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Sample records for cleavage fracture stress

  1. Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  2. [Stress fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, M

    2016-07-01

    Bone stress injuries are due to repetitive mechanical overuse of the skeleton and occur as a result of microscopic lesions sustained when bone is subjected to repeated submaximal stress. Over time accumulation of such injuries can lead to bone failure and fractures. Stress-related bone injuries are relatively common among otherwise healthy persons who have recently started new or intensified forms of physical training activities. Stress injuries lead to typical findings on radiography, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and need to be discriminated from other conditions, in particular infections and neoplasms. Stress fractures must be differentiated from insufficiency fractures that occur in bones with reduced mechanical resistance or disturbed structure.

  3. Method of Evaluating Delayed Fracture Susceptibility of Tempered Martensitic Steel Showing Quasi-Cleavage Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yu; Takai, Kenichi

    2017-02-01

    The difference in the hydrogen charging methods, immersion in a NH4SCN aqueous solution, and cathodic electrolysis in a NaOH aqueous solution, did not affect the hydrogen state present in the steel, but it did affect the surface state of the specimens through corrosion, causing fracture strength to fluctuate in tensile testes. As for stress application method, the fracture strength at lower crosshead speeds in tensile tests was consistent with that found for hydrogen precharging prior to stress application in CLTs as long as hydrogen charging was conducted by cathodic electrolysis. However, the fracture strength obtained with concurrent hydrogen charging without precharging prior to stress application in CLTs was higher than that with hydrogen precharging prior to stress application in CLTs regardless of the same hydrogen content. In other words, delayed fracture susceptibility was affected by the order of hydrogen charging and stress application for quasi-cleavage fracture associated with local plastic deformation, i.e., dislocation motion. Therefore, by taking into account the cathodic electrolysis in the NaOH solution, the low crosshead speed and the order of hydrogen charging and stress application, the fracture strength in CLTs, and tensile tests coincided with respect to quasi-cleavage fracture even though the stress application methods were different.

  4. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000553.htm Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that ...

  5. Stress fractures in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Provencher, Matthew T

    2012-04-01

    Stress fractures are a relatively common entity in athletes, in particular, runners. Physicians and health care providers should maintain a high index of suspicion for stress fractures in runners presenting with insidious onset of focal bone tenderness associated with recent changes in training intensity or regimen. It is particularly important to recognize “high-risk” fractures, as these are associated with an increased risk of complication. A patient with confirmed radiographic evidence of a high-risk stress fracture should be evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon. Runners may benefit from orthotics, cushioned sneakers, interval training, and vitamin/calcium supplementation as a means of stress fracture prevention.

  6. The shallow flaw effect and the local approach to cleavage fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moinereau, D.

    1996-10-01

    The capability of Beremin model to explain the shallow flaw effect in cleavage fracture is evaluated. Numerous two-dimensional finite element calculations are performed on several cracked specimens (cladded and un-cladded specimens with different values of a/W ratio) submitted to mechanical or thermal loading. The behavior of different specimens is examined using the Weibull stress {sigma}{sub w} versus stress intensity factor K{sub J} curves. The stress fields and plastic zones at the crack tip are also compared on respective cracked specimens. (K.A.). 12 refs.

  7. -Lesser known stress fractures-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybier, M; Hamze, B; Champsaur, P; Parlier, C

    1997-01-01

    Stress fractures of the tibia may disclose a longitudinal orientation which is obvious at bone scanning; a mild periostosis may appear on plain films; CT demonstrates a radially-oriented fracture in one aspect of the diaphyseal cortex. A cortical dissection-like vertically oriented insufficiency fracture may involve the medial aspect of the femoral shaft underlying the lesser trochanter; the fracture is concentric to the femoral cortex at CT. Insufficiency fractures of the sacrum may be misdiagnosed on plain films; bone scanning displays a typical H-shaped increased uptake which is a specific pattern. Insufficiency fractures of the pubis may appear as tumoral bone destruction; however no soft tissue mass is present at CT which in addition demonstrates normal fat tissue abutting the osseous lesion.

  8. STRESS FRACTURES IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đivo Ban

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents today, all before starting with regular sports activities and involvement in semi-professional and top professional sport, so it increases the num- ber of discovered stress fractures in this age. This type of injury can occur as a consequence of action one strong force, or the many repeated small force strength, to be exact, when the load (stress transcend ability reparations bones. Stress fractures are recorded and described up to the lower limbs. Research has been confirmed that the bones of lower leg are mostly made in injury, and with the el- derly and with the population of children and young adolescents. Occur in many sports, something to them is greater when the frequency of running and often are present in the female population. According to the results of numerous investigations, mistakes in the training are the most common cause of the emergence of stress fracture. In a direct comparison with complemented these injuries is the condition of muscles, so it is important that at the sa- me time carry out exercises strengthen muscles and stretching. Typical clinical signs of stress fractures are localized painful sensitivity to palpa- tion and runoff in a small number of cases. The basic diagnostic procedure is a medical check, it is the small, radiology and scintigraphyc diagnostics (most accurate and mag- netic resonance imaging. Treatment is usually without surgery and conservative, with rest and reducing stress, and its activity athlete breaks mainly between four and eight weeks. Only the very need surgical treatment The most important thing is that attention is focused on the proper prevention and to take all that it ever occurred to stress fractures that athletes ramble of the courts and the competition (better education of sports workers, separation of groups with increa- sed risk of the formation of an injury, adaptation activities age and abilities of athletes, adequate sports equipment, high-quality sports

  9. Cleavage fracture of large scale cladded mock-ups. preliminary analyses by the local approach of cleavage fracture; Rupture par clivage de maquettes revetues. Analyse preliminaire par l`approche locale de la rupture par clivage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moinereau, D.; Rousselier, G.; Bethmont, M.

    1993-07-01

    Innocuity of underclad flaws in the reactor pressure vessels regarding the risk of fast fracture must be demonstrated in the French safety analyses, particularly in case of severe overcooling transient. The safety analyses are usually performed with elastic and elasto-plastic analyses taking into account the effect of the stainless steel cladding. A new method called ``the local approach of cleavage fracture`` is considered here. This method allows evaluating the probability of failure of a component submitted to a mechanical or thermal loading. EDF has started a structural integrity verification program including experiments on large size cladded specimens and interpretation of the test results. The purpose of this program is to evaluate the different methods of fracture analysis used in safety studies. Four tests in four point bending have been performed at low temperature on mock-ups containing an underclad crack. In each case, the crack instability is obtained by cleavage fracture is base metal, without crack arrest, at a temperature of about - 170 deg C. The experimental results and the main mechanical analyses are presented in other papers. We present in this paper the preliminary interpretations of the test results using the local approach in cleavage fracture. Each test is interpreted by two-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic computations using the Weibull model with the parameters proposed by FRAMATOME (m = 22, {sigma}{sub u} = 2630 MPa). The probability of failure is evaluated with different meshes in each test. The results show an important effect of the size of the elements near the crack tip and of the Weibull stress {sigma}{sub w} calculation method. The effects are confirmed on a CT specimen. (authors). 11 figs., 7 refs.

  10. Stress Fractures: Concepts and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Carolina A; Bilezikian, John P

    2017-02-01

    Stress fractures are repetitive use injuries in which recurrent strains lead to material fatigue and microarchitectural discontinuities. They account for up to 20% of athletic injuries, more often in women and in the setting of track-and-field events. In women, menstrual disturbances, low body mass index, low energy intake, and sometimes low bone mass, may be contributing factors. There are no standard protocols for evaluation or management of stress fractures. Available literature published in English was retrieved using the following terms: stress fractures; fractures; osteoporosis, athletes, premenopausal women, and athletic triad; through PubMed. Reviews, original reports, and case reports were all included. Despite lack of consistency among the publications, a phenotype emerges, namely of individuals whose bone mineral density is reduced along with low intake of dietary calcium and low circulating levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Limited experience suggests that calcium and vitamin D supplementation might be helpful. Bisphosphonates or teriparatide may accelerate fracture healing in special circumstances. Most individuals who experience a stress fracture are young and healthy and do not appear to have an underlying metabolic bone disease. On the other hand, the presence of low bone mass and hormonal disturbances in some afflicted individuals might identify a cohort who needs endocrinological attention. Prospective, well-designed studies of stress fractures are needed to elucidate further underlying pathophysiological elements that predispose such individuals. Guidelines for prevention and treatment may follow from such well-controlled studies.

  11. Foot and Ankle Stress Fractures in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaser, Michael C

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of stress fractures in the general athletic population is less than 1%, but may be as high as 15% in runners. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle account for almost half of bone stress injuries in athletes. These injuries occur because of repetitive submaximal stresses on the bone resulting in microfractures, which may coalesce to form complete fractures. Advanced imaging such as MRI and triple-phase bone scans is used to evaluate patients with suspected stress fracture. Low-risk stress fractures are typically treated with rest and protected weight bearing. High-stress fractures more often require surgical treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cleavage Fracture Toughness of SA508 Gr.4N High Strength Low Alloy Steel with Different Phase Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Hyoung; Kim, Min Chul; Choi, Kwon Jae; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Materials for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are required to have good mechanical properties to endure the severe operating conditions inside the reactor. Various researches have focused on improving mechanical properties by the controlling the heat treatment process of commercial SA508 Gr.3 RPV steel. Some studies for identifying new material with high strength and toughness for larger capacity and longer lifetime of reactor are being performed. SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel may be a promising RPV material due to its excellent mechanical properties from its tempered martensitic microstructure. Recently, some research showed that F/M steel composed of the tempered martensite has a steeper temperature dependency of the fracture toughness than the master curve expression. We have also focused on the steep transition properties of tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N steel in previous research. However, it has not yet confirmed that the transition behavior including temperature dependency with tempered martensite fraction. This investigation aims to evaluate the relationship between cleavage fracture toughness and tempered martensite fraction for SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel. For this purpose, the model alloys were prepared by controlling the cooling rate from the austenitization temperature. The cleavage fracture toughness was characterized in transition temperature region by 3-point bending tests. Based on the test results and a stress distribution near crack tip calculated in FE analysis, the relationship between the carbide size distributions and the transition properties are analyzed

  13. Hydrogen-enhanced-plasticity mediated decohesion for hydrogen-induced intergranular and ``quasi-cleavage'' fracture of lath martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Akihide; Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Somerday, Brian P.; Sofronis, Petros; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of lath martenistic steels is characterized by intergranular and "quasi-cleavage" transgranular fracture. Recent transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses (Nagao et al., 2012a, 2014a, 2014b, 2014c) of samples lifted from beneath fracture surfaces through focused ion beam machining (FIB) revealed a failure mechanism that can be termed hydrogen-enhanced-plasticity mediated decohesion. Fracture occurs by the synergistic action of the hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity and decohesion. In particular, intergranular cracking takes place by dislocation pile-ups impinging on prior austenite grain boundaries and "quasi-cleavage" is the case when dislocation pile-ups impinge on block boundaries. These high-angle boundaries, which have already weakened by the presence of hydrogen, debond by the pile-up stresses. The micromechanical model of Novak et al. (2010) is used to quantitatively describe and predict the hydrogen-induced failure of these steels. The model predictions verify that introduction of nanosized (Ti,Mo)C precipitates in the steel microstructure enhances the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The results are used to discuss microstructural designs that are less susceptible to hydrogen-induced failure in systems with fixed hydrogen content (closed systems).

  14. Sacral stress fractures in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, E G; Giangarra, C

    1996-08-01

    Low back and buttock pain in runners can be a source of frustration for the athlete and a diagnostic dilemma for the physician. The authors reported on 3 cases of sacral stress fractures in women athletes, all of which initially presented as low back and/or buttock pain. Sacral stress fractures have been increasingly recognized as a potential cause of these symptoms, especially in young athletes. Because plain radiograph findings are typically normal, the diagnosis is best made with bone scintigraphy. Computed tomography is indicated if there is concern about neoplasm and to evaluate healing of the fracture. If treated with rest, most of these fractures heal and the athlete can return to previous sports activity. The treating physician should be suspicious of this injury among running athletes reporting sacral and buttock pain that does not respond to treatment.

  15. Pedicular stress fracture in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Htoo, M.M. [Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, (Singapore). Department of Diagnostic Radiology

    1997-08-01

    Spondylolisthesis with or without spondylolysis is common in the lumbar spine. Associated fracture in the pedicle (`pediculolysis`) is unusual. The margins of pedicular stress fractures, like spondylolysis, usually appear sclerotic. A patient with a pedicular stress fracture with minimal marginal sclerosis suggesting an injury of recent onset is presented here. There was associated bilateral spondylolysis. The findings in this patient suggest that established pediculolysis probably represents a stress fracture that has failed to heal. (authors). 10 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Stress fracture of the femoral neck in a child (stress fracture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coldwell, D.; Gross, G.W.; Boal, D.K.

    1984-03-01

    Femoral neck stress fracture is extremely rare in childhood. We report a case of femoral neck stress fracture in an 11-year-old girl. Differentials diagnosis and a brief review of the literature follow.

  17. Epidemiology and site specificity of stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, K L; Brukner, P D

    1997-04-01

    Clinically, stress fractures appear to be a common overuse injury among athletes and in military recruits undertaking basic training; however, there is a lack of sound epidemiologic studies describing stress fracture occurrence in athletes. Few have directly compared stress fracture rates between sports to establish which poses the greatest risk for this injury. Furthermore, incidence rates, expressed in terms of exposure, have rarely been reported for stress fractures in athletes. Nevertheless, available data suggest that runners and ballet dancers are at relatively high risk for stress fractures. Although a gender difference in rates is clearly evident in military populations, this is less apparent in athletes. Other participant characteristics, such as age and race, may also influence stress fracture risk. The most common site of stress fracture in athletes is the tibia, although the site reflects the nature of the load applied to the skeleton. Stress fracture morbidity, expressed as the time until return to sport or activity, varies depending on the site. Generally, a period of 6 to 8 weeks is needed for healing; however, stress fractures at certain sites, such as the navicular and anterior tibial cortex, are often associated with protracted recovery and, in some cases, termination of sporting pursuits.

  18. Stress fractures: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Deepak S; Roth, Matt; Kapil, Neha

    2011-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in athletes and military recruits. These injuries occur more commonly in lower extremities than in upper extremities. Stress fractures should be considered in patients who present with tenderness or edema after a recent increase in activity or repeated activity with limited rest. The differential diagnosis varies based on location, but commonly includes tendinopathy, compartment syndrome, and nerve or artery entrapment syndrome. Medial tibial stress syndrome (shin splints) can be distinguished from tibial stress fractures by diffuse tenderness along the length of the posteromedial tibial shaft and a lack of edema. When stress fracture is suspected, plain radiography should be obtained initially and, if negative, may be repeated after two to three weeks for greater accuracy. If an urgent diagnosis is needed, triple-phase bone scintigraphy or magnetic resonance imaging should be considered. Both modalities have a similar sensitivity, but magnetic resonance imaging has greater specificity. Treatment of stress fractures consists of activity modification, including the use of nonweight-bearing crutches if needed for pain relief. Analgesics are appropriate to relieve pain, and pneumatic bracing can be used to facilitate healing. After the pain is resolved and the examination shows improvement, patients may gradually increase their level of activity. Surgical consultation may be appropriate for patients with stress fractures in high-risk locations, nonunion, or recurrent stress fractures. Prevention of stress fractures has been studied in military personnel, but more research is needed in other populations.

  19. Topographic Stress, Bedrock Fractures, and Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, J. T.; Moon, S.; St Clair, J. T.; Martel, S. J.; Holbrook, W. S.; Singha, K.; Hayes, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Fractures influence the development of landforms by altering the permeability and erodibility of bedrock. Landforms may in turn influence the development of bedrock fractures by perturbing the stress field generated by gravity and tectonics. This mutual influence could lead to feedbacks between evolving landforms and topographic stress. We summarize new geological and geophysical field evidence that topographic stress alters the distribution and state of bedrock fractures. Using these observations as a guide, we propose a framework for incorporating stress effects into landscape evolution models, including a dimensionless number that describes the relative importance of gravitational and ambient tectonic stresses.

  20. Treatment of stress fractures: the fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, William Glenn; Hergan, David J

    2006-01-01

    This article is an introduction to the fundamentals of stress fracture management. Extrinsic and intrinsic factors, that may play a role in the development of stress fractures, are discussed and incorporated as possible treatment options. Different treatment modalities including ultrasound and electromagnetic fields are addressed, with an emphasis on literature support.

  1. Stress fractures. A review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troussier, B.; Drevet, J.G.; Lelong, C.; Juvin, R.; Phelip, X.

    1988-04-07

    Stress fractures result from increased bone remodelling induced by intense, unusual and repeated physical activity. They occur mainly in young individuals who are either servicemen or athletes, and are usually located in the tibias, calcaneums, metatarsals and femurs. Stress fractures should be distinguished from fractures due to bone loss, which are fractures of weakened bones occurring after a moderate or even negligeable injury in adults over 50 years of age, mainly in the bones of the pelvic girdle and lower leg. The diagnosis of stress fracture is suggested by the history and unremarkable physical findings, and confirmed by roentgenologic and scintigraphic investigations. The early, marked, localized increase in bone uptake demonstrated by isotopic scans is suggestive. Roentgenologic changes are delayed and inconspicuous, explaining diagnostic mistakes. Prompt therapy consists in refraining from weightbearing and represents the most effective means for preventing the only possible complication, ie, true fracture.

  2. Stress fractures in the lower extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Ferco H. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jonge, Milko C. de [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: m.maas@amc.uva.nl

    2007-04-15

    Stress fractures are fatigue injuries of bone usually caused by changes in training regimen in the population of military recruits and both professional and recreational athletes. Raised levels of sporting activity in today's population and refined imaging technologies have caused a rise in reported incidence of stress fractures in the past decades, now making up more than 10% of cases in a typical sports medicine practice. Background information (including etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatment and prevention) as well as state of the art imaging of stress fractures will be discussed to increase awareness amongst radiologists, providing the tools to play an important role in diagnosis and prognosis of stress fractures. Specific fracture sites in the lower extremity will be addressed, covering the far majority of stress fracture incidence. Proper communication between treating physician, physical therapist and radiologist is needed to obtain a high index of suspicion for this easily overlooked entity. Radiographs are not reliable for detection of stress fractures and radiologist should not falsely be comforted by them, which could result in delayed diagnosis and possibly permanent consequences for the patient. Although radiographs are mandatory to rule out differentials, they should be followed through when negative, preferably by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as this technique has proven to be superior to bone scintigraphy. CT can be beneficial in a limited number of patients, but should not be used routinely.

  3. Transverse Stress Fracture of the Proximal Patella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Satoru; Arai, Yuji; Kato, Ko; Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Nakagawa, Shuji; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sudo, Akihiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Among stress fractures associated with sports activities, patellar stress fracture is rare. Regarding patella stress fractures, so far only distal transverse or lateral longitudinal fractures have been reported, but there are no reports of transverse fractures occurring in the proximal patella. We describe an extremely rare case of transverse stress fracture of proximal patella in a 9-year-old athlete. A 9-year old boy, who participated in sports (sprints and Kendo) presented with left knee pain without any external injury. In plain radiographs, a fracture line was observed in the proximal 1/3 of the left patella, and a patella stress fracture was diagnosed. For treatment, because 7 months of conservative therapy showed no improvement, internal fixation was carried out using Acutrak screws, and bone union was thus achieved. Three months after the operation, he was able to return to his previous level of athletic sports activity. Regarding the mechanism of onset, it is believed that the causes are longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure. On the other hand, the contact region of the patella with the femur changes with the flexion angle of the knee. In the current case, the fracture occurred at a site where the patella was in contact with the femur at a flexion angle of >90°, so it is believed that it occurred as a clinical condition from being subjected to repeated longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure at a flexion angle of >90°, during the sports activities of sprints and Kendo. The nonunion of the transverse stress fracture of his proximal patella was successfully treated with internal fixation using Acutrak screws. PMID:26871789

  4. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  5. Stress Analysis and Fracture in Nanolaminate Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2008-01-01

    A stress analysis is performed on a nanolaminate subjected to bending. A composite mechanics computer code that is based on constituent properties and nanoelement formulation is used to evaluate the nanolaminate stresses. The results indicate that the computer code is sufficient for the analysis. The results also show that when a stress concentration is present, the nanolaminate stresses exceed their corresponding matrix-dominated strengths and the nanofiber fracture strength.

  6. Rare stress fracture: longitudinal fracture of the femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez González, M; Velázquez Fragua, P; López Miralles, E; Abad Moretón, M M

    2017-09-21

    42-year-old man with pain in the posterolateral region of the right knee that began while he was running. Initially, it was diagnosed by magnetic resonance (MR) as a possible aggressive process (osteosarcoma or Ewing's sarcoma) but with computed tomography it was noted a cortical hypodense linear longitudinal image with a continuous, homogeneous and solid periosteal reaction without clear soft tissue mass that in this patient suggest a longitudinal distal femoral fatigue stress fracture. This type of fracture at this location is very rare. Stress fractures are entities that can be confused with an agressive process. MR iscurrently the most sensitive and specific imaging method for its diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. STRESS FRACTURE PREVALENCE IN ELITE FIGURE SKATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Dubravcic-Simunjak

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Figure skating is a physically demanding sport that requires a unique combination of artistic ability, speed, agility, flexibility and power. During the last decades not only the competitive schedule has become tougher, but after introduction of the new judging system in 2003, also more emphasis is put on difficult technical elements, jumps, steps and spins (ISU Rules, 2006. More studies about possible increasing prevalence of stress fractures in figure skaters and contributing factors are lacking (Dubravcic-Simunjak et al., 2003; Moran, 2000; Pecina et al., 1990. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain data about the current stress fracture cumulative risk among elite junior and senior figure skaters, as well as possible factors that may contribute to stress fracture incidence. An anonymous questionnaire, divided into 5 sections, inquired about the prevalence of stress fracture were mailed and distributed to all 62 International Skating Union (ISU members by the ISU headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland. The guidelines of the Helsinki declaration 2004 were followed. From the 644 skaters who received the questionnaire, 412 completed ones were returned from 110 female juniors (78 single skaters, 12 pair skaters and 20 ice dancers and 135 female seniors (97 single skaters, 16 pair skaters and 22 ice dancers and from 79 male juniors (47 single skaters, 12 pair skaters and 20 ice dancers and 88 male seniors (50 single skaters, 16 pair skaters and 22 ice dancers, coming from different ISU members. The response rate was 62% in females and 67% in males. The median age for female skaters was 16 years and for males 18 years (range 12-25 years. All participants started to skate between 3 and 6 years of age and started to compete in national and international competitions when they were between 5 and 7 years old. At the time of this analysis, they had been skating between 9 and 20 years.In females 41 (16.7%, and in males 25 (13.8% figure skaters

  8. Thermal stress fracture of ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal stress failures of ceramic coatings are discussed in terms of fracture mechanics concepts. The effects of transient and residual stresses on single and multiple cycle failure mechanisms are considered. A specific example of a zirconia thermal barrier coating is presented and its endurance calculated using the proposed relationships.

  9. Stress Modulation of Fracture Fixation Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Michael J; Collinge, Cory A; Gardner, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Stress modulation is the concept of manipulating bridge plate variables to provide a flexible fixation construct that allows callus formation through uneventful secondary bone healing. Obtaining absolute stability through the anatomic reduction of all fracture fragments comes at the expense of fracture biology, whereas intramedullary nailing, which is more advantageous for diaphyseal fractures of the lower extremity, is technically demanding and often may not be possible when stabilizing many metaphyseal fractures. Overly stiff plating constructs are associated with asymmetric callus formation, early implant failure, and fracture nonunion. Numerous surgeon-controlled variables can be manipulated to increase flexibility without sacrificing strength, including using longer plates with well-spaced screws, choosing titanium or stainless steel implants, and using locking or nonlocking screws. Axially dynamic emerging concepts, such as far cortical locking and near cortical overdrilling, provide further treatment options when bridge plating techniques are used.

  10. Transverse Stress Fracture of the Proximal Patella: A Case Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atsumi, Satoru; Arai, Yuji; Kato, Ko; Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Nakagawa, Shuji; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sudo, Akihiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    .... Regarding patella stress fractures, so far only distal transverse or lateral longitudinal fractures have been reported, but there are no reports of transverse fractures occurring in the proximal patella...

  11. Bone stress in runners with tibial stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Willson, John D; Gries, Samantha R; Kernozek, Thomas W; Derrick, Timothy R

    2015-11-01

    Combinations of smaller bone geometry and greater applied loads may contribute to tibial stress fracture. We examined tibial bone stress, accounting for geometry and applied loads, in runners with stress fracture. 23 runners with a history of tibial stress fracture & 23 matched controls ran over a force platform while 3-D kinematic and kinetic data were collected. An elliptical model of the distal 1/3 tibia cross section was used to estimate stress at 4 locations (anterior, posterior, medial and lateral). Inner and outer radii for the model were obtained from 2 planar x-ray images. Bone stress differences were assessed using two-factor ANOVA (α=0.05). Key contributors to observed stress differences between groups were examined using stepwise regression. Runners with tibial stress fracture experienced greater anterior tension and posterior compression at the distal tibia. Location, but not group, differences in shear stress were observed. Stepwise regression revealed that anterior-posterior outer diameter of the tibia and the sagittal plane bending moment explained >80% of the variance in anterior and posterior bone stress. Runners with tibial stress fracture displayed greater stress anteriorly and posteriorly at the distal tibia. Elevated tibial stress was associated with smaller bone geometry and greater bending moments about the medial-lateral axis of the tibia. Future research needs to identify key running mechanics associated with the sagittal plane bending moment at the distal tibia as well as to identify ways to improve bone geometry in runners in order to better guide preventative and rehabilitative efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress fracture of the pelvis and lower limbs including atypical femoral fractures-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tins, Bernhard J; Garton, Mark; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N; Tyrrell, Prudencia N M; Lalam, Radhesh; Singh, Jaspreet

    2015-02-01

    Stress fractures, that is fatigue and insufficiency fractures, of the pelvis and lower limb come in many guises. Most doctors are familiar with typical sacral, tibial or metatarsal stress fractures. However, even common and typical presentations can pose diagnostic difficulties especially early after the onset of clinical symptoms. This article reviews the aetiology and pathophysiology of stress fractures and their reflection in the imaging appearances. The role of varying imaging modalities is laid out and typical findings are demonstrated. Emphasis is given to sometimes less well-appreciated fractures, which might be missed and can have devastating consequences for longer term patient outcomes. In particular, atypical femoral shaft fractures and their relationship to bisphosphonates are discussed. Migrating bone marrow oedema syndrome, transient osteoporosis and spontaneous osteonecrosis are reviewed as manifestations of stress fractures. Radiotherapy-related stress fractures are examined in more detail. An overview of typical sites of stress fractures in the pelvis and lower limbs and their particular clinical relevance concludes this review. Teaching Points • Stress fractures indicate bone fatigue or insufficiency or a combination of these. • Radiographic visibility of stress fractures is delayed by 2 to 3 weeks. • MRI is the most sensitive and specific modality for stress fractures. • Stress fractures are often multiple; the underlying cause should be evaluated. • Infratrochanteric lateral femoral fractures suggest an atypical femoral fracture (AFF); endocrinologist referral is advisable.

  13. Healing of Stress Fracture in an Animal Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Jiliang

    2004-01-01

    .... We have successfully established a reproducible stress fracture model in the rodent. We have investigated the role of an exercise program in the prevention of stress fractures using the ulna axial compression loading model...

  14. Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_166853.html Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners Researcher says less muscle ... low body weight are more likely to have stress fractures and take longer to recover from them, according ...

  15. Inelastic and Dynamic Fracture and Stress Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Large deformation inelastic stress analysis and inelastic and dynamic crack propagation research work is summarized. The salient topics of interest in engine structure analysis that are discussed herein include: (1) a path-independent integral (T) in inelastic fracture mechanics, (2) analysis of dynamic crack propagation, (3) generalization of constitutive relations of inelasticity for finite deformations , (4) complementary energy approaches in inelastic analyses, and (5) objectivity of time integration schemes in inelastic stress analysis.

  16. Fluid Production Induced Stress Analysis Surrounding an Elliptic Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Harshad Rajendra

    Hydraulic fracturing is an effective technique used in well stimulation to increase petroleum well production. A combination of multi-stage hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling has led to the recent boom in shale gas production which has changed the energy landscape of North America. During the fracking process, highly pressurized mixture of water and proppants (sand and chemicals) is injected into to a crack, which fractures the surrounding rock structure and proppants help in keeping the fracture open. Over a longer period, however, these fractures tend to close due to the difference between the compressive stress exerted by the reservoir on the fracture and the fluid pressure inside the fracture. During production, fluid pressure inside the fracture is reduced further which can accelerate the closure of a fracture. In this thesis, we study the stress distribution around a hydraulic fracture caused by fluid production. It is shown that fluid flow can induce a very high hoop stress near the fracture tip. As the pressure gradient increases stress concentration increases. If a fracture is very thin, the flow induced stress along the fracture decreases, but the stress concentration at the fracture tip increases and become unbounded for an infinitely thin fracture. The result from the present study can be used for studying the fracture closure problem, and ultimately this in turn can lead to the development of better proppants so that prolific well production can be sustained for a long period of time.

  17. Stress fractures: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcuk, George R; Mahanty, Scott R; Skalski, Matthew R; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Gottsegen, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Stress fracture, in its most inclusive description, includes both fatigue and insufficiency fracture. Fatigue fractures, sometimes equated with the term "stress fractures," are most common in runners and other athletes and typically occur in the lower extremities. These fractures are the result of abnormal, cyclical loading on normal bone leading to local cortical resorption and fracture. Insufficiency fractures are common in elderly populations, secondary to osteoporosis, and are typically located in and around the pelvis. They are a result of normal or traumatic loading on abnormal bone. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the hip or knee may cause acute pain that may present in the emergency setting. Medial tibial stress syndrome is a type of stress injury of the tibia related to activity and is a clinical syndrome encompassing a range of injuries from stress edema to frank-displaced fracture. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy is also a recently discovered entity that needs early recognition to prevent progression to a complete fracture. Imaging recommendations for evaluation of stress fractures include initial plain radiographs followed, if necessary, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is preferred over computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy. Radiographs are the first-line modality and may reveal linear sclerosis and periosteal reaction prior to the development of a frank fracture. MRI is highly sensitive with findings ranging from periosteal edema to bone marrow and intracortical signal abnormality. Additionally, a brief description of relevant clinical management of stress fractures is included.

  18. Mezzo-scopic Analysis of Fracture Toughness in Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyata Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cleavage fracture toughness of steels was mezzo-scopically analyzed on the basis of the statistical local fracture criterion approach. The statistical stress criterion at the crack tip region suggests that the cleavage fracture toughness in steels can be described as a function of the yield stress, the cleavage fracture stress, and other mechanical properties of the materials. Formulation of the cleavage fracture toughness was first examined through an investigation on correlation between the cleavage toughness and the cleavage fracture stress obtained in notched round bar specimens in accordance with the theoretical prediction. Then, the scatter of the toughness, specimen thickness effect on the toughness, deterioration of the toughness due to cold working and irradiation, and improvement of the toughness caused by the Ni addition, were analyzed through the formulation of the toughness.

  19. Stress fracture of the pelvis and lower limbs including atypical femoral fractures?a review

    OpenAIRE

    Tins, Bernhard J.; Garton, Mark; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N.; Tyrrell, Prudencia N. M.; Lalam, Radhesh; Singh, Jaspreet

    2014-01-01

    Stress fractures, that is fatigue and insufficiency fractures, of the pelvis and lower limb come in many guises. Most doctors are familiar with typical sacral, tibial or metatarsal stress fractures. However, even common and typical presentations can pose diagnostic difficulties especially early after the onset of clinical symptoms. This article reviews the aetiology and pathophysiology of stress fractures and their reflection in the imaging appearances. The role of varying imaging modalities ...

  20. Thermal stress fracturing of magma simulant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemple, R.P.; Longcope, D.B.

    1986-10-01

    Direct contact heat exchanger concepts for the extraction of energy from magma chambers are being studied as part of the DOE-funded Magma Energy Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories. These concepts require the solidification of molten material by a coolant circulated through a borehole drilled into the magma and subsequent fracture of the solid either as a natural consequence of thermal stress or by deliberate design (intentional flaws, high pressure, etc.). This report summarizes the results of several thermal stress fracturing experiments performed in the laboratory and compares the results with an analysis developed for use as a predictive tool. Information gained from this test series has been the basis for additional work now under way to simulate magma melt solidification processes.

  1. Atypical stress-avulsion fracture of the Lisfranc joint complex.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Barry J

    2014-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic erythematosus have been associated with metatarsal stress fractures. Stress fractures of the Lisfranc joint complex are uncommon injuries but have been reported to occur most frequently in ballet dancers. We present a case of an avulsion fracture of the Lisfranc joint complex that occurred spontaneously. We have reviewed the association between systemic conditions and metatarsal fractures and proposed a series of hypothetical pathological events that may have contributed to this unusual injury.

  2. Stress Fractures of the Pelvis and Legs in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Steve B.; Deren, Matthew E.; Matson, Andrew; Fadale, Paul D.; Monchik, Keith O.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures are common injuries in athletes, often difficult to diagnose. A stress fracture is a fatigue-induced fracture of bone caused by repeated applications of stress over time. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed articles published from 1974 to January 2012. Results: Intrinsic and extrinsic factors may predict the risk of stress fractures in athletes, including bone health, training, nutrition, and biomechanical factors. Based on their location, stress fractures may be categorized as low- or high-risk, depending on the likelihood of the injury developing into a complete fracture. Treatment for these injuries varies substantially and must account for the risk level of the fractured bone, the stage of fracture development, and the needs of the patient. High-risk fractures include the anterior tibia, lateral femoral neck, patella, medial malleolus, and femoral head. Low-risk fractures include the posteromedial tibia, fibula, medial femoral shaft, and pelvis. Magnetic resonance is the imaging test of choice for diagnosis. Conclusions: These injuries can lead to substantial lost time from participation. Treatment will vary by fracture location, but most stress fractures will heal with rest and modified weightbearing. Some may require more aggressive intervention, such as prolonged nonweightbearing movement or surgery. Contributing factors should also be addressed prior to return to sports. PMID:24427386

  3. Emergence of Anomalous Transport in Stressed Rough Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Brown, S.; Alves da Silva, J.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow and tracer transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the geosciences, and therefore has been extensively studied. Geologic fractures, however, are always under significant overburden stress. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through rough-walled fractures in a fundamental way, studies of anomalous tracer transport at the scale of individual fractures have so far ignored the potential role of confining stress.Here, we report the emergence of anomalous (non-Fickian) transport through a rough-walled fracture as a result of increasing the normal stress on the fracture. We generate fracture surfaces with fractal roughness, and solve the elastic contact problem between the two surfaces to obtain the 3D fracture geometry for increasing levels of normal stress. We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed rough fracture. We observe a transition from Fickian to anomalous transport as the normal stress on the fracture increases.We show that the origin of this anomalous transport behavior can be traced to the self-organization of the flow field into a heterogeneous structure dominated by preferential channels and stagnation zones, as a result of the larger number of contacts in a highly stressed fracture. We also propose a spatial Markov model that reproduces the transport behavior at the scale of the entire fracture with only three physical parameters. Our results point to a heretofore unrecognized link between geomechanics and anomalous particle transport in fractured media. Finally, we show preliminary laboratory experiment results that confirm our findings. (a) Magnitude of the volumetric flux at each discretization grid block at low stress. (b) Magnitude of the volumetric flux for a highly stressed fracture. Values are normalized with the mean volumetric flux.

  4. Impact of Stress on Anomalous Transport in Fractured Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Lei, Q.; Lee, S.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Fluid flow and transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the subsurface. However, characterizing flow and transport through fractured media is challenging due to the large heterogeneity of fractured rock properties. In addition to these "static" challenges, geologic fractures are always under significant overburden stress, and changes in the stress state can lead to changes in the fracture's ability to conduct fluids. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through fractures in a fundamental way, the impact of confining stress on transport through fractured rock remains largely unexplored. The link between anomalous (non-Fickian) transport and confining stress has been shown only recently, at the level of a single rough fracture [1]. Here, we investigate the impact of confining stress on flow and transport through discrete fracture networks. We model geomechanical effects in 2D fractured rock by means of a finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM), which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, reactivation and propagation of cracks. We implement a joint constitutive model within the FEMDEM framework to simulate the effect of fracture roughness. We apply the model to a fracture network extracted from the geological map of an actual outcrop to obtain the aperture field at different stress conditions (Figure 1). We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed fracture networks. We observe that anomalous transport emerges in response to confining stress on the fracture networks, and show that this anomalous behavior can be linked to the stress state of the rock. Finally, we develop an effective transport model that captures the anomalous transport through stressed fractures. Our results point to a heretofore unrecognized link between geomechanics and anomalous transport in discrete fractured networks. [1] P. K. Kang, S. Brown, and R. Juanes, Emergence of anomalous transport in stressed

  5. Modelling stress-dependent permeability in fractured rock including effects of propagating and bending fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latham, J.P.; Xiang, J.; Belayneh, M.; Nick, H.M.; Tsang, C.F.; Blunt, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of in-situ stresses on flow processes in fractured rock is investigated using a novel modelling approach. The combined finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM) is used to model the deformation of a fractured rock mass. The fracture wall displacements and aperture changes are modelled in

  6. Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) stress and fracture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The revised stress and fracture analysis of the Spartan REM hardware for current load conditions and mass properties is presented. The stress analysis was performed using a NASTRAN math model of the Spartan REM adapter, base, and payload. Appendix A contains the material properties, loads, and stress analysis of the hardware. The computer output and model description are in Appendix B. Factors of safety used in the stress analysis were 1.4 on tested items and 2.0 on all other items. Fracture analysis of the items considered fracture critical was accomplished using the MSFC Crack Growth Analysis code. Loads and stresses were obtaind from the stress analysis. The fracture analysis notes are located in Appendix A and the computer output in Appendix B. All items analyzed met design and fracture criteria.

  7. Stress Fracture and Nonunion of Coronoid Process in a Gymnast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hetling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gymnasts have high mechanical loading forces of up to 14 times body weight. Overuse lesions are typical in wrists and stress fractures in the olecranon, while isolated fractures of the coronoid process are uncommon. We present a case of retraumatized nonunion stress fracture of the ulnar coronoid process. Case Description. A 19-year-old gymnast presented with elbow pain after training. Imaging confirmed an old fracture of the coronoid process. We describe a 6-month multiphase return to competition rehabilitation program, which allowed him to compete pain-freely. Literature Review. Acute and overuse injuries in gymnasts are known but no nonunion of the coronoid process has been described before. Only one case of stress fracture of coronoid process in a gymnast was reported. Purpose and Clinical Relevance. We could successfully and conservatively return to sport a reactivated nonunion of a stress fracture of the coronoid process.

  8. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studied, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  9. Could this unusual scaphoid fracture occurring in a badminton player be a stress fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutus, J P; Chahidi, N

    2004-02-01

    An unusual fracture of the scaphoid occurred in an otherwise healthy young badminton player, caused by a violent movement of extension/flexion of the wrist while performing a smash. There was no direct blow or fall on the wrist, nor history of wrist pain prior to the fracture. No underlying pathology was identified. Conservative treatment failed and surgical stabilization was required to achieve bone union. The diagnosis of stress fracture was suggested. The characteristics of these uncommon fractures are reviewed.

  10. Spallation and fracture resulting from reflected and intersecting stress waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinslow, R.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of stress waves produced in solid by explosions or high-velocity impacts. These waves rebound from free surfaces in the form of tensile waves that are capable of causing internal fractures or spallation of the material. The high-speed framing camera is shown to be an important tool for observing the stress waves and fracture in transparent targets, and its photographs provide valuable information on the mechanics of fracture.

  11. Stress fractures of the distal radius in adolescent gymnasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, M. T. F.

    1981-01-01

    Adolescent girl gymnasts sustained stress fractures of the distal end of the radius in the wrist on which a rotational vault was performed. The history and clinical progress were typical of stress fractures. Imagesp272-aFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:7317727

  12. CANDIDATE GENE ANALYSIS IN ISRAELI SOLDIERS WITH STRESS FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Yanovich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of polymorphisms within candidate genes which we hypothesized may contribute to stress fracture predisposition, a case-control, cross- sectional study design was employed. Genotyping 268 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms- SNPs within 17 genes in 385 Israeli young male and female recruits (182 with and 203 without stress fractures. Twenty-five polymorphisms within 9 genes (NR3C1, ANKH, VDR, ROR2, CALCR, IL6, COL1A2, CBG, and LRP4 showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05 in the distribution between stress fracture cases and non stress fracture controls. Seventeen genetic variants were associated with an increased stress fracture risk, and eight variants with a decreased stress fracture risk. None of the SNP associations remained significant after correcting for multiple comparisons (false discovery rate- FDR. Our findings suggest that genes may be involved in stress fracture pathogenesis. Specifically, the CALCR and the VDR genes are intriguing candidates. The putative involvement of these genes in stress fracture predisposition requires analysis of more cases and controls and sequencing the relevant genomic regions, in order to define the specific gene mutations

  13. High-Risk Stress Fractures: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, Kelly C; Ramey, Lindsay N

    2016-03-01

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries in athletes. They occur during periods of increased training without adequate rest, disrupting normal bone reparative mechanisms. There are a host of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including biochemical and biomechanical, that put athletes at risk. In most stress fractures, the diagnosis is primarily clinical, with imaging indicated at times, and management focused on symptom-free relative rest with advancement of activity as tolerated. Overall, stress fractures in athletes have an excellent prognosis for return to sport, with little risk of complication. There is a subset of injuries that have a greater risk of fracture progression, delayed healing, and nonunion and are generally more challenging to treat with nonoperative care. Specific locations of high-risk stress fracture include the femoral neck (tension side), patella, anterior tibia, medial malleolus, talus, tarsal navicular, proximal fifth metatarsal, and great toe sesamoids. These sites share a characteristic region of high tensile load and low blood flow. High-risk stress fractures require a more aggressive approach to evaluation, with imaging often necessary, to confirm early and accurate diagnosis and initiate immediate treatment. Treatment consists of nonweight-bearing immobilization, often with a prolonged period away from sport, and a more methodic and careful reintroduction to athletic activity. These stress fractures may require surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion is essential to avoid delayed diagnosis and optimize outcomes in this subset of stress fractures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Postpartum Sacral Stress Fracture: An Atypical Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Speziali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sacral stress fractures are common in elderly people. However, sacral stress fracture should be always screened in the differential diagnoses of low back pain during the postpartum period. We present a case of sacral fracture in a thirty-six-year-old woman with low back pain and severe right buttock pain two days after cesarean section delivery of a 3.9 Kg baby. The diagnosis was confirmed by MRI and CT scan, while X-ray was unable to detect the fracture. Contribution of mechanical factors during the cesarean section is not a reasonable cause of sacral fracture. Pregnancy and lactation could be risk factors for sacral stress fracture even in atraumatic delivery such as cesarean section. Our patient had no risk factors for osteoporosis except for pregnancy and lactation. Transient or focal osteoporosis is challenging to assess and it cannot be ruled out even if serum test and mineral density are within the normal range.

  15. Women with previous stress fractures show reduced bone material strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Fink Eriksen, Erik

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - Bone fragility is determined by bone mass, bone architecture, and the material properties of bone. Microindentation has been introduced as a measurement method that reflects bone material properties. The pathogenesis of underlying stress fractures, in particular the role of impaired bone material properties, is still poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that impaired bone material strength might play a role in the development of stress fractures, we used microindentation in patients with stress fractures and in controls. Patients and methods - We measured bone material strength index (BMSi) by microindentation in 30 women with previous stress fractures and in 30 normal controls. Bone mineral density by DXA and levels of the bone markers C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type-1 collagen (CTX) and N-terminal propeptide of type-1 procollagen (P1NP) were also determined. Results - Mean BMSi in stress fracture patients was significantly lower than in the controls (SD 72 (8.7) vs. 77 (7.2); p = 0.02). The fracture subjects also had a significantly lower mean bone mineral density (BMD) than the controls (0.9 (0.02) vs. 1.0 (0.06); p = 0.03). Bone turnover-as reflected in serum levels of the bone marker CTX-was similar in both groups, while P1NP levels were significantly higher in the women with stress fractures (55 μg/L vs. 42 μg/L; p = 0.03). There was no correlation between BMSi and BMD or bone turnover. Interpretation - BMSi was inferior in patients with previous stress fracture, but was unrelated to BMD and bone turnover. The lower values of BMSi in patients with previous stress fracture combined with a lower BMD may contribute to the increased propensity to develop stress fractures in these patients.

