlight the importance of the simultaneous use of different gene-targeting real-time RT-PCR assays for the clinical diagnosis of influenza.

  2. Detection of mutation in embB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical isolates of tuberculous patients in China by means of reverse-dot blot hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE QIONG WU; YANG LU; JIAN QIN LIANG; JUN XIAN ZHANG; GUANG YU ZHANG; CUI HUAN L(U); HONG MIN LI; BEI CHUAN DING

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between embB mutation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and ethambutol (EMB) resistance of the clinical isolates of tuberculous patients in China was investigated by reversedot blot hybridization (RDBH) in addition to evaluating the clinical value with application of PCR-RD-BH technique to detect EMB resistance. In the present study, the genotypes of the 258 bp fragments of embB genes from 196 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were analysed with RDBH and DNA sequencing. It was demonstrated that 60 out of 91 phenotypically EMB-resistant isolates (65.9%) showed 5 types of missense mutations at codon 306 of embB gene, resulting in the replacement of the Met residue of the wild type strain with Val, Ile or Leu residues. In these mutations, the GTP mutation (38/91,41.8% ) and the ATA mutation ( 16/91, 17.6% ) were the most encountered genotypes. The embB mutation at codon 306 could also be found in 69 isolates of phenotypically EMB-sensitive but resistant to other anti-tuberculous drugs, but no such gene mutation could be found in 36 strains of drug-sensitive isolates. Meanwhile, the concordance with the results of DNA sequencing for one wide-type probe and 5 probes for specific mutations was 100%. It was concluded that the EMB-resistance occurring in most M. tuberculosis is due to appearance of embB mutation at codon 306, and the PCR-RDBH assay was proved to be a rapid, simple and reliable method for the detection of gene mutations, which might be a good alternative for the drug-resistance screening.

  3. Amelogenin gene influence on enamel defects of cleft lip and palate patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Veronese OLIVEIRA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of mutations in the amelogenin gene (AMELX in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP and enamel defects (ED. A total of 165 patients were divided into four groups: with CLP and ED (n=46, with CLP and without ED (n = 34, without CLP and with ED (n = 34, and without CLP or ED (n = 51. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva followed by conducting a Polymerase Chain Reaction and direct DNA sequencing of exons 2 through 7 of AMELX. Mutations were found in 30% (n = 14, 35% (n = 12, 11% (n = 4 and 13% (n = 7 of the subjects from groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Thirty seven mutations were detected and distributed throughout exons 2 (1 mutation – 2.7%, 6 (30 mutations – 81.08% and 7 (6 mutations – 16.22% of AMELX. No mutations were found in exons 3, 4 or 5. Of the 30 mutations found in exon 6, 43.34% (n = 13, 23.33% (n = 7, 13.33% (n = 4 and 20% (n = 6 were found in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. c.261 C > T (rs2106416, a silent mutation, was detected in 26 subjects, and found more significantly (p = 0.003 in patients with CLP (groups 1 and 2 – 23.75%, compared with those without CLP (groups 3 and 4 – 8.23%. In the groups without ED, this silent mutation was also found more significantly (p = 0.032 among subjects with CLP (17.65% in group 2, compared with those without CLP (7.8% in group 4. In conclusion, this study suggested that AMELX may be a candidate gene for cleft lip and palate.

  4. Deficiency of the cytoskeletal protein SPECC1L leads to oblique facial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saadi, Irfan; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S;

    2011-01-01

    morphogenesis. During murine embryogenesis, Specc1l is expressed in cell populations of the developing facial primordial, which proliferate and fuse to form the face. In zebrafish, knockdown of a SPECC1L homolog produces a faceless phenotype with loss of jaw and facial structures, and knockdown in Drosophila......Genetic mutations responsible for oblique facial clefts (ObFC), a unique class of facial malformations, are largely unknown. We show that loss-of-function mutations in SPECC1L are pathogenic for this human developmental disorder and that SPECC1L is a critical organizer of vertebrate facial...

  5. The Primary Care Pediatrician and the Care of Children With Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charlotte W; Jacob, Lisa S; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2017-05-01

    Orofacial clefts, specifically cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P), are among the most common congenital anomalies. CL/P vary in their location and severity and comprise 3 overarching groups: cleft lip (CL), cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP), and cleft palate alone (CP). CL/P may be associated with one of many syndromes that could further complicate a child's needs. Care of patients with CL/P spans prenatal diagnosis into adulthood. The appropriate timing and order of specific cleft-related care are important factors for optimizing outcomes; however, care should be individualized to meet the specific needs of each patient and family. Children with CL/P should receive their specialty cleft-related care from a multidisciplinary cleft or craniofacial team with sufficient patient and surgical volume to promote successful outcomes. The primary care pediatrician at the child's medical home has an essential role in making a timely diagnosis and referral; providing ongoing health care maintenance, anticipatory guidance, and acute care; and functioning as an advocate for the patient and a liaison between the family and the craniofacial/cleft team. This document provides background on CL/P and multidisciplinary team care, information about typical timing and order of cleft-related care, and recommendations for cleft/craniofacial teams and primary care pediatricians in the care of children with CL/P. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Lexical selectivity in Danish toddlers with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study if Danish toddlers with cleft palate display lexical selectivity in their early lexicon at 18 months of age. Design: A cross-sectional study. Participants: Thirty-four children with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 35 children without cleft palate, matched for gender and age...... productions establishing an observed productive vocabulary size for each participant. Results: At 18 months of age Danish toddlers with cleft palate showed marked lexical selectivity in their early words. The distribution of consonant classes observed at 11 months of age in a previous study of the children...... with cleft palate was almost perfectly reflected in their early lexicon at 18 months. The early lexicon of children with cleft palate differed from the early lexicon of their non cleft peers. Conclusions & Implications: Danish toddlers with cleft palate display lexical selectivity in the early lexicon...

  7. Lexical selectivity in Danish toddlers with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study if Danish toddlers with cleft palate display lexical selectivity in their early lexicon at 18 months of age. Design: A cross-sectional study. Participants: Thirty-four children with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 35 children without cleft palate, matched for gender and age...... productions establishing an observed productive vocabulary size for each participant. Results: At 18 months of age Danish toddlers with cleft palate showed marked lexical selectivity in their early words. The distribution of consonant classes observed at 11 months of age in a previous study of the children...... with cleft palate was almost perfectly reflected in their early lexicon at 18 months. The early lexicon of children with cleft palate differed from the early lexicon of their non cleft peers. Conclusions & Implications: Danish toddlers with cleft palate display lexical selectivity in the early lexicon...

  8. Alar web in cleft lip nose deformity: study in adult unilateral clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Chandra, Ramesh

    2012-09-01

    The correction of alar webbing in unilateral cleft lip nose deformity is challenging because of progressive distortions in the alar web region during the period of growth. Alar webbing is a persistent universal deformity in both the primary and secondary cleft lip noses. The purpose of this article is to study the alar web deformity in adult patients with unilateral cleft lip noses. Twenty-five patients aged 13 years and older presenting with unilateral cleft nasal deformity were included. Preoperative and postoperative measurements of the nose, along with detailed intraoperative recording of the deformed anatomy, were done. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging was also done in selected cases. Transcolumellar open rhinoplasty was performed in all the cases, and nasal septal straightening with centralization was done. Cleft alar base augmentation was done using bone graft to restore symmetry of the nasal tripod. Both the cleft and noncleft alar cartilages were extensively mobilized from the skin and mucosal sides. The overgrown and caudally slumped cleft-side alar cartilage was resected caudally and was then resuspended in a symmetrical position with the noncleft alar cartilage. A midline-strut septal cartilage extension graft was used to restore the tip aesthetics. The skin overlying the alar web was in-rolled after semilunar cartilage resection, and skin excision was also done to restore symmetry with the opposite vestibule. The remaining secondary cleft nasal and lip deformities were corrected depending upon the specific presenting pathologic abnormality. The cleft alar cartilage was found to be caudally displaced in all the cases. The caudal border of the lateral crus was prolapsing in the cavity of the vestibule on the superomedial aspect and was tenting the skin in the area of the weak triangle, producing the characteristic alar web deformity. In the study group, the maximum width of the cleft alar cartilage at the level of the lateral crus was increased by

  9. Breastfeeding After Early Repair of Cleft Lip in Newborns With Cleft Lip or Cleft Lip and Palate in a Baby-Friendly Designated Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burianova, Iva; Kulihova, Katarina; Vitkova, Veronika; Janota, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Goals of treatment of orofacial cleft are to improve feeding, speech, hearing, and facial appearance. Early surgery brings faster healing, better cosmetic effect, and fewer complications. Breastfeeding rates after early surgery are unknown. Early repair of the cleft lip may influence breastfeeding rates. Research aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate breastfeeding after early repair of the cleft lip in a Baby-Friendly designated hospital. The rate of breastfeeding in newborns with cleft lip was compared to cleft lip and palate. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study group included infants with cleft lip and cleft lip and palate operated on in the first 2 weeks of life. Newborns and their mothers were supported by a team promoting breastfeeding. One hundred four infants (70 boys and 34 girls) were included. Isolated cleft lip was present in 56 (53.8%) infants, and cleft lip and palate in 48 (46.2%). Forty-four (78.6%) of the infants with a cleft lip were breastfed, 3 (5.4%) received human milk via bottle or syringe, and 9 (16.0%) were formula fed. Three (6.2%) of the infants with a cleft lip and palate were breastfed, 31 (64.6%) received human milk via bottle or Haberman feeder, and 14 (29.2%) were formula fed. The rate of breastfeeding in patients following early surgery of the cleft lip was high and comparable to the general population. The rate of breastfeeding in babies with cleft lip and palate after early repair of the cleft lip remained low.

  10. Not All Clefts Are Created Equal: Patterns of Hospital-Based Care Use among Children with Cleft Lip and Palate within 4 Years of Initial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligh, Cassandra A; Fox, Justin P; Swanson, Jordan; Yu, Jason W; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    This study compares hospital-based care and associated charges among children with cleft lip, cleft palate, or both, and identifies subgroups generating the greatest cumulative hospital charges. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of cleft lip, cleft palate, or cleft lip and palate who underwent initial surgery from 2006 to 2008 in four U.S. states. Primary outcome was hospital-based care-emergency, outpatient, inpatient-within 4 years of surgery. Regression models compared outcomes and classification tree analysis identified patients at risk for being in the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. The authors identified 4571 children with cleft lip (18.2 percent), cleft palate (39.2 percent), or cleft lip and palate (42.6 percent). Medical comorbidity was frequent across all groups, with feeding difficulty (cleft lip, 2.4 percent; cleft palate, 13.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 6.0 percent; p cleft lip, 1.8 percent; cleft palate, 9.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 3.6 percent; p cleft palate were most likely to return to the hospital (p cleft lip group, yet comparable among those with cleft palate and cleft lip and palate (p cleft palate cohort (cleft lip, $56,966; cleft palate, $106,090; cleft lip and palate, $91,263; p cleft lip versus cleft palate with or without cleft lip), and age at initial surgery were the most important factors associated with the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. Cleft lip and palate children experience a high rate of hospital-based care early in life, with degree of medical comorbidity being a significant burden. Understanding this relationship and associated needs may help deliver more efficient, patient-centered care.

  11. Prevalence of orofacial clefts in Korean live births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung Won; Hwang, Sun Mi; Lee, You Sun; Kim, Min-A; Seo, Kyung

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of orofacial clefts and identify the characteristics of other birth defects associated with orofacial clefts in Korea. This study used data from the Congenital Anomaly Survey conducted by the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs. The survey was conducted on birth defects documented during 2005 to 2006 in 2,348 medical institutes in Korea. This study was performed using data from medical insurance claims of the National Health Insurance Corporation. The prevalence of orofacial clefts was defined as the number of cases per 10,000 live births. Among the 883,184 live births, 25,335 infants had birth defects, which included 980 infants with orofacial clefts. The prevalence of total orofacial clefts in the total live births was 11.09 per 10,000, accounting for 3.9% of all birth defects. The most common orofacial cleft was cleft palate only (n=492), followed by cleft lip only (n=245) and cleft lip with cleft palate (n=243), with prevalence rates of 5.57, 2.77, 2.75 per 10,000 live births, respectively. While malformations of the circulatory system; digestive system; eyes, ears, face, and neck; and musculoskeletal system were most frequently encountered among infants with a cleft lip with or without a cleft palate, anomalies of most organ systems were notably observed among infants with cleft palate only. The prevalence of orofacial clefts in Korea was similar or slightly lower than that of other countries. This study informs present status of orofacial clefts and gives baseline data to lay the foundation stone for Korea's registry system of orofacial clefts.

  12. Soft tissue chondroma of hard palate associated with cleft palate

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendra Nehete; Anita Nehete; Sandeep Singla; Sudhir Sankalecha

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue chondroma of palate is very rare. It has never been reported in a cleft palate patient. We report a case of 22-year-old male who came with asymptomatic swelling on the palate since birth, along with complete cleft of secondary palate. He had symptoms related to cleft palate only, i.e., nasal regurgitation and speech abnormalities. Swelling was excised and the cleft palate was repaired. Histopathological examination revealed chondroma of the palate. The patient had no recurrence af...

  13. Congenital Palatal Fistula Associated with Submucous Cleft Palate

    OpenAIRE

    Eshete, Mekonen; Camison, Liliana; Abate, Fikre; Hailu, Taye; Demissie, Yohannes; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Butali, Azeez; Losken, H. Wolfgang; Spiess, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common congenital malformations, the presence of an isolated congenital palatal fistula along with a submucous cleft is very rare. This appears as an oval-shaped, full-thickness fenestration in the palatal midline that does not fully extend anteriorly or posteriorly, accompanied by the findings of a submucous cleft. Because of the uncommon nature of this entity, there is controversy about its etiology, diagnosis, and managemen...

  14. Novel findings of left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy, microform cleft lip and poor vision in patient with SMC1A-associated Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Tara L; Chow, Penny; Randle, Stephanie C; Rosen, Anna; Birgfeld, Craig; Wrede, Joanna; Javid, Patrick; King, Darcy; Manh, Vivian; Hing, Anne V; Albers, Erin

    2017-02-01

    Relatively few patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) due to SMC1A mutation have been reported, limiting understanding of the full extent of the phenotype. Compared to children with classic NIPBL-associated CdLS, patients with SMC1A-associated CdLS have a milder physical phenotype with prominent intellectual disability, high rate of cleft palate and absence of limb reductions. We present a patient with SMC1A-associated CdLS who had typical features including developmental delay, seizure disorder, feeding difficulties, hirsutism, and cleft palate. She also was found to have three novel features: (i) left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC) cardiomyopathy; (ii) microform cleft lip; and (iii) severe hyperopia and astigmatism. These features have implications regarding potential insight into the pathogenesis of the disorder, screening, and medical management. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has previously been reported in SMC1A-associated CdLS, but to our knowledge this is the first reported child with LVNC. Previous reports have included children with isolated clefts of the palate without involvement of the lip. When cleft palate alone is associated with a disorder, the underlying pathophysiology for clefting is sometimes secondary due to mechanical blocking of the fusion of the palatal shelves with the developing tongue. The presence of microform cleft lip in this patient suggests that the pathophysiology of clefting in SMC1A is primary rather than secondary. Few studies report ophthalmologic findings specific to SMC1A. Based on these findings, LVNC cardiomyopathy and cleft lip should be considered features of SMC1A-associated CdLS. All patients should receive echocardiogram and undergo thorough ophthalmologic evaluation as part of routine CdLS care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dermatoglyphic peculiarities in children with oral clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew L

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In humans, the development of the primary palate and the lip is completed by the 7th week of intra uterine life and that of secondary palate by 12th week. The dermal ridges develop in relation to the volar pads, which are formed by the 6th week of gestation and reach maximum size between 12th and 13th weeks. This means that the genetic message contained in the genome - normal or abnormal is deciphered during this period and is also reflected by dermatoglyphics.Hence this study was done in order to observe the differences in dermatoglyphic patterns between the children with oral clefts and normal children and to determine the usefulness of dermatoglyphics in studying the genetic etiology of oral clefts.Dermatoglyphic data from 50 oral cleft children and 50 normal children were collected using the ink method and comparison was done between them. In the present study, we found an increase in the ulnar loop patterns on the distal phalanges of the ten fingers, an increase in the atd angle and an increase in the fluctuating asymmetry of the atd angle in the oral cleft children which indicates the degree of developmental instability of the oral cleft individual.

  16. Cleft palate caused by congenital teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyssière, Alexis; Streit, Libor; Traoré, Hamady; Bénateau, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    A cleft palate results from incomplete fusion of the lateral palatine processes, the median nasal septum and the median palatine process. This case report describes a rare case of congenital teratoma originating from the nasal septum that may have interfered with the fusion of the palatal shelves during embryonic development, resulting in a cleft palate. An infant girl was born at 40 weeks of gestation weighing 3020 g with a complete cleft palate associated with a large central nasopharyngeal tumour. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed a well defined mass of mixed density. The tumour was attached to the nasal septum in direct contact with the cleft palate. A biopsy confirmed the teratoma. Tumour resection was performed at 5 months, soft palate reconstruction at 7 months and hard palate closure at 14 months. There was no sign of local recurrence 1 year later. Most teratomas are benign and the prognosis is usually good. However, recurrence is not rare if germ cell carcinomatous foci are present within the teratoma. For these reasons, we advocate the use of a two-stage procedure in which closure of the cleft palate is postponed until histological examination confirms complete excision of the teratoma.

  17. Occlusal Classification in Relation to Original Cleft Width in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Andrew H; Patel, Kamlesh B; Maschhoff, Clayton W; Huebener, Donald V; Skolnick, Gary B; Naidoo, Sybill D; Woo, Albert S

    2015-09-01

    To determine a correlation between the width of the cleft palate measured at the time of lip adhesion, definitive lip repair, and palatoplasty and the subsequent occlusal classification of patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Retrospective, observational study. Referral, urban, children's hospital Participants : Dental models and records of 270 patients were analyzed. None. Angle occlusion classification. The mean age at which occlusal classification was determined was 11 ± 0.3 years. Of the children studies, 84 were diagnosed with Class I or II occlusion, 67 were diagnosed with Class III occlusion, and 119 were lost to follow up or transferred care. Mean cleft widths were significantly larger in subjects with Class III occlusion for all measures at time of lip adhesion and definitive lip repair (P cleft widths were significantly greater at the alveolus (P = .025) but not at the midportion of the hard palate (P = .35) or posterior hard palate (P = .10). Cleft widths from the lip through to the posterior hard palate are generally greater in children who are diagnosed with Class III occlusion later in life. Notably, the alveolar cleft width is significantly greater at each time point for patients who went on to develop Class III occlusion. There were no significant differences in cleft widths between patients diagnosed later with Class I and Class II occlusions.

  18. Patterns of tooth agenesis in patients with orofacial clefts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermus, Ruurd R.; van Wijk, Arjen J.; Tan, Stephan P. K.; Kramer, Gem J. C.; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are a common oral disorder associated with tooth agenesis. As information on the simultaneous absence of teeth can be an aid in treatment planning, a large sample of orofacial cleft patients was examined. The sample consisted of 910 patients with cleft lip and palate. Tooth agenesis

  19. Isolated congenital palatal fistula without submucous cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, Mehmet; Olgun, Haşim; Tan, Onder; Caner, Ibrahim

    2009-09-01

    Congenital fistula of the palate is a rare deformity. It has been generally associated with cleft palate. Treatment of cleft palate is surgical intervention. We present a child with congenital fistula of palate that was not associated with submucous cleft and closed spontaneously at 18 months.

  20. Is an isolated cleft lip an isolated anomaly?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelder, J. D.; Breugem, C. C.; de Vries, Iris; de Bruin, M.; van der Molen, A. B. Mink; van der Horst, C. M. A. M.

    Introduction: It is well known that patients with cleft lip/palate or cleft palate can have associated anomalies. However, there is a relative paucity of information about the possible anomalies associated with an isolated cleft lip. A recent study (Vallino et al., 2008) showed that children with

  1. Is an isolated cleft lip an isolated anomaly?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelder, J. D.; Breugem, C. C.; de Vries, Iris; de Bruin, M.; van der Molen, A. B. Mink; van der Horst, C. M. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: It is well known that patients with cleft lip/palate or cleft palate can have associated anomalies. However, there is a relative paucity of information about the possible anomalies associated with an isolated cleft lip. A recent study (Vallino et al., 2008) showed that children with cl

  2. A modified procedure for velopharyngeal sphincteroplasty in primary cleft palate repair and secondary velopharyngeal incompetence treatment and its preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ningxin; Zhao, Min; Qi, Kemin; Deng, Hui; Fang, Zeng; Song, Ruyao

    2006-01-01

    During cleft repair, velopharyngeal sphincter reconstruction is still a challenge to plastic surgeons. To improve the surgical treatment for cleft palate and secondary velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI), a carefully designed modified procedure for primary palatoplasty and secondary VPI was presented. Fifty-six patients (48 for primary cleft palate repair and eight for secondary VPI of previously repaired clefts) underwent this procedure from 1988 to 2001. The modified procedure is a combination of the tunnelled palatopharyngeus myomucosal flap for dynamic circular reconstruction of the pharyngeal element of the velopharyngeal sphincter and the double-reversing Z-plasty with levator velo palatini muscles reposition in the velar element of the sphincter. The satisfactory velopharyngeal competence (complete velopharyngeal closure and marginal velopharyngeal closure) was achieved in 23 of 25 patients with primary cleft palate repair examined by nasendoscopy and the nasality, speech articulation and intelligibility are also assessed in 25 primary cleft palate repaired patients with 92% satisfactory result (normal speech and speech with mild VPI) in single word test and 88% in continuous speech evaluation. Based on our experience, we believe that this modified procedure is a reasonable choice for primary cleft repair and secondary VPI treatment because it is in accord with normal physiology and anatomy of the velopharyngeal sphincter, can lengthen the soft palate, decrease the enlarged velopharynx, augment the posterior pharyngeal wall, and enhance the relationship between the muscles of velopharyngeal sphincter which results in a dynamic neo-sphincter in palatopharyngoplasty. Further study of the procedure is needed. The theoretical basis, operative highlights, velopharyngeal function, advantages and disadvantages of the modified procedure were discussed.

  3. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  4. Clinical and molecular characterization of a Brazilian cohort of campomelic dysplasia patients, and identification of seven new SOX9 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo P. Mattos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Campomelic dysplasia (CD is an autosomal, dominantly inherited, skeletal abnormality belonging to the subgroup of bent bone dysplasias. In addition to bowed lower limbs, CD typically includes the following: disproportionate short stature, flat face, micrognathia, cleft palate, bell-shaped thorax, and club feet. Up to three quarters of 46, XY individuals may be sex-reversed. Radiological signs include scapular and pubic hypoplasia, narrow iliac wings, spaced ischia, and bowed femora and tibiae. Lethal CD is usually due to heterozygous mutations in SOX9, a major regulator of chondrocytic development. We present a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of nine Brazilian CD patients. Infants were either stillborn (n = 2 or died shortly after birth and presented similar phenotypes. Sex-reversal was observed in one of three chromosomally male patients. Sequencing of SOX9 revealed new heterozygous mutations in seven individuals. Six patients had mutations that resulted in premature transcriptional termination, while one infant had a single-nucleotide substitution at the conserved splice-site acceptor of intron 1. No clear genotype-phenotype correlations were observed. This study highlights the diversity of SOX9 mutations leading to lethal CD, and expands the group of known genetic alterations associated with this skeletal dysplasia.

  5. Submucous cleft palate and the general practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, R. B.; Courtemanche, A. D.; MacDonald, C.

    1973-01-01

    Submucous cleft palate refers to a situation where the soft palate is largely composed of mucosa with little or no muscle. The defect is often not obvious on inspection of the mouth and pharynx. There is considerable clinical variation, with speech ranging from normal or minimal nasality to severe nasality and defective articulation. Many patients who have latent submucous cleft palate have the condition unmasked by an adenoidectomy because the adenoid pad had served as a compensatory factor in effecting palatopharyngeal closure. All physicians who perform tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy should be aware of the signs and symptoms which may suggest the diagnosis. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:4758872

  6. Nutritional standard for children with orofacial clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowicka, Grażyna; Weker, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of children with orofacial clefts is a multi-stage process, usually extending over many years and requiring intervention of numerous specialists. Most of the problems in such children before the tissue reconstruction surgery are related to feeding and airway protection during swallowing. Feeding of children with orofacial clefts is the more difficult the more severe the defect is. Such children are at an increased risk of body weight deficit and malnutrition. The aim of the study is to present the nutritional standard for children with orofacial clefts. Feeding principles for children with orofacial clefts: If the clinical state of the child and the emotional state of the mother allow, children with orofacial clefts should be breastfed or bottle-fed with breast milk. If feeding with breast milk is not possible, children should receive appropriate formulas for infants. Their diet can usually be expanded at the same time as in healthy infants and should comply with the nutritional model or standard for children aged 6-12 months. Various feeding techniques are used in children with orofacial clefts, depending not only on the type of the defect, but also the experience of the institution taking care of the child. Such children may require a diet with higher calories due to their increased energy expenditure related to eating. In the case of body weight deficit and/or malnutrition resulting from inadequate diet, a change of the feeding technique should be considered, and, subsequently, a diet modification. The modification may mean an extra formula feeding (in children fed with breast milk) or earlier introduction of supplementary foods. Sometimes a different feeding method than oral feeding must be used, e.g. through a naso-gastric tube or, in extreme cases, a feeding stoma. It is of utmost importance that infants with the said defects gain the optimal body weight before the planned operation, since malnutrition may be a significant reason for delaying the

  7. Occipital meningoencephalocele with Cleft Lip, Cleft Palate and Limb Abnormalities- A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Arthi; T, Sadeesh; Swer, Mary Hydrina; Rao, Sudha

    2014-12-01

    A 21-week-old still born female fetus with occipital encepholocele, cleft lip and cleft palate was received from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry and was studied in detail. It was born to Primigravida, of a second degree consanguineous marriage, with unremarkable family history. The biometric measurements were noted which corresponded to the age of the fetus. Further the fetus was embalmed and dissected. On examination an encephalocele of 2.7×1.5 cm was seen in the occipital region with a midline defect in the occipital bone and herniated brain tissue. Other anomalies observed were right unilateral cleft lip, right cleft palate, and bilateral syndactyly of the lower limbs and associated Congenital Talipus Equino Varus of the right foot. Other internal organs were developed appropriate for the age of the fetus.

  8. AZT-related mutation Lys70Arg in reverse transcriptase of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 confers decrease in susceptibility to ddATP in in vitro RT inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P L; Chatis, P A; Dogon, A L; Mayers, D L; McCutchan, F E; Page, C; Crumpacker, C S

    1996-09-15

    The genetic basis for didanosine (ddl) resistance in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has previously been shown to be commonly associated with a Leu to Val change at codon 74 in the HIV-1 RT gene. In this study sequential viral isolates were analyzed from five patients with prior zidovudine (AZT) use who received 6 to 16 months of ddl therapy. Following ddl therapy, viral isolates exhibited an increased AZT susceptibility and decreased ddl susceptibility. Sequence and nested PCR analysis of the HIV-1 RT gene revealed that two viral isolates contained the Leu to Val change at codon 74, and three other isolates with reduced susceptibility to ddl each contained changes at codons 65, 70, and 72. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to insert specific mutations in RT gene of proviral clone pNL4-3. Analysis of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity indicated that the Lys70Arg mutation resulted in an enzyme with 2- to 4-fold decreased susceptibility to ddATP. Statistical analysis of the inhibitory concentration for RT activity between pNL4-3 and mutant Lys70Arg viruses obtained in three independent RT inhibition assays was significant (P = 0.05) by student t test paired analysis. Drug susceptibility assays on the virus with Lys70Arg mutation showed a marginal decrease in susceptibility to ddl (1.5- to 2-fold) and about 4- to 6-fold decrease in susceptibility to AZT. Mutations Lys65Glu and Arg72Ser resulted in an impaired RT with greatly diminished functional RT activity. The AZT-associated Lys70Arg mutation results in an RT enzyme with decreased susceptibility to ddATP.

  9. Possible sex-discriminant variables in craniofacial growth in clefting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, R E; Jain, R B; Krogman, W M

    1982-11-01

    In this investigation, 174 patients with orofacial clefts were examined for identification of possible sex differences in craniodentofacial measurements. The patients were selected from the longitudinal growth files of the H. K. Cooper Clinic. Records available for analysis were serial lateral cephalometric radiographs from the age of 1 month to 10 years. Patients were grouped by cleft type and sex within each cleft group (78 cleft palate only, 64 unilateral cleft of lip and palate, 32 bilateral cleft of lip and palate). Stepwise discriminant analysis of fourteen linear and angular craniofacial dimensions was used to identify those variables which contributed to sex differences within each cleft group over the growth/time intervals examined. Results suggested the possibility of sex-related differences in growth timing, that is, earlier maturation and growth in females in several craniofacial areas which did not appear to be related to the presence, absence, or type of cleft but which could possibly modify cleft-specific responses to treatment (cranial base dimensions, face heights). Other sex-related differences appeared to be more specifically related to known sex differences in original cleft type and severity (mandibular size and position, midfacial dimensions). The manner in which these various sex factors interface with environmental and therapeutic influences in producing the ultimate craniodentofacial morphology in a given sex and cleft type is discussed.

  10. The incidence, classification, etiology, and embryology of oral clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J B; Nimer, S; Howard, P S

    1996-09-01

    There are numerous problems encountered among individuals with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Addressing these problems necessitates a multidisciplinary approach, requiring a team of experts to facilitate care for these individuals. Dentists play a vital role on the team. An orthodontist, pediatric dentist, oral maxillofacial surgeon, and prosthodontist usually represent the dental members of the team. The success of this team depends on expertise within each discipline but also depends on each member having a broad base of knowledge in general about oral clefts. An understanding of other disciplines and how they approach the treatment of oral clefts is important for each team member. Also, each team representative should appreciate the need to understand the causes of oral clefts, how clefts develop in utero, how various populations are affected, and how to recognize and classify an oral cleft. It is difficult to communicate effectively within the team if we fail to recognize the importance of expanding our knowledge to include other aspects of oral clefts beyond treatment perspectives. This article provides the orthodontist with basic information as it relates to the etiology of oral clefts (ie, genetics, teratogens, and medical conditions), the demographics and incidence of oral clefts, the embryology and classification of clefts.

  11. Parents' age and the risk of oral clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, C.; Skytthe, A.; Vach, W.

    2005-01-01

    . In a joint analysis, both maternal and paternal ages were associated with the risk of cleft lip with or without cleft palate, but the contribution of each was dependent on the age of the other parent. In the analysis of cleft palate only, the effect of maternal age disappeared, leaving only paternal age......BACKGROUND: Some malformations are clearly associated with older maternal age, but the effect of older age of the father is less certain. The aim of this study is to determine the degree to which maternal age and paternal age independently influence the risk of having a child with oral clefts...... as a risk factor. CONCLUSION: Both high maternal age and high paternal age were associated with cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Higher paternal age but not maternal age increased the risk of cleft palate only....

  12. Lexical selectivity in danish toddlers with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective : To study if Danish children with cleft palate display lexical selectivity in their early lexicon at 18 months of age. Design : A cross-sectional study. Participants : Thirty-four children with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 35 children without cleft palate, matched for gender...... also analyzed with respect to word productions, establishing an observed productive vocabulary size for each participant. Results : At 18 months of age Danish children with cleft palate showed marked lexical selectivity in their early words. The distribution of consonant classes observed at 11 months...... of age in a previous study of the children with cleft palate was almost perfectly reflected in their early lexicon at 18 months. The early lexicon of children with cleft palate differed from the early lexicon of their noncleft peers. Conclusions and Implications : Danish toddlers with cleft palate...

  13. Fetal genetic risk of isolated cleft lip only versus isolated cleft lip and palate: A subphenotype analysis using two population-based studies of orofacial clefts in scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cleft lip only (CLO) and cleft lip and palate (CLP) are commonly regarded as variants of the same defect and are traditionally combined to form the single group of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) prior to analysis. However, recent data have suggested that at least...... a subgroup of isolated CLO may be etiologically distinct from isolated CLP. METHODS: To explore fetal genetic risk of isolated CLO separately from isolated CLP, we performed a subphenotype analysis using two population-based studies of clefts in Scandinavia. One hundred twenty-one isolated CLO, 190 isolated...... CLP, and 592 control triads were available from Norway (1996-2001), and a further 76 isolated CLO and 107 isolated CLP triads were available from Denmark (1991-2001). Genotypes for 1315 SNPs in 334 autosomal cleft candidate genes were analyzed using two complementary statistical methods, Triad Multi...

  14. Resolving clinical diagnoses for syndromic cleft lip and/or palate phenotypes using whole-exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengelly, R J; Upstill-Goddard, R; Arias, L; Martinez, J; Gibson, J; Knut, M; Collins, A L; Ennis, S; Collins, A; Briceno, I

    2015-11-01

    Individuals from three families ascertained in Bogota, Colombia, showing syndromic phenotypes, including cleft lip and/or palate, were exome-sequenced. In each case, sequencing revealed the underlying causal variation confirming or establishing diagnoses. The findings include very rare and novel variants providing insights into genotype and phenotype relationships. These include the molecular diagnosis of an individual with Nager syndrome and a family exhibiting an atypical incontinentia pigmenti phenotype with a missense mutation in IKBKG. IKBKG mutations are typically associated with preterm male death, but this variant is associated with survival for 8-15 days. The third family exhibits unusual phenotypic features and the proband received a provisional diagnosis of Pierre Robin sequence (PRS). Affected individuals share a novel deleterious mutation in IRF6. Mutations in IRF6 cause Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndrome and contribute to nonsyndromic cleft lip phenotypes but have not previously been associated with a PRS phenotype. Exome sequencing followed by in silico screening to identify candidate causal variant(s), and functional assay in some cases offers a powerful route to establishing molecular diagnoses. This approach is invaluable for conditions showing phenotypic and/or genetic heterogeneity including cleft lip and/or palate phenotypes where many underlying causal genes have not been identified. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Hearing outcomes in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuladottir, Hildur; Sivertsen, Ase; Assmus, Jorg; Remme, Asa Rommetveit; Dahlen, Marianne; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2015-03-01

    Objective : Children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only have a high incidence of conductive hearing loss from otitis media with effusion. Studies demonstrating longitudinal results are lacking. This study was undertaken to investigate long-term longitudinal hearing outcomes of children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and cleft palate only. Design : Retrospective chart review. Setting : Clinical charts of patients born with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only in 1985 to 1994 who were referred to the cleft team in Bergen, Norway. Study findings include 15 years of follow-up. Participants : The study population consisted of 317 children of whom 159 had nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 158 had nonsyndromic cleft palate. Main Outcome Measures : Pure tone average calculated from pure tone audiometry at ages 4, 6, and 15 years. Results : The median pure tone average significantly improved with increasing age. For the cleft lip and palate group, the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 16 dB hearing level (HL), 13 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). In the cleft palate group the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 15 dB HL, 12 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). There was no significant difference in the hearing levels between the two groups. Patients who had surgical closure of the palate at age 18 months had a significantly better pure tone average outcome at age 15 compared with patients who had surgery at 12 months. Conclusions : Hearing improves significantly from childhood to adolescence in patients with cleft lip and palate and cleft palate only.