  16. Postpartum Sacral Stress Fracture: An Atypical Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Speziali, Andrea; Tei, Matteo Maria; Placella, Giacomo; Chillemi, Marco; Cerulli, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    Sacral stress fractures are common in elderly people. However, sacral stress fracture should be always screened in the differential diagnoses of low back pain during the postpartum period. We present a case of sacral fracture in a thirty-six-year-old woman with low back pain and severe right buttock pain two days after cesarean section delivery of a 3.9 Kg baby. The diagnosis was confirmed by MRI and CT scan, while X-ray was unable to detect the fracture. Contribution of mechanical factors d...

  17. Patterns of fracture and tidal stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation - Implications for fracturing on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, P.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    This study considers the global patterns of fracture that would result from nonsynchronous rotation of a tidally distorted planetary body. The incremental horizontal stresses in a thin elastic or viscous shell due to a small displacement of the axis of maximum tidal elongation are derived, and the resulting stress distributions are applied to interpret the observed pattern of fracture lineaments on Europa. The observed pattern of lineaments can be explained by nonsynchronous rotation if these features formed by tension fracturing and dike emplacement. Tension fracturing can occur for a small displacement of the tidal axis, so that the resulting lineaments may be consistent with other evidence suggesting a young age for the surface.

  18. Prognostic classification of fifth metatarsal stress fracture using plantar gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Tai; Park, Young Uk; Jegal, Hyuk; Park, Jong Won; Choi, Jung Pil; Kim, Jin Su

    2013-05-01

    There have been diverse results even in same Torg type of fifth metatarsal stress fractures. Eighty-six cases with a fifth metatarsal stress fracture that were treated with modified tension band wiring from January 2003 to May 2009 were evaluated retrospectively. Each case was classified according to Torg's classification and a new classification. Using the new proposed classification, cases were subdivided into complete fracture and incomplete fracture. The cases of incomplete fracture were subdivided based on presence or absence of plantar gap more than 1 mm. After surgery, bone union was determined by CT. Statistical analysis of the Torg classification and time for bone union as well as the proposed new classification and time for bone union was performed. There was a significant difference in the time for bone union among the three Torg types (P = 0.004). The mean time for bone union in group A (complete fracture, n = 32) was 67.5 ± 28.8, and it was 103.2 ± 47.7 for group B (incomplete fracture, n = 54). There was a significant difference in time for bone union between them (P fracture, plantar gap less than 1 mm, n = 16) was 73.9 ± 26.7, and it was 115.5 ± 45.4 for group B2 (incomplete fracture, plantar gap 1 mm or more, n = 38). There was a significant difference in time for bone union between them (P stress fractures. Level III, retrospective comparative series.

  19. Family History Predicts Stress Fracture in Active Female Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loud, Keith J.; Micheli, Lyle J.; Bristol, Stephanie; Austin, S. Bryn; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Increased physical activity and menstrual irregularity have been associated with increased risk for stress fracture among adult women active in athletics. The purposes of this study were to determine whether menstrual irregularity is also a risk factor for stress fracture in active female adolescents and to estimate the quantity of exercise associated with an increased risk for this injury. PATIENTS AND METHODS A case-control study was conducted of 13- to 22-year-old females diagnosed with their first stress fracture, each matched prospectively on age and self-reported ethnicity with 2 controls. Patients with chronic illnesses or use of medications known to affect bone mineral density were excluded, including use of hormonal preparations that could alter menstrual cycles. The primary outcome, stress fracture in any extremity or the spine, was confirmed radiographically. Girls with stress fracture had bone mineral density measured at the lumbar spine by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS The mean ± SD age of the 168 participants was 15.9 ± 2.1 years; 91.7% were postmenarchal, with a mean age at menarche of 13.1 ± 1.1 years. The prevalence of menstrual irregularity was similar among cases and controls. There was no significant difference in the mean hours per week of total physical activity between girls in this sample with stress fracture (8.2 hours/week) and those without (7.4 hours/week). In multivariate models, case subjects had nearly 3 times the odds of having a family member with osteoporosis or osteopenia. In secondary analyses, participants with stress fracture had a low mean spinal bone mineral density for their age. CONCLUSIONS Among highly active female adolescents, only family history was independently associated with stress fracture. The magnitude of this association suggests that further investigations of inheritable skeletal factors are warranted in this population, along with evaluation of bone mineral density in girls with stress

  20. Risk factors associated with sacral stress fractures: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Kristi; Bartsokas, Jenna; Averell, Kristina; McBride, Erin; Long, Christine; Cook, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine and identify risk factors associated with the development of sacral stress fractures in order to improve diagnosis in clinical practice. Methods: Electronic search strategies in PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and SPORTDiscus were combined with a hand search to identify articles for inclusion. Studies were considered if they described patient cases in which imaging confirmed diagnosis of a sacral stress fracture, and the diagnosis included whether the fracture was a sacral insufficiency or sacral fatigue stress fracture. Results: In those that developed sacral insufficiency fractures, the risk factors that were most prevalent included osteoporosis, pelvic radiation therapy, rheumatoid arthritis, long-term corticosteroid therapy, and postmenopausal, each with a prevalence of 100%. Risk factors with 100% prevalence in those diagnosed with sacral fatigue fractures included recent increase in training intensity and deficient diet. Discussion: A pattern of signs and symptoms are consistent among subjects with sacral stress fractures. Patients being unsuccessfully treated for low-back and buttock pain who fit the risk factor profiles for sacral stress fractures should be referred to a physician for further diagnostic workup. PMID:26109829

  1. Fatigue stress fractures of the sacrum: diagnosis with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahovuo, J.A. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Kiuru, M.J. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Research Inst. of Military Medicine, Helsinki (France); Vusuri, T. [Central Military Hospital, Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Surgery

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the MRI findings and clinical observations in a fatigue stress fracture of the sacrum. In this retrospective study, 380 conscripts (53 women, 327 men; age range 18-29 years, mean age 20.7 years) who suffered from stress-related hip pain were studied with MRI of the pelvis. The findings of MRI were evaluated with regard to stress fracture of the sacrum. Thirty-one (8%) patients had MRI changes in signal intensity of the cranial part of the sacrum, extending to the first and second sacral foramina. The MRI changes in signal intensity were intermediate on T1-weighted images, and high on short tau inversion recovery or T2-weighted fat-suppressed images. A linear signal void fracture line was also seen. Multiple stress injuries to the pelvic bones were also seen in 7 of 31 (23%) patients. Five patients (16%) had bilateral sacral stress fracture. Fatigue sacral stress fractures appeared more commonly in women than in men (p<0.001). During recovery time 20 of the 31 patients underwent control MRI, and fatty marrow conversion was seen in 8 (40%) cases as high signal intensity on T1-weighted images, which disappeared 5-6 months after the onset of symptoms. Fatigue sacral stress fractures are associated with stress-related hip pain. These fractures were more common in women than in men. Other stress injuries of the pelvis may be seen simultaneously with sacral stress fractures. Signal intensity of the sacrum was normal after 5-6 months.

  2. Measurements of residual stress in fracture mechanics coupons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Michael R [U.C. DAVIS; Nav Dalen, John E [HILL ENGINEERING

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of residual stress in coupons used for fracture mechanics testing. The primary objective of the measurements is to quantify the distribution of residual stress acting to open (and/or close) the crack across the crack plane. The slitting method and the contour method are two destructive residual stress measurement methods particularly capable of addressing that objective, and these were applied to measure residual stress in a set of identically prepared compact tension (C(T)) coupons. Comparison of the results of the two measurement methods provides some useful observations. Results from fracture mechanics tests of residual stress bearing coupons and fracture analysis, based on linear superposition of applied and residual stresses, show consistent behavior of coupons having various levels of residual stress.

  3. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, calcaneus, talus, metatarsal, cuboid, cuneiform, sesamoid, or athlete. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle can be divided into low and high risk based upon their propensity to heal without complication. A wide variety of nonoperative strategies are employed based on the duration of symptoms, type of fracture, and patient factors, such as activity type, desire to return to sport, and compliance. Operative management has proven superior in several high-risk types of stress fractures. Evidence on pharmacotherapy and physiologic therapy such as bone stimulators is evolving. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion for stress fractures is appropriate in many high-risk groups of athletes with lower extremity pain. Proper and timely work-up and treatment is successful in returning these athletes to sport in many cases. Low-risk stress fracture generally requires only activity modification while high-risk stress fracture necessitates more aggressive intervention. The specific treatment of these injuries varies with the location of the stress fracture and the goals of the patient. PMID:25364480

  4. Unusual exercise-related stress fractures. Two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink-Bennett, D.M.; Benson, M.T.

    1984-08-01

    We describe two unusual exercise-related stress fractures, one in the sacroiliac joint of a long distance runner, the other in the body of the scapulae of an above-knee amputee. Each were detected on a 2-hour delay bone scan. To our knowledge, neither have been described scintigraphically. The bilateral scapular fracture is an unreported entity, and the fractured SI joint is a very uncommon site for an overuse injury.

  5. Transverse Stress Fracture of the Proximal Patella: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Satoru; Arai, Yuji; Kato, Ko; Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Nakagawa, Shuji; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sudo, Akihiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-02-01

    Among stress fractures associated with sports activities, patellar stress fracture is rare. Regarding patella stress fractures, so far only distal transverse or lateral longitudinal fractures have been reported, but there are no reports of transverse fractures occurring in the proximal patella. We describe an extremely rare case of transverse stress fracture of proximal patella in a 9-year-old athlete.A 9-year old boy, who participated in sports (sprints and Kendo) presented with left knee pain without any external injury. In plain radiographs, a fracture line was observed in the proximal 1/3 of the left patella, and a patella stress fracture was diagnosed. For treatment, because 7 months of conservative therapy showed no improvement, internal fixation was carried out using Acutrak screws, and bone union was thus achieved. Three months after the operation, he was able to return to his previous level of athletic sports activity.Regarding the mechanism of onset, it is believed that the causes are longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure. On the other hand, the contact region of the patella with the femur changes with the flexion angle of the knee. In the current case, the fracture occurred at a site where the patella was in contact with the femur at a flexion angle of >90°, so it is believed that it occurred as a clinical condition from being subjected to repeated longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure at a flexion angle of >90°, during the sports activities of sprints and Kendo. The nonunion of the transverse stress fracture of his proximal patella was successfully treated with internal fixation using Acutrak screws.

  6. Stress Fractures: Etiology, Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Reynolds, Katy; Hoedebecke, Kyle L

    Stress fractures are part of a continuum of changes in healthy bones in response to repeated mechanical deformation from physical activity. If the activity produces excessive repetitive stress, osteoclastic processes in the bone may proceed at a faster pace than osteoblastic processes, thus weakening the bone and augmenting susceptibility to stress fractures. Overall stress fracture incidence is about three cases per 1,000 in active duty Servicemembers, but it is much higher among Army basic trainees: 19 per 1,000 for men and 80 per 1,000 for women. Well-documented risk factors include female sex, white ethnicity, older age, taller stature, lower aerobic fitness, prior physical inactivity, greater amounts of current physical training, thinner bones, cigarette smoking, and inadequate intake of vitamin D and/or calcium. Individuals with stress fractures present with focal tenderness and local pain that is aggravated by physical activity and reduced by rest. A sudden increase in the volume of physical activity along with other risk factors is often reported. Simple clinical tests can assist in diagnosis, but more definitive imaging tests will eventually need to be conducted if a stress fracture is suspected. Plain radiographs are recommended as the initial imaging test, but magnetic resonance imaging has higher sensitivity and is more likely to detect the injury sooner. Treatment involves first determining if the stress fracture is of higher or lower risk; these are distinguished by anatomical location and whether the bone is loaded in tension (high risk) or compression (lower risk). Lowerrisk stress fractures can be initially treated by reducing loading on the injured bone through a reduction in activity or by substituting other activities. Higher-risk stress fractures should be referred to an orthopedist. Investigated prevention strategies include modifications to physical training programs, use of shock absorbing insoles, vitamin D and calcium supplementation

  7. Medial supracondylar stress fracture in an adolescent pitcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Fronek, Jan [Scripps Healthcare, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    We report the occurrence of a medial supracondylar stress fracture in an adolescent pitcher. To our knowledge, this fracture has not been described in the literature, and awareness of this entity allows initiation of therapy and precludes further unnecessary work-up. The radiographic, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging appearances are reviewed and the mechanism of injury is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Repeated Stress Fractures in an Amenorrheic Marathoner: A Case Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, John R.; Nilson, Karen L.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a case conference by 2 experts on the relationship between a 26-year-old marathoner's amenorrhea and her sustained unusual stress fractures in 4 ribs (plus previous similar fractures of the calcaneal, navicular, metatarsal, and tibial bones). The experts conclude that she suffers many manifestations of overtraining. (SM)

  9. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  10. MR semiology of stress fractures; Semiologie IRM des fractures de fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, B.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Naudinat, E.; Sylvestre, A.; Pharaboz, C. [Hopital des Armees Begin, 94 - Saint-Mande (France)

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging can contribute to stress fractures diagnosis when it makes obvious the fracture line which signal is variable in function of site lesion. The importance of inflammatory reactions must not call the diagnosis in question again. 5 figs., 8 refs.

  11. A curious case of stress fracture in a transsexual athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom; Grant, Michael; Chandran, Prakash

    2016-03-31

    Femoral neck stress fractures in young healthy individuals are rare and occur in those who take part in physical training with repetitive loading and those with osteoporosis. Bone density is related to sex hormone status, which is artificially manipulated during gender reassignment. Conflicting evidence currently exists on the effect of cross sex hormone treatment on bone density, with no literature suggesting a link between hormone treatment in gender reassignment and stress fractures. Our aim is to highlight the potential risk of stress fractures amongst transsexual patients receiving cross sex hormones as part of gender reassignment. The patient presented with groin pain after competing in a running event. Despite a number of risk factors, there was a delay in diagnosis, which could have led to complications compromising outcome. Femoral neck stress fractures should be considered in the differential diagnosis of transsexual patients receiving hormone treatment with non-specific groin/thigh pain following exercise. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Case report: bilateral ischial stress fractures in an elite tennis player

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, A.W.; Connell, D.A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    A case report of bilateral ischial stress fractures in an elite tennis player initially mimicking hamstring pathology is described. This is an unusual site of stress fracture. Typical sites of stress fracture are well documented; however, awareness of less common sites of stress-related bone injury can aid early diagnosis and treatment before overt fracture occurs. (orig.)

  13. Genetic predisposition for femoral neck stress fractures in military conscripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barral Sandra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stress fractures are a significant problem among athletes and soldiers and may result in devastating complications or even permanent handicap. Genetic factors may increase the risk, but no major susceptibility genes have been identified. The purpose of this study was to search for possible genetic factors predisposing military conscripts to femoral neck stress fractures. Results Eight genes involved in bone metabolism or pathology (COL1A1, COL1A2, OPG, ESR1, VDR, CTR, LRP5, IL-6 were examined in 72 military conscripts with a femoral neck stress fracture and 120 controls. The risk of femoral neck stress fracture was significantly higher in subjects with low weight and body mass index (BMI. An interaction between the CTR (rs1801197 minor allele C and the VDR C-A haplotype was observed, and subjects lacking the C allele in CTR and/or the C-A haplotype in VDR had a 3-fold higher risk of stress fracture than subjects carrying both (OR = 3.22, 95% CI 1.38-7.49, p = 0.007. In addition, the LRP5 haplotype A-G-G-C alone and in combination with the VDR haplotype C-A was associated with stress fractures through reduced body weight and BMI. Conclusions Our findings suggest that genetic factors play a role in the development of stress fractures in individuals subjected to heavy exercise and mechanical loading. The present results can be applied to the design of future studies that will further elucidate the genetics of stress fractures.

  14. Women with previous stress fractures show reduced bone material strength

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Fink Eriksen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose ? Bone fragility is determined by bone mass, bone architecture, and the material properties of bone. Microindentation has been introduced as a measurement method that reflects bone material properties. The pathogenesis of underlying stress fractures, in particular the role of impaired bone material properties, is still poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that impaired bone material strength might play a role in the development of stress fractures, we used microin...

  15. Stress fracture of the second proximal phalanx of the foot in teenage athletes: Unrecognized location of stress fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yamaguchi

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Although a rare injury, it is important that clinicians be aware of this type of stress fracture, as a timely diagnosis can avoid the need for surgical treatment and allow an early return to play.

  16. Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarao; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-12-07

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the

  17. Patterns of Fracture and Tidal Stresses Due to Nonsynchronous Rotation: Implications for Fracturing on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, E. M.; Helfenstein, P.

    1985-01-01

    Global lineaments on Europa were interpreted as fractures in an icy crust. A variety of lineament types were identified, which appear to form a systematic pattern on the surface. For a synchronously rotating body, the patterns of fractures observed could be produced by a combination of stresses due to orbital recession, orbital eccentricity, and internal contraction. However, it was recently suggested that the forced eccentricity of Europa's orbit may result in nonsynchronous rotation. The hypothesis that fractures in a thin icy crust may have formed in response to stresses resulting from nonsynchronous rotation is studied.

  18. Sacral Stress Fracture in an Amateur Badminton Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yuasa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sacral stress fractures are rare among athletes but have been reported most frequently in long distance runners. We report herein the first case of a sacral stress fracture in an amateur badminton player. A 16-year-old, left-handed adolescent girl, who had just started to play badminton 3 months previously, complained of acute left buttock pain when she received a shuttlecock. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a linear lesion of the left sacrum with low signal intensity on T1- and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, which was consistent with a stress fracture. Conservative treatment with rest relieved her symptoms. Her fracture was considered to have occurred due to repetition of an exercise that caused excessive vertical power.

  19. Stress fracture of the ulna in a break-dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hsu; Kuo, Chun-Lin; Lin, Leou-Chyr; Wang, Shyu-Jye; Lee, Chian-Her

    2008-01-01

    Break dancing is a popular activity in teenagers and is associated with severe trauma to bones and tissues. We report the first known case of a break dancer with an ulnar stress fracture. Such injuries occur in a variety of sports due to substantial stress on the ulna and repetitive excessive rotation of the forearm. In this study we describe a patient who experienced an ulnar stress fracture during break dancing training. The diagnosis was established by history and physical examination. Initial radiographic findings were negative. However, radiographs taken 3 months after initial presented revealed callus formation over the ulnar shaft. This suggested that readjustment is required in break dancing training protocols. It is important to increase awareness of this injury among physicians to expedite the diagnosis and to prevent the possibility of conversion to an overt fracture in the future. Key pointsStress fractures should not be ignored when the patient changes exercise loading.A thoroughly detailed clinical history, physical examination, and plain radiographs were used diagnostically in this clinical case.The best methods for the treatment of stress fractures include readjustment training protocols to prevent conversion to overt fractures.

  20. Influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress in tight reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongping; Wei, Xu; Zhang, Ye; Xing, Libo; Xu, Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    Currently, hydraulic fracturing is an important way to develop low permeability reservoirs. The fractures produced during the fracturing process are the main influencing factors of changing in-situ stress. In this paper, the influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress is studied by establishing a mathematical model to describe the relationship between fracture length and in-situ stress. The results show that the growth rate gradually decreases after the fracture reaches a certain length with the increase of fracturing time; the continuous extension of the fracture is the main factor to change the in-situ stress. In order to reduce the impact on the subsequent fracture extension due to the changing of in-situ stress, controlling fracturing time and fracture length without affecting the stimulated reservoir effect is an important way. The results presented in this study can effectively reduce the impact of changing of in-situ stress on subsequent fracturing construction.

  1. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarad; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi

    2002-04-20

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the present time, we are developing an inverse process using a simulation model to understand the fluid flow patterns in

  2. Probability of stress-corrosion fracture under random loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    Mathematical formulation is based on cumulative-damage hypothesis and experimentally-determined stress-corrosion characteristics. Under both stationary random loadings, mean value and variance of cumulative damage are obtained. Probability of stress-corrosion fracture is then evaluated, using principle of maximum entropy.

  3. Taking a holistic approach to managing difficult stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L; Best, Thomas M

    2016-09-09

    Stress fractures and other bony stress injuries occur along a spectrum of severity which can impact treatment and prognosis. When treating these injuries, it should be borne in mind that no two stress fractures behave exactly alike. Given that they are not a consistent injury, standardized treatment protocols can be challenging to develop. Treatment should be individualized to the patient or athlete, the causative activity, the anatomical site, and the severity of the injury. A holistic approach to the treatment of the most difficult stress fractures should be taken by orthopedists and sports medicine specialists. This approach is necessary to obtain optimal outcomes, minimize loss of fitness and time away from sports participation, and decrease the risk of recurrence.

  4. Postpartum osteoporosis associated with proximal tibial stress fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemetson, I.A.; Anderson, S.E. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Bern, Inselspital, 3010, Bern (Switzerland); Popp, A.; Lippuner, K. [Department of Osteology, University Hospital of Bern, Inselspital, 3010, Bern (Switzerland); Ballmer, F. [Knee and Sports Medicine Unit, Lindenhofspital Bern, 3012, Bern (Switzerland)

    2004-02-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with acute nonspecific knee pain, 6 months postpartum. MR imaging, computed tomography and radiography were performed and a proximal tibia plateau insufficiency fracture was detected. Bone densitometry demonstrated mild postpartum osteoporosis. To our knowledge these findings have not been described in this location and in this clinical setting. The etiology of the atraumatic fracture of the tibia is presumed to be due to a low bone mineral density. The bone loss was probably due to pregnancy, lactation and postpartum hormonal changes. There were no other inciting causes and the patient was normocalcemic. We discuss the presence of a postpartum stress fracture in a hitherto undescribed site in a patient who had lactated following an uncomplicated pregnancy and had no other identifiable cause for a stress fracture. (orig.)

  5. Thermal stresses, differential subsidence, and flexure at oceanic fracture zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Pal; Haxby, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Geosat geoid undulations over four Pacific fracture zones have been analyzed. After correcting for the isostatic thermal edge effect, the amplitudes of the residuals are shown to be proportional to the age offset. The shape of the residuals seems to broaden with increasing age. Both geoid anomalies and available ship bathymetry data suggest that slip must sometimes occur on the main fracture zone or secondary faults. Existing models for flexure at fracture zones cannot explain the observed anomalies. A combination model accounting for slip and including flexure from thermal stresses and differential subsidence is presented. This model accounts for lateral variations in flexural rigidity from brittle and ductile yielding due to both thermal and flexural stresses and explains both the amplitudes and the shape of the anomalies along each fracture zone. The best fitting models have mechanical plate thicknesses that are described by the depth to the 600-700 C isotherms.

  6. Fracture toughness and the effects of stress state on fracture of nickel aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Michal, Gary M.; Locci, Ivan; Rigney, Joseph D.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of stress state on the fracture behavior of Ni3Al, Ni3Al + B, and NiAl were determined using either notched or fatigue-precracked bend bars tested to failure at room temperature, in addition to testing specimens in tension under superposed hydrostatic pressure. Although Ni3Al is observed to fail in a macroscopically brittle intergranular manner in tension tests conducted at room temperature, the fracture toughnesses presently obtained on Ni3Al exceeded 20 MPam, and R-curve behavior was exhibited. In situ monitoring of the fracture experiments was utilized to aid in interpreting the source(s) of the high toughness in Ni3Al, while SEM fractography was utilized to determine the operative fracture modes. The superposition by hydrostatic pressure during tensile testing of NiAl specimens was observed to produce increased ductility without changing the fracture mode.

  7. L5 radiculopathy due to sacral stress fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aylwin, Anthony; Saifuddin, Asif [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, HA7 4LP, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Tucker, Stuart [Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, HA7 4LP, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with a history of left buttock pain with radiation into the left leg in an L5 distribution. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed a left sacral stress fracture with periosteal reaction involving the left L5 nerve root anterior to the sacral ala. With spontaneous healing of the fracture, the patient's symptoms resolved completely. (orig.)

  8. BISPHOSPHONATE INDUCED STRESS FRACTURE OF BILATERAL FEMUR: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidapur

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a common problem affecting people after 4 - 5 decade of life. There are various treatment options available for Osteoporosis and Bisphosphonates are widely used. Bisphosphonates work by blocking osteoclast mediated bone resorption and can be given in oral and injectable forms. R ecent studies have brought to light the risk of sub trochanteric stress fracture secondary to bisphosphonate therapy. Here we are presenting a case with bilateral sub trochanteric fracture following prolonged bisphosphonate therapy

  9. Adhesive fracture mechanics. [stress analysis for bond line interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S. J.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    In studies of fracture mechanics the adhesive fracture energy is regarded as a fundamental property of the adhesive system. It is pointed out that the value of the adhesive fracture energy depends on surface preparation, curing conditions, and absorbed monolayers. A test method reported makes use of a disk whose peripheral part is bonded to a substrate material. Pressure is injected into the unbonded central part of the disk. At a certain critical pressure value adhesive failure can be observed. A numerical stress analysis involving arbitrary geometries is conducted.

  10. Application of fracture mechanics to graphite under complex stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahr, G. T.; Valachovic, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the applicability of linear-elastic fracture mechanics to graphite under multiaxial stress conditions. The specimens were thick-walled graphite cylinders with flat heads which were internally pressurized. Two series of specimens were used. The first series had complete circumferential notches machined diagonally into the head-cylinder juncture region, while the second series was unnotched. The methods of linear-elastic fracture mechanics and a finite-element analysis were used to predict pressures to cause fracture for both notched and unnotched specimens.

  11. STRESS FRACTURE OF THE ULNA IN A BREAK-DANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsu Chen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Break dancing is a popular activity in teenagers and is associated with severe trauma to bones and tissues. We report the first known case of a break dancer with an ulnar stress fracture. Such injuries occur in a variety of sports due to substantial stress on the ulna and repetitive excessive rotation of the forearm. In this study we describe a patient who experienced an ulnar stress fracture during break dancing training. The diagnosis was established by history and physical examination. Initial radiographic findings were negative. However, radiographs taken 3 months after initial presented revealed callus formation over the ulnar shaft. This suggested that readjustment is required in break dancing training protocols. It is important to increase awareness of this injury among physicians to expedite the diagnosis and to prevent the possibility of conversion to an overt fracture in the future

  12. Femoral neck stress fracture in Air Force basic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferer, Kevin R; Bush, David M; Cornell, John E; Lawrence, Valerie A; Alexander, Jeffrey L; Ramos, Rosemarie G; Curtis, Denice

    2014-01-01

    Stress fractures are a common overuse problem among military trainees resulting in preventable morbidity, prolonged training, and long-term disability following military service. Femoral neck stress fractures (FNSFs) account for 2% of all stress fractures but result in disproportionate burden in terms of cost and convalescence. The purpose of this study was to describe and investigate FNSF in U.S. Air Force basic trainees and to present new data on risks factors for developing FNSF. We examined 47 cases of FNSF occurring in Air Force basic trainees between 2008 and 2011 and 94 controls using a matched case-control model. Analysis with t tests and conditional logistic regression found the risk of FNSF was not associated with body mass index or abdominal circumference. Female gender (p physical fitness level on arrival to training and female gender were significantly associated with risk of FNSF. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Postpartum Unilateral Sacral Stress Fracture Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Bağçacı

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum sacral stress fracture is a very rare clinical entity. Because of the ambiguous clinical and radiological findings, it is often diagnosed late. A case of a postpartal 25-year-old female patient presented with acute onset of low back pain radiating to the right extremity, mimicking lumbar radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacrum revealed a non-displaced stress fracture of the right sacral ala. The 25-hydroxy vitamine D level of the patient was very low; dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements were in the normal range. The patient is completely cured as a result of conservative treatment. As a result, sacrum stress fracture should be kept in mind in the presence of back pain during pregnancy and postpartum period.

  14. Stress Related Fracturing in Dimension Stone Quarries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi Deliormanli, Ahmet; Maerz, Norbert H.

    2016-10-01

    In Missouri, the horizontal stresses (pressures) in the near surface rock are uncommonly high. While the vertical stresses in rock are simply a function of the weight of the overlying rock, near surface stresses can be many times higher. The near surface horizontal stresses can be in excess of 5 times greater than the vertical stresses. In this research, Flatjack method was used to measure horizontal stress in Red Granite Quarry in Missouri. The flat jack method is an approved method of measuring ground stresses. A saw cut is used to “relax” the stress in the ground by allowing the rock to deform inwards the cut. A hydraulic flat jack is used to inflate the slot; to push the rock back to its stressed position, as measured by a strain gauge on either side of the slot. The pressure in the jack, when the rock is exactly back to its original position, is equal to the ground stress before the saw cut was made. According to the results, present production direction for each pit is not good because the maximum stress direction is perpendicular with production direction. This case causes unintentional breakage results in the loss rock. The results show that production direction should be changed.

  15. Acromial stress fractures: correlation with acromioclavicular osteoarthritis and acromiohumeral distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrow, Samuel; Streit, Jonathan J; Muh, Stephanie; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2014-12-01

    Fractures around the acromion are a known complication of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The literature provides limited data on the risk factors associated with this complication as well as the ultimate outcomes after nonoperative treatment. The goal of this study was to report clinical outcomes in patients with acromial fractures after nonoperatively treated reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The authors performed a retrospective review of 125 patients undergoing reverse total shoulder arthroplasty that included several acromial stress fractures in the postoperative period. They prospectively compared radiographic data, including acromiohumeral distance, the presence of acromioclavicular joint arthritis, clinical measures of motion, visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) score, in 2 groups based on the presence or absence of fracture in the postoperative period. Fourteen patients (11.2%) had an acromial fracture after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty at an average of 5.1 months postoperatively. Patients who had fractures had worse postoperative forward elevation before fracture (116.6 vs 143.5; P=.02) and greater pain relief after reverse shoulder replacement, before fracture (P=.04). No significant difference was found between groups when the degree of arm lengthening was compared (27.6 vs 26.2 mm), and no difference was found in the prevalence of degenerative acromioclavicular joint changes identified preoperatively (66.4% vs 77.3%). After conservative management, most patients who had an acromial fracture returned to a functional level that was comparable to that achieved before fracture. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Correlates of stress fractures among preadolescent and adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loud, Keith J; Gordon, Catherine M; Micheli, Lyle J; Field, Alison E

    2005-04-01

    Although stress fractures are a source of significant morbidity in active populations, particularly among young female athletes, the causes of stress fractures have not been explored among females stress fractures in a large, population-based, national, cohort study of preadolescent and adolescent girls. A cross-sectional analysis of data from 5461 girls, 11 to 17 years of age, in the Growing Up Today Study, an ongoing longitudinal study of the children of registered female nurses participating in Nurses' Health Study II, was performed. Mothers self-reported information regarding their children's histories of stress fractures on their 1998 annual questionnaire. Growing Up Today Study participants self-reported their weight and height, menarcheal status, physical activity, dietary intake, and disordered eating habits on annual surveys. In 1998, the mean age of the participants was 13.9 years. Approximately 2.7% of the girls had a history of stress fracture, 3% engaged in disordered eating (using fasting, diet pills, laxatives, or vomiting to control weight), and 16% participated in > or =16 hours per week of moderate to vigorous activity. Age at menarche, z score of BMI in 1998, calcium intake, vitamin D intake, and daily dairy intake were all unrelated to stress fractures after controlling for age. Independent of age and BMI, girls who participated in > or =16 hours per week of activity in 1998 had 1.88 greater odds of a history of stress fracture than did girls who participated in or =16 hours per week of activity were also more likely than their peers to engage in disordered eating (4.6% vs 2.8%); however, disordered eating did not have an independent association with stress fractures (odds ratio [OR]: 1.33; 95% CI: 0.61-2.89). Independent of age and BMI, each hour per week of high-impact activity significantly increased the risk of stress fracture (OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.02-1.09). Among the high-impact physical activities, only running (OR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1

  17. Hygrothermomechanical fracture stress criteria for fiber composites with sense-parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Ginty, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Hygrothermomechanical fracture stress criteria are developed and evaluated for unidirectional composites (plies) with sense-parity. These criteria explicity quantify the individual contributions of applied, hygral and thermal stresses as well as couplings among these stresses. The criteria are for maximum stress, maximum strain, internal friction, work-to-fracture and combined-stress fracture. Predicted results obtained indicate that first ply failure will occur at stress levels lower than those predicted using criteria currently available in the literature. Also, the contribution of the various stress couplings (predictable only by fracture criteria with sense-parity) is significant to first ply failure and attendant fracture modes.

  18. Fiber networks below the isostatic point: Fracture without stress concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leyou; Rocklin, D. Zeb; Sander, Leonard M.; Mao, Xiaoming

    2017-10-01

    Crack nucleation, in which a crack is propagated via the concentration of stress at its tip, is a ubiquitous phenomenon. Here, we show via simulations and theory that in systems such as fiber networks that are below the point of mechanical stability, continuous nonlinear alignments lead to a steady state in which new load-bearing fiber chains emerge to replace those lost to fracture, preventing stress concentration and leading to the accumulation of distributed damage over a divergent length scale. In contrast to linear models that display diverging length scales at a critical point, this phenomenon occurs over a large parameter range, and is expected to be observed in biopolymer networks and porous artificial materials. This mixture of fiber alignment and fracture leads to massively greater energy dissipation and to fracture avalanche statistics distinct from those present in linear models.

  19. Micromechanical studies of cyclic creep fracture under stress- controlled loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giessen, E. van der; Tvergaard, V.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with a study of intergranular failure by creep cavitation under stress-controlled cyclic loading conditions. Loading is assumed to be slow enough that diffusion and creep mechanisms (including grain boundary sliding) dominate, leading to intergranular creep fracture. This study is

  20. An Unusual Stress Fracture in an Archer with Hypophosphatasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Yavuz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 45-year-old male archer with stress fracture in his left ulna on the background of adult type of hypophosphatasia. The patient presented to several medical centers for pain around the left elbow and received medical treatment upon diagnosis of tenosynovitis. History of the patient revealed that he had had diagnosis of hypophosphatasia ten years ago and underwent percutaneous screwing for stress fracture on both of his femoral necks. Upon finding nondisplaced stress fracture on proximal metaphysis of the ulna on X-ray, the patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in order to exclude pathological causes. No additional pathology was observed in MRI scanning. The patient’s sportive activities were restricted for 6 weeks and he received conservative management with arm slings. Adult type of hypophosphatasia is a disease manifesting with widespread osteoporosis and presenting with low serum level of alkali phosphatase (ALP. Stress fracture should definitely be considered in the patients with history of hypophosphatasia and refractory extremity pain.

  1. A reassessment of in situ stress determination by hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakirouhani, A.; Detournay, E.; Bunger, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    Estimating in situ stress based on hydraulic fracturing data typically depends on interpretation of the breakdown, secondary breakdown (`reopening') and shut-in pressure. While it has been recognized that the near-wellbore stress field should be taken into account and that the compressibility of the injection system and the viscous flow of the fluid can diminish the accuracy of stress estimates, these issues have not been well quantified. A coupled numerical model that includes the compressibility of the injection system and the flow of a viscous fluid in a plane-strain hydraulic fracture extending from a wellbore, in an impermeable rock, and in the presence of a non-isotropic in situ stress field provides a basic tool for estimating the order of the error associated with hydraulic fracturing stress measurements under non-ideal conditions. The main findings of this work are model-based guidelines on the values of relevant dimensionless parameter groups to ensure sufficient accuracy of stress estimates that use idealized models. When these guidelines cannot be met under field conditions, the model can be further applied to obtain first-order corrections that account for compressibility, viscosity and near-wellbore effects.

  2. Lumbar isthmic defects in teenagers resulting from stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitman, Charles A; Gertzbein, Stanley D; Francis, William R

    2002-01-01

    An accepted classification of spondylolysis exists. However, etiology remains controversial. There are several reports supporting acquired stress fractures in the etiology of this condition, although radiographic evidence of an acquired fracture in a given individual is very rare. To present evidence of development of pars defects during the teenage years. Retrospective review of charts. Two case studies. Charts and X-rays were reviewed to look for radiographic evidence of development of pars defects in patients who were ultimately found to have spondylolisthesis or spondylolysis. Two cases were found that demonstrated development of a pars fracture. Both patients had radiographic evidence that these fractures developed during their teenage years. Both were active individuals with a consistent level of participation in athletics. Although development of pars defects may be multifactorial, these two cases support the concept that these fractures can be acquired lesions resulting from repetitive stress injury. They also demonstrate that isthmic defects can arise in teenagers, in these cases in an athletic population.

  3. Composite fracture using the normal stress ratio theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Gurdal, Z.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were performed on center-notched specimens of unidirectional AS4/3501-6 graphite-epoxy subjected to varied far-field loading conditions. Specimens tested include on-axis and off-axis tensile coupons and Iosipescu shear specimens, allowing the study of normal, shear, and combined far-field loading conditions. From the tests, the direction of initial crack extension and the far-field stresses at crack initiation and fracture are obtained. The normal stress ratio theory is subsequently applied within a macroscopic-level homogeneous anisotropic stress solution to predict the direction of crack extension, critical stresses, and other crack growth behavior for the experiments. Comparison between experimental results and theoretical predictions indicates that application of the normal stress ratio theory within a macroscopic-level stress analysis has significant potential as an approach to modeling composite crack growth.

  4. Stress fracture in posterior aspect of the tibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Tae Yong; Jung, Hyun Woo; Park, Chung Hun [Pusan National Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Kyung Ah [Catholic Univ Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Bong Sig [Donga Univ. Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Yong [Chunbuk Natinoal Univ. Hospital, Chunju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    To determine correlation between stress fracture of the posterior tibia and flexor digitorum longus muscle injury caused by athletic or sporting activity during adolescence. Eleven cases diagnosed as stress fracture after X-ray and MR imaging of the lower leg were reviewed. With regard to each fracture, the following features were noted : age, sex, and athletic or sporting activity of the patient, and site. Using MR imaging techniques, axial and sagittal T1 and T2 weighted imaged were obtained in all cases and T1-Gd DTPA images in seven. The activities undertaken were running (n=3), football (n=2), ballet (n=2), taekwando (n=1), badminton (n=1), field hockey (n=1), and basketball (n=1). MR images revealed localized cortical thickness (n=11), linear intramedullary callus showing a low signal on T1 and T2 weighted images (n=9), marrow hyperemia (n=7), and flexor digitorum longus muscle injury showing a high signal on T1-Gd DTPA and T2 weighted image (n=7). Stress fracture of the posterior tibia might be induced by flexor digitorum longus muscle activity induced by athletic or sporting activities during adolescence.

  5. Evaluation of the cleavage fracture toughness of SA508 Gr. 4N low alloy steels in the transition region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Bong-Sang (Nuclear Material Research Div., Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea)), e-mail: mckim@kaeri.re.kr; Lee, Ki-Hyoung (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Daejeon (Korea))

    2009-07-01

    In this study, fracture toughness properties of several SA508 Gr.4N model alloys with different alloying elements contents were evaluated in the transition region. Moreover, effects of alloying elements and impurities on the transition properties of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steels were investigated based on fractographs and micrographs. Fracture toughness tests were conducted following the ASTM standard E1921-05. All toughness data were size-corrected corresponding to those of 1T specimens

  6. Sequential Proximal Tibial Stress Fractures associated with Prolonged usage of Methotrexate and Corticosteroids: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan TJL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress fractures of the proximal tibia metaphysis are rare in the elderly. We present a case of a 65-year old male who developed sequential proximal tibia stress fractures associated with prolonged usage of methotrexate and prednisolone within a span of 18 months. Magnetic Resonance Imaging revealed an incomplete stress fracture involving the medial proximal tibial region. The patient was treated with stemmed total knee arthroplasty (TKA bilaterally. Stress fractures should be considered in patients with atypical knee pain who have a history of methotrexate and prednisolone usage. TKA is an effective treatment in stress fractures of the proximal tibia.

  7. Stress- and Chemistry-Mediated Permeability Enhancement/Degradation in Stimulated Critically-Stressed Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham S. Grader; Chris Marone; Phillip Halleck; Peter Rose; Igor Faoro; Joshua Taron; André Niemeijer; Hideaki Yasuhara

    2009-03-30

    This work has investigated the interactions between stress and chemistry in controlling the evolution of permeability in stimulated fractured reservoirs through an integrated program of experimentation and modeling. Flow-through experiments on natural and artificial fractures in Coso diorite have examined the evolution of permeability under paths of mean and deviatoric stresses, including the role of dissolution and precipitation. Models accommodating these behaviors have examined the importance of incorporating the complex couplings between stress and chemistry in examining the evolution of permeability in EGS reservoirs. This document reports the findings of experiment [1,2] and analysis [3,4], in four sequential chapters.

  8. Thermal stress fracture in elastic-brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    The reported investigation shows that the assessment of the possibility of the thermal fracture of brittle materials depends upon an accurate evaluation of the thermal stresses and the determination of the resulting stress intensity factors. The stress intensity factors can be calculated in a variety of ways ranging from the very precise to approximate, but only for a limited number of geometries. The main difficulty is related to the determination of the thermal stress field because of its unusual character and its dependence upon boundary conditions at points far from the region of thermal activity. Examination of a number of examples suggests that the best visualization of the thermal stresses and any associated fracture can be made by considering the problem to be the combination of thermal and isothermal problems or by considering that the prime effect of the temperature is in the generation of thermal strains and that the thermal stresses are simply the result of the region trying to accommodate these strains.

  9. Fracture and Stress Evolution on Europa: New Insights Into Fracture Interpretation and Ice Thickness Estimates Using Fracture Mechanics Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattenhorn, Simon

    2004-01-01

    The work completed during the funding period has provided many important insights into fracturing behavior in Europa's ice shell. It has been determined that fracturing through time is likely to have been controlled by the effects of nonsynchronous rotation stresses and that as much as 720 deg of said rotation may have occurred during the visible geologic history. It has been determined that there are at least two distinct styles of strike-slip faulting and that their mutual evolutionary styles are likely to have been different, with one involving a significant dilational component during shear motion. It has been determined that secondary fracturing in perturbed stress fields adjacent to older structures such as faults is a prevalent process on Europa. It has been determined that cycloidal ridges are likely to experience shear stresses along the existing segment portions as they propagate, which affects propagation direction and ultimately induces tailcracking at the segment tip than then initiates a new cycle of cycloid segment growth. Finally, it has been established that mechanical methods (e.g., flexure analysis) can be used to determine the elastic thickness of the ice shell, which, although probably only several km thick, is likely to be spatially variable, being thinner under bands but thicker under ridged plains terrain.

  10. Acetabular stress fractures in military endurance athletes and recruits: incidence and MRI and scintigraphic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.R. [Portsmouth Naval Medical Center, Radiology Department, Charette Health Care Center, Portsmouth, VA (United States); Puckett, M.L.; Shin, A.Y.; Gorman, J.D. [Naval Medical Center San Diego, Radiology Department, San Diego, CA (United States); Denison, G. [US Naval Hospital Guam (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and the MRI and scintigraphic appearance of acetabular stress (fatigue) fractures in military endurance athletes and recruits. Design and patients: One hundred and seventy-eight active duty military endurance trainees with a history of activity-related hip pain were evaluated by both MRI and bone scan over a 2-year period. Patients in the study ranged in age from 17 to 45 years. They had hip pain related to activity and had plain radiographs of the hip and pelvis that were interpreted as normal or equivocal. The study was originally designed to evaluate the MRI and scintigraphic appearance of femoral neck stress fractures. Patients had scintigraphy and a limited MRI examination (coronal imaging only) within 48 h of the bone scan. Twelve patients demonstrated imaging findings compatible with acetabular stress fractures. Results: Stress fractures are common in endurance athletes and in military populations; however, stress fracture of the acetabulum is uncommon. Twelve of 178 patients (6.7%) in our study had imaging findings consistent with acetabular stress fractures. Two patterns were identified. Seven of the 12 (58%) patients had acetabular roof stress fractures. In this group, two cases of bilateral acetabular roof stress fractures were identified, one with a synchronous tensile sided femoral neck stress fracture. The remaining five of 12 (42%) patients had anterior column stress fractures, rarely occurring in isolation, and almost always occurring with inferior pubic ramus stress fracture (4 of 5, or 80%). One case of bilateral anterior column stress fractures was identified without additional sites of injury. Conclusions: Stress fractures are commonplace in military populations, especially endurance trainees. Acetabular stress fractures are rare and therefore unrecognized, but do occur and may be a cause for activity-related hip pain in a small percentage of military endurance athletes and recruits. (orig.)

  11. The effect of stress fracture interventions in a single elite infantry training unit (1983-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Charles; Finestone, Aharon S

    2017-10-01

    Stress fractures can be seen as an undesired byproduct of demanding physical training. The threshold value of stress that places an individual bone at high risk for stress fracture has not been identified. In a prospective study of stress fractures in 1983, a 31% incidence was found during demanding Israeli infantry basic training by bone scan criteria. Within a subgroup of these recruits, an elite infantry unit was found to have a 40% incidence. Since then and until 2015, eight additional induction companies of the same elite infantry unit were prospectively monitored for stress fractures during their basic training. In all of the studies, stress fracture surveillance and the examining orthopedist were the same. A retrospective review of all nine studies and of eight training changes was performed to look for a temporal trend in stress fracture incidence and to see if these might be related to training changes. There was a statistically significant trend for lower radiological proven stress fractures (p=0.0001) and radiological proven stress fractures plus clinical stress fractures (p=0.0013), as well as lower stress fracture severity by radiological criteria (p=0.0001) between 1983 and 2015. The only training change that was associated, by multivariate logistic regression, with a decreased incidence of stress fracture was restricting training to the authorized training protocol (odds ratio, 3874; 95% CI, 1.526 to 9.931; p=0.004). Increased recruit weight was found by multivariate analysis to be associated with lower stress fracture incidence (odds ratio 1.034; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.070; p=0.051). Moving the training to a base with flatter terrain and reducing the formal marching distance by 1/3 was associated with a decrease in high grade stress fractures (odds ratio, 10.03; 95% CI, 3.5 to 28.4; p=0.0001). Neither the combined changes of enforcing a seven hour a night sleep regimen, training in more comfortable boots and adding a physical therapist to the unit nor

  12. Understanding the etiology of the posteromedial tibial stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Charles; Burr, David B; Finestone, Aharon S; Voloshin, Arkady

    2015-09-01

    Previous human in vivo tibial strain measurements from surface strain gauges during vigorous activities were found to be below the threshold value of repetitive cyclical loading at 2500 microstrain in tension necessary to reduce the fatigue life of bone, based on ex vivo studies. Therefore it has been hypothesized that an intermediate bone remodeling response might play a role in the development of tibial stress fractures. In young adults tibial stress fractures are usually oblique, suggesting that they are the result of failure under shear strain. Strains were measured using surface mounted unstacked 45° rosette strain gauges on the posterior aspect of the flat medial cortex just below the tibial midshaft, in a 48year old male subject while performing vertical jumps, staircase jumps and running up and down stadium stairs. Shear strains approaching 5000 microstrain were recorded during stair jumping and vertical standing jumps. Shear strains above 1250 microstrain were recorded during runs up and down stadium steps. Based on predictions from ex vivo studies, stair and vertical jumping tibial shear strain in the test subject was high enough to potentially produce tibial stress fracture subsequent to repetitive cyclic loading without necessarily requiring an intermediate remodeling response to microdamage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acetabular roof stress fracture: a rare cause of hip pain in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stress fracture of acetabular roof is an unusual cause of hip pain. It is considered as an underdiagnosed entity. People who are more susceptible to experience this fracture are athletes, soldiers and dancers. We present the case of an 11 year old girl with a roof acetabular stress fracture for which the diagnosis and ...

  14. Two tandem RNase III cleavage sites determine betT mRNA stability in response to osmotic stress in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minji Sim

    Full Text Available While identifying genes regulated by ribonuclease III (RNase III in Escherichia coli, we observed that steady-state levels of betT mRNA, which encodes a transporter mediating the influx of choline, are dependent on cellular concentrations of RNase III. In the present study, we also observed that steady-state levels of betT mRNA are dependent on RNase III activity upon exposure to osmotic stress, indicating the presence of cis-acting elements controlled by RNase III in betT mRNA. Primer extension analyses of betT mRNA revealed two tandem RNase III cleavage sites in its stem-loop region, which were biochemically confirmed via in vitro cleavage assays. Analyses of cleavage sites suggested the stochastic selection of cleavage sites by RNase III, and mutational analyses indicated that RNase III cleavage at either site individually is insufficient for efficient betT mRNA degradation. In addition, both the half-life and abundance of betT mRNA were significantly increased in association with decreased RNase III activity under hyper-osmotic stress conditions. Our findings demonstrate that betT mRNA stability is controlled by RNase III at the post-transcriptional level under conditions of osmotic stress.

  15. Effect of A mixing on elastic modulus, cleavage stress, and shear stress in the Ti3(SixAl1 -x) C2 MAX phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Woongrak; Gao, Huili; Duong, Thien; Talapatra, Anjana; Radovic, Miladin; Arróyave, Raymundo

    2017-06-01

    Solid solution MAX phases offer the opportunity for further tuning of the thermomechanical and functional properties of MAX phases, increasing their envelope of performance. Previous experimental results show that the lattice parameters of Ti3(SixAl1 -x) C2 decrease, while the Young's modulus increases with increased Si content in the lattice. In this work, we present a computational investigation of the structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of Ti3(SixAl1 -x) C2 (x =0 , 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1). The solid solutions were modeled using special quasirandom structures (SQS) and calculated using density functional theory (DFT), which is implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). The SQS structures represent random mixing of Al and Si in the A sublattice of 312 MAX phase and their structural, electronic, and mechanical properties were calculated and compared with experiments. We study the cleavage and slip behavior of Ti3(SixAl1 -x) C2 to investigate the deformation behavior in terms of cleavage and shear. It has been shown that the cleavage between M and A layers results in increasing cleavage stress in Ti3(SixAl1 -x) C2 as a function of Si content in the lattice. In addition, the shear deformation of hexagonal close packed Ti3(SixAl1 -x) C2 under 0 1 ¯10 >">2 1 ¯1 ¯0 {0001 } and {0001 } results in increasing unstable stacking fault energy (USFE) and ideal shear strength (ISS) in Ti3(SixAl1 -x) C2 as the system becomes richer in Si.

  16. On the strength of oceanic fracture zones and their influence on the intraplate stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    We use the locations and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes to test the hypothesis that the strength of oceanic fracture zones is less than that of normal oceanic lithosphere. The 77 earthquakes selected for the study have well-determined focal mechanisms and epicenters in regions where fracture zones are well mapped. We have search for dependence of faulting style, fault orientation, or principal stress direction on the distance from the nearest fracture zone. If fracture zones were generally weaker than the surrounding lithosphere, one of the principal horizontal stresses would be oriented nearly perpendicular to the fracture zone; we find no evidence that principal stresses near fracture zones are oriented preferentially in this manner. There is a slight tendency for earthquakes to occur near fracture zones, and patterns of fault orientation and sense of slip support the view that differential cooling and horizontal contraction on fracture zones may contribute seismogenic stress.

  17. Stress Fracture of the Lateral Femoral Condyle afterTotal Knee Arthroplasty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammad M. Sarzaeem; Mahmood Jabalameli

    2017-01-01

    .... Radiographic examination revealed a lateral femoral condylar stress fracture.Results: After analyzing the images, we found common characteristics among all patients, which might be attributable to the later fracture including varus deformity...

  18. Functional polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptor gene are associated with stress fracture injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Ian; Greeves, Julie P; Sale, Craig; Friedman, Eitan; Moran, Daniel S; Yanovich, Ran; Wilson, Peter J; Gartland, Alison; Hughes, David C; Stellingwerff, Trent; Ranson, Craig; Fraser, William D; Gallagher, James A

    2016-03-01

    Military recruits and elite athletes are susceptible to stress fracture injuries. Genetic predisposition has been postulated to have a role in their development. The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) gene, a key regulator of bone remodelling, is a genetic candidate that may contribute to stress fracture predisposition. The aim of this study is to evaluate the putative contribution of P2X7R to stress fracture injury in two separate cohorts, military personnel and elite athletes. In 210 Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) military conscripts, stress fracture injury was diagnosed (n = 43) based on symptoms and a positive bone scan. In a separate cohort of 518 elite athletes, self-reported medical imaging scan-certified stress fracture injuries were recorded (n = 125). Non-stress fracture controls were identified from these cohorts who had a normal bone scan or no history or symptoms of stress fracture injury. Study participants were genotyped for functional SNPs within the P2X7R gene using proprietary fluorescence-based competitive allele-specific PCR assay. Pearson's chi-squared (χ (2)) tests, corrected for multiple comparisons, were used to assess associations in genotype frequencies. The variant allele of P2X7R SNP rs3751143 (Glu496Ala-loss of function) was associated with stress fracture injury, whilst the variant allele of rs1718119 (Ala348Thr-gain of function) was associated with a reduced occurrence of stress fracture injury in military conscripts (P stress fractures was replicated in elite athletes (P stress fracture cases in elite athletes (P stress fracture prevalence supports the role of a genetic predisposition in the development of stress fracture injury.

  19. RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway: genetic associations with stress fracture period prevalence in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Ian; Hughes, David C; Greeves, Julie P; Stellingwerff, Trent; Ranson, Craig; Fraser, William D; Sale, Craig

    2015-02-01

    The RANK/RANKL/OPG signalling pathway is important in the regulation of bone turnover, with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within this pathway associated with bone phenotypic adaptations. To determine whether four SNPs associated with genes in the RANK/RANKL/OPG signalling pathway were associated with stress fracture injury in elite athletes. Radiologically confirmed stress fracture history was reported in 518 elite athletes, forming the Stress Fracture Elite Athlete (SFEA) cohort. Data were analysed for the whole group and were sub-stratified into male and cases of multiple stress fracture groups. Genotypes were determined using proprietary fluorescence-based competitive allele-specific PCR assays. SNPs rs3018362 (RANK) and rs1021188 (RANKL) were associated with stress fracture injury (Pstress fracture group and 2.8% of the non-stress fracture group were homozygote for the rare allele of rs1021188. Allele frequency, heterozygotes and homozygotes for the rare allele of rs3018362 were associated with stress fracture period prevalence (Pstress fracture whilst 2.5% of the non-stress fracture group were homozygous. In cases of multiple stress fractures, homozygotes for the rare allele of rs1021188 and individuals possessing at least one copy of the rare allele of rs4355801 (OPG) were shown to be associated with stress fracture injury (Pstress fracture injury. The association of rs3018362 (RANK) and rs1021188 (RANKL) with stress fracture injury susceptibility supports their role in the maintenance of bone health and offers potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stress analysis of fracture of atherosclerotic plaques: crack propagation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani-Sharif, Alireza; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Kazemi-Saleh, Davood; Sotoudeh-Anvari, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    Traditionally, the degree of luminal obstruction has been used to assess the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. However, recent studies have revealed that other factors such as plaque morphology, material properties of lesion components and blood pressure may contribute to the fracture of atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of fracture of atherosclerotic plaques based on the mechanical stress distribution and fatigue analysis by means of numerical simulation. Realistic models of type V plaques were reconstructed based on histological images. Finite element method was used to determine mechanical stress distribution within the plaque. Assuming that crack propagation initiated at the sites of stress concentration, crack propagation due to pulsatile blood pressure was modeled. Results showed that crack propagation considerably changed the stress field within the plaque and in some cases led to initiation of secondary cracks. The lipid pool stiffness affected the location of crack formation and the rate and direction of crack propagation. Moreover, increasing the mean or pulse pressure decreased the number of cycles to rupture. It is suggested that crack propagation analysis can lead to a better recognition of factors involved in plaque rupture and more accurate determination of vulnerable plaques.

  1. Stress fracture of the ulna in an elite ice dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornese, Davide; Curci, Domenico; Nardo, Alice; Cuccia, Alessandra; Pozzi, Grazia

    2015-03-01

    Stress fracture of the ulna is a rare overuse injury often arising from repetitive excessive forearm rotation. Here we report the first case of ulnar stress fracture in a female ice dancer. Diagnosis was made by history and physical examination, with the aid of imaging studies (plain x-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging), and biomechanical analysis of forearm pronation and supination. Following identification and modification of the causal technical element, the ice dancer was able to continue training and competing without cessation of activity. Treatment was with a 30-day course of capacitively coupled bone stimulation to promote fracture healing, confirmed on radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Such injuries to ice dancers may be prevented at the planning stage of technical elements in the dance program if coaches place more attention on the potentially deleterious effects of difficult positions the lifted dancer must sustain to reward points on the technical elements score. Key pointsThe technical elements in ice dancing can overload joints and bones due to the positions held by the skaters.To project a competition program as much as possible safe regarding overuse injury prevention an accurate knowledge of physiological parameters of the ice dancer and of ISU rules is necessary.

  2. Stress fractures of the pelvis and legs in athletes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Steve B; Deren, Matthew E; Matson, Andrew; Fadale, Paul D; Monchik, Keith O

    2013-03-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in athletes, often difficult to diagnose. A stress fracture is a fatigue-induced fracture of bone caused by repeated applications of stress over time. PubMed articles published from 1974 to January 2012. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors may predict the risk of stress fractures in athletes, including bone health, training, nutrition, and biomechanical factors. Based on their location, stress fractures may be categorized as low- or high-risk, depending on the likelihood of the injury developing into a complete fracture. Treatment for these injuries varies substantially and must account for the risk level of the fractured bone, the stage of fracture development, and the needs of the patient. High-risk fractures include the anterior tibia, lateral femoral neck, patella, medial malleolus, and femoral head. Low-risk fractures include the posteromedial tibia, fibula, medial femoral shaft, and pelvis. Magnetic resonance is the imaging test of choice for diagnosis. These injuries can lead to substantial lost time from participation. Treatment will vary by fracture location, but most stress fractures will heal with rest and modified weightbearing. Some may require more aggressive intervention, such as prolonged nonweightbearing movement or surgery. Contributing factors should also be addressed prior to return to sports.

  3. Lower limb stress fractures in sport: Optimising their management and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Greg A J; Wood, Alexander M

    2017-01-01

    Stress fractures in sport are becoming increasing more common, comprising up to 10% of all of sporting injuries. Around 90% of such injuries are located in the lower limb. This articles aims to define the optimal management of lower limb stress fractures in the athlete, with a view to maximise return rates and minimise return times to sport. Treatment planning of this condition is specific to the location of the injury. However, there remains a clear division of stress fractures by “high” and “low” risk. “Low risk” stress fractures are those with a low probability of fracture propagation, delayed union, or non-union, and so can be managed reliably with rest and exercise limitation. These include stress fractures of the Postero-Medial Tibial Diaphysis, Metatarsal Shafts, Distal Fibula, Medial Femoral Neck, Femoral Shaft and Calcaneus. “High risk” stress fractures, in contrast, have increased rates of fracture propagation, displacement, delayed and non-union, and so require immediate cessation of activity, with orthopaedic referral, to assess the need for surgical intervention. These include stress fractures of the Anterior Tibial Diaphysis, Fifth Metatarsal Base, Medial Malleolus, Lateral Femoral Neck, Tarsal Navicular and Great Toe Sesamoids. In order to establish the optimal methods for managing these injuries, we present and review the current evidence which guides the treatment of stress fractures in athletes. From this, we note an increased role for surgical management of certain high risk stress fractures to improve return times and rates to sport. Following this, key recommendations are provided for the management of the common stress fracture types seen in the athlete. Five case reports are also presented to illustrate the application of sport-focussed lower limb stress fracture treatment in the clinical setting. PMID:28361017

  4. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahanov, Leamor; Eberman, Lindsey E; Games, Kenneth E; Wasik, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence. PMID:25848327

  5. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahanov, Leamor; Eberman, Lindsey E; Games, Kenneth E; Wasik, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence.

  6. Modified maximum tangential stress criterion for fracture behavior of zirconia/veneer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsayar, M M; Park, P

    2016-06-01

    The veneering porcelain sintered on zirconia is widely used in dental prostheses, but repeated mechanical loadings may cause a fracture such as edge chipping or delamination. In order to predict the crack initiation angle and fracture toughness of zirconia/veneer bi-layered components subjected to mixed mode loadings, the accuracy of a new and traditional fracture criteria are investigated. A modified maximum tangential stress criterion considering the effect of T-stress and critical distance theory is introduced, and compared to three traditional fracture criteria. Comparisons to the recently published fracture test data show that the traditional fracture criteria are not able to properly predict the fracture initiation conditions in zirconia/veneer bi-material joints. The modified maximum tangential stress criterion provides more accurate predictions of the experimental results than the traditional fracture criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Is in situ stress important to groundwater flow in shallow fractured rock aquifers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, L.; Aydin, A.; Simmons, C. T.; Love, A. J.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryIn situ stress affects the permeability tensor of fractured rock masses at depth but its effect on shallow to near-surface fractured rock aquifers has received little attention. This is partly because stress-related effects on groundwater flow at shallow depths are difficult to identify and characterise due to the complex interactions between all of the inherent properties of a fractured rock aquifer. These properties include the factors that dominantly control groundwater flow: fracture network density, geometry, connectivity and infill. Furthermore, surface processes such as weathering, erosion and unloading alter the original hydraulic nature (connectivity, transmissivity) of fractured rock masses resulting in higher degrees of spatial heterogeneity within shallow flow systems. These processes and interactions often mask the influence of in situ stress fields on fracture network permeability and groundwater flow. In this study, an integrated analysis of local area fracture networks, borehole geophysical logs, borehole groundwater yields and hydromechanical models demonstrate that in situ stress does affect groundwater flow in shallow (fractured rock aquifers by altering fracture hydraulic aperture distributions, fracture network connectivity and groundwater flow rates via fracture deformation processes. In particular, a comparison between representative models of deformed (stressed state) and undeformed (zero stress state) fracture networks showed that below 100 m depth, groundwater flow rates could decrease several fold under the influence of the contemporary stress field. This prediction was highly consistent with the field observations. In contrast, groundwater flow modelling of shallow fractured rock aquifers is typically conducted under the assumption that permeability is independent of the state of stress. A key finding of this study is that in situ stress may be a more important control on both local and regional scale shallow groundwater flow

  8. The FEM Analysis of Stress Distribution in front of the Crack Tip and Fracture Process in the Elements of Modified and Unmodified Cast Steel G17CrMo5-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pała Robert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents influence of modification of the low-alloy cast steel G17CrMo5-5 by rare earth metals on stress distribution in front of the crack at the initial moment of the crack extension. Experimental studies include determination of strength and fracture toughness characteristics for unmodified (UM and modified (M cast steel. In the numerical computations, experimentally tested specimens SEN(B were modelled. The true stress–strain curves for the UM and M cast steel are used in the calculation. The stress distributions in front of the crack were calculated at the initial moment of the crack extension. On the basis of data on the particle size inclusions in the UM and M cast steel, and the calculated stress distributions was performed an assessment of the possibility of the occurrence of cleavage fracture. The analysis results indicate that at room temperature for the UM cast steel, there is a possibility of cleavage fracture, while for the M cast steel occurrence of cleavage fracture is negligible.

  9. Longitudinal stress fracture: patterns of edema and the importance of the nutrient foramen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, Joseph G.; Widman, David; Holsbeeck, Marnix van [Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed the MR appearances of six cases of longitudinal stress fracture of the lower extremity.Results. One fracture was in the femur and five were in the tibia. Four of the tibial fractures showed edema starting in the mid-tibia at the level of the nutrient foramen with the fracture on the anteromedial cortex. The other tibial fracture started at the nutrient foramen. Three fractures (two tibial and the femur fracture) showed eccentric marrow edema; all fractures showed either eccentric periosteal reaction or soft tissue edema.Conclusion. Primary diagnosis of longitudinal stress fracture is made by finding a vertical cleft on one or more axial images. Secondary signs of position of the nutrient foramen and patterns of edema may be useful. (orig.)

  10. Effect of T-stress on the cleavage crack growth resistance resulting from plastic flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    , the materials show crack growth resistance. It is shown here that the resistance is strongly dependent on the value of the non-singular T-stress, acting parallel to the crack plane. The numerical technique employed makes use of a thin dislocation-free strip of elastic material inside which the crack propagates...

  11. Bilateral Tibial Stress Fractures in a Young Man Associated with Idiopathic Osteoporosis - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Özyürek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress fractures are defined as a partial or complete fracture of bone due to an inability to endure a non-violent stress. Two factors have been proposed to explain the aetiology of stress fractures: muscle fatigue, and direct muscle action. We want to point to third factor with our case report: Osteoporosis. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2010;16:58-60

  12. Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0652 TITLE: Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0652 Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...to stress fracture risk. In particular, in Study 1, we will perform advanced skeletal imaging along with gait-assessments in subjects with history of

  13. Factors associated with recurrent fifth metatarsal stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-tai; Park, Young-uk; Jegal, Hyuk; Kim, Ki-chun; Young, Ki-won; Kim, Jin-su

    2013-12-01

    Many surgeons agree that fifth metatarsal stress fractures have a tendency toward delayed union, nonunion, and possibly refracture. Difficulty healing seems to be correlated with fracture classification. However, refracture sometimes occurs after low-grade fracture, even long after apparent resolution. The records of 168 consecutive cases of fifth metatarsal stress fracture (163 patients) treated by modified tension band wiring from March 2002 to June 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Mean length of follow-up was 23.6 months (range, 10-112 months). Forty-nine cases classified as Torg III were bone grafted initially also. All enrolled patients were elite athletes. Eleven patients experienced nonunion and 18 refracture. The 11 nonunion cases were bone grafted. The 157 patients (excluding nonunion cases) were allocated to either a refracture group or a union group. Clinical features, such as age, weight, fracture classification, time to union, and reinjury history, were compared. Radiological parameters representing cavus deformity and fifth metatarsal head protrusion were compared to evaluate the influence of structural abnormalities. Mean group weights were significantly different (P = .041), but mean ages (P = .879), fracture grades (P = .216, P = .962), and time from surgery to rehabilitation (P = .539) were similar. No significant intergroup differences were found for talocalcaneal (TC) angle (P = .470), calcaneal pitch (CP) angle (P = .847), or talo-first metatarsal (T-MT1) angle (P = .407) on lateral radiographs; for fifth metatarsal lateral deviation (MT5-LD) angle (P = .623) on anteroposterior (AP) radiographs; or for MT5-LD angle (P = .065) on the 30-degree medial oblique radiographs. However, the mean fourth-fifth intermetatarsal (IMA4-5) angle on AP radiographs was significantly greater in the refracture group, and for Torg II cases, mean weight (P = .042), IMA4-5 angle on AP radiographs (P = .014), and MT5-LD angle (P = .043) on 30-degree medial

  14. Micromechanical studies of cyclic creep fracture under stress controlled loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Giessen, Erik; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with a study of intergranular failure by creep cavitation under stress-controlled cyclic loading conditions. Loading is assumed to be slow enough that diffusion and creep mechanisms (including grain boundary sliding) dominate, leading to intergranular creep fracture. This study...... case with a facet-site microcrack yields important insight for damage accumulation under balanced loading. Under unbalanced loading, the time-average accumulation of creep cavitation gives rise to macroscopic ratchetting, while its rate is demonstrated to depend subtly on material and loading...

  15. Incidence and Time to Return to Training for Stress Fractures during Military Basic Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Wood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, little is known about the length of time required to rehabilitate patients from stress fractures and their return to preinjury level of physical activity. Previous studies have looked at the return to sport in athletes, in a general population, where rehabilitation is not as controlled as within a captive military population. In this study, a longitudinal prospective epidemiological database was assessed to determine the incidence of stress fractures and the time taken to rehabilitate recruits to preinjury stage of training. Findings demonstrated a background prevalence of 5% stress fractures in Royal Marine training; femoral and tibial stress fractures take 21.1 weeks to return to training with metatarsal stress fractures being the most common injury taking 12.2 weeks. Rehabilitation from stress fractures accounts for 814 weeks of recruit rehabilitation time per annum. Stress fracture incidence is still common in military training; despite this stress fracture recovery times remain constant and represent a significant interruption in training. It takes on average 5 weeks after exercise specific training has restarted to reenter training at a preinjury level, regardless of which bone has a stress fracture. Further research into their prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation is required to help reduce these burdens.

  16. Stress fracture of the ulna associated with bisphosphonate therapy and use of walking aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, G S H; Grace, C S H; Koh, K W B; Kelvin, K W B; Chong, T W; Wei, C T; Tan, B Y; Yeow, T B

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a stress fracture of the ulna secondary to long-term bisphosphonate therapy and walking cane. Physicians need to have a high index of suspicion of stress fractures occurring in patients complaining of chronic upper limb pain if they are on bisphosphonate therapy and are using walking aids. Stress fractures of the upper extremities are rare and are usually associated with athletes; however, a few recent case reports have shown an association between stress fractures of the upper extremities and the use of walking aids. The association between increased incidence of upper extremity stress fractures and the use of both bisphosphonates and walking aids in patients has not been well studied, with only one previously reported case. Here, we report a case of a complete stress fracture of the ulna in a 77-year-old female, premorbidly ambulant with walking cane, on long-term bisphosphonates without any pre-existing medical conditions which could result in secondary causes of bone loss. Investigations did not reveal any causes of pathological fracture. This fracture is attributed to the use of long-term bisphosphonate therapy in conjunction with the use of a walking cane. This case highlights the importance of entertaining the possibility of such fractures occurring in any patient who is on bisphosphonate therapy presenting with stress fractures of the upper extremity.

  17. Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertazzi, Bruno; Ozaki, Norimasa; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Faenov, Anatoly; Habara, Hideaki; Harmand, Marion; Hartley, Nicholas; Ilnitsky, Denis; Inogamov, Nail; Inubushi, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Katayama, Tetsuo; Koyama, Takahisa; Koenig, Michel; Krygier, Andrew; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; McBride, Emma; Migdal, Kirill Petrovich; Morard, Guillaume; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Okuchi, Takuo; Pikuz, Tatiana; Purevjav, Narangoo; Sakata, Osami; Sano, Yasuhisa; Sato, Tomoko; Sekine, Toshimori; Seto, Yusuke; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Tanaka, Kazuo; Tange, Yoshinori; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Umeda, Yuhei; Vinci, Tommaso; Yabashi, Makina; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2017-06-01

    The understanding of fracture phenomena of a material at extremely high strain rates is a key issue for a wide variety of scientific research ranging from applied science and technological developments to fundamental science such as laser-matter interaction and geology. Despite its interest, its study relies on a fine multiscale description, in between the atomic scale and macroscopic processes, so far only achievable by large-scale atomic simulations. Direct ultrafast real-time monitoring of dynamic fracture (spallation) at the atomic lattice scale with picosecond time resolution was beyond the reach of experimental techniques. We show that the coupling between a high-power optical laser pump pulse and a femtosecond x-ray probe pulse generated by an x-ray free electron laser allows detection of the lattice dynamics in a tantalum foil at an ultrahigh strain rate of [Formula: see text] ~2 × 108 to 3.5 × 108 s-1. A maximal density drop of 8 to 10%, associated with the onset of spallation at a spall strength of ~17 GPa, was directly measured using x-ray diffraction. The experimental results of density evolution agree well with large-scale atomistic simulations of shock wave propagation and fracture of the sample. Our experimental technique opens a new pathway to the investigation of ultrahigh strain-rate phenomena in materials at the atomic scale, including high-speed crack dynamics and stress-induced solid-solid phase transitions.

  18. Virtual stress testing of fracture stability in soldiers with severely comminuted tibial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petfield, Joseph L; Hayeck, Garry T; Kopperdahl, David L; Nesti, Leon J; Keaveny, Tony M; Hsu, Joseph R

    2017-04-01

    Virtual stress testing (VST) provides a non-invasive estimate of the strength of a healing bone through a biomechanical analysis of a patient's computed tomography (CT) scan. We asked whether VST could improve management of patients who had a tibia fracture treated with external fixation. In a retrospective case-control study of 65 soldier-patients who had tibia fractures treated with an external fixator, we performed VST utilizing CT scans acquired prior to fixator removal. The strength of the healing bone and the amount of tissue damage after application of an overload were computed for various virtual loading cases. Logistic regression identified computed outcomes with the strongest association to clinical events related to nonunion within 2 months after fixator removal. Clinical events (n = 9) were associated with a low tibial strength for compression loading (p tibia-fracture patients who can safely resume weight bearing. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:805-811, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A geometrically based method for predicting stress-induced fracture aperture and flow in discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is often done through modeling and upscaling of discrete fracture networks (DFNs). The two-dimensional fracture geometry required for DFNs is obtained from subsurface and outcropping analog data. However, these data provide little information...... to DFNs using the fracture orientation and spacing distributions in combination with an estimate of the regional stress tensor and orientation. The frequency distribution of hydraulic aperture from the geometrically based method is compared with finite-element models constructed from five real fracture...... networks, digitized from outcropping pavements. These networks cover a wide range of possible geometries and spatial distributions. The geometrically based method predicts the average hydraulic aperture and equivalent permeability of fractured porous media with error margins of less than 5%....

  20. Stress-dependent permeability of fractured rock masses: A numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Ki-Bok; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru

    2004-04-30

    We investigate the stress-dependent permeability issue in fractured rock masses considering the effects of nonlinear normal deformation and shear dilation of fractures using a two-dimensional distinct element method program, UDEC, based on a realistic discrete fracture network realization. A series of ''numerical'' experiments were conducted to calculate changes in the permeability of simulated fractured rock masses under various loading conditions. Numerical experiments were conducted in two ways: (1) increasing the overall stresses with a fixed ratio of horizontal to vertical stresses components; and (2) increasing the differential stresses (i.e., the difference between the horizontal and vertical stresses) while keeping the magnitude of vertical stress constant. These numerical experiments show that the permeability of fractured rocks decreases with increased stress magnitudes when the stress ratio is not large enough to cause shear dilation of fractures, whereas permeability increases with increased stress when the stress ratio is large enough. Permeability changes at low stress levels are more sensitive than at high stress levels due to the nonlinear fracture normal stress-displacement relation. Significant stress-induced channeling is observed as the shear dilation causes the concentration of fluid flow along connected shear fractures. Anisotropy of permeability emerges with the increase of differential stresses, and this anisotropy can become more prominent with the influence of shear dilation and localized flow paths. A set of empirical equations in closed-form, accounting for both normal closure and shear dilation of the fractures, is proposed to model the stress-dependent permeability. These equations prove to be in good agreement with the results obtained from our numerical experiments.

  1. Bilateral stress fractures of the ulnae in a Kendo (Japanese fencing) player

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujino, T.; Ohe, T.; Shinozuka, M.

    1998-01-01

    A case of bilateral stress fractures of the ulnae in a Kendo (Japanese fencing) player is reported; the mechanism of the fractures, particularly the difference in the site of fracture between the right and left ulna, is discussed. 




 PMID:9865410

  2. PCNA-Dependent Cleavage and Degradation of SDE2 Regulates Response to Replication Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ukhyun Jo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining genomic integrity during DNA replication is essential for cellular survival and for preventing tumorigenesis. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA functions as a processivity factor for DNA replication, and posttranslational modification of PCNA plays a key role in coordinating DNA repair against replication-blocking lesions by providing a platform to recruit factors required for DNA repair and cell cycle control. Here, we identify human SDE2 as a new genome surveillance factor regulated by PCNA interaction. SDE2 contains an N-terminal ubiquitin-like (UBL fold, which is cleaved at a diglycine motif via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP box and deubiquitinating enzyme activity. The cleaved SDE2 is required for negatively regulating ultraviolet damage-inducible PCNA monoubiquitination and counteracting replication stress. The cleaved SDE2 products need to be degraded by the CRL4CDT2 ubiquitin E3 ligase in a cell cycle- and DNA damage-dependent manner, and failure to degrade SDE2 impairs S phase progression and cellular survival. Collectively, this study uncovers a new role for CRL4CDT2 in protecting genomic integrity against replication stress via regulated proteolysis of PCNA-associated SDE2 and provides insights into how an integrated UBL domain within linear polypeptide sequence controls protein stability and function.

  3. Prospective intraoperative syndesmotic evaluation during ankle fracture fixation: stress external rotation versus lateral fibular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewski, Paul E; Dombroski, Derek; Lawrence, J Todd R; Esterhai, John L; Mehta, Samir

    2015-04-01

    We hypothesized that the method of stress external rotation more accurately reproduces the mechanism of injury, and therefore this diagnostic method more likely detects ankle instability than the fibular stress examination. Prospective cohort comparison study. Level 1 trauma center. Twenty-eight consecutive patients with unstable ankle fractures presenting within 7 days from the time of injury. Previous ankle surgical history or age younger than 18 years was excluded. Stress external rotation and lateral fibular stress examination was performed intraoperatively. Radiographic measurement of the tibiofibular clear space, tibiofibular overlap, and medial clear space were recorded. After normalization of the fluoroscopic measurements, there was no difference in detecting changes in tibiofibular clear space or tibiofibular overlap. However, there was a significant difference in detecting medial clear space widening with stress external rotation. Compared with lateral fibular stress, stress external rotation demonstrated a 35% increase (P stress external rotation. Untreated instability impacts patient outcomes. The difference in widening with stress external rotation was significantly greater than lateral fibular stress and appreciable on standard fluoroscopic views. Stress external rotation radiographs are a more reliable indicator of mortise instability than traditional lateral fibular stress. Diagnostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  4. Prospective cohort study of the risk factors for stress fractures in Chinese male infantry recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Chang, Qi; Huang, Tao; Huang, Changlin

    2016-08-01

    To determine potential risk factors that could predict stress fractures over an 8-week basic military training in Chinese male infantry recruits. Recruits from three infantry units enrolled in this prospective study. At baseline, demographic data, personal history of stress fractures, mean duration of weekly exercise and smoking history were recorded on questionnaires and blood samples taken for analysis of bone turnover biomarkers and genetic factors. Of the 1516 male recruits who volunteered to participate in the study, 1398 recruits provided data for analysis. In total, 189 stress fracture cases were observed (incidence rate: 13.5%) during the 8-week training period. Recruits with stress fractures had a significantly higher incidence of prior fracture history and lower exercise level prior to enrolment compared with those without stress fractures. A significant difference in both allelic frequency and genotypic distribution of the growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) gene rs143383 polymorphism was observed between recruits with and without stress fractures. However, no difference in serum bone turnover biomarkers was detected between groups. This prospective, cohort study indicates that fracture history, lower exercise level and GDF5 rs143383 may be predictive risk factors for stress fractures in Chinese male infantry recruits. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Visualization of stress fractures of the foot using PET-MRI: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crönlein, Moritz; Rauscher, Isabel; Beer, Ambros J; Schwaiger, Markus; Schäffeler, Christoph; Beirer, Marc; Huber, Stephan; Sandmann, Gunther H; Biberthaler, Peter; Eiber, Matthias; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2015-12-23

    Diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures still remains to be a clinical and radiological challenge. Therapeutic options vary from conservative treatment to surgical treatment without a clear treatment concept. Recently the combination of PET and MRI has been introduced, aiming a superior diagnostic accuracy in clinical practice. Therefore the aim of our study was to analyse whether PET-MRI would be a feasible technique to recognize stress fractures of the foot and to analyse if our conservative treatment plan leads to a good clinical outcome. Therefore, 20 patients with suspected stress fractures of the foot and ankle underwent plain radiography and (18)F-Fluoride PET-MRI. Two blinded readers assessed in consensus both imaging techniques for the presence of stress fracture, stress reaction or osteoarthritis. Patients with stress fractures or stress reactions in the foot and ankle area underwent our conservative treatment plan, with immobilization in a VACO®ped cast for 6 weeks under partial weight bearing on forearm crutches. The benefit of our conservative therapeutic concept was evaluated by the patients on the basis of VAS and FAOS scoring systems before and after treatment. 8 out of 20 patients underwent conservative treatment after diagnosis of either a stress fracture or a stress reaction of the foot and ankle area. PET-MRI identified four stress fractures and seven stress reactions. In all cases, no pathological findings were present on plain X-ray. FAOS and VAS significantly improved according to the patients' records. PET-MRI seems to be a useful modality to diagnose stress fractures and stress reactions of the foot and ankle area, especially when conventional modalities, such as plain radiographs fail. Conservative management is a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of stress fractures. To rule out the benefits compared to a surgical treatment plan, further studies are needed.

  6. Unusual stress fracture in an adolescent baseball pitcher affecting the trochlear groove of the olecranon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Joseph J.; Block, John J.; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Hannah, Gene A. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Sports Medicine, Vanderbilt Orthopaedic Institute, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Stress fractures of the proximal ulna are known to occur in throwing athletes. Most cases extend to involve the olecranon, and cases limited to the trochlear groove are rare. In this report we present a 17-year-old elite baseball pitcher with a stress fracture of the trochlear groove of the proximal ulna. Diagnosis was made by demonstration of characteristic signal changes on MRI of the elbow. The fracture occurred at the cortical notch, also known as the pseudodefect of the trochlear groove. This case suggests that the cortical notch serves as an area of weakness predisposing pitchers to development of a stress fracture. (orig.)

  7. Polyaxial stress-dependent permeability of a three-dimensional fractured rock layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qinghua; Wang, Xiaoguang; Xiang, Jiansheng; Latham, John-Paul

    2017-12-01

    A study about the influence of polyaxial (true-triaxial) stresses on the permeability of a three-dimensional (3D) fractured rock layer is presented. The 3D fracture system is constructed by extruding a two-dimensional (2D) outcrop pattern of a limestone bed that exhibits a ladder structure consisting of a "through-going" joint set abutted by later-stage short fractures. Geomechanical behaviour of the 3D fractured rock in response to in-situ stresses is modelled by the finite-discrete element method, which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, variation of stress fields, reactivation of pre-existing rough fractures and propagation of new cracks. A series of numerical simulations is designed to load the fractured rock using various polyaxial in-situ stresses and the stress-dependent flow properties are further calculated. The fractured layer tends to exhibit stronger flow localisation and higher equivalent permeability as the far-field stress ratio is increased and the stress field is rotated such that fractures are preferentially oriented for shearing. The shear dilation of pre-existing fractures has dominant effects on flow localisation in the system, while the propagation of new fractures has minor impacts. The role of the overburden stress suggests that the conventional 2D analysis that neglects the effect of the out-of-plane stress (perpendicular to the bedding interface) may provide indicative approximations but not fully capture the polyaxial stress-dependent fracture network behaviour. The results of this study have important implications for understanding the heterogeneous flow of geological fluids (e.g. groundwater, petroleum) in subsurface and upscaling permeability for large-scale assessments.

  8. Compression Fracture of CFRP Laminates Containing Stress Intensifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Christian; Schütt, Martin; Liebig, Wilfried V; Philipkowski, Timo; Kürten, Jonas; Schulte, Karl; Fiedler, Bodo

    2017-09-05

    For brittle fracture behaviour of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) under compression, several approaches exist, which describe different mechanisms during failure, especially at stress intensifications. The failure process is not only initiated by the buckling fibres, but a shear driven fibre compressive failure beneficiaries or initiates the formation of fibres into a kink-band. Starting from this kink-band further damage can be detected, which leads to the final failure. The subject of this work is an experimental investigation on the influence of ply thickness and stacking sequence in quasi-isotropic CFRP laminates containing stress intensifications under compression loading. Different effects that influence the compression failure and the role the stacking sequence has on damage development and the resulting compressive strength are identified and discussed. The influence of stress intensifications is investigated in detail at a hole in open hole compression (OHC) tests. A proposed interrupted test approach allows identifying the mechanisms of damage initiation and propagation from the free edge of the hole by causing a distinct damage state and examine it at a precise instant of time during fracture process. Compression after impact (CAI) tests are executed in order to compare the OHC results to a different type of stress intensifications. Unnotched compression tests are carried out for comparison as a reference. With this approach, a more detailed description of the failure mechanisms during the sudden compression failure of CFRP is achieved. By microscopic examination of single plies from various specimens, the different effects that influence the compression failure are identified. First damage of fibres occurs always in 0°-ply. Fibre shear failure leads to local microbuckling and the formation and growth of a kink-band as final failure mechanisms. The formation of a kink-band and finally steady state kinking is shifted to higher compressive strains

  9. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  10. Risk Stratification of Stress Fractures and Prediction of Return to Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    fracture . In this study, we will assess bone mineral density at the hip and spine, as well as bone microarchitecture at the distal tibia in young adult...recovery from stress fracture of the tibia . Our collaborators will use these data to perform analyses and develop mathematical models to predict bone...1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-15-C-0024 TITLE: Risk Stratification of Stress Fractures and Prediction of Return-to-Duty PRINCIPAL

  11. Bilateral stress fractures of the distal fibula in a woman with osteoporosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimoglu, Cemal; Karapinar, Hasan; Sener, Muhittin; Bozkurt, Attila

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral stress fractures of the fibula are very rare. We present an unusual case report of a 54-year-old osteoporotic woman with bilateral stress fractures involving the distal fibula. After conservative treatment, she made a good recovery with full motion and was free of pain.

  12. Sternal stress fracture in a gymnast: A case report and literature review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a high incidence of injuries among gymnasts.1 This is not surprising given the highly repetitive nature of impacts associated with landings from dismounts and during floor routines. The majority of upper extremity stress fractures involve the distal radius.2 Sternal stress fractures are rare, with the only other similar ...

  13. STRESS FRACTURE OF THE FIRST RIB IN A HIGH SCHOOL WEIGHT LIFTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Fujioka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old boy, who played a weight lifting in high school, sustained stress fracture of the first rib without any causes. We successfully treated first rib stress fracture with limitation of using the upper extremity and with using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound

  14. [MRI diagnosis in longitudinal stress fractures: differential diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauleit, D; Sommer, T; Textor, J; Flacke, S; Hasan, C; Steuer, K; Emous, D; Schild, H

    1999-01-01

    To compare MR imaging features of stress fractures, simulating malignancies, and Ewing sarcomas. MR imaging studies of 4 patients with longitudinal stress fractures of the tibia (n = 2) and the femur (n = 2) simulating malignancy were retrospectively compared with the MRI scans of 10 patients with histologically proven Ewing sarcoma (femur n = 5; tibia n = 3, fibula n = 1, humerus n = 1). The diagnosis of stress fractures was confirmed by follow-up examinations. An additional biopsy was performed in two patients. Despite negative x-ray examinations, MRI showed the fracture line in all patients with stress fractures. In these cases marrow edema was irregular and there was no well defined margin towards normal fatty marrow. In contrast Ewing sarcomas were sharply demarcated in 9/10 cases. Extraosseous enhancing soft tissue was found in Ewing sarcomas as well as in stress fractures. In stress fractures the enhancing mass was repair tissue. Areas of necrosis within the enhancing mass was seen in (8/10) Ewing sarcomas, only. In follow-up studies we observed a decrease of the marrow edema in patients with stress fractures. Occurrence of low signal areas in T1- and T2-weighted sequences within the initial enhanced extraosseous tissue corresponded to bony callus on x-rays films. Repair tissue in stress fractures can imitate malignancy. The irregularity of the marrow edema without well defined margins, the lack of necrosis in the small enhancing tissue and the proof of the fracture line in the MRI are criteria to differentiate stress fractures from Ewing sarcomas. Short-term follow up studies are helpful to underline the diagnosis.