  16. Analysis of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) in sex reversed patients: point-mutation in SRY causing sex-reversion in a 46,XY female

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Jørn; Schwartz, M; Skakkebaek, N E

    1992-01-01

    to be determined. We have tested three human females with 46,XY karyotype and gonadal dysgenesis and two 46,XX males for the presence of SRY using the polymerase chain reaction and subsequent DNA sequencing. Both 46,XX males contained SRY, whereas one of the 46,XY females had suffered a point mutation in SRY...... been reported, and it has been called the sex determining region of the Y (SRY). The hypothesis has been supported by the finding of XX individuals with SRY, and two females with 46,XY karyotype and a mutation in SRY. However, XX males without SRY has been reported, and the role of SRY still has...... changing a codon for lysine to a stop codon. This information supports the hypothesis that SRY is significant in normal male sex differentiation. The two remaining 46,XY individuals had an intact HMG box, but it is possible that a mutation may be found in a regulatory gene or further downstream in the gene...

  17. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BALACHANDRAN SARANYA; GUNASEKARAN BHAVANI; BRINDHA ARUMUGAM; MEENA JAYASHANKAR; SATHIYAVEDU THYAGARAJAN SANTHIYA

    2016-12-01

    Molecular characterization of 23 cytogenetically confirmed XY females was attempted by screening coding regions of SRY and androgen receptor (AR) genes. Five of the index cases showed sequence variations in various exons of the AR gene: a deletion (n.1911delG) and substitutions n.1761G>A and n.1317C>T in exon 1; n.3510C>T transition in exon 6 and deletion mutation (n.3672delT) in exon 7. Four mutations identified here lead to the formation of truncated receptor protein, involving a substantial loss of AR functional domains which explains the phenotype in the subjects. The n.1761G>A substitution has been previously reported in cases with mild androgen insensitivity. Although the ligand-binding domain was considered as the mutational hot spot in AR gene, we report here 3/5 variations in the N-terminal domain emphasizing the significance of considering the N-terminal domain of AR as well for mutation screening. Our present observation also strengthens the role of AR gene and its direct association with AIS.

  18. Fetal cleft lip with and without cleft palate: Comparison between MR imaging and US for prenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Guangbin, E-mail: wgb7932596@hotmail.com [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, 324 Jingwu Road, Jinan, 250021 (China); Shan Ruiqin [Jinan Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Jinan (China); Zhao Lianxin; Zhu Xiangyu; Zhang Xinjuan [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, 324 Jingwu Road, Jinan, 250021 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of fetal CL/CP and evaluate its diagnostic value. Methods and materials: Twelve fetuses with CL/CP diagnosed by transabdominal US underwent MR imaging within 2 days of US. Half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) sequence on T2-weighted images was performed on sagittal, coronal, and axial planes anatomic to the fetuses during maternal breath holding. US and MR imaging findings were compared with final diagnoses obtained from post-natal physical examination or fetal autopsy. Results: Final diagnoses confirmed incomplete midline cleft lip (n = 1), unilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 7), bilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 1), midline cleft lip and palate (n = 3). US and MR imaging diagnosed all 12 fetuses with cleft lip and the laterality. 5 (45.5%) of 11 cleft palates were identified with US, 2 of 7 fetuses with unilateral cleft palate, 2 of 3 fetuses with midline cleft palate, and one fetus with bilateral cleft palate. On MR imaging, 10 (91%) of 11 cleft palates were correctly detected. One fetus with unilateral cleft palate was not detected. No false-positives occurred. Conclusion: MR imaging is valuable for diagnosis of fetal CL/CP. It can demonstrate additional findings and provide more information compared with US.

  19. Review of the role of potential teratogens in the origin of human nonsyndromic oral clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszynski, D F; Beaty, T H

    1996-05-01

    Oral clefts are common birth defects affecting approximately 1 every 1,000 caucasian newborns. While many syndromes with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) or with cleft palate (CP) are recognized, the majority of oral clefts fall into the category of "nonsyndromic oral clefts" and the etiology of this group remains incompletely understood. Investigators agree that oral clefts are multifactorial in origin, with both genetic and environmental factors in their etiology. While animal models have identified several teratogens for oral clefts, their precise relevance for humans remains unclear. The goal of this work is to review literature on environmental exposures potentially associated with non-syndromic oral clefts.

  20. Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewings Ember

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The master plan of all vertebrate embryos is based on neuroanatomy. The embryo can be anatomically divided into discrete units called neuromeres so that each carries unique genetic traits. Embryonic neural crest cells arising from each neuromere induce development of nerves and concomitant arteries and support the development of specific craniofacial tissues or developmental fields. Fields are assembled upon each other in a programmed spatiotemporal order. Abnormalities in one field can affect the shape and position of developing adjacent fields. Craniofacial clefts represent states of excess or deficiency within and between specific developmental fields. The neuromeric organization of the embryo is the common denominator for understanding normal anatomy and pathology of the head and neck. Tessier′s observational cleft classification system can be redefined using neuroanatomic embryology. Reassessment of Tessier′s empiric observations demonstrates a more rational rearrangement of cleft zones, particularly near the midline. Neuromeric theory is also a means to understand and define other common craniofacial problems. Cleft palate, encephaloceles, craniosynostosis and cranial base defects may be analyzed in the same way.

  1. Cleft Lip and Palate (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to latch on and suck during breastfeeding or bottle feeding. As a result, a baby with a cleft palate may need a special nipple and bottle to receive pumped breast milk or formula. ... with feeding issues should be seen regularly by a doctor ...

  2. Isolated cleft sternum: Neonatal surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanojia Ravi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated cleft sternum is a rare congenital defect of the anterior chest wall and is the result of failed ventral midline fusion of sternal bands. We present two cases operated 18 and 24 days after birth with satisfactory results. Surgery is indicated to protect the heart and mediastinal contents.

  3. CLEFT-PALATE REPAIR - FURLOW VERSUS VONLANGENBECK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPAUWEN, PHM; GOORHUISBROUWER, SM; SCHUTTE, HK

    1992-01-01

    The Furlow cleft palate repair using a double opposing Z-plasty appears to be very promising. In order to detect advantages and disadvantages concerning the technique as well as speech- and hearing results, the Furlow palatoplasty was compared with the classical von Langenbeck technique. Data analys

  4. The correction of alar-columella web deformities in unilateral cleft-lip nasal deformities with web graft technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Ju Young; Mun, Goo-Hyun; Bang, Sa Ik; Oh, Kap Sung; Lim, So Young

    2014-10-01

    Among the many secondary deformities in cleft-lip nose, the alar-columella web is unsightly and is a recurrent deformity. The purpose of this article is to revisit the correction of alar web deformity in patients with cleft-lip nasal deformities and to introduce our web graft technique. Thirteen patients with alar webbing underwent surgery between June 2012 and February 2013. The age range of the patients at the time of surgery was 14-29 years. An open rhinoplasty incision, including a reverse-U incision, was made and cartilage work was performed. After the cleft side was equalized with the dome angle of the healthy side, we used contralateral alar or auricular cartilage grafts as a stiff batten to stabilize the converted web skin. The web graft was fixed to the cleft-side web skin's inner side with at least three sutures to maintain the tucking of the vestibular skin. The follow-up period ranged from 1 to 20 months. The postoperative frontal and basal views showed that the nostrils and columella had better shape. Most patients demonstrated correction of the drooping alar rim and satisfactory symmetry of the nostrils. A web graft supports the vestibular lining of the reverse-U incision and increases the strength of the new concavity of the tucked skin. We expect that a long-lasting concave web contour could be achieved with this technique.

  5. Syntax and Discourse in Near-Native French: Clefts and Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This study examines aspects of the syntax-discourse interface in near-native French. Two cleft structures--"c'est" clefts and "avoir" clefts--are examined in experimental and spontaneous conversational data from 10 adult Anglophone learners of French and ten native speakers of French. "C'est" clefts mark focus, and "avoir" clefts introduce new…

  6. A descriptive epidemiology study of cleft lip and palate in Northern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithovius, Riitta H; Ylikontiola, Leena P; Harila, Virpi; Sándor, George K

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of cleft lip and/or cleft palate in a population uniquely from Northern Finland. The records of a total of 214 cleft patients treated between 1998-2011 at the Oulu Cleft Lip and Palate Center at the University of Oulu were assessed on a retrospective basis. Data regarding cleft type, sex and side of cleft was collected and analyzed. Family history of clefting was investigated. Cleft palate (68.7%) was most frequently found, followed by cleft lip and palate (18.7%) and cleft lip with or without alveolus (12.6%). Cleft palate occurred more frequently in females (63.3%) and cleft lip and palate was more frequently found in males (62.5%). The left side was more frequently affected in both male and female patients. Left-sided clefts were observed in 82% of patients compared to right-sided clefts in 18%. A family history of clefting was detected in 20.1% of patients. The incidence of clefts in Northern Finland is higher than the corresponding incidence in other European countries. Cleft palate was the most frequent cleft type and it was more frequent in females. In males, cleft lip and palate was more frequent. The left side was more frequently affected in both genders. One fifth of the patients had a family history of clefts.

  7. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse...... model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7...... weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose...

  8. Cranio-facial clefts in pre-hispanic America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marius-Nunez, A L; Wasiak, D T

    2015-10-01

    Among the representations of congenital malformations in Moche ceramic art, cranio-facial clefts have been portrayed in pottery found in Moche burials. These pottery vessels were used as domestic items during lifetime and funerary offerings upon death. The aim of this study was to examine archeological evidence for representations of cranio-facial cleft malformations in Moche vessels. Pottery depicting malformations of the midface in Moche collections in Lima-Peru were studied. The malformations portrayed on pottery were analyzed using the Tessier classification. Photographs were authorized by the Larco Museo.Three vessels were observed to have median cranio-facial dysraphia in association with midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible. ML001489 portrays a median cranio-facial dysraphia with an orbital cleft and a midline cleft of the lower lip extending to the mandible. ML001514 represents a median facial dysraphia in association with an orbital facial cleft and a vertical orbital dystopia. ML001491 illustrates a median facial cleft with a soft tissue cleft. Three cases of midline, orbital and lateral facial clefts have been portrayed in Moche full-figure portrait vessels. They represent the earliest registries of congenital cranio-facial malformations in ancient Peru.

  9. Mice with Tak1 deficiency in neural crest lineage exhibit cleft palate associated with abnormal tongue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhongchen; Liu, Chao; Iwata, Junichi; Gu, Shuping; Suzuki, Akiko; Sun, Cheng; He, Wei; Shu, Rong; Li, Lu; Chai, Yang; Chen, YiPing

    2013-04-12

    Cleft palate represents one of the most common congenital birth defects in humans. TGFβ signaling, which is mediated by Smad-dependent and Smad-independent pathways, plays a crucial role in regulating craniofacial development and patterning, particularly in palate development. However, it remains largely unknown whether the Smad-independent pathway contributes to TGFβ signaling function during palatogenesis. In this study, we investigated the function of TGFβ activated kinase 1 (Tak1), a key regulator of Smad-independent TGFβ signaling in palate development. We show that Tak1 protein is expressed in both the epithelium and mesenchyme of the developing palatal shelves. Whereas deletion of Tak1 in the palatal epithelium or mesenchyme did not give rise to a cleft palate defect, inactivation of Tak1 in the neural crest lineage using the Wnt1-Cre transgenic allele resulted in failed palate elevation and subsequently the cleft palate formation. The failure in palate elevation in Wnt1-Cre;Tak1(F/F) mice results from a malformed tongue and micrognathia, resembling human Pierre Robin sequence cleft of the secondary palate. We found that the abnormal tongue development is associated with Fgf10 overexpression in the neural crest-derived tongue tissue. The failed palate elevation and cleft palate were recapitulated in an Fgf10-overexpressing mouse model. The repressive effect of the Tak1-mediated noncanonical TGFβ signaling on Fgf10 expression was further confirmed by inhibition of p38, a downstream kinase of Tak1, in the primary cell culture of developing tongue. Tak1 thus functions to regulate tongue development by controlling Fgf10 expression and could represent a candidate gene for mutation in human PRS clefting.

  10. In silico reversal of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP identifies the origins of repeat families and uncovers obscured duplicated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hane James K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP is a fungal genome defence mechanism guarding against transposon invasion. RIP mutates the sequence of repeated DNA and over time renders the affected regions unrecognisable by similarity search tools such as BLAST. Results DeRIP is a new software tool developed to predict the original sequence of a RIP-mutated region prior to the occurrence of RIP. In this study, we apply deRIP to the genome of the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum SN15 and predict the origin of several previously uncharacterised classes of repetitive DNA. Conclusions Five new classes of transposon repeats and four classes of endogenous gene repeats were identified after deRIP. The deRIP process is a new tool for fungal genomics that facilitates the identification and understanding of the role and origin of fungal repetitive DNA. DeRIP is open-source and is available as part of the RIPCAL suite at http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/ripcal.

  11. Definition of critical periods for Hedgehog pathway antagonist-induced holoprosencephaly, cleft lip, and cleft palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen W Heyne

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway mediates multiple spatiotemporally-specific aspects of brain and face development. Genetic and chemical disruptions of the pathway are known to result in an array of structural malformations, including holoprosencephaly (HPE, clefts of the lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P, and clefts of the secondary palate only (CPO. Here, we examined patterns of dysmorphology caused by acute, stage-specific Hh signaling inhibition. Timed-pregnant wildtype C57BL/6J mice were administered a single dose of the potent pathway antagonist vismodegib at discrete time points between gestational day (GD 7.0 and 10.0, an interval approximately corresponding to the 15th to 24th days of human gestation. The resultant pattern of facial and brain dysmorphology was dependent upon stage of exposure. Insult between GD7.0 and GD8.25 resulted in HPE, with peak incidence following exposure at GD7.5. Unilateral clefts of the lip extending into the primary palate were also observed, with peak incidence following exposure at GD8.875. Insult between GD9.0 and GD10.0 resulted in CPO and forelimb abnormalities. We have previously demonstrated that Hh antagonist-induced cleft lip results from deficiency of the medial nasal process and show here that CPO is associated with reduced growth of the maxillary-derived palatal shelves. By defining the critical periods for the induction of HPE, CL/P, and CPO with fine temporal resolution, these results provide a mechanism by which Hh pathway disruption can result in "non-syndromic" orofacial clefting, or HPE with or without co-occurring clefts. This study also establishes a novel and tractable mouse model of human craniofacial malformations using a single dose of a commercially available and pathway-specific drug.

  12. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning.

  13. Effect of Nasal Floor Closure on the Size of Alveolar Cleft in Complete Unilateral or Bilateral Primary Cleft Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Moghadaszadeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleft lip (CL and cleft palate (CP are among the most common congenital anomalies. Constituting 65% of head and neck anomalies in isolated or syndromic forms, they are considered as the most common head and neck congenital deformities in children. Methods: 15 children from the Tabriz Children Hospital were evaluated in this descriptive-analytic cross sectional study that possessed unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate with inclusion criteria. The effect of nasal floor reconstruction on the size of alveolar cleft and palatal anterior fistula formation were evaluated in primary unilateral and bilateral cleft palate. Results: There were 11 (73.3% male and only 4 (26.7% female patients in the sample group. The mean duration from first consult to reconstructive surgery was 3.4±1.8 months (1 to 9 months range. The width of alveolar cleft and alveolar ridge angle on cleft side compared to normal side in sagittal and coronal axis was significant after nasal floor reconstruction (P=0.001, P=0.02, while septal angle changes were not significant (P=0.26, which means no increase in septal deviation has been documented. Conclusion: Considering the significant changes of alveolar cleft width and alveolar ridge angle on cleft side compared to normal side in sagittal and coronal axis after nasal floor closure, this method can be applied as a new interventional surgery in primary unilateral and bilateral cleft palate.

  14. Fully Human VH Single Domains That Rival the Stability and Cleft Recognition of Camelid Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, Romain; Dudgeon, Kip; Christie, Mary; Langley, David; Christ, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Human VH single domains represent a promising class of antibody fragments with applications as therapeutic modalities. Unfortunately, isolated human VH domains also generally display poor biophysical properties and a propensity to aggregate. This has encouraged the development of non-human antibody domains as alternative means of antigen recognition and, in particular, camelid (VHH) domains. Naturally devoid of light chain partners, these domains are characterized by favorable biophysical properties and propensity for cleft binding, a highly desirable characteristic, allowing the targeting of cryptic epitopes. In contrast, previously reported structures of human VH single domains had failed to recapitulate this property. Here we report the engineering and characterization of phage display libraries of stable human VH domains and the selection of binders against a diverse set of antigens. Unlike "camelized" human domains, the domains do not rely on potentially immunogenic framework mutations and maintain the structure of the VH/VL interface. Structure determination in complex with hen egg white lysozyme revealed an extended VH binding interface, with complementarity-determining region 3 deeply penetrating into the active site cleft, highly reminiscent of what has been observed for camelid domains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that fully human VH domains can be constructed that are not only stable and well expressed but also rival the cleft binding properties of camelid antibodies.

  15. A case report of acampomelic campomelic dysplasia and operative difficulties in cleft palate reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pasupathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acampomelic campomelic dysplasia (CD is a type of CD (CD; OMIM #114290, a rare form of congenital short-limbed dwarfism and is due to mutations in SOX9 gene family. Characteristic phenotypes of CD include bowing of the lower limbs, a narrow thoracic cage, 11 pairs of ribs, hypoplastic scapulae, macrocephaly, flattened supraorbital ridges and nasal bridge, cleft palate and micrognathia. The bending of the long bones is not an obligatory feature and is absent in about 10% of cases, referred to as acampomelic CD. A child previously diagnosed with acampomelic CD was brought to our outpatient clinic for cleft palate reconstruction. Our neurosurgeon cautioned us against performing surgery with extension of the neck in view of the possibility of producing quadriparesis, due to narrowing of the spinal canal as part of the osseous anomaly noted in the magnetic resonance imaging study of the spine, thus making the anaesthesia, surgical and post-operative procedures difficult. The cleft palate reconstruction was performed with all precautions and was uneventful.

  16. [Prevalence of oral clefts from 1975 to 1994, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro Monteiro Loffredo, L; Freitas, J A; Grigolli, A A

    2001-12-01

    To estimate the prevalence of oral clefts in Brazil categorized by etiology and geographical region. Case reports of oral cleft in newborns in the period 1975 - 1994 were included in the study. Data was collected using the morbidity certificates of the Hospital de Reabilitação de Anomalias Craniofaciais (Craniofacial Abnormalities Rehabilitation Hospital), Ministry of Health data (Datasus), and Fundação Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (Brazilian Census Bureau). There were 16,853 new cases of oral clefts, with a total prevalence of 0.19 per 1,000 births, and there was an increased prevalence every five years. The highest prevalence were observed in the Midwest, southeast, and south regions. As for the studied categories, cleft lip (or the cleft of lip and palate) was seen in 74% of the cases and isolated cleft palate was seen in 26% of them.

  17. TREATMENT OF SOFT TISSUE INJURY BY PUNCTURING CLEFT-POINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yunxiang; Chen Guizhen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of acupuncture of "Xi" (Cleft)-points in treatment of soft tissue injury. Methods: 335 cases of soft tissue injury patients were divided into Cleft-point group (264 cases) and Ashipoint group (control group, 71 cases) randomly. In Cleft-point group, the 16 Cleft-points were used in combination with Ahshi points. In control group, only local Ahshi-points were punctured. The treatment was conducted once every day, with 5 sessions being a therapeutic course. After 2 courses of treatment, the therapeutic effect was analyzed.Results: Results showed that the therapeutic effect of cleft-point group was significantly better than that of control group (P<0.05), particularly in treatment of acute soft tissue. Conclusion: Cleft-point acupuncture has a better therapeutic effect in treatment of soft tissue injury in comparison with Ashi-point.

  18. A genome-wide association study of cleft lip with and without cleft palate identifies risk variants near MAFB and ABCA4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaty, Terri H; Murray, Jeffrey C; Marazita, Mary L

    2010-01-01

    Case-parent trios were used in a genome-wide association study of cleft lip with and without cleft palate. SNPs near two genes not previously associated with cleft lip with and without cleft palate (MAFB, most significant SNP rs13041247, with odds ratio (OR) per minor allele = 0.704, 95% CI 0...

  19. Protocols in Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment: Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Ribeiro Soares de Ladeira; Nivaldo Alonso

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To find clinical decisions on cleft treatment based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Method. Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results. A scarce number of RCTs were found approaching cleft treatment. The experimental clinical approaches analyzed in the 28 articles were infant orthopedics, rectal acetaminophen, palatal bloc...

  20. Congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts

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    Nahvi H.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Oral clefts are among the most common congenital anomalies. Infants with oral clefts often have other associated congenital defects, especially congenital heart defects. The reported incidences and the types of associated malformations and congenital heart defects vary between different studies. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of associated congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts. Methods: All infants with cleft lip and palate referred to the Children's Medical Center and Bahramy; the teaching Hospitals of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences from 1991 to 2005 were prospectively enrolled in this study group. All patients were examined and noted by an academic cleft team contain; a pediatrician and a pediatric surgeon, and received cardiac consultation and echocardiography by a pediatric cardiologist. non cardiac associated anomalies, still born and patients without echocardiography were excluded from the study.  Data including age, gender, exposure to contagions and high risk elements ,consanguinity and familial history of oral cleft, type of oral cleft, results of cardiac consultation and echocardiography and associated cardiac anomalies were cumulated and analyzed by SSPS version 13.5Results: Among the 284 infants with oral clefts, 162 were male (57% and 122 were female (43%. Seventy-nine patients (27.8% had cleft lip, 84 (29.5% had cleft palate and 121 (42.6% had both cleft lip and palate. Of all the patients, 21.1% had congenital heart defects. the most common type Of these congenital heart defects(28.3%  was atrial septal defect.Conclusions: For patients with cleft lip and palate, we recommend preoperative cardiac consultation, careful examination and routine echocardiography for associated cardiac anomalies, as well as appropriate management and prophylactic antibiotic therapy for those with associated congenital heart anomaly.

  1. Dating brittle tectonic movements with cleft monazite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Gnos, E.; Janots, E.

    2013-01-01

    . Interaction of cleft-filling hydrothermal fluid with wall-rock results in REE mineral formation-/crystallisation and alteration of the wall-rock. The main newly-formed REE-minerals are Y-Si mineral grains (probably tombarthite), a Y-Nb-Ti mineral (aeschynite/pyrochlore) and monazite. Despite......Two millimeter-sized hydrothermal monazites from a cleft that developed late during a dextral transpressional deformation event in the Aar Massif, Switzerland, have been investigated using EMP and ion probe. The monazites are characterised by high Th/U ratios typical of other hydrothermal monazites...... these mineralogical changes, the bulk chemistry of the system remains constant at the decimetre scale and thus these mineralogical changes require redistribution of elements via a fluid over short distances (cm). Low-grade alteration enables local redistribution of REE, related to the stability of the accessory...

  2. Oronasal fistula in cleft palate surgery

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    Sadhu Partha

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Oronasal fistula (ONF is the commonest complication associated with cleft palate surgery. The main symptoms associated with ONF are nasal regurgitation of food matter and hypernasality of voice. Repair of cleft palate under tension is considered to be the main reason of ONF though vascular accidents and infection can also be the cause. Most of the ONFs are situated in the hard palate or at the junction of hard and soft palate. Repair of ONF depends on its site, size and mode of presentation. A whole spectrum of surgical procedures starting from small local flaps to microvascular tissue transfers have been employed for closure of ONF. Recurrence rate of ONF is 25% on an average after the first attempt of repair.

  3. Concordance between allele-specific PCR and ultra-deep pyrosequencing for the detection of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Gillian M; Morris, Lynn; Moorthy, Anitha; Coovadia, Ashraf; Abrams, Elaine J; Strehlau, Renate; Kuhn, Louise; Persaud, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping technologies have allowed for detection of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations present at low levels. The presence and percentage of Y181C and K103N drug-resistant variants in the blood of 105 subtype C HIV-infected infants who failed single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis for HIV transmission were compared using two highly sensitive genotyping methods, allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) and ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Significant correlations in detection between both methods were found for both Y181C (correlation coefficients of 0.94 [95% CI 0.91-0.96]) and K103N (0.89 [95% CI 0.84 – 0.92]) mutations. The majority of discordant specimens (3/5 Y181C and 8/11 K103N) had wild-type variants when population sequencing was used, but mutant variants were detectable at very low levels (≤5%) with either assay. This difference is most likely due to stochastic variations in the appearance of mutant variants. Overall, both AS-PCR and ultra-deep pyrosequencing methods have proven to be sensitive and accurate, and may confidently be used where feasible. PMID:25034127

  4. Acute Liver Failure and Hepatic Encephalopathy After Cleft Palate Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaaslan, Nihal Durmuş; Tuncer, Fatma Betul; Tutar, Engin; Celebiler, Ozhan

    2015-09-01

    Paracetamol is the most commonly used analgesic after cleft palate repair. It has rarely caused acute hepatic failure at therapeutic or supratherapeutic doses. Only one case of therapeutic paracetamol toxicity after cleft palate repair had been reported previously. Here, we present a similar patient who developed acute liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy after an uncomplicated cleft palate surgery. Lack of large prospective trials in young children due to ethical concerns increases the value of the case reports of acetaminophen toxicity at therapeutic doses. The dosing recommendations of paracetamol may need to be reconsidered after cleft palate surgery.

  5. Ectodermal dysplasias associated with clefting: significance of scalp dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosko, S W; Stenn, K S; Bolognia, J L

    1992-08-01

    Several clinical syndromes are characterized by ectodermal dysplasia (ED) in association with clefting of the lip and/or palate. The three most commonly recognized entities are (1) the EEC syndrome (ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly, cleft lip/palate); (2) the Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome with ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate, and mid facial hypoplasia; and (3) the Hay-Wells or AEC syndrome (ankyloblepharon, ectodermal defects, cleft lip/palate). The clinical characteristics of these entities as well as several less common syndromes are reviewed and summarized. The presence of scalp dermatitis in patients with the AEC syndrome and less often the Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome is emphasized.

  6. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reema Sharma Dhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the triad of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia, and facial clefting along with some associated features. Presence of all the three major features in a single individual is extremely rare. We report a case of 4 year 11 months old child with EEC syndrome having ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and cleft palate and ectrodactyly with some associated features. Clinical features, diagnosis and role of a dentist in the multidisciplinary treatment approach have been elaborated in this case report.

  7. The development of speech production in children with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Chapman, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of speech development of children with cleft palate +/- cleft lip. The chapter will begin with a discussion of the impact of clefting on speech. Next, we will provide a brief description of those factors impacting speech development...... for this population of children. Finally, research examining various aspects of speech development of infants and young children with cleft palate (birth to age five) will be reviewed. This final section will be organized by typical stages of speech sound development (e.g., prespeech, the early word stage...

  8. Modified technique of presurgical infant maxillary orthopedics for complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hyeran; Maguire, Meg; Low, David W

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a modified device fabrication and facial taping method that increases the efficiency and efficacy of presurgical infant maxillary orthopedic therapy for babies born with complete cleft lip and palate. Interarch and intra-arch relationships of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches were evaluated on mounted stone models before and after treatment. The palatal plate device was custom-fabricated in a manner that bypassed the need for periodic acrylic addition and removal, thereby eliminating the risk of natural maxillary growth restriction during therapy. Elastic labial tapes were fabricated and applied in a configuration that mimicked normal function of the orbicularis oris muscle. A nasal stent wire was utilized from the initiation of therapy to enhance intraoral retention and stability of the device. Examples of infants undergoing a unilateral complete cleft lip and palate treatment protocol are presented. Treatment objectives were achieved within 7 to 8 weeks of therapy for patients who had an initial alveolar cleft size more than 10 to 12 mm. The modified protocol of presurgical infant maxillary orthopedic therapy is an effective and efficient treatment modality in reversing the pre-existing orofacial dysmorphism by redirecting the infant's natural growth.

  9. Cleft lip-cleft palate in Zimbabwe: estimating the distribution of the surgical burden of disease using geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Travis T; Shaye, David; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Mehdezadeh, Omid; Mahomva, Leonard; Chidzonga, Midion

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and unmet need for cleft lip-cleft palate reconstructive surgery by using incidence. Our hypotheses were that the age of presentation to screening clinics will decrease between 2006 and 2012, and the geospatial distribution of cases will expand to a more rural catchment area. Longitudinal cross-sectional/geospatial distribution study. An online, secure database was created from intake forms for children with cleft lip-cleft palate (N=604) in Zimbabwe (2006-2012). Univariate analysis was completed. A linear regression model was fitted to test the time trend of a child's age at the time of presentation. Unique patient addresses (n=411) were matched. Maps presenting cleft diagnosis and presentation year were created with geographic information systems (GIS) software. The median age of presentation was greater for isolated cleft palate (4.2 years, n=106) than isolated cleft lip (1.5 years, n=251) and cleft lip-cleft palate (2.0 years, n=175). Cleft lip cases were mostly left sided with equal gender distribution. The overall age of presentation remained stable (P=.83). The age of children with isolated cleft palate decreased by 0.8 years per surgical trip (P=.01), suggesting the prevalence of unrepaired cleft palate is decreasing due to local and visiting surgeons. The catchment area extended to a less populous area, but clustered around Harare and Bulawayo. This study gives Zimbabwe-specific evidence that supports reports of the persistent burden of disease requiring attention. The GIS software provided data for the primary needs assessment, which will direct communication to healthcare providers and prospective patients outside of the current catchment area. 3 © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Effects of lip repair on maxillofacial morphology in patients with unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qinghua; Chen, Zhengxi; Yang, Yang; Chen, Zhenqi

    2014-11-01

    Objective : To evaluate the effects of lip repair on maxillofacial development of patients with unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Design : Retrospective. Patients : A total of 75 patients were recruited, including 38 surgical patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and 37 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate who had lip but not palate repair. As controls, 38 patients with no cleft were selected. All subjects were divided according to two growth stages: before the pubertal peak (GS1) and after the pubertal peak (GS2). Interventions : Lateral cephalograms of all subjects were obtained. Main Outcome Measures : Cephalograms were analyzed and compared in the study and control groups. Results : The patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate in both GS1 and GS2 demonstrated an almost normal maxillary and mandibular growth with retroclined maxillary incisors. The patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate showed a shorter length of maxilla, a more clockwise-rotated mandible, and retroclined maxillary incisors. Conclusions : There was an almost normal maxillary and mandibular growth but retroclined maxillary incisors in patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate who had received lip repair only, indicating that lip repair may not have a negative impact on the maxillofacial development and influences only the inclination of the maxillary incisors. The shorter anterior-posterior maxillary length and larger gonial angle in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate compared with those in patients with unilateral cleft lip and alveolus suggest that these variations in maxillary and mandibular growth may be a consequence of the cleft itself.

  11. PVRL1 as a Candidate Gene for Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip With or Without Cleft Palate: No Evidence for the Involvement of Common or Rare Variants in Southern Han Chinese Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong-Qiu; Huang, En-Min; Xu, Ming-Yan; Shu, Shen-You

    2012-01-01

    The poliovirus receptor related-1 (PVRL1) gene encodes nectin-1, a cell–cell adhesion molecule (OMIM #600644), and is mutated in the cleft lip with or without cleft palate/ectodermal dysplasia-1 syndrome (CLPED1, OMIM #225000). In addition, PVRL1 mutations have been associated with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without a cleft palate (NSCL/P) in studies of multiethnic samples. To investigate the possible involvement of this gene in southern Han Chinese NSCL/P patients, we performed (i) a case–control association study, and (ii) a resequencing study. A set of 470 patients with NSCL/P and 693 controls were recruited, and a total of 45 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In the resequencing study, the coding regions of the PVRL1 α isoform were direct sequenced in 45 trios from multiply affected families. One (rs7128327) of the 45 tested SNPs showed a trend toward statistical significance in the genotypic-level chi-square test (p=0.009567). However, this result did not withstand correction for multiple testing. Likewise, sliding window haplotype analyses consisting of two, three, or four SNPs failed to detect any positive association. Resequencing analysis also failed to identify any novel rare sequence variants. In conclusion, the present study provided no support for the hypothesis that common or rare variants in PVRL1 play a significant role in NSCL/P development in the southern Han Chinese population. This is the first study that has used tagging SNPs covering all the coding and noncoding regions to search for common NSCL/P-associated mutations of PVRL1. PMID:22455396

  12. Reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor resistant mutations in art treatment naïve and treated HIV-1 infected children in India A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Bure,

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of first line and second line antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the quality of life and survival of the HIV-1 infected individuals. Extension of this therapy in children has similar effect. However the emergence of drug selected resistance has hampered the response to the therapy. A database of prevalence of drug resistance mutations in the Indian children both ART naïve and treated will help in deciding the appropriate regimen for the individual patient as well as formulating the policies regarding the composition of drugs included in the fixed dose combinations and its periodic review by analysis of the information that is made available from time to time. This will enable us to utilize our limited resources in most prudent way.

  13. Craniofacial Morphology and Growth Comparisons in Children With Robin Sequence, Isolated Cleft Palate, and Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip and Palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, N. V.; Kreiborg, S.; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Comparison of early craniofacial morphology and growth in children with nonsyndromic Robin Sequence (RS), isolated cleft palate (ICP), and unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCCLP). Subjects: One hundred eight children with cleft: 7 with RS, 53 with ICP, and 48 with UCCLP were...... included in the study. The children were drawn from the group of all Danish children with cleft born 1976 through 1981. Method: Three-projection infant cephalometry. Results: The craniofacial morphology in the RS, ICP, and UCCLP groups had some common characteristics: a wide maxilla with decreased length...