  15. Acute Stress Fracture of the Pelvis after Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbo, Oluwaseun; Tyagi, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    Acute hip pain following total hip arthroplasty (THA) could have numerous causes to include stress fracture of the pelvis. Stress fractures of the pelvis are rare and have been reported to involve the medial wall and the pubic ramus. A unique case is presented demonstrating the clinical presentation and management of an acute stress fracture of ilium and anterior column following a THA. A 72-year-old man underwent an uncomplicated right THA. He was noted to have femoral head resorption and thin osteoporotic bone intraoperatively. He initially did well postoperatively and ambulating without pain or assistive devices. Within 1 month of surgery, he returned with acute right hip pain without any traumatic event. Radiographs showed migration of the acetabular component and computed tomography scan confirmed a fracture through the ilium. The patient underwent revision surgery, where the fracture was reduced and internal fixation was achieved with a reconstruction plate and acetabular cage construct. At 9 months postoperatively, the patient remained pain-free with full weight bearing and with stable radiographs. Elderly patients who undergo THA may have low bone mineral density. These patients can develop stress fractures in their pelvis after surgery. These fractures may involve the medial wall, posterior column, or posterior wall. In patients who develop atraumatic pain postoperatively, it is important to consider for potential stress fractures of the ilium and evaluate appropriately with imaging. In these cases, revision surgery can be necessary to provide fixation of the stress fracture.

  16. The role of adaptive bone formation in the etiology of stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Julie M; Popp, Kristin L; Yanovich, Ran; Bouxsein, Mary L; Matheny, Ronald W

    2017-05-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries with load-bearing activities. Stress fractures have been reported in the scientific literature for over a century; however, the etiology continues to be investigated with important distinctions made between the contributions of the tissue-level processes of bone remodeling and modeling. In response to novel repetitive loading, increased bone remodeling may serve to replace fatigue-damaged bone while at the same time creating temporary porosity. Much attention has been given to the role of remodeling in the etiology of stress fracture; however, the role of bone modeling has received less attention. Modest increases in modeling, via bone formation on the periosteal surface of long bones in response to mechanical loading, greatly increases the fatigue resistance of bone. Thus, enhancing this adaptive bone formation is a promising target for stress fracture prevention, and a focus on adaptive bone formation may reveal novel risk factors for stress fracture.

  17. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahanov L

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leamor Kahanov,1 Lindsey E Eberman,2 Kenneth E Games,2 Mitch Wasik2 1College of Health Science, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA, USA; 2Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA Abstract: Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence. Keywords: medial tibial stress syndrome, stress injury, nonunion stress fracture

  18. Stress Fracture Influences Bone Resorption marker (u-NTX) in Female Long Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shimpei; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Kubota, Atsushi; Wakamatsu, Kenta; Koikawa, Natsue

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we aim to clarify the influence based on bone resorption markers at onset of stress fracture. Also, we will clarify the state of the bone resorption markers of female long distance runners who have a history of stress fracture and also ones who routinely practices running long distances. Participants comprised 19 female long distance athletes. The survey period was 2011-2014, and we measured u-NTX as a bone resorption marker at least twice a year, taking the mean±SD of the periodic measured values without stress fracture as the mean value. Measurements were collected sample when stress fractures developed. 132 u-NTX measurements were taken from 19 participants. As a result, the average was 41.03±12.31 nmolBCE/mmolCRE (Q1: 33.15, Q2: 40.55, Q3: 47.95). In six of the 19 participants, u-NTX could be measured following a stress fracture. The mean value of u-NTX for those participants was 40.16±9.10 nmolBCE/mmolCRE, increasing to 64.08±16.07 nmolBCE/mmol CRE with the stress fracture (pstress fracture were within the standard value for mean premenopausal women, but increased when the athletes suffered from a stress fracture. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Measuring Stress-dependent Fluid Flow Behavior in Fractured Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Da; Benson, Sally

    2014-05-01

    Maintaining long-term storage of CO2 is one of the most important factors for selecting the site for a geological CO2 storage project. Nevertheless, it is important to be prepared for possible leakage due to leaking wells or leakage pathways through the seal of a storage reservoir. This research project is motivated by the need to understand unexpected CO2 leakage. The goal of this research is to investigate stress-dependent fracture permeability and relative permeability of CO2/brine systems. Laboratory measurements of fracture permeability and fracture apertures have been made as a function of effective stress. The phenomenon that permeability decreases with effective pressure increase is observed. Due to deformation of the fracture surface during periods with high effective stress, hysteretic behavior of fractured rock permeability is also observed in core flood experiments. A series of experiments are conducted to investigate permeability hysteresis. A single saw-cut fracture is created in the rock sample to simplify the problem and to focus on the fracture itself. Permeability is measured using a high pressure core flood apparatus with X-Ray CT scanning to measure the fracture aperture distributions. Two permeability data sets, including a high permeability fractured Berea Sandstone and a low permeability fractured Israeli Zenifim Formation sandstone, show clear hysteretic behavior in both permeability and fracture aperture in repeated cycles of compression and decompression. Due to closure of the fracture aperture, when a fractured rock is compressed axially, the permeability has an exponential decline with effective pressure, as expected from stress-dependent permeability theory. When the fractured rock is decompressed afterwards, permeability increases, but not along the compression pathway and never returns to the original value. Depending on the nature of the fracture and host rock, permeability can decrease from a factor of 2 to 40. After one or more

  20. Review of possible correlations between in situ stress and PFL fracture transmissivity data at Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Derek (University of Alberta (United States)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB (Sweden))

    2011-11-15

    In laboratory samples, the fracture transmissivity decreases significantly as the confining stress increases. While these experimental relationships are widely accepted and validated on laboratory samples, it is unknown if such relationships exist in situ or if these relationships can be scaled from the centimetre-scale laboratory tests to the metre-scale of in situ fractures. The purpose of this work is to assess the relationship between the structural-hydraulic data gathered in deep, cored boreholes at Forsmark and the in situ stress state acting on the these fractures. In conclusion, there does not appear to be sufficient evidence from these analyses to support the notion that the magnitude of the flow along the fractures at Forsmark is solely controlled by the in situ stress acting on the fracture. This should not be surprising because the majority of the fractures formed more than 1 billion years ago and the current in situ stress state has only been active for the past 12 million years. It is more likely that the transmissivity values are controlled by fracture roughness, open channels within the fracture, fracture stiffness and fracture infilling material

  1. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambeau, C.B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution was studied by slow strain rate (SSR) technique and fracture mechanics method. The fractured surface was characterized by cleavage fracture. In order to clarify the SCC mechanism, the effects of inhibitor KI on SCC behaviour were ...

  3. Radiological findings and healing patterns of incomplete stress fractures of the pars interarticularis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Andrew J.; Campbell, Robert S.D. [Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Teaching Hospitals, Department of Medical Imaging, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mayor, Peter E. [Leighton Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Crewe, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Rees, Dai [Robert Jones and Agnes-Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to retrospectively record the CT and MRI features and healing patterns of acute, incomplete stress fractures of the pars interarticularis. The CT scans of 156 adolescents referred with suspected pars interarticularis stress fractures were reviewed. Patients with incomplete (grade 2) pars fractures were included in the study. Fractures were assessed on CT according to vertebral level, location of cortical involvement and direction of fracture propagation. MRI was also performed in 72 of the 156 cases. MRI images of incomplete fractures were assessed for the presence of marrow oedema and cortical integrity. Fracture healing patterns were characterised on follow-up CT imaging. Twenty-five incomplete fractures were identified in 23 patients on CT. All fractures involved the inferior or infero-medial cortex of the pars and propagated superiorly or superolaterally. Ninety-two percent of incomplete fractures demonstrated either complete or partial healing on follow-up imaging. Two (8%) cases progressed to complete fractures. Thirteen incomplete fractures in 11 patients confirmed on CT also had MRI, and 92% demonstrated oedema in the pars. Ten out of thirteen fractures (77%) showed a break in the infero-medial cortex with intact supero-lateral cortex, which correlated with the CT findings. MRI incorrectly graded one case as a complete (grade 3) fracture, and 2 cases as (grade 1) stress reaction. Six fractures had follow-up MRI, 67% showed partial or complete cortical healing, and the same number showed persistent marrow oedema. Incomplete fracture of the pars interarticularis represents a stage of the evolution of a complete stress fracture. The direction of fracture propagation is consistent, and complete healing can be achieved in most cases with appropriate clinical management. CT best demonstrates fracture size and extent, and is the most appropriate modality for follow-up. MRI is limited in its ability to fully depict the cortical integrity of

  4. Dry fracture method for simultaneous measurement of in-situ stress state and material properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serata, S. [Serata Geomechanics, Inc., Richmond, CA (United States); Oka, S.; Kikuchi, S. [JDC Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    Based on the dry fracture principle, a computerized borehole probe has been developed to measure stress state and material properties, simultaneously. The probe is designed to obtain a series of measurements in a continuing sequence along a borehole length, without any interruptive measures, such as resetting packers, taking indentation of borehole wall, overcoming, etc. The new dry fracture probe for the single fracture method is designed to overcome the difficulties posed by its ancestor which was based on the double fracture method. The accuracy of the single fracture method is confirmed by a close agreement with the theory, FE modeling and laboratory testing.

  5. Dynamic Response in Transient Stress-Field Behavior Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Andrew

    Hydraulic fracturing is a technique which is used to exploit geologic features and subsurface properties in an effort to increase production in low-permeability formations. The process of hydraulic fracturing provides a greater surface contact area between the producing formation and the wellbore and thus increases the amount of recoverable hydrocarbons from within the reservoir. The use of this stimulation technique has brought on massive applause from the industry due to its widespread success and effectiveness, however the dynamic processes that take part in the development of hydraulic fractures is a relatively new area of research with respect to the massive scale operations that are seen today. The process of hydraulic fracturing relies upon understanding and exploiting the in-situ stress distribution throughout the area of study. These in-situ stress conditions are responsible for directing fracture orientation and propagation paths throughout the period of injection. The relative magnitude of these principle stresses is key in developing a successful stimulation plan. In horizontal well plan development the interpretation of stress within the reservoir is required for determining the azimuth of the horizontal well path. These horizontal laterals are typically oriented in a manner such that the well path lies parallel to the minimum horizontal stress. This allows for vertical fractures to develop transversely to the wellbore, or normal to the least principle stress without the theoretical possibility of fractures overlapping, creating the most efficient use of the fluid energy during injection. The orientation and magnitude of these in-situ stress fields however can be dynamic, controlled by the subsequent fracture propagation and redistribution of the surrounding stresses. That is, that as the fracture propagates throughout the reservoir, the relative stress fields surrounding the fractures may see a shift and deviate from their original direction or

  6. Association between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and bone stress fractures in Finnish young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohola, Juha-Petri; Laaksi, Ilkka; Ylikomi, Timo; Haataja, Riina; Mattila, Ville M; Sahi, Timo; Tuohimaa, Pentti; Pihlajamäki, Harri

    2006-09-01

    Low vitamin D level may predict rickets, osteomalacia, or osteoporosis. We examined serum 25(OH)D concentration as a predisposing factor for bone stress fracture in 756 military recruits. The average serum 25(OH)D concentration was significantly lower in the group with fracture, suggesting a relationship between vitamin D and fatigue bone stress fracture. Low vitamin D level may predict rickets, osteomalacia, or osteoporosis. Fatigue bone stress fracture is one of the most frequently seen types of overuse injuries in athletes and military recruits. An association was recently shown between vitamin D and BMC. A correlation has also been found between low femoral BMD and stress fractures. We measured serum 25(OH)D concentration in a population sample of military recruits to determine if vitamin D is a predisposing factor for fatigue bone stress fracture. We prospectively followed 800 randomly selected, healthy Finnish military recruits with a mean age of 19 years for developing stress fractures in homogenous circumstances. Blood for serum 25(OH)D concentration was drawn at entry into military service, and the weight, height, body mass index (BMI), muscle strength, and 12-minute running were measured for all subjects. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were measured with enzyme immunoassay. At end of the 90-day follow-up, 756 subjects completed the study. Subjects without fracture constituted controls. Twenty-two recruits with stress fracture were identified (2.9%), the incidence being 11.6 (95% CI: 6.8-16.5) per 100 person-years. In the final multivariate analysis, the significant risk factor for stress fracture in conscripts was a below median serum 25(OH)D level (75.8 nM), OR being 3.6 (95% CI: 1.2-11.1). No significant associations between BMI (p = 0.255), age (p = 0.216), or smoking (p = 0.851) and bone stress fracture were found in this study population. A lower level of serum 25(OH)D concentration may be a generally predisposing element for bone stress fractures

  7. Upper extremity stress fractures in athletes: clinical features of 44 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, A K; Kaeding, C C; Wadley, G M

    1999-10-01

    To review the clinical features of a large series of active patients with a stress fracture in a non-weight-bearing location of the upper extremity or ribs. Multicenter cross-sectional study. Multiple academic medical centers. 44 patients with a diagnosis of upper extremity or rib stress fracture. Clinical features according to anatomic location, primary sport, and subdivided according to the nature of the sport-specific skills involved. A diagnosis of stress fracture was made in 44 patients based on history and physical examination, and confirmed by radiography, scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), or a combination of imaging techniques. Patients were subjectively divided into four categories based on the predominant type of upper extremity activity required for participation in their sport: 1) weight lifter (e.g., football, weight lifting, wrestling); 2) upper extremity weight bearer (e.g., gymnastics, diving, cheerleading); 3) thrower (e.g., pitcher, soccer goalie, javelin); or 4) swinger (e.g., golf, tennis). We noted that all fractures in the weight bearers occurred distal to the elbow, whereas in the throwers most fractures affected the shoulder girdle. Lower rib stress fractures predominated in the swingers group, whereas weight lifters had fractures located throughout the upper extremity. Stress fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of athletes presenting with upper extremity or rib pain of bony origin that is of insidious onset. Further study of the sport-specific patterns of injury described here may improve our ability to treat and prevent these injuries.

  8. Medial tibial plateau morphology and stress fracture location: A magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukata, Kiminori; Yamanaka, Issei; Ueda, Yuzuru; Nakai, Sho; Ogasa, Hiroyoshi; Oishi, Yosuke; Hamawaki, Jun-Ichi

    2017-06-18

    To determine the location of medial tibial plateau stress fractures and its relationship with tibial plateau morphology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A retrospective review of patients with a diagnosis of stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau was performed for a 5-year period. Fourteen patients [three female and 11 male, with an average age of 36.4 years (range, 15-50 years)], who underwent knee MRI, were included. The appearance of the tibial plateau stress fracture and the geometry of the tibial plateau were reviewed and measured on MRI. Thirteen of 14 stress fractures were linear, and one of them stellated on MRI images. The location of fractures was classified into three types. Three fractures were located anteromedially (AM type), six posteromedially (PM type), and five posteriorly (P type) at the medial tibial plateau. In addition, tibial posterior slope at the medial tibial plateau tended to be larger when the fracture was located more posteriorly on MRI. We found that MRI showed three different localizations of medial tibial plateau stress fractures, which were associated with tibial posterior slope at the medial tibial plateau.

  9. A geometrically based method for predicting stress-induced fracture aperture and flow in discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    a geometrically based method for calculating the shear-induced hydraulic aperture, that is, an aperture of up to 0.5 mm (0.02 in.) that can result from shear displacement along irregular fracture walls. The geometrically based method does not require numerical simulations, but it can instead be directly applied...... to DFNs using the fracture orientation and spacing distributions in combination with an estimate of the regional stress tensor and orientation. The frequency distribution of hydraulic aperture from the geometrically based method is compared with finite-element models constructed from five real fracture...... networks, digitized from outcropping pavements. These networks cover a wide range of possible geometries and spatial distributions. The geometrically based method predicts the average hydraulic aperture and equivalent permeability of fractured porous media with error margins of less than 5%....

  10. The Young's Modulus, Fracture Stress, and Fracture Strain of Gellan Hydrogels Filled with Whey Protein Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Cherry Wing Yu; Ikeda, Shinya

    2017-05-01

    Texture modifying abilities of whey protein microparticles are expected to be dependent on pH during heat-induced aggregation of whey protein in the microparticulation process. Therefore, whey protein microparticles were prepared at either pH 5.5 or 6.8 and their effects on small and large deformation properties of gellan gels containing whey protein microparticles as fillers were investigated. The majority of whey protein microparticles had diameters around 2 μm. Atomic force microscopy images showed that whey protein microparticles prepared at pH 6.8 partially collapsed and flatted by air-drying, while those prepared at pH 5.5 did not. The Young's modulus of filled gels adjusted to pH 5.5 decreased by the addition of whey protein microparticles, while those of filled gels adjusted to pH 6.8 increased with increasing volume fraction of filler particles. These results suggest that filler particles were weakly bonded to gel matrices at pH 5.5 but strongly at pH 6.8. Whey protein microparticles prepared at pH 5.5 showed more enhanced increases in the Young's modulus than those prepared at pH 6.8 at volume fractions between 0.2 and 0.4, indicating that microparticles prepared at pH 5.5 were mechanically stronger. The fracture stress of filled gels showed trends somewhat similar to those of the Young's modulus, while their fracture strains decreased by the addition of whey protein microparticles in all examined conditions, indicating that the primary effect of these filler particles was to enhance the brittleness of filled gels. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  11. A comparison of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of commercially pure titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and in distilled water: a fracture mechanics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael D; Williamson, R Scott; Thomas, Joseph A; Griggs, Jason A; Zardiackas, Lyle D

    2014-01-01

    From the results of laboratory investigations reported in the literature, it has been suggested that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms may contribute to early failures in titanium alloys that have elevated oxygen concentrations. However, the susceptibility of titanium alloys to SCC in physiological environments remains unclear. In this study, a fracture mechanics approach was used to examine the SCC susceptibility of CP titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and distilled de-ionized (DI) water, at 37°C. The study duration was 26 weeks, simulating the non-union declaration of a plated fracture. Four wedge loads were used corresponding to 86-95% of the alloy's ligament yield load. The longest cracks were measured to be 0.18 mm and 0.10 mm in Ringer's solution and DI water, respectively. SEM analysis revealed no evidence of extensive fluting and quasi-cleavage fracture features which, in literature reports, were attributed to SCC. We thus postulate that the Ringer's solution accelerated the wedge-loaded crack growth without producing the critical stresses needed to change the fracture mechanism. Regression analysis of the crack length results led to a significant best-fit relationship between crack growth velocity (independent variable) and test electrolyte, initial wedge load, and time of immersion of specimen in electrolyte (dependent variables). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Research on Stress Sensitivity of Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs Based on CT Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfei Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fracture aperture change under stress has long been considered as one of primary causes of stress sensitivity of fractured gas reservoirs. However, little is known about the evolution of the morphology of fracture apertures on flow property in loading and unloading cycles. This paper reports a stress sensitivity experiment on carbonate core plugs in which Computed Tomography (CT technology is applied to visualize and quantitatively evaluate morphological changes to the fracture aperture with respect to confining pressure. Fracture models were obtained at selected confining pressures on which pore-scale flow simulations were performed to estimate the equivalent absolute permeability. The results showed that with the increase of confining pressure from 0 to 0.6 MPa, the fracture aperture and equivalent permeability decreased at a greater gradient than their counterparts after 0.6 MPa. This meant that the rock sample is more stress-sensitive at low effective stress than at high effective stress. On the loading path, an exponential fitting was found to fit well between the effective confining pressure and the calculated permeability. On the unloading path, the relationship is found partially reversible, which can evidently be attributed to plastic deformation of the fracture as observed in CT images.

  13. Bilateral tibial stress fracture in a young man due to hypercalciuric osteoporosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofluoglu, Demet; Ofluoglu, Onder; Akyuz, Gulseren

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is commonly thought of as a disease of postmenopausal women, and older men have a lower risk of fracture than women. A stress fracture is an overuse injury and an important cause of disability in the athletic population. Presented here is a 30-year-old healthy man with pain on the anterior surface of the bilateral tibia. He did not communicate any trauma or overuse activity. The neurologic and locomotor system examinations were normal. Radiological examinations revealed tibial stress fractures in both left and right tibia and he had low bone mineral density. Routine hematological tests, bone resorption and formation markers were normal, except for hypercalciuria. After analyzing the results of these tests, the patient was diagnosed with bilateral tibial stress fractures due to hypercalciuric secondary osteoporosis. Osteoporosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atraumatic insufficiency fractures, especially in young healthy adults.

  14. Fracture strength and stress distributions of pulpless premolars restored with fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yu; Huang, Shih-Hao; Takeda, Yuko; Fok, Alex; Hayashi, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of glass fiber posts on increasing the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Extracted upper premolars with two canals in a root were divided into three groups according to the number of posts they were restored with: none, one, or two. All teeth were endodontically treated, crown-sectioned, and restored with a composite core and a metallic crown. A static oblique load was applied to the restored tooth until fracture, and the fracture pattern was recorded. Stress distributions were examined by finite element analysis (FEA). Teeth with glass fiber post(s) showed significantly higher fracture loads compared with those without posts. In the premolars without posts, von Mises and maximum principal stresses were found on the root surface alone; in premolars restored with posts, stresses were distributed on both root and post surfaces. Risk of root dentin fracture was significantly lowest in teeth restored with two posts.

  15. Endonucleolytic cleavage in the expansion segment 7 of 25S rRNA is an early marker of low-level oxidative stress in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlovskiy, Daniel; Zinskie, Jessica A; Gardner, Ethan; Pestov, Dimitri G; Shcherbik, Natalia

    2017-11-10

    The ability to detect and respond to oxidative stress is crucial to the survival of living organisms. In cells, sensing of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) activates many defensive mechanisms that limit or repair damage to cell components. The ROS-signaling responses necessary for cell survival under oxidative stress conditions remain incompletely understood, especially for the translational machinery. Here, we found that drug treatments or a genetic deficiency in the thioredoxin system that increase levels of endogenous hydrogen peroxide in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae promote site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in 25S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) adjacent to the c loop of the expansion segment 7 (ES7), a putative regulatory region located on the surface of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Our data also show that ES7c is cleaved at early stages of the gene expression program that enables cells to successfully counteract oxidative stress and is not a prerequisite or consequence of apoptosis. Moreover, the 60S subunits containing ES7c-cleaved rRNA cofractionate with intact subunits in sucrose gradients and repopulate polysomes after a short starvation-induced translational block, indicating their active role in translation. These results demonstrate that ES7c cleavage in rRNA is an early and sensitive marker of increased ROS levels in yeast cells and suggest that changes in ribosomes may be involved in the adaptive response to oxidative stress. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Dynamic Stress Testing Is Unnecessary for Unimalleolar Supination-External Rotation Ankle Fractures with Minimal Fracture Displacement on Lateral Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortunen, Simo; Leskelä, Hannu-Ville; Haapasalo, Heidi; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Pakarinen, Harri

    2017-03-15

    This study aimed to identify factors from standard radiographs that contributed to the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with isolated supination-external rotation fractures of the lateral malleolus (OTA/AO 44-B). Non-stress radiographs of the mortise and lateral views, without medial clear space widening or incongruity, were prospectively collected for 286 consecutive patients (mean age, 45 years [range, 16 to 85 years]), including 144 female patients (mean age, 50 years [range, 17 to 85 years]) and 142 male patients (mean age, 40 years [range, 16 to 84 years]) from 2 trauma centers. The radiographs were analyzed for fracture morphology by 2 orthopaedic surgeons, who were blinded to each other's measurements and to the results of external rotation stress radiographs (the reference for stability). Factors significantly associated with ankle mortise stability were tested in multiple logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed for continuous variables to determine optimal thresholds. A sensitivity of >90% was used as the criterion for an optimal threshold. According to external rotation stress radiographs, 217 patients (75.9%) had a stable injury, defined as that with a medial clear space of fracture fragments (OR, 7.3 [95% CI, 2.1 to 26.3]). When the posterior diastasis was fracture fragments were present, the probability of a stable ankle mortise was 0.98 for 48 female patients (16.8%) and 0.94 for 37 male patients (12.9%). Patients with noncomminuted lateral malleolar fractures (85 patients [29.7%]) could be diagnosed with a stable ankle mortise without further stress testing, when the fracture line widths were <2 mm on lateral radiographs. Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  17. Range limitation in hip internal rotation and fifth metatarsal stress fractures (Jones fracture) in professional football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Yoshitomo; Nagao, Masashi; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Yohei; Kobayashi, Keiji; Nakajima, Hiroki; Takazawa, Yuji; Kaneko, Kazuo; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2017-04-25

    To identify unknown risk factors associated with fifth metatarsal stress fracture (Jones fracture). A case-controlled study was conducted among male Japanese professional football (soccer) players with (N = 20) and without (N = 40) a history of Jones fracture. Injury history and physical examination data were reviewed, and the two groups were compared. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression controlling for age, leg dominance and body mass index were used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to describe the association between physical examination data and the presence or absence of Jones fractures. From 2000 to 2014, among 162 professional football club players, 22 (13.6%; 21 Asians and one Caucasian) had a history of Jones fracture. Thirteen out of 22 (60%) had a Jones fracture in their non-dominant leg. The mean range of hip internal rotation (HIR) was restricted in players with a history of Jones fracture [25.9° ± 7.5°, mean ± standard deviation (SD)] compared to those without (40.4° ± 11.1°, P fracture (OR = 3.03, 95% CI 1.45-6.33, P = 0.003). Subgroup analysis using data prior to Jones fracture revealed a causal relationship, such that players with a restriction of HIR were at high risk of developing a Jones fracture [Crude OR (95% CI) = 6.66 (1.90-23.29), P = 0.003, Adjusted OR = 9.91 (2.28-43.10), P = 0.002]. In addition, right HIR range limitation increased the risks of developing a Jones fracture in the ipsilateral and the contralateral feet [OR = 3.11 (1.35-7.16) and 2.24 (1.22-4.12), respectively]. Similarly, left HIR range limitation increased the risks in the ipsilateral or the contralateral feet [OR (95% CI) = 4.88 (1.56-15.28) and 2.77 (1.08-7.08), respectively]. The restriction of HIR was associated with an increased risk of developing a Jones fracture. Since the HIR range is a modifiable factor, monitoring and improving the HIR range can lead to prevent reducing the occurrence of

  18. Coulomb stress change during and after tensile fracture opening in a geothermal reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urpi, L.; Blöcher, G.; Zimmermann, G.; Wees, J.D. van; Fokker, P.

    2013-01-01

    Stress shadowing and the ratio of shear to normal stress in the rock surrounding a newly created tensile fracture are investigated. Shearing on plane of weakness near the stimulated volume can be inhibited or promoted by change in poro- and thermo-elastic stress, while pore pressure increase tends

  19. Subtrochanteric stress fractures in patients on oral bisphosphonate therapy: an emerging problem.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Colin G

    2012-01-31

    The emergence of a new variant of subtrochanteric stress fractures of the femur, affecting patients on oral bisphosphonate therapy, has only recently been described. This fracture is often preceded by pain and distinctive radiographic changes (lateral cortical thickening), and associated with a characteristic fracture pattern (transverse fracture line and medial cortical spike). A retrospective review (2007-2009) was carried out for patients who were taking oral bisphosphonates and who sustained a subtrochanteric fracture after a low velocity injury. Eleven fractures were found in 10 patients matching the inclusion criteria outlined. All were females, and taking bisphosphonates for a mean of 43 years. Five of the 10 patients mentioned prodromal symptoms, for an average of 9.4 months before the fracture. Although all fractures were deemed low velocity, 5 of 11 were even atraumatic. Two patients had previously sustained contralateral subtrochanteric fractures. Plain radiographs of two patients showed lateral cortical thickening on the contralateral unfractured femur; the bisphosphonate therapy was stopped and close surveillance was started. Patients taking oral bisphosphonates may be at risk of a new variant of stress fracture of the proximal femur. Awareness of the symptoms is the key to ensure that appropriate investigations are undertaken.

  20. Bilateral Stress Fractures of the Femoral Neck from Renal Osteomalacia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sengupta

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of spontaneous bilateral stress fractures of femoral neck leading to coxa vara in a young female with history of chronic renal disease and secondary osteomalacia is described. Once the underlying disease was controlled, the fracture was treated by valgus osteotomy with good result.

  1. Stress analysis of implant-bone fixation at different fracture angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzawati, B.; Daud, R.; Afendi, M.; Majid, MS Abdul; Zain, N. A. M.; Bajuri, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Internal fixation is a mechanism purposed to maintain and protect the reduction of a fracture. Understanding of the fixation stability is necessary to determine parameters influence the mechanical stability and the risk of implant failure. A static structural analysis on a bone fracture fixation was developed to simulate and analyse the biomechanics of a diaphysis shaft fracture with a compression plate and conventional screws. This study aims to determine a critical area of the implant to be fractured based on different implant material and angle of fracture (i.e. 0°, 30° and 45°). Several factors were shown to influence stability to implant after surgical. The stainless steel, (S. S) and Titanium, (Ti) screws experienced the highest stress at 30° fracture angle. The fracture angle had a most significant effect on the conventional screw as compared to the compression plate. The stress was significantly higher in S.S material as compared to Ti material, with concentrated on the 4th screw for all range of fracture angle. It was also noted that the screws closest to the intense concentration stress areas on the compression plate experienced increasing amounts of stress. The highest was observed at the screw thread-head junction.

  2. Exercise-induced rib stress fractures: influence of reduced bone mineral density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anders; Kanstrup, Inge-Lis; Christiansen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Exercise-induced rib stress fractures have been reported frequently in elite rowers during the past decade. The etiology of rib stress fractures is unclear, but low bone mineral density (BMD) has been suggested to be a potential risk factor for stress fractures in weight-bearing bones. The present...... density may be a potential risk factor for the development of exercise-induced rib stress fractures in elite rowers....... a DEXA scanner. The RSF subjects showed significantly lower L2-L4 BMD: RSF: 1.22+/-0.05 g cm(-2) (mean+/-SEM) (median 1.19 g cm(-2), range 1.02-1.37 g cm(-2)) compared to C: 140+/-0.04 g cm(-2) (median 1.41 g cm(-2), range 1.27-1.57 g cm(-2)) (P=0.028). The present results suggest that low bone mineral...

  3. Determinants of Stress Fracture and Bone Mass in Elite Military Cadets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cosman, Felicia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this 4-year prospective cohort study of 891 cadets at the United States Military Academy at West Point was to examine the determinants of stress fractures and the acquisition of peak bone...

  4. Discrete fracture in quasi-brittle materials under compressive and tensile stress states

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klerck, PA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for modelling discrete fracture in geomaterials under tensile and compressive stress fields has been developed based on a Mohr-Coulomb failure surface in compression and three independent anisotropic rotating crack models in tension...

  5. Osteomalacia and coxa vara. An unusual co-existence for femoral neck stress fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerim Sariyilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Joint and bone pain without any trauma should be investigated and bone metabolism disorders should be kept in mind. There might be co-existing factors related with stress fractures, and they must be treated simultaneously.

  6. [Calcium and bone metabolism across women's life stages. Stress fracture in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries in athletes, especially in long-distance runner, jumping sports and gymnastics in female athletes. The pathology of stress fracture mainly includes repeated biomechanical loading, which leads to bone micro-damage and failure of bone structure. Female athlete triad(FAT), which includes low energy availability with or without an eating disorder, functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, and osteoporosis, is a serious healthcare concern in female athletes. For prevention and treatment of stress fracture, management of biomechanical factors modifying the load applied to a bone is important, and especially in female athletes, management for FAT is one of the important factors. This report outlines the current knowledge on the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of stress fracture, relating to FAT in female athletes.

  7. Plane-stress fracture of compact and notch-bend specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Thin-gaged or high toughness materials containing cracks usually fail in a ductile manner with nominal failure stresses approaching the ultimate strength of the material. For such materials, a two-parameter fracture criterion was developed. An equation which related the linear elastic stress-intensity factor, elastic nominal stress, and two material parameters has previously been derived and has been used as a fracture criterion for surface- and through-cracked specimens under tensile loading. In the present paper the two-parameter fracture criterion was rederived in a more general form and was extended to compact and notch-bend fracture specimens. A close correlation was found between experimental and calculated failure stresses.

  8. Manubrial stress fractures diagnosed on MRI: report of two cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Jonathan C.; Demertzis, Jennifer L. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In contrast to widely-reported sternal insufficiency fractures, stress fractures of the sternum from overuse are extremely rare. Of the 5 cases of sternal stress fracture published in the English-language medical literature, 3 were in the sternal body and only 2 were in the manubrium. We describe two cases of manubrial stress fracture related to golf and weightlifting, and present the first report of the MR findings of this injury. In each of these cases, the onset of pain was atraumatic, insidious, and associated with increased frequency of athletic activity. Imaging was obtained because of clinical diagnostic uncertainty. On MRI, each patient had a sagittally oriented stress fracture of the lateral manubrium adjacent to the first rib synchondrosis. Both patients had resolution of pain after a period of rest, with subsequent successful return to their respective activities. One patient had a follow-up MRI, which showed resolution of the manubrial marrow edema and fracture line. Based on the sternal anatomy and MR findings, we hypothesize that this rare injury might be caused by repetitive torque of the muscle forces on the first costal cartilage and manubrium, and propose that MRI might be an effective means of diagnosing manubrial stress fracture. (orig.)

  9. FEM analysis of deformation localization mechanisms in a 3-D fractured medium under rotating compressive stress orientations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijker, G.; Beekman, F.; Bertotti, G.; Luthi, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Stress distributions and deformation patterns in a medium with a pre-existing fracture set are analyzed as a function of the remote compressive stress orientation (σH) using finite element models with increasingly complex fracture configurations. Slip along the fractures causes deformation

  10. Bone turnover markers do not predict stress fracture in elite combat recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovich, Ran; Evans, Rachel K; Friedman, Eitan; Moran, Daniel S

    2013-04-01

    With bone resorption rates greater than formation, stress fracture pathogenesis plausibly involves bone remodeling imbalance. If this is the case, one would anticipate serum levels of bone turnover markers would be higher in patients with stress fractures than in those without. We therefore asked whether: (1) bone turnover markers differ between soldiers who will or will not have stress fractures during basic training; (2) bone turnover markers change during basic training; and (3) serial bone formation or bone resorption markers differ between subjects with and without stress fractures during basic training? We performed serial determinations of serum bone formation (bone alkaline phosphatase [BAP] and procollagen type I amino-terminal propeptide [PINP]), and resorption (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase [TRAP5b] and cross-linked collagen telopeptide [CTx]) biomarkers, measured at 2- to 4-week intervals (during 18 weeks) in 69 male soldiers in the Israeli Defense Forces during elite basic training. Twenty-two soldiers (32%) were diagnosed with stress fractures. The mean training week at diagnosis was 8.0±2.0 weeks. We observed no differences in bone turnover markers between soldiers with and without stress fractures. During basic training, the mean values of all subjects for bone turnover markers (BAP, PINP, and CTx) changed in comparison to their mean levels at induction (43.9 versus 37.3 μg/L, 110.4 versus 78.0 μg/L, 1.4 versus 1.1 ng/mL, respectively). We found no changes in bone formation and resorption markers between subjects with and without stress fractures. These specific bone turnover markers cannot be considered as either diagnostic or predictive tools for stress fracture detection in young male military recruits. Level II prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Bone scintigraphy depicts bilateral atypical femoral stress fractures with metachronous presentation, long before a complete fracture occurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridonidis, Trifon J; Mousafiris, Kostantinos V; Rapti, Efi K; Apostolopoulos, Dimitris J

    2014-01-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFF), although rare, are recognized more often during the last decade. They are located in the subtrochanteric region or the femoral shaft, may be bilateral, can evolve to complete fractures after bone overload or minimal trauma and have specific radiological features. The complete fractures have horizontal or slightly oblique configuration accompanied by a medial spike, are non-comminuted, and extend to both cortices. There is also generalized cortical thickening of femoral shaft. Newer evidence suggests that AFF are stress or insufficiency fractures, possibly associated with long-term use of bisphoshonates (BP). AFF can also occur in oncologic patients referred for bone scintigraphy and, in such a case, they should be differentiated from bone metastases. We present here a case with bilateral AFF with metachronous appearance in a female patient with a history of breast cancer and osteoporosis. The first AFF had been depicted on bone scintigraphy 3 years before a complete fracture occurred at this site, but the finding was overlooked. A second bone scan performed shortly after the fracture in order to exclude underlying bone metastases disclosed an additional unsuspected incomplete AFF in the contralateral femur, which was confirmed by radiography. In conclusion, oncologists should consider other causes of bone pain besides bone metastatic disease, and physicians interpreting whole body bone scans of oncologic patients should be aware of the entity of AFF, in order to avoid false positive results and provide early information about an impending complete AFF.

  12. Operative strategy for different types of thoracolumbar stress fractures in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WenSheng; Zheng, MinQian

    2014-12-01

    There are no accurate guidelines on the operative treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS)-related thoracolumbar stress fractures. For this reason, we categorized such bone fractures into 2 types: vertebral body type and intervertebral space type, according to the damage mechanism, cross-section spot, and iconography, and devised a targeted surgical plan based on the characteristics of each fracture type. To investigate the types and surgical treatment of thoracolumbar stress fractures in AS. Thoracolumbar stress fractures are complications of AS. The patients with AS have a higher fracture risk that is approximately 3.5 times than the healthy. As the mechanism of injury, clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics, and principles of treatment of these fractures differ from those of general spinal fractures, the surgical approach is different from that of AS kyphosis orthopedic surgery. In this study, we summarize the clinical data of 11 AS patients with thoracolumbar fractures and discuss the clinical efficacy of the surgical approach based on the mechanism of injury and radiographic features. We reviewed the data of 11 patients who underwent surgery for AS-related thoracolumbar stress fractures. Five patients with vertebral body-type fractures underwent vertebral wedge osteotomy through the pedicle and posterior internal fixation, whereas 6 patients with intervertebral space-type fractures underwent anterior spinal decompression with strut grafting and posterior internal fixation. The follow-up period was 2-4 years. After surgery, all kyphosis deformities were corrected, low back pain was relieved immediately, and scores on the visual analog scale improved by >70%. At the final follow-up, kyphosis correction had no significant loss. In the radiographic images, neither nonunion signs of pseudarthrosis plane nor neurologic or infectious complications were observed. Choosing an anterior or posterior surgical approach based on the type of AS

  13. Identification of natural fractures and in situ stress at Rantau Dedap geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyanto, Andika; Sapiie, Benyamin; Idham Abdullah, Chalid; Permana Sidik, Ridwan

    2017-12-01

    Rantau Dedap Area is a geothermal field which is located in Great Sumatra Fault (GSF). The fault and fracture are main factor in the permeability of the geothermal system. However, not all faults and fractures have capability of to flow the fluids. Borehole image log is depiction of the borehole conditions, it is used to identify the natural fractures and drilling induced fracture. Both of them are used to identify the direction of the fracture, direction of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax), and geomechanics parameters. The natural fractures are the results of responses to stress on a rock and permeability which controlling factor in research area. Breakouts is found in this field as a trace of drilling induced fracture due to in situ stress work. Natural fractures are strongly clustered with true strike trending which first, second, and third major direction are N170°E – N180°E (N-S), N60°E – N70°E (NE-SW), and N310°E – N320°E (NW-SE), while the dominant dip is 80° –90°. Based on borehole breakout analysis, maximum horizontal stress orientation is identified in N162°E – N204°E (N-S) and N242°E (NE-SW) direction. It’s constantly similar with regional stress which is affected by GSF. Several parameters have been identified and analyzed are SHmax, SHmin, and Sy. It can be concluded that Rantau Dedap Geothermal Field is affected by strike-slip regime. The determination of in situ stress and natural fractures are important to study the pattern of permeability which is related to the fault in reservoir of this field.

  14. Physical and psychological stressors linked with stress fractures in recruit training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, D S; Evans, R; Arbel, Y; Luria, O; Hadid, A; Yanovich, R; Milgrom, C; Finestone, A S

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to measure ambulation in infantry army basic training, and to evaluate if covering more distance can explain stress fractures in a stressor-stress model. Forty-four male combat recruits (18.7 ± 0.7 years) participated in a 6-month rigorous high intensity combat training program. Baseline data included anthropometric measurements, VO(2)max, and psychological questionnaires. Actual distance covered was measured using a pedometer over an 11-week training period. Psychological questionnaires were repeated after 2 months. Sixteen recruits were diagnosed with stress fractures by imaging (SFi = 36.4%). Statistical analysis included comparing measured variables between SFi and those without stress fractures (NSF). The recruits covered 796 ± 157 km, twofold the distance planned of 378 km (P psychological stress. These data reveal the importance of adherence to or enforcement of military training programs. In the light of these data, the Israeli Defense Forces program needs reappraisal. A stressor-stress response might explain the susceptibility of certain recruits for injury. Using advanced technology, monitoring ambulation may prevent stress fracture development by limiting subjects exceeding a certain level. Psychological profile may also play a role in predicting stress fracture development. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Fracture Toughness Prediction under Compressive Residual Stress by Using a Stress-Distribution T-Scaling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Meshii

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The improvement in the fracture toughness Jc of a material in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature region due to compressive residual stress (CRS was considered in this study. A straightforward fracture prediction was performed for a specimen with mechanical CRS by using the T-scaling method, which was originally proposed to scale the fracture stress distributions between different temperatures. The method was validated for a 780-MPa-class high-strength steel and 0.45% carbon steel. The results showed that the scaled stress distributions at fracture loads without and with CRS are the same, and that Jc improvement was caused by the loss in the one-to-one correspondence between J and the crack-tip stress distribution. The proposed method is advantageous in possibly predicting fracture loads for specimens with CRS by using only the stress–strain relationship, and by performing elastic-plastic finite element analysis, i.e., without performing fracture toughness testing on specimens without CRS.

  16. kISMET: Stress and fracture characterization in a deep mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Dobson, P. F.; Daley, T. M.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Cook, P. J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Rutqvist, J.; Siler, D.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y.; Guglielmi, Y.; Ulrich, C.; Marchesini, P.; Wang, H. F.; Haimson, B. C.; Sone, H.; Vigilante, P.; Roggenthen, W.; Doe, T.; Lee, M.; Mattson, E.; Huang, H.; Johnson, T. C.; Morris, J.; White, J. A.; Johnson, P. A.; Coblentz, D. D.; Heise, J.

    2016-12-01

    We are developing a community facility called kISMET (permeability (k) and Induced Seismicity Management for Energy Technologies) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. The purpose of kISMET is to investigate stress and the effects of rock fabric on hydraulic fracturing. Although findings from kISMET may have broad applications that inform stress and fracturing in anisotropic rock, results will be most applicable to improving control of hydraulic fracturing for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) in crystalline rock. At the kISMET site on the 4850 ft (1480 m depth) level of SURF, we have drilled and cored an array of nearly vertical boreholes in Precambrian phyllite. The array consists of four 50-m deep monitoring boreholes surrounding one 100-m deep borehole forming a 6 m-wide five-spot pattern at a depth of 1530 m. Previous investigations of the stress field at SURF suggest that the principal stress s1 is nearly vertical. By aligning the kISMET boreholes approximately with σ1, fractures created in the center borehole should in theory be perpendicular to σ3, the least principal horizontal stress. But the phyllite at kISMET has a strong fabric (foliation) that could influence fracturing. Stress measurements and stimulation using hydraulic fracturing will be carried out in the center borehole using a straddle packer and high-pressure pump. We will use an impression packer and image logs after stress testing and stimulation to determine fracture orientation and extent at the center borehole. In order to study the control of stress, rock fabric, and stimulation approach on size, aperture, and orientation of hydraulic fractures, we will carefully monitor the stress measurements and stimulation. For example, we will use continuous active source seismic (CASSM) in two of the monitoring boreholes to measure changes in seismic-wave velocity as water fills the fracture. Second, near real-time electrical resistance tomography (ERT) will be used in

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography in stress fractures of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganiyusufoglu, A.K., E-mail: kursady33@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Onat, L. [Department of Radiology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Karatoprak, O.; Enercan, M.; Hamzaoglu, A. [Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computed tomography (CT) in stress fractures of the lumbar spine. Materials and methods: Radiological and clinical data from 57 adolescents and young adults with a diagnosis of stress injury of the lumbar spine were retrospectively reviewed. All cases had undergone both 1.5 T MRI and 16-section CT examinations. All MRI and CT images were retrospectively reviewed and evaluated in separate sessions. The fracture morphology (complete/incomplete, localization) and vertebral levels were noted at both the CT and MRI examinations. Bone marrow/peri-osseous soft-tissue oedema was also determined at MRI. Results: In total, 73 complete and 32 incomplete stress fractures were detected with CT. Sixty-seven complete, 24 incomplete fractures and eight stress reactions were detected using MRI in the same study group. Marrow oedema was also seen in eight of the complete and 20 of the incomplete fractures. The specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of MRI in detecting fracture lines were 99.6, 86.7, and 97.2%, respectively. MRI was more accurate at the lower lumbar levels in comparison to upper lumbar levels. Conclusion: MRI has a similar diagnostic accuracy to CT in determining complete fractures with or without accompanying marrow oedema and incomplete fractures with accompanying marrow oedema, especially at the lower lumbar levels, which constitutes 94% of all fractures. At upper lumbar levels and in the incomplete fractures of the pars interarticularis with marked surrounding sclerosis, MRI has apparent limitations compared to CT imaging.

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Bedding Planes on Hydraulic Fracturing Under True Triaxial Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingxiang; Liu, Jiangwei

    2017-10-01

    A bedding plane effect occurs when hydraulic fractures encounter the bedding plane. True triaxial hydraulic fracturing experiments were conducted with test blocks containing bedding planes. The effects of bedding plane properties and stress state on fracture propagation were analyzed. When hydraulic fracture encounters the bedding plane in sedimentary stratum, it usually propagates along the bedding plane at first. When the hydraulic pressure increases to a critical value in the direction of main hydraulic fracture, the main hydraulic fracture continues propagating along the original direction. The length of the long axial of the hydraulic fracture propagating along the bedding plane is greater than the length of the main hydraulic fracture before penetrating the bedding plane, and both of them are greater than the length of the main hydraulic fracture after penetrating the bedding plane. Three-dimensional propagation models were established. Three propagation forms of hydraulic fractures existed when encountering bedding planes: (1) propagation along the bedding plane; (2) initial propagation along the bedding plane followed by penetration of the bedding plane and propagation along the principal direction; and (3) direct penetration of the bedding plane and propagation along the principal direction.

  19. In situ stress and fracture permeability along the Stillwater fault zone, Dixie Valley Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, S.H.; Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D.; Morin, R.; Sass, J.; Benoit, R.

    1997-01-01

    Borehole televiewer and hydrologic logging and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements were carried out in a 2.7-km-deep geothermal production well (73B-7) drilled into the Stillwater fault zone. Precision temperature and spinner flowmeter logs were also acquired in well 73B-7, with and without simultaneously injecting water into the well. Localized perturbations to well-bore temperature and flow were used to identify hydraulically conductive fractures. Comparison of these data with fracture orientations from the televiewer log indicates that permeable fractures within and adjacent to the Stillwater fault zone are critically stressed, potentially active shear planes in the current west-northwest extensional stress regime at Dixie Valley.

  20. Stress fracture of the navicular bone in a patient with cerebral palsy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Mari; Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Kawamura, Yoshika; Matsuo, Keisuke; Saeki, Mitsuru; Wada, Futoshi

    2015-03-01

    A 14-year-old girl with cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia) underwent examination due to a chief complaint of right foot pain, and was diagnosed with a stress fracture of the central one third of the navicular bone. The fracture was considered to have developed due to repeated loading on the navicular bone as a result of an equinus gait.Therefore, she underwent osteosynthesis and Achilles tendon lengthening to correct the equinus deformity. Following our review of the current literature, we did not identify any reports of stress fracture of the navicular bone in cerebral palsy. We believe that in cases where cerebral palsy patients with paralytic equinus complain of foot pain, the possibility of stress fracture of the navicular bone should be considered.

  1. Marrow changes in anorexia nervosa masking the presence of stress fractures on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, B.; Cassar-Pullicino, V. [Department of Radiology, RJAH Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) usually have abnormal bone and bone marrow metabolism resulting in osteopenia and serous bone marrow change. There is an increased risk of stress/insufficiency fractures and these can be the first presentation of AN. This case report describes a patient with previously undiagnosed AN who presented with foot pain. The serous bone marrow changes of AN were found to mask the MR imaging features of stress fractures, as both had low T1w and high T2w and STIR signal intensities. Contrast enhancement was not helpful but actually masked fractures. Scintigraphy was helpful. The radiologist might be the first clinician to raise the possibility of AN and should be aware of the difficulties in diagnosing stress fractures in bones with underlying serous bone marrow change. In this severe case of AN even the heel fat pad and the fat pad in Kager's triangle had undergone serous change.

  2. Evaluation of tarsal navicular stress fracture fixation using intraoperative O-arm computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Lee, Simon

    2014-12-01

    Stress fractures of the tarsal navicular are high-risk injuries that can result in displacement, avascular necrosis, malunion, and nonunion. Delayed diagnosis and improper treatment can lead to long-term functional impairments and poor clinical outcomes. Increased shear stress and decreased vascularity in the central third of the navicular can complicate bony healing with often unpredictable return times to activity using conservative management in a non-weight-bearing cast. There recently has been increasing debate regarding the effectiveness of treatment options with a trend toward surgical management to anatomically reduce and stabilize navicular stress fractures in athletes. However, anatomic reduction and fixation of the navicular can be difficult despite direct visualization and intraoperative fluoroscopy. We report a case of a chronic navicular stress fracture in a high-level teenage athlete treated with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) and calcaneus autograft using intraoperative computed tomography (CT) (O-arm®, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) for real-time evaluation of fracture reduction and fixation. Intraoperative CT was fast, reliable, and allowed for confirmation of guide wire orientation, alignment, and length across the fracture site. Anatomic fixation of navicular stress fractures can be challenging, and it is important for surgeons to be aware of the potential advantages of using intraoperative CT when treating these injuries. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case Report. © 2014 The Author(s).

  3. Subchondral stress fracture of femoral head in a healthy adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subchondral fracture of the femoral head is an uncommon entity and usually occurs as an insufficiency fracture associated with poor bone quality or as a fatigue fracture in young military recruits. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in young patients along with transient osteoporosis and avascular necrosis of the hip. We report a case of acute onset hip pain in an asymptomatic healthy adult in which the diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging and the patient responded well to conservative treatment.

  4. Wavy Lineaments on Europa: Fracture Propagation into Combined Nonsynchronous and Diurnal Stress Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Zane; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Barr, Amy C.; Gleeson, Damhnait; Mullen, McCall; Nimmo, Francis; Stempel, Michelle M.; Wahr, John

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the processes that have operated on Europa and the manner in which they may have changed through time is fundamental to understanding the satellite's geology and present-day habitability. Previous studies have shown that lineament patterns on Europa can be explained by accumulation of tensile stress from slow nonsynchronous rotation (NSR), while the cycloidal planforms of other Europan lineaments can be explained if fractures propagate through a diurnally changing tensile stress field. We find that fractures propagated into combined diurnal and NSR stress fields can be "wavy" in planform for NSR stress accumulated over 2 to 8 of ice shell rotation and average propagation speeds of approx. 1 to 3 m/s. The variety of Europa's observed lineament planforms from cycloidal, to wavy, to arcuate can be produced by accumulation of NSR stress relative to the diurnal stress field. Varying proportions of these stress mechanisms plausibly may be related to a time-variable (slowing) NSR rate.

  5. Chronic Bilateral Tibial Stress Fractures with Valgus Treated with Bilateral Intramedullary Nailing: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven K Dailey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress fractures are overuse injuries most commonly seen in athletes, military recruits, and individuals with endocrine abnormalities. It has been demonstrated that chronic cases of anterior tibial stress fractures refractory to conservative management respond well to intramedullary nailing. To our knowledge, only one report has been published concerning patients with bilateral tibial stress fractures treated with bilateral intramedullary nailing. All patients in the series were high-level athletes. We present the case of a non-athletic patient with chronic bilateral tibial stress fractures and associated deformity successfully treated with bilateral intramedullary nails. Case Report: A 23-year-old Caucasian female full-time student presented with chronic bilateral shin pain for approximately five years. She had failed an extensive regimen of conservative management. She was diagnosed with chronic bilateral tibial stress fractures based on history, physical examination, and radiologic findings. She subsequently underwent sequential intramedullary nailing of her tibiae. Both tibiae were in valgus alignment; however, this did not preclude nail placement. The nails deformed upon insertion into the sclerotic canals to conform to the deformation. Post operatively the tibiae united and patient was relieved of her symptoms. Conclusion: Bilateral intramedullary nailing of chronic bilateral tibial stress fractures should be considered as a treatment option for all patients, not just high-level athletes, who fail a trial of conservative management. Additionally, mild to moderate tibial malalignment does not necessarily preclude tibial nailing as the smaller nails placed in sclerotic canals will likely deform on insertion and conform to the canal. Keywords: Bilateral intramedullary nailing, bilateral tibial stress fractures, valgus

  6. Determinants of stress fracture risk in United States Military Academy cadets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosman, Felicia; Ruffing, Jamie; Zion, Marsha; Uhorchak, John; Ralston, Stuart; Tendy, Susan; McGuigan, Fiona E A; Lindsay, Robert; Nieves, Jeri

    2013-08-01

    Prior studies have identified some risk factors for stress fracture in athletes and military recruits. To determine whether historical factors, physical measures, biochemical variables of skeletal metabolism, genetic factors, bone density (BMD) and bone size could predict risk of stress fracture over 4 years in physically fit cadets at the US Military Academy (USMA). Baseline surveys, assessments of height, weight, scores on the Army Physical Fitness Test, and peripheral BMD were obtained in all cadets (755 men, 136 women), and central BMD in a subset. Blood samples were analyzed for variables of calcium homeostasis, bone turnover, and selected hormones and genetic factors. Stress fractures were adjudicated by review of orthopedic notes and imaging reports. 5.7% of male and 19.1% of female cadets had at least 1 stress fracture (58% metatarsal and 29% tibial), most within 3 months of entry to USMA. In males, risk of stress fracture was higher in those who exercised stress fracture risk was seen in those with shorter time since menarche (RR 1.44 per year; CI 1.19, 1.73) and smaller femoral neck diameter (RR 1.16; CI 1.01, 1.33.). Although prior physical training in men, length of prior estrogen exposure in women and leg bone dimensions in both genders played a role, the maximum variance explained by all of these factors was below 10%. We conclude these factors play a minor role in the development of stress fractures in physically fit USMA cadets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bilateral stress fractures of femoral neck in non-athletes: a report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Monappa A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Femoral neck stress fractures (FNSFs are rare, constituting only 5% of all stress fractures in young adults. These fractures are usually seen in athletes, military recruits and patients with underlying metabolic diseases. The treatment of FNSFs is still controversial because of the inherent complications associated with the treatment procedure. We came across 4 cases of bilateral FNSFs in non-athletic individuals who were manual labourers with-out underlying bony disorders. Two patients with FNSFs and coxa vara deformity on both sides were managed by subtrochanteric valgus osteotomy and dynamic hip screw fixation. One of the remaining two patients was treated by cannulated cancellous screw fixation on one side and sub-trochanteric valgus osteotomy on the other side. The fourth patient received subtrochanteric valgus osteotomy on one side and bipolar hemiarthroplasty on the other side after failed cannulated screw fixation. All the fractures healed without any complications. No evidence of avascular ne-crosis or arthritis was noted in our series. Subtrochanteric valgus osteotomy restores normal neck-shaft angle in pa-tients suffering from FNSFs combined with coxa vara deformity. Moreover, it helps to bring the forces acting around the hip to normal biomechanical levels, leading to fracture union and better results. Replacement arthroplasty is recommended to patients who fail to achieve bony union after fixation. Key words: Fractures, stress; Femoral neck fractures; Coxa vara; Osteotomy

  8. Techniques for determining subsurface stress direction and assessing hydraulic fracture azimuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.E.; Peterson, R.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Lorenz, J.C.; Teufel, L.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aslakson, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    This reference paper reviews and describes 15 techniques for determining hydraulic fracture azimuth. The techniques described are categorized into core-based, borehole-based, near-wellbore, and regional geologic indicators that can be used to predict or measure hydraulic fracture azimuth. The core based methods include: (1) circumferential velocity anisotropy, (2) anelastic strain recovery, (3) differential strain curve analysis, (4) axial point load tests, (5) petrographic examination of microcracks, (6) overcoming of archived core, (7) drilling-induced fractures in core, and (8) direct observation of over-cored open-hole stress test fractures. The borehole based techniques include: (9) borehole breakouts, (10) borehole deformation, (11) borehole imaging of drilling induced fractures, and (12) directional gamma ray logging. The near-wellbore techniques provided data on the orientation of the fracture induced during an actual fracture treatment and include: (13) microseismic logging and (14) earth tilt surveys. Finally there are the geologic indicators (Method 15) including earthquake focal mechanisms, fault slip data, surface mapping of neotectonic joints, and volcanic vent alignment. These regional data have been compiled for the World Stress Mapping Project and many maps are available that can be used as a first approximation of stress direction. Experience has shown that the more techniques that can be used in a single well or field, the more reliable the result. The concept or theoretical basis for each technique as well as the benefits and limitations of the techniques are described.

  9. Distribution and natural history of stress fractures in U. S. Marine recruits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greaney, R.B.; Gerber, F.H.; Laughlin, R.L.; Kmet, J.P.; Metz, C.D.; Kilcheski, T.S.; Rao, B.R.; Silverman, E.D.

    1983-02-01

    In a prospective study of stress injuries of the lower extremities of U.S. Marine recruits, researchers derived a frequency distribution of stress fractures. The most frequently fractured bone was the tibia (73%), while the single most common site was the posterior calcaneal tuberosity (21%). The natural history of stress fractures by scintigraphy and radiography has been outlined, showing the evolutionary changes on either study as a universal progression independent of injury site or type of stress. An identical spectrum of changes should be present within any group undergoing intense new exercise. The frequency distribution of stress fractures should be a function of differing forms and intensities of exercise, therefore, our figures should not be applied to other groups. Researchers used the presence of a scintigraphic abnormality at a symptomatic site as the criterion for diagnosis of stress fracture. Since the distribution of skeletal radiotracer uptake is directly dependent on local metabolic activity, it is expected that a focal alteration in bone metabolism will result in a scintigram approaching 100% sensitivity for the abnormality (9). In the proper clinical setting, the specificity should approximate this figure; however, a focal, nonstress-related bone abnormality which has not manifested any radiographic change, such as early osteomyelitis, could result in a false-positive examination. Specificity cannot, therefore, be accurately determined without an actual determination of the pathologic changes within the bone, necessarily involving biopsy.

  10. Influence of shear and deviatoric stress on the evolution of permeability in fractured rock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faoro, Igor; Niemeijer, André|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370832132; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    The evolution of permeability in fractured rock as a function of effective normal stress, shear displacement, and damage remains a complex issue. In this contribution, we report on experiments in which rock surfaces were subject to direct shear under controlled pore pressure and true triaxial stress

  11. Use of Noninvasive Bone Structural Measurements to Evaluate Stress Fracture Susceptibility Among Female Recruits in U.S. Marine Corps Basic Training: Individual Profiles of Stress Fracture Susceptibility Among Female Recruits in U.S. Marine Corps Basic Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaffer, Rick

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to derive predictive models of stress fracture susceptibility in female military recruits by administering a questionnaire highlighting exercise and health habits prior...

  12. Initiation of cleavage in a low alloy steel: effect of a ductile damage localized around inclusions; Declenchement du clivage dans un acier faiblement allie: role de l'endommagement ductile localise autour des inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carassou, S

    2000-07-01

    The fracture mechanism in a low alloy steel, used in the pressurised water reactor vessel, has been studied in the ductile to brittle transition temperature range. We used the local approach of fracture in conjunction with both fractographic observations and numerical simulations. Previous studies suggested the onset of cleavage to be favoured by the presence of nearby manganese sulphide (MnS) clusters: the ductile damaged zone localised inside a cluster increases the stress around it, and so contribute to the triggering of cleavage due to nearby classical sites, like carbides. The experimental study of size dependence and anisotropy on the global fracture behaviour, together with fractographic observations, give here the proof of the influence of MnS clusters on the onset of cleavage in this steel. Fracture behaviour of pre-cracked specimens tested in the transition regime has then been simulated, by three dimensional finite element method computations. Ductile tearing process preceding the cleavage onset at those temperatures regime was well reproduced by the Rousselier's model. Failure probabilities, related to given stress states, has been given by post-processor calculations, using a probabilistic model based on the specific cleavage fracture process. Fracture toughness scatter of the steel, tested in the transition regime, is then well reproduced by those calculations. However, the critical cleavage stress of an elementary volume, that scales for the fracture process, is still assumed to be temperature dependant. Numerical simulations of the local fracture process suggest that this temperature effect can partly be explained by the temperature dependant decrease of the stress amplification due to the MnS clusters. (author)

  13. Preventive osteopathic manipulative treatment and stress fracture incidence among collegiate cross-country athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumm, Lynn F; Janiski, Carrie; Balawender, Jenifer L; Feinstein, Adam

    2013-12-01

    Stress fractures are common among athletes, particularly distance runners, with many theories regarding the etiologic process of stress fractures and various studies identifying risk factors or suggesting preventive techniques. To our knowledge, no previous studies have discussed the possible causative effects of somatic dysfunction or the preventive capabilities of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). To apply a preventive OMT protocol for cross-country athletes to reduce the incidence of stress fractures. Cohort study. Examinations of cross-country athletes at an NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I university were performed by supervising physician-examiners and first- and second-year osteopathic medical students during several consecutive academic years. Athletes re-enrolled in the study each year they continued to be eligible. The intervention included osteopathic structural examination and OMT that focused on somatic dysfunction identified in the pelvis, sacrum, and lower extremities. More than 1800 participant examinations were performed on 124 male and female participants by 3 supervising physician-examiners and 141 osteopathic medical students over the course of 5 consecutive academic years (2004-2005 to 2008-2009). Data from these academic years were compared with data from the previous 8 academic years (1996-1997 to 2003-2004). An average of 20 new participants enrolled yearly. The number of annual stress fractures per team ranged from 0 to 6 for male participants and 1 to 6 for female participants. The cumulative annual incidence of stress fractures for male participants demonstrated a statistically significant decrease from 13.9% (20 of 144) before intervention to 1.0% (1 of 105) after intervention, resulting in a 98.7% relative reduction in stress-fracture diagnosis (P=.019). The cumulative annual incidence for female participants showed a minimal decrease from 12.9% (23 of 178) before intervention to 12.0% (17 of 142) after

  14. Evaluating the Risk of a Fifth Metatarsal Stress Fracture by Measuring the Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimasaki, Yu; Nagao, Masashi; Miyamori, Takayuki; Aoba, Yukihiro; Fukushi, Norifumi; Saita, Yoshitomo; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kim, Sung-Gon; Nozawa, Masahiko; Kaneko, Kazuo; Yoshimura, Masafumi

    2016-03-01

    The fifth metatarsal bone is a common site of stress fractures in soccer athletes. Although several endocrine risk factors for stress fractures have been proposed, the endocrine risks for fifth metatarsal (5-MT) stress fractures have not been evaluated. To evaluate the endocrine risks of fifth metatarsal stress fractures, we conducted a cumulative case-control study. The present study included 37 athletes, of which 18 had a history of a zone 2 or zone 3 fifth metatarsal stress fracture and 19 controls. We analyzed serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), as well as biochemical markers of bone turnover by univariate or multivariate analyses. Logistic regression analyses adjusted for multiple confounders revealed that insufficient serum 25-OHD levels less than 30 ng/mL (odds ratio [OR], 23.3), higher serum PTH levels (OR, 1.01), or higher serum bone-specific isoform of alkaline phosphatase levels (OR, 1.10) rather than serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b were associated with statistically significantly increased odds of 5-MT stress fractures. A postestimation calculation demonstrated that 25-OHD levels of 10 and 20 ng/mL were associated with 5.1 and 2.9 times greater odds for 5-MT stress fractures, respectively. 25-OHD insufficiency was associated with an increased incidence of 5-MT stress fractures. This insight may be useful for intervening to prevent 5-MT stress fractures. Level III, case-control study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Natural Fractures Characterization and In Situ Stresses Inference in a Carbonate Reservoir—An Integrated Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shafiei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we characterized the natural fracture system inferred the state of in situ stress field through an integrated study in a very complex and heterogeneous fractured carbonate reservoir. Relative magnitudes and orientations of the in-situ principal stresses in a naturally fractured carbonate heavy oil field were estimated with a combination of available data (World Stress Map, geological and geotectonic evidence, outcrop studies and techniques (core analysis, borehole image logs and Side View Seismic Location. The estimates made here using various tools and data including routine core analysis and image logs are confirmatory to estimates made by the World Stress Map and geotectonic facts. NE-SW and NW-SE found to be the dominant orientations for maximum and minimum horizontal stresses in the study area. In addition, three dominant orientations were identified for vertical and sub-vertical fractures atop the crestal region of the anticlinal structure. Image logs found useful in recognition and delineation of natural fractures. The results implemented in a real field development and proved practical in optimal well placement, drilling and production practices. Such integrated studies can be instrumental in any E&P projects and related projects such as geological CO2 sequestration site characterization.

  16. Talar body fatigue stress fractures: three cases observed in elite female gymnasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F. [National Institute of Sports Medicine of the Italian Olympic Committee, Rome (Italy); Dragoni, S. [National Institute of Sports Medicine of the Italian Olympic Committee, Rome (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Medicina dello Sport, Rome (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    To introduce and emphasize the clinical and radiological findings of three talar body fatigue stress fractures in competitive athletes. Clinical and radiographic skeletal records of 24,562 athletes taken between 1962 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 6851 files related to acute foot and ankle injuries or chronic post-traumatic sequelae were found. There were 925 (3.76%) stress fatigue fractures selected from the whole collection. Among these there were three cases (0.32%) of talar body stress fractures diagnosed in elite female gymnasts 15 - 17 years old. The negative first radiograph become positive 4-6 weeks later. Scintigraphy was positive at an early stage and consistent for the diagnosis. CT and MRI gave positive results 1-2 weeks after the beginning of symptoms which were always greatly diagnostic. The sports medicine literature lacks reports of talar body fatigue stress fractures. The poor initial sensitivity of radiography makes it problematic to establish an early diagnosis. A wise combination of scintigraphy, CT and MRI has therefore to be relied upon. Familiarity with this rare location for a stress fracture may prevent delayed diagnosis and long-lasting damage, both of which are important factors in competitive athletes. (orig.)

  17. Spondylolisthesis on bilateral pedicle stress fracture in the lumbar spine: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjioui, A; Khazzani, H; Sbihi, S; Bahiri, R; Benchekroune, B; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2011-02-01

    We report the clinical case of a 54-year-old woman presenting radicular low back pain on the right side of L4 associated to spondylolisthesis on L4-L5, without any notion of trauma or spine surgery. Furthermore this patient is regularly seen for benign rheumatoid polyarthritis complicated by steroid-induced osteoporosis. A preventive treatment was implanted with good results on pain improvement and functional capacities. For pedicle fractures the literature review reports several different etiologies: spontaneous fractures, hereditary fractures or stress-related fractures. There was a discussion on the various treatments available and in this case of spondylolisthesis on pedicle fracture a conservative treatment was implemented similar to the one for isthmic spondylolisthesis. It yielded satisfying results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Femoral Neck Stress Fracture: Can MRI Grade Help Predict Return-to-Running Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Lindsay N; McInnis, Kelly C; Palmer, William E

    2016-08-01

    Limited research is available regarding return-to-running (RTR) time after femoral neck stress fractures. While studies have shown the prognostic value of image-based grading scales for stress fractures at other sites, few have included femoral neck stress fractures. To determine if the grade of femoral neck stress fractures based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics correlates with RTR time. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included 24 patients (mean age, 32.9 years; range, 18-51 years) who were diagnosed with 27 femoral neck stress fractures by MRI from 2009 to 2015 at a single sports medicine clinic. All fractures were compression sided and were treated nonoperatively. Charts were reviewed for patient demographics and RTR time. Images were graded from 1 to 4 using the Arendt stress fracture severity scale. Statistical analysis was performed using survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard model to compare the RTR time between grades. Cox regression was repeated, adjusted for age, bone mineral density (BMD), and body mass index (BMI). The mean (±standard error of the mean) RTR time in weeks for patients with fractures graded 1 to 4 was 7.4 ± 2.7 (range, 4-11), 13.8 ± 3.8 (range, 6-21), 14.7 ± 3.5 (range, 8.5-24), and 17.5 ± 3.4 (range, 10-32), respectively. Survival analysis indicated that there was a statistically significant effect of fracture grade on RTR time (P = .0065). The Cox model indicated a statistically significant difference in RTR time between grades 1 and 2 (P = .036), 1 and 3 (P = .014), and 1 and 4 (P = .002). The unadjusted hazard ratio was significant (P = .037). There were no statistically significant differences between the remaining grades (P = .82 for grades 2 and 3, P = .37 for grades 2 and 4, and P = .31 for grades 3 and 4). Age (P = .71) and BMD (P = .81) did not have an effect on RTR time. The hazard ratio remained significant (P = .05) after adjusting for age and BMD. BMI tended to have an effect on

  19. Predicting Fluid Flow in Stressed Fractures: A Quantitative Evaluation of Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihmann, S. A.; Healy, D.

    2015-12-01

    Reliable estimation of fracture stability in the subsurface is crucial to the success of exploration and production in the petroleum industry, and also for wider applications to earthquake mechanics, hydrogeology and waste disposal. Previous work suggests that fracture stability is related to fluid flow in crystalline basement rocks through shear or tensile instabilities of fractures. Our preliminary scoping analysis compares the fracture stability of 60 partly open (apertures 1.5-3 cm) and electrically conductive (low acoustic amplitudes relative to matrix) fractures from a 16 m section of a producing zone in a basement well in Bayoot field, Yemen, to a non-producing zone in the same well (also 16 m). We determine the Critically Stressed Fractures (CSF; Barton et al., 1995) and dilatation tendency (Td; Ferrill et al., 1999). We find that: 1. CSF (Fig. 1) is a poor predictor of high fluid flow in the inflow zone; 88% of the fractures are predicted to be NOT critically stressed and yet they all occur within a zone of high fluid flow rate 2. Td (Fig. 2) is also a poor predictor of high fluid flow in the inflow zone; 67% of the fractures have a LOW Td(mud or a lower density and electrically conductive fill such as clay in the producing zone and therefore appear (partly) open. In situ stress, fluid pressure, rock properties (friction, strength) and fracture orientation data used as inputs for the CSF and Td calculations are all subject to uncertainty. Our results suggest that scope exists to systematically quantify and explore the impacts of these uncertainties for better predictions of geomechanical stability and fluid conductivity in the subsurface.

  20. Stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, M J; Hamilton, W G; Munyak, J; DeFranco, M J

    1996-02-01

    Stress fractures are a frequent injury in ballet companies and the most common location is at the base of the second metatarsal. While previous reports have focused on risk factors for this injury (overtraining, delayed menarche, poor nutrition), there is no published series describing the natural history and outcome following this fracture. We reviewed the office records of the senior author and identified 51 professional dancers (64 fractures) who sustained a stress fracture at the base of the second metatarsal. History of a previous stress fracture in the lower extremity was seen in 19 patients and delayed menarche in the women was common. The clinical presentation was insidious onset of midfoot pain an average of 2.5 weeks prior to seeking medical care. The initial radiographs of the foot were positive in 19 patients, questionable in 3 patients, and negative in 42 patients. The usual location of the fracture was at the proximal metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction (three fractures extended into the tarsometatarsal joint). Treatment consisted of a short leg walking cast for 6 patients, and a wooden shoe and symptomatic treatment for the remainder. At follow-up, 14% of patients still had occasional pain or stiffness in the midfoot with dancing. The patients returned to performance at an average of 6.2 weeks following diagnosis. No patients required bone grafting for persistent symptoms. There were eight refractures (at the same site) occurring an average of 4.3 years, all of which healed with conservative care. Stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal are common in ballet dancers and can usually be treated with symptomatically. The results of this study are discussed in terms of risk factors, the use of a posterior-anterior view of the foot to eliminate overlap at Lisfranc's joint, and our present treatment regimen.

  1. Fracture analysis of concrete plane-stress pull-out tests

    OpenAIRE

    Cervenka, Vladimir; Pukl, Radomir; Eligehausen, Rolf

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a parameter study which was performed for the Round Robin Analysis Of Anchor Bolts organized by RILEM Committee TC-90 FMA (Fracture Mechanics Applications). 18 plane-stress pull-out specimens were analyzed by the computer program SBETA which is based on the finite element method and takes into account nonlinear fracture mechanics. A simplified formula for the design of such anchors is derived.

  2. Greater Polar Moment of Inertia at the Tibia in Athletes Who Develop Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidauer, Lee A.; Binkley, Teresa; Vukovich, Matt; Specker, Bonny

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several previous investigations have determined potential risk factors for stress fractures in athletes and military personnel. Purpose: To determine factors associated with the development of stress fractures in female athletes. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 88 female athletes (cross-country, n = 29; soccer, n = 15; swimming, n = 9; track and field, n = 14; volleyball, n = 12; and basketball, n = 9) aged 18 to 24 years were recruited to participate in a longitudinal bone study and had their left distal tibia at the 4%, 20%, and 66% sites scanned by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Patients included 23 athletes who developed stress fractures during the following year (cases). Whole body, hip, and spine scans were obtained using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Analysis of covariance was used to determine differences in bone parameters between cases and controls after adjusting for height, lower leg length, lean mass, fat mass, and sport. Results: No differences were observed between cases and controls in any of the DXA measurements. Cases had significantly greater unadjusted trabecular bone mineral content (BMC), greater polar moment of inertia (PMI) at the 20% site, and greater cortical BMC at the 66% site; however, after adjusting for covariates, the differences became nonsignificant. When analyses were repeated using all individuals who had ever had a stress fracture as cases (n = 31) and after controlling for covariates, periosteal circumference was greater in the cases than the controls (71.1 ± 0.7 vs 69.4 ± 0.5 mm, respectively; P = .04). Conclusion: A history of stress fractures is associated with larger bones. These findings are important because larger bones were previously reported to be protective against fractures and stress fractures, but study findings indicate that may not always be true. One explanation could be that individuals who sustain stress fractures have

  3. A Case Report of Long-Term Bisphosphonate Therapy and Atypical Stress Fracture of Bilateral Femur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yil Ryun; Kim, Hye Won; Moon, Seock Ho

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of bone resorption and considered as a gold standard and are generally recommended as first-line therapy in patients with osteoporosis. Though bisphosphonates are shown to significantly reduce the risk of vertebral, non-vertebral and hip fractures, recent reports suggest a possible correlation between long-term bisphosphonate therapy and the occurrence of insufficiency fractures owing to prolonged bone turnover suppression. We report a patient with non-traumatic stress fractures of bilateral femoral shafts related to long-term bisphosphonate therapy indicating the need for a critical evaluation of patients with long-term bisphosphonate therapy. PMID:23869343

  4. Patterns of fracture and tidal stresses on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, P.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison of dark band, triple band, and cuspate ridge orientations with the fracture patterns predicted for tidal distortion due to orbital recession and eccentricity is undertaken, to test the hypothesized identification of Europa's lineaments as tidal distortion and planetary volume change fractures. Short, reticule dark bands near the anti-Jove point could be tension cracks caused by orbital eccentricity. Long, arcuate dark bands and triple bands peripheral to the anti-Jove point may be strike-slip faults due to orbital recession. The orientation and distribution of cuspate ridges, if they are compressional, suggests their formation in response to a combination of orbital recession and planetary volume decrease. If surface fracturing is due to tidal deformation, important constraints are exerted by it on Europa's orbital evolution.

  5. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Characteristics of Single Fracture Stress-Seepage Coupling considering Microroughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengtong Di

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of the test among the joint roughness coefficient (JRC of rock fracture, mechanical aperture, and hydraulic aperture proposed by Barton, this paper deduces and proposes a permeability coefficient formula of single fracture stress-seepage coupling considering microroughness by the introduction of effect variables considering the microparticle size and structural morphology of facture surface. Quasi-sandstone fracture of different particle size is made by the laboratory test, and the respective modification is made on the coupled shear-seepage test system of JAW-600 rock. Under this condition, the laboratory test of stress-seepage coupling of fracture of different particle size is carried out. The test results show that, for the different particle-sized fracture surface of the same JRC, the permeability coefficient is different, which means the smaller particle size, the smaller permeability coefficient, and the larger particle size, the larger permeability coefficient; with the increase of cranny hydraulic pressure, the permeability coefficient increases exponentially, and under the same cranny hydraulic pressure, there is relation of power function between the permeability coefficient and normal stress. Meanwhile, according to the theoretical formula, the microroughness coefficient of the fractures with different particle size is obtained by the calculation, and its accuracy and validity are verified by experiments. The theoretical verification values are in good agreement with the measured values.

  6. Stress fractures of the ribs in elite competitive rowers: a report of nine cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragoni, S. [Institute of Sport Medicine and Science of the Italian Olympic Committee, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Giombini, A.; Ripani, M. [University of Motor Sciences, Department of Health, Rome (Italy); Di Cesare, A. [University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rome (Italy); Magliani, G. [Medical Department of the Italian State Police, Rome (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    The objective was to report the clinical and imaging patterns of nine cases of stress fractures of the rib diagnosed in Italian Olympic rowers. Nine patients with stress fractures of the rib detected from 103 (8.7%) Italian team rowers competing between May 2000 and May 2006 were identified based on the database of a sports medicine institute. All athletes were male. They were aged between 17 and 31 years (mean: 24.4). Patient weight, fracture location, rowing side and imaging methods employed were noted. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical examination and Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy. Eight of the 9 fractures were located anterolaterally between the fourth and ninth rib. In 1 of the 5 athletes with standard radiographs, a fracture line was visible and in 4 there was callus formation. In 2 athletes sonography was performed, which detected discontinuity of the rib surface and callus formation (1 case each). Stress fractures of the ribs are relatively common in competitive rowers. They are characterized by increasing lateral chest pain and typical scintigraphic, radiographic and sonographic findings. (orig.)

  7. Posttraumatic stress disorder associated with orthopaedic trauma: a study in patients with extremity fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Choi, Choong Hyeok; Yoon, Sang-Young; Lee, Jin Kyu

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this prospective study were to determine the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a population of young male military conscripts who experienced an extremity long-bone fracture, and to evaluate whether injury-related variables are associated with the development of PTSD. Prospective, nonrandomized comparative study. Level 1 trauma center. A total of 148 men (age older than 18 years) who had 1 or more acute long-bone extremity fractures within 12 months and were seen at the Seoul Regional Military Manpower Center for examination of military conscripts from March 2013 to March 2014, were enrolled. The Korean version of the posttraumatic disorder scale was used to identify aspects of PTSD. The injury-related variables assessed included injury mechanism, fracture location and multiplicity, fracture severity, and the occurrence of joint ankylosis and secondary osteoarthritis. Of the 148 participants, 40 (27.0%) met the criteria for the diagnosis of PTSD. Multivariate logistic linear analysis confirmed that lower extremity fracture, multiple fractures, and a higher pain visual analog scale score were significantly (P = 0.042, P = 0.043 and P fracture, multiple extremity fractures, and higher pain visual analog scale scores were significantly related to the occurrence of PTSD. To achieve an optimal recovery after orthopaedic injury, clinicians must address both physical and psychologic needs of their patients. Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  8. Bilateral stress fracture of the fibulae and periostitis of the tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchie, Hiroyuki; Okada, Kyoji; Nagasawa, Hiroyuki; Chida, Shuichi; Shimada, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    This study describes a unique case of bilateral stress fractures of the fibulae and provides a literature review. A 16-year-old female badminton player presented with pain around the bilateral distal lateral legs. She had mild bilateral varus deformity at the knee joint, and the bilateral ankles showed valgus deformity in standing posture. Radiographs and computed tomography showed periosteal reactions on the bilateral distal fibulae. Technetium-99m bone scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake in the bilateral distal fibulae and the bilateral middle third of the tibiae. A diagnosis of bilateral distal fibular stress fractures was made. She was advised to stop playing badminton until the symptoms disappeared. Varus deformity of the knee and valgus deformity of the ankle may have influenced the mechanism underlying bilateral symmetric stress fractures. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Atypical femoral neck stress fracture in a marathon runner: a case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Femoral neck stress fractures are relatively rare and may present as sports-related injuries. The presentation is variable, and prompt diagnosis facilitates the earliest return to pre-morbid functional activity levels. Delayed detection may precipitate femoral non-union or avascular necrosis, resulting in long-term functional deficit. AIMS: We present the case of a basicervical femoral neck stress fracture occurring in a 23-year-old marathon runner. The pathophysiology and practical management issues related to this unusual injury pattern are discussed. CONCLUSION: The growing interest in amateur athletic activities should raise the index of suspicion for stress fractures of the femoral neck in healthy adults with atypical hip pain. Increased levels of patient education and physician awareness can reduce the incidence of long-term morbidity in cases of this unusual sports-related injury.

  10. Bilateral stress fracture of femoral neck in non-athlete - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubiratan Stefani de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bilateral stress fracture of femoral neck in healthy young patients is an extremely rare entity, whose diagnostic and treatment represent a major challenge. Patients with history of hip pain, even non-athletes or military recruits, should be analyzed to achieve an early diagnosis and prevent possible complications from the surgical treatment. This report describes a 43-year-old male patient, non-athlete, without previous diseases, who developed bilateral stress fracture of femoral neck without displacement. He had a late diagnosis; bilateral osteosynthesis was made using cannulated screws. Although the diagnosis was delayed in this case, the study highlights the importance of the diagnosis of stress fracture, regardless of the activity level of the patients, for the success of the treatment.

  11. Clavicular stress fracture in a cricket fast bowler: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Jeremy AF

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Whilst rare, stress fractures of the clavicle have been described in other sports. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a stress fracture of the clavicle occurring in a cricket fast bowler. Case presentation A 23-year-old professional cricket fast bowler presented with activity related shoulder pain. Imaging demonstrated a stress fracture of the lateral third of the clavicle. This healed with rest and rehabilitation allowing a full return to professional sport. Conclusion This injury is treated with activity modification and technique adaptation. In a professional sportsman, this needs to be recognised early so that return to play can be as quick as possible.

  12. Diagnosis and serial sonography of a proximal fifth metatarsal stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Patrick J; Kaeser, Martha A; Kettner, Norman W

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a fifth metatarsal stress fracture that was not detectable using conventional radiographs and was identified with diagnostic ultrasonography (US), confirmed with computed tomography, and followed through symptom resolution with US. A 68-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic for evaluation of right foot pain. Diagnostic US examination using an 8- to 15-MHz linear array transducer showed increased vascularity, periosteal elevation, and cortical disruption of the proximal diaphysis of the fifth metatarsal suggestive of a stress fracture. The patient was referred to an orthopedic specialist for comanagement. The patient was treated by an orthopedist who confirmed a stress fracture using computed tomography, and she was fit with a short-leg walking boot. Serial US images were obtained to document fracture healing and exclude complications. After 6 months, the patient was asymptomatic and had resumed all of her daily activities. We report a case of a proximal fifth metatarsal stress fracture that was visualized with US and followed through symptom resolution by serial examinations.

  13. Acoustic Emission Based Surveillance System for Prediction of Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    aging are susceptible to such fractures in contexts of osteoporosis, diabetes, cerebral palsy, fibrous dysplasia and osteogenesis imperfecta. This...Proceedings of the ASME 2008 Summer Bioengineering Conference (SBC2008) June 25-29, Marriott Resort, Marco Island, Florida , USA SBC2008-192778

  14. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle, part 1: biomechanics of bone and principles of imaging and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Jacob C; Khurana, Bharti; Smith, Stacy E

    2017-08-01

    A stress fracture is a focal failure of bone induced by the summation of repetitive forces, which overwhelms the normal bone remodeling cycle. This review, the first of two parts, discusses the general principles of stress fractures of the foot and ankle. This includes bone structure, biomechanics of stress applied to bone, bone remodeling, risk factors for stress fracture, and general principles of imaging and treatment of stress fractures. Cortical bone and trabecular bone have a contrasting macrostructure, which leads to differing resistances to externally applied forces. The variable and often confusing imaging appearance of stress fractures of the foot and ankle can largely be attributed to the different imaging appearance of bony remodeling of trabecular and cortical bone. Risk factors for stress fracture can be divided into intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Stress fractures subject to compressive forces are considered low-risk and are treated with activity modification and correction of any modifiable risk factors. Stress fractures subject to tensile forces and/or located in regions of decreased vascularity are considered high risk, with additional treatment options including restricted weight-bearing or surgery.

  15. An integrated workflow for stress and flow modelling using outcrop-derived discrete fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisdom, K.; Nick, H. M.; Bertotti, G.

    2017-06-01

    Fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is often controlled by subseismic-scale fracture networks. Although the fracture network can be partly sampled in the direct vicinity of wells, the inter-well scale network is poorly constrained in fractured reservoir models. Outcrop analogues can provide data for populating domains of the reservoir model where no direct measurements are available. However, extracting relevant statistics from large outcrops representative of inter-well scale fracture networks remains challenging. Recent advances in outcrop imaging provide high-resolution datasets that can cover areas of several hundred by several hundred meters, i.e. the domain between adjacent wells, but even then, data from the high-resolution models is often upscaled to reservoir flow grids, resulting in loss of accuracy. We present a workflow that uses photorealistic georeferenced outcrop models to construct geomechanical and fluid flow models containing thousands of discrete fractures covering sufficiently large areas, that does not require upscaling to model permeability. This workflow seamlessly integrates geomechanical Finite Element models with flow models that take into account stress-sensitive fracture permeability and matrix flow to determine the full permeability tensor. The applicability of this workflow is illustrated using an outcropping carbonate pavement in the Potiguar basin in Brazil, from which 1082 fractures are digitised. The permeability tensor for a range of matrix permeabilities shows that conventional upscaling to effective grid properties leads to potential underestimation of the true permeability and the orientation of principal permeabilities. The presented workflow yields the full permeability tensor model of discrete fracture networks with stress-induced apertures, instead of relying on effective properties as most conventional flow models do.

  16. Quantitative Stress Determination by Wire-line Hydraulic Fracturing Tests in the ANDRILL South McMurdo Sound Drillhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Wilson, T. J.; Pierdominici, S.; Jarrard, R. D.; Paulsen, T. S.; Wonik, T.; Handwerger, D.

    2008-12-01

    In general, knowledge of the state of stress within the Antarctic lithosphere remains largely unconstrained due in part to Antarctica's inaccessibility and because of the paucity of seismic focal mechanism solutions. As such, an important component of the ANDRILL project was to acquire new information on the stress directions and magnitudes within the upper crust. Extensive fracture mapping of the core and oriented ultrasonic televiewer logging, as presented in a related contribution, provided strong constraints on both stress orientations and the faulting regime. The first hydraulic fracturing stress determinations in Antarctica were also carried out to provide complimentary stress magnitudes. These measurements were accomplished using a wireline transported hydraulic fracturing system consisting, essentially, of two synthetic polymer packers that were inflated to isolate the 1-m long pressurization interval. The tests were conducted at the end of the drilling and logging in a ~130-m section specially drilled below 1000 mbsf for hydraulic fractures. This zone was drilled primarily through competent, dense, and low permeability diamicts. The core fracture and televiewer logging information was used to site twenty separate measurements. Classic hydraulic fracturing pressurization records with unambiguous breakdown and fracture closure pressures were obtained in about half of the measurements. The remaining tests provided fracture propagation and closure pressures that are consistent with the classic breakdown curves, but they did not include a clear breakdown pressure and are indicative of the reopening of either natural or drilling induced fractures in the wellbore wall. Comparison of the televiewer images obtained before and after the hydraulic fracturing tests highlighted the existence of at least one artificial hydraulic fracture; more could not be obtained because blockage of the wellbore did not allow the lowest sections to be logged a second time. The

  17. Analysis of the in situ stress contrast impact on a planar hydraulic fracture propagation using the fully coupled poroelastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykin, A. N.; Golovin, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we use a fully coupled model for 3D planar fracture propagation within a poroelastic reservoir in order to analysis the non-symmetry of the fracture as it develops in a 3-layer reservoir with different compressive stresses in each layer. We demonstrate that the fracture predominantly develops in the layer with the lower compressive stress until it gets arrested due to the equality of the total leakoff to the volume of pumped fluid.