  14. Gonioscopically Guided Nonpenetrating Cyclodialysis Cleft Repair: A Novel Surgical Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ian AS; Shah, Brinda; Goyal, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim We present a novel surgical technique for repair of persistent and symptomatic cyclodialysis clefts refractory to conservative or minimally invasive treatment. Background Numerous surgical techniques have been described to close cyclodialysis clefts. The current standard approach involves intraocular repair of cyclodialysis clefts underneath a full-thickness scleral flap. Technique Our technique employs intraoperative use of a direct gonioscope to guide a nonpenetrating surgical repair. Subsequently, a significantly less invasive, nonpenetrating technique utilizing a partial-thickness scleral flap can be performed that reduces potential risks associated with intraocular surgery. The direct gonioscope is also used for confirmation of adequate surgical closure of the cyclodialysis cleft prior to completion of surgery. This technique has been successfully carried out to repair traumatic chronic cyclodialysis clefts associated with hypotony in two patients. There were no significant adverse events as a result of using this technique. Conclusion The novel technique described increases the likelihood of successful and permanent repair of cyclodialysis clefts with resolution of symptoms associated with hypotony, through direct intraoperative visualization of the cleft. Clinical significance Gonioscopically guided nonpenetrating cyclodialysis cleft repair offers significant benefits over previously described techniques. Advantages of our technique include gonioscopic cleft visualization, enabling accurate localization of the area requiring repair, and subsequent confirmation of adequate closure of the cleft. Using a partial-thickness scleral flap is also less invasive and reduces risks associated with treatment of this potentially challenging complication of ocular trauma. How to cite this article Rodrigues IAS, Shah B, Goyal S, Lim S. Gonioscopically Guided Nonpenetrating Cyclodialysis Cleft Repair: A Novel Surgical Technique. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2017

  15. Distinct DNA methylation profiles in subtypes of orofacial cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Gemma C; Ho, Karen; Davies, Amy; Stergiakouli, Evie; Humphries, Kerry; McArdle, Wendy; Sandy, Jonathan; Davey Smith, George; Lewis, Sarah J; Relton, Caroline L

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic data could help identify risk factors for orofacial clefts, either by revealing a causal role for epigenetic mechanisms in causing clefts or by capturing information about causal genetic or environmental factors. Given the evidence that different subtypes of orofacial cleft have distinct aetiologies, we explored whether children with different cleft subtypes showed distinct epigenetic profiles. In whole-blood samples from 150 children from the Cleft Collective cohort study, we measured DNA methylation at over 450,000 sites on the genome. We then carried out epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) to test the association between methylation at each site and cleft subtype (cleft lip only (CLO) n = 50; cleft palate only (CPO) n = 50; cleft lip and palate (CLP) n = 50). We also compared methylation in the blood to methylation in the lip or palate tissue using genome-wide data from the same 150 children and conducted an EWAS of CLO compared to CLP in lip tissue. We found four genomic regions in blood differentially methylated in CLO compared to CLP, 17 in CPO compared to CLP and 294 in CPO compared to CLO. Several regions mapped to genes that have previously been implicated in the development of orofacial clefts (for example, TBX1, COL11A2, HOXA2, PDGFRA), and over 250 associations were novel. Methylation in blood correlated with that in lip/palate at some regions. There were 14 regions differentially methylated in the lip tissue from children with CLO and CLP, with one region (near KIAA0415) showing up in both the blood and lip EWAS. Our finding of distinct methylation profiles in different orofacial cleft (OFC) subtypes represents a promising first step in exploring the potential role of epigenetic modifications in the aetiology of OFCs and/or as clinically useful biomarkers of OFC subtypes.

  16. A study of nasal cavity volume in patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Kenichi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    Nasal cavity volume was studied in 11 patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging. The areas of horizontal sections of the nasal cavity on the cleft and non-cleft sides were measured with the help of a personal computer and image analyzing software. Nasal cavity volume was determined by integrated volume calculation. The volume of each side was measured before and after cleft lip repair. Before cleft lip repair nasal cavity volume on the non-cleft side was larger than on the cleft side. However there was no significant difference in the volume of the cleft and non-cleft sides after cleft lip repair. (author)

  17. Genetics and Management of the Patient with Orofacial Cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Abreu Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip or palate (CL/P is a common facial defect present in 1 : 700 live births and results in substantial burden to patients. There are more than 500 CL/P syndromes described, the causes of which may be single-gene mutations, chromosomopathies, and exposure to teratogens. Part of the most prevalent syndromic CL/P has known etiology. Nonsyndromic CL/P, on the other hand, is a complex disorder, whose etiology is still poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies have contributed to the elucidation of the genetic causes, by raising reproducible susceptibility genetic variants; their etiopathogenic roles, however, are difficult to predict, as in the case of the chromosomal region 8q24, the most corroborated locus predisposing to nonsyndromic CL/P. Knowing the genetic causes of CL/P will directly impact the genetic counseling, by estimating precise recurrence risks, and the patient management, since the patient, followup may be partially influenced by their genetic background. This paper focuses on the genetic causes of important syndromic CL/P forms (van der Woude syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, and Robin sequence-associated syndromes and depicts the recent findings in nonsyndromic CL/P research, addressing issues in the conduct of the geneticist.

  18. Influence of the Alveolar Cleft Type on Preoperative Estimation Using 3D CT Assessment for Alveolar Cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Suk Choi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe bone graft for the alveolar cleft has been accepted as one of the essential treatments for cleft lip patients. Precise preoperative measurement of the architecture and size of the bone defect in alveolar cleft has been considered helpful for increasing the success rate of bone grafting because those features may vary with the cleft type. Recently, some studies have reported on the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D computed tomography (CT assessment of alveolar bone defect; however, no study on the possible implication of the cleft type on the difference between the presumed and actual value has been conducted yet. We aimed to evaluate the clinical predictability of such measurement using 3D CT assessment according to the cleft type.MethodsThe study consisted of 47 pediatric patients. The subjects were divided according to the cleft type. CT was performed before the graft operation and assessed using image analysis software. The statistical significance of the difference between the preoperative estimation and intraoperative measurement was analyzed.ResultsThe difference between the preoperative and intraoperative values were -0.1±0.3 cm3 (P=0.084. There was no significant intergroup difference, but the groups with a cleft palate showed a significant difference of -0.2±0.3 cm3 (P<0.05.ConclusionsAssessment of the alveolar cleft volume using 3D CT scan data and image analysis software can help in selecting the optimal graft procedure and extracting the correct volume of cancellous bone for grafting. Considering the cleft type, it would be helpful to extract an additional volume of 0.2 cm3 in the presence of a cleft palate.

  19. The cleft-columellar angle: a useful variable to describe the unilateral cleft lip-associated nasal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Noah E; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Capone, Randolph B

    2013-01-01

    Objective : To study a method for quantification of the severity of either the unilateral cleft lip deformity or the associated cleft nasal deformity. A standard method would be useful for defining surgical outcomes. Design : Using a developed rating questionnaire and patient photographs, 26 nonexpert volunteers rated 14 children with untreated unilateral cleft lip according to the severity of their overall deformity, as well as the individual lip and nose deformities. The cleft-columellar angle was measured as defined by the intersection of a line in the parasagittal plane and a line perpendicular to the columellar base along the midcolumellar line. The association between deformity ratings and the cleft-columellar angle was modeled using mixed-model regression analysis. Setting : Tertiary care academic medical center. Results : After accounting for within-rater and within-child effects, the cleft-columellar angle explained a statistically significant portion of the variance in the rated severity for lip deformity (49%, p  =  .0012), nasal deformity (57%, p  =  .0001), and overall deformity (57%, p  =  .0005). Conclusions : Measurement of the cleft-columellar angle in two-dimensional digital photography is simple and correlative, capturing a substantial portion of nonexpert severity ratings of the constellation of deformities seen with the unilateral cleft lip deformity. Given its ease of application, the cleft-columellar angle is a useful variable in the description of the unilateral cleft lip deformity and may find utility across institutions as cleft surgeons seek to advance surgical care through outcomes research.

  20. Long-term replacement of a mutated nonfunctional CNS gene: reversal of hypothalamic diabetes insipidus using an EIAV-based lentiviral vector expressing arginine vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienemann, Alison S; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Cosgrave, Anna S; Glover, Colin P J; Wong, Liang-Fong; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Uney, James B

    2003-05-01

    Due to the complexity of brain function and the difficulty in monitoring alterations in neuronal gene expression, the potential of lentiviral gene therapy vectors to treat disorders of the CNS has been difficult to fully assess. In this study, we have assessed the utility of a third-generation equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in the Brattleboro rat model of diabetes insipidus, in which a mutation in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene results in the production of nonfunctional mutant AVP precursor protein. Importantly, by using this model it is possible to monitor the success of the gene therapy treatment by noninvasive assays. Injection of an EIAV-CMV-AVP vector into the supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus resulted in expression of functional AVP peptide in magnocellular neurons. This was accompanied by a 100% recovery in water homeostasis as assessed by daily water intake, urine production, and urine osmolality lasting for a 1-year measurement period. These data show that a single gene defect leading to a neurological disorder can be corrected with a lentiviral-based strategy. This study highlights the potential of using viral gene therapy for the long-term treatment of disorders of the CNS.

  1. Reverse Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was focused on the analysis of the concept of reverse logistics and actual reverse processes which are implemented in mining industry and finding solutions for the optimization of reverse logistics in this sphere. The objective of this paper was the assessment of the development of reverse logistics in mining industry on the example of potash production. The theoretical part was based on reverse logistics and mining waste related literature and provided foundations for further...

  2. Prenetal Detection of Oral Clefts : Diagnostic, Genetic and Ethical Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarse, W.

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of routine prenatal screening with ultrasound in the Netherlands in 2007, parents are confronted with the diagnosis of oral cleft (OC) already during pregnancy. This imposed a new dimension in cleft care in the Netherlands. As a consequence to increasing prenatal detection rat

  3. Nutrition and Genes in the Development of Orofacial Clefting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krapels, I.P.C.; Vermeij-Keers, C.; Müller, M.R.; Klein, A.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Clefts of the lip, alveolus, and/or palate, which are called orofacial clefts (OFC), occur in 0.5 to 3 per 1000 live and stillbirths. The pathogenesis of these congenital malformations remains largely unknown, but evidence is increasing that both nutritional and genetic factors are involved. Unlike

  4. Lexical selectivity in danish toddlers with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2013-07-01

    Objective : To study if Danish children with cleft palate display lexical selectivity in their early lexicon at 18 months of age. Design : A cross-sectional study. Participants : Thirty-four children with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 35 children without cleft palate, matched for gender and age. Methods : All participants were video recorded at 18 months of age during play interaction with a parent. The video recordings were transcribed according to the International Phonetic Alphabet and an individual consonant inventory was established for each participant. The video recordings were also analyzed with respect to word productions, establishing an observed productive vocabulary size for each participant. Results : At 18 months of age Danish children with cleft palate showed marked lexical selectivity in their early words. The distribution of consonant classes observed at 11 months of age in a previous study of the children with cleft palate was almost perfectly reflected in their early lexicon at 18 months. The early lexicon of children with cleft palate differed from the early lexicon of their noncleft peers. Conclusions and Implications : Danish toddlers with cleft palate display lexical selectivity in the early lexicon as it has been described for English-speaking toddlers with and without cleft palate, even though some qualitative differences were found.

  5. Prevalence of congenital heart diseases in oral cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, M M; Rocha, C M G; Katina, T; Caldas, M; Codorniz, A; Medeiros, C

    2003-01-01

    To establish the prevalence of congenital heart diseases (CHDs) in cleft patients, the type of cleft and the presence of a syndrome were coded in 220 patients. A Doppler echocardiogram with color-flow mapping (DE) was obtained in all patients. Mean age was 112.0 +/- 101.2 months (range, 1-576 months), and 56.8% (125) were males. Cleft lip and palate occurred in 144 patients (65.5%), cleft lip in 40 (18.2%), and cleft palate in 36 (16.4%). Cleft palates were more frequent among females. Twenty-four CHDs were diagnosed in 21 of 220 patients (9.5%): 7 mitral valve prolapses, 6 atrial septal defects, 4 patent ductus arteriosus, 3 ventricular septal defects, 2 cases of tetralogy of Fallot, 1 pulmonary stenosis, and 1 bicuspid aortic valve. The presence of CHD did not correlate with the type of cleft. Syndromes occurred in 28 patients (12.7%), and this association was higher among patients with a cleft palate.

  6. Smile Train: The ascendancy of cleft care in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Subodh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Though India has an estimated population of one million untreated cleft patients, facilities for its treatment have been limited and are not evenly distributed across the country. Furthermore, a paucity of committed cleft surgeons in fewer hospitals to provide quality surgical treatment to these patients, poverty, illiteracy, superstitions and poor connectivity in some remote regions severely limit the chances of an average cleft lip patient born in India from receiving rational and effective comprehensive treatment for his/her malady. The Smile Train Project with its singular focus on cleft patients started its philanthropic activities in India in the year 2000. It made hospitals and included clefts surgeon equal partners in this programme and helped them treat as many cleft patients as they possibly could. The Project encouraged improvement of the training and infrastructure in various centres across the length and breadth of the region. The Project received an unprecedented success in terms of growth of number of centres, cleft surgeons and quantum of cleft patients reporting for treatment. The G S Memorial Hospital is one such partner hospital. It started innovative outreach programmes and took a holistic view of the needs of these patients and their families. With the support of the Smile Train, it has not only succeeded in providing treatment to more than 14,500 patients in 5 years, but has also devised innovative outreach programmes and seamlessly incorporated salient changes in the hospital system to suit the needs of the target population.

  7. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  8. The nose in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.D.A. Verwoerd (Carel); R. Mladina (R.); G.J. Nolst-Trenité (Gilbert J.); R.W. Pigott (R.)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSurgeons and orthodontists are still challenged to achieve ‘better’ noses for children with a unilateral cleft or lip, alveolus and palate (UCLP). Various aspects are discussed: infant anatomy and later changes, developmental mechanics, cleft syndrome in animals with surgically produced

  9. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  10. Transverse facial cleft: A series of 17 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L K Makhija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transverse facial cleft (Tessier type 7 or congenital macrostomia is a rare congenital anomaly seldom occurring alone and is frequently associated with deformities of the structures developing from the first and second branchial arches. The reported incidence of No. 7 cleft varies from 1 in 60,000 to 1 in 300,000 live births. Material and Methods: Seventeen patients of transeverse facial cleft who presented to us in last 5 years were included in the study. Their history regarding familial and environmental predispositions was recorded. The cases were analysed on basis of sex, laterality, severity, associated anomalies and were graded according to severity. They were operated by z plasty technique and were followed up for 2 years to look for effectiveness of the technique and its complications. Result: Out of the seventeen patients of transverse cleft, none had familial predilection or any environmental etiology like antenatal radiological exposure or intake of drugs of teratogenic potential. Most of the patients (9/17 were associated with hemifacial microsomia and 1 patient was associated with Treacher Colin′s Syndrome. Out of the 6 cases of Grade I clefts, 4 were isolated transverse clefts and of the 10 patients of Grade II clefts, 7 were associated with hemifacial microsomia. We encountered only one case of Grade III Transverse Cleft which was not only associated with hemifacial microsomia but also had cardiac anomaly. Out of the17 cases, 15 were operated and in most of them the outcome was satisfactory.

  11. #Cleft: The Use of Social Media Amongst Parents of Infants with Clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouri, Joseph S; McCheyne, Melisande J; Morrison, Clinton S

    2017-01-13

      Many societies and organizations are using social media to reach their target audience. The extent to which parents of patients with craniofacial anomalies use social media has yet to be determined. The goal of this study is to characterize and describe the use of social media by the parents of children with cleft lip and palate as it pertains to the care of their child.   Parents or guardian of all patients presenting for initial consultation regarding a child's congenital cleft anomaly were contacted by phone or mail to complete a survey regarding their use of social media vis-à-vis their child's cleft anomaly. Participants were asked to answer a 19-question survey.   Thirty-two families were contacted and 25 surveys were completed. Ninety-two percent of respondents used social media to learn about their child's diagnosis. Facebook (76%) and blogs (24%) were the most commonly accessed social media outlets, followed by Instagram (8%). Education about the diagnosis and treatment of cleft pathology (87%) was the most common reason for accessing social media, followed by companionship and support (56%), and advice about perioperative care (52%). Almost half (43%) of parents used social media to obtain information on their caregiver and treatment team, and 26% of parents used information gained on social media to guide their decision on where to seek care.   Social media is a readily available resource, one that will certainly shape the experiences of our patients and families for years to come.

  12. Cross-linguistic perspectives on speech assessment in cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Henningsson, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with cross linguistic perspectives that need to be taken into account when comparing speech assessment and speech outcome obtained from cleft palate speakers of different languages. Firstly, an overview of consonants and vowels vulnerable to the cleft condition is presented. Then......, consequences for assessment of cleft palate speech by native versus non-native speakers of a language are discussed, as well as the use of phonemic versus phonetic transcription in cross linguistic studies. Specific recommendations for the construction of speech samples in cross linguistic studies are given....... Finally, the influence of different languages on some aspects of language acquisition in young children with cleft palate is presented and discussed. Until recently, not much has been written about cross linguistic perspectives when dealing with cleft palate speech. Most literature about assessment...

  13. Protocols in Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ladeira, Pedro Ribeiro Soares; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To find clinical decisions on cleft treatment based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Method. Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results. A scarce number of RCTs were found approaching cleft treatment. The experimental clinical approaches analyzed in the 28 articles were infant orthopedics, rectal acetaminophen, palatal block with bupivacaine, infraorbital nerve block with bupivacaine, osteogenesis distraction, intravenous dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and alveoloplasty with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Conclusions. Few randomized controlled trials were found approaching cleft treatment, and fewer related to surgical repair of this deformity. So there is a need for more multicenter collaborations, mainly on surgical area, to reduce the variety of treatment modalities and to ensure that the cleft patient receives an evidence-based clinical practice. PMID:23213503

  14. Protocols in Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ribeiro Soares de Ladeira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To find clinical decisions on cleft treatment based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Method. Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results. A scarce number of RCTs were found approaching cleft treatment. The experimental clinical approaches analyzed in the 28 articles were infant orthopedics, rectal acetaminophen, palatal block with bupivacaine, infraorbital nerve block with bupivacaine, osteogenesis distraction, intravenous dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and alveoloplasty with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2. Conclusions. Few randomized controlled trials were found approaching cleft treatment, and fewer related to surgical repair of this deformity. So there is a need for more multicenter collaborations, mainly on surgical area, to reduce the variety of treatment modalities and to ensure that the cleft patient receives an evidence-based clinical practice.

  15. Spectrographic analysis of pain cry in neonates with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsson, K; Sirviö, P; Koivisto, M; Sovijärvi, A; Wasz-Höckert, O

    1975-01-01

    52 phonations of 13 cleft palate neonates were analyzed by sound spectrographic methods. 17 phonetical attributes were included in the study and the first signal after the pain stimulus was analyzed. The cries of the cleft palate infants were compared with the crying of 75 normal babies of the same age. No change in the fundamental frequency, melody type and duration of the cries was seen in association with these anatomical defects. Two of the characteristics studied, vibrato and the 'tonal pit', occurred significantly more often in cries of the cleft palate infants than in cries of the control series. The changes in the qualities seen in association with cleft palate and/or cleft lip do not mimic the abnormalities produced by brain damage.

  16. Epidemiology of orofacial clefts in Africa: Methodological challenges in ascertainment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mossey

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:To carry out a systematic review of the birth prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP and cleft palate (CP in Africa based on available published data. Methods:Using the Cochrane search strategy and the following keywords words “cleft palate”, “prevalence”, “incidence”, “cleft lip” and “Africa” to screen Ovid Medline (1966 to March 2007, Cinahl (1982-March 2007, Pub Med, Scopus, and Web-Google. All identified published, prospective and retrospective studies on the birth prevalence of CLP and CP in Africa were included. The dates, location, sources, number of births (live births, still births, number of cleft cases, prevalence rates, sex ratio, cleft types, and clefts with associated anomalies were extracted. Results:Ascertainment of cases was through the hospitals. Overall there were 57 CL/P, 56 CL and 36 CP reported from all the studies. From seven studies combined, 21 males and 20 females had CL, 10 males and 22 females with CP and 26 males and 24 females with CL/P. There were 3 cases with CL/P, 2 with CP and 2 with CL from the three studies that reported clefts with associated anomalies. Conclusion:For an improved ascertainment of cleft cases, there is a need to set up a birth defects surveillance system in the form of a national birth registry. Future studies should then aim to include the entire population in geographically defined regions. Reliable data on incidence is an essential pre-requisite for studies into aetiology and prevention.

  17. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhaib, Mohammed; Bonanthaya, Krishnamurthy; Parmar, Renu; Shetty, Pritham N; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM) is a non-surgical method of reshaping the cleft lip, alveolus, palate and the nose to minimize the severity of the cleft deformity, before primary cheiloplastyand palatoplasty. In this context, PNAM proves to be an invaluable asset in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate. The study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PNAM in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate with the following objectives: (1) To assess and compare the degree of reduction in the size of cleft palate and alveolus (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (2) To evaluate and compare the improvement in columellar length and correction of columellar deviation (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (3) To assess the changes in the position of the alar base and the alar cartilages. Prospective study. A prospective study consisting of, which included 20 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate was conducted. The age at the start of PNAM treatment of the infants ranged from 2 to 44 days of age reporting to our institute between December 2011 and August 2013. All the patients underwent PNAM therapy before primary cheiloplasty at 6 months of age; clinical parameters were assessed pre- and post-therapy using photographs and dental study models of the maxilla. Student's t-test for paired comparisons. Results of the study showed a promising reduction in the cleft size before the surgery, significant improvement in nasal symmetry, including the columellar length on the cleft side. PNAM is a valuable adjunct to our surgical armamentarium in dealing with the challenges of primary closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate thereby enhancing the overall surgical outcome. The advantages of this method include the simplicity of the procedure and improving the quality of surgical repair, particularly in obtaining tension free muscle closure in unilateral clefts.

  18. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM is a non-surgical method of reshaping the cleft lip, alveolus, palate and the nose to minimize the severity of the cleft deformity, before primary cheiloplastyand palatoplasty. In this context, PNAM proves to be an invaluable asset in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate. Aims: The study was conducted to evaluate the effi cacy of PNAM in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate with the following objectives: (1 To assess and compare the degree of reduction in the size of cleft palate and alveolus (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM. (2 To evaluate and compare the improvement in columellar length and correction of columellar deviation (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM. (3 To assess the changes in the position of the alar base and the alar cartilages. Settings and Design: Prospective study. Subjects and Methods: A prospective study consisting of, which included 20 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate was conducted. The age at the start of PNAM treatment of the infants ranged from 2 to 44 days of age reporting to our institute between December 2011 and August 2013. All the patients underwent PNAM therapy before primary cheiloplasty at 6 months of age; clinical parameters were assessed pre- and post-therapy using photographs and dental study models of the maxilla. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test for paired comparisons. Results: Results of the study showed a promising reduction in the cleft size before the surgery, signifi cant improvement in nasal symmetry, including the columellar length on the cleft side. Conclusions: PNAM is a valuable adjunct to our surgical armamentarium in dealing with the challenges of primary closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate thereby enhancing the overall surgical outcome. The advantages of this method include the simplicity of the procedure and improving the quality of surgical repair, particularly in obtaining tension free muscle

  19. Key susceptibility locus for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate on chromosome 8q24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birnbaum, Stefanie; Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Reutter, Heiko; Herms, Stefan; Steffens, Michael; Rubini, Michele; Baluardo, Carlotta; Ferrian, Melissa; de Assis, Nilma Almeida; Alblas, Margrieta A.; Barth, Sandra; Freudenberg, Jan; Lauster, Carola; Schmidt, Guel; Scheer, Martin; Braumann, Bert; Berge, Stefaan J.; Reich, Rudolf H.; Schiefke, Franziska; Hemprich, Alexander; Poetzsch, Simone; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P.; Poetzsch, Bernd; Moebus, Susanne; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Wienker, Thomas F.; Mossey, Peter A.; Propping, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Hoffmann, Per; Knapp, Michael; Noethen, Markus M.; Mangold, Elisabeth

    We conducted a genome-wide association study involving 224 cases and 383 controls of Central European origin to identify susceptibility loci for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P). A 640-kb region at chromosome 8q24.21 was found to contain multiple markers with highly

  20. The Effects of Secondary Cleft Procedures on Alar Base Position and Nostril Morphology in Patients with Unilateral Clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Stephanie M; Matic, Damir B

    2017-07-01

    To compare effects of secondary cleft procedures on alar base position and nostril morphology. Retrospective review. Multidisciplinary cleft clinic at tertiary center. Seventy consecutive patients with unilateral clefts were grouped according to secondary procedure. Alveolar bone graft versus total lip takedown with anatomic muscle repair versus single-stage total lip with cleft septorhinoplasty (nose-lip) versus rhinoplasty alone. Anthropometric measurements were recorded from pre- and postoperative photographs. Ratios of cleft to noncleft side were compared within and across groups pre- and postoperatively using parametric and nonparametric tests. Within the bone graft group, no differences were seen postoperatively in alar base position in long-term follow-up. The total lip group demonstrated greater symmetry at the alar base (P alar base support (P alar base symmetry on worm's-eye view (P Alar base asymmetry in patients with unilateral clefts may be related to soft tissue deficiency and was not affected by alveolar bone grafting. Total lip takedown with anatomic muscle reapproximation was associated with increased alar base symmetry and vertical lip dimension on cleft to noncleft side. Greatest symmetry at the alar base was seen following single-stage nose-lip reconstruction, which may be an effective technique for correcting the secondary cleft lip nasal deformity.

  1. Assessment of nostril symmetry after primary cleft rhinoplasty in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, S.G.; Devarakonda, V.; Reddy, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the nostril symmetry following primary cleft rhinoplasty done with either a dorsal onlay or columellar strut graft in patients with non-syndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. In this retrospective study 30 consecutive patients treated with autogenous

  2. Assessment of nostril symmetry after primary cleft rhinoplasty in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, S.G.; Devarakonda, V.; Reddy, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the nostril symmetry following primary cleft rhinoplasty done with either a dorsal onlay or columellar strut graft in patients with non-syndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. In this retrospective study 30 consecutive patients treated with autogenous

  3. Imputation of orofacial clefting data identifies novel risk loci and sheds light on the genetic background of cleft lip ± cleft palate and cleft palate only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, Anne C.; Bowes, John; Nikolić, Miloš; Ishorst, Nina; Wyatt, Niki; Hammond, Nigel L.; Gölz, Lina; Thieme, Frederic; Barth, Sandra; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Spielmann, Malte; Aldhorae, Khalid; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Dixon, Michael J.; Knapp, Michael; Mangold, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (nsCL/P) is among the most common human birth defects with multifactorial etiology. Here, we present results from a genome-wide imputation study of nsCL/P in which, after adding replication cohort data, four novel risk loci for nsCL/P are identified (at chromosomal regions 2p21, 14q22, 15q24 and 19p13). On a systematic level, we show that the association signals within this high-density dataset are enriched in functionally-relevant genomic regions that are active in both human neural crest cells (hNCC) and mouse embryonic craniofacial tissue. This enrichment is also detectable in hNCC regions primed for later activity. Using GCTA analyses, we suggest that 30% of the estimated variance in risk for nsCL/P in the European population can be attributed to common variants, with 25.5% contributed to by the 24 risk loci known to date. For each of these, we identify credible SNPs using a Bayesian refinement approach, with two loci harbouring only one probable causal variant. Finally, we demonstrate that there is no polygenic component of nsCL/P detectable that is shared with nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO). Our data suggest that, while common variants are strongly contributing to risk for nsCL/P, they do not seem to be involved in nsCPO which might be more often caused by rare deleterious variants. Our study generates novel insights into both nsCL/P and nsCPO etiology and provides a systematic framework for research into craniofacial development and malformation. PMID:28087736

  4. Communicative abilities in toddlers and in early school age children with cleft palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, Jolien S.; Korsten-Meijer, Astrid G. W.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, Siena M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation of improvement in communicative abilities in children with nonsyndromic cleft palate. Methods: Longitudinal retrospective case history Study. Out of 117 children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate born in 1998, 1999 and 2000 and enrolled in the cleft palate team of the Univers

  5. SOME EPIDEMIOLOGIC DATA ON ORAL CLEFTS IN THE NORTHERN NETHERLANDS, 1981-1988

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CORNEL, MC; SPREEN, JA; MEIJER, [No Value; SPAUWEN, PHM; DHAR, BK; TENKATE, LP

    1992-01-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate [CL(P)] has a high incidence in the northern Netherlands. Several epidemiological parameters for oral clefts, including both CL(P) and cleft palate (CP), were analysed and compared with the literature. Except for the high prevalence at birth of isolated CL(P) n

  6. Cleft Lip Repair: The Hybrid Subunit Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-04-01

    The unilateral cleft lip repair is one of the most rewarding and challenging of plastic surgery procedures. Surgeons have introduced a variety of straight line, geometric, and rotation-advancement designs, while in practice the majority of North American surgeons have been using hybrids of the rotation-advancement techniques. The anatomic subunit approach was introduced in 2005 by Fisher and has gained popularity, with early adopters of the design touting its simplicity and effectiveness. The objectives of this article are to summarize the basic tenets of respecting the philtral subunit, accurate measurement and planning, and tips for transitioning to this subunit approach.

  7. Facial clefts and associated limb anomalies: description of three cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, M C; Offringa, P J; Bos, R R M; Verhagen, A A E; Niessen, F B; Roche, N A

    2010-11-01

    Facial clefts are rare congenital malformations. In the literature these are sometimes reported in combination with limb malformations, especially ring constrictions. This article describes three children with facial clefts and limb ring constrictions with various expressions. The first case has a lateral cleft with associated limb malformations. This combination has, to our knowledge, not yet been reported. The literature about facial clefting and the amniotic band syndrome and the possible etiology of clefting and constrictions in these cases are discussed.

  8. The Epidemiology of Cleft Lip and Palate in Canada, 1998 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jennifer L K; Oddone-Paolucci, Elizabeth; Harrop, Robertston A

    2015-07-01

    To examine the birth prevalence, gender distribution, and pattern of surgical intervention for clefts in Canada (1998 to 2007). Also to highlight the difficulties associated with studying the epidemiology of clefts using the current data collection mechanisms. Epidemiologic data acquired from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Population-based study in Canada 1998 to 2007. All live births with an International Classification of Diseases (9th or 10th revision) diagnostic code for cleft palate or for cleft lip with or without cleft palate or with a surgical intervention code for repair of cleft lip or cleft palate. Birth prevalence, gender distribution, and pattern of surgical intervention. There were 3,015,325 live births in Canada (1998 to 2007). The mean birth prevalence was 0.82 per 1000 live births for cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 0.58 per 1000 live births for cleft palate. The birth prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate was significantly higher in boys, with a stable boy to girl ratio of 1.75:1. Cleft palate was significantly greater in girls; however, the boy to girl ratio decreased from 0.97:1 in 1998 to 0.59:1 in 2007. The median age of repair in Canada from 1998 to 2007 was 4.7 months for cleft lip and 11.6 months for cleft palate. Thirty percent of patients underwent cleft palate repair after age 1. The birth prevalence of cleft palate and cleft lip with or without cleft palate is stable in Canada. An increasing birth prevalence of cleft palate in girls is suggested. The timing of surgical intervention is consistent with current standards. The challenges associated with collecting these data in Canada are discussed.

  9. Clinical photography among African cleft caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Babatunde Olaitan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this paper is to document the practice of photography among clinicians whose daily work depends and is influenced so much by medical photography. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires documenting the bio data, place of practice, and experience of cleft caregivers with clinical photography were distributed. Knowledge of rules guiding clinical photography and adherence to them were also asked. Types of camera used were documented and knowledge of the value of clinical photographs were also inquired. Results: Plastic surgeons constitute the highest proportion of 27 (38.6%, followed by Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons with 14 (20.0%. Twenty one (30.0% of the respondents always, 21 (30.0% often, 12 (17.1% frequently, while 9 respondents sometimes took photographs of their patients. Suggested uses of clinical photographs included training, 52 (74.3%, education, 51 (72.9%, medicolegal, 44 (62.9% and advertisement, 44 (62.9% among others. Twenty two (31.4% did not know that there were standard guidelines for taking clinical photographs. Twenty three (32.9% of them did not seek the consent of the patients before taking clinical photographs. Conclusion: While the practice of clinical photography is high among African cleft caregivers, there is a need for further education on the issues of standard rules and obtaining consent from patients.

  10. Clinical photography among African cleft caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaitan, Peter Babatunde; Oseni, Ganiyu Oladiran

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this paper is to document the practice of photography among clinicians whose daily work depends and is influenced so much by medical photography. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires documenting the bio data, place of practice, and experience of cleft caregivers with clinical photography were distributed. Knowledge of rules guiding clinical photography and adherence to them were also asked. Types of camera used were documented and knowledge of the value of clinical photographs were also inquired. Results: Plastic surgeons constitute the highest proportion of 27 (38.6%), followed by Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons with 14 (20.0%). Twenty one (30.0%) of the respondents always, 21 (30.0%) often, 12 (17.1%) frequently, while 9 respondents sometimes took photographs of their patients. Suggested uses of clinical photographs included training, 52 (74.3%), education, 51 (72.9%), medicolegal, 44 (62.9%) and advertisement, 44 (62.9%) among others. Twenty two (31.4%) did not know that there were standard guidelines for taking clinical photographs. Twenty three (32.9%) of them did not seek the consent of the patients before taking clinical photographs. Conclusion: While the practice of clinical photography is high among African cleft caregivers, there is a need for further education on the issues of standard rules and obtaining consent from patients. PMID:22279284

  11. Modeling CMB lensing cross correlations with CLEFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Chirag; White, Martin; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2017-08-01

    A new generation of surveys will soon map large fractions of sky to ever greater depths and their science goals can be enhanced by exploiting cross correlations between them. In this paper we study cross correlations between the lensing of the CMB and biased tracers of large-scale structure at high z. We motivate the need for more sophisticated bias models for modeling increasingly biased tracers at these redshifts and propose the use of perturbation theories, specifically Convolution Lagrangian Effective Field Theory (CLEFT). Since such signals reside at large scales and redshifts, they can be well described by perturbative approaches. We compare our model with the current approach of using scale independent bias coupled with fitting functions for non-linear matter power spectra, showing that the latter will not be sufficient for upcoming surveys. We illustrate our ideas by estimating σ8 from the auto- and cross-spectra of mock surveys, finding that CLEFT returns accurate and unbiased results at high z. We discuss uncertainties due to the redshift distribution of the tracers, and several avenues for future development.