  18. Excess Stress Fractures, Musculoskeletal Injuries, and Health Care Utilization Among Unfit and Overweight Female Army Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Margot R; Garvin, Nadia U; Boivin, Michael R; Cowan, David N

    2017-02-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are prevalent among military trainees and certain occupations. Fitness and body mass index (BMI) have been associated with musculoskeletal conditions, including stress fractures. The incidence of, and excess health care utilization for, stress fracture and non-stress fracture overuse musculoskeletal injuries during the first 6 months of service is higher among unfit female recruits. Those who exceeded body fat limits are at a greater risk of incident stress fractures, injuries, or health care utilization compared with weight-qualified recruits. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All applicants to the United States Army were required to take a preaccession fitness test during the study period (February 2005-September 2006). The test included a 5-minute step test scored as pass or fail. BMI was recorded at application. There were 2 distinct comparisons made in this study: (1) between weight-qualified physically fit and unfit women and (2) between weight-qualified physically fit women and those who exceeded body fat limits. We compared the incidence of, and excess health care utilization for, musculoskeletal injuries, including stress fractures and physical therapy visits, during the first 183 days of military service. Among the weight-qualified women, unfit participants had a higher non-stress fracture injury incidence and related excess health care utilization rate compared with fit women, with rate ratios of 1.32 (95% CI, 1.14-1.53) and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.10-1.27), respectively. Among fit women, compared with the weight-qualified participants, those exceeding body fat limits had higher rate ratios for non-stress fracture injury incidence and related excess health care utilization of 1.27 (95% CI, 1.07-1.50) and 1.20 (95% CI, 1.11-1.31), respectively. Weight-qualified women who were unfit had a higher incidence of stress fractures and related excess health care utilization compared with fit women, with rate ratios of 1.62 (95% CI, 1

  19. Effective Stress Approximation using Geomechanical Formulation of Fracturing Technology (GFFT) in Petroleum Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, A.; Asef, M.; Kharrat, R.

    2010-12-01

    Recently, rock mechanics and geophysics contribution in petroleum industry has been significantly increased. Wellbore stability analysis in horizontal wells, sand production problem while extracting hydrocarbon from sandstone reservoirs, land subsidence due to production induced reservoir compaction, reservoir management, casing shearing are samples of these contributions. In this context, determination of the magnitude and orientation of the in-situ stresses is an essential parameter. This paper is presenting new method to estimate the magnitude of in-situ stresses based on fracturing technology data. Accordingly, kirsch equations for the circular cavities and fracturing technology models in permeable formations have been used to develop an innovative Geomechanical Formulation (GFFT). GFFT introduces a direct reasonable relation between the reservoir stresses and the breakdown pressure of fracture, while the concept of effective stress was employed. Thus, this complex formula contains functions of some rock mechanic parameters such as poison ratio, Biot’s coefficient, Young’s modulus, rock tensile strength, depth of reservoir and breakdown/reservoir pressure difference. Hence, this approach yields a direct method to estimate maximum and minimum effective/insitu stresses in an oil field and improves minimum in-situ stress estimation compared to previous studies. In case of hydraulic fracturing; a new stress analysis method is developed based on well known Darcy equations for fluid flow in porous media which improves in-situ stress estimation using reservoir parameters such as permeability, and injection flow rate. The accuracy of the method would be verified using reservoir data of a case history. The concepts discussed in this research would eventually suggest an alternative methodology with sufficient accuracy to derive in-situ stresses in hydrocarbon reservoirs, while no extra experimental work is accomplished for this purpose.

  20. Prediction of tectonic stresses and fracture networks with geomechanical reservoir models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henk, A.; Fischer, K. [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften

    2014-09-15

    This project evaluates the potential of geomechanical Finite Element (FE) models for the prediction of in situ stresses and fracture networks in faulted reservoirs. Modeling focuses on spatial variations of the in situ stress distribution resulting from faults and contrasts in mechanical rock properties. In a first methodological part, a workflow is developed for building such geomechanical reservoir models and calibrating them to field data. In the second part, this workflow was applied successfully to an intensively faulted gas reservoir in the North German Basin. A truly field-scale geomechanical model covering more than 400km{sup 2} was built and calibrated. It includes a mechanical stratigraphy as well as a network of 86 faults. The latter are implemented as distinct planes of weakness and allow the fault-specific evaluation of shear and normal stresses. A so-called static model describes the recent state of the reservoir and, thus, after calibration its results reveal the present-day in situ stress distribution. Further geodynamic modeling work considers the major stages in the tectonic history of the reservoir and provides insights in the paleo stress distribution. These results are compared to fracture data and hydraulic fault behavior observed today. The outcome of this project confirms the potential of geomechanical FE models for robust stress and fracture predictions. The workflow is generally applicable and can be used for modeling of any stress-sensitive reservoir.

  1. Unilateral Pedicle Stress Fracture in a Long-Term Hemodialysis Patient with Isthmic Spondylolisthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Maruo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most unilateral pedicle stress fractures occur on the contralateral side of patients with unilateral spondylolysis. However, there are few reports of unilateral pedicle stress fractures in patients with bilateral spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. We report a unique case of unilateral pedicle stress fracture in a long-term hemodialysis patient with isthmic spondylolisthesis. A 65-year-old man who had undergone hemodialysis presented with lower back pain that had persisted for several years. The patient experienced severe right lower extremity pain with no history of trauma. Computed tomography revealed unilateral pedicle fracture with bilateral L5 spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis with progression of scoliosis. The patient underwent Gill laminectomy of L5 with pedicle screw fixation at L4-S1 and interbody fusion at L5-S1. The patient’s leg pain ceased immediately, and he began walking without leg pain. In our present patient, development of scoliosis caused by destructive spondyloarthropathy may have contributed to a unilateral pedicle fracture.

  2. Pore Pressure and Stress Distributions Around a Hydraulic Fracture in Heterogeneous Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qian; Ghassemi, Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    One of the most significant characteristics of unconventional petroleum bearing formations is their heterogeneity, which affects the stress distribution, hydraulic fracture propagation and also fluid flow. This study focuses on the stress and pore pressure redistributions during hydraulic stimulation in a heterogeneous poroelastic rock. Lognormal random distributions of Young's modulus and permeability are generated to simulate the heterogeneous distributions of material properties. A 3D fully coupled poroelastic model based on the finite element method is presented utilizing a displacement-pressure formulation. In order to verify the model, numerical results are compared with analytical solutions showing excellent agreements. The effects of heterogeneities on stress and pore pressure distributions around a penny-shaped fracture in poroelastic rock are then analyzed. Results indicate that the stress and pore pressure distributions are more complex in a heterogeneous reservoir than in a homogeneous one. The spatial extent of stress reorientation during hydraulic stimulations is a function of time and is continuously changing due to the diffusion of pore pressure in the heterogeneous system. In contrast to the stress distributions in homogeneous media, irregular distributions of stresses and pore pressure are observed. Due to the change of material properties, shear stresses and nonuniform deformations are generated. The induced shear stresses in heterogeneous rock cause the initial horizontal principal stresses to rotate out of horizontal planes.

  3. Coupling stress and reactive transport in fractures: Effects on contacting asperities, permeability and stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokas, K.; Peters, C. A.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Morris, J.; Fitts, J. P.; Deng, H.

    2015-12-01

    The permeability and geomechanical stability of fractured rock can be altered by reactive flow that induces mineral dissolution and/or precipitation. Understanding the coupling of geochemical and geomechanical processes is critical for predicting and identifying leakage pathways for environmentally-relevant fluids in the subsurface. This study couples a two-dimensional reactive transport model with a mechanical deformation model to simulate reaction, flow and deformation in a fractured carbonate rock under subsurface confining pressures. The fracture is represented as a homogenous calcite material subjected to high-pressure reactive CO2-acidified brine, and the dissolution reaction is modeled to be kinetically-limited by carbonic acid. Initial conditions for the simulations were based on fractured Indiana Limestone geometries obtained from xCT data. Simulation of reactive flow results in the enlargement of apertures and reduction in contact area along preferential flow paths, while apertures outside these channelized flow paths remain relatively unchanged. At high confining pressures, contact area occurred mainly in regions where channelization did not occur, resulting in a two- to three-fold reduction in the fracture specific stiffness. Moreover, at high confining stresses, channelized regions were preserved, enabling permeability to remain relatively unchanged compared to non-channelized regions, which in contrast showed an order of magnitude decrease in permeability when stressed. These simulations suggest that differences in dissolution patterns can lead to significant variations in fracture permeability and stiffness when subject to subsurface confining stresses. This work has important applications for geologic carbon sequestration, natural gas storage, hydraulic fracturing, geothermal energy and deep well injection of hazardous waste.

  4. Prevention of brittle fracture of steel structures by controlling the local stress and strain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyseychik Evgeniy Alekseevich

    Full Text Available In the article the author offers a classification of the methods to increase the cold resistance of steel structural shapes with a focus on the regulation of local fields of internal stresses and strains to prevent brittle fracture of steel structures. The need of a computer thermography is highlighted not only for visualization of temperature fields on the surface, but also to control the fields of residual stresses and strains in a controlled element.

  5. Stress Fracture of the Second Metacarpal Bone in a Badminton Player

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Koji; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Ikuo; Uemoto, Harunobu; Hiranaka, Takafumi; Tsuji, Mitsuo; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    We present a rare case of stress fracture of the second metacarpal bone. A14-year-old girl felt pain on the dorsal aspect of the right wrist without any history ofmajor trauma, when she played a smash during a game of badminton. On theradiographs, periost

  6. Experiments and fracture modeling of high-strength pipelines for high and low stress triaxialities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.; Kofiani, K.; Nonn, A.; Wierzbicki, T.; Kalwa, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides results from a comprehensive study on mechanical characterization of high-strength pipeline steel, grade X100 using experimental and numerical methods. The material was characterized for anisotropic plasticity, fracture initiation for various states of stress, (pre-cracked)

  7. Effects of Stretch Shortening Cycle Exercise Fatigue on Stress Fracture Injury Risk during Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C. Roger; Dufek, Janet S.; Bates, Barry T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in landing performance during fatigue that could result in increased stress fracture injury risk. Five participants performed nonfatigued and fatigued drop landings (0.60 m), while ground reaction force (GRF), electromyographic (EMG) activity, and kinematics were recorded. Fatigue was defined as a…

  8. A case of stress fracture of the femoral neck; Przypadek przeciazeniowego zlamania szyjki kosci udowej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walenczak, K.; Widawski, T. [Szpital MSW, Lodz (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    A case of 28 years-old male with stress fracture of the femoral neck is presented. Heterogeneous clinical picture is blamed for diagnostic problems in the initial stage of the disease. Bone scintigraphy aids in the early diagnosis. The use of low frequency electromagnetic field had unquestionable effect on shortening of the treatment time in the case reported. (author). 10 refs, 1 fig.

  9. [Stress fractures in disabled athletes' preparation for the paralympic games in Athens, 2004: an assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboute, E; Druvert, J C; Pailler, D; Piera, J-B

    2008-03-01

    To identify stress fracture frequency and the associated risk factors in disabled female athletes preparing the Paralympic Games in Athens in 2004. The study is focused on four athletes (including one with a vision impairment) among the 31 women selected to participate in the Paralympic Games. The medical records of selected athletes not having been able to participate in the Games due to a stress fracture were analyzed. One case of stress fracture to the first metatarsal was reported of one below-knee amputee and an additional case to the second metatarsal of one hemiplegic athlete. Two of three athletes with physical disability were unable to participate in the Games because of stress fracture occurring during the preparatory phase. Among four athletes selected to take part in the Paralympic Games. If morphological predispositions are inherent to the sportswomen, the main favouring factor to be retained is their running asymmetry. Training programmes must therefore take this characteristic into account and must not offer heavy-load repetitive exercise (such as endurance or jogging) at the expense of technique. Over-intense training exposes the disabled athlete to this type of pathology and is likely to affect his chances of competing.

  10. Residual stress state in pipe cut ring specimens for fracture toughness testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damjanovic, Darko [J.J. Strossmayer Univ. of Osijek, Slavonski Brod (Croatia). Mechanical Engineering Faculty; Kozak, Drazan [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. for Mechanical Design; Marsoner, Stefan [Materials Center, Leoben (Austria).; Gubeljak, Nenad [Maribor Univ. (Slovenia). Chair of Mechanics

    2017-07-01

    Thin-walled pipes are not suitable for measuring fracture toughness parameters of vital importance because longitudinal crack failure is the most common failure mode in pipes. This is due to the impossibility to manufacture standard specimens for measuring fracture toughness, such as SENB or CT specimens, from the thin wall of the pipe. Previous works noticed this problem, but until now, a good and convenient solution has not been found or developed. To overcome this problem, very good alternative solution was proposed, the so-called pipe ring notched bend specimen (PRNB) [1-5]. Until now, only the idealized geometry PRNB specimen is analyzed, i. e., a specimen which is not cut out from an actual pipe but produced from steel plate. Based on that, residual stresses are neglected along with the imperfections in geometry (elliptical and eccentricity). The aim of this research is to estimate the residual stress state(s) in real pipes used in the boiler industry produced by hot rolling technique. These types of pipes are delivered only in normalized condition, but not stress relieved. Therefore, there are residual stresses present due to the manufacturing technique, but also due to uneven cooling after the production process. Within this paper, residual stresses are estimated by three methods: the incremental hole drilling method (IHMD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the splitting method (SM). Knowing the residual stress state in the ring specimen, it is possible to assess their impact on fracture toughness measured on the corresponding PRNB specimen(s).

  11. Are Elite Female Soccer Athletes at Risk for Disordered Eating Attitudes, Menstrual Dysfunction, and Stress Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Hunt, Devyani; McKeon, Kathryn; Simpson, Scott; Meyer, E Blair; Yemm, Ted; Brophy, Robert

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of stress fractures, menstrual dysfunction and disordered eating attitudes in elite female soccer athletes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Female soccer athletes were recruited from a national level youth soccer club, an NCAA Division I university team, and a women's professional team. Two hundred twenty female soccer athletes with a mean age of 16.4 ± 4 years and BMI of 20.8 ± 2 kg/m(2) completed the study, representing all athletes from the included teams. One-time surveys completed by the athletes. Height and weight were recorded, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each athlete. Athletes reported age of menarche, history of missing 3 or more menses within a 12-month period and stress fracture. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to assess the athlete's body perception and attitudes toward eating. Of the 220 soccer athletes, 3 athletes (1.6%) had a low BMI for their age, and 19 (8.6%) reported stress fractures of the lower extremity. Among athletes who had reached menarche, the average onset was 13 + 1 year; menstrual dysfunction were present in 21 (19.3%). On the EAT-26, 1 player scored in the high risk range (>20) and 17 (7.7%) scored in the intermediate risk range (10-19) for eating disorders. Athletes with an EAT-26 score ≥ 10 points had a significantly higher prevalence of menstrual dysfunction in the past year compared to athletes with an EAT-26 score of less than 10 (P = .02). Elite female soccer athletes are susceptible to stress fractures and menstrual dysfunction and have delayed onset of menarche despite normal BMI and appropriate body perception and attitudes towards eating. Further studies are needed to better understand stress fracture risk in female soccer athletes and in other team sports to determine how these findings relate to long-term bone health in this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Association between the stress fracture and bone metabolism/quality markers in lacrosse players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, Kenta; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Suzuki, Yoshio; Maruyama, Asako; Tsuchiya, Yosuke; Shikakura, Jiro; Ochi, Eisuke

    2012-01-01

    Overuse injury including stress fracture is a serious problem for athletes. Recently, the importance of bone metabolism and quality as factors preventing overuse injury has been increasingly recognized. Hence, we hypothesized that markers of bone metabolism and quality are related to overuse injuries. The subjects, which were elite university lacrosse players (male, n = 35; age, 19.8 ± 1.1; female, n = 49; age, 20.0 ± 1.0), were divided into a stress fracture group and a control group. We measured the subjects' physical characteristics (height, weight, body mass index, and body fat) and bone architecture was evaluated using quantitative ultrasound. Bone alkaline phosphatase, N-telopeptide cross-link of type I collagen, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP-5b), homocysteine, and pentosidine were measured from blood samples obtained from all subjects. No significant difference was observed between groups with respect to height, weight, body mass index, and body fat, as well as quantitative ultrasound. Further, there were no significant differences in the levels of bone alkaline phosphatase, N-telopeptide cross-link of type I collagen, or TRAP-5b between stress fracture and control groups in all subjects and in male subjects. However, a significant increase in TRAP-5b level was observed in the stress fracture group compared with the control in the female subjects (409.9 ± 209.3 and 318.6 ± 81.6 mU/dL, respectively; P athletes with stress fractures may be enhanced by TRAP-5b.

  13. Displacement and stress fields around rock fractures opened by irregular overpressure variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigekazu eKusumoto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many rock fractures are entirely driven open by fluids such as ground water, geothermal water, gas, oil, and magma. These are a subset of extension fractures (mode I cracks; e.g., dikes, mineral veins and joints referred to as hydrofractures. Field measurements show that many hydrofractures have great variations in aperture. However, most analytical solutions for fracture displacement and stress fields assume the loading to be either constant or with a linear variation. While these solutions have been widely used, it is clear that a fracture hosted by heterogeneous and anisotropic rock is normally subject to loading that is neither constant nor with a linear variation. Here we present new general solutions for the displacement and stress fields around hydrofractures, modelled as two-dimensional elastic cracks, opened by irregular overpressure variations given by the Fourier cosine series. Each solution has two terms. The first term gives the displacement and stress fields due to the average overpressure acting inside the crack; it is given by the initial term of the Fourier coefficients expressing the overpressure variation. The second term gives the displacement and stress fields caused by the overpressure variation; it is given by general terms of the Fourier coefficients and solved through numerical integration. Our numerical examples show that the crack aperture variation closely reflects the overpressure variation. Also, that the general displacement and stress fields close to the crack follow the overpressure variation but tend to be more uniform far from the crack. The present solutions can be used to estimate the displacement and stress fields around any fluid-driven crack, that is, any hydrofracture, as well as its aperture, provided the variation in overpressure can be described by Fourier series. The solutions add to our understanding of local stresses, displacements, and fluid transport associated with hydrofractures in the crust.

  14. Cleavage of Bid by executioner caspases mediates feed forward amplification of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization during genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Shary N; Shawgo, Mary E; Robertson, John D

    2009-04-24

    The extent to which the BH3-only protein Bid is important for intrinsic (mitochondria-mediated) apoptotic cell death induced by genotoxic stress remains controversial. In the present study, we examine this issue using a panel of gene-manipulated Bax-deficient Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Cells stably depleted of Bid were far less sensitive than control-transfected cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis. In particular, drug-induced Bak activation, cytochrome c release, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and caspase activation were all decreased in cells lacking Bid. Reconstitution experiments using recombinant proteins and permeabilized Bid-deficient cells demonstrated that truncated Bid (tBid), but not full-length Bid, potently induced Bak activation and the release of cytochrome c. Further, caspase-8-deficient Jurkat cells efficiently cleaved Bid and were sensitive to drug-induced apoptosis. By comparison, Apaf-1-deficient cells, as well as cells overexpressing full-length X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) or the BIR1/BIR2 domains of XIAP, failed to cleave Bid in response to genotoxic stress. These data suggest that tBid plays an important regulatory role in the execution of DNA damage-induced cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the fact that cleavage of Bid to tBid is mediated by executioner caspases suggests that a self-amplifying feed forward loop involving caspases, Bid, and mitochondria may help determine irreversible commitment to apoptosis.

  15. Intrapartum sacral stress fracture due to pregnancy-related osteoporosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Aydoğ, Ece

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) and hip pain frequently occur during pregnancy and postpartum period. Although pelvic and mechanic lesions of the soft tissues are most responsible for the etiology, sacral fracture is also one of the rare causes. A 32-year-old primigravid patient presented with LBP and right hip pain which started 3 days after vaginal delivery. Although direct radiographic examination was normal, magnetic resonance imaging of the sacrum revealed sacral stress fracture. Lumbar spine and femoral bone mineral density showed osteoporosis as a risk factor. There were no other risk factors such as trauma, excessive weight gain, and strenuous physical activity. It is considered that the patient had sacral fatigue and insufficiency fracture in intrapartum period. The patient's symptoms subsided in 3 months after physical therapy and rest. In conclusion, sacral fractures during pregnancy and postpartum period, especially resulting from childbirth, are very rare. To date, there are two cases in the literature. In cases who even do not have risk factors related to vaginal delivery such as high birth weight infant and the use of forceps, exc., sacral fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of LBP and hip pain started soon after child birth. Pregnancy-related osteoporosis may lead to fracture during vaginal delivery.

  16. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fracture resistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information in archival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. In fact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralized tissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled, there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. The present study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel set of in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving a double-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whether the critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locally stress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used to characterize the notion of ''plasticity'' in dentin and the interaction of cracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed that fracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that the presence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this process of crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to be critical steps in the development of a micromechanical model for the fracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence of both the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  17. Photoelastic stress analysis assisted evaluation of fracture toughness in hydrothermally aged epoxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitarresi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work has investigated the fracture toughness of a model DGEBA epoxy system subject to Hidro-Thermal aging. A Photoelastic Stress Analysis technique has been implemented, showing the evolution of stresses arising throughout the water uptake process due to the non-uniform swelling of the material. Gravimetric and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analyses have further complemented the characterization, showing the onset of plasticization effects with aging. The correlation of all previous characterizations has allowed to conclude that an increase of KIC fracture toughness is obtained at the fully saturated condition. In particular Photoelasticity has also revealed the onset of relevant swelling induced stresses during the first stages of water absorption, leading to an increase of fracture toughness due to compressive stresses settling near the crack tip. A stress free condition is instead reestablished at the later stages of absorption, suggesting that the increased toughness of the saturated material is an effect of the modifications induced by aging on the polymer structure.

  18. Epidemiology of stress fracture injuries among US high school athletes, 2005-2006 through 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changstrom, Bradley G; Brou, Lina; Khodaee, Morteza; Braund, Cortney; Comstock, R Dawn

    2015-01-01

    High school athletes in the United States sustain millions of injuries annually, approximately 10% of which are fractures. However, there is no clear estimate of the number of stress fractures sustained by high school athletes annually despite reports that stress fractures account for 0.7% to 20% of injuries seen in sports medicine clinics. This suggests a high utilization of resources for a potentially preventable injury. In addition, stress fractures have been associated with low energy availability and disordered eating in young athletes, highlighting the importance of early recognition and intervention. To investigate stress fracture rates and patterns in a large national sample of US high school athletes. Descriptive epidemiologic study. Data from High School RIO (Reporting Information Online), a national sports injury surveillance study, were analyzed to describe rates and patterns of stress fracture injury sustained from 2005-2006 through 2012-2013, across sports and by sex. From 2005-2006 through 2012-2013, a total of 51,773 injuries were sustained during 25,268,873 athlete-exposures, of which 389 (0.8%) were stress fractures, resulting in an overall stress fracture rate of 1.54 per 100,000 athlete-exposures. Rates per 100,000 athlete-exposures were highest in girls' cross country (10.62), girls' gymnastics (7.43), and boys' cross country (5.42). In sex-comparable sports, girls sustained more stress fractures (63.3%) than did boys (36.7%) and had higher rates of stress fracture (2.22 vs 1.27; rate ratio, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.38-2.23). The most commonly injured sites were the lower leg (40.3% of all stress fractures), foot (34.9%), and lower back/lumbar spine/pelvis (15.2%). Management was nonsurgical in 98.7% of the cases, and 65.3% of injuries resulted in ≥3 weeks of time loss, medical disqualification, or an end to the season before athletes could return to play. Although a rare injury, stress fractures cause considerable morbidity for high school athletes

  19. Geochemical controls on the kinetics of quartz fracture at subcritical tensile stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Patricia M.

    1995-11-01

    A new kinetic model links physical and chemical controls on the subcritical fracture kinetics of quartz from the assumption that molecular level reactions governing fracture and dissolution proceed by similar pathways. The model formulation combines fracture theory with a mechanistically based description of chemical, thermal, and tensile stress effects on reactivity in aqueous environments. Water, as a vapor or liquid, promotes rupture of Si-O bonds by end-member processes: (1) reaction of a protonated surface with molecular water and (2) reaction of hydroxyl ions at an ionized surface. In humid environments, reaction frequency is determined by water accessibility to the crack tip. In wetted environments, the relative contributions of these mechanisms are determined by bulk solution composition which affects surface ionization and sol vent-surf ace interactions. The macroscopic fracture rate law is given in meters per second by the fractional sum of these end-member reaction mechanisms per a first-order equation. Agreement of this empirical rate expression with reported measurements of quartz fracture rates suggests the model is robust. It gives a good fit to fracture rates over 6 orders of magnitude and explains increasing rates with increasing solution pH, the dependence of rate upon crystallographic direction, and thermal dependence of rate over 20° to 80°C. Findings in this study suggest that (1) fracture models based upon changes in surface free energy with solution composition are macroscopic descriptions of solvent-surface interactions and parallel the mechanistic model presented here; (2) faster fracture rates observed in basic solutions are not facilitated by decreases in the activation barrier but are due to a transition in the solvent-surface reaction to give a higher reaction frequency and (3) power law expressions applied to fracture rate versus stress intensity measurements may not have direct mechanistic significance since log-linear relations

  20. Spontaneous Subtrochanteric Femoral Stress Fracture Related to Alendronate : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul CC Chew

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous atypical fractures of the femur have been reported in patients on long-term antiresorptive bisphosphonate therapy. Here, we report a case of subtrochanteric stress fracture in a seventy-year-old female patient on long-term alendronate therapy, and accompanying management challenges. Potential measures to prevent this complication of antiresorptive treatment for osteoporosis include the following: setting strict criteria for prescribing antiresorptive therapy, limiting the duration of continuous antiresorptive therapy, and increasing the use of bone anabolic agents.

  1. Tension Band Plating for Chronic Anterior Tibial Stress Fractures in High-Performance Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbeda, Robert M; Sculco, Peter K; Urch, Ekaterina Y; Lazaro, Lionel E; Borens, Olivier; Williams, Riley J; Lorich, Dean G; Wellman, David S; Helfet, David L

    2015-07-01

    Anterior tibial stress fractures are associated with high rates of delayed union and nonunion, which can be particularly devastating to a professional athlete who requires rapid return to competition. Current surgical treatment strategies include intramedullary nailing, which has satisfactory rates of fracture union but an associated risk of anterior knee pain. Anterior tension band plating is a biomechanically sound alternative treatment for these fractures. Tension band plating of chronic anterior tibial stress fractures leads to rapid healing and return to physical activity and avoids the anterior knee pain associated with intramedullary nailing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 13 chronic anterior tibial stress fractures in 12 professional or collegiate athletes who underwent tension band plating after failing nonoperative management. Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, injury history, and surgical details. Radiographs were used to assess time to osseous union. Follow-up notes and phone interviews were used to determine follow-up time, return to training time, and whether the patient was able to return to competition. Cases included 13 stress fractures in 12 patients (9 females, 3 males). Five patients were track-and-field athletes, 4 patients played basketball, 2 patients played volleyball, and 1 was a ballet dancer. Five patients were Division I collegiate athletes and 7 were professional or Olympic athletes. Average age at time of surgery was 23.6 years (range, 20-32 years). Osseous union occurred on average at 9.6 weeks (range, 5.3-16.9 weeks) after surgery. Patients returned to training on average at 11.1 weeks (range, 5.7-20 weeks). Ninety-two percent (12/13) eventually returned to preinjury competition levels. Thirty-eight percent (5/13) underwent removal of hardware for plate prominence. There was no incidence of infection or nonunion. Anterior tension band plating for chronic tibial stress

  2. Fracture strength of porous ceramics: stress concentration vs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we have reviewed recently published strength-porosity data of porous ceramics, and compared these data with those computed from both the minimum contact solid area (MCA) and the pore stress concentration effect (SCE) models. We observed that the theoretical data (MCA model) matched better the ...

  3. Increased oxidative stress response in granulocytes from older patients with a hip fracture may account for slow regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Ehnert, Sabrina; Ihle, Christoph; Schyschka, Lilianna; Pscherer, Stefan; Nussler, Natascha C; Braun, Karl F; Van Griensven, Martijn; Wang, Guobin; Burgkart, Rainer; Stöckle, Ulrich; Gebhard, Florian; Vester, Helen; Nussler, Andreas K

    2014-01-01

    Proximal femur fracture, a typical fracture of the elderly, is often associated with morbidity, reduced quality of life, impaired physical function and increased mortality. There exists evidence that responses of the hematopoietic microenvironment to fractures change with age. Therefore, we investigated oxidative stress markers and oxidative stress-related MAPK activation in granulocytes from the young and the elderly with and without fractured long bones. Lipid peroxidation levels were increased in the elderly controls and patients. Aged granulocytes were more sensitive towards oxidative stress induced damage than young granulocytes. This might be due to the basally increased expression of SOD-1 in the elderly, which was not further induced by fractures, as observed in young patients. This might be caused by an altered MAPK activation. In aged granulocytes basal p38 and JNK activities were increased and basal ERK1/2 activity was decreased. Following fracture, JNK activity decreased, while ERK1/2 and p38 activities increased in both age groups. Control experiments with HL60 cells revealed that the observed p38 activation depends strongly on age. Summarizing, we observed age-dependent changes in the oxidative stress response system of granulocytes after fractures, for example, altered MAPK activation and SOD-1 expression. This makes aged granulocytes vulnerable to the stress stimuli of the fracture and following surgery.

  4. A Scaphoid Stress Fracture in a Female Collegiate-Level Shot-Putter and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Kohring

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scaphoid stress fractures are rare injuries that have been described in young, high-level athletes who exhibit repetitive loading with the wrist in extension. We present a case of an occult scaphoid stress fracture in a 22-year-old female Division I collegiate shot-putter. She was successfully treated with immobilization in a thumb spica splint for 6 weeks. Loaded wrist extension activities can predispose certain high-level athletes to sustain scaphoid stress fractures, and a high index of suspicion in this patient population may aid prompt diagnosis and management of this rare injury.

  5. The impact of in-situ stress and outcrop-based fracture geometry on hydraulic aperture and upscaled permeability in fractured reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    and permeability, where hydraulic opening is maximum for an angle of 15°. At this angle, the fracture experiences a minor amount of shear displacement that allows the fracture to remain open even when fluid pressure is lower than the local normal stress. Averaging the heterogeneous aperture to scale up......Aperture has a controlling impact on porosity and permeability and is a source of uncertainty in modeling of naturally fractured reservoirs. This uncertainty results from difficulties in accurately quantifying aperture in the subsurface and from a limited fundamental understanding of the mechanical...... and diagenetic processes that control aperture. In the absence of cement bridges and high pore pressure, fractures in the subsurface are generally considered to be closed. However, experimental work, outcrop analyses and subsurface data show that some fractures remain open, and that aperture varies even along...

  6. Dietary Intake and Stress Fractures Among Elite Male Combat Recruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    Center, Jerusalem, ISRAEL Aff4 The, Orthopaedic Department, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zerifin and The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University...prohibited and their use was not monitored. Formally, recruits were allowed to get additional snacks at the canteen , but they were not given access to the... canteen on a regular basis. They might also have eaten extra food sent by relatives. Injury assessment Injury surveillance and bone stress injury

  7. Critical fracturing phenomenon in heterogeneous materials under external mechanical stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jei, Y.; Ouaskit, S.; Nassif et, R.; Boughaleb, Y.; Nechad, H.; El Guerjouma, R.

    2005-12-01

    We analyzed experiments designed for industrial applications in order to test the concept that in heterogeneous materials such as fiber composites concrete subjected to an external mechanical stress rupture is a genuine critical point. This prediction has been tested extensively on heterogeneous materials bases polymer from acoustic emission measurements. The investigating consists in simulating the two-dimensional model of a spring network. Also the bond percolation concept has been very helpful in the interpretation of the numerical results.

  8. Stress intensity factors as the fracture parameters for delamination crack growth in composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, W. T.; Atluri, S. N.

    A ``mutual integral'' approach is used to calculate the mixed-mode stress intensity factors for a free-edge delamination crack in a laminate under tensile loading conditions. This ``mutual integral'' approach, for generalized plane strain conditions, is based on the application of the path-independent J integral to a linear combination of three solutions: one, the problem of the laminate to be solved using the quasi 3-D finite element method, the second, an ``auxiliary'' solution with a known asymptotic singular solution, and the third, the particular solution due to the out-of-plane loading. A comparison with the exact solutions is made to determine the accuracy and efficiency of this numerical method. With this ``mutual integral'' approach, it was found that the calculated mixed-mode stress intensity factors of the free-edge delamination crack remain relatively constant as the crack propagates into the laminate. It was also found that the fracture criterion based on the mixed-mode stress intensity factors is more consistent with the experimental observations than the criterion based on the total energy release rate, and hence demonstrates the importance of the ability to calculate each individual component of the stress intensity factors. Furthermore, it was found that the fracture toughness measurements from double cantilever beam specimens can be used directly to predict the onset of delamination crack growth between two dissimilar laminae. Using these fracture toughness measurements from the double cantilever beam specimens, some examples are given to show that the fracture criterion based on the mixed-mode stress intensity factors can accurately predict the failure load for various laminates under tensile loading conditions.

  9. Numerical Investigation of the Time-Dependent and the Proppant Dominated Stress Shadow Effects in a Transverse Multiple Fracture System and Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a numerical study is conducted to investigate the stress shadow effects (stress reorientation and change during hydraulic fracturing in a transverse multiple fracture system. A numerical model is used for the numerical study. It is a 3D model and can simulate the fracture operation from injection begin to full closure (fracture contact. Therefore, there is no need to assume the fracture geometry for the investigation of the stress shadow effects (unlike previous studies. In the numerical study, the first and second operations in a fictive transverse multiple fracture system are simulated, meanwhile the stress shadow effects and their influences on the propagation and proppant placement of the second fracture are investigated. According to the results, the following conclusions are discerned: (1 most proppants are located in the lower part of the reservoir, even below the perforation; (2 the stress shadow effects are time-dependent and proppant dominated; (3 the stress shadow effects affect the fracture propagation and the proppant placement of the second fracture, and also the fracture conductivity of the first fracture; (4 the time-dependent stress shadow effects can be divided into four phases, fracture enlargement, closure without proppant contact, closure with proppant contact and full closure; and (5 the superposition effect of the stress shadow in a transverse multiple fracture system exists. According to the conclusions, some optimizations are recommended.

  10. Reference point indentation is not indicative of whole mouse bone measures of stress intensity fracture toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriero, Alessandra; Bruse, Jan L; Oldknow, Karla J; Millán, José Luis; Farquharson, Colin; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-12-01

    Bone fragility is a concern for aged and diseased bone. Measuring bone toughness and understanding fracture properties of the bone are critical for predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease and for preclinical testing of therapies. A reference point indentation technique (BioDent) has recently been developed to determine bone's resistance to fracture in a minimally invasive way by measuring the indentation distance increase (IDI) between the first and last indentations over cyclic indentations in the same position. In this study, we investigate the relationship between fracture toughness KC and reference point indentation parameters (i.e. IDI, total indentation distance (TID) and creep indentation distance (CID)) in bones from 38 mice from six types (C57Bl/6, Balb, oim/oim, oim/+, Phospho1(-/-) and Phospho1 wild type counterpart). These mice bone are models of healthy and diseased bone spanning a range of fracture toughness from very brittle (oim/oim) to ductile (Phospho1(-/-)). Left femora were dissected, notched and tested in 3-point bending until complete failure. Contralateral femora were dissected and indented in 10 sites of their anterior and posterior shaft surface over 10 indentation cycles. IDI, TID and CID were measured. Results from this study suggest that reference point indentation parameters are not indicative of stress intensity fracture toughness in mouse bone. In particular, the IDI values at the anterior mid-diaphysis across mouse types overlapped, making it difficult to discern differences between mouse types, despite having extreme differences in stress intensity based toughness measures. When more locations of indentation were considered, the normalised IDIs could distinguish between mouse types. Future studies should investigate the relationship of the reference point indentation parameters for mouse bone in other material properties of the bone tissue in order to determine their use for measuring bone quality. Copyright © 2014

  11. The impact of different aperture distribution models and critical stress criteria on equivalent permeability in fractured rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Predicting equivalent permeability in fractured reservoirs requires an understanding of the fracture network geometry and apertures. There are different methods for defining aperture, based on outcrop observations (power law scaling), fundamental mechanics (sublinear length-aperture scaling......-world large-scale fracture networks. (Sub)linear length scaling predicts the largest average aperture and equivalent permeability. Barton-Bandis aperture is smaller, predicting on average a sixfold increase compared to matrix permeability. Application of critical stress criteria results in a decrease...

  12. Plate Versus Intramedullary Nail Fixation of Anterior Tibial Stress Fractures: A Biomechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markolf, Keith L; Cheung, Edward; Joshi, Nirav B; Boguszewski, Daniel V; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R

    2016-06-01

    Anterior midtibial stress fractures are an important clinical problem for patients engaged in high-intensity military activities or athletic training activities. When nonoperative treatment has failed, intramedullary (IM) nail and plate fixation are 2 surgical options used to arrest the progression of a fatigue fracture and allow bone healing. A plate will be more effective than an IM nail in preventing the opening of a simulated anterior midtibial stress fracture from tibial bending. Controlled laboratory study. Fresh-frozen human tibias were loaded by applying a pure bending moment in the sagittal plane. Thin transverse saw cuts, 50% and 75% of the depth of the anterior tibial cortex, were created at the midtibia to simulate a fatigue fracture. An extensometer spanning the defect was used to measure the fracture opening displacement (FOD) before and after the application of IM nail and plate fixation constructs. IM nails were tested without locking screws, with a proximal screw only, and with proximal and distal screws. Plates were tested with unlocked bicortical screws (standard compression plate) and locked bicortical screws; both plate constructs were tested with the plate edge placed 1 mm from the anterior tibial crest (anterior location) and 5 mm posterior to the crest. For the 75% saw cut depth, the mean FOD values for all IM nail constructs were 13% to 17% less than those for the saw cut alone; the use of locking screws had no significant effect on the FOD. The mean FOD values for all plate constructs were significantly less than those for all IM nail constructs. The mean FOD values for all plates were 28% to 46% less than those for the saw cut alone. Anterior plate placement significantly decreased mean FOD values for both compression and locked plate constructs, but the mean percentage reductions for locked and unlocked plates were not significantly different from each other for either plate placement. The percentage FOD reductions for all plate

  13. Revisiting fracture gradient: Comments on “A new approaching method to estimate fracture gradient by correcting Matthew–Kelly and Eaton's stress ratio”

    KAUST Repository

    Hakiki, Farizal

    2017-07-25

    A study performed by Marbun et al. [1] claimed that “A new methodology to predict fracture pressure from former calculations, Matthew–Kelly and Eaton are proposed.” Also, Marbun et al.\\'s paper stated that “A new value of Poisson\\'s and a stress ratio of the formation were generated and the accuracy of fracture gradient was improved.” We found those all statements are incorrect and some misleading concepts are revealed. An attempt to expose the method of fracture gradient determination from industry practice also appears to solidify that our arguments are acceptable to against improper Marbun et al.\\'s claims.

  14. Calcaneal stress fracture: an adverse event following total hip and total knee arthroplasty: a report of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Takaaki; Miki, Takahito; Nishiyama, Akihiro

    2014-01-15

    Stress fractures have been reported to occur in the pubis, femoral neck, proximal part of the tibia, and fabella during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty. However, to our knowledge, calcaneal stress fractures after total hip or total knee arthroplasty have not been reported in the English-language literature. Most orthopaedic surgeons are not familiar with calcaneal stress fractures that may occur in elderly patients after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features, imaging findings, and bone mineral content of the proximal part of the femur and the distal end of the radius in five patients who had a calcaneal stress fracture after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. All patients were women with a mean age of 76.8 years. All fractures occurred in the calcaneus on the same side as the arthroplasty. The fracture appeared at a mean of 10.2 weeks postoperatively. All patients reported heel pain on walking. Swelling and local heat were found in four and three patients, respectively. Pain was elicited by squeezing the calcaneus in all patients. Early radiographs had normal findings in two patients, and an irregular sclerotic line appeared later in the radiographs of all patients. All fractures were treated conservatively. Four fractures healed uneventfully, but one fracture displaced. All patients had osteoporosis. Calcaneal stress fractures during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty may not be as rare as previously thought. Because clinical symptoms of the fracture appear insidiously and radiographic findings are absent or subtle in the early stage, a high index of suspicion is needed for orthopaedic surgeons to make the correct diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging or repeated radiographs may be necessary to make the correct diagnosis when no abnormality is apparent on the initial radiograph.

  15. Distribution of stress drop, stiffness, and fracture energy over earthquake rupture zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Joe B.; McGarr, A.

    2006-01-01

    Using information provided by slip models and the methodology of McGarr and Fletcher (2002), we map static stress drop, stiffness (k = ????/u, where ???? is static stress drop and u is slip), and fracture energy over the slip surface to investigate the earthquake rupture process and energy budget. For the 1994 M6.7 Northridge, 1992 M7.3 Landers, and 1995 M6.9 Kobe earthquakes, the distributions of static stress drop show strong heterogeneity, emphasizing the importance of asperities in the rupture process. Average values of static stress drop are 17, 11, and 4 Mpa for Northridge, Landers, and Kobe, respectively. These values are substantially higher than estimates based on simple crack models, suggesting that the failure process involves the rupture of asperities within the larger fault zone. Stress drop as a function of depth for the Northridge and Landers earthquakes suggests that stress drops are limited by crustal strength. For these two earthquakes, regions of high slip are surrounded by high values of stiffness. Particularly for the Northridge earthquake, the prominent patch of high slip in the central part of the fault is bordered by a ring of high stiffness and is consistent with expectations based on the failure of an asperity loaded at its edge due to exterior slip. Stiffness within an asperity is inversely related to its dimensions. Estimates of fracture energy, based on static stress drop, slip, and rupture speed, were used to investigate the nature of slip weakening at four locations near the hypocenter of the Kobe earthquake for comparison with independent results based on a dynamic model of this earthquake. One subfault updip and to the NE of the hypocenter has a fracture energy of 1.1 MJ/m2 and a slip-weakening distance, Dc, of 0.66 m. Right triangles, whose base and height are Dc and the dynamic stress drop, respectively, approximately overlie the slip-dependent stress given by Ide and Takeo (1997) for the same locations near the hypocenter. The

  16. Proximal base stress fracture of the second metatarsal in a Highland dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hannah Isabella; O'Donnell, Barry; Hopper, Graeme Philip; Chang, Winston

    2013-06-26

    A 15-year-old female Highland dancer presented to the accident and emergency department with an ankle inversion injury on a background of several weeks of pain in the right foot. A radiograph of the right foot demonstrated a stress fracture at the base of the second metatarsal. She was treated conservatively with a below knee removable supportive walking boot with a rocker bottom sole. She re-presented to the accident and emergency department 3 weeks later with pins and needles in the right foot; she was given crutches to use along side the supportive walking boot. Radiographs 12 weeks after the first presentation showed healing of the stress fracture. The patient was now asymptomatic of the injury. She was unable to fully train for 12 weeks due to the injury. Conservative management was successful in this patient.

  17. Stress fracture of the second metacarpal bone in a badminton player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Koji; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Ikuo; Uemoto, Harunobu; Hiranaka, Takafumi; Tsuji, Mitsuo; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2008-07-18

    We present a rare case of stress fracture of the second metacarpal bone. A 14-year-old girl felt pain on the dorsal aspect of the right wrist without any history of major trauma, when she played a smash during a game of badminton. On the radiographs, periosteal reaction was detected on the ulnar aspect of the base of the second metacarpal bone. She was treated conservatively and she returned to the original activity level.