  12. Molecular basis of the association of H208Y and thymidine analogue resistance mutations M41L, L210W and T215Y in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase of treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancor, Gilberto; Nevot, María; Mendieta, Jesús; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Martínez, Miguel A; Menéndez-Arias, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs) in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) associate in two clusters: (i) TAM1 (M41L, L210W and T215Y) and TAM2 (D67N, K70R, K219E/Q, and sometimes T215F). The amino acid substitution H208Y shows increased prevalence in patients treated with nucleoside analogues and is frequently associated with TAM1 mutations. We studied the molecular mechanism favoring the selection of H208Y in the presence of zidovudine, tenofovir and other nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs). NRTI susceptibility was not affected by the addition of H208Y in phenotypic assays carried out in MT-4 cells using recombinant HIV-1 containing wild-type (subtype B, BH10), H208Y, M41L/L210W/T215Y or M41L/H208Y/L210W/T215Y RTs. However, enzymatic studies carried out with purified RTs revealed that in the presence of M41L/L210W/T215Y, H208Y increases the RT's ability to unblock and extend primers terminated with zidovudine, tenofovir and in a lesser extent, stavudine. These effects were observed with DNA/DNA complexes (but not with RNA/DNA) and resulted from the higher ATP-dependent excision activity of the M41L/H208Y/L210W/T215Y RT compared with the M41L/L210W/T215Y mutant. The increased rescue efficiency of the M41L/H208Y/L210W/T215Y RT was observed in the presence of ATP but not with GTP or ITP. Molecular dynamics studies predict an alteration of the stacking interactions between Tyr(215) and the adenine ring of ATP due to long-distance effects caused by tighter packaging of Tyr(208) and Trp(212). These studies provide a mechanistic explanation for the association of TAM-1 and H208Y mutations in viral isolates from patients treated with NRTIs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sequential emergence and clinical implications of viral mutants with K70E and K65R mutation in reverse transcriptase during prolonged tenofovir monotherapy in rhesus macaques with chronic RT-SHIV infection

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    Pedersen Niels C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We reported previously on the emergence and clinical implications of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251 mutants with a K65R mutation in reverse transcriptase (RT, and the role of CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses in suppressing viremia during tenofovir therapy. Because of significant sequence differences between SIV and HIV-1 RT that affect drug susceptibilities and mutational patterns, it is unclear to what extent findings with SIV can be extrapolated to HIV-1 RT. Accordingly, to model HIV-1 RT responses, 12 macaques were inoculated with RT-SHIV, a chimeric SIV containing HIV-1 RT, and started on prolonged tenofovir therapy 5 months later. Results The early virologic response to tenofovir correlated with baseline viral RNA levels and expression of the MHC class I allele Mamu-A*01. For all animals, sensitive real-time PCR assays detected the transient emergence of K70E RT mutants within 4 weeks of therapy, which were then replaced by K65R mutants within 12 weeks of therapy. For most animals, the occurrence of these mutations preceded a partial rebound of plasma viremia to levels that remained on average 10-fold below baseline values. One animal eventually suppressed K65R viremia to undetectable levels for more than 4 years; sequential experiments using CD8+ cell depletion and tenofovir interruption demonstrated that both CD8+ cells and continued tenofovir therapy were required for sustained suppression of viremia. Conclusion This is the first evidence that tenofovir therapy can select directly for K70E viral mutants in vivo. The observations on the clinical implications of the K65R RT-SHIV mutants were consistent with those of SIVmac251, and suggest that for persons infected with K65R HIV-1 both immune-mediated and drug-dependent antiviral activities play a role in controlling viremia. These findings suggest also that even in the presence of K65R virus, continuation of tenofovir treatment as part of HAART may be

  14. Children's Listening with Cleft Lip and Palate in the School

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    Manoel, Rosana Ribeiro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A great similarity between the patients with cleft lip and palate' behavior and those with auditory processing disorder are related by parents and professors. Objective: To verify the listening in children with cleft lip and palate in six conditions of listening. Method: Professors of 224 students (7 to 11 years old with cleft completed a questionnaire aiming to judge the student listening in the noise, ideal condition, with multiple stimulus, in the silence, when it is solicited to remember the listened information and during a lengthy period of listening, comparing it to the other of the same age and listening condition, without cleft. A Prospective Study. Results: The mean of the trial (-0, 08, standard deviation of 0,27 of the students with cleft, performed by professor was about the "same difficulty" (zero, when compared with the student without cleft. It was not found statistical significance to anyone conditions, neither to the total value of the questionnaire, considering the gender nor the school year level. Conclusion: The listening characteristics of the students with cleft lip and palate were similar to the other without this craniofacial deformity of the same age and similar listening condition. In the noise, the conditions more difficult occurred when the memory and the auditory attention were required.

  15. Unfavourable results in the repair of the cleft lip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Puthucode V.; Adenwalla, Hirji Sorab

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Unfavorable results in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip repair are often easy to spot but not always easy to prevent as to treat. We have tried to deal with the more common problems and explain possible causes and the best possible management options from our experience. Unilateral cleft lip repair: Unfavorable results immediately after repair involve Dehiscence and Scaring. Delayed blemishes include vermillion notching, a short lip, deficiency in the height of the lateral vermillion on the cleft side, white roll malalignment, oro-vestibular fistula, the cleft lip nose deformity, a narrow nostril and a “high-riding” nostril. We analyze the causes of these blemishes and outline our views regarding the treatment of these. Bilateral cleft lip: Immediate problems again include dehiscence as also loss of prolabium or premaxilla. Delayed unfavorable results are central vermillion deficiency, a lip that is too tight, bilateral cleft lip nose deformity, problems with the premaxilla and maxillary growth disturbances. Here again we discuss the causation of these problems and our preferred methods of treatment. Conclusion: We have detailed the significant unfavorable results after unilateral and bilateral cleft lip surgery. The methods of treatment advocated have been layer from our own experience. PMID:24501453

  16. Nonsynonymous variants in MYH9 and ABCA4 are the most frequent risk loci associated with nonsyndromic orofacial cleft in Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsiu-Huei; Chang, Nai-Chung; Chen, Kuo-Ting; Lu, Jang-Jih; Chang, Pi-Yueh; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Wu-Chou, Yah-Huei; Chou, Yi-Ting; Phang, Wanni; Cheng, Po-Jen

    2016-08-15

    Nonsyndromic orofacial cleft is a common birth defect with a complex etiology, including multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. Recent whole genome analyses suggested associations between nonsyndromic orofacial cleft and up to 18 genetic risk loci (ABCA4, BMP4, CRISPLD2, GSTT1, FGF8, FGFR2, FOXE1, IRF6, MAFB, MSX1, MTHFR, MYH9, PDGFC, PVRL1, SUMO1, TGFA, TGFB3, and VAX1), each of which confers a different relative risk in different populations. We evaluate the nonsynonymous variants in these 18 genetic risk loci in nonsyndromic orofacial clefts and normal controls to clarify the specific variants in Taiwanese population. We evaluated these 18 genetic risk loci in 103 cases of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts and 100 normal controls using a next-generation sequencing (NGS) customized panel and manipulated a whole-exon targeted-sequencing study based on the NGS system of an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (IT-PGM). IT-PGM data processing, including alignment with the human genome build 19 reference genome (hg19), base calling, trimming of barcoded adapter sequences, and filtering of poor signal reads, was performed using the IT platform-specific pipeline software Torrent Suite, version 4.2, with the plug-in "variant caller" program. Further advanced annotation was facilitated by uploading the exported VCF file from Variant Caller to the commercial software package Ion Reporter; the free online annotation software Vanno and Mutation Taster. Benign or tolerated amino acid changes were excluded after analysis using sorting intolerant from tolerant and polymorphism phenotyping. Sanger sequencing was used to validate the significant variants identified by NGS. Furthermore, each variant was confirmed in asymptomatic controls using the Sequenom MassARRAY (San Diego, CA, USA). We identified totally 22 types of nonsynonymous variants specific in nonsyndromic orofacial clefts, including 19 single nucleotide variants, 2 deletions, and 1 duplication in 10 studied

  17. EVALUATION OF MANDIBULAR HARD AND SOFT TISSUES IN CLEFT PATIENTS*

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    Işıl ARAS

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the mandibular hard and soft tissue measurements of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients with non-cleft individuals. Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised of lateral cephalograms of 45 subjects. Sample included 15 non-cleft (NC, 15 unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP and 15 bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP cases whose age were between 15 to 17. 1 angular 13 linear measurements were carried out using Arnett and Gunson soft tissue cephalometric analysis and 4 angular measurements were calculated with Steiner Analysis. Results: Mandibular incisor inclinations relative to the occlusal plane (Md1-Md OP were significantly greater and mandibular incisor projections (Md1-TVL were significantly retrusive in cleft subjects (p<0.05. Projection values pertaining to lower lip anterior (LLA-TVL, soft tissue B point (B’-TVL, and soft tissue pogonion (Pog’-TVL were significantly deficient as well in cleft patients (p<0.05. Sagittal position of the maxilla (SNA (p<0.001 and intermaxillary relation of the jaws (ANB were significantly deficient in UCLP subjects (p<0.05 and BCLP individuals (p<0.01. LLA-TVL and B’-TVL correlated with SNB in cleft patients (p<0.05. Conclusion: Decreased lower lip and chin projection values suggest that mandibular region of cleft patients should be taken into account in forming the treatment plan to improve the esthetic outcome of orthodontic and plastic surgery interventions.

  18. Assessing Angle's malocclusion among cleft lip and/or palate patients in Jammu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akshay; Gupta, Anur; Bhardwaj, Amit; Vikram, S; Gomathi, Ajeetha; Singh, Karanprakash

    2016-04-01

    The study was conducted to examine the patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate and its association with different types of malocclusion. This descriptive study was done among 168 patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate. Angle's classification of malocclusion was applied for assessment of occlusion as Class I, Class II, and Class III. The types of oral clefts classification such as cleft lip unilateral and cleft lip bilateral, cleft palate (CP), unilateral cleft lip with palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip with palate (BCLP) was considered. Chi-square test was applied to analyze the data at P clefts patients as cleft lip (81), CP (31), and both cleft lip and palate (53). The occurrence of unilateral cleft lip (44) was maximum among the sample followed by UCLP (39), and bilateral cleft lip (31). Maximum subjects with Class II (10.7%) and Class III (4.9%) malocclusion were seen with unilateral cleft lip deformities. None of the patients with UCLP had Class III malocclusion. Cleft lip was the most commonly observed deformity and high frequency of Class II and III malocclusion was evident. Therefore, patients with such abnormalities should be screened timely.

  19. Effect of Panax Ginseng Powder on Salmonella Typhimurium Gene Reverse Mutation%人参细粉的鼠伤寒沙门菌基因回复突变试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晶莹; 邹梅; 孙兰

    2011-01-01

    目的 体外观察人参细粉能否诱发鼠伤寒沙门菌组氨酸营养缺陷型突变株的回复突变.方法 Ames试验用TA97、TA98、TA100、TA102菌株并分加与不加肝微粒体酶活化系统(+/-S9)试验.结果 人参细粉各剂量组对4个菌株的诱发回变菌落数都未超过自然回变菌落数,Ames试验结果为阴性.结论 未见人参细粉对鼠伤寒沙门菌的致突变性.%[Objective]To test whether Panax ginseng powder can induce in vitro reverse mutation of Salmonella typhimurium histamine-auxo-troph mutant. [Methods] Ames test, used TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA102 tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium with or without the addition of liver microsomal enzyme activation system( +/ -S9) was carried out. [Results]The number of Panax ginseng powder induced revertant colonies had no markedly difference with that of spontaneously revertant colonies with the 4 tester strains at a series of Panax ginseng powder doses, Therefore, the Ames test gave negative result for Panax ginseng powder. [Conclusion]Panax ginseng powder does not express mutagenesis.

  20. Maternal alcohol binge-drinking in the first trimester and the risk of orofacial clefts in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeRoo, Lisa A.; Wilcox, Allen J; Lie, Rolv T

    2016-01-01

    Using individual participant data from six population-based case–control studies, we conducted pooled analyses to examine maternal alcohol consumption and the risk of clefts among >4600 infants with cleft lip only, cleft lip with cleft palate, or cleft palate only and >10,000 unaffected controls....

  1. Syndromes associated with labiopalatine clefting: A report of three cases

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    Thomas A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Clefts of the lip and palate are a common craniofacial anomaly, The etiology is thought to be multifactorial, with both genetic and environmental factors playing a role. Because of the frequent manifestation of cleft lip and palate in association with some syndromes, it is essential that a detailed examination of these patients be carried out. This facilitates early formulation of preventive and treatment advice and aids in overcoming gross deformities in the early stages of development. In this paper, we review three such patients who presented with cleft lip and palate in association with a syndrome.

  2. Branchial cleft cyst: A case report and review of literature

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    Surekha Chavan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available First branchial cleft anomaly is a rare disease of the head and neck. Because of its rarity, first branchial cleft anomaly is often misdiagnosed and results in inappropriate management. In this article, we present a case of type II first branchial cleft anomaly. A middle-aged woman who had suffered from swelling on lower jaw visited our department with the chief complaint of a swelling. She underwent complete excision of the lesion with preservation of the facial nerve. The patient recovered well and had no recurrence at 1-year of follow up.

  3. Otologic Concerns for Cleft Lip and Palate Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryhill, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Understanding eustachian tube physiology and anticipating probable eustachian tube dysfunction is an important component of cleft palate management. This article provides a brief summary of the otologic physiology and issues that may be of concern to cleft palate management. It is of critical importance not only to provide primary closure of the cleft palate, but also to recognize that along with speech, hearing has a critical component to the educational and social success of all individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate: New BCL3 information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, C.; Hecht, J.T. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States); Gasser, D. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    We did not previously provide LOD scores for linkage assuming heterogeneity, as suggested by Ott for the linkage analysis of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and BCL3, ApoC2, and D19S178 in the paper by Stein et al. The results from analysis using the HOMOG program, allowing for heterogeneity under the reduced penetrance model, gave a maximum LOD score of 1.85 for ApoC2, 0.41 for BCL3, 0.03 for D19S178, and 1.72 for multipoint analysis in the interval. For the affecteds-only model, the values are 1.96 for ApoC2, 0.41 for BCL3, 0.01 for D19S178, and 1.44 for the multipoint analysis. 8 refs.

  5. Candidate pathway based analysis for cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Xiao; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this research was to identify potential biological pathways associated with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P), and to explore the potential biological mechanisms underlying these associated pathways on risk of NSCL/P. This project was based on the dataset of a previously published genome-wide association (GWA) study on NSCL/P (Beaty et al. 2010). Case-parent trios used here originated from an international consortium (The Gene, Environment Association Studies consortium, GENEVA) formed in 2007. A total of 5,742 individuals from 1,908 CL/P case-parents trios (1,591 complete trios and 317 incomplete trios where one parent was missing) were collected and genotyped using the Illumina Human610-Quad array. Candidate pathways were selected using a list of 356 genes that may be related to oral clefts. In total, 42 candidate pathways, which included 1,564 genes and 40,208 SNPs were tested. Using a pathway-based analysis approach proposed by Wang et al (2007), we conducted a permutation-based test to assess the statistical significance of the nominal p-values of 42 candidate pathways. The analysis revealed several pathways yielding nominally significant p-values. However, controlling for the family wise error rate, none of these pathways could retain statistical significance. Nominal p-values of these pathways were concentrated at the lower tail of the distribution, with more than expected low p-values. A permutation based test for examining this type of distribution pattern yielded an overall p-value of 0.029. Thus, while this pathway-based analysis did not yield a clear significant result for any particular pathway, we conclude that one or more of the genes and pathways considered here likely do play a role in oral clefting.

  6. Temporal characteristics of nasalization in speakers with and without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seunghee; Kuehn, David P

    2011-03-01

    The purposes of the study were to compare the temporal characteristics of nasalization between speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip and normal adult speakers and to investigate the relationship between acoustic temporal measures and perceived nasality. Fifteen speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip and 15 speakers without cleft palate aged 13 to 45 years participated in this study. Two listeners judged the degree of nasality in speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Two distinct acoustic energies derived from the mouth and nose were recorded simultaneously while speakers were producing the speech tasks /pimip/, /pamap/, and /pumup/. Absolute and proportional measures related to nasalization duration were obtained. Speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip exhibited more extensive acoustic nasalization in the time domain than did speakers without cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Speakers without cleft palate with or without cleft lip showed larger nasalization-duration ratios in the high vowel contexts than in the low vowel context. Speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip did not exhibit distinct differences in nasalization-duration ratios among the vowel contexts. The acoustic measurements reflecting temporal patterns of oral-nasal acoustic impedance were related to the perception of hypernasality. These results suggest that the speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip showed longer duration of acoustic nasalization than speakers without cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Temporal characteristics of acoustic nasalization grew longer as the degree of perceived hypernasality increased. The positive correlation between temporal measures of acoustic nasalization and degree of perceived nasality suggests that temporal measures of nasalization would provide supplementary diagnostic information in relation to the degree of hypernasality.

  7. Influence of the Alveolar Cleft Type on Preoperative Estimation Using 3D CT Assessment for Alveolar Cleft

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    Hang Suk Choi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The bone graft for the alveolar cleft has been accepted as one of the essentialtreatments for cleft lip patients. Precise preoperative measurement of the architecture andsize of the bone defect in alveolar cleft has been considered helpful for increasing the successrate of bone grafting because those features may vary with the cleft type. Recently, somestudies have reported on the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D computed tomography(CT assessment of alveolar bone defect; however, no study on the possible implication of thecleft type on the difference between the presumed and actual value has been conducted yet.We aimed to evaluate the clinical predictability of such measurement using 3D CT assessmentaccording to the cleft type.Methods The study consisted of 47 pediatric patients. The subjects were divided according tothe cleft type. CT was performed before the graft operation and assessed using image analysissoftware. The statistical significance of the difference between the preoperative estimationand intraoperative measurement was analyzed.Results The difference between the preoperative and intraoperative values were -0.1±0.3cm3 (P=0.084. There was no significant intergroup difference, but the groups with a cleftpalate showed a significant difference of -0.2±0.3 cm3 (P<0.05.Conclusions Assessment of the alveolar cleft volume using 3D CT scan data and image analysissoftware can help in selecting the optimal graft procedure and extracting the correct volumeof cancellous bone for grafting. Considering the cleft type, it would be helpful to extract anadditional volume of 0.2 cm3 in the presence of a cleft palate.

  8. Cleft characteristics and treatment outcomes in hemifacial microsomia compared to non-syndromic cleft lip/palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentino, K M; Valstar, A; Padwa, B L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) and cleft lip/palate (CL/P), and to compare them to a historic cohort of patients with non-syndromic CL/P treated at the same centre. A retrospective review of patients with HFM and CL/P was performed; the main outcome measures assessed were cleft type/side, surgical outcome, midfacial retrusion, and speech. Twenty-six patients (13 male, 13 female; mean age 22.7±14.9, range 1-52 years) with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL±P) were identified: three with cleft lip (12%), two with cleft lip and alveolus and an intact secondary palate (8%), and 21 with cleft lip and palate (CLP) (81%; 15 unilateral and six bilateral). Four patients (19%) had a palatal fistula after palatoplasty. Twelve of 22 patients aged >5 years (55%) had midfacial retrusion and two (9%) required a pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Fisher's exact test demonstrated a higher frequency of complete labial clefting (P=0.004), CLP (P=0.009), midfacial retrusion (P=0.0009), and postoperative palatal fistula (P=0.03) in HFM compared to non-syndromic CL±P. There was no difference in VPI prevalence. This study revealed that patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe forms of orofacial clefting than patients with non-syndromic CL±P. Patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe midfacial retrusion and a higher palatal fistula rate compared to patients with non-syndromic CL±P.

  9. Maternal Risk Factors Associated with the Development of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Mexico: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Castro, Emmanuel; Acosta-Alfaro, Luis F; Guadron-Llanos, Alma M; Canizalez-Román, Adrian; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Osuna-Ramírez, Ignacio; Murillo-Llanes, Joel

    2017-07-01

    Cleft lip and palate, the most common developmental deformity, is seen worldwide and the etiology involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the maternal risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate. We conducted a case control study at the Women's Hospital in Culiacan, Mexico. Medical records were analyzed, including patients who delivered babies with and without cleft lip and cleft palate from January 2010 to December 2015. Multiple variables were analyzed, including gestational age, weight at birth, the use of folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy, smoking, alcohol abuse, the use of recreational drugs, history of sexually transmitted infections, marital status, socioeconomic status, education, and nutritional status. We found that the maternal risk factors with the strongest association for the development of cleft lip and cleft palate were the following: patients who were not taking folic acid during pregnancy [OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.32-8.09], P=0.00; patients who were not taking vitamin supplementation during pregnancy [OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.19-7.27], P=0.02; smoking during pregnancy [OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.23-3.41], P=0.01; and alcohol abuse during pregnancy [OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.17-3.08], P=0.03. The main risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate in a Mexican population at the Women's hospital in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico were smoking, alcohol abuse, and patients not taking folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy.

  10. Genetic determinants of facial clefting: analysis of 357 candidate genes using two national cleft studies from Scandinavia.

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    Astanand Jugessur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark: 235 case-parent triads. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used two complementary statistical methods, TRIMM and HAPLIN, to look for associations across these two national samples. TRIMM tests for association in each gene by using multi-SNP genotypes from case-parent triads directly without the need to infer haplotypes. HAPLIN on the other hand estimates the full haplotype distribution over a set of SNPs and estimates relative risks associated with each haplotype. For isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (I-CL/P, TRIMM and HAPLIN both identified significant associations with IRF6 and ADH1C in both populations, but only HAPLIN found an association with FGF12. For isolated cleft palate (I-CP, TRIMM found associations with ALX3, MKX, and PDGFC in both populations, but only the association with PDGFC was identified by HAPLIN. In addition, HAPLIN identified an association with ETV5 that was not detected by TRIMM. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Strong associations with seven genes were replicated in the Scandinavian samples and our approach effectively replicated the strongest previously known association in clefting--with IRF6. Based on two national cleft cohorts of similar ancestry, two robust statistical methods and a large panel of SNPs in the most promising cleft candidate genes to date, this study identified a previously unknown association with clefting for ADH1C and provides additional candidates and analytic approaches to advance the field.

  11. Treatment of 4-5 year old patients with cleft lip and cleft palate in Tawanchai center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradubwong, Suteera; Volrathongchai, Kanittha; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of Cleft Lip/Palate condition in Thailand reaches a rate of 2.49% of child births, with estimates of 800 new cases per year in the Northeastern region. The healthcare process emphasizes interdisciplinary teamwork at each stage of the planning of treatment and services with the primary goal of achieving patient satisfaction and ability to live normally in society. The first 5 years are particularly important, with a focus on quality of care and ability to adapt to the environment before entering school. To study the treatment of patients with cleft lip and palate in Tawanchai center in the 4-5 year age range. A retrospective study of the clinical records was led, concerning the 123 cleft lip and cleft palate patients aged 4-5 years under treatment in Tawanchai center, Srinagarind Hospital. Data was collected during three months from October to December 2011, using the admission records of the interdisciplinary team. Percentages and mean values were calculated from these data. 120 of the 123 patients were operated, giving a ratio of 97.56%. 108 cases were under government universal health coverage regime, corresponding to 87.80% of cases. 74 cases (60.16%) presented both cleft lip and palate condition, and an average of 5-night stay in hospital per person. Medical services by the interdisciplinary team were provided as follows: (1) of 30 patients with cleft lip aged 3-4 months, 30 (100%) received pre and post-surgery care counseling, 29 (96.67%) received surgery; (2) of 19 patients with cleft palate aged 10-18 months, 17 (89.47%) received treatment information, pre and postsurgery counseling and were operated according to the protocols; (3) of 74 patients with cleft lip and palate, 53 (71.62%) received counseling for pre and post-surgery care for lip repair at the age of 3-4 months, 52 (70.27%) were operated following the protocols, while at the age of 10-18 months 63 patients (85.14%) received treatment information, pre and postsurgery care counseling

  12. Intraflagellar transport 88 (IFT88) is crucial for craniofacial development in mice and is a candidate gene for human cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Ho, Thach-Vu; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Brindopke, Frederick; Figueiredo, Jane C; Magee, William; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Ciliopathies are pleiotropic human diseases resulting from defects of the primary cilium, and these patients often have cleft lip and palate. IFT88 is required for the assembly and function of the primary cilia, which mediate the activity of key developmental signaling pathways. Through whole exome sequencing of a family of three affected siblings with isolated cleft lip and palate, we discovered that they share a novel missense mutation in IFT88 (c.915G > C, p.E305D), suggesting this gene should be considered a candidate for isolated orofacial clefting. In order to evaluate the function of IFT88 in regulating craniofacial development, we generated Wnt1-Cre;Ift88fl/fl mice to eliminate Ift88 specifically in cranial neural crest (CNC) cells. Wnt1-Cre;Ift88fl/flpups died at birth due to severe craniofacial defects including bilateral cleft lip and palate and tongue agenesis, following the loss of the primary cilia in the CNC-derived palatal mesenchyme. Loss of Ift88 also resulted in a decrease in neural crest cell proliferation during early stages of palatogenesis as well as a downregulation of the Shh signaling pathway in the palatal mesenchyme. Importantly, Osr2KI-Cre;Ift88fl/flmice, in which Ift88 is lost specifically in the palatal mesenchyme, exhibit isolated cleft palate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IFT88 has a highly conserved function within the primary cilia of the CNC-derived mesenchyme in the lip and palate region in mice and is a strong candidate as an orofacial clefting gene in humans. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Risk variants in BMP4 promoters for nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate in a Chilean population

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    Suazo José

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone morphogenetic protein 4 gene (BMP4 plays a key role during maxillofacial development, since orofacial clefts are observed in animals when this gene is conditionally inactivated. We recently reported the existence of association between nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCLP and BMP4 polymorphisms by detecting transmission deviations for haplotypes that include a region containing a BMP4 promoter in case-parent trios. The aim of the present study was to search for possible causal mutations within BMP4 promoters (BMP4.1 and BMP4.2. Methods We analyzed the sequence of BMP4.1 and BMP4.2 in 167 Chilean NSCLP cases and 336 controls. Results We detected three novel variants in BMP4.1 (c.-5514G > A, c.-5365C > T and c.-5049C > T which could be considered as cleft risk factors due to their absence in controls. Additionally, rs2855530 G allele (BMP4.2 carriers showed an increased risk for NSCLP restricted to males (OR = 1.52; 95% C.I. = 1.07-2.15; p = 0.019. For this same SNP the dominant genotype model showed a higher frequency of G/G+G/C and a lower frequency of C/C in cases than controls in the total sample (p = 0.03 and in the male sample (p = 0.003. Bioinformatic prediction analysis showed that all the risk variants detected in this study could create new transcription factor binding motifs. Conclusions The sex-dependent association between rs2855530 and NSCLP could indirectly be related to the differential gene expression observed between sexes in animal models. We concluded that risk variants detected herein could potentially alter BMP4 promoter activity in NSCLP. Further functional and developmental studies are necessary to support this hypothesis.

  14. Un Futuro Prometedor para su Nino con Labio Hendido y Paladar Hendido. Edicion Refundida (Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    The booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to help parents of babies with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Topics covered include the sequence of prenatal development and the effects of birth defects, common misconceptions about what causes the conditions, possible hereditary and environmental causes, and what it means to have a cleft palate or a…

  15. Issues involved in the phenotypic classification of orofacial clefts ascertained through a state birth defects registry for the North Carolina Cleft Outcomes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylsworth, Arthur S; Allori, Alexander C; Pimenta, Luiz A; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Harmsen, Katherine G; Watkins, Stephanie E; Ramsey, Barry L; Strauss, Ronald P; Meyer, Robert E

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies involving birth defects are extremely sensitive to phenotype accuracy and precision. We devised a case review and classification protocol for a project to study school achievement in children with idiopathic, nonsyndromic orofacial clefts to improve the reliability of phenotypic classification from the statewide birth defects registry. Surveillance-program abstraction data and medical records at the birth or treating hospitals were used when available. Exclusion criteria included: median cleft lip; Tessier cleft; premaxillary agenesis; presence of a recognizable syndrome, phenotype, association, or sequence (other than Robin sequence); clefts with other malformations not considered to be normal or common variants in the newborn; and cases with documented or suspected genetic or teratogenic causes. Of 712 children identified with orofacial clefts, 153 were excluded, leaving 559 nonsyndromic orofacial cleft cases of unknown cause in the final study. These cases were grouped into the following clinically meaningful types: cleft lip with or without cleft alveolus; cleft lip and cleft palate; and cleft palate only. This review and classification process resulted in the elimination of 21.5% of the original cohort of identified cases, with most exclusions being due to suspected syndromic associations. Verbatim descriptions of the clinical findings are critical for accurate classification of diagnoses. This review process improved the precision of orofacial cleft phenotype classification for our study. Precision would have been further improved if all of the cases had verbatim descriptions of diagnoses and all medical records could have been reviewed by the classification team. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Un Futuro Prometedor para su Nino con Labio Hendido y Paladar Hendido. Edicion Refundida (Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    The booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to help parents of babies with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Topics covered include the sequence of prenatal development and the effects of birth defects, common misconceptions about what causes the conditions, possible hereditary and environmental causes, and what it means to have a cleft palate or a…

  17. Assessing Angle's malocclusion among cleft lip and/or palate patients in Jammu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akshay; Gupta, Anur; Bhardwaj, Amit; Vikram, S.; Gomathi, Ajeetha; Singh, Karanprakash

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to examine the patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate and its association with different types of malocclusion. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was done among 168 patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate. Angle's classification of malocclusion was applied for assessment of occlusion as Class I, Class II, and Class III. The types of oral clefts classification such as cleft lip unilateral and cleft lip bilateral, cleft palate (CP), unilateral cleft lip with palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip with palate (BCLP) was considered. Chi-square test was applied to analyze the data at P Class III malocclusion. Conclusion: Cleft lip was the most commonly observed deformity and high frequency of Class II and III malocclusion was evident. Therefore, patients with such abnormalities should be screened timely. PMID:27195223

  18. Characteristics of the Thermal Ion Bulk Parameters in the Cleft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, V. N.; Chandler, M. O.; Moore, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    Bulk parameters for the thermal ions (0.3 to 25 eV) have been derived using data from the Scanning Thermal Ion Composition Spectrometer (STICS) on the Sounding of the Cleft Ion Fountain Energization Region (SCIFER) experiment. The SCIFER rocket was launched into the ionospheric cleft region at 1000 MLT with a maximum altitude of 1450 km. The heated cleft plasma was observed to be H(+) dominated, in sharp contrast with observations of the same region near solar maximum. Regions of particular interest include the sharp, heated equatorward wall of the cleft and highly structured patches of transversely-accelerated ions (TAI). Densities, temperatures and velocities are used to characterize and distinguish these regions and to compare to predicted bulk parameters from candidate heating mechanisms.

  19. Ankyloglossia with cleft lip: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritika Jangid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital anomaly affecting the tongue, which is characterized by thick, short lingual frenulum. This condition causes many difficulties such as limited tongue protrusion, breastfeeding difficulties, speech impairment and lack of self-confidence. It is very rarely associated with any other congenital craniofacial disorders such as cleft lip, X-linked cleft palate, Van der Woude syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Orofacial digital syndrome, Beckwith Weidman syndrome or Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. This article presents a rare case of ankyloglossia associated with cleft lip treated with diode laser in a 12-year-old Indian boy who had undergone surgical correction of associated cleft lip soon after birth. Correction of ankyloglossia at a young age would lead to enhanced phonetics, improved oral hygiene, and overall personality development.

  20. Ankyloglossia with cleft lip: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangid, Kritika; Alexander, Aurelian Jovita; Jayakumar, Nadathur Doraiswamy; Varghese, Sheeja; Ramani, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital anomaly affecting the tongue, which is characterized by thick, short lingual frenulum. This condition causes many difficulties such as limited tongue protrusion, breastfeeding difficulties, speech impairment and lack of self-confidence. It is very rarely associated with any other congenital craniofacial disorders such as cleft lip, X-linked cleft palate, Van der Woude syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Orofacial digital syndrome, Beckwith Weidman syndrome or Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. This article presents a rare case of ankyloglossia associated with cleft lip treated with diode laser in a 12-year-old Indian boy who had undergone surgical correction of associated cleft lip soon after birth. Correction of ankyloglossia at a young age would lead to enhanced phonetics, improved oral hygiene, and overall personality development.

  1. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  2. Changing lifestyles and oral clefts occurrence in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Camilla; Knudsen, Lisbeth B.; Christensen, Kaare

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was to access whether any changes in the birth prevalence of cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL(P)) occurred in Denmark during the period 1988 through 2001. In this period an official recommendation of a supplementation of folic acid to pregnant women was introduced......; furthermore, smoking among pregnant women decreased considerably. Design and settings There are few places in which ecological studies of oral clefts are possible. Denmark provides a particularly good setting for this kind of study, due to a high ascertainment and a centralized registration of cleft cases...... births, 95% CI=1.37 to 1.52). The introduction of folic acid and the decrease in smoking prevalence among pregnant women do not seem to have reduced the birth prevalence negatively. This may be due to non-compliance in respect to the folic acid recommendation and/or only a weak causal association between...

  3. Protocols in cleft lip and palate treatment: systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Ladeira, Pedro Ribeiro Soares; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    .... Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results...

  4. Protocols in Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment: Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Ladeira, Pedro Ribeiro Soares; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    .... Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results...

  5. An extraorally activated expansion appliance for cleft palate infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, R A; Kusy, R P; Georgiade, N G

    1976-07-01

    A new lever-action expansion appliance is described which is designed specifically for use in infants with cleft lip and palate. An extraoral control knob allows for easy activation, while the important anterior cleft areas are left clear for premaxillary repositioning and clinical assessment. Activation is registered by a positive clicking sound. Rapid expansion is made possible by the design of the appliance which is retained by stainless steel pins.

  6. Fetal Cleft Lip/Palate Surgery: End of a Dream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih; Inangil, Gökhan; Kara, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Recognition that a fetus can scarlessly heal in intrauterine life led to various animal studies in the mid 1980s exploring the possibility of fetal cleft lip/palate surgery. The idea of scarless cleft repair seemed like a possible dream after the promising results from the early animal studies. In this review, we analyze the progress made in the 30 years since our first experience with animal models.

  7. Nasalance measures in German-speaking cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swennen, Gwen R J; Grimaldi, Hannes; Upheber, Juliane; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Dempf, Rupert

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate nasalance measures in German-speaking patients with different types of repaired cleft lip and palate and to find out if significant nasalance gender differences exist in the different cleft groups. A total of 125 German-speaking cleft patients (74 male and 51 female) were included in this study: 18 patients with isolated unilateral cleft lip (UCL; mean age: 13.00 +/- 2.03 years), 66 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP; mean age: 14.80 +/- 3.45 years), 25 patients with isolated cleft palate (CP; mean age: 14.60 +/- 3.48 years), and 16 patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP; mean age: 14.30 +/- 3.61 years). Nasalance data were collected and computed using the NasalView hardware/software system (Fa. Tiger Electronics, Seattle, WA). Speech stimuli according to a modified Heidelberg Rhinophonia Assessment Form (sustained vowels "a," "e," "i," "o," and "u"; oral and nasal sentences; and three oral-nasal reading passages) were used to obtain nasalance scores. Nasalance distance and ratio were also calculated for the oral and nasal sentences and for one of the oral-nasal reading passages. Unpaired t tests showed no significant gender nasalance differences in each cleft group. Analysis of variance showed no significant differences in mean nasalance distance and ratio. For the nasal sentence, a significant difference (P = 0.032) in mean nasalance scores was found between the UCL and UCLP groups.

  8. Augmentation Rhinoplasty in Cleft Lip Nasal Deformity: Preliminary Patients’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H. C. Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The correction of cleft lip nasal deformity is challenging and there have been numerous methods described in the literature with little demonstrated technical superiority of one over another. The common clinical issues associated with cleft lip nasal deformity are its lack of symmetry, alar collapse on the affected side, obtuse nasal labial angle, short nasal length, loss of tip definition, and altered columella show among others. We carried out augmentation of cleft lip rhinoplasties with rib graft in 16 patients over the one-year study period. Each of these patients was reviewed and given questionnaire before and after surgery to evaluate their response on the outcome to the approach. Preoperatively, nasal asymmetry is the main complaint (14/16, 87.5% among our series of patients. Postoperatively, 12 (75% patients out of the 16 reported significant improvement in their nasal symmetry with the other four marginal. All patients reported excellent nasal projection postoperatively with good nasal tip definition. Our series of patients reported overall good satisfaction outcome and will recommend this procedure to other patients with cleft lip nasal deformity. In conclusion, augmentation of cleft lip rhinoplasty can be employed to achieve perceivable and satisfactory outcome in patients with cleft lip nasal deformity.

  9. Outcome analysis of palatoplasty in various types of cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh M Annigeri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To analyse the factors affecting clinical and functional outcome of Veau-Wardill-Kilner palatoplasty in various types of cleft palate. Materials and Methods: Demographic data were retrieved from case records and a detailed speech, language and hearing and an orthodontic analysis were carried out prospectively. Results: Mean age at operation was 2.7 years; whereas mean age at the time of evaluation was 6 years. Most of the patients (43.3%, 13/30 had a bilateral cleft lip and palate. The postoperative fistula had developed in 31% (4/13 of the patients with bilateral clefts and in 17% (1/6 and 9% (1/11 of the patients with left unilateral and isolated cleft palate respectively (P0.05. Tympanic membrane (TM abnormalities were also more common in bilateral cleft patients (P<0.05. Mean maxillary arch length, arch circumference and maxillary inter-canine and inter-molar width were significantly reduced as compared to the control group (P<0.001. Conclusions: Socially acceptable quality of speech can be achieved in more than 85% of the patients. The postoperative fistula is associated with poor speech; bilateral cleft and older age being the risk factors for fistula formation. Many patients require audiological surveillance even when asymptomatic. Maxillary growth is impaired in all the patients despite early surgery.

  10. 3D finite element model for treatment of cleft lip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Chun; Hong, Dongming; Lu, Hongbing; Wang, Jianqi; Lin, Qin; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-02-01

    Cleft lip is a congenital facial deformity with high occurrence rate in China. Surgical procedure involving Millard or Tennison methods is usually employed for treatment of cleft lip. However, due to the elasticity of the soft tissues and the mechanical interaction between skin and maxillary, the occurrence rate of facial abnormality or dehisce is still high after the surgery, leading to multiple operations of the patient. In this study, a framework of constructing a realistic 3D finite element model (FEM) for the treatment of cleft lip has been established. It consists of two major steps. The first one is the reconstruction of a 3D geometrical model of the cleft lip from scanning CT data. The second step is the build-up of a FEM for cleft lip using the geometric model, where the material property of all the tetrahedrons was calculated from the CT densities directly using an empirical curve. The simulation results demonstrated (1) the deformation procedure of the model step-by-step when forces were applied, (2) the stress distribution inside the model, and (3) the displacement of all elements in the model. With the computer simulation, the minimal force of having the cleft be repaired is predicted, as well as whether a given force sufficient for the treatment of a specific individual. It indicates that the proposed framework could integrate the treatment planning with stress analysis based on a realistic patient model.

  11. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding treatment in cleft lip and palate patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grayson Barry

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Presurgical infant orthopedics has been employed since 1950 as an adjunctive neonatal therapy for the correction of cleft lip and palate. Most of these therapies did not address deformity of the nasal cartilage in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate as well as the deficiency of the columella tissue in infants with bilateral cleft. The nasolaveolar molding (NAM technique a new approach to presurgical infant orthopedics developed by Grayson reduces the severity of the initial cleft alveolar and nasal deformity. This enables the surgeon and the patient to enjoy the benefits associated with repair of a cleft deformity that is minimal in severity. This paper will discuss the appliance design, clinical management and biomechanical principles of nasolaveolar molding therapy. Long term studies on NAM therapy indicate better lip and nasal form, reduced oronasal fistula and labial deformities, 60 % reduction in the need for secondary alveolar bone grafting. No effect on growth of midface in sagittal and vertical plane has been recorded up to the age of 18 yrs. With proper training and clinical skills NAM has demonstrated tremendous benefit to the cleft patients as well as to the surgeon performing the repair.

  12. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh A. Seifeldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate (CL/P is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material.

  13. Considerations Regarding Age at Surgery and Fistula Incidence Using One- and Two-stage Closure for Cleft Palate

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Stoicescu; Dm Enescu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although cleft lip and palate (CLP) is one of the most common congenital malformations, occurring in 1 in 700 live births, there is still no generally accepted treatment protocol. Numerous surgical techniques have been described for cleft palate repair; these techniques can be divided into one-stage (one operation) cleft palate repair and two-stage cleft palate closure. The aim of this study is to present our cleft palate team experience in using the two-stage cleft palate closu...

  14. Comparing caries risk profiles between 5- and 10- year-old children with cleft lip and/or palate and non-cleft controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundell, Anna Lena; Ullbro, Christer; Marcusson, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    of cleft lip and/or palate (CL(P)) children with non-cleft controls in the same age using a computerized caries risk assessment model. METHODS: The study group consisted of 133 children with CL(P) (77 subjects aged 5 years and 56 aged 10 years) and 297 non-cleft controls (133 aged 5 years and 164 aged 10......BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that children with oral clefts may have higher caries prevalence in comparison with non-cleft controls but the relative importance of the potential risk factors is not clear. The aim of this study was to compare the caries risk profiles in a group...

  15. Reverse logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); S.D.P. Flapper; R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper gives an overview of scientific literature that describes and discusses cases of reverse logistics activities in practice. Over sixty case studies are considered. Based on these studies we are able to indicate critical factors for the practice of reverse logistics. In addi

  16. Assessment of the safety of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin: reverse mutation assay, acute and 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity in rats, and acute no-effect level for diarrhea in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yuko; Kishimoto, Yuka; Tagami, Hiroyuki; Kanahori, Sumiko

    2013-01-01

    A series of safety assessments were performed on hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin prepared by converting the reducing terminal glucose of resistant maltodextrin into sorbitol. The reverse mutation assay did not show mutagenicity. Acute and 90-day subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats showed no death was observed in any groups, including the group receiving the highest single dose of 10 g/kg body weight or the highest dose of 5 g/kg body weight per day for 90 days. Mucous or watery stools were observed in the hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin treatment group on the acute study, which were transient and were associated with the osmotic pressure caused by intake of the high concentrations. Subchronic study showed dose-dependent increases in the weights of cecum alone, cecal contents alone, and cecum with cecal contents as well as hypertrophy of the cecal mucosal epithelium, which are considered to be common physiological responses after intake of indigestible carbohydrates. These results indicated that the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin was 10 g/kg body weight or more on the acute oral toxicity study and 5.0 g/kg body weight/day or more on the 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity study in rats. Further study performed in healthy adult humans showed that the acute no-effect level of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin for diarrhea was 0.8 g/kg body weight for men and more than 1.0 g/kg body weight for women. The results of the current safety assessment studies suggest that hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin is safe for human consumption.

  17. Enhancing accessibility of patients with cleft lip/palate to healthcare services via a cleft birth registration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volrathongchai, Kanittha; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp; Pradubwong, Suteera

    2014-10-01

    Cleft lip/palate is a critical health problem in Thailand; with an incidence rate of 2.49/1,000 live births. To insure the best outcomes, surgery should be performed near the age of three months. However; during the years 1993-2007, only 39.7% of children with a cleft lip/palate underwent an operation by the age of 3-4 months and only 58.18% by the age of 9-12 months. The purpose of the study is to determine if a cleft birth registry might facilitate timely and proper treatment for children with a cleft lip/palate. A pilot cleft birth registry, developed by the Tawanchai Cleft Center, was made available to hospitals in Khon Kaen, Roi-et, Kalasin, and Mahasarakam provinces, Thailand. Ninety-eight personnel involved in the care of children with a cleft lip/palate were recruited from the participating hospitals to evaluate the system. Assigned to one offour focus groups, participants were asked to evaluate the pilot system in terms of satisfaction and benefit. Following the focus groups, those participants that were traditionally responsible for registration were asked to use the cleft birth registry to register any newborns with a cleft lip/palate that were encountered in the course of their duties. Records were examined to determine how many newborns were properly registered and for those registered, whether proper care was received in a timely manner With 78 focus group participants responding to the satisfaction survey, results indicated mostly high levels of satisfaction with 26 (33%) participants rating satisfaction as very good, 49 (63%) as good and 3 (4%) as fair No participant rated satisfaction below fair. Furthermore, a majority stated that the cleft birth registy would benefit patients and contribute to timely treatment. During two years of active use, one hundred and thirty-seven newborns with a cleft lip/palate were registered into this cleft birth registry. Subsequent examination showed that eighty-eight percent ofregistered cases received proper

  18. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Gaia, Bruno Felipe; Cheng, Cheong Kuo; Trindade, Paulo Alceu Kiemle; Bastos, José Carlos da Cunha; Mattos, Beatriz Silva Câmara

    2012-02-01

    Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1) to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2) to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3) to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  19. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Kiemle Trindade-Suedam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1 to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2 to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3 to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  20. Cleft lip and cleft palate relationship with familial marriage: a study in 136 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azimi C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Clefts of the lip and palate are one of the most common congenital birth anomalies. Genetic factors play a great role in the etiology of them and the high percentage of the consanguineous marriage of the parents of the affected persons is one of the reasons. These defects not only make abnormal changes on appearance of the neonate, but also make a lot of stress and psychological problems for the patients and their families. Study on the prevalence of clefts, their risk factors and also genetic counseling for affected persons and their families can be a guideline for general population and probably reduce these anomalies over the generations."n"nMethods: Patients referred to the Department of Genetics, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran were studied. A total of 7374 pedigrees of all the patients admitted to the Department, were studied during 2002-2005 and 99 pedigrees with the patients with cleft lip± palate or isolated cleft palate were separated. The total number of cases among these 99 pedigrees was 136. The effects of consanguineous marriage, positive family history and sex were investigated among cases."n"nResults: 70.8% of patients with syndromic clefts and 58.7% of patients with nonsyndromic CL

  1. De novo MEIS2 mutation causes syndromic developmental delay with persistent gastro-esophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Atsushi; Isidor, Bertrand; Piloquet, Hugues; Corre, Pierre; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-09-01

    MEIS2 aberrations are considered to be the cause of intellectual disability, cleft palate and cardiac septal defect, as MEIS2 copy number variation is often observed with these phenotypes. To our knowledge, only one nucleotide-level change-specifically, an in-frame MEIS2 deletion-has so far been reported. Here, we report a female patient with a de novo nonsense mutation (c.611C>G, p.Ser204*) in MEIS2. She showed severe intellectual disability, moderate motor/verbal developmental delay, cleft palate, cardiac septal defect, hypermetropia, severe feeding difficulties with gastro-esophageal reflux and constipation. By reviewing this patient and previous patients with MEIS2 point mutations, we found that feeding difficulty with gastro-esophageal reflux appears to be one of the core clinical features of MEIS2 haploinsufficiency, in addition to intellectual disability, cleft palate and cardiac septal defect.

  2. PREVALENCE OF CLEFT LIP AND PALATE IN GEORGIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chincharadze, S; Vadachkoria, Z; Mchedlishvili, I

    2017-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate take significant place in congenital malformations. We aimed to study epidemiological peculiarities of these pathologies in Georgia for 2006-2015. We compared magnitude of its distribution with the data from 1981-1990. Prevalence of cleft lip and palate in Georgia in 2006-2015 was 0.95±0.04 per 1000 live births, while in 1981-1990- it was 1.05, i.e. in contrast to 1980's frequency of these pathological conditions decreased to some extent. Distribution of cleft lip and palate varies across the country regions. The most intensive spread has been observed in Mtskheta-Mtianeti region, where prevalence composed 2.28/1000. In the rest of the regions frequency of these pathologies is significantly lower. For instance, in Kakheti the rate is equal to 1,87/1000, in Kvemo Kartli - 1.56/1000, in Shida Kartli - 1.55/1000. In the rest of the regions prevalence rate is lower than the country average. It should be noted that in Tbilisi the rate is as low as 0.80/1000. The lowest level has been reported in Guria - 0.56/1000. Currently cleft lip with palate is the most frequently occurring anomaly in Georgia accounting for 39.8% of all congenital malformations. Cleft lip alone ranks the second - 36.1%, followed by cleft palate (24.1%). These pathologies are more frequent in boys than in girls. 60.3% of the cases are reported in males, in contrast to girls - 39.7% (pcleft palate is the most common among girls, but in our case, it had higher prevalence among boys, 53.6% vs. 46,4%. Thus cleft lip and palate distribution in Georgia is characterized by epidemiological peculiarities, which should be considered in implementation of preventive measures.

  3. Cleft-lift operation for pilonidal sinuses under tumescent local anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Claus Anders

    2011-01-01

    The use of tumescent local anesthesia in the Bascom cleft-lift procedure has not been described before.......The use of tumescent local anesthesia in the Bascom cleft-lift procedure has not been described before....

  4. Current status of presurgical infant orthopaedic treatment for cleft lip and palate patients: A critical review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niranjane, P Priyanka; Kamble, R H; Diagavane, S Pallavi; Shrivastav, S Sunita; Batra, Puneet; Vasudevan, S D; Patil, Pushkar

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients is a challenge for all the concerned members of the cleft team, and various treatment modalities have been attempted to obtain aesthetic results...

  5. Testing the face shape hypothesis in twins discordant for nonsyndromic orofacial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roosenboom, Jasmien; Indencleef, Karlijne; Hens, Greet

    2017-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (OFCs) are complex traits characterized by multifactorial inheritance and wide phenotypic variability. Numerous studies have shown subtle differences in the faces of unaffected relatives from cleft families compared to controls, the implication being that such outward...

  6. Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients......Reconstruction of alveolar defects in patients with cleft lip and palate - 111 consecutive patients...

  7. Cleft lip and palate review: Epidemiology, risk factors, quality of life, and importance of classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureen Supit

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip with or without cleft palate is the most occurring craniofacial anomaly in human, resulting from a complex etiology involving multiple genetic and environmental factors. The defect carries lifelong morbidity and economic burden. Children with clefts will require continuous medical interventions for at least the first 18 years of life, affecting many aspects of their lives. The extent and complexity of clefts vary infinitely, later determining individual management and outcome. Identification and classification play significant roles in initial assessment of these unique cleft cases, which affect options for following correctional attempts. Some classifications even allow measurement of progress after anatomical repositioning, and success rate after surgical repairs. The challenge of developing one such widely inclusive classification is discussed. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 226-39Keywords: Cleft lip, cleft palate, congenital anomaly, cleft  classfications

  8. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Exclusion of linkage between cleft lip with or without cleft palate and markers on chromosomes 4 and 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, S.H. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Malcolm, S.; Winter, R. [Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without associate cleft palate (CLP) is a common craniofacial defect, occurring in {approximately}1/1,000 live births. While the defect generally occurs sporadically, multiplex families have been reported. Segregation analyses have demonstrated that, in some families, CLP is inherited as an autosomal dominant/codominant disorder with low penetrance. Several clefting loci have been proposed on multiple chromosomes, including 6p24, 4q, and 19q13.1. Association studies and linkage studies suggested a locus that mapped to 6p24. We were unable to confirm this in a linkage study of 12 multigenerational families. A subsequent linkage study by Carinci et al., however, found evidence for linkage to this region in 14 of 21 clefting families. Additionally, Davies et al. studied the chromosomes of three individuals with cleft lip and palate, all of whom had a rearrangement involving 6p24. Their investigation supported a locus at 6p24. Carinci et al. reported that the most likely position for a clefting locus was at D6S89, which is centromeric to EDN1. This is in contrast to the findings of Davies et al., who suggested a placement telomeric to EDN1. F13A, which had been implicated in the initial association studies, is telomeric to EDN1. Thus, the region between F13A and D6S89 encompasses the regions proposed by both Davies et al. and Carinci et al. A second clefting locus, at 4q, was proposed by Beiraghi et al., who studied a single multigenerational family by linkage analysis. Their data suggested a locus near D4S175 and D4S192. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Dental Implant Treatment for a Patient with Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    OpenAIRE

    Sugahara, Toshio; Kuboki, Takuo; Shirasu,Nobuaki; Honda,Kozo; Kanou,Miwa; Kagawa,Toshimasa; Ueno, Takaaki; Sawaki, Masako

    2008-01-01

    Dental reconstruction in the cleft space is difficult in some patients with cleft lip and palate because of oronasal fistulas. Most of these patients receive a particle cancellous bone marrow (PCBM) graft to close the alveolar cleft, and secondary bone grafting is also required. Treatment options for the alveolar cleft including fixed or removable prostheses require the preparation of healthy teeth and are associated with functional or social difficulties. Recently, the effectiveness of denta...

  11. Orofacial clefts at Bugando Medical Centre: associated factors and postsurgical complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyu, Yunus; Manyama, Mange; Chandika, Alphonce; Gilyoma, Japhet

    2012-11-01

    To determine factors associated with orofacial clefts and postsurgical complications of cleft lip and palate repair surgeries in northwestern Tanzania. This was a cohort study involving patients with orofacial clefts. Associated factors (family history of orofacial clefts, maternal use of alcohol and cigarette smoking during pregnancy) were obtained through interviews with accompanying parents. Antenatal cards were used to obtain maternal age at birth and birth weight. Ninety-four patients with different orofacial clefts were seen. Among them, 46.8% (44/94), 13.8% (13/94), and 39.4% (37/94) had cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip and palate, respectively. About 15% of orofacial cleft cases had a positive family history of orofacial clefts. Among these, 7.4% had an affected relative on the maternal side, 4.3% had an affected relative on the paternal side, and 3.2% had an affected sibling. This difference was statistically significant (chi-square  =  27.7, p Orofacial cleft was significantly associated with order of birth (chi-square  =  21.0, p orofacial clefts and order of birth were significantly associated with orofacial clefts in northwestern Tanzania. These factors have been associated with risk of orofacial clefts elsewhere and suggest a hereditary role in the etiology of orofacial cleft. Palatal fistula and philtrum dehiscence were postsurgical complications observed in orofacial clefts patients who had primary surgery past the recommended age. These complications could have resulted from delayed surgery and absence of presurgical procedures.

  12. Diagnosis and presurgical orthopedics in infants with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fundagul Bilgic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate are one of the most common congenital craniofacial malformations. While preoperative treatment for infants with cleft lip and palate is still a scientific debate, patients with this malocclusion usually have to be treated from infancy to adulthood. Orthodontist plays an important role in the treatment of patients with cleft lip and palate. The purpose of this review is to give information about cleft lip and palate and presurgical nasoalveolar molding.

  13. Post septorhinoplasty custom-made unilateral nasal stent for nasal cleft deformity

    OpenAIRE

    Manu Rathee; Mohaneesh Bhoria; Priyanka Boora

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nasal cleft deformity is a complicated problem. Utilization of nasal stent in post septorhinoplastyaims at establishing and maintaining airway patency, tissue position, and reduces tissue contracture after surgery. Case Report: A 16-year-old female patient presented with history of surgical reconstruction of congenital cleft lip and cleft palate with secondary septorhinoplasty of nasal cleft deformity. Patient was referred for nasal stent 1 week after septorhinoplasty. This case repo...

  14. Centre-based statistics of cleft lip with/without alveolus and palate as well as cleft palate only patients in Aden, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmail, Ahlam Hibatulla Ali; Abdo, Muhgat Ahmed Ali; Krentz, Helga; Lenz, Jan-Hendrik; Gundlach, Karsten K H

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to report the types and patterns of cleft lip with/without cleft alveolus and palate as well as cleft palate only as seen in Aden, Yemen. Retrospective, centre-based study conducted at the Cleft Lip and Palate Centre, Aden University, Yemen. Statistical evaluation of the data from all cleft patients who were registered at or referred to this centre during the years 2005-2011. A total of 1110 cleft patients were seen during the period studied (2005-2011). Amongst these there were 183 (16.48%) with a cleft lip and 144 (12.98) with a cleft of lip and alveolus, 228 (20.54%) had a cleft palate, and 555 (50%) had a combination of cleft lip, alveolus, and palate. The clefts were found more often in males than in females (56.5% boys versus 43.5% girls). This difference was statistically significant (p ≤ 0.001). Statistically significant sex differences were also noted when evaluating the various cleft types. Isolated cleft palates were found most often in females. Among the cleft palate cases there were 102 (9.2%) with a cleft soft palate only. The ages of the patients were between one day and 40 years. Two hundred and one children (18%) had a positive family history of clefts. Among the risk factors considered in this study, consanguineous marriages among cousins were found most frequently (in 48% of the cases). In contrast to this, only 10% of the mothers had reported to have been taking medication directly prior to or during the first trimester of their pregnancy. On average the mothers were neither very young nor very old. The prevalence rate of orofacial cleft types among this Yemeni sample was similar to prevalence rates previously reported in white Caucasians. The present study did neither find many cases with medication before, nor during, pregnancy; there were few young or very old mothers; and the incidence of positive family histories was similar to those found in other studies on clefts. However, consanguineous marriages were

  15. Whole blood propionylcarnitine in newborns with orofacial cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozyasz, Kamil K; Oltarzewski, Mariusz; Lugowska, Iwona; Szymanski, Marta; Surowiec, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are thought to be determined by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Experiments on animals demonstrated that vitamin B12 supplemented diets antagonize selected teratogens during palatogenesis. Increased propionylcarnitine in neonates is regarded as a marker of maternal vitamin B12 deficiency. The retrospective study was undertaken to determine whether increased propionylcarnitine in newborns is associated with orofacial clefts. Fifty-two newborns with isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) and 107 control newborns without congenital anomalies were investigated. Whole blood propionylcarnitine concentrations were measured using tandem mass spectrometry. The mean concentrations of propionylcarnitine in newborns with clefts and controls were 2.82±1.06µmolL(-1) and 2.68±0.94µmolL(-1), respectively. T-test for equality of means did not confirm any significant differences between both groups (P=0.381). Deficiency of vitamin B12 with metabolic disturbances seems not to be a risk factor for CLP in the investigated group of patients. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Association between maternal smoking, gender, and cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Daniella Reis Barbosa; Coletta, Ricardo D; Oliveira, Eduardo A; Swerts, Mário Sérgio Oliveira; Rodrigues, Laíse A Mendes; Oliveira, Maria Christina; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) represent the most common congenital anomalies of the face. To assess the relationship between maternal smoking, gender and CL/P. This is an epidemiological cross-sectional study. We interviewed 1519 mothers divided into two groups: mothers of children with CL/P (n=843) and mothers of children without CL/P (n=676). All mothers were classified as smoker or non-smoker subjects during the first trimester of pregnancy. To determine an association among maternal smoking, gender, and CL/P, odds ratios were calculated and the adjustment was made by a logistic regression model. An association between maternal smoking and the presence of cleft was observed. There was also a strong association between male gender and the presence of cleft (OR=3.51; 95% CI 2.83-4.37). By binary logistic regression analysis, it was demonstrated that both variables were independently associated with clefts. In a multivariate analysis, male gender and maternal smoking had a 2.5- and a 1.5-time greater chance of having a cleft, respectively. Our findings are consistent with a positive association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and CL/P in male gender. The results support the importance of smoking prevention and introduction of cessation programs among women with childbearing potential. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between maternal smoking, gender, and cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Reis Barbosa Martelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P represent the most common congenital anomalies of the face. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between maternal smoking, gender and CL/P. METHODS: This is an epidemiological cross-sectional study. We interviewed 1519 mothers divided into two groups: Cases: mothers of children with CL/P (n = 843 and Controls: mothers of children without CL/P (n = 676. All mothers were classified as smoker or non-smoker subjects during the first trimester of pregnancy. To determine an association among maternal smoking, gender, and CL/P, odds ratios were calculated and the adjustment was made by a logistic regression model. RESULTS: An association between maternal smoking and the presence of cleft was observed. There was also a strong association between male gender and the presence of cleft (OR = 3.51; 95% CI 2.83-4.37. By binary logistic regression analysis, it was demonstrated that both variables were independently associated with clefts. In a multivariate analysis, male gender and maternal smoking had a 2.5- and a 1.5-time greater chance of having a cleft, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our findings are consistent with a positive association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and CL/P in male gender. The results support the importance of smoking prevention and introduction of cessation programs among women with childbearing potential.

  18. Presurgical cleft lip and palate orthopedics: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzain, Ibtesam; Batwa, Waeil; Cash, Alex; Murshid, Zuhair A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and/or palate go through a lifelong journey of multidisciplinary care, starting from before birth and extending until adulthood. Presurgical orthopedic (PSO) treatment is one of the earliest stages of this care plan. In this paper we provide a review of the PSO treatment. This review should help general and specialist dentists to better understand the cleft patient care path and to be able to answer patient queries more efficiently. The objectives of this paper were to review the basic principles of PSO treatment, the various types of techniques used in this therapy, and the protocol followed, and to critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of some of these techniques. In conclusion, we believe that PSO treatment, specifically nasoalveolar molding, does help to approximate the segments of the cleft maxilla and does reduce the intersegment space in readiness for the surgical closure of cleft sites. However, what we remain unable to prove equivocally at this point is whether the reduction in the dimensions of the cleft presurgically and the manipulation of the nasal complex benefit our patients in the long term. PMID:28615974

  19. Alveolar cleft closure by osseodistraction: pitfalls and troubleshooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichelmayer, Margit; Zemann, Wolfgang

    2012-03-01

    Segmental maxillary osseodistraction is a proper method to close alveolar gaps in patients with clefts of lip, palate, and alveolus. The technique is mainly used in very wide clefts after failure of conventional bone grafting procedures. The aim of the study was to analyze problems that may occur during the distraction process. Patients with uncommon wide alveolar clefts or recurrent oronasal fistulas and patients with bilateral clefts of lip, plate, and alveolus and an additional vertical deficit of the posterior cleft segment underwent distraction procedures. The patients were subdivided according to the vector of distraction: linear (following the dental arch) and vertical. The devices for horizontal distraction were tooth-borne and manufactured to the specific clinical situation. For vertical distraction, standard devices were used. Of this sample, patients with complications occurring during or after surgery and during the distraction period were selected as the study participants. On the basis of the data collected on these complications, the need for additional bone grafting procedures was evaluated. Results suggest that modifications in preoperative planning and the construction of the distraction devices may be necessary to prevent unexpected problems in segmental maxillary distraction procedures. Considerations concerning the placement of distraction devices are discussed.

  20. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Shanghai, China: Evidence for an autosomal major locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marazita, M.L. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)); Hu, Dan-Ning; Liu, You-E. (Zhabei Eye Institute, Shanghai (China)); Spence, A. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Melnick, M. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Orientals are at higher risk for cleft lip with our without cleft palate (CL[+-] P) than Caucasians or blacks. The authors collected demographic and family data to study factors contributing to the etiology of CL[+-]P in Shanghai. The birth incidence of nonsyndromic CL[+-]P (SHanghai 1980-87) was 1.11/1,000, with a male/female ratio of 1.42. Almost 2,000 nonsyndromic CL[+-]P probands were ascertained from individuals operated on during the years 1956-83 at surgical hospitals in Shanghai. Detailed family histories and medical examinations were obtained for the probands and all available family members. Genetic analysis of the probands' families were performed under the mixed model with major locus (ML) and multifactorial (MFT) components. The hypothesis of no familial transmission and of MFT alone could be rejected. Of the ML models, the autosomal recessive was significantly most likely and was assumed for testing three complex hypothesis: (1) ML and sporadics; (2) ML and MFT; (3) ML, MFT, and sporadics. None of the complex models were more likely than the ML alone model. In conclusion, the best-fitting, most parsimonious model for CL[+-]P in Shanghai was that of an autosomal recessive major locus. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Facial aesthetics and perceived need for further treatment among adults with repaired cleft as assessed by cleft team professionals and laypersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Peter; Sampson, Wayne; Roberts, Rachel; Jamieson, Lisa; David, David

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the ratings of professionals and laypeople with and without a cleft regarding the facial aesthetics of adult patients previously treated for orofacial clefting. The necessity for further treatment, as perceived by the respective groups, is also compared. The design of the study was a cross-sectional study. Professionals (two plastic surgeons, one dentist, one orthodontist, and one psychologist) and laypeople (one male and one female adult without a cleft and one male and one female adult with a cleft) were recruited to rate photographs of 80 non-syndromic cleft patients treated by the Australian Craniofacial Unit from 1975 to 2009. Facial aesthetics were measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). High values indicated good aesthetics. Necessity for further treatment was also measured by a VAS (0-100 mm). High values indicated high perceived need for further treatment. The professionals rated facial aesthetics significantly lower and had a lower perception of need for further treatment than the raters with and without a cleft. The laypeople with a cleft rated facial aesthetics significantly higher and had a lower perceived need for further treatment than laypeople without a cleft. The non-surgical professionals rated facial aesthetics significantly lower and had a lower perceived need for further treatment than the surgical professionals. Differences exist in the facial aesthetics ratings and perceived need for further surgery between professionals and laypeople with and without a cleft. This should be considered when managing cleft treatment expectations.

  2. Cleft size at the time of palate repair in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate as an indicator of maxillary growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Y-F; Prasad, N K K; Chiu, Y-T; Yun, C; Chen, P K-T

    2010-10-01

    Cleft size at the time of palate repair might affect the difficulty of surgical repair and, thus, indirectly postoperative maxillary growth. This retrospective study aimed to determine whether a correlation existed between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the growth of the maxilla. Maxillary dental casts of 39 infants with non-syndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, taken at the time of palate repair, were used to measure cleft size. Cleft size was defined as the percentage of the total palatal area. The later growth of the maxilla was determined using lateral and postero-anterior cephalometric radiographs taken at 9 years of age. The Pearson correlation analysis was used for statistical analysis. The results showed negative correlations between cleft size and the maxillary length (PMP-ANS, PMP-A) and the maxillary protrusion (S-N-ANS, SNA). These data suggest that in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate there is a significant correlation between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the maxillary length and protrusion. Patients with a large cleft at the time of palate repair have a shorter and more retrusive maxilla than those with a small cleft by the age of 9 years.

  3. Nasal Airway Dysfunction in Children with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study, with Anatomical and Surgical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Danielle L; Allori, Alexander C; Carlson, Anna R; Pien, Irene J; Watkins, Stephanie E; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Meyer, Robert E; Pimenta, Luiz A; Strauss, Ronald P; Ramsey, Barry L; Raynor, Eileen; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    The aesthetic aspects of the cleft lip nasal deformity have been appreciated for over a century, but the functional implications have remained largely underappreciated or misunderstood. This study describes the frequency and severity of nasal obstructive symptoms among children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, addressing the hypotheses that age, cleft type, and severity are associated with the development of nasal obstructive symptoms. Children with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate and a comparison group of unaffected children born from 1997 to 2003 were identified through the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program and birth certificates. Nasal airway obstruction was measured using the validated Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale. The survey was completed by parental proxy for 176 children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and 333 unaffected children. Nasal obstructive symptoms were more frequently reported in cleft lip with cleft palate compared with unaffected children (p teams to consider using this or similar screening methods to identify which children may benefit from functional rhinoplasty. Risk, I.

  4. Initial size of cleft does not correlate with size and function of nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Erika; Andlin-Sobocki, Anna; Mani, Maria; Holmström, Mats

    2011-06-01

    The noses of patients with clefts are often functionally inadequate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between size of the maxillary cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). This is a long-term follow up study including 53 patients with UCLP born between 1960 and 1987 and treated at the Cleft Lip and Palate Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Lip repair was performed at 3-4 months of age followed by either a one-stage or a two-stage palatal closure. The size of the cleft was measured on infant maxillary dental casts. Nasal minimum cross-sectional area (cm(2)) and volume (cm(3)) (acoustic rhinometry), air flow resistance (Pa s/cm(3)) (rhinomanometry), peak inspiratory flow (l/min) (peak nasal inspiratory flow) and number of identified odours (Scandinavian odor-identification test) were assessed in adulthood. The size of the maxillary cleft varied considerably at infancy. The size of the nasal airway and its function on the cleft side in adulthood were reduced compared with the non-cleft side, but no correlations were found between size of the initial cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood. In adults born with UCLP, therefore, size of the maxillary cleft in infancy does not seem to affect size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood.

  5. Dental age in children with a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyskens, R.W.F.; Katsaros, C.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess dental age in children with a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate and to compare this with a noncleft control group. DESIGN: Two-group, mixed-longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: Cleft group from an academic center for cleft lip and palate treatment. Noncleft control group

  6. Unilateral cleft lip and palate : treatment outcome and long-term craniofacial growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollet, Petrus Josephus Paulinus Maria

    2006-01-01

    Treatment results of children with a complete Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate (UCLP) from the Cleft Palate Craniofacial Unit of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre were evaluated and compared with prominent European cleft centers. Treatment outcome of the Nijmegen patients with UCLP and

  7. A Population-Based Study of Effects of Genetic Loci on Orofacial Clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno Uribe, L M; Fomina, T; Munger, R G

    2017-01-01

    Prior genome-wide association studies for oral clefts have focused on clinic-based samples with unclear generalizability. Prior samples were also small for investigating effects by cleft type and exclusively studied isolated clefts (those occurring without other birth defects). We estimated the e...

  8. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  9. Children with Diagnoses of Cleft Lip and/or Palate: What School Psychologists Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewicz, Eva Aleksandra; Ausikaitis, Ashley Etzel; Kapp-Simon, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a review of the literature on orofacial clefting in children. The authors review the etiology, prevalence, and variations of clefting as well as issues related to neuropsychological, social, academic, emotional, and behavioral functioning of children with clefts. Finally, the authors discuss the implications for school…

  10. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  11. Dental age in children with a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyskens, R.W.F.; Katsaros, C.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess dental age in children with a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate and to compare this with a noncleft control group. DESIGN: Two-group, mixed-longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: Cleft group from an academic center for cleft lip and palate treatment. Noncleft control group f

  12. Speech and language development in toddlers with and without cleft palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priester, G. H.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, S. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The effect of early palate closure on speech and language development in children with cleft palate. Design: Comparative study. Setting: University Medical Center Groningen, Cleft Palate Team (The Netherlands). Materials and methods: Forty-three toddlers with cleft palate and thirty-two t

  13. Coexistence of hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-HBs in Chinese chronic hepatitis B virus patients relating to genotype C and mutations in the S and P gene reverse transcriptase region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwei; Hu, Tingting; Wang, Xinyu; Chen, Yuming; Huang, Minying; Yuan, Chao; Guan, Ming

    2012-04-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of the coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs and to analyze the clinical and virological features of infection, including amino acid (aa) patterns of the S gene and reverse transcriptase (RT) region in Chinese chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Fifty-four (2.90%) CHB patients who were positive for both HBsAg and anti-HBs were tested, and sequences were obtained from 52 of them as well as 48 patients from a control group. S gene and RT region sequences were amplified and sequenced using in-house protocols. There was no significant difference between patients with and without anti-HBs with regard to age, gender, alanine aminotransferase level, and the proportion positive for HBeAg and HBcAb. The occurrence of genotype C (P = 0.001) and anti-HBeAb positivity (P = 0.027) was significantly higher in HBsAg+/anti-HBs+ individuals. In the S gene, the number of mutated residues in the HBsAg+/anti-HBs+ group was markedly higher than in control patients (1.88 versus 1.02 substitutions per 100 amino acids, P = 0.022). The amino acid exchange occurred mostly within the N-terminal region (2.15 versus 0.87 substitutions per 100 amino acids, P = 0.023) and the "a" determinant (3.61 versus 1.56 substitutions per 100 amino acids, P = 0.049) in the two groups. In the RT region, the mean number of substitution per 100 aa showed a tendency to be significantly higher in HBsAg+/anti-HBs+ patients than in controls (2.34 versus 1.46, P = 0.040). This study showed a prevalence of coexistence of anti-HBs in HBsAg-positive patients and an increased frequency of genotype C and aa variability within both HBsAg and RT involving functionally important regions of those proteins.