  18. Stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphysis in an elite junior badminton player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, K T; Batt, M E

    1997-01-01

    An elite junior badminton player presented with a chronic painful dominant shoulder after an intense training course. An acute stress fracture to the proximal humeral epiphysis was found. Two-plane radiography will identify abnormalities of the growth plate but comparative films of the unaffected side may also be required to differentiate subtle changes. Rest with subsequent rehabilitation is the appropriate management of these injuries although ideally they should be subjected to primary prevention. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9298564

  19. Association between the stress fracture and bone metabolism/quality markers in lacrosse players

    OpenAIRE

    Wakamatsu, Kenta; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Suzuki, Yoshio; Maruyama, Asako; Tsuchiya, Yosuke; Shikakura, Jiro; Ochi, Eisuke

    2012-01-01

    Kenta Wakamatsu,1 Keishoku Sakuraba,1 Yoshio Suzuki,2 Asako Maruyama,2 Yosuke Tsuchiya,3 Jiro Shikakura,2 Eisuke Ochi31Department of Sports Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan; 2School of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University, Chiba, Japan; 3Laboratory of Health and Sports Sciences, Meiji Gakuin University, Kanagawa, JapanBackground: Overuse injury including stress fracture is a serious problem for athletes. Recently, the importance of bone metabo...

  20. Multi-scale finite element modelling at the posterior lumbar vertebra: analysis of pedicle stresses due to pars fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inceoğlu, Serkan; Mageswaran, Prasath

    2014-05-01

    Multi-scale finite element (FE) model is a cost-effective way to analyse stress response of micro-level structures to the changes in loading at macro-level. This study deals with the development of a multi-scale model of a human vertebra and stress changes in the pedicle at high resolution after a gross fracture at the posterior neural arch. Spondylolysis (pars fracture) is a painful condition occurring in the vertebral neural arch and common especially among the athletic young population. The fracture of the pars significantly alters load distribution and load transfer characteristics at the neural arch. Structural changes in the posterior vertebra due to the new loading patterns can trigger secondary complications. Clinical reports have shown the association of pedicle hypertrophy or pedicle fracture with unilateral pars fractures. However, the biomechanical consequences of pars fracture and its effect on the pedicle have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we prepared a multi-scale model of posterior vertebra with continuum laminar complex model combined with micro-FE model of a pedicle section. The results showed that stress at the contralateral pars and pedicle increased after unilateral pars fracture simulation. High-stress regions were found around the outer boundaries of the pedicle. This model and information are helpful in understanding the stress changes in the pedicle and can be used for adaptive remodelling studies.

  1. Hydrologic effects of stress-relief fracturing in an Appalachian Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, Granville G.; Borchers, James W.

    1981-01-01

    being formed from stress relief. As stress-relief fractures have been described in other valleys of the Appalachian Plateaus, the same aquifer conditions may exist in those valleys.

  2. Mixed mode stress field effect in adhesive fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical or analytical analyses were performed on seven different test specimens including blister test, 90-degree peel test, torsion test, and various cone tests. These specimens are in general subjected to complex stress fields having various amounts of Mode I, Mode II, and Mode III loads. The specimens were then constructed using polymethyl methacrylate for the adherends and a transparent polyurethane elastomer (Solithane 113) for the adhesive. This combination permitted direct observation of the bondline as load was applied. Although initial debonds as well as bond end termination singularities were present in all specimens, in some cases the debond did not initiate at the singularity points as would normally have been expected. An explanation for this behavior is presented, as well as a comparison of loading mode effect on those specimens for which the debond did propagate from a bond terminus singular point.

  3. Stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones in young trainee ballet dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, Walter; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Tagliabue, Lorenzo; Camerucci, Emanuela; Calori, Giorgio Maria

    2009-01-01

    Classical ballet is an art form requiring extraordinary physical activity, characterised by rigorous training. These can lead to many overuse injuries arising from repetitive minor trauma. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures at the base of the second and third metatarsal bones in young ballet dancers. We considered 150 trainee ballet dancers from the Ballet Schools of "Teatro Alla Scala" of Milan from 2005 to 2007. Nineteen of them presented with stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones. We treated 18 dancers with external shockwave therapy (ESWT) and one with pulsed electromagnetic fields (EMF) and low-intensity ultrasound (US); all patients were recommended rest. In all cases good results were obtained. The best approach to metatarsal stress fractures is to diagnose them early through clinical examination and then through X-ray and MRI. ESWT gave good results, with a relatively short time of rest from the patients’ activities and a return to dancing without pain. PMID:19415273

  4. Mechanical stress, fracture risk and beak evolution in Darwin's ground finches (Geospiza)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soons, Joris; Herrel, Anthony; Genbrugge, Annelies; Aerts, Peter; Podos, Jeffrey; Adriaens, Dominique; de Witte, Yoni; Jacobs, Patric; Dirckx, Joris

    2010-01-01

    Darwin's finches have radiated from a common ancestor into 14 descendent species, each specializing on distinct food resources and evolving divergent beak forms. Beak morphology in the ground finches (Geospiza) has been shown to evolve via natural selection in response to variation in food type, food availability and interspecific competition for food. From a mechanical perspective, however, beak size and shape are only indirectly related to birds' abilities to crack seeds, and beak form is hypothesized to evolve mainly under selection for fracture avoidance. Here, we test the fracture-avoidance hypothesis using finite-element modelling. We find that across species, mechanical loading is similar and approaches reported values of bone strength, thus suggesting pervasive selection on fracture avoidance. Additionally, deep and wide beaks are better suited for dissipating stress than are more elongate beaks when scaled to common sizes and loadings. Our results illustrate that deep and wide beaks in ground finches enable reduction of areas with high stress and peak stress magnitudes, allowing birds to crack hard seeds while limiting the risk of beak failure. These results may explain strong selection on beak depth and width in natural populations of Darwin's finches. PMID:20194171

  5. Stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones in young trainee ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, Walter; Perugia, Dario; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Tagliabue, Lorenzo; Camerucci, Emanuela; Calori, Giorgio Maria

    2010-02-01

    Classical ballet is an art form requiring extraordinary physical activity, characterised by rigorous training. These can lead to many overuse injuries arising from repetitive minor trauma. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures at the base of the second and third metatarsal bones in young ballet dancers. We considered 150 trainee ballet dancers from the Ballet Schools of "Teatro Alla Scala" of Milan from 2005 to 2007. Nineteen of them presented with stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones. We treated 18 dancers with external shockwave therapy (ESWT) and one with pulsed electromagnetic fields (EMF) and low-intensity ultrasound (US); all patients were recommended rest. In all cases good results were obtained. The best approach to metatarsal stress fractures is to diagnose them early through clinical examination and then through X-ray and MRI. ESWT gave good results, with a relatively short time of rest from the patients' activities and a return to dancing without pain.

  6. Bilateral subtrochanteric stress fractures in a Dambali mystic dancer--a unique complication of a Sufi ritual. Case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaffar, Nasir; Hussain, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Nawaz; Moosa, Mohammad; Shah, Nissar

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are commonly seen among soldiers and athletes with the usual sites being the tibia, fibula or the metatarsals. Clinical examination may not be very helpful in such cases unless a high degree of suspicion is directed towards the pathology. We present a case of bilateral synchronous subtrochanteric stress fractures in a Sufi mystic dancer who presented with mild leg pain. The patient responded well to rest and conservative management.

  7. Influence of chemistry and climate on large induced large scale stresses in anisotropically fractured carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, R.; Cornet, F.

    2012-04-01

    We will explore a simple model coupling for carbonate rocks the fracture density and orientation, the water chemistry and transport, the dissolution reactions and the expected irreversible rock deformation. Adding elasticity and boundary conditions, plus an estimation of the water source composition in the formation, we will estimate orders of magnitudes of the stress changes that can be expected from these processes in sedimentary basins over long times. We will in particular examine whether such intrinsic deformation mechanism can give a hint to explain the observed anisotropic stresses, in orientation and magnitude, in zones above the C.O.X. argillite formation in the Paris Basin, where the horizontal stress anisotropy has been shown to be important, whereas stress decoupling from the deep crustal roots should be effective, and no strong anisotropy would be expected in the absence of active deformation mechanism. In the Paris basin, the analysis of log cores shows that fractures and joints, up to meter-long ones, are common anisotropic features present in the carbonate rocks. Dissolution of calcite along these oriented features removes material with an a priori oriented flux reflecting this structural anisotropy, resulting in a non-isotropic deformation associated to this dissolution. We will present a simple model where dissolution and transport of dissolved calcite is associated with the deformation of the carbonate rock. Estimating the reaction constants, the chemical composition variation of the meteoric water, the rock permeability and the fracture density from observations around the Bure underground laboratory, we will estimate the order of magnitude of the deformations expected from these types of mechanisms. Such estimates have already been performed for dissolution along stylolites, e.g. by Clark, 1966; Renard et al., 2004; Schmittbuhl et al., 2004; Koehn et al., 2007. We will adapt these to reflect the anisotropic feature of the fractures present in

  8. Fracture prediction of hole expansion forming using forming limit stress criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakoyama, Tomoyuki; Nakano, Hayato; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2017-10-01

    The fracture prediction of a hole expansion forming for a cold rolled steel sheet is investigated using the concept of forming limit stress criterion. Multiaxial tube expansion tests (MTET) (T. Kuwabara and F. Sugawara, 2014), in which linear paths in the first quadrant of the stress space are applied to tubular specimens, are performed to measure the contours of plastic work and the directions of the plastic strain rates of the test material. The anisotropic parameters and the exponent of the Yld2000-2d yield function (F. Barlat et al., 2003) are optimized to approximate the material test data. Marciniak-Kuczynski type forming limit analyses (Z. Marciniak and K. Kuczynski, 1967) are performed to determine the forming limit stress surface (FLSS) in a stress space. It is concluded that the FLSS calculated using an appropriate material model calibrated using the MTET is effective in predicting the necking timing in the hole expansion forming of the test material.

  9. Intergranular fracture stress and phosphorus grain boundary segregation of a Mn-Ni-Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naudin, C.; Frund, J.M. [EDF, Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Pineau, A. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux

    1999-04-09

    Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steel A508 class 3 which is a low alloyed steel is not usually sensitive to reversible temper embrittlement when properly heat treated. However heterogeneous zones may be present in particular near the inner side of the vessel. These zones result from the segregation of the alloying elements (C, Mn, Ni, Mo) and impurities (S, P) taking place during solidification of the material. They are called segregated zones (or ghost lines). They can reach 2 mm thick along the radius and 30 mm long through the circumferential direction. Their susceptibility to reversible temper embrittlement is mainly due to grain boundary phosphorus segregation triggering brittle intergranular fracture when the material is tested at low temperature. In this material like in other steels the influence of some other alloying elements (Mo, Mn...) is clearly significant and should also be taken into account. But phosphorus effect has proved to be predominant. The aim of the present study is therefore to find out a quantitative relationship between grain boundary phosphorus segregation and critical intergranular fracture stress. A synthetic steel with a chemical composition representative of an average segregated zone was prepared for the present study. A number of heat treatments were applied to reach different embrittlement conditions. Then brittle fracture properties were obtained by performing cryogenic fracture tests on notched tensile specimens while the corresponding grain boundary phosphorus levels were measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. Systematic fractographic observations were carried out. Moreover an attempt to determine the influence of temperature on the critical intergranular fracture stress was made.

  10. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...... with a nearly constant spacing of approximately 1 µ were found. Occasionally long cleavage whiskers—up to some millimeters long—were observed. Within certain regions the cleavage steps were crossed and interrupted by two line systems. The maximum fracture velocity has been measured to 350 m/sec. Further...

  11. Prevention of lower extremity stress fractures: a controlled trial of a shock absorbent insole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, L I; Dziados, J E; Jones, B H; Brundage, J F; Harris, J M; Sullivan, R; Gill, P

    1988-01-01

    A prospective controlled trial was carried out to determine the usefulness of a viscoelastic polymer insole in prevention of stress fractures and stress reactions of the lower extremities. The subjects were 3,025 US Marine recruits who were followed for 12 weeks of training at Parris Island, South Carolina. Polymer and standard mesh insoles were systematically distributed in boots that were issued to members of odd and even numbered platoons. The most important finding was that an elastic polymer insole with good shock absorbency properties did not prevent stress reactions of bone during a 12-week period of vigorous physical training. To control for the confounding effects of running in running shoes, which occurred for about one and one-half hours per week for the first five weeks, we also examined the association of age of shoes and cost of shoes with injury incidence. A slight trend of increasing stress injuries by increasing age of shoes was observed. However, this trend did not account for the similarity of rates in the two insole groups. In addition, we observed a strong trend of decreasing stress injury rate by history of increasing physical activity, as well as a higher stress injury rate in White compared to Black recruits. The results of the trial were not altered after controlling for these factors. This prospective study confirms previous clinical reports of the association of stress fractures with physical activity history. The clinical application of a shock absorbing insole as a preventive for lower extremity stress reactions is not supported in these uniformly trained recruits. The findings are relevant to civilian populations. PMID:3056045

  12. [Secondary osteoporosis or secondary contributors to bone loss in fracture. Effects of oxidative stress on bone metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notsu, Masakazu; Yamaguchi, Toru

    2013-09-01

    Recent years, many reports showed that patients with diabetes mellitus, arteriosclerotic diseases and life style diseases have a higher fracture risk, and one of the reasons about it is an oxidative stress on bone metabolism. Oxidative stress, which is induced by life style diseases, aging and menopause, increases active oxygen production and fracture risk by affecting bone metabolism related cells and bone matrix proteins. Since there are few treatments against oxidative stress, so it is important to search further therapeutic agents. This report gives an outline of the effect of oxidative stress on bone metabolism in some conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, arteriosclerotic diseases, chronic kidney diseases and menopause.

  13. Stress fractures of the metacarpal bones in adolescent tennis players: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balius, Ramon; Pedret, Carles; Estruch, Assun; Hernández, Gemma; Ruiz-Cotorro, Angel; Mota, Javier

    2010-06-01

    There are 12 reported cases of metacarpal stress fractures in athletes, with only 4 of them involving the second metacarpal. The authors describe stress fracture of the second metacarpal bone in teenaged tennis players and the relationship with sport intensity and type of grip used. They also demonstrate that magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic study of choice to differentiate this entity from the most common cause of pain in this region of the hand in tennis players-the carpal boss. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Seven adolescent tennis players (mean age, 16.5 years; 6 female, 1 male) with dorsal hand pain produced by playing tennis were examined by radiographs and initial magnetic resonance imaging. In 2 cases, bone scintigraphy was performed. In the first 2 cases, the presumptive diagnosis was a carpal boss, but with this experience, the diagnostic evaluation of the last 5 cases was oriented toward a stress reaction at this level. Radiologic follow-up was performed. The authors also evaluated the grip type used by each tennis player. Clinical evaluation and imaging studies resulted in a diagnosis of stress injury of the second metatarsal in 6 of 7 cases, with the seventh case involving the third metacarpal. Initial imaging was positive in 3 cases, revealing an increased signal in the marrow without hairline crack and cortical thickening of the shaft or simply an increased signal in the marrow. In all cases, there was a history of recent increase in the sport training load. Six of the 7 tennis players were using a semi-Western or Western grip. Stress fractures of the second metacarpal are characteristic of adolescent tennis players and are associated with an increased intensity of tennis play and may be associated with use of the semi-Western or Western grip. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most useful tool for obtaining a definitive diagnosis.

  14. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation increases blood flow during the early stages of stress fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Ryan E; Shoghi, Kooresh I; Silva, Matthew J

    2014-02-15

    Despite the strong connection between angiogenesis and osteogenesis in skeletal repair conditions such as fracture and distraction osteogenesis, little is known about the vascular requirements for bone formation after repetitive mechanical loading. Here, established protocols of damaging (stress fracture) and nondamaging (physiological) forelimb loading in the adult rat were used to stimulate either woven or lamellar bone formation, respectively. Positron emission tomography was used to evaluate blood flow and fluoride kinetics at the site of bone formation. In the group that received damaging mechanical loading leading to woven bone formation (WBF), (15)O water (blood) flow rate was significantly increased on day 0 and remained elevated 14 days after loading, whereas (18)F fluoride uptake peaked 7 days after loading. In the group that received nondamaging mechanical loading leading to lamellar bone formation (LBF), (15)O water and (18)F fluoride flow rates in loaded limbs were not significantly different from nonloaded limbs at any time point. The early increase in blood flow rate after WBF loading was associated with local vasodilation. In addition, Nos2 expression in mast cells was increased in WBF-, but not LBF-, loaded limbs. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester was used to suppress NO generation, resulting in significant decreases in early blood flow rate and bone formation after WBF loading. These results demonstrate that NO-mediated vasodilation is a key feature of the normal response to stress fracture and precedes woven bone formation. Therefore, patients with impaired vascular function may heal stress fractures more slowly than expected.

  15. A cross-sectional study of the effects of load carriage on running characteristics and tibial mechanical stress: implications for stress fracture injuries in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    effects of load carriage on running characteristics and tibial mechanical stress : implications for stress -fracture injuries in women Chun Xu1, Amy Silder2...Ju Zhang3, Jaques Reifman1* and Ginu Unnikrishnan1Abstract Background: Load carriage is associated with musculoskeletal injuries, such as stress ...kinematics and kinetics of the body, as well as the tibial mechanical stress during running. We also compared the biomechanics of walking (studied

  16. On the Relationship between Stress and Elastic Strain for Porous and Fractured Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Berryman, James G.

    2008-02-25

    Modeling the mechanical deformations of porous and fractured rocks requires a stress-strain relationship. Experience with inherently heterogeneous earth materials suggests that different varieties of Hook's law should be applied within regions of the rock having significantly different stress-strain behavior, e.g., such as solid phase and various void geometries. We apply this idea by dividing a rock body conceptually into two distinct parts. The natural strain (volume change divided by rock volume at the current stress state), rather than the engineering strain (volume change divided by the unstressed rock volume), should be used in Hooke's law for accurate modeling of the elastic deformation of that part of the pore volume subject to a relatively large degree of relative deformation (i.e., cracks or fractures). This approach permits the derivation of constitutive relations between stress and a variety of mechanical and/or hydraulic rock properties. We show that the theoretical predictions of this method are generally consistent with empirical expressions (from field data) and also laboratory rock experimental data.

  17. Short-term effects of teriparatide versus placebo on bone biomarkers, structure, and fracture healing in women with lower-extremity stress fractures: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirol, Ellen A; Chi, Lisa Y; Khurana, Bharti; Hurwitz, Shelley; Bluman, Eric M; Chiodo, Christopher; Matzkin, Elizabeth; Baima, Jennifer; LeBoff, Meryl S

    2016-09-01

    In this pilot, placebo-controlled study, we evaluated whether brief administration of teriparatide (TPTD) in premenopausal women with lower-extremity stress fractures would increase markers of bone formation in advance of bone resorption, improve bone structure, and hasten fracture healing according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Premenopausal women with acute lower-extremity stress fractures were randomized to injection of TPTD 20-µg subcutaneous (s.c.) (n = 6) or placebo s.c. (n = 7) for 8 weeks. Biomarkers for bone formation N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP) and osteocalcin (OC) and resorption collagen type-1 cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX) and collagen type 1 cross-linked N-telopeptide (NTX) were measured at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. The area between the percent change of P1NP and CTX over study duration is defined as the anabolic window. To assess structural changes, peripheral quantitative computed topography (pQCT) was measured at baseline, 8 and 12 weeks at the unaffected tibia and distal radius. The MRI of the affected bone assessed stress fracture healing at baseline and 8 weeks. After 8 weeks of treatment, bone biomarkers P1NP and OC increased more in the TPTD- versus placebo-treated group (both p ≤ 0.01), resulting in a marked anabolic window (p ≤ 0.05). Results from pQCT demonstrated that TPTD-treated women showed a larger cortical area and thickness compared to placebo at the weight bearing tibial site, while placebo-treated women had a greater total tibia and cortical density. No changes at the radial sites were observed between groups. According to MRI, 83.3% of the TPTD- and 57.1% of the placebo-treated group had improved or healed stress fractures (p = 0.18). In this randomized, pilot study, brief administration of TPTD showed anabolic effects that TPTD may help hasten fracture healing in premenopausal women with lower-extremity stress fractures. Larger prospective studies are warranted to determine

  18. Treatment of stress fracture of the olecranon in throwing athletes with internal fixation through a small incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study is a report of retrospective case series of stress fracture of the olecranon. Six patients presented posterior elbow pain in throwing in baseball and softball, but fracture was not diagnosed in radiographs. We detected stress fracture of the olecranon using computed tomographic (CT scan and treated the patient with internal fixation with a headless cannulated double threaded screw through a small skin incision. All patients returned to competitive level without elbow complaints after the operation. When throwing athletes present with unusual posterior elbow pain and no significant findings on radiographs, a CT scan examination should be performed. We recommend surgical treatment of internal fixation with a screw through a small skin incision, as a good option for stress fracture of the olecranon in order to allow early return to sports activity in competitive athletes.

  19. Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Bourdin, Blaise; Francfort, Gilles A.

    2011-01-01

    These notes begin with a review of the mainstream theory of brittle fracture, as it has emerged from the works of Griffi th and Irwin. We propose a re-formulation of that theory within the confi nes of the calculus of variations, focussing on crack path prediction. We then illustrate the various possible minimality criteria in a simple 1d-case as well as in a tearing experiment and discuss in some details the only complete mathematical formulation so far, that is that where global minimality ...

  20. LOW-TEMPERATURE AND STRAIN RATE DEPENDENCE OF FRACTURE-STRESS AND FRACTURE-TOUGHNESS ON THIN FE40NI40B20 AMORPHOUS RIBBON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, Vaclav; BENGUS, VZ; KOROLKOVA, EB; CSACH, K; MISKUF, J; DUHAJ, P

    1991-01-01

    The fracture stress and the critical stress intensity factor of the Fe40Ni40B20 amorphous metallic ribbons 20-mu-m thick were measured in the temperature range 4.2-300 K and at deformation rates from 3.3 x 10(-6) to 1.25 x 10(-3) m-1 with the aim to obtain more information on the condition for the

  1. Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased risk of stress fracture during Royal Marine recruit training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, T; Lanham-New, S A; Shaw, A M; Hale, B; Cobley, R; Berry, J L; Roch, M; Allsopp, A J; Fallowfield, J L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate vitamin D status and stress fracture risk during Royal Marine military training. Poor vitamin D status was associated with an increased risk of stress fracture. Vitamin D supplementation may help to reduce stress fracture risk in male military recruits with low vitamin D status. Stress fracture is a common overuse injury in military recruits, including Royal Marine (RM) training in the UK. RM training is recognised as one of the most arduous basic training programmes in the world. Associations have been reported between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and risk of stress fracture, but the threshold of 25(OH)D for this effect remains unclear. We aimed to determine if serum 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with stress fracture risk during RM training. We prospectively followed 1082 RM recruits (males aged 16-32 years) through the 32-week RM training programme. Troops started training between September and July. Height, body weight and aerobic fitness were assessed at week 1. Venous blood samples were drawn at weeks 1, 15 and 32. Serum samples were analysed for 25(OH)D and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Seventy-eight recruits (7.2 %) suffered a total of 92 stress fractures. Recruits with a baseline serum 25(OH)D concentration below 50 nmol L(-1) had a higher incidence of stress fracture than recruits with 25(OH)D concentration above this threshold (χ(2) (1) = 3.564, p = 0.042; odds ratio 1.6 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.6)). Baseline serum 25(OH)D varied from 47.0 ± 23.7 nmol L(-1) in February, to 97.3 ± 24.6 nmol L(-1) in July (overall mean 69.2 ± 29.2 nmol L(-1), n = 1016). There were weak inverse correlations between serum 25(OH)D and PTH concentrations at week 15 (r = -0.209, p stress fracture. Further studies into the effects of vitamin D supplementation on stress fracture risk are certainly warranted.

  2. Hedgehog signaling mediates woven bone formation and vascularization during stress fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; McKenzie, Jennifer A; Shen, Tony S; Long, Fanxin; Silva, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical in developmental osteogenesis, and recent studies suggest it may also play a role in regulating osteogenic gene expression in the post-natal setting. However, there is a void of studies directly assessing the effect of Hh inhibition on post-natal osteogenesis. This study utilized a cyclic loading-induced ulnar stress fracture model to evaluate the hypothesis that Hh signaling contributes to osteogenesis and angiogenesis during stress fracture healing. Immediately prior to loading, adult rats were given GDC-0449 (Vismodegib - a selective Hh pathway inhibitor; 50mg/kg orally twice daily), or vehicle. Hh signaling was upregulated in response to stress fracture at 3 days (Ptch1, Gli1 expression), and was markedly inhibited by GDC-0449 at 1 day and 3 days in the loaded and non-loaded ulnae. GDC-0449 did not affect Hh ligand expression (Shh, Ihh, Dhh) at 1 day, but decreased Shh expression by 37% at 3 days. GDC-0449 decreased woven bone volume (-37%) and mineral density (-17%) at 7 days. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed that the 7 day callus was composed predominantly of woven bone in both groups. The observed reduction in woven bone occurred concomitantly with decreased expression of Alpl and Ibsp, but was not associated with differences in early cellular proliferation (as determined by callus PCNA staining at 3 days), osteoblastic differentiation (Osx expression at 1 day and 3 days), chondrogenic gene expression (Acan, Sox9, and Col2α1 expression at 1 day and 3 days), or bone resorption metrics (callus TRAP staining at 3 days, Rankl and Opg expression at 1 day and 3 days). To evaluate angiogenesis, vWF immunohistochemistry showed that GDC-0449 reduced fracture callus blood vessel density by 55% at 3 days, which was associated with increased Hif1α gene expression (+30%). Dynamic histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that GDC-0449 also inhibited lamellar bone formation. Lamellar bone analysis of the loaded limb (directly adjacent

  3. Prospective Study of Physical Activity and Risk of Developing a Stress Fracture among Preadolescent and Adolescent Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Alison E.; Gordon, Catherine M.; Pierce, Laura M.; Ramappa, Arun; Kocher, Mininder S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors of developing a stress fracture among adolescent females during a seven-year period. Design Prospective cohort study Setting Adolescent females living throughout the United States Participants 6831 females, aged 9–15 years at baseline, in the Growing Up Today Study (GUTS), an ongoing prospective cohort study. Main Exposures Exposures were assessed by self-report questionnaires completed by adolescent girls in 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2003. The adolescent girl’s history of stress fracture, including age when fracture occurred and site, were reported by their mothers, who are registered nurses, in 2004. Cox proportional hazards models were used in the analysis. Main Outcome Measure Incident stress fracture that occurred between 1997 and 2004. Results During seven years of follow-up, 267 females (3.9%) developed a stress fracture. Independent of age, age at menarche, family history of fracture, and hours per week of low and moderate impact activity, hours per week of running (relative risk (RR)=1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–1.23), basketball (RR=1.12, 95% CI 1.03–1.22) and cheerleading and gymnastics (RR=1.12, 95% CI 1.02–1.23) were significant predictors of developing a stress fracture. No other type of high impact activity was associated with an increased risk. Conclusions Females who engage in running, basketball, cheerleading, or gymnastics should be encouraged to include varied training in lower impact activities to decrease the cumulative amount of impact in order minimize their risk of stress fractures. PMID:21464375

  4. Prospective study of physical activity and risk of developing a stress fracture among preadolescent and adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Alison E; Gordon, Catherine M; Pierce, Laura M; Ramappa, Arun; Kocher, Mininder S

    2011-08-01

    To identify predictors of developing a stress fracture among adolescent girls during a 7-year period. Prospective cohort study. Adolescent girls living throughout the United States. A total of 6831 girls aged 9 to 15 years at baseline in the Growing Up Today Study, an ongoing prospective cohort study. Exposures were assessed by self-report questionnaires completed by adolescent girls in 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2003. The adolescent girls' history of stress fracture, including age when fracture occurred and site, were reported by their mothers, who are registered nurses, in 2004. Cox proportional hazards models were used in the analysis. Main Outcome Measure Incident stress fracture that occurred between 1997 and 2004. During 7 years of follow-up, 267 girls (3.9%) developed a stress fracture. Independent of age, age at menarche, family history of fracture, and hours per week of low- and moderate-impact activity, hours per week of running (hazard ratio = 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.23), basketball (hazard ratio = 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.23), and cheerleading/gymnastics (hazard ratio = 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.22) were significant predictors of developing a stress fracture. No other type of high-impact activity was associated with an increased risk. Girls who engage in running, basketball, cheerleading, or gymnastics should be encouraged to include varied training in lower-impact activities to decrease the cumulative amount of impact in order to minimize their risk of stress fractures.

  5. Correlation of stress-wave-emission characteristics with fracture aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartbower, C. E.; Reuter, W. G.; Morais, C. F.; Crimmins, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    A study to correlate stress wave emission characteristics with fracture in welded and unwelded aluminum alloys tested at room and cryogenic temperature is reported. The stress wave emission characteristics investigated were those which serve to presage crack instability; viz., a marked increase in:(1) signal amplitude; (2) signal repetition rate; and (3) the slope of cumulative count plotted versus load. The alloys were 7075-T73, 2219-T87 and 2014-T651, welded with MIG and TIG using 2319 and 4043 filler wire. The testing was done with both unnotched and part-through-crack (PTC) tension specimens and with 18-in.-dia subscale pressure vessels. In the latter testing, a real time, acoustic emission, triangulation system was used to locate the source of each stress wave emission. With such a system, multiple emissions from a given location were correlated with defects found by conventional nondestructive inspection.

  6. Stress wave propagationin the site 12 hydraulic/explosive fracturing experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boade, R. R.; Reed, R. P.

    1980-05-01

    The Site 12 experiment was a heavily instrumented field event performed to examine the hydraulic/explosive fracturing concept for preparing an underground oil shale bed for true in situ processing. One of the key phases of this fracturing concept is the blasting operation which involves the insertion and detonation of slurry explosive in a pre-formed system of hydrofractures. To obtain a sound understanding of the nature of the blasting operations, a rather extensive array of stress gages, accelerometers, and time-of-arrival gages was installed in the rock mass in the vacinity of the explosive to monitor the dynamic events initiated by the detonation. These gages provided considerable amounts of information which were useful in evaluating overall results of the experiment. Details of the gage array, of the data, of analysis methods, and of the results and conclusions are considered in the report.

  7. Negative magnetic resonance imaging in femoral neck stress fracture with joint effusion: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Nobutoshi; Okuyama, Koichiro; Kamo, Keiji; Chiba, Mitsuho [Akita Rosai Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Odate, Akita (Japan); Shimada, Yoichi [Akita University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Akita (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Femoral neck stress fracture (FNSF) is well documented in the orthopedic literature and is generally associated with strenuous activities such as long-distance running and military training. The diagnostic yield of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for FNSF was reported to be 100 %, and early MRI is recommended when this fracture is suspected. We encountered a 16-year-old male long-distance runner with FNSF in whom the left femoral neck showed no signal changes on MRI although an effusion was detected in the left hip joint. One month later, roentgenograms revealed periosteal callus and oblique consolidation of the left femoral neck, confirming the diagnosis of compression FNSF. Because FNSF with a normal bone marrow signal on MRI is very rare, this patient is presented here. (orig.)

  8. Nonoperative Treatment of Posterior Wall Acetabular Fractures After Dynamic Stress Examination Under Anesthesia: Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Andrew R; Boudreau, John A; Moed, Berton R

    2015-08-01

    Performing an examination under general anesthesia (EUA) using dynamic stress fluoroscopy of patients with posterior wall acetabular fractures has been used as a tool to determine hip stability and the need for surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of this technique, from a source other than its primary advocates, in patients with posterior wall acetabular fractures less than or equal to 50% who were stable on EUA and treated nonoperatively. Retrospective case series. University Level 1 Trauma Center. Seventeen patients with a posterior wall acetabular fracture stable on EUA treated nonoperatively. The patients were treated nonoperatively as guided by an EUA negative for instability. Patient follow-up averaged 30 months (range, 6-64 months). Outcome evaluation included the modified Merle d'Aubigné clinical score and the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Questionnaire. Radiographic evaluation for subluxation or arthritis consisted of the 3 standard pelvic radiographs. Radiographic evaluation showed all hips to be congruent with a normal joint space. Sixteen of the 17 patients had radiographic outcomes rated as "excellent"; 1 patient was rated "good." The modified Merle d'Aubigné score (obtained in 12 patients) averaged very good, with only 1 having less than a good (graded as fair) clinical outcome. The Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Questionnaire scores (from 11 patients) were not significantly different from normal and were within the normal reported values for all indices and categories. There was no correlation between fracture fragment size and outcome. This study further supports the contention that a stable hip joint, as determined by EUA, after posterior wall acetabular fracture treated nonoperatively is predictive of continued joint congruity, an excellent radiographic outcome, and good-to-excellent early clinical and functional outcomes. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for

  9. Fabrication and Probabilistic Fracture Strength Prediction of High-Aspect-Ratio Single Crystal Silicon Carbide Microspecimens With Stress Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Evans, Laura J.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Sharpe, William N., Jr.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Trapp, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Single crystal silicon carbide micro-sized tensile specimens were fabricated with deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) in order to investigate the effect of stress concentration on the room-temperature fracture strength. The fracture strength was defined as the level of stress at the highest stressed location in the structure at the instant of specimen rupture. Specimens with an elliptical hole, a circular hole, and without a hole (and hence with no stress concentration) were made. The average fracture strength of specimens with a higher stress concentration was larger than the average fracture strength of specimens with a lower stress concentration. Average strength of elliptical-hole, circular-hole, and without-hole specimens was 1.53, 1.26, and 0.66 GPa, respectively. Significant scatter in strength was observed with the Weibull modulus ranging between 2 and 6. No fractographic examination was performed but it was assumed that the strength controlling flaws originated from etching grooves along the specimen side-walls. The increase of observed fracture strength with increasing stress concentration was compared to predictions made with the Weibull stress-integral formulation by using the NASA CARES/Life code. In the analysis isotropic material and fracture behavior was assumed - hence it was not a completely rigorous analysis. However, even with these assumptions good correlation was achieved for the circular-hole specimen data when using the specimen data without stress concentration as a baseline. Strength was over predicted for the elliptical-hole specimen data. Significant specimen-to-specimen dimensional variation existed in the elliptical-hole specimens due to variations in the nickel mask used in the etching. To simulate the additional effect of the dimensional variability on the probabilistic strength response for the single crystal specimens the ANSYS Probabilistic Design System (PDS) was used with CARES/Life.

  10. On the expected relationships among apparent stress, static stress drop, effective shear fracture energy, and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, N.M.; Wong, T.-F.; Hickman, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    We consider expected relationships between apparent stress ??a and static stress drop ????s using a standard energy balance and find ??a = ????s (0.5 - ??), where ?? is stress overshoot. A simple implementation of this balance is to assume overshoot is constant; then apparent stress should vary linearly with stress drop, consistent with spectral theories (Brune, 1970) and dynamic crack models (Madariaga, 1976). Normalizing this expression by the static stress drop defines an efficiency ??sw = ??sa/????s as follows from Savage and Wood (1971). We use this measure of efficiency to analyze data from one of a number of observational studies that find apparent stress to increase with seismic moment, namely earthquakes recorded in the Cajon Pass borehole by Abercrombie (1995). Increases in apparent stress with event size could reflect an increase in seismic efficiency; however, ??sw for the Cajon earthquakes shows no such increase and is approximately constant over the entire moment range. Thus, apparent stress and stress drop co-vary, as expected from the energy balance at constant overshoot. The median value of ??sw for the Cajon earthquakes is four times lower than ??sw for laboratory events. Thus, these Cajon-recorded earthquakes have relatively low and approximately constant efficiency. As the energy balance requires ??sw = 0.5 - ??, overshoot can be estimated directly from the Savage-Wood efficiency; overshoot is positive for Cajon Pass earthquakes. Variations in apparent stress with seismic moment for these earthquakes result primarily from systematic variations in static stress drop with seismic moment and do not require a relative decrease in sliding resistance with increasing event size (dynamic weakening). Based on the comparison of field and lab determinations of the Savage-Wood efficiency, we suggest the criterion ??sw > 0.3 as a test for dynamic weakening in excess of that seen in the lab.

  11. The Epidemiology of Stress Fractures in Collegiate Student-Athletes, 2004-2005 Through 2013-2014 Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzone, Katherine H; Ackerman, Kathryn E; Roos, Karen G; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-10-01

    Stress fractures are injuries caused by cumulative, repetitive stress that leads to abnormal bone remodeling. Specific populations, including female athletes and endurance athletes, are at higher risk than the general athletic population. Whereas more than 460 000 individuals participate in collegiate athletics in the United States, no large study has been conducted to determine the incidence of stress fractures in collegiate athletes.   To assess the incidence of stress fractures in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes and investigate rates and patterns overall and by sport.   Descriptive epidemiology study.   National Collegiate Athletic Association institutions.   National Collegiate Athletic Association athletes.   Data were analyzed from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program for the academic years 2004-2005 through 2013-2014. We calculated rates and rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).   A total of 671 stress fractures were reported over 11 778 145 athlete-exposures (AEs) for an overall injury rate of 5.70 per 100 000 AEs. The sports with the highest rates of stress fractures were women's cross-country ( 28.59/100  000 AEs), women's gymnastics ( 25.58/100  000 AEs), and women's outdoor track ( 22.26/100  000 AEs). Among sex-comparable sports (baseball/softball, basketball, cross-country, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor track, and outdoor track), stress fracture rates were higher in women (9.13/100 000 AEs) than in men (4.44/100 000 AEs; RR = 2.06; 95% CI = 1.71, 2.47). Overall, stress fracture rates for these NCAA athletes were higher in the preseason (7.30/100 000 AEs) than in the regular season (5.12/100 000 AEs; RR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.22, 1.67). The metatarsals (n = 254, 37.9%), tibia (n = 147, 21.9%), and lower back/lumbar spine/pelvis (n = 81, 12.1%) were the most common locations of injury. Overall, 21.5% (n = 144) of stress fractures were

  12. Recent developments in analysis of crack propagation and fracture of practical materials. [stress analysis in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardrath, H. F.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Elber, W.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics in aircraft design and in the study of fatigue crack propagation in aircraft structures are discussed. NASA-Langley research to extend the capabilities of fracture mechanics to predict the maximum load that can be carried by a cracked part and to deal with aircraft design problems are reported. Achievements include: (1) improved stress intensity solutions for laboratory specimens; (2) fracture criterion for practical materials; (3) crack propagation predictions that account for mean stress and high maximum stress effects; (4) crack propagation predictions for variable amplitude loading; and (5) the prediction of crack growth and residual stress in built-up structural assemblies. These capabilities are incorporated into a first generation computerized analysis that allows for damage tolerance and tradeoffs with other disciplines to produce efficient designs that meet current airworthiness requirements.

  13. The effects of residual stress, viscoelastic and thermodynamic parameters on apparent fracture toughness of dental bilayer ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskonak, Burak

    Bilayer dental ceramic composites used for fixed partial dentures are becoming more widely used in dental practices because of their biocompatibility, aesthetic properties, and chemical durability. However, large statistical variations in the strength of ceramics are associated with the structural flaws as a result of processing and complex stress states within the surfaces of the materials because of thermal properties of each layer. In addition, partial delaminations of the veneer layer and connector fractures of bilayer ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) have been observed in a clinical study which is a part of this dissertation. Analysis of fracture surfaces of failed FPDs reveals that such fractures of the veneering ceramic are most likely caused by lateral crack growth. Global residual stresses associated with the coefficient of thermal expansion differences between core and veneering ceramics can cause lateral crack initiation. Also, rapid cooling of bilayer ceramics from the sintering temperature of the glass veneer may not allow the interfacial stresses in the viscoelastic glass to relax to equilibrium values. This can further contribute to the propagation of lateral cracks. Furthermore, local residual stresses that develop in the plastic deformation zone below sharp contact areas on the occlusal surface are another contributor to lateral crack growth. Superposition of global residual stresses and a Boussinesq stress field can incrementally increase the possibility of lateral crack growth. The long-range goals of this study are to critically analyze the lateral crack growth mechanisms associated with residual stresses, to modify residual tensile stress distributions by controlled heat treatment, and to minimize the probability of veneering ceramic fractures. Four approaches were used to accomplish these goals: (1) clinical evaluation of a bilayer ceramic fixed partial denture system; (2) fracture surface analysis of clinically failed FPDs; (3

  14. Pace bowlers in cricket with history of lumbar stress fracture have increased risk of lower limb muscle strains, particularly calf strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, John; Farhart, Patrick; Kountouris, Alex; James, Trefor; Portus, Marc

    2010-01-01

    To assess whether a history of lumbar stress fracture in pace bowlers in cricket is a risk factor for lower limb muscle strains. This was a prospective cohort risk factor study, conducted using injury data from contracted first class pace bowlers in Australia during seasons 1998-1999 to 2008-2009 inclusive. There were 205 pace bowlers, 33 of whom suffered a lumbar stress fracture when playing first class cricket. Risk ratios ([RR] with 95% confidence intervals[CI]) were calculated to compare the seasonal incidence of various injuries between bowlers with a prior history of lumbar stress fracture and those with no history of lumbar stress fracture. Risk of calf strain was strongly associated with prior lumbar stress fracture injury history (RR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.4-7.1). Risks of both hamstring strain (RR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.03-2.1) and quadriceps strain (RR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.5) were somewhat associated with history of lumbar stress fracture. Risk of groin strain was not associated with history of lumbar stress fracture (RR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4-1.1). Other injuries showed little association with prior lumbar stress fracture, although knee cartilage injuries were more likely in the non-stress fracture group. Bony hypertrophy associated with lumbar stress fracture healing may lead to subsequent lumbar nerve root impingement, making lower limb muscle strains more likely to occur. Confounders may be responsible for some of the findings. In particular, bowling speed is likely to be independently correlated with risk of lumbar stress fracture and risk of muscle strain. However, as the relationship between lumbar stress fracture history and calf strain was very strong, and that there is a strong theoretical basis for the connection, it is likely that this is a true association.

  15. Anemia, iron deficiency, and stress fractures in female combatants during 16 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovich, Ran; Merkel, Drorit; Israeli, Eran; Evans, Rachel K; Erlich, Tomer; Moran, Daniel S

    2011-12-01

    Yanovich, R, Merkel, D, Israeli, E, Evans, RK, Erlich, T, and Moran, DS. Anemia, iron deficiency, and stress fractures in female combatants during 16 months. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3412-3421, 2011-The purpose of this study is to evaluate the hematological profile of military recruits in different settings and training programs and to investigate the link between anemia and iron deficiency with stress fracture (SF) occurrence. We surveyed 3 groups of recruits for 16 months: 221 women (F) and 78 men (M) from 3 different platoons of a gender-integrated combat battalion and a control group (CF) of 121 female soldiers from a noncombat unit. Data were fully collected upon induction and at 4 and 16 months from 48F, 21M, and 31CF. Blood tests, anthropometry, physical aerobic fitness, and SF occurrence were evaluated. On induction day, 18.0 and 19.0% of F and CF were found to be anemic, and 61.4 and 50.9%, respectively, were found to have iron deficiency, whereas 7.7% of M were found to be anemic and 10.2% iron deficient. During the 4 months of army basic training (ABT), anemia and iron deficiency prevalence did not change significantly in any group. After 16-months, anemia prevalence decreased by 8% among F and CF and abated in M. Iron deficiency was prevalent in 50.0, 59.4, and 18.8% of F, CF, and M, respectively. Stress fractures were diagnosed in 14 F during ABT, and they had a significantly higher prevalence (p kosher meat as a possible explanation for the high prevalence of iron deficiency among young Israeli recruits.

  16. Permeability, Fracture Clusters, and Stress State:Implications for Mine-based Studies of EcoHydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, E. J.; Boutt, D. F.; Murdoch, L.; Hisz, D. B.; Ebenhack, J.; Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Wang, H. F.