  14. Treatment outcome after neonatal cleft lip repair in 5-year-old children with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košková, Olga; Vokurková, Jitka; Vokurka, Jan; Bryšova, Alena; Šenovský, Pavel; Čefelínová, Julie; Lukášová, Darina; Dorociaková, Petra; Abelovský, Juraj

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess speech outcomes and dental arch relationship of 5-year-old Czech patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) who have undergone neonatal cleft lip repair and one-stage palatal closure. Twenty-three patients with UCLP, born between 2009 and 2010, were included in the study. Three universal speech parameters (hypernasality, articulation and speech intelligibility) have been devised for speech recordings evaluation. Outcomes of dental arch relationship were evaluated by applying the GOSLON Yardstick and subsequently compared with the GOSLON outcome of other cleft centers. Moderate hypernasality was present in most cases, the mean value for articulation and speech intelligibility was 2.07 and 1.93, respectively. The Kappa values for inter-examiner agreement for all the three speech outcomes ranged from 0.786 to 0.808. Sixty-three percent of patients were scored GOSLON 1 and 2, 26% GOSLON 3, and 10% GOSLON 4. GOSLON mean score was 2.35. Interrater agreement was very good, represented by kappa value of 0.867. The treatment protocol, involving neonatal cleft lip repair and one-stage palatal repair performed up to the first year of UCLP patient's life, has shown good speech outcomes and produced very good treatment results in regard to maxillary growth, comparable with other cleft centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Association between non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and environmental factors in Ningxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lili, Yu; Jian, Ma; Junpeng, Gao; Kun, Zhai; Jinfang, Zhu; Yongqing, Huang

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the association between non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) and environmental factors in Ningxia population. This case-control study involved 453 NSCL/P patients and 452 normal newborns from Ningxia. A questionnaire focusing on various factors, including family history, pregnancy reaction, drug use during pregnancy, and infections, was used and responses were analyzed through Chi-square test and Logistic regression analysis with SPSS 16.0. The constituent ratio of different types of NSCL/P was cleft lip∶cleft lip and palate∶cleft palate equal to 1︰2.02︰1.51. Logistic regression analysis revealed that abnormal pregnancy, infection, abortion, drugs, drinking, smoking, and living near factories likely increased the risk of NSCL/P (P<0.05). Single fetus, pregnancy-related nausea, vomiting, parents' moderate tastes, and eating soy foods and fruits decreased the risk of NSCL/P (P<0.05). The incidence of NSCL/P should be reduced to enhance the conditions of women during pregnancy by maintaining a balanced diet and avoiding infections, abortion, drugs, and negative habits. 
.

  16. A novel mutation in IRF6 resulting in VWS-PPS spectrum disorder with renal aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Filipe; Hansen, Lars; Mawlad, Evete; Eiberg, Hans; Asklund, Camilla; Tommerup, Niels; Jakobsen, Linda P

    2008-06-15

    Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) and Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) are caused by mutations in the gene interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6). Skeletal, genital malformations and involvement of the skin occur in PPS and orofacial clefting and lip pits occur in both. We report on a patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate, ankyloblepharon, paramedian lip pits, unilateral renal aplasia, and a coronal hypospadias. By sequencing IRF6, we detected a novel missense mutation (Arg339Ile). The other family members were unaffected and had no IRF6 mutations, including the patient's brother who was also born with hypospadias. The patient and his brother were both conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF). It is discussed whether the renal malformation in the patient is related to the IVF procedure or to the IRF6 mutation.

  17. An illusionary prosthetic design for a unilateral cleft palate patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andaç Barkın Bavbek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosthetic rehabilitation is an important part of the cleft lip and palate therapy assisting orthodontic and orthognathic treatments. Prosthesis does not only help to improve function and aesthetics but also needs to facilitate a better oral health. The aim of this report is to introduce the prosthetic approach of a 21-year-old female unilateral cleft palate patient that considered reinforcing the mobile canine adjacent to the cleft, easing the elimination of dental plaque from the remaining fistula and reaching an accurate occlusion. Facial aesthetics was established by the illusionary effect of a removable crown complex which is joined onto a fixed partial denture with a precision attachment system.

  18. Facial tissue depths in children with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is a craniofacial malformation affecting more than seven million people worldwide that results in defects of the hard palate, teeth, maxilla, nasal spine and floor, and maxillodental asymmetry. CLP facial soft-tissue depth (FSTD) values have never been published. The purpose of this research is to report CLP FSTD values and compare them to previously published FSTD values for normal children. Thirty-eight FSTDs were measured on cone beam computed tomography images of CLP children (n = 86; 7-17 years). MANOVA and ANOVA tests determined whether cleft type, age, sex, and bone graft surgical status affect tissue depths. Both cleft type (unilateral/bilateral) and age influence FSTDs. CLP FSTDs exhibit patterns of variation that differ from normal children, particularly around the oronasal regions of the face. These differences should be taken into account when facial reconstructions of children with CLP are created.

  19. Examine your orofacial cleft patients for Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, J T; Kreusch, T

    1997-07-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is characterized by four primary symptoms: multiple nevoid basal cell epitheliomas that usually undergo malignant transformation; jaw keratocysts that show constant growth; skeletal anomalies; and intracranial calcifications. A myriad of additional findings may also be noted. Among the most frequent are: palmar and plantar pits, a characteristic flattened facies and broad nasal root, frontal and parietal bossing, mandibular prognathia, hypertelorism, strabismus, dystrophia of the canthi, and clefts of the lip, alveolus, and/or palate. In this study, we review the literature and our 25 cases of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome patients, questioning their incidence of cleft formations (8.5%) as compared to the general population (0.1%). It is our contention that all patients who present with an orofacial cleft warrant deeper investigation as to the presence of additional signs indicative of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. The nevi turn malignant with time, and thus, early diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment are imperative.

  20. Fixed prosthetic treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajevska Jagoda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prosthetic treatment of patients with cleft palate includes various treatment options such as fixed partial dentures, removable partial prosthesis, etc. The type of prosthetic appliance is determined by the oral health of each individual and the circumstances. We presented three adult patients with the cleft lip and palate subjected to prosthetic treatment. Case report. From the possible prosthetic solutions according to the conditions in the oral cavity and the circumstances, fixed partial dentures veneered with composite or ceramic were chosen. A proper relationship between the teeth was reached with the fixed partial dentures, and function established, the phonetics improved and satisfying aesthetics effect accomplished improving the profile appearance of the patient’s face. Plastic surgery of the nose was performed after that. Conclusion. Multidisclipinary treatment is necessary for favourable long-term outcome in cleft lip and palate patients.

  1. Cleft Lip Nasal Deformity After Mucormycosis Infection: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Orhan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is an acute fulminant fungal infection. Mucormycosis usually accompanies uncontrolled diabetes [in particular, patients with ketoacidosis], malignancies like lymphoma or leukemia, renal failure, organ transplantations, long-term corticosteroid or immunosuppressant therapy, and conditions including burns, cirrhosis, protein-energy malnutrition or AIDS, though it also may be seen in healthy individuals. A 21-year-old male patient applied to our clinic with cleft lip and nasal deformity. It was understood from his medical history that he was diagnosed with lymphoma at age 10 and he developed an infection in his palate and nose during the treatment course. His cleft palate and nasal deformity was repaired by surgery in our clinic. Herein we reported a case of nasal deformity and incomplete cleft palate caused by mucormycosis infection.

  2. TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Remke (Marc); E.A. Ramaswamy; M. Peacock (Munro); D.J.H. Shih (David J.); C. Koelsche (Christian); P.A. Northcott (Paul A.); N. Hill (Nadia); S. Cavalli (Silvia); M. Kool (Marcel); X. Wang (Xin); S. Mack (Stephen); M. Barszczyk (Mark); A.S. Morrissy (A. Sorana); X. Wu (Xiaochong); S. Agnihotri (Sameer); P. Luu (Phan); D. Jones (David); L. Garzia (Livia); A.M. Dubuc (Adrian); N. Zhukova (Nataliya); R. Vanner (Robert); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.J. French (Pim); E.G. van Meir (Erwin); R. Vibhakar (Rajeev); K. Zitterbart (Karel); J.A. Chan (Jennifer); L. Bognár (László); A. Klekner (Almos); B. Lach (Boleslaw); S. Jung (Shin); F. Saad (Fred); L.M. Liau (Linda); S. Albrecht (Steffen); M. Zollo (Maurizio); M.K. Cooper (Michael); R.C. Thompson (Reid); O. Delattre (Olivier); F. Bourdeaut (Franck); F.F. Doz (François); M. Garami (Miklós); P. Hauser (Peter); C.G. Carlotti (Carlos); T.E. Van Meter (Timothy); L. Massimi (Luca); D. Fults (Daniel); L.W. Pomeroy (Laura); T. Kumabe (Toshiro); Y.S. Ra (Young Shin); J.R. Leonard (Jeffrey); S.K. Elbabaa (Samer); J. Mora (Jaume); J.B. Rubin (Joshua); Y.-J. Cho (Yoon-Jae); R.E. McLendon (Roger); D.D. Bigner (Darell); C.G. Eberhart (Charles); M. Fouladi (Maryam); R.J. Wechsler-Reya (Robert); R. Faria (Rui); S.E. Croul (Sidney); A. Huang (Anding); E. Bouffet (Eric); C.E. Hawkins (Cynthia); M. Dirks (Maaike); W.A. Weiss (William); U. Schüller (Ulrich); A. Pollack (Aaron); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); D. Meyronet (David); A. Jouvet (Anne); M. Fèvre-Montange (Michelle); N. Jabado (Nada); M. Perek-Polnik (Marta); W.A. Grajkowska (Wieslawa); S.-K. Kim (Seung-Ki); J.T. Rutka (James); E. Malkin (Elissa); U. Tabori (Uri); S.M. Pfister (Stefan); A. Korshunov (Andrey); A. von Deimling (Andreas); M.D. Taylor (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTelomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations were recently shown to drive telomerase activity in various cancer types, including medulloblastoma. However, the clinical and biological implications of TERT mutations in medulloblastoma have not been described. Hence, we sought

  3. TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Remke (Marc); E.A. Ramaswamy; M. Peacock (Munro); D.J.H. Shih (David J.); C. Koelsche (Christian); P.A. Northcott (Paul A.); N. Hill (Nadia); S. Cavalli (Silvia); M. Kool (Marcel); X. Wang (Xin); S. Mack (Stephen); M. Barszczyk (Mark); A.S. Morrissy (A. Sorana); X. Wu (Xiaochong); S. Agnihotri (Sameer); P. Luu (Phan); D. Jones (David); L. Garzia (Livia); A.M. Dubuc (Adrian); N. Zhukova (Nataliya); R. Vanner (Robert); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.J. French (Pim); E.G. van Meir (Erwin); R. Vibhakar (Rajeev); K. Zitterbart (Karel); J.A. Chan (Jennifer); L. Bognár (László); A. Klekner (Almos); B. Lach (Boleslaw); S. Jung (Shin); F. Saad (Fred); L.M. Liau (Linda); S. Albrecht (Steffen); M. Zollo (Maurizio); M.K. Cooper (Michael); R.C. Thompson (Reid); O. Delattre (Olivier); F. Bourdeaut (Franck); F.F. Doz (François); M. Garami (Miklós); P. Hauser (Peter); C.G. Carlotti (Carlos); T.E. Van Meter (Timothy); L. Massimi (Luca); D. Fults (Daniel); L.W. Pomeroy (Laura); T. Kumabe (Toshiro); Y.S. Ra (Young Shin); J.R. Leonard (Jeffrey); S.K. Elbabaa (Samer); J. Mora (Jaume); J.B. Rubin (Joshua); Y.-J. Cho (Yoon-Jae); R.E. McLendon (Roger); D.D. Bigner (Darell); C.G. Eberhart (Charles); M. Fouladi (Maryam); R.J. Wechsler-Reya (Robert); R. Faria (Rui); S.E. Croul (Sidney); A. Huang (Anding); E. Bouffet (Eric); C.E. Hawkins (Cynthia); M. Dirks (Maaike); W.A. Weiss (William); U. Schüller (Ulrich); A. Pollack (Aaron); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); D. Meyronet (David); A. Jouvet (Anne); M. Fèvre-Montange (Michelle); N. Jabado (Nada); M. Perek-Polnik (Marta); W.A. Grajkowska (Wieslawa); S.-K. Kim (Seung-Ki); J.T. Rutka (James); E. Malkin (Elissa); U. Tabori (Uri); S.M. Pfister (Stefan); A. Korshunov (Andrey); A. von Deimling (Andreas); M.D. Taylor (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTelomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations were recently shown to drive telomerase activity in various cancer types, including medulloblastoma. However, the clinical and biological implications of TERT mutations in medulloblastoma have not been described. Hence, we sought

  4. Alveolar bone grafting with simultaneous cleft lip rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Eun; Han, Jihyeon; Baek, Rong-Min; Kim, Baek-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    Optimal timing for cleft lip rhinoplasty is controversial. Definitive rhinoplasty is deferred until facial skeletal growth is completed. Intermediate rhinoplasty is performed after stabilization of the grafted alveolar bone, because the grafted bone tends to be absorbed over several months postoperatively, distorting the nasal profile. Here, we report our experience with simultaneous rhinoplasty during alveolar bone grafting for indicated patients, describe our surgical technique that ensures long-term bone graft survival, and report graft take rates and nasal profile changes. This retrospective chart review included a total of 54 patients; 44 underwent alveolar bone grafting only, and 10 underwent simultaneous cleft lip rhinoplasty. All surgeries were conducted with a judicious mucosal incision for tensionless wound closure. Bone graft take was evaluated with dental radiographs by the Bergland classification. Further, nasal aesthetic outcome was evaluated with medical photographs, based on nostril height and width and alar base width. In total, 96.3% of clefts showed graft success with Type I (66.7%) or Type II (27.8%) classifications; only 3.7% of clefts showed unfavorable results classified as Type III, and no clefts showed Type IV failure. The nasal shape was flatter with a decreased nostril height and increased nostril width after alveolar bone grafting, while nostril height was increased and nostril width was decreased in patients who underwent simultaneous rhinoplasty. With surgical techniques ensuring alveolar bone graft survival, simultaneous cleft lip rhinoplasty can result in nasal aesthetic improvement for patients with severe nasal deformities, decreasing the number of operations. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dislocated Tongue Muscle Attachment and Cleft Palate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouskoura, T; El Fersioui, Y; Angelini, M; Graf, D; Katsaros, C; Chiquet, M

    2016-04-01

    In Pierre Robin sequence, a retracted tongue due to micrognathia is thought to physically obstruct palatal shelf elevation and thereby cause cleft palate. However, micrognathia is not always associated with palatal clefting. Here, by using the Bmp7-null mouse model presenting with cleft palate and severe micrognathia, we provide the first causative mechanism linking the two. In wild-type embryos, the genioglossus muscle, which mediates tongue protrusion, originates from the rostral process of Meckel's cartilage and later from the mandibular symphysis, with 2 tendons positive for Scleraxis messenger RNA. In E13.5 Bmp7-null embryos, a rostral process failed to form, and a mandibular symphysis was absent at E17.5. Consequently, the genioglossus muscle fibers were diverted toward the lingual surface of Meckel's cartilage and mandibles, where they attached in an aponeurosis that ectopically expressed Scleraxis. The deflection of genioglossus fibers from the anterior-posterior toward the medial-lateral axis alters their direction of contraction and necessarily compromises tongue protrusion. Since this muscle abnormality precedes palatal shelf elevation, it is likely to contribute to clefting. In contrast, embryos with a cranial mesenchyme-specific deletion of Bmp7 (Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre) exhibited some degree of micrognathia but no cleft palate. In these embryos, a rostral process was present, indicating that mesenchyme-derived Bmp7 is dispensable for its formation. Moreover, the genioglossus appeared normal in Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre embryos, further supporting a role of aberrant tongue muscle attachment in palatal clefting. We thus propose that in Pierre Robin sequence, palatal shelf elevation is not impaired simply by physical obstruction by the tongue but by a specific developmental defect that leads to functional changes in tongue movements.

  6. Periconceptional health and lifestyle factors of both parents affect the risk of live-born children with orofacial clefts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krapels, Ingrid P. C.; Zielhuis, Gerhard A.; Vroom, Fokaline; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne-Marie; van der Molen, Aebele B. Mink; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P. M.

    BACKGROUND: Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) or cleft palate only (CPO) are orofacial clefts and have a multifactorial etiology. The identification of amendable parental risk factors may contribute to a reduced occurrence of these malformations in the future. METHODS:

  7. Periconceptional health and lifestyle factors of both parents affect the risk of live-born children with orofacial clefts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krapels, I.P.C.; Zielhuis, G.A.; Vroom, F.; Jong-van den Berg, L.T. de; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Molen, A.B. van der; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) or cleft palate only (CPO) are orofacial clefts and have a multifactorial etiology. The identification of amendable parental risk factors may contribute to a reduced occurrence of these malformations in the future. METHODS:

  8. Simplified feeding appliance for an infant with cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaila Masih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A child born with cleft palate may experience difficulties while feeding. Early surgical treatment may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain of the infant. The case presented here is of a 1-month-old neonate born with cleft palate, assisted with a new feeding appliance made with ethylene vinyl acetate using pressure molding technique to aid in proper feeding. The patient′s weight and health significantly improved after the insertion of obturator. The advantages of this material included being lightweight, moldability, good palatal fit and decreased soft tissue injury.

  9. EEC syndrome sans clefting: Variable clinical presentations in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakkar Sejal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft palate/lip syndrome (EEC is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome with varied presentation and is actually a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome leading to intra- and interfamilial differences in severity because of its variable expression and reduced penetrance. The cardinal features include ectrodactyly, sparse, wiry, hypopigmented hair, peg-shaped teeth with defective enamel and cleft palate/lip. A family comprising father, daughter and son presented to us with split hand-split foot deformity (ectrodactyly, epiphora, hair changes and deafness with variable involvement in each family member.

  10. Surgical management of cleft lip in pedo-patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taware, C P; Kulkarni, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Present article describes in short etiology of cleft lip and cleft palate. With this in-born defect, patient develops crucial problems with feeding, phonation, overall growth and development of affected and allied soft and hard tissue structures. This in turn results in deformity and asymmetry which is going to affect functional requirements as well as aesthetic outlook. Hence it really becomes mandatory to correct this defect surgically as early as possible, at stipulated timings so as to avoid present and future anticipated problems.

  11. Unilateral Cleft Lip: Principles and Practice of Surgical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Management of cleft lip and palate requires a unique understanding of the various dimensions of care to optimize outcomes of surgery. The breadth of treatment spans multiple disciplines and the length of treatment spans infancy to adulthood. Although the focus of reconstruction is on form and function, changes occur with growth and development. This review focuses on the surgical management of the primary cleft lip and nasal deformity. In addition to surgical treatment, the anatomy, clinical spectrum, preoperative care, and postoperative care are discussed. Principles of surgery are emphasized and controversies are highlighted. PMID:24179447

  12. Ectopic salivary gland tissue in a Rathke's cleft cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranucci, Valentina; Coli, Antonella; Marrucci, Eleonora; Paolo, Mattogno Pier; Della Pepa, Giuseppe; Anile, Carmelo; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2013-01-01

    The presence of salivary gland tissue in the sella turcica has rarely been reported, mainly after pituitary examination at autopsy. Only five symptomatic cases have previously been described, mainly associated with Rathke's cleft cyst. We report a 17-year-old boy presenting with headaches and hyperprolactinemia. The MRI showed a 19 mm sellar mass that at surgery revealed as a cystic lesion filled with mucinous fluid. The histological examination documented the presence of ectopic salivary gland tissue in the wall of a Rathke's cleft cyst. The present report focuses on the possible pitfalls when dealing with unusual sellar lesions, and the need of increased awareness of this rare condition.

  13. Stability after Cleft Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis or Conventional Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristian; Svenstrup, Martin; Pedersen, Thomas Klit

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare stability of maxillary advancements in patients with cleft lip and palate following distraction osteogenesis or orthognathic surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: INCLUSION CRITERIA: 1) cleft lip and palate, 2) advancement > 8 mm. Eleven patients comprised the distraction.......98 mm (P = 0.002) was observed in DOG. Horizontal overjet increased 11.62 mm (P = 0.001). A point-nasion-B point (ANB) angle increased 8.82° (P = 0.001). Aesthetic plane to upper lip was reduced 5.44 mm (P = 0.017) and the naso-labial angle increased 16.6° (P = 0.001). Vertical overbite (VOB) increased...

  14. Lateral facial cleft associated with accessory mandible having teeth, absent parotid gland and peripheral facial weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, D; Toplu, G; Türkseven, A; Senses, D A; Yiğit, B

    2014-07-01

    Transverse facial cleft is a very rare malformation. The Tessier no. 7 cleft is a lateral facial cleft which emanates from oral cavity and extends towards the tragus, involving both soft tissue and skeletal components. Here, we present a case having transverse facial cleft, accessory mandible having teeth, absent parotid gland and ipsilateral peripheral facial nerve weakness. After surgical repair of the cleft in 2-month of age, improvement of the facial nerve function was detected in 3-year of age. Resection of the accessory mandible was planned in 5-6 years of age.

  15. Tessier 3 Cleft in a Pre-Hispanic Anthropomorphic Figurine in El Salvador, Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ramon Manuel; Martinez, Maria Guadalupe

    2017-03-01

    In 1976, Paul Tessier provided a numerical classification system for rare facial clefts, numbered from 0 to 14. The Tessier 3 cleft is a rare facial cleft extending from the philtrum of the upper lip through the wing of the nostril, and reaches the medial canthus of the eye. The aim of this document was to describe a pre-Hispanic anthropomorphic figurine dating from the classic period (200 A.D.-900 A.D.), which has a Tessier 3 cleft. We also discuss the documented pre-Hispanic beliefs about facial clefts.

  16. Ethnic Variation in Oral Cleft Occurrence in Denmark 1981–2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Grete Skøtt; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2014-01-01

    cases were categorized into isolated and nonisolated cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P) and cleft palate only (CP). Birth prevalence was calculated as cases per 1,000 live born children by maternal country of origin, world region, and mixed parental groups. Results :   We identified 3094 OC cases......Objective :  To examine differences in oral cleft (OC) occurrence based on maternal only and parental country of origin in Denmark from 1981 to 2002. Methods :   Data on all live births from the Danish Medical Birth Register from 1981 to 2002 were linked with the Danish Facial Cleft Database. Cleft...

  17. Oblique lip-alveolar banding in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, S; Bütow, K-W

    2015-04-01

    We report an oblique lip-alveolar band, a rare banding of soft tissue that involves the lip and alveolus, which we have found in five patients with cleft lip and palate (0.2%), compared with an incidence of the Simonartz lip-lip band of 5.7%). To our knowledge this has not been reported previously. In two patients the bands affected the cleft lip and alveolus bilaterally, with or without the palatal cleft, and in three the bands were unilateral cleft lip and alveolus with or without the palatal cleft.

  18. Activation of Notch1 inhibits medial edge epithelium apoptosis in all-trans retinoic acid-induced cleft palate in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yadong; Dong, Shiyi; Wang, Weicai; Wang, Jianning [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510055 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510055 (China); Wang, Miao [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kiang Wu Hospital, Macao (China); Chen, Mu [Department of Stomatology, Nanshan Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College, Shenzhen (China); Hou, Jinsong [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510055 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510055 (China); Huang, Hongzhang, E-mail: drhuang52@163.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510055 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510055 (China)

    2016-08-26

    Administration of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) on E12.0 (embryonic day 12.0) leads to failure of medial edge epithelium (MEE) disappearance and cleft palate. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship between atRA and MEE remains to be identified. In this study, atRA (200 mg/kg) administered by gavage induced a 75% incidence of cleft palate in C57BL/6 mice. Notch1 was up-regulated in MEE cells in the atRA-treated group compared with the controls at E15.0, together with reduced apoptosis and elevated proliferation. Next, we investigated the mechanisms underlying atRA, Notch1 and MEE degradation in palate organ culture. Our results revealed that down-regulation of Notch1 partially rescued the inhibition of atRA-induced palate fusion. Molecular analysis indicated that atRA increased the expression of Notch1 and Rbpj and decreased the expression of P21. In addition, depletion of Notch1 expression decreased the expression of Rbpj and increased the expression of P21. Moreover, inhibition of Rbpj expression partially reversed atRA-induced MEE persistence and increased P21 expression. These findings demonstrate that atRA inhibits MEE degradation, which in turn induces a cleft palate, possibly through the Notch1/RBPjk/P21 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • atRA exposure on E12.0 induced MEE persistence and cleft palate. • Notch1 was up-regulated in MEE cells in the atRA-treated embryos. • atRA inhibits MEE degradation, which in turn induces cleft palate, possibly through the Notch1/RBPjk/P21 signaling pathway.

  19. The Role of the Velopharyngeal Sphincter in the Speech of Patients with Cleft Palate or Cleft Lip and Palate Using Perceptual Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Tatjana Georgievska-Jancheska; Juliana Gjorgova; Mirjana Popovska

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The velopharyngeal sphincter (VPS) plays the main role in speech formation. The cleft palate, due to the damage of the soft palate, leads to dysfunction of the velopharyngeal sphincter thus causing speech disorder. AIM: To establish a link between the nasal air escape and the perceptual symptoms in the speech of patients with cleft palate or cleft lip and palate using auditory-visual perceptual procedures for determining the influence the velopharyngeal dysfunction has on spee...

  20. Reversible Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    will have been introduced. 9. Reversible celular autemata We shall assume the reader to have some familiarity with the concept of cel- lular...10003 Mr. Kin B. Thcmpson 1 copy Technical Director Information Systems Divisia.i Naval Research Laboratory (OP-91T) Technical Information Division

  1. Early hard palate closure using a vomer flap in unilateral cleft lip and palate: effects on cleft width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Johanna P; Breugem, Corstiaan C

    2014-05-01

    Although no universal consensus exists on treatment of cleft palates, early hard palate closure is commonly performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of a vomer flap for early hard palate closure on residual palatal cleft width in patients with a unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Forty-seven UCLP patients were retrospectively divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 25 patients who underwent early lip closure and simultaneous hard palate closure using a vomer flap. Group B included 22 patients who had lip closure only at first surgery. Palatal cleft widths of both groups were measured at two time points and were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test to examine the influence of vomerplasty in this very early stage. No significant difference of baseline characteristics between the groups was found, and comparison of age at the time of surgeries was not significantly different. Mean age at the time of vomerplasty was 4.0 months. After the first surgery, a significantly greater total cleft width reduction of 5.0 mm average was found in group A compared to only 1.5 mm reduction in group B. This reduction took place after an average of 7.1 and 7.0 months, respectively. Lip closure accompanied by early hard palate closure using a vomer flap is associated with a significant postoperative reduction of the residual cleft when compared to lip closure only. This study shows another great advantage of performing early hard palate closure using a vomer flap.

  2. Maxillary growth in a congenital cleft palate canine model for surgical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradas-Lara, Irene; Casado-Gómez, Inmaculada; Martín, Conchita; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; López-Gordillo, Yamila; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; Chamorro, Manuel; Arias, Pablo; Maldonado, Estela; Ortega, Ricardo; Berenguer, Beatriz; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    We have recently presented the Old Spanish Pointer dog, with a 15-20% spontaneous congenital cleft palate rate, as a unique experimental model of this disease. This study aimed to describe the cleft palate of these dogs for surgical research purposes and to determine whether congenital cleft palate influences maxillofacial growth. Seven newborn Old Spanish Pointer dogs of both sexes, comprising a cleft palate group (n = 4) and a normal palate group (n = 3), were fed using the same technique. Macroscopic photographs and plaster casts from the palate, lateral radiographs and computer tomograms of the skull were taken sequentially over 41 weeks, starting at week 5. The cleft morphology, the size and the tissue characteristics in these dogs resembled the human cleft better than current available animal models. During growth, the cleft width varies. Most of the transverse and longitudinal measures of the palate were statistically lower in the cleft palate group. The cleft palate group showed hypoplasia of the naso-maxillary complex. This model of congenital cleft palate seems suitable for surgical research purposes. A reduced maxillofacial pre- and post-natal development is associated to the congenital cleft palate in the Old Spanish Pointer dog.

  3. Radiology of Cleft Lip and Palate: Imaging for the Prenatal Period and throughout Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Zachary R; Peacock, Zachary S; Cohen, Harris L; Choudhri, Asim F

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in prenatal imaging have made possible the in utero diagnosis of cleft lip and palate and associated deformities. Postnatal diagnosis of cleft lip is made clinically, but imaging still plays a role in detection of associated abnormalities, surgical treatment planning, and screening for or surveillance of secondary deformities. This article describes the clinical entities of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate and documents their prenatal and postnatal appearances at radiography, ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and computed tomography (CT). Imaging protocols and findings for prenatal screening, detection of associated anomalies, and evaluation of secondary deformities throughout life are described and illustrated. CLP and isolated cleft palate are distinct entities with shared radiologic appearances. Prenatal US and MR imaging can depict clefting of the lip or palate and associated anomalies. While two- and three-dimensional US often can depict cleft lip, visualization of cleft palate is more difficult, and repeat US or fetal MR imaging should be performed if cleft palate is suspected. Postnatal imaging can assist in identifying associated abnormalities and dentofacial deformities. Dentofacial sequelae of cleft lip and palate include missing and supernumerary teeth, oronasal fistulas, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hearing loss, maxillary growth restriction, and airway abnormalities. Secondary deformities can often be found incidentally at imaging performed for other purposes, but detection is necessary because they may have considerable implications for the patient.

  4. Prevention of orofacial clefts caused by smoking: implications of the Surgeon General's report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honein, Margaret A; Devine, Owen; Grosse, Scott D; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2014-11-01

    According to the 2014 Surgeon General's Report, smoking in early pregnancy can cause orofacial clefts. We sought to examine the implications of this causal link for the potential prevention of orofacial clefts in the United States. Using published data on the strength of the association between orofacial clefts and smoking in early pregnancy and the prevalence of smoking at the start of pregnancy, we estimated the attributable fraction for smoking as a cause of orofacial clefts. We then used the prevalence of orofacial clefts in the United States to estimate the number of orofacial clefts that could be prevented in the United States each year by eliminating exposure to smoking during early pregnancy. We also estimated the financial impact of preventing orofacial clefts caused by maternal smoking based on a published estimate of attributable healthcare costs through age 10 for orofacial clefts. The estimated attributable fraction of orofacial clefts caused by smoking in early pregnancy was 6.1% (95% uncertainty interval 4.4%, 7.7%). Complete elimination of smoking in early pregnancy could prevent orofacial clefts in approximately 430 infants per year in the United States, and could save an estimated $40.4 million in discounted healthcare costs through age 10 for each birth cohort. Understanding the magnitude of the preventable burden of orofacial clefts related to maternal smoking could help focus smoking cessation efforts on women who might become pregnant. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Root development of permanent lateral incisor in cleft lip and palate children: A radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarlal Deepti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the root development of lateral incisor on the cleft side with the root development of its contralateral tooth in cleft lip and palate children. Setting: Cleft lip and palate wing, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: A sample of 96 orthopantamograms of patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and/or cleft palate was selected, regardless of sex and race. Main Outcome Measure: Orthopantamograms were analyzed for root development of lateral incisor on the cleft and noncleft side. Associated anomalies like hypodontia, supernumerary teeth, malformed lateral incisors and root development of canine, if present, were recorded. Findings and Conclusions: Root development of permanent lateral incisor was delayed on the cleft side compared to the noncleft side. There was a statistically significant relationship between levels of root development of lateral incisors on the cleft side within the different study groups ( P < 0.05. Incidence of hypodontia increased in proportion to cleft severity. Frequency of missing second premolars, supernumerary teeth and malformed lateral incisors increased in cleft lip and palate patients. Root development of canine showed a slight delay on the cleft side when compared to the canine on the noncleft side.

  6. 3D computed tomographic evaluation of secondary alveolar bone grafts in cleft lip and palate patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, Fumio; Akai, Hidemi; Hosaka, Yoshiaki [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-04-01

    Alveolar bone grafting in patients with cleft lip and palate has becomes a routine part of most treatment regimes. This study was undertaken to estimate how much bone needs to be grafted into the cleft cavity and to evaluate the grafted bone using 3-DCT over a period from the early postoperative stage to after one year. Seventy-five patients divided into four groups according to the type of cleft were studied. All patients underwent secondary alveolar bone grafting using particulate cancellous bone from the anterior iliac crest. The bone graft areas were divided into two regions: the extra-cleft region and the intra-cleft region. The weight and the volume of the grafted bone were correlated and the average density was 1.5 g/ml regardless of the cleft type. The bone in the extra-cleft region could be seen in almost all slices of the CT scans, from the lower alveolar process to the piriform aperture. The extra-cleft graft ratio of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate is higher than that of cleft lip and alveolus. The extra-cleft grafting is necessary to restore facial symmetry. The grafted bone was decreased in both height and volume following three months and adequate bone bridging was maintained for one year. We concluded that 3-DCT findings are one of the most valuable methods to evaluate postoperative conditions after alveolar bone grafting. (author)

  7. Isolated cleft of the ala nasi: A report of seven cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rajesh Jinka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial clefts other than cleft lip & palate are reported to be 1.4 to 4.9 per 100,000 live births. Of these, clefts of nose are usually associated with other clefts. Isolated cleft of Ala is rare, 0.7% of all clefts reported by Monasterio. In an analysis of photographic records of 3,500 consecutive patients with craniofacial clefts including cleft lip & palate registered with us between 1985- 2012 which were accessed through our data base, 13 patients with nasal clefts were identified, seven out of which had Isolated cleft of the Ala. All were treated by a rotation flap of the Ala with good results with the longest follow up of 14Yrs. The authors have emphasised the rarity of the condition and presented a simple surgical procedure for correction. In the opinion of the authors this very simple procedure which can be performed by the junior surgeon gives a good long term result in the management of cleft Ala.

  8. A Case of Complex Facial Clefts Treated with Staged-tissue Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Ueda, MD, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Craniofacial clefts involve all soft tissue and skeletal elements throughout the cleft. Usefulness of tissue expansion in craniofacial clefts is reported. Surgery for a complex type of facial clefts is more difficult and more extensive than for a simple one. We experienced a primary case of complex facial clefts (Tessier No. 2 and 12 on the right and 3, 11, and 5 on the left. Soft-tissue closure of all clefts could be completed by using 4 tissue expanders and 7 operations. Because multiple tissue deficiencies and abnormalities exist in craniofacial clefts, especially complex type, a planned, staged, sequential approach by tissue expansion is necessary to produce ideal results.

  9. GFA Taq I polymorphism and cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lijia; Ma, Lian

    2015-01-01

    The transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) Taq I polymorphism has been indicated to be correlated with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) susceptibility, but study results are still debatable. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted. We conducted a comprehensive search of Embase, Ovid, Web of Science, the Cochrane database, PubMed, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM-disc, 1979-2014), the database of National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1979-2014) and the full paper database of Chinese Science and Technology of Chongqing (VIP, 1989-2014) to identify suitable studies. There were 18 studies suitable for this meta-analysis, involving a total of 3135 cases and 3575 controls. Significantly increased CL/P risk was observed (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.17-1.89; P = 0.001). In subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, there was evidence in the Caucasian population for an association between this polymorphism and CL/P risk (OR = 1.52; 95% CI 1.14-2.02; P = 0.004). However, no significant association was found between this his polymorphism and CL/P risk in African and Hispanic populations. According to a specific CL/P type, increased clip lip and palate risk and clip palate risk were found (OR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.10-1.73; P = 0.005; OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.01-1.66; P = 0.042). In conclusion, the present meta-analysis found that the TGFA Taq I polymorphism may be associated with CL/P susceptibility. PMID:26064247

  10. Genome-wide association studies in dogs and humans identify ADAMTS20 as a risk variant for cleft lip and palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena T Wolf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P is the most commonly occurring craniofacial birth defect. We provide insight into the genetic etiology of this birth defect by performing genome-wide association studies in two species: dogs and humans. In the dog, a genome-wide association study of 7 CL/P cases and 112 controls from the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (NSDTR breed identified a significantly associated region on canine chromosome 27 (unadjusted p=1.1 x 10(-13; adjusted p= 2.2 x 10(-3. Further analysis in NSDTR families and additional full sibling cases identified a 1.44 Mb homozygous haplotype (chromosome 27: 9.29 - 10.73 Mb segregating with a more complex phenotype of cleft lip, cleft palate, and syndactyly (CLPS in 13 cases. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 CLPS cases and 4 controls at 15X coverage led to the discovery of a frameshift mutation within ADAMTS20 (c.1360_1361delAA (p.Lys453Ilefs*3, which segregated concordant with the phenotype. In a parallel study in humans, a family-based association analysis (DFAM of 125 CL/P cases, 420 unaffected relatives, and 392 controls from a Guatemalan cohort, identified a suggestive association (rs10785430; p =2.67 x 10-6 with the same gene, ADAMTS20. Sequencing of cases from the Guatemalan cohort was unable to identify a causative mutation within the coding region of ADAMTS20, but four coding variants were found in additional cases of CL/P. In summary, this study provides genetic evidence for a role of ADAMTS20 in CL/P development in dogs and as a candidate gene for CL/P development in humans.

  11. Treatment of 4-5 year old patients with cleft lip and cleft palate in Tawanchai Center: prevalence and type of associated malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradubwong, Suteera; Pongpagatip, Sumalee; Pathumwiwatana, Pornpen; Kiatchoosakun, Pakaphan; Panamonta, Manat; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2014-10-01

    Patients with cleft lip/palate may have other associated malformations but the reported prevalence and type of associated malformations varied between different studies. To report the prevalence and the type of associated malformations in Northeastern Thai patients with cleft lip/palate. A retrospective study of 123 cleft lip/palate patients aged 4-5 years was carried out at the Tawanchai Cleft Center, Khon Kaen University during the periodfrom October to December 2011. Data were collected by reviewing the patients medical records. Seventeen (14%) of the 123patients had associated malformations. Four (21%) of the 19patients with cleft palate, eleven (15%) of the 74 patients with clefts lip and palate, and two (7%) of the 30 patients with cleft lip had associated malformations. The organ systems affected by associated malformations were cardiovascular system (41%), craniofacial anomaly (23%), skeletal system (12%), urogenital system (12%) and central nervous systemn (12%). Atrial septal defect and tetralogy ofFallot were most common associated cardiovascular malformation found. The high prevalence of associated malformationsfound in patients with cleft lip/palate emphasizes the needfor a thorough screening of associated malformations and congenital heart disease ofall cleft lip/palatepatients.

  12. The Cleft Aesthetic Rating Scale for 18-Year-Old Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients: A Tool for Nasolabial Aesthetics Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, F J; Mosmuller, D G M; de Vet, H C W; Mouës, C M; Breugem, C C; van der Molen, A B Mink; Griot, J P W Don

    2016-12-20

      To develop a reliable and easy-to-use method to assess the nasolabial appearance of 18-year-old patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP).   Retrospective analysis of nasolabial aesthetics using a 5-point ordinal scale and newly developed photographic reference scale: the Cleft Aesthetic Rating Scale (CARS). Three cleft surgeons and 20 medical students scored the nasolabial appearance on standardized frontal photographs.   Medical Center X.   Inclusion criteria: 18-year-old patients, unilateral cleft lip and palate, available photograph of the frontal view. history of facial trauma, congenital syndromes affecting facial appearance. Eighty photographs were available for scoring.   The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the CARS for 18-year-old patients when used by cleft surgeons and medical students.   The interobserver reliability for the nose and lip together was 0.64 for the cleft surgeons and 0.61 for the medical students. There was an intraobserver reliability of 0.75 and 0.78 from the surgeons and students, respectively, on the nose and lip together. No significant difference was found between the cleft surgeons and medical students in the way they scored the nose (P = 0.22) and lip (P = 0.72).   The Cleft Aesthetic Rating Scale for 18-year-old patients has a substantial overall estimated reliability when the average score is taken from three or more cleft surgeons or medical students assessing the nasolabial aesthetics of CLP patients.

  13. A Leu to Ile but not Leu to Val change at HIV-1 reverse transcriptase codon 74 in the background of K65R mutation leads to an increased processivity of K65R+L74I enzyme and a replication competent virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crumpacker Clyde S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major hurdle in the treatment of Human Immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 includes the development of drug resistance-associated mutations in the target regions of the virus. Since reverse transcriptase (RT is essential for HIV-1 replication, several nucleoside analogues have been developed to target RT of the virus. Clinical studies have shown that mutations at RT codon 65 and 74 which are located in β3-β4 linkage group of finger sub-domain of RT are selected during treatment with several RT inhibitors, including didanosine, deoxycytidine, abacavir and tenofovir. Interestingly, the co-selection of K65R and L74V is rare in clinical settings. We have previously shown that K65R and L74V are incompatible and a R→K reversion occurs at codon 65 during replication of the virus. Analysis of the HIV resistance database has revealed that similar to K65R+L74V, the double mutant K65R+L74I is also rare. We sought to compare the impact of L→V versus L→I change at codon 74 in the background of K65R mutation, on the replication of doubly mutant viruses. Methods Proviral clones containing K65R, L74V, L74I, K65R+L74V and K65R+L74I RT mutations were created in pNL4-3 backbone and viruses were produced in 293T cells. Replication efficiencies of all the viruses were compared in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM cells in the absence of selection pressure. Replication capacity (RC of mutant viruses in relation to wild type was calculated on the basis of antigen p24 production and RT activity, and paired analysis by student t-test was performed among RCs of doubly mutant viruses. Reversion at RT codons 65 and 74 was monitored during replication in PBM cells. In vitro processivity of mutant RTs was measured to analyze the impact of amino acid changes at RT codon 74. Results Replication kinetics plot showed that all of the mutant viruses were attenuated as compared to wild type (WT virus. Although attenuated in comparison to WT virus

  14. Comparison of three incisions to repair complete unilateral cleft lip.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, S.; Reddy, R.R.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Prasad, R.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Berge, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incision design for correcting a unilateral cleft lip is important because all subsequent stages of surgery depend on the access and maneuverability of the incision. This prospective cohort study compares the aesthetic and functional outcomes of three different skin incisions for pri

  15. Cyclodialysis Cleft Treatment Using a Minimally Invasive Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pinheiro-Costa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of a cyclodialysis cleft that was successfully managed with gas endotamponade and cyclocryotherapy. Methods: A 37-year-old male victim of a severe blunt ocular trauma was referred to our service for evaluation and treatment of a left eye hypotony. Clinical examination revealed an intraocular pressure of 2 mm Hg, a cyclodialysis cleft extending from the 11 to 1 o'clock positions and a hypotonic maculopathy. Left eye best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was 3/10. The patient failed to respond to conservative treatment with atropine 1%, so a single bubble of 16% C2F6 was injected into the vitreous cavity, followed by superior quadrant transconjunctival cyclocryotherapy. Results: After gas absorption, the intraocular pressure increased to 11 mm Hg and became steady during the 24 months of follow-up. His hypotonic maculopathy resolved, and the BCVA improved to 9/10. Complete closure of the cyclodialysis cleft was documented with ultrasound biomicroscopy. Conclusion: Cryotherapy associated with gas endotamponade is a minimally invasive technique that could be considered for patients with cyclodialysis clefts that fail to respond to medical therapy.

  16. Comparison of two different gingivectomy techniques for gingival cleft treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkoc, Siddik; Buyukyilmaz, Tamer; Gelgor, Ibrahim; Gursel, Mihtikar

    2004-06-01

    Interdental clefts or invaginations contribute to orthodontic relapse and poor periodontal health in extraction cases. These clefts or invaginations can be removed both by electrosurgical or conventional surgical gingivectomy techniques. This study investigates and compares the efficacy of two different techniques to remove gingival clefts with respect to periodontal health and patient tolerance. Twenty-two patients (mean age, 15.7 years) with bilateral gingival clefts participated in this study. In each patient, the gingival invaginations were removed by gingivectomy using electrosurgery on one side and conventional surgery on the contralateral side. The length and depth of the invaginations, the gingival index of the adjacent teeth, and the changes in visual analogue scale scores were recorded before and after the operation for both groups. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze the data statistically. The results showed significant improvement in invagination depth and length and gingival index scores for both techniques. There were no statistical differences between the two gingivectomy techniques with respect to gingival health and patient tolerance. Both techniques can be used to remove the gingival invaginations efficiently.

  17. Embryology, sternal clefts, ectopia cordis, and Cantrell's pentalogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engum, Scott A

    2008-08-01

    Sternal clefts, ectopia cordis, and Cantrell's pentalogy continue to be very rare congenital anomalies in pediatric surgery. Unfortunately, these conditions present as neonatal emergencies and demand early surgical intervention. This article reviews the embryological development of the chest wall, specific sternal defect anomalies, along with available methods of treatment.

  18. Congenital medium sternal cleft with partial ectopia cordis repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Paulo Rego; Antunes, Sónia; Couto, Alexandra; Santos, Gonçalo Cassiano; Leal, Luis Gagp; Magalhães, Manuel Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Congenital sternal malformation is a rare anomaly often diagnosed as an asymptomatic condition at birth. The authors report a clinical case of a full-term female neonate with congenital sternal cleft and partial ectopia cordis. Successful surgical repair was accomplished at 6 days of age. When surgery is performed shortly after birth, the procedure is easier and better results are achieved.

  19. Comparison of three incisions to repair complete unilateral cleft lip.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, S.; Reddy, R.R.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Prasad, R.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Berge, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incision design for correcting a unilateral cleft lip is important because all subsequent stages of surgery depend on the access and maneuverability of the incision. This prospective cohort study compares the aesthetic and functional outcomes of three different skin incisions for pri

  20. Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... familias La alimentación de su bebé Tratamiento de labio/paladar hendido Forma de contacto La historia del mes Quick Links ACPA Website How to order bottles Order ACPA publications © Copyright 2017 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Website by Mixer Creative Follow us on Become a fan on

  1. First trimester exposure to corticosteroids and oral clefts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradat, P; Robert-Gnansia, E; Di Tanna, GL; Rosano, A; Lisi, A; Mastroiacovo, P

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The possible association between oral cleft in the newborn and maternal exposure to corticoids during pregnancy is still controversial. The aim of this study was to test this association by a case-control analysis using the large multicentric MADRE database. METHODS: The MADRE database i

  2. The Cleft Care UK study. Part 4: perceptual speech outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, D; Mildinhall, S; Albery, L; Wills, A K; Sandy, J R; Ness, A R

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objectives To describe the perceptual speech outcomes from the Cleft Care UK (CCUK) study and compare them to the 1998 Clinical Standards Advisory Group (CSAG) audit. Setting and sample population A cross-sectional study of 248 children born with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2007 who underwent speech assessment. Materials and methods Centre-based specialist speech and language therapists (SLT) took speech audio–video recordings according to nationally agreed guidelines. Two independent listeners undertook the perceptual analysis using the CAPS-A Audit tool. Intra- and inter-rater reliability were tested. Results For each speech parameter of intelligibility/distinctiveness, hypernasality, palatal/palatalization, backed to velar/uvular, glottal, weak and nasalized consonants, and nasal realizations, there was strong evidence that speech outcomes were better in the CCUK children compared to CSAG children. The parameters which did not show improvement were nasal emission, nasal turbulence, hyponasality and lateral/lateralization. Conclusion These results suggest that centralization of cleft care into high volume centres has resulted in improvements in UK speech outcomes in five-year-olds with unilateral cleft lip and palate. This may be associated with the development of a specialized workforce. Nevertheless, there still remains a group of children with significant difficulties at school entry. PMID:26567854

  3. Influence of isolated cleft palate and palatoplasty on the face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gabriel da Silva Filho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The literature has demonstrated that alterations in craniofacial morphology characterizing individuals with cleft palate are observed in both operated and unoperated patients. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the influence of isolated cleft palate and palatoplasty on the face, based on facial analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Lateral facial photographs of the right side of 85 young adult patients with cleft palate were analyzed, of whom 50 were operated on and 35 had never received any previous surgical treatment. The nasolabial angle and zygomatic projection were used to define the maxillary position in the face. Mandibular positioning was classified as Pattern I, II and III. RESULTS: Patients were distributed into 54.12% as Pattern I, 32.94% Pattern II and 12.94% Pattern III. Distribution of facial patterns did not show statistically significant differences between groups (p>0.05. Although palatoplasty did not influence the facial pattern, the zygomatic projection was vulnerable to plastic surgeries. Twenty-eight percent of the patients in the operated group showed zygomatic deficiency, compared to only 8.5% in the unoperated group. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with isolated cleft palate, palatoplasty may influence negatively the sagittal behavior of the maxilla, according to the zygomatic projection of the face, though without compromising the facial pattern.

  4. Study of oral clefts: Indication of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, S.J.; Beaty, T.H.; Panny, S. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In this study of infants with isolated birth defects, 69 cleft palate-only (CPO) cases, 114 cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P), and 284 controls with non-cleft birth defects (all born in Maryland during 1984-1992) were examined to test for associations among genetic markers and different oral clefts. Modest associations were found between transforming growth factor {alpha} (TGF{alpha}) marker and CPO, as well as that between D17S579 (Mfd188) and CL/P in this study. The association between TGF{alpha} marker and CPO reflects a statistical interaction between mother`s smoking and child`s TGF{alpha} genotype. A significantly higher risk of CPO was found among those reporting maternal smoking during pregnancy and carrying less common TGF{alpha} TaqI allele (odds ratio=7.02 with 95% confidence interval 1.8-27.6). This gene-environment interaction was also found among those who reported no family history of any type of birth defect (odds ratio=5.60 with 95% confidence interval 1.4-22.9). Similar associations were seen for CL/P, but these were not statistically significant.

  5. Genetic studies in congenital anterior midline cervical cleft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, L P; Pfeiffer, P; Andersen, M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anterior midline cervical cleft (CAMCC) is a rare anomaly, with less than 100 cases reported. The cause of CAMCC is unknown, but genetic factors must be considered as part of the etiology. Three cases of CAMCC are presented. This is the first genetic study of isolated CAMCC. Conventional...

  6. Speech and language in the patient with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildinhall, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the normal development of speech and speech problems that may arise for the child born with cleft lip and/or palate. It describes current trends and the importance of multidisciplinary working in this complex field. The contribution of the speech and language therapist to the management of this population is considered.

  7. Production of Two Nasal Sounds by Speakers With Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressmann, Tim; Radovanovic, Bojana; Harper, Susan; Klaiman, Paula; Fisher, David; Kulkarni, Gajanan V

    2016-12-29

    Manyspeakers with cleft palate develop atypical consonant productions, especially for pressure consonants such as plosives, fricatives, and affricates. The present study investigated the nature of nasal sound errors. The participants were eight female and three male speakers with cleft palate between the ages of 6 to 20. Speakers were audio-recorded, and midsagittal tongue movement was captured with ultrasound. The speakers repeated vowel-consonant-vowel with the vowels /α/, /i/, and /u/ and the alveolar and velar nasal consonants /n/ and //. The productions were reviewed by three listeners. The participants showed a variety of different placement errors and insertions of plosives, as well as liquid productions. There was considerable error variability between and within speakers, often related to the different vowel contexts. Three speakers co-produced click sounds. The study demonstrated the wide variety of sound errors that some speakers with cleft palate may demonstrate for nasal sounds. Nasal sounds, ideally in different vowel contexts, should be included in articulation screenings for speakers with cleft palate, perhaps more than is currently the case.

  8. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Assessment of Lower Facial Asymmetry in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate and Non-Cleft Patients with Class III Skeletal Relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Lin

    Full Text Available To evaluate, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, both the condylar-fossa relationships and the mandibular and condylar asymmetries between unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP patients and non-cleft patients with class III skeletal relationship, and to investigate the factors of asymmetry contributing to chin deviation.The UCLP and non-cleft groups consisted of 30 and 40 subjects, respectively, in mixed dentition with class III skeletal relationships. Condylar-fossa relationships and the dimensional and positional asymmetries of the condyles and mandibles were examined using CBCT. Intra-group differences were compared between two sides in both groups using a paired t-test. Furthermore, correlations between each measurement and chin deviation were assessed.It was observed that 90% of UCLP and 67.5% of non-cleft subjects had both condyles centered, and no significant asymmetry was found. The axial angle and the condylar center distances to the midsagittal plane were significantly greater on the cleft side than on the non-cleft side (P=0.001 and P=0.028, respectively and were positively correlated with chin deviation in the UCLP group. Except for a larger gonial angle on the cleft side, the two groups presented with consistent asymmetries showing shorter mandibular bodies and total mandibular lengths on the cleft (deviated side. The average chin deviation was 1.63 mm to the cleft side, and the average absolute chin deviation was significantly greater in the UCLP group than in the non-cleft group (P=0.037.Compared with non-cleft subjects with similar class III skeletal relationships, the subjects with UCLP showed more severe lower facial asymmetry. The subjects with UCLP presented with more asymmetrical positions and rotations of the condyles on axial slices, which were positively correlated with chin deviation.

  9. Bite force evaluation in subjects with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Renata Sipert

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the masticatory function of subjects with cleft lip and palate by analyzing the bite force developed by these individuals. Bite force was evaluated in a group of 27 individuals with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (14 males and 13 females - aged 18-26 years and compared to the data achieved from a group of 20 noncleft subjects (10 males and 10 females - aged 18-26 years. Measurement was achieved on three positions within the dental arch (incisors, right molars and left molars, three times at each position considering the highest value for each one. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test ( α = 5%. There was a significant deficit in bite force in male individuals with cleft lip and palate compared to the male control group (p=0.02, p=0.004, p=0.003 for incisors, right and left molars, respectively. For the female group, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.79, p=0.06, p=0.47. In the group of individuals with clefts, 92.6% were under orthodontic treatment, which could be a reason for the present findings, since it can decrease the bite force more remarkably in males than in females. In conclusion, the bite force is significantly reduced in men when comparing the cleft group to the noncleft group. In females, this reduction was not significant in the same way. However, the main reason for this reduction and for the different behavior between genders should be further investigated.

  10. Management of cleft lip and palate in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Jyotsna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With advancement of medical services in developed countries and awareness among the patients, it is rare to find an adult with an unoperated cleft lip and palate. However, the scenario is totally different in developing countries. Working as a part of a team in developing country, where co-coordinated team work is primitive, resources to provide treatment are very thin, public awareness of availability of treatment for this anomaly is minimal, the age of patients reaching for primary treatment varies from few days to late forties. Though the aim and aspiration is to provide holistic multidisciplinary care, the priority is getting treatment for all cleft patients. In such situation, the management of cleft lip and palate demands changes of approach, techniques and philosophy. Aims and Objectives: The deformed anatomy especially the facial bones and dentition is described. Due to well established deformities, the approach for management is individualized. The procedures and modification of procedures has been described. Results and Outcome: The outcome of the primary repair is adults certainly have less than satisfactory outcome for obvious reasons. The expected outcome and expectation of patients and families following primary surgeries in cleft lip and palate has been discussed. Though all adult patients got some improvement in speech after palate repair, achieving normal speech was difficult. The naso-labial appearance was not perfect, but well accepted by the patients and families. There are many psychosocial problems in these patients, the objective evaluation could not be done due to too many variables. However, primary repair of cleft lip and palate is justified and beneficial for the patients.

  11. Maternal occupational exposure and oral clefts in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinder, Nynke; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Boezen, H Marike; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Kromhout, Hans; de Walle, Hermien E K

    2017-08-04

    Previous studies suggest that periconceptional maternal occupational exposure to solvents and pesticides increase the risk of oral clefts in the offspring. Less is known about the effect of occupational exposure to metals, dust, and gases and fumes on development of oral clefts. This case-malformed control study used data from a population-based birth defects registry (Eurocat) of children and foetuses born in the Northern Netherlands between 1997 and 2013. Cases were defined as non-syndromic oral clefts. The first control group had chromosomal/monogenic defects, and the second control group was defined as non-chromosomal/non-monogenic malformed controls. Maternal occupational exposure was estimated through linkage of mothers' occupation with a community-based Job Exposure Matrix (JEM). Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the effect of occupational exposures. Odds ratios were adjusted (aORs) for relevant confounders. A total of 387 cases, 1135 chromosomal and 4352 non-chromosomal malformed controls were included in this study. Prevalence of maternal occupational exposures to all agents was 43.9% and 41.0%/37.7% among cases and controls, respectively. Oral clefts had significantly increased ORs of maternal occupational exposure to pesticides (aOR = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-3.1) and dust (aOR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.6) when using non-chromosomal controls. Subgroup analysis for CL(P) stratified by gender showed a significantly increased risk for male infants exposed to 'other solvents' and exposure to mineral dust for female infants. Our study showed that maternal occupational exposure to pesticides and dust are risk factors for oral clefts in the offspring. Larger studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  12. Replication of 13q31.1 Association in Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip with Cleft Palate in Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Margaret E.; Butali, Azeez; Standley, Jennifer; Rigdon, Jennifer; Suzuki1, Satoshi; Gongorjav, Ayana; Shonkhuuz, T. Enkhtur; Natsume, Nagato; Shi, Bing; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association (GWA) studies have successfully identified at least a dozen loci associated with orofacial clefts. However, these signals may be unique to specific populations and require replication to validate and extend findings as a prelude to etiologic SNP discovery. We attempted to replicate the findings of a recent meta-analysis of orofacial cleft GWA studies using four different ancestral populations. We studied 946 pedigrees (3436 persons) of European (US white and Danish) and Asian (Japanese and Mongolian) origin. We genotyped six SNPs which represented the most significant P value associations identified in published studies: rs742071 (1p36), rs7590268 (2p21), rs7632427 (3p11.1), rs12543318 (8q21.3), rs8001641 (13q31.1) and rs7179658 (15q22.2). We directly sequenced three non-coding conserved regions 200kb downstream of SPRY2 in 713 cases, 438 controls, and 485 trios from the US, Mongolia, and the Philippines. We found rs8001641 to be significantly associated with cleft lip with cleft palate (NSCLP) in Europeans (p-value=4 × 10−5, ORtransmission=1.86 with 95% confidence interval: 1.38-2.52). We also found several novel sequence variants in the conserved regions in Asian and European samples, which may help to localize common variants contributing directly to the risk for NSCLP. This study confirms the prior association between rs8001641 and NSCLP in European populations. PMID:25786657

  13. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  14. A Comparative Study of Oral Microbiota in Infants with Complete Cleft Lip and Palate or Cleft Soft Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Machorowska-Pieniążek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Few reports have been published on the early microbiota in infants with various types of cleft palate. We assessed the formation of the oral microbiota in infants with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP n=30 or cleft soft palate (CSP n=25 in the neonatal period (T1 time and again in the gum pad stage (T2 time. Culture swabs from the tongue, palate, and/or cleft margin at T1 and T2 were taken. We analysed the prevalence of the given bacterial species (the percentage and the proportions in which the palate and tongue were colonised by each microorganism. At T1, Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis were the most frequently detected in subjects with CLP or CSP (63% and 60%, resp.. A significantly higher frequency of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus MSSA was observed in CLP compared to the CSP group. At T2, significantly higher percentages of S. mitis, S. aureus MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were noted in CLP infants compared to the CSP. S. mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis appeared with the greatest frequency on the tongue, whereas Streptococcus salivarius was predominant on the palate. The development of the microbiota in CLP subjects was characterised by a significant increase in the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria.

  15. A Comparative Study of Oral Microbiota in Infants with Complete Cleft Lip and Palate or Cleft Soft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Mertas, Anna; Skucha-Nowak, Małgorzata; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Morawiec, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Few reports have been published on the early microbiota in infants with various types of cleft palate. We assessed the formation of the oral microbiota in infants with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP n = 30) or cleft soft palate (CSP n = 25) in the neonatal period (T1 time) and again in the gum pad stage (T2 time). Culture swabs from the tongue, palate, and/or cleft margin at T1 and T2 were taken. We analysed the prevalence of the given bacterial species (the percentage) and the proportions in which the palate and tongue were colonised by each microorganism. At T1, Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis) were the most frequently detected in subjects with CLP or CSP (63% and 60%, resp.). A significantly higher frequency of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus MSSA) was observed in CLP compared to the CSP group. At T2, significantly higher percentages of S. mitis, S. aureus MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were noted in CLP infants compared to the CSP. S. mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis appeared with the greatest frequency on the tongue, whereas Streptococcus salivarius was predominant on the palate. The development of the microbiota in CLP subjects was characterised by a significant increase in the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria.

  16. [Cleft lip, alveolar and palate sequelae. Proposal of new alveolar score by the Alveolar Cleft Score (ACS) classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molé, C; Simon, E

    2015-06-01

    The management of cleft lip, alveolar and palate sequelae remains problematic today. To optimize it, we tried to establish a new clinical index for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Seven tissue indicators, that we consider to be important in the management of alveolar sequelae, are listed by assigning them individual scores. The final score, obtained by adding together the individual scores, can take a low, high or maximum value. We propose a new classification (ACS: Alveolar Cleft Score) that guides the therapeutic team to a prognosis approach, in terms of the recommended surgical and prosthetic reconstruction, the type of medical care required, and the preventive and supportive therapy to establish. Current studies are often only based on a standard radiological evaluation of the alveolar bone height at the cleft site. However, the gingival, the osseous and the cellular areas bordering the alveolar cleft sequelae induce many clinical parameters, which should be reflected in the morphological diagnosis, to better direct the surgical indications and the future prosthetic requirements, and to best maintain successful long term aesthetic and functional results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Orthodontic treatment results following grafting autologous mandibular bone to the alveolar cleft in patients with a complete unilateral cleft.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, A. de; Bilt, A. van der; Meijer, G.J.; Koole, R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze orthodontic treatment results following mandibular symphysis bone grafting and postoperative orthodontic treatment. DESIGN: Randomized selection of 75 patients out of 308 with unilateral cleft of lip, alveolus, and palate, operated upon according to protocol between 1990 and 20

  18. A Comparative Study of Oral Microbiota in Infants with Complete Cleft Lip and Palate or Cleft Soft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasiewicz, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Few reports have been published on the early microbiota in infants with various types of cleft palate. We assessed the formation of the oral microbiota in infants with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP n = 30) or cleft soft palate (CSP n = 25) in the neonatal period (T1 time) and again in the gum pad stage (T2 time). Culture swabs from the tongue, palate, and/or cleft margin at T1 and T2 were taken. We analysed the prevalence of the given bacterial species (the percentage) and the proportions in which the palate and tongue were colonised by each microorganism. At T1, Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis) were the most frequently detected in subjects with CLP or CSP (63% and 60%, resp.). A significantly higher frequency of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus MSSA) was observed in CLP compared to the CSP group. At T2, significantly higher percentages of S. mitis, S. aureus MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were noted in CLP infants compared to the CSP. S. mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis appeared with the greatest frequency on the tongue, whereas Streptococcus salivarius was predominant on the palate. The development of the microbiota in CLP subjects was characterised by a significant increase in the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria.

  19. Transforming growth factor-alpha and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without palate or cleft palate only in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Roselinda Abdul; Ahmad, Azlina; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Mokhtar, Khairani Idah; Lah, Nik Ahmad Shah Nik; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi; Samsudin, Ab Rani

    2008-11-01

    To determine the frequency of the transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) Taq1 polymorphism in nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL+/-P) and cleft palate only (CP) in Kelantan, Malaysia. The study was conducted at the Combined Cleft Clinic and at the Human Genome Centre in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia in Kelantan, Malaysia. We examined the C2/Taq1 variant of the TGFalpha gene in 46 patients with nonsyndromic CL+/-P or CP only and in 33 controls. The TGFalpha genotype frequencies in patients were compared with those in controls using the chi-square or Fisher exact test. DNA samples were obtained from peripheral blood. No association was found between TGFalphaTaq1 polymorphism and CL+/-P or CP in this case-control study. In addition, no homozygosity for the rare allele C2 was noted in CL+/-P, CP, or the controls. No evidence of TGFalphaTaq1 polymorphism was observed in association with CL+/-P and CP in this study.

  20. Prevalence of dental anomalies of number in different subphenotypes of isolated cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Schwartz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at carrying out a radiographic analysis on the prevalence of dental anomalies of number (agenesis and supernumerary teeth in permanent dentition, in different subphenotypes of isolated cleft palate pre-adolescent patients. METHODS: Panoramic radiographs of 300 patients aged between 9 and 12 years, with cleft palate and enrolled in a single treatment center, were retrospectively analyzed. The sample was divided into two groups according to the extension/severity of the cleft palate: complete and incomplete . The chi-square test was used for intergroup comparison regarding the prevalence of the investigated dental anomalies (P < 0.05. RESULTS: Agenesis was found in 34.14% of patients with complete cleft palate and in 30.27% of patients with incomplete cleft palate. Supernumerary teeth were found in 2.43% of patients with complete cleft palate and in 0.91% of patients with incomplete cleft palate. No statistically significant difference was found between groups with regard to the prevalence of agenesis and supernumerary teeth. There was no difference in cleft prevalence between genders within each study group. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of dental anomalies of number in pre-adolescents with cleft palate was higher than that reported for the general population. The severity of cleft palate did not seem to be associated with the prevalence of dental anomalies of number.

  1. Clinical Outcomes of Primary Palatal Surgery in Children with Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate with and without Lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunghee Ha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents clinical outcomes of primary cleft palate surgery, including rate of oronasal fistula development, rate of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI requiring secondary surgery, and speech outcomes. We examined the effect of cleft type on the clinical outcomes. Retrospective analysis was performed using clinical records of all patients who received a primary palatoplasty at the Cleft Palate Clinic at Seoul Asan Medical Center, South Korea, between 2007 and 2012. The study included 292 patients with nonsyndromic overt cleft palate (±cleft lip. The results revealed that the rate of oronasal fistula was 7.9% and the incidence of VPI based on the rate of secondary palatal surgery was 19.2%. The results showed that 50.3% of all the patients had received speech therapy and 28.8% and 51.4% demonstrated significant hypernasality and articulatory deficits, respectively. The results of the rate of VPI and speech outcomes were significantly different in terms of cleft type. Except for the rate of oronasal fistula, patients with cleft palate generally exhibited better clinical outcomes compared to those with bilateral or unilateral cleft lip and palate. This study suggests that several factors, including cleft type, should be identified and comprehensively considered to establish an optimal treatment regimen for patients with cleft palate.

  2. Incidence of cleft pathology in Greater New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenjian, Haig A; Chiu, Ernest S; Alexander, Mary Ellen; St Hilaire, Hugo; Moses, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Reports after the 2005 Hurricane Katrina have documented an increase in stress reactions and environmental teratogens (arsenic, mold, alcohol). To assess the incidence of cleft pathology before and after the hurricane, and the distribution of cleft cases by gender and race. Retrospective chart review of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate (CP) cases registered with the Cleft and Craniofacial Team at Children's Hospital of New Orleans, the surgical center that treated cleft cases in Greater New Orleans between 2004 and 2007. Live birth data were obtained from the Louisiana State Center for Health Statistics. The incidence of cleft cases, beginning 9 months after the hurricane (i.e., June 1, 2006) was significantly higher compared with the period before the hurricane (0.80 versus 1.42; p = .008). Within racial group comparisons showed a higher incidence among African Americans versus whites (0.42 versus 1.22; p = .01). The distribution of CL/P and CP cases by gender was significant (p = .05). The increase in the incidence of cleft cases after the hurricane may be attributable to increased stress and teratogenic factors associated with the hurricane. The increase among African Americans may have been due to comparatively higher exposure to environmental risk factors. These findings warrant further investigation to replicate the results elsewhere in the Gulf to determine whether there is a causal relationship between environmental risk factors and increased cleft pathology.

  3. Receptive and expressive language performance in children with and without Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamônica, Dionísia Aparecida Cusin; Silva-Mori, Mariana Jales Felix da; Ribeiro, Camila da Costa; Maximino, Luciana Paula

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance in the abilities of receptive and expressive language of children with cleft lip and palate with that of children without cleft lip and palate with typical 12 to 36-month chronological development. The sample consisted of 60 children aged 12 and 36 months: 30 with cleft lip and palate diagnosis and 30 without cleft lip and palate diagnosis with typical development. The groups were paired according to gender, age (in months), and socioeconomic level. The procedures consisted of analysis of medical records, anamnesis with family members, and valuation of the Early Language Milestone Scale (ELMS). The chart analysis showed 63.34% of the children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, 16.66% with bilateral incisive transforamen cleft, and 20% with post-foramen cleft. Children with cleft lip and palate underwent surgeries (lip repair and/or palatoplasty) at the recommended ages and participated in early intervention programs; 40% presented recurrent otitis history, and 50% attended schools. Statistical analysis included the use of the Mann Whitney test with significance level of p cleft lip and palate showed statistically significant low performance in receptive and expressive language compared with children without cleft lip and palate.

  4. Esthetic evaluation of the facial profile in rehabilitated adults with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari Júnior, Flávio Mauro; Ayub, Priscila Vaz; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Pereira Lauris, José Roberto; Garib, Daniela Gamba

    2015-01-01

    To assess the facial esthetics of patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate, and to compare the judgment of raters related and unrelated to cleft care. The sample comprised 23 adult patients (7 women and 16 men) with a mean age of 26.1 years, rehabilitated at a single center. Standardized photographs of the right and left facial profile were taken of each patient and subjectively evaluated by 25 examiners: 5 orthodontists and 5 plastic surgeons with expertise in oral cleft rehabilitation, 5 orthodontists and 5 plastic surgeons without expertise in oral cleft rehabilitation, and 5 laypersons. The facial profiles were classified into 3 categories: esthetically unpleasant, esthetically acceptable, and esthetically pleasant. Intraexaminer and interexaminer agreements were evaluated with the Spearman correlation coefficient and Kendall coefficient of concordance. The differences between rater categories were analyzed using the Student-Newman-Keuls test (with P cleft rehabilitation gave the best scores to the facial profiles, followed by layperson examiners and by orthodontists and plastic surgeons unrelated to oral cleft rehabilitation. The middle third of the face, the nose, and the upper lip were frequently pointed out as contributors to the esthetic impairment. The facial profile of rehabilitated adult patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate was considered esthetically acceptable because of morphologic limitations in the structures affected by the cleft. Laypersons and professionals unrelated to oral cleft rehabilitation seem to be more critical regarding facial esthetics than professionals involved with cleft rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. R368X mutation in MID1 among recurrent mutations in patients with X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiksaitiene, Egle; Krasovskaja, Natalija; Utkus, Algirdas; Kasnauskiene, Jurate; Meškienė, Raimonda; Paulauskiene, Iveta; Valevičienė, Nomeda R; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2015-01-01

    Opitz G/BBB syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous condition, with both autosomal dominant and X-linked forms. The MID1 gene is associated with X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome. Most mutations identified are unique, which makes it difficult to assess possible genotype/phenotype correlations. We report on a familial c.1102C>T (p.R368X) mutation in the MID1 gene, previously reported by Cox et al. (Hum Mol Genet 9:2553-2562, 2000), and document it as a recurrent mutation causing Opitz G/BBB syndrome. This mutation may result in various midline defects, including cleft lip/palate, laryngeal cleft, hypertelorism, Dandy-Walker malformation, ventricular septal defect and hypospadias in male patients, with intrafamilial variability. Seven other mutations (c.712G>T, c.829C>T, c.1108A>G, c.1444_1447dupAACA, c.1483C>T, c.1798dupC and entire gene deletions) have been previously reported as recurrent mutations. The presented family with the c.1102C>T mutation provides additional information about the clinical consequences of the nonsense mutation causing premature truncation of the protein at the level of the COS domain.