    2011-12-01

    Mine-based ecohydrology studies provide unique access to deep flow systems at multiple crustal depths. Mass and energy transfer in such deep flow systems is typically dominated by localized flow through discrete features such as fractures and faults, of which only a small percentage contribute to both local and regional flow systems. Predicting which fractures are contributing to flow and transport in these networks has proven extremely difficult. Researchers working at deeper crustal levels (Barton et al., 1995) have successfully predicted fracture network permeability using relationships between fracture aperture (i.e. transmissivity) and in-situ stress. Observations suggest that compared to porous media, fractured rocks have flow systems that operate across large spatial scales and may contain clusters that are hydraulically isolated. . This point is important as these flow systems can house fluids and microbes in isolated clusters and are minimally impacted by the presence of a mine. One example of this is the the former Homestake gold mine in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, which is being considered as a location for an underground science laboratory. Mine workings cover several km2 in plan and extend to a depth 2.4 km. The area is dominantly Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, forming regional-scale folds with plunge axes oriented ~40o to the SSE. Prior analysis of the hydrogeology of the area indicates that permeability is strongly dependent on effective stress; an increase in permeability with decreasing depth appears to be an important factor controlling the development of a shallow ground water flow systems. In this contribution we examine a set of factors contributing to permeability distribution at the site with a specific focus on: 1) refining permeability-depth models for fractured rock to include the influence of both normal and shear fracture deformation on permeability-depth trends, 2) promote the development and testing of a stress

  17. Numerical Investigation of Influence of In-Situ Stress Ratio, Injection Rate and Fluid Viscosity on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Using a Distinct Element Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is very useful for understanding the hydraulic fracturing mechanism. In this paper, we simulate the hydraulic fracturing using the distinct element approach, to investigate the effect of some critical parameters on hydraulic fracturing characteristics. The breakdown pressure obtained by the distinct element approach is consistent with the analytical solution. This indicates that the distinct element approach is feasible on modeling the hydraulic fracturing. We independently examine the influence of in-situ stress ratio, injection rate and fluid viscosity on hydraulic fracturing. We further emphasize the relationship between these three factors and their contributions to the hydraulic fracturing. With the increase of stress ratio, the fracture aperture increases almost linearly; with the increase of injection rate and fluid viscosity, the fracture aperture and breakdown pressure increase obviously. A low value of product of injection rate and fluid viscosity (i.e., Qμ will lead to narrow fracture aperture, low breakdown pressure, and complex or dispersional hydraulic fractures. A high value of Qμ would lead wide fracture aperture, high breakdown pressure, and simple hydraulic fractures (e.g., straight or wing shape. With low viscosity fluid, the hydraulic fracture geometry is not sensitive to stress ratio, and thus becomes a complex fracture network.

  18. On the failure analysis of bondlines: Stress or energy based fracture criteria?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Bonded structure, can be either considered a multilayer material system, where its sublayers are held together through media that provide adhesion, or an adhesive joint designated for the assembly of different parts involved in a structure. For the assessment of the adhesion strength...... that characterizes a given bondline, both its cohesive strength and fracture toughness material parameters must be experimentally defined. Based on these properties, failure analysis of the bondline can be done either through stress- or energy-based criteria. The aim of this work is to investigate the effectiveness...

  19. Scaphoid Stress Fracture in High-Level Gymnast: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Nakamoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of an 18-year-old high-level gymnast who sustained a stress fracture of the scaphoid associated with a distal radial epiphysiolysis. Clinical evaluation demonstrated decreased range of motion of the affected wrist and insidious pain on the snuffbox and tenderness on the distal radial physis. He was submitted to surgical treatment with scaphoid percutaneous fixation and radial styloid process in situ fixation. Clinical features improved, and he got back to competition 6 months after surgery without symptoms and with complete range of motion.

  20. Stress fracture of the thoracic spine in an elite rhythmic gymnast: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Subash C; Sakai, Toshinori; Hangai, Mika; Toyota, Akiko; Fukuta, Shoji; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Spondylolysis, a defect or stress fracture of the vertebral pars interarticularis, occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar spine and occasionally in the cervical spine, but is extremely rare in the thoracic spine. We report the case of a 17 year-old girl, an elite rhythmic gymnast, who reported with early-stage thoracic spondylolysis at T10 and T11 levels. Physicians should be aware that performance of unusual athletic movements, such as those by gymnasts, may lead to spondylolysis in rare locations.

  1. Three-dimensional elastic--plastic stress and strain analyses for fracture mechanics: complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, H.J.

    1975-11-01

    The report describes the continuation of research into capability for three-dimensional elastic-plastic stress and strain analysis for fracture mechanics. A computer program, MARC-3D, has been completed and was used to analyze a cylindrical pressure vessel with a nozzle insert. A method for generating crack tip elements was developed and a model was created for a cylindrical pressure vessel with a nozzle and an imbedded flaw at the inside nozzle corner. The MARC-3D program was again used to analyze this flawed model. Documentation for the use of the MARC-3D computer program has been included as an appendix.

  2. Induced stress changes and associated fracture development as a result of deglaciation on the Zugspitzplatt, SE Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, Kerry; Kupp, Jan; Geisenhof, Benedikt; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Bedrock stresses in alpine regions result from the combined effects of exhumation, tectonics, topography, inelastic strain (e.g. fault displacement and fracture formation), and external loading. Gravitational loading by glacial ice can significantly affect near-surface stress magnitudes, although the nature of this effect and it's impact on stress distributions and bedrock fracturing is strongly dependent on the stress history of the bedrock landscape. We assess the effects of recent (post-Little Ice Age , ~1850 AD) and future deglaciation on bedrock stresses in the region of the Zugspitzplatt, a glaciated plateau surrounded by 1500 m high bedrock walls in SE Germany. We address this by undertaking a 2-D elasto-plastic finite element method analysis of stress changes and fracture propagation due to repeated glacial - interglacial cycles. Our model is initialised with upper crustal stresses in equilibrium with bedrock strength and regional tectonics, and we then simulate two cycles of major Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation in order to dissipate stress concentrations and incorporate path-dependent effects of glacial loading on the landscape. We then simulate a final glacial cycle, and remove 1 m of bedrock to approximate glacial erosion across the topography. Finally, ice levels are reduced in accordance with known late-glacial and recent ice retreat, allowing us to compare relative stress changes and predicted patterns of fracture propagation to observed fracture distributions on the Zugspitzplatt. Model results compare favourably to observed fracture patterns, and indicate the plateau is likely to be undergoing N-S extension as a result of deglaciation, with a strong reduction of horizontal stress magnitudes beneath the present-day Schneeferner glacier. As each glacial cycle has a similar effect on the plateau, it is likely that surficial stresses are slightly tensile, and each cycle of deglaciation produces additional sub-vertical tensile fractures, which

  3. Effects of fluid dynamic stress on fracturing of cell-aggregated tissue during purification for islets of Langerhans transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintaku, H; Kawano, S [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Okitsu, T [Transplantation Unit, Kyoto University Hospital, Kawara-cho Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Matsumoto, S [Baylor Research Institute Islet Cell Laboratory, 1400 Eight Avenue, Fort Worth, TX 76104 (United States); Suzuki, T; Kanno, I; Kotera, H [Department of Microengineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: shintaku@me.es.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-06-07

    Among clinical treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus, the transplantation of islets of Langerhans to the portal vein of the hepar is a commonly used treatment for glucose homeostasis. Islet purification using the density gradient of a solution in a centrifuge separator is required for safety and efficiency. In the purification, the number of tissues to be transplanted is reduced by removing the acinar tissue and gathering the islet from the digest of pancreas. However, the mechanical effects on the fracture of islets in the centrifuge due to fluid dynamic stress are a serious problem in the purification process. In this study, a preliminary experiment using a cylindrical rotating viscometer with a simple geometry is conducted in order to systematically clarify the effect of fluid dynamic stress on the fracture of islets. The effects of fluid dynamic stress on the islet configuration is quantitatively measured for various flow conditions, and a predictive fracture model is developed based on the experimental results. Furthermore, in the practical purification process in the COBE (Gambro BCT), which is widely used in clinical applications, we perform a numerical analysis of the fluid dynamic stress based on Navier-Stokes equations to estimate the stress conditions for islets. Using the fracture model and numerical analysis, the islet fracture characteristics using the COBE are successfully investigated. The results obtained in this study provide crucial information for the purification of islets by centrifuge in practical and clinical applications.

  4. Elastic stress transmission and transformation (ESTT) by confined liquid: A new mechanics for fracture in elastic lithosphere of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing-Wang; Peters, Stephen; Liang, Guang-He; Zhang, Bao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We report on a new mechanical principle, which suggests that a confined liquid in the elastic lithosphere has the potential to transmit a maximum applied compressive stress. This stress can be transmitted to the internal contacts between rock and liquid and would then be transformed into a normal compressive stress with tangential tensile stress components. During this process, both effective compressive normal stress and tensile tangential stresses arise along the liquid–rock contact. The minimum effective tensile tangential stress causes the surrounding rock to rupture. Liquid-driven fracture initiates at the point along the rock–liquid boundary where the maximum compressive stress is applied and propagates along a plane that is perpendicular to the minimum effective tensile tangential stress and also is perpendicular to the minimum principal stress.

  5. Fracture mechanics correlation of boron/aluminum coupons containing stress risers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsit, N. R.; Waszczak, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of boron/aluminum near stress risers has been studied and reported. This effort was directed toward defining the tensile behavior of both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). The material used was 5.6-mil boron in 6061 aluminum, consolidated using conventional diffusion bonding techniques. Mechanical properties are reported for both unidirectional and (0/ plus or minus 45) boron/aluminum, which serve as control data for the fracture mechanics predictions. Three different flawed specimen types were studied. In each case the series of specimens remained geometrically similar to eliminate variations in finite size correction factors. The fracture data from these tests were reduced using two techniques. They both used conventional LEFM methods, but the existence of a characteristic flaw was assumed in one case and not the other. Both the data and the physical behavior of the specimens support the characteristic flaw hypothesis. Cracks were observed growing slowly in the (0/ plus or minus 45) laminates, until a critical crack length was reached at which time catastrophic failure occurred.

  6. Weightbearing vs Gravity Stress Radiographs for Stability Evaluation of Supination-External Rotation Fractures of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Angela; Krause, Fabian; Weber, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Isolated lateral malleolar fractures may result from a supination-external rotation (SER) injury of the ankle. Stable fractures maintain tibiotalar congruence due to competent medial restraints and can be treated nonoperatively with excellent functional results and long-term prognosis. Stability might be assessed with either stress radiographs or weightbearing radiographs. A consecutive series of patients with closed SER fractures (presumed AO 44-B1) were prospectively enrolled from 2008 to 2015. Patients with clearly unstable fractures (medial clear space more than 7 mm) on the initial nonweightbearing radiograph were excluded and operated on. All other patients were examined with a gravity stress and a weightbearing anteroposterior radiograph. Borderline instability of the fracture was assumed when the medial clear space was 4 to 7 mm. Those were treated nonoperatively. Of 104 patients with isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type, 14 patients were treated operatively because of clear instability (displacement) on the initial radiographs. Of the nonoperative patients, 44 patients demonstrated borderline instability on the gravity stress but stability on the weightbearing radiograph ("gravity borderline"); the remaining 46 were stable in both tests ("gravity stable"). At an average follow-up of 23 months, no significant differences were seen in the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot score (92 points gravity-borderline group vs 93 points gravity-unstable group), the Foot Functional Index score (11 vs 10 points), the Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical component (86 vs 85 points), and SF-36 mental component (84 vs 81 points). Radiographically, all fractures had healed with anatomic congruity of the ankle. Weightbearing radiographs provided a reliable basis to decide about stability and nonoperative treatment in isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type with excellent clinical and radiographic outcome at short-term follow-up. Gravity

  7. The Effect of Shear and Deviatoric Stress on Permeability Evolution in Fractured Diorite and Novaculite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoro, I.; Elsworth, D.; Marone, C.; Niemeijer, A.

    2006-12-01

    The evolution of the permeability in fractured rocks, subject to changing stress conditions is a complex issue. In this contribution, we report on experiments in which rock surfaces were sheared under controlled pore pressure and true-triaxial stress conditions while permeability was monitored via flow parallel to the shear direction. Direct shear tests were performed in a pressure vessel under drained conditions on samples of novaculite and of diorite (Coso Geothermal field, CA). Smoothed-faced, prismatic blocks were roughened by grinding with 60# grit, assembled face-to-face, and jacketed within a sealed membrane. Normal stress was applied by a hydraulic ram, and confining- and pore-pressures were maintained via high precision servo- controlled pressure intensifiers. The sample pairs are sheared to 18 mm of final displacement at 5 μm/sec, at room temperature, and at effective normal stresses ranging from 5 to 20 MPa. Permeability evolution is measured throughout shearing via flow of distilled water from an upstream reservoir at 0.1 MPa and discharged at atmospheric pressure. The permeability of the smooth fracture in novaculite varied only slightly with applied effective normal stress (0.5×10^{-14} m2 at 5 MPa, 10^{-14} m2 at 10 MPa and 10^{-14} m2 at 20 MPa). The corresponding hydraulic apertures were respectively 20 μm, 15 μm and 13 μm. In all three tests, permeability dropped one order of magnitude upon shearing. Steady state values for permeability and shear strength were typically reached after ~ 10 mm of load point displacement. An associated reduction of ~10 μm was observed in the hydraulic apertures. Similar behavior was recorded in the diorite sample but only at the highest effective normal stresses. The initial permeability of ~10^{-13 m2 dropped four orders of magnitude before reaching a steady state value. This corresponds to a reduction in hydraulic aperture of ~23 μm, reaching a steady state magnitude of ~1.5 μm. At lower effective normal

  8. Effects of fatigue on running mechanics associated with tibial stress fracture risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clansey, Adam C; Hanlon, Michael; Wallace, Eric S; Lake, Mark J

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of progressive fatigue on the parameters of running mechanics previously associated with tibial stress fracture risk. Twenty-one trained male distance runners performed three sets (Pre, Mid, and Post) of six overground running trials at 4.5 m.s(-1) (± 5%). Kinematic and kinetic data were collected during each trial using a 12-camera motion capture system, force platform, and head and leg accelerometers. Between tests, each runner ran on a treadmill for 20 min at their corresponding lactate threshold (LT) speed. Perceived exertion levels (RPE) were recorded at the third and last minute of each treadmill run. RPE scores increased from 11.8 ± 1.3 to 14.4 ± 1.5 at the end of the first LT run and then further to 17.4 ± 1.6 by the end of the second LT run. Peak rearfoot eversion, peak axial head acceleration, peak free moment and vertical force loading rates were shown to increase (P risk factors for impact-related injuries (such as tibial stress fracture) are modified with fatigue. Because fatigue is associated with a reduced tolerance for impact, these findings lend support to the importance of those measures to identify individuals at risk of injury from lower limb impact loading during running.

  9. Pressure Transient Analysis and Flux Distribution for Multistage Fractured Horizontal Wells in Triple-Porosity Reservoir Media with Consideration of Stress-Sensitivity Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-porosity model is usually adopted to describe reservoirs with multiscaled pore spaces, including matrix pores, natural fractures, and vugs. Multiple fractures created by hydraulic fracturing can effectively improve the connectivity between existing natural fractures and thus increase well deliverability. However, little work has been done on pressure transient behavior of multistage fractured horizontal wells in triple-porosity reservoirs. Based on source/sink function method, this paper presents a triple-porosity model to investigate the transient pressure dynamics and flux distribution for multistage fractured horizontal wells in fractured-vuggy reservoirs with consideration of stress-dependent natural fracture permeability. The model is semianalytically solved by discretizing hydraulic fractures and Pedrosa’s transformation, perturbation theory, and integration transformation method. Type curves of transient pressure dynamics are generated, and flux distribution among hydraulic fractures for a fractured horizontal well with constant production rate is also discussed. Parametric study shows that major influential parameters on transient pressure responses are parameters pertinent to reservoir properties, interporosity mass transfer, and hydraulic fractures. Analysis of flux distribution indicates that flux density gradually increases from the horizontal wellbore to fracture tips, and the flux contribution of outermost fractures is higher than that of inner fractures. The model can also be extended to optimize hydraulic fracture parameters.

  10. Outcomes of posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum treated nonoperatively after diagnostic screening with dynamic stress examination under anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Charles S; Moed, Berton R

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic stress fluoroscopy with the patient under general anesthesia has been advocated as a clinical measure of hip stability and congruity in patients with a posterior wall acetabular fracture. The purpose of this study was to establish the predictive value of the dynamic stress fluoroscopic examination for these fractures by evaluating clinical and radiographic outcomes after nonoperative treatment of fractures found to be stable with this examination. Twenty-one consecutive patients with an acute posterior wall fracture of the acetabulum who were shown to have a stable hip joint by dynamic stress fluoroscopy while they were under general anesthesia were treated nonoperatively. At the time of follow-up, the patients underwent clinical and/or radiographic evaluation. Clinical follow-up was performed for eighteen patients at a minimum of two years after injury, at which time the average modified Merle d'Aubigné score was very good, with no one having less than a good clinical outcome. Fifteen of these eighteen patients had radiographic evaluation at a minimum of two years, and all were found to have a congruent joint with a normal joint space and no evidence of posttraumatic arthritis. Hip joint stability determined with dynamic stress fluoroscopy with the patient under general anesthesia after a posterior wall acetabular fracture is predictive of hip joint congruity, an excellent radiographic outcome, and a good-to-excellent early clinical outcome after nonoperative treatment.

  11. High‐stress triaxial direct‐shear fracturing of Utica shale and in situ X‐ray microtomography with permeability measurement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frash, Luke P; Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Ickes, Timothy; Viswanathan, Hari S

    2016-01-01

    ...‐stress conditions remains underinvestigated at this time. The studies of this type that do exist do not include in situ fracture geometry measurements acquired at stressed conditions, which would be beneficial for interpreting the flow behavior...

  12. Discrete element analysis is a valid method for computing joint contact stress in the hip before and after acetabular fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Kevin C; Thomas-Aitken, Holly D; Rudert, M James; Kern, Andrew M; Willey, Michael C; Anderson, Donald D; Goetz, Jessica E

    2018-01-23

    Evaluation of abnormalities in joint contact stress that develop after inaccurate reduction of an acetabular fracture may provide a potential means for predicting the risk of developing post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a computational technique for calculating intra-articular contact stress distributions in a fraction of the time required to obtain the same information using the more commonly employed finite element analysis technique. The goal of this work was to validate the accuracy of DEA-computed contact stress against physical measurements of contact stress made in cadaveric hips using Tekscan sensors. Four static loading tests in a variety of poses from heel-strike to toe-off were performed in two different cadaveric hip specimens with the acetabulum intact and again with an intentionally malreduced posterior wall acetabular fracture. DEA-computed contact stress was compared on a point-by-point basis to stress measured from the physical experiments. There was good agreement between computed and measured contact stress over the entire contact area (correlation coefficients ranged from 0.88 to 0.99). DEA-computed peak contact stress was within an average of 0.5 MPa (range 0.2-0.8 MPa) of the Tekscan peak stress for intact hips, and within an average of 0.6 MPa (range 0-1.6 MPa) for fractured cases. DEA-computed contact areas were within an average of 33% of the Tekscan-measured areas (range: 1.4-60%). These results indicate that the DEA methodology is a valid method for accurately estimating contact stress in both intact and fractured hips. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evolution of stress and strain during 3D folding: application to orthogonal fracture systems in folded turbidites, SW Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, J. E.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Lechmann, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    We present field data and numerical modeling results which show the evolution of stress and strain patterns during 3D folding resulting in an orthogonal fracture system. The field area is located near Almograve, SW Portugal. The area is part of the Mira Formation which itself is part of the South Portuguese Zone (SPZ). The structural development of the SPZ is characterized by southwest vergent folding and thrust displacement. The metamorphism in the SPZ increases from diagenetic conditions in the southwest to greenschist-facies conditions to the northeast. The Mira Formation is composed of turbiditic layers of Carboniferous age with low sandstone to shale ratio. The data was gathered at three outcrops which show structures similar to chocolate tablet structures in the folded sandstone layers. Chocolate tablet structures are generated under simultaneous extension in two directions and show two fracture systems of the same age which are perpendicular to each other. However, the Mira Formation is located in a convergent area. Also, the outcrops near Almograve show two fracture systems of different age. The fractures orthogonal to the fold axis and the bedding are crosscut by fractures parallel to the fold axis and orthogonal to the bedding. Our hypothesis for the evolution of the observed fracture systems is as follows; the older fractures which are now orthogonal to the fold axis and to the bedding plane were generated during compression while the layers were still approximately horizontal. They are parallel to σ1(i.e. mode 1 fractures). The second and younger fracture family was generated in a phase where there is local extension in the fold limbs. These fractures are orthogonal to the far-field σ1, parallel to the fold axis and perpendicular to the bedding. The shortening direction is constant during the entire folding process. We test our hypothesis with numerical modeling. We use 2D and 3D finite element codes with a mixed formulation for incompressible flow

  14. ``Global and local approaches of fracture in the ductile to brittle regime of a low alloy steel``; ``Approches globale et locale de la rupture dans le domaine de transition fragile-ductile d`un acier faiblement allie``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renevey, S

    1998-12-31

    The study is a contribution to the prediction of flow fracture toughness of low alloy steel and to a better knowledge of fracture behavior in the ductile to brittle transition region. Experiments were performed on a nozzle cut-off from a pressurized water reactor vessel made of steels A508C13 type steel. Axisymmetrical notched specimens were tested to study the fracture onset in a volume element while pre-cracked specimens were used to investigate cleavage fracture after stable crack growth. Systematic observations of fracture surfaces showed manganese sulfide inclusions (MnS) at cleavage sites or in the vicinity. The experimental results were used for modelling by the local approach to fracture. In a volume element the fracture is described by an original probabilistic model. This model is based on volume fraction distributions of MnS inclusions gathered in clusters and on the assumption of a competition without interaction between ductile and cleavage fracture modes. This model was applied to pre-cracked specimens (CT specimens). It is able to describe the scatter in the toughness after a small stable crack growth if a temperature effect on the cleavage stress is assumed. So, the modelling is able to give a lower bound of fracture toughness as a function of temperature. (author) 100 refs.

  15. Analysis of stress fractures associated with lameness in Thoroughbred flat racehorses training on different track surfaces undergoing nuclear scintigraphic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, M C; Bonder, D; Boston, R C; Ross, M W

    2015-05-01

    There is limited information regarding the impact of training track surface on the occurrence of stress fractures. To evaluate the impact of training track surface on the proportion of long bone and pelvic stress fractures associated with lameness in Thoroughbred horses in flat race training undergoing nuclear scintigraphic examination. Retrospective study. Scintigraphic examinations of Thoroughbred flat racehorses were evaluated from 2 hospitals (hospital A [Toronto Equine Hospital], 2003-2009, and hospital B [George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania], 1994-2006). Horses admitted to hospital A trained at a single track, at which the main training surface changed from dirt to synthetic on 27 August 2006. Two distinct populations existed at hospital B: horses that trained on dirt (numerous trainers) and those that trained on turf (single trainer). All scintigraphic images were evaluated by a blinded reviewer. Fisher's exact test and logistic regression were used when appropriate, and significance was set at Pexaminations from hospital A (257 dirt and 271 synthetic, numerous trainers), there was a greater proportion of stress fractures detected in scintigraphic examinations from horses training on a synthetic surface (31.7%) in comparison to scintigraphic examinations from horses training on a dirt surface (23.0%) at an earlier point in time (P = 0.03). There was a greater proportion of hindlimb/pelvic and tibial stress fractures diagnosed in horses from the synthetic surface-trained group than from the dirt-trained group at hospital A (Pstress fractures diagnosed, but other factors, such as training philosophy, appear to be important. Future prospective investigations to fully elucidate the relationship between training track surface and the proportion of stress fractures and other nonfatal musculoskeletal injuries are warranted. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  16. The concept of the average stress in the fracture process zone for the search of the crack path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.G. Matvienko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the average stress has been employed to propose the maximum average tangential stress (MATS criterion for predicting the direction of fracture angle. This criterion states that a crack grows when the maximum average tangential stress in the fracture process zone ahead of the crack tip reaches its critical value and the crack growth direction coincides with the direction of the maximum average tangential stress along a constant radius around the crack tip. The tangential stress is described by the singular and nonsingular (T-stress terms in the Williams series solution. To demonstrate the validity of the proposed MATS criterion, this criterion is directly applied to experiments reported in the literature for the mixed mode I/II crack growth behavior of Guiting limestone. The predicted directions of fracture angle are consistent with the experimental data. The concept of the average stress has been also employed to predict the surface crack path under rolling-sliding contact loading. The proposed model considers the size and orientation of the initial crack, normal and tangential loading due to rolling–sliding contact as well as the influence of fluid trapped inside the crack by a hydraulic pressure mechanism. The MATS criterion is directly applied to equivalent contact model for surface crack growth on a gear tooth flank.

  17. Stress analysis and optimization of Nd:YAG pulsed laser processing of notches for fracture splitting of a C70S6 connecting rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Shuqing; Gao, Yan; Zhao, Yong; Lin, Baojun [Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2017-05-15

    The pulsed laser pre-processing of a notch as the fracture initiation source for the splitting process is the key mechanism of an advanced fracture splitting technology for C70S6 connecting rods. This study investigated the stress field of Nd:YAG pulsed laser grooving, which affects the rapid fracture initiation at the notch root and the controlled crack extension in the critical fracture splitting quality, to improve manufacturing quality. Thermal elastic-plastic incremental theory was applied to build the finite element analysis model of the stress field of pulsed laser grooving for fracture splitting based on the Rotary-Gauss body heat source. The corresponding numerical simulation of the stress field was conducted. The changes and distributions of the stress during pulsed laser grooving were examined, the influence rule of the primary technological parameters on the residual stress was analyzed, and the analysis results were validated by the corresponding cutting experiment. Results showed that the residual stress distribution was concentrated in the Heat-affected zone (HAZ) near the fracture splitting notch, which would cause micro-cracks in the HAZ. The stress state of the notch root in the fracture initiation direction was tensile stress, which was beneficial to the fracture initiation and the crack rapid extension in the subsequent fracture splitting process. However, the uneven distribution of the stress could lead to fracture splitting defects, and thus the residual stress should be lowered to a reasonable range. Decreasing the laser pulse power, increasing the processing speed, and lowering the pulse width can lower the residual stress. Along with the actual production, the reasonable main technological parameters were obtained.

  18. Faulting, fracturing and in situ stress prediction in the Ahnet Basin, Algeria — a finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, Fred; Badsi, Madjid; van Wees, Jan-Diederik

    2000-05-01

    Many low-efficiency hydrocarbon reservoirs are productive largely because effective reservoir permeability is controlled by faults and natural fractures. Accurate and low-cost information on basic fault and fracture properties, orientation in particular, is critical in reducing well costs and increasing well recoveries. This paper describes how we used an advanced numerical modelling technique, the finite element method (FEM), to compute site-specific in situ stresses and rock deformation and to predict fracture attributes as a function of material properties, structural position and tectonic stress. Presented are the numerical results of two-dimensional, plane-strain end-member FEM models of a hydrocarbon-bearing fault-propagation-fold structure. Interpretation of the modelling results remains qualitative because of the intrinsic limitations of numerical modelling; however, it still allows comparisons with (the little available) geological and geophysical data. In all models, the weak mechanical strength and flow properties of a thick shale layer (the main seal) leads to a decoupling of the structural deformation of the shallower sediments from the underlying sediments and basement, and results in flexural slip across the shale layer. All models predict rock fracturing to initiate at the surface and to expand with depth under increasing horizontal tectonic compression. The stress regime for the formation of new fractures changes from compressional to shear with depth. If pre-existing fractures exist, only (sub)horizontal fractures are predicted to open, thus defining the principal orientation of effective reservoir permeability. In models that do not include a blind thrust fault in the basement, flexural amplification of the initial fold structure generates additional fracturing in the crest of the anticline controlled by the material properties of the rocks. The folding-induced fracturing expands laterally along the stratigraphic boundaries under enhanced

  19. Electromagnetic Monitoring of Hydraulic Fracturing: Relationship to Permeability, Seismicity, and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Hydraulic fracking is a geoengineering application designed to enhance subsurface permeability to maximize fluid and gas flow. Fracking is commonly used in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), tight shale gas, and coal seam gas (CSG) plays and in CO_2 storage scenarios. Common monitoring methods include microseismics and mapping small earthquakes with great resolution associated with fracture opening at reservoir depth. Recently, electromagnetic (EM) methods have been employed in the field to provide an alternative way of direct detection of fluids as they are pumped in the ground. Surface magnetotelluric (MT) measurements across EGS show subtle yet detectable changes during fracking derived from time-lapse MT deployments. Changes are directional and are predominantly aligned with current stress field, dictating preferential fracture orientation, supported by microseismic monitoring of frack-related earthquakes. Modeling studies prior to the injection are crucial for survey design and feasibility of monitoring fracks. In particular, knowledge of sediment thickness plays a fundamental role in resolving subtle changes. Numerical forward modeling studies clearly favor some form of downhole measurement to enhance sensitivity; however, these have yet to be conclusively demonstrated in the field. Nevertheless, real surface-based monitoring examples do not necessarily replicate the expected magnitude of change derived from forward modeling and are larger than expected in some cases from EGS and CSG systems. It appears the injected fluid volume alone cannot account for the surface change in resistivity, but connectedness of pore space is also significantly enhanced and nonlinear. Recent numerical studies emphasize the importance of percolation threshold of the fracture network on both electrical resistivity and permeability, which may play an important role in accounting for temporal changes in surface EM measurements during hydraulic fracking.

  20. Reservoir Stimulation Experiments at the Grimsel Test Site: Stress Measurements using Hydraulic fracturing, Hydraulic Tests on Pre-existing Fractures and Overcoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doetsch, J.; Gischig, V.; Amann, F.; Madonna, C.; Jalali, M.; Valley, B.; Evans, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    A decameter-scale in-situ hydraulic stimulation and circulation experiment has been planned in the Deep Underground rock Laboratory (DUG Lab) at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland. The general objective of this experiment is to improve our understanding of the pressure, temperature and stress changes in the rock mass due to hydraulic stimulation. In this context, the main goal is to investigate the effect of hydro-shearing on the local stress variation as well as transient and permanent permeability changes with comprehensive thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) and acoustic emission monitoring. This experiment is designed such that stimulation processes are recorded in a dataset that is unique in THM coupled processes and induced seismicity research. In preparation to the hydro-shearing experiments, the experimental rock volume has been studied in detail using geological tunnel mapping, optical televiewer in existing boreholes, hydraulic tests, geophysical imaging and review of the extensive literature on experiments at the Grimsel Test Site. The geophysical investigations include reflection and transmission ground penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic measurements between the tunnels to image shear zones and reveal heterogeneity of the rock mass. The orientation and magnitude of the principal stresses of the rock volume and its surroundings has been analyzed using hydraulic fracturing, hydraulic tests on pre-existing fractures and overcoring. The hydraulic fracturing tests for stress measurements were monitored using a 32-channel acoustic emission monitoring system and a regional seismic monitoring network. Here, we present the results of the pre-investigations and stress measurements, and give an outlook for the hydro-shearing experiments planned for spring 2016.

  1. Surgical treatment of bilateral femoral stress fractures related with long-term alendronate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatlı, Ulunay; Ataoğlu, M Baybars; Özer, Mustafa; Topçu, H Nevzat; Çetinkaya, Mehmet

    2017-04-01

    A 67-year-old female patient admitted to our outpatient clinic suffering from pain in both thighs for one year without any history of trauma. Patient was receiving alendronate therapy for five years. Physical examination revealed pain increasing with weight-bearing in both thighs with full range of hip and knee movements. Radiographs showed an area of thickened cortex of middle femoral diaphysis in both femurs, but no fracture. Bone scan showed a single area of increased uptake of radioisotope. These images were compatible with stress fractures of both femurs. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed a T-score of -3.2 for the lumbar spine and -3.5 for the hip. Alendronate treatment was ceased. Calcium and vitamin D treatment were started. Patient was performed prophylactic surgical stabilization by titanium elastic nails in May 2009. On first day after the surgery, unsupported mobilization and weight-bearing activities were started. Upon persistence of pain on left thigh, plate fixation was performed for the nonunion in June 2012. Patient is now pain-free and able to walk with full weight-bearing without any complications.

  2. Stress Concentration and Fracture at Inter-variant Boundaries in an Al-Li Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Roy; Tayon, Wes; Domack, Marcia; Wagner, John; Beaudoin, Armand

    2009-01-01

    Delamination fracture has limited the use of lightweight Al-Li alloys. Studies of secondary, delamination cracks in alloy 2090, L-T fracture toughness samples showed grain boundary failure between variants of the brass texture component. Although the adjacent texture variants, designated B(sub s1) and B(sub s2), behave similarly during rolling, their plastic responses to mechanical tests can be quite different. EBSD data from through-thickness scans were used to generate Taylor factor maps. When a combined boundary normal and shear tensor was used in the calculation, the delaminating grains showed the greatest Taylor Factor differences of any grain pairs. Kernel Average Misorientation (KAM) maps also showed damage accumulation on one side of the interface. Both of these are consistent with poor slip accommodation from a crystallographically softer grain to a harder one. Transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm the EBSD observations and to show the role of slip bands in the development of large, interfacial stress concentrations. A viewgraph presentation accompanies the provided abstract.

  3. Modeling of multi-phase microstructures in press hardened components: plastic deformation and fracture in different stress states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golling, S.; Östlund, R.; Oldenburg, M.

    2017-09-01

    Hot stamping or press hardening is an industrialized technique with the aim of improving material properties by heat treatment and forming of a component in a single production stage. Within the field of press hardening the method of tailored material properties evolved. Components with tailored material properties possess different mechanical properties in designated areas. This paper presents an approach for modeling the mechanical response of mixed microstructures under different stress states. A homogenization method is used to predict the hardening of the material; the strain decomposition provides the possibility of applying a fracture criterion per phase. To validate the modeling approach for different stress states a set of samples with different notch and hole geometries as well as microstructural composition are produced. The combination of a homogenization method and a fracture criterion show good agreement with experimental results. The homogenization method is suitable to predict the hardening of the material with good accuracy. Fracture for different microstructural compositions is well predicted over a range of stress triaxialities relevant for sheet metal applications. It is concluded that the use of a homogenization method combined with a fracture model can be used to predict the mechanical response of mixed microstructures for a range of different stress states.

  4. Investigating the Influence of Regional Stress on Fault and Fracture Permeability at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Donald M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Smith, Kenneth D. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Parashar, Rishi [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Collins, Cheryl [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Heintz, Kevin M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-05-24

    Regional stress may exert considerable control on the permeability and hydraulic function (i.e., barrier to and/or conduit for fluid flow) of faults and fractures at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). In-situ measurements of the stress field are sparse in this area, and short period earthquake focal mechanisms are used to delineate principal horizontal stress orientations. Stress field inversion solutions to earthquake focal mechanisms indicate that Pahute Mesa is located within a transtensional faulting regime, represented by oblique slip on steeply dipping normal fault structures, with maximum horizontal stress ranging from N29°E to N63°E and average of N42°E. Average horizontal stress directions are in general agreement with large diameter borehole breakouts from Pahute Mesa analyzed in this study and with stress measurements from other locations on the NNSS.

  5. Plastic deformation and fracture behaviour of 21/4 Cr-1 Mo pressure-vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzmann, M.; Vlach, B.; Man, J.; Bilek, Z.

    1989-01-01

    During the heat treatment of steel plates and forgings of large thicknesses, microstructures with various volume fractions of ferrite appear. Plastic properties and fracture behaviour of these mixed microstructures are a function of ferrite content. The influence of ferrite content in the range from 0% to 54% in the bainitic-ferritic microstructure on mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of 21/4 Cr-1 Mo steel was examined. The yield stress was found to decrease linearly with the volume fraction of ferrite. The tensile strength was independent of ferrite content up to 25%, after which the tensile strength decreased. Using the Charpy test it has been found that the critical ferrite content-25%-exists in a mixed microstructure, at which the propagation and initiation transition temperatures attain the highest values. The fracture toughness tests gave the same results. Increasing the volume fraction of ferrite, the cleavage fracture toughness/temperature curves were shifted to higher temperatures. Simultaneously, the ductile-brittle fracture toughness transition temperature was raised reaching the highest value for the critical ferrite content. The fracture behaviour could be tentatively explained through the influence of ferrite volume fraction on both the cleavage fracture stress and the stress level at the crack tip.

  6. Fundamental differences in axial and appendicular bone density in stress fractured and uninjured Royal Marine recruits--a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Trish; Lanham-New, Susan A; Shaw, Anneliese M; Cobley, Rosalyn; Allsopp, Adrian J; Hajjawi, Mark O R; Arnett, Timothy R; Taylor, Pat; Cooper, Cyrus; Fallowfield, Joanne L

    2015-04-01

    Stress fracture is a common overuse injury within military training, resulting in significant economic losses to the military worldwide. Studies to date have failed to fully identify the bone density and bone structural differences between stress fractured personnel and controls due to inadequate adjustment for key confounding factors; namely age, body size and physical fitness; and poor sample size. The aim of this study was to investigate bone differences between male Royal Marine recruits who suffered a stress fracture during the 32 weeks of training and uninjured control recruits, matched for age, body weight, height and aerobic fitness. A total of 1090 recruits were followed through training and 78 recruits suffered at least one stress fracture. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at the lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN) and whole body (WB) using Dual X-ray Absorptiometry in 62 matched pairs; tibial bone parameters were measured using peripheral Quantitative Computer Tomography in 51 matched pairs. Serum C-terminal peptide concentration was measured as a marker of bone resorption at baseline, week-15 and week-32. ANCOVA was used to determine differences between stress fractured recruits and controls. BMD at the LS, WB and FN sites was consistently lower in the stress fracture group (Pstress fracture recruits and controls were evident in all slices of the tibia, with the most prominent differences seen at the 38% tibial slice. There was a negative correlation between the bone cross-sectional area and BMD at the 38% tibial slice. There was no difference in serum CTx concentration between stress fracture recruits and matched controls at any stage of training. These results show evidence of fundamental differences in bone mass and structure in stress fracture recruits, and provide useful data on bone risk factor profiles for stress fracture within a healthy military population. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fatigue surviving, fracture resistance, shear stress and finite element analysis of glass fiber posts with different diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; de Oliveira, Ariele Freitas; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Souto Borges, Alexandre Luiz; Limberguer, Inácio da Fontoura; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the shear stress presented in glass fiber posts with parallel fiber (0°) and different coronal diameters under fatigue, fracture resistance and FEA. 160 glass-fiber posts (N=160) with eight different coronal diameters were used (DT=double tapered, number of the post=coronal diameter and W=Wider - fiber post with coronal diameter wider than the conventional): DT1.4; DT1.8W; DT1.6; DT2W; DT1.8; DT2.2W; DT2; DT2.2. Eighty posts were submitted to mechanical cycling (3×10(6) cycles; inclination: 45°; load: 50N; frequency: 4Hz; temperature: 37°C) to assess the surviving under intermittent loading and other eighty posts were submitted to fracture resistance testing (resistance [N] and shear-stress [MPa] values were obtained). The eight posts types were 3D modeled (Rhinoceros 4.0) and the shear-stress (MPa) evaluated using FEA (Ansys 13.0). One-way ANOVA showed statistically differences to fracture resistance (DT2.2W and DT2.2 showed higher values) and shear stress values (DT1.4 showed lower values). Only the DT1.4 fiber posts failed after mechanical cycling. FEA showed similar values of shear stress between the groups and these values were similar to those obtained by shear stress testing. The failure analysis showed that 95% of specimens failed by shear. Posts with parallel fiber (0°) may suffer fractures when an oblique shear load is applied on the structure; except the thinner group, greater coronal diameters promoted the same shear stresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pace bowlers in cricket with history of lumbar stress fracture have increased risk of lower limb muscle strains, particularly calf strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Orchard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available John Orchard1, Patrick Farhart2, Alex Kountouris3, Trefor James3, Marc Portus31School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia; 2Punjab Kings XI team, Indian Premier League, India; 3Cricket Australia, Melbourne, AustraliaObjective: To assess whether a history of lumbar stress fracture in pace bowlers in cricket is a risk factor for lower limb muscle strains.Methods: This was a prospective cohort risk factor study, conducted using injury data from contracted first class pace bowlers in Australia during seasons 1998–1999 to 2008–2009 inclusive. There were 205 pace bowlers, 33 of whom suffered a lumbar stress fracture when playing first class cricket. Risk ratios ([RR] with 95% confidence intervals[CI] were calculated to compare the seasonal incidence of various injuries between bowlers with a prior history of lumbar stress fracture and those with no history of lumbar stress fracture.Results: Risk of calf strain was strongly associated with prior lumbar stress fracture injury history (RR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.4–7.1. Risks of both hamstring strain (RR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.03–2.1 and quadriceps strain (RR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1–3.5 were somewhat associated with history of lumbar stress fracture. Risk of groin strain was not associated with history of lumbar stress fracture (RR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4–1.1. Other injuries showed little association with prior lumbar stress fracture, although knee cartilage injuries were more likely in the non-stress fracture group.Conclusion: Bony hypertrophy associated with lumbar stress fracture healing may lead to subsequent lumbar nerve root impingement, making lower limb muscle strains more likely to occur. Confounders may be responsible for some of the findings. In particular, bowling speed is likely to be independently correlated with risk of lumbar stress fracture and risk of muscle strain. However, as the relationship between lumbar stress fracture history and calf strain was very strong, and that there is a

  9. Numerical Evaluation and Optimization of Multiple Hydraulically Fractured Parameters Using a Flow-Stress-Damage Coupled Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-factor analysis and optimization play a critical role in the the ability to maximizethe stimulated reservoir volume (SRV and the success of economic shale gas production. In this paper, taking the typical continental naturally fractured silty laminae shale in China as anexample, response surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize multiple hydraulic fracturing parameters to maximize the stimulated area in combination with numerical modeling based on the coupled flow-stress-damage (FSD approach. This paper demonstrates hydraulic fracturing effectiveness by defining two indicesnamelythe stimulated reservoir area (SRA and stimulated silty laminae area (SLA. Seven uncertain parameters, such as laminae thickness, spacing, dip angle, cohesion, internal friction angle (IFA, in situ stress difference (SD, and an operational parameter-injection rate (IR with a reasonable range based on silty Laminae Shale, Southeastern Ordos Basin, are used to fit a response of SRA and SLA as the objective function, and finally identity the optimum design under the parameters based on simultaneously maximizingSRA and SLA. In addition, asensitivity analysis of the influential factors is conducted for SRA and SLA. The aim of the study is to improve the artificial ability to control the fracturing network by means of multi-parameteroptimization. This work promises to provide insights into the effective exploitation of unconventional shale gas reservoirs via optimization of the fracturing design for continental shale, Southeastern Ordos Basin, China.

  10. The generalized fracture criteria based on the multi-parameter representation of the crack tip stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, L. V.

    2017-12-01

    The paper is devoted to the multi-parameter asymptotic description of the stress field near the crack tip of a finite crack in an infinite isotropic elastic plane medium subject to 1) tensile stress; 2) in-plane shear; 3) mixed mode loading for a wide range of mode-mixity situations (Mode I and Mode II). The multi-parameter series expansion of stress tensor components containing higher-order terms is obtained. All the coefficients of the multiparameter series expansion of the stress field are given. The main focus is on the discussion of the influence of considering the higher-order terms of the Williams expansion. The analysis of the higher-order terms in the stress field is performed. It is shown that the larger the distance from the crack tip, the more terms it is necessary to keep in the asymptotic series expansion. Therefore, it can be concluded that several more higher-order terms of the Williams expansion should be used for the stress field description when the distance from the crack tip is not small enough. The crack propagation direction angle is calculated. Two fracture criteria, the maximum tangential stress criterion and the strain energy density criterion, are used. The multi-parameter form of the two commonly used fracture criteria is introduced and tested. Thirty and more terms of the Williams series expansion for the near-crack-tip stress field enable the angle to be calculated more precisely.

  11. Gas migration model based on overburden strata fracture evolution law in three dimensional mine-induced stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Yin, Guangzhi

    2017-04-01

    Based on the fracture features obtained from similarity simulation excavation experiment in 3D mine-induced stress condition, the gas migration model in gob area was set up, and numerical simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics software on gas migration law was studied. The research results show that: Gas pressure variety gradient and flow velocity are obviously influenced by fracture distribution shape. Gas concentration distribution presents the rounded rectangle shape in the lower strata, while in higher strata it tends to be a "O shape” morphology which is similar to the fracture form in strata above the gob. Besides, the pressure relief gas mainly accumulates in the working face fracture field, especially in the higher overlying strata. In the compaction field, gas concentration distribution form presents a “saddle” shape morphology in the vertical section, and gas concentration in boundary fracture zone is higher than in the compaction zone. It is remarkable that gas concentration in start-up fractured zone is also relatively high, and with the advance of working face, its gas