  6. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate: Associations with transforming growth factor alpha and retinoic acid receptor loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenevix-Trench, G.; Jones, K. (Queensland Inst. of Medical Research (Australia) Univ. of Queensland (Australia)); Green, A.C.; Duffy, D.L.; Martin, N.G. (Queensland Inst. of Medical Research (Australia))

    1992-12-01

    The first association study of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), with candidate genes, found an association with the transforming growth-factor alpha (TGFA) locus. This finding has since been replicated, in whole or in part, in three independent studies. Here the authors extend their original analysis of the TGFA TaqI RFLP to two other TGFA RFLPs and seven other RFLPs at five candidate genes in 117 nonsyndromic cases of CL/P and 113 controls. The other candidate genes were the retinoic acid receptor (RARA), the bcl-2 oncogene, and the homeobox genes 2F, 2G, and EN2. Significant associations with the TGFA TaqI and BamHI RFLPs were confirmed, although associations of clefting with previously reported haplotypes did not reach significance. Of particular interest, in view of the known teratogenic role of retinoic acid, was a significant association with the RARA PstI RFLP (P = .016; not corrected for multiple testing). The effect on risk of the A2 allele appears to be additive, and although the A2A2 homozygote only has an odds ratio of about 2 and recurrence risk to first-degree relatives ([lambda][sub 1]) of 1.06, because it is so common it may account for as much as a third of the attributable risk of clefting. There is no evidence of interaction between the TGFA and RARA polymorphisms on risk, and jointly they appear to account for almost half the attributable risk of clefting. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Pre-speech in children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only: phonetic analysis related to morphologic and functional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmander-Agerskov, A; Söderpalm, E; Friede, H; Persson, E C; Lilja, J

    1994-07-01

    Pre-speech in 35 children with clefts of the lip and palate or palate only were analyzed for place and manner of articulation. Transcriptions were made from tape recorded babbling sequences. Two children without clefts were used as reference. All of the children with clefts were treated according to a regimen of early surgical repair of the velum cleft and delayed closure of the cleft in the hard palate. The frequency of selected phonetic features was calculated. Correlations between phonetic/perceptual and functional and morphological factors were tested. Supraglottal articulation dominated among all the children indicating a sufficient velopharyngeal mechanism. The results also showed correlations between cleft type and place of articulation. Anteriorly placed sounds (i.e., bilabial, dental, and alveolar sounds) occurred frequently among the children with cleft palate only and in the noncleft children. In children with cleft lip and palate, posteriorly placed articulations predominated. It was postulated that early intervention may have a positive effect on articulatory development.

  8. Does the interaction between maternal folate intake and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms affect the risk of cleft lip with or without cleft palate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, IALM; Vermeij-Keers, C; Kluijtmans, LAJ; Ocke, MC; Zielhuis, GA; Goorhuis-Brouwer, SM; van der Biezen, JJ; Kuijpers-Jagtman, AM; Steegers-Theunissen, RPM

    2003-01-01

    Periconceptional folic acid supplementation may reduce the risk of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL(P)). Polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene reduce availability of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the predominant circulating form of folate. To determine the effec

  9. Identification of Functional Variants for Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate in or near PAX7, FGFR2, and NOG by Targeted Sequencing of GWAS Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Taub, Margaret A; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for nonsyndromic orofacial clefts have identified multiple strongly associated regions, the causal variants are unknown. To address this, we selected 13 regions from GWASs and other studies, performed targeted sequencing in 1,409 Asian and European...... alleles for nonsyndromic clefting in humans....

  10. Epidemiology of orofacial clefts in the East of ireland in the 25-year period 1984-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Robert; Owens, Miriam; Delany, Caroline; Earley, Michael; McGillivary, Anne; Orr, David J; Duggan, Laura

    2014-07-01

    Objective : To describe the epidemiology of orofacial clefts in the east of Ireland. Design and Setting : A descriptive epidemiologic study on 851 cases of orofacial cleft identified over a 25-year period from 1984 to 2008 from more than 500,000 births. Results : There were 438 (51.5%) cases of cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 413 (48.5%) cases of cleft palate. The total birth prevalence was 16.0 per 10,000 births for all orofacial clefts, 8.2 for cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and 7.8 for cleft palate. Of all cases, 63.7% (542/851) occurred as isolated anomalies, 21.5% (183/851) were associated with multiple anomalies, and 14.8% (126/851) were associated with a syndrome or chromosomal anomaly. A significantly increasing trend over the 25-year period was observed for cleft lip with or without cleft palate associated with syndromes or chromosomal anomalies among mothers younger than 35 years but not in those older than 35 years. Conclusion : A slightly higher rate of orofacial clefts was observed in the east of Ireland than was observed in European and multinational studies during the study period, and there were higher rates of cleft palate. The rising trend in the proportion of mothers aged 35 years or older in Ireland is not contributing significantly to orofacial clefts associated with chromosomal syndromes.

  11. The prevalence of CHD7 missense versus truncating mutations is higher in patients with Kallmann syndrome than in typical CHARGE patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos, Séverine; Sarfati, Julie; Leroy, Chrystel

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mutations in CHD7, a gene previously implicated in CHARGE (coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retardation of growth and/or development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies) syndrome, have been reported in patients presenting with Kallmann syndrome (KS) or congenital hypogonadotropic ...... in this gene in KS patients seeking fertility treatment, especially if KS is associated with deafness and cleft lip/palate........ Thus, the clinical spectrum associated with CHD7 mutations may be partly explained by genotype/phenotype correlations. Eight patients also had congenital deafness and one had a cleft lip/palate, whereas six had both. For 10 patients, the presence of diverse features of the CHARGE spectrum in at least...

  12. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenkraft, A.; Pode-Shakked, B.; Goldstein, N.; Shpirer, Z.; Bokhoven, H. van; Anikster, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish

  13. Further evidence of a relationship between the retinoic acid receptor alpha locus and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL [+-] P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, D.; Field, L. (Univ. of Calgary (Canada)); Ray, A. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada)); Marazita, M. (Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Chenevix-Trench et al. (1992) reported a significant difference between nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL [+-] P) cases and unrelated controls in the frequency of alleles at the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) PstI RFLP located at 17q21.1. They also observed borderline significant (P = .055) differences between allele frequencies in subjects with cleft lip and palate (CL + P) compared with those with cleft lip only (CL). Retinoic acid (RA) is a known teratogen capable of producing cleft palate in rodents (Abbott and Birnbaum 1990). Chenevix-Tench et al. (1992) hypothesized that variation in susceptibility to the effects of RA in humans may result from alterations at the RARA locus. We have investigated association and linkage between CL [+-] P and a microsatellite marker (D17S579) located at 17q21 (Hall et al. 1992), selected for its proximity to RARA, in 14 extended multiplex families from rural West Bengal, India.

  14. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Analysis of the Nasopharyngeal Airway in Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fahdawi, Mahmood Abd; Farid, Mary Medhat; El-Fotouh, Mona Abou; El-Kassaby, Marwa Abdelwahab

    2017-03-01

      To assess the nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth in previously repaired nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate versus bilateral cleft lip and palate patients compared with noncleft controls using cone-beam computed tomography with the ultimate goal of finding whether cleft lip and palate patients are more liable to nasopharyngeal airway obstruction.   A retrospective analysis comparing bilateral cleft lip and palate, unilateral cleft lip and palate, and control subjects. Significance at P ≤ .05.   Cleft Care Center and the outpatient clinic that are both affiliated with our faculty.   Cone-beam computed tomography data were selected of 58 individuals aged 9 to 12 years: 14 with bilateral cleft lip and palate and 20 with unilateral cleft lip and palate as well as 24 age- and gender-matched noncleft controls.   Volume, depth, and cross-sectional area of nasopharyngeal airway were measured.   Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger nasopharyngeal airway volume than controls and patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger cross-sectional area than those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P .05). Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger depth than controls and those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P cleft lip and palate showed insignificant nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth compared with controls (P > .05).   Unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients did not show significantly less volume, cross-sectional area, or depth of nasopharyngeal airway than controls. From the results of this study we conclude that unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients at the studied age and stage of repaired clefts are not more prone to nasopharyngeal airway obstruction than controls.

  15. Olfactory cleft computed tomography analysis and olfaction in chronic rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Preeti; Schlosser, Rodney J.; Storck, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Volumetric analysis of the olfactory cleft by using computed tomography has been associated with olfaction in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). However, existing studies have not comprehensively measured olfaction, and it thus remains unknown whether correlations differ across specific dimensions of odor perception. Objective: To use comprehensive measures of patient-reported and objective olfaction to evaluate the relationship between volumetric olfactory cleft opacification and olfaction. Methods: Olfaction in patients with CRS was evaluated by using “Sniffin' Sticks” tests and a modified version of the Questionnaire of Olfactory Disorders. Olfactory cleft opacification was quantified by using two- and three-dimensional, computerized volumetric analysis. Correlations between olfactory metrics and olfactory cleft opacification were then calculated. Results: The overall CRS cohort included 26 patients without nasal polyposis (CRSsNP) (68.4%) and 12 patients with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) (31.6%). Across the entire cohort, total olfactory cleft opacification was 82.8%, with greater opacification in the CRSwNP subgroup compared with CRSsNP (92.3 versus 78.4%, p < 0.001). The percent total volume opacification correlated with the total Sniffin' Sticks score (r = −0.568, p < 0.001) as well as individual threshold, discrimination, and identification scores (p < 0.001 for all). Within the CRSwNP subgroup, threshold (r = −0.616, p = 0.033) and identification (r = −0.647, p = 0.023) remained highly correlated with total volume opacification. In patients with CRSsNP, the threshold correlated with total volume scores (r = −0.457, p = 0.019), with weaker and nonsignificant correlations for discrimination and identification. Correlations between total volume opacification and the Questionnaire of Olfactory Disorders were qualitatively similar to objective olfactory findings in both CRSwNP (r = −0.566, p = 0.070) and CRSsNP (r = −0.310, p

  16. Tfap2a-dependent changes in mouse facial morphology result in clefting that can be ameliorated by a reduction in Fgf8 gene dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca M; Feng, Weiguo; Phang, Tzulip; Fish, Jennifer L; Li, Hong; Spritz, Richard A; Marcucio, Ralph S; Hooper, Joan; Jamniczky, Heather; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Williams, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Failure of facial prominence fusion causes cleft lip and palate (CL/P), a common human birth defect. Several potential mechanisms can be envisioned that would result in CL/P, including failure of prominence growth and/or alignment as well as a failure of fusion of the juxtaposed epithelial seams. Here, using geometric morphometrics, we analyzed facial outgrowth and shape change over time in a novel mouse model exhibiting fully penetrant bilateral CL/P. This robust model is based upon mutations in Tfap2a, the gene encoding transcription factor AP-2α, which has been implicated in both syndromic and non-syndromic human CL/P. Our findings indicate that aberrant morphology and subsequent misalignment of the facial prominences underlies the inability of the mutant prominences to fuse. Exencephaly also occured in some of the Tfap2a mutants and we observed additional morphometric differences that indicate an influence of neural tube closure defects on facial shape. Molecular analysis of the CL/P model indicates that Fgf signaling is misregulated in the face, and that reducing Fgf8 gene dosage can attenuate the clefting pathology by generating compensatory changes. Furthermore, mutations in either Tfap2a or Fgf8 increase variance in facial shape, but the combination of these mutations restores variance to normal levels. The alterations in variance provide a potential mechanistic link between clefting and the evolution and diversity of facial morphology. Overall, our findings suggest that CL/P can result from small gene-expression changes that alter the shape of the facial prominences and uncouple their coordinated morphogenesis, which is necessary for normal fusion.

  17. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle P. Porter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33, as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118. Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20% were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study.

  18. A novel mutation in the putative DNA helicase XH2 is responsible for male-to-female sex reversal associated with an atypical form of the ATR-X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ion, A.; Telvi, L.; Galacteros, F.; McElreavey, K. [Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    We describe a pedigree presenting X-linked severe mental retardation associated with multiple congenital abnormalities and 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, leading in one family member to female gender assignment. Female carriers are unaffected. The dysmorphic features are similar to those described in the {alpha}-thalassemia and mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome, although there is no clinical evidence of {alpha}-thalassemia in this family. In addition, the family had other clinical features not previously observed in the ATR-X syndrome, including partial optic-nerve atrophy and partial ocular albinism. Mutations in a putative DNA helicase, termed XH2, have been reported to give rise to the ATR-X syndrome. We screened the YCH2 gene for mutations in affected members of the family and identified a 4-bp deletion at an intron/exon boundary that removes an invariant 3{prime} splice-acceptor site. The mutation cosegregates with the syndrome. The genomic deletion causes missplicing of the pre-mRNA, which results in the loss of 8 bp of coding sequence, thereby generating a frameshift and a downstream premature stop codon. Our finding increases the range of clinical features associated with mutations in the XH2 gene. 17 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. [Investigation of children with congenital cleft lip and palate by Eysenck personality questionnaire(Junior)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Z; Hu, J F

    1998-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To approach the personality of the children suffering from congenital cleft lip and palate. METHODS: The subject were 50 children (aged 7 to 17) with congenital cleft lip and palate,and 50 normal children as control.Both groups were investigated by Eysenck personality questionnaire EPQ(Junior). RESULTS: According to the general quantitative table of EPQ(Junior),the abnormal cases in cleft group were significantly more than those in control(P<0.005),and also were the abnormal cases in the single quantitative or in the multiple quantitative tables of EPQ(Junior)(P<0.005) respectively. CONCLUSION: The poor personality in children with cleft lip and palate is correlated to the cleft condition.Therefore it is necessary to pay attention to the prevention of poor personality while the cleft lip and palate is treated.

  20. Cholesteatoma risk in 8,593 orofacial cleft cases and 6,989 siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurhuus, Bjarki Ditlev; Skytthe, Axel; Faber, Christian Emil

    2015-01-01

    249,708 persons without an orofacial cleft was created, and 175,724 siblings to these persons were identified. These controls underwent 485 and 332 first-time cholesteatoma surgeries, respectively. For individuals with cleft lip and palate the HR for cholesteatoma surgery was 14 (95% confidence...... increase in the risk of cholesteatoma was found in individuals with cleft palate, whereas cleft lip did not pose a risk of cholesteatoma. Furthermore, the study indicates an increased risk of cholesteatoma in unaffected siblings of individuals with cleft palate. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2b Laryngoscope, 2014.......OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To estimate the risk of surgically treated middle ear cholesteatoma in individuals with a nonsyndromic orofacial cleft and in their siblings compared with the general population. STUDY DESIGN: Historical cohort study. METHODS: Using the unique civil registration number...

  1. Post septorhinoplasty custom-made unilateral nasal stent for nasal cleft deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Rathee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nasal cleft deformity is a complicated problem. Utilization of nasal stent in post septorhinoplastyaims at establishing and maintaining airway patency, tissue position, and reduces tissue contracture after surgery. Case Report: A 16-year-old female patient presented with history of surgical reconstruction of congenital cleft lip and cleft palate with secondary septorhinoplasty of nasal cleft deformity. Patient was referred for nasal stent 1 week after septorhinoplasty. This case report provides a novel technique for fabrication of esthetic nasal stent after postseptorhinoplasty for secondary cleft nose deformity correction. Conclusion: This case report presents a simple, convenient technique for nasal stent fabrication for prevention of restenosis for cleft nose deformity post secondary septorhinoplasty. Provision of nasal stent allows breathing, maintains esthetics, comfort, nasal patency, and contour with minimal discomfort.

  2. A Genome-wide Association Study of Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate Identifies an Etiologic Missense Variant in GRHL3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Liu, Huan; Carlson, Jenna C.; Shaffer, John R.; Feingold, Eleanor; Wehby, George; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Jain, Deepti; Laurie, Cathy C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; McHenry, Toby; Resick, Judith; Sanchez, Carla; Jacobs, Jennifer; Emanuele, Beth; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Neiswanger, Katherine; Standley, Jennifer; Czeizel, Andrew E.; Deleyiannis, Frederic; Christensen, Kaare; Munger, Ronald G.; Lie, Rolv T.; Wilcox, Allen; Romitti, Paul A.; Field, L. Leigh; Padilla, Carmencita D.; Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria C.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Valencia-Ramirez, Luz Consuelo; Lopez-Palacio, Ana Maria; Valencia, Dora Rivera; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Mereb, Juan C.; Poletta, Fernando A.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Carvalho, Flavia M.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Blanton, Susan H.; Buxó, Carmen J.; Butali, Azeez; Mossey, Peter A.; Adeyemo, Wasiu L.; James, Olutayo; Braimah, Ramat O.; Aregbesola, Babatunde S.; Eshete, Mekonen A.; Deribew, Milliard; Koruyucu, Mine; Seymen, Figen; Ma, Lian; de Salamanca, Javier Enríquez; Weinberg, Seth M.; Moreno, Lina; Cornell, Robert A.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate (CP) is a common birth defect occurring in 1 in 2,500 live births. Approximately half of infants with CP have a syndromic form, exhibiting other physical and cognitive disabilities. The other half have nonsyndromic CP, and to date, few genes associated with risk for nonsyndromic CP have been characterized. To identify such risk factors, we performed a genome-wide association study of this disorder. We discovered a genome-wide significant association with a missense variant in GRHL3 (p.Thr454Met [c.1361C>T]; rs41268753; p = 4.08 × 10−9) and replicated the result in an independent sample of case and control subjects. In both the discovery and replication samples, rs41268753 conferred increased risk for CP (OR = 8.3, 95% CI 4.1–16.8; OR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.43–3.27, respectively). In luciferase transactivation assays, p.Thr454Met had about one-third of the activity of wild-type GRHL3, and in zebrafish embryos, perturbed periderm development. We conclude that this mutation is an etiologic variant for nonsyndromic CP and is one of few functional variants identified to date for nonsyndromic orofacial clefting. This finding advances our understanding of the genetic basis of craniofacial development and might ultimately lead to improvements in recurrence risk prediction, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:27018472

  3. Augmented BMPRIA-mediated BMP signaling in cranial neural crest lineage leads to cleft palate formation and delayed tooth differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Li

    Full Text Available The importance of BMP receptor Ia (BMPRIa mediated signaling in the development of craniofacial organs, including the tooth and palate, has been well illuminated in several mouse models of loss of function, and by its mutations associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome and facial defects in humans. In this study, we took a gain-of-function approach to further address the role of BMPR-IA-mediated signaling in the mesenchymal compartment during tooth and palate development. We generated transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of BmprIa (caBmprIa in cranial neural crest (CNC cells that contributes to the dental and palatal mesenchyme. Mice bearing enhanced BMPRIa-mediated signaling in CNC cells exhibit complete cleft palate and delayed odontogenic differentiation. We showed that the cleft palate defect in the transgenic animals is attributed to an altered cell proliferation rate in the anterior palatal mesenchyme and to the delayed palatal elevation in the posterior portion associated with ectopic cartilage formation. Despite enhanced activity of BMP signaling in the dental mesenchyme, tooth development and patterning in transgenic mice appeared normal except delayed odontogenic differentiation. These data support the hypothesis that a finely tuned level of BMPRIa-mediated signaling is essential for normal palate and tooth development.

  4. Crystal structure of Pedobacter heparinus heparin lyase Hep III with the active site in a deep cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Wataru; Maruyama, Yukie; Nakamichi, Yusuke; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku

    2014-02-04

    Pedobacter heparinus (formerly known as Flavobacterium heparinum) is a typical glycosaminoglycan-degrading bacterium that produces three heparin lyases, Hep I, Hep II, and Hep III, which act on heparins with 1,4-glycoside bonds between uronate and amino sugar residues. Being different from Hep I and Hep II, Hep III is specific for heparan sulfate. Here we describe the crystal structure of Hep III with the active site located in a deep cleft. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Hep III was determined at 2.20 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. This enzyme comprised an N-terminal α/α-barrel domain and a C-terminal antiparallel β-sheet domain as its basic scaffold. Overall structures of Hep II and Hep III were similar, although Hep III exhibited an open form compared with the closed form of Hep II. Superimposition of Hep III and heparin tetrasaccharide-bound Hep II suggested that an active site of Hep III was located in the deep cleft at the interface between its two domains. Three mutants (N240A, Y294F, and H424A) with mutations at the active site had significantly reduced enzyme activity. This is the first report of the structure-function relationship of P. heparinus Hep III.

  5. X-chromosome inactivation patterns in monozygotic twins and sib pairs discordant for nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimani, Jane W; Shi, Min; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Nonsyndromic clefts of the lip and/or palate are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. Based on unequal gender ratios for clefting phenotypes, evidence for linkage to the X chromosome and the occurrence of several X-linked clefting syndromes, we investigated the role of skewed X...... of XCI was defined as the deviation in inactivation pattern from a 50:50 ratio. Our analysis revealed no significant difference in the degree of skewing between twin pairs (P = 0.3). However, borderline significant differences were observed in the sister pairs (P = 0.02), with the cleft lip with cleft......, particularly cleft lip and palate....

  6. Reversible Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell

    2004-01-01

    The study aims is to describe how the inclusion and exclusion of materials and calculative devices construct the boundaries and distinctions between statistical facts and artifacts in economics. My methodological approach is inspired by John Graunt's (1667) Political arithmetic and more recent work...... within constructivism and the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). The result of this approach is here termed reversible statistics, reconstructing the findings of a statistical study within economics in three different ways. It is argued that all three accounts are quite normal, albeit...... in different ways. The presence and absence of diverse materials, both natural and political, is what distinguishes them from each other. Arguments are presented for a more symmetric relation between the scientific statistical text and the reader. I will argue that a more symmetric relation can be achieved...

  7. 腭裂、唇裂及腭裂伴有唇裂疾病及手术编码的探讨%Discussion on the Disease and Surgery Coding of Cleft palate, Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑金龙

    2015-01-01

    唇裂和腭裂是最常见的先天性畸形之一。依据疾病和有关健康问题的国际统计分类第十次修订本(ICD-10)第二版,针对不同临床分型,对唇裂、腭裂、腭裂伴唇裂相关情况疾病给出正确编码,同时对唇裂、腭裂、腭裂伴唇裂常见手术给出正确编码。编码员编码时要认真阅读病案及与临床医师沟通,根据ICD-10分类轴心,将唇裂、腭裂、腭裂伴有唇裂的临床分类与ICD-10分类进行对应,按照编码规则进行准确编码。%Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common congenital malformations. In this paper, based on the International statistical classification of diseases and related health problems(ICD-10), for different clinical types of cleft lip, cleft palate, cleft lip and cleft palate with secondary deformity of disease and give the correct surgery coding. When coders coding they should carefully read the medical records and communicate with clinicians to determine the cleft lip, cleft palate, cleft lip with a specific type of cleft palate and related specific surgical repair, make accurate coding according to the encoding rules.

  8. Application of high resolution SNP arrays in patients with congenital oral clefts in south China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TING-YING LEI; HONG-TAO WANG; FAN LI; YING-QIU CUI; FANG FU; RU LI; CAN LIAO

    2016-12-01

    Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) has proven to be a powerful tool in postnatal patients with intellectual disabilities. However, the diagnostic capability of CMA in patients with congenital oral clefts remain mysterious. Here, we present ourclinical experience in implementing whole-genome high-resolution SNP arrays to investigate 33 patients with syndromic and nonsyndromic oral clefts in whom standard karyotyping analyses showed normal karyotypes. We aim to identify the genomic aetiology and candidate genes in patients with congenital oral clefts. CMA revealed copy number variants (CNVs) in every patient, which ranged from 2 to 9 per sample. The size of detected CNVs varied from 100 to 3.2 Mb. In 33 patients, we identified six clinically significant CNVs. The incidence of clinically significant CNVs was 18.2% (6/33). Three of these six CNVs were detected in patients with nonsyndromic clefts, including one who presented with isolated cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP) and two with cleft palate only (CPO). The remaining three CNVs were detected in patients with syndromic clefts. However, no CNV was detected in patients with cleft lip only (CLO). The six clinically significant CNVs were as follows: 8p23.1 microduplication (198 kb); 10q22.2-q22.3 microdeletion (1766 kb); 18q12.3 microduplication (638 kb); 20p12.1 microdeletion (184 kb); 6q26 microdeletion (389 kb); and 22q11.21-q11.23 microdeletion (3163 kb). In addition, two novel candidate genes for oral clefts, KAT6B and MACROD2, were putatively identified. We also found a CNV of unknown clinical significance witha detection rate of 3.0% (1/33). Our results further support the notion that CNVs significantly contributed to the genetic aetiology of oral clefts and emphasize the efficacy of whole-genome high-resolution SNP arrays to detect novel candidate genes in patients with syndromic and nonsyndromic clefts.

  9. Incidence of cleft Lip and palate in the state of Andhra Pradesh, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Srinivas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the incidence of cleft lip and palate defects in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. Design Setting: The study was conducted in 2001 in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. The state has a population of 76 million. Three districts, Cuddapah, Medak and Krishna, were identified for this study owing to their diversity. They were urban, semi-urban and rural, respectively. Literacy rates and consanguinity of the parents was elicited and was compared to national averages to find correlations to cleft births. Type and side of cleft were recorded to compare with other studies around the world and other parts of India. Results: The birth rate of clefts was found to be 1.09 for every 1000 live births. This study found that 65% of the children born with clefts were males. The distribution of the type of cleft showed 33% had CL, 64% had CLP, 2% had CP and 1% had rare craniofacial clefts. Unilateral cleft lips were found in 79% of the patients. Of the unilateral cleft lips 64% were left sided. There was a significant correlation of children with clefts being born to parents who shared a consanguineous relationship and those who were illiterate with the odds ratio between 5.25 and 7.21 for consanguinity and between 1.55 and 5.85 for illiteracy, respectively. Conclusion: The birth rate of clefts was found to be comparable with other Asian studies, but lower than found in other studies in Caucasian populations and higher than in African populations. The incidence was found to be similar to other studies done in other parts of India. The distribution over the various types of cleft was comparable to that found in other studies.

  10. [A case of EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip) syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Yoshimasu, H; Komuro, C; Kobayashi, A; Moon, K; Sato, M; Yamashiro, M; Arai, N; Shioiri, S; Amagasa, T

    1991-12-01

    EEC syndrome is a rare congenital malformation characterized by ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip and/or palate. We reported a case of EEC syndrome with cleft palate. The patient was a 15-month-old girl. She had split hands of the upper extremities, syndactyly and polydactyly of the right lower extremity, ectodermal dysplasia including sparse hair, enamel hypoplasia and cleft palate. The patient underwent palatoplasty at the age of 18 months.

  11. Complete sternal cleft associated with right clavicular, manubrial, and thyroid hypoplasia, pectus deformity, and spinal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Eleza T; Alazraki, Adina; Loewen, Jonathan; Braithwaite, Kiery

    2016-01-01

    Sternal cleft anomalies are rare. Associated anomalies include pentalogy of Cantrell and posterior fossa abnormalities, hemangiomas, arteriopathy, cardiac anomalies, eye abnormalities, and sternal defects syndrome. There is only a single report of complete sternal cleft, pectus excavatum, and right clavicular hypoplasia in an adult. Thyroid hemiagenesis is also very rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case of complete sternal cleft, pectus deformity, and right clavicular hypoplasia in a child and the first case with right thyroid hemiagenesis.

  12. A structure-function study of MID1 mutations associated with a mild Opitz phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnayer, Laila; Khuri, Sawsan; Merheby, Hassan Al-Ali; Meroni, Germana; Elsas, Louis J

    2006-03-01

    The X-linked form of Opitz syndrome (OS) affects midline structures and produces a characteristic, but heterogeneous, phenotype that may include severe mental retardation, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, widow's peak, cleft lip/cleft palate, congenital heart disease, laryngotracheal defects, and hypospadias. The MID1 gene was implicated in OS by linkage to Xp22. It encodes a 667 amino acid protein that contains a RING finger motif, two B-box zinc fingers, a coiled-coil, a fibronectin type III (FNIII) domain, and a B30.2 domain. Several mutations in MID1 are associated with severe OS. Here, we describe an intelligent male with a milder phenotype characterized by hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, widow's peak, mild hypospadias, pectus excavatum, and a surgically corrected tracheo-esophageal fistula. He has an above average intelligence and no cleft lip/palate or heart disease. We identified a novel mutation in MID1 (P441L) which is in exon 8 and functionally associated with the FNIII domain. While OS phenotypes have been attributed to mutations in the C-terminal part of MID1, little is currently known about the structure-function relationships of MID1 mutations, and how they affect phenotype. We find from a literature review that missense mutations within the FNIII domain of MID1 are associated with a milder presentation of OS than missense mutations elsewhere in MID1. All truncating mutations (frameshift, insertions/deletions) lead to severe OS. We used homology analysis of the MID1 FNIII domain to investigate structure-function changes caused by our missense mutation. This and other missense mutations probably cause disruption of protein-protein interactions, either within MID1 or between MID1 and other proteins. We correlate these protein structure-function findings to the absence of CNS or palatal changes and conclude that the FNIII domain of the MID1 protein may be involved in midline differentiation after neural tube and palatal structures are completed.

  13. Phonetic features by babies with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gara, M M; Logemann, J A; Rademaker, A W

    1994-11-01

    Twenty-three babies with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate were audiotaped at regular intervals from 5 to 35 months of age. Narrow phonetic transcription of their comfort-state vocalizations and word approximations was accomplished to describe phonetic development over time and according to the nonrandomized age of palatoplasty. The babies that had earlier palatal repair produced significantly higher percentages of oral stops after 12 months of age than babies with similar clefts that had later palatal repair. No significant differences are evident, however, according to age of palatoplasty, for mean frequency use of oral fricatives up to 3 years of age. For all 23 babies, regardless of the age of palatoplasty intervention, time is an even stronger variable than age of palatoplasty for development of palatal, alveolar and velar place features, oral stops, and oral fricatives.

  14. Prosthetic rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Rodigues, Polyana Barbara; Marcello-Machado, Raissa Micaella; Pinto, Luciana Rezende; Faot, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult today to find older patients without their cleft palate prosthetically rehabilitated. This case report presents the rehabilitation by conventional dental prostheses of a cleft palate patient who had no prior treatment. A 52-year-old male presented himself to have his fissured palate obturated and occlusion restored. He reported difficulties in swallowing food and liquids, along with a severe speech disability. The patient's medical history revealed diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, low vision due to macular atrophic lesions, and xerostomia. The upper and lower arches were completely and partially edentulous, respectively. The treatment plan involved a conventional denture to be placed in the upper arch, and a removable partial denture to be placed in the lower arch.

  15. Bridging the synaptic cleft: lessons from orphan glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Sabine M; Hollmann, Michael

    2010-08-24

    For neurons to communicate, signals must cross the cell-to-cell distance at their points of contact. At the predominant cell-cell contact in the central nervous system, the chemical synapse, the synaptic cleft spans roughly 20 nanometers. To signal across this distance, the presynaptic neuron secretes a diffusible neurotransmitter, which is detected by receptors on the postsynaptic neuron. Although this signaling mechanism has become common knowledge, it remains unclear how synapses are maintained when they are not in immediate use. New evidence reveals how Nature solved this problem at a particular type of synapse in the cerebellum: Three old acquaintances bridge the cleft. The ionotropic glutamate receptor GluD2 constitutes the postsynaptic anchor that indirectly interacts with the presynaptic anchor neurexin through a presynaptically secreted soluble factor, a member of the C1q protein family named Cbln1. This trio collaborates to align pre- and postsynaptic sides.

  16. Simple Technique Overcoming a Persistent Problem in Cleft Palate Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrashetti, S M; Dube, Gunjan; Thakkar, Bhushan; Ahuja, Manav

    2016-12-01

    Cleft palate repair mandates use of a mouth gag and Dingmans moth gag is the most commonly used for the same; but the use of Dingmans mouth gag may have the demerit of the suture getting tethered at various places of the instrument during cleft palate closure particularly in the hands of the beginner surgeon. This article discusses about a simple technique of using a rubber dam sheet to cover the frame of the mouth gag. The technique discussed in this article is simple, cost effective method to overcome the potential disadvantage of suture adherence during repair of palatal tissue. The technique also has the potential to reduce the total operative time which needs a further study to validate the same.

  17. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Solanki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis.

  18. Velopharyngeal sphincter pathophysiologic aspects in the in cleft palat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are common congenital abnormalities with typical functional disorders on speech, deglutition and middle ear function. Objective: This article reviews functional labiopalatine disorders through a pathophysiological view. Method: We performed a literature search on line, as well as books and periodicals related to velopharyngeal sphincter. Our sources were LILACS, MEDLINE and SciELO databases, and we applied to the research Keywords of interest on the velopharyngeal pathophysiology, for articles published between 1965 and 2007. Conclusion: Velopharyngeal sphincter plays a central role in speech, swallowing and middle ear physiology in patients with labiopalatine cleft. At the end of our bibliographic review, pursuant to the velopharyngeal physiology in individuals with this disorder in the functional speech, deglutition and otologic function, we observed that although there is a great number of published data discussing this issue, further studies are necessary to completely understand the pathophysiology, due to the fact they have been exploited superficially.

  19. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova University, were studied for 19 different CFTR mutations by the strip assay method which is based on reverse hybridization. Results: In cystic fibrosis diagnosed patients, 19 mutations were observed of which 9 were homozygous and 10 were heterozygous. ∆F508 frequency was found as 11.9%, and rate of homozygous was found as 66.7%. Mutation frequencies of W1282X and N1303K were found as 2.40% and 4.80% respectively and rate of homozygous mutations were 50% for both. I148T mutation frequency was found as 3.20% and all were heterozygous. For the whole 19 mutations, frequency of mutation in 63 subjects was 22.3%. Conclusion: Detection of CFTR gene mutations by the strip assay method by reverse hybridization is an easy, fast and informative method. However, due to improvability of the common mutations in probable cystic fibrosis patients because of heterogenity in this region, it is still a major problem and does not exclude cystic fibrosis diagnosis. But this problematic issue can be overcome by evaluating the whole exons of CFTR mutations by advanced molecular tecniques. Key words: CFTR, cystic fibrosis, molecular diagnosis, reverse hibridisation [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 202-208

  20. Evaluation of two putative susceptibility loci for oral clefts in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, L E; Murray, J C; O'Brien, S;

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL+/-P) and isolated cleft palate (CP) is influenced by genetic variation at several loci and that the relation between specific genetic variants and disease risk may be modified by environmental factors....... The present study evaluated potential associations between CL+/-P and CP and two putative clefting susceptibility loci, MSX1 and TGFB3, using data from a nationwide case-control study conducted in Denmark from 1991 to 1994. The potential effects of interactions between these genes and two common environmental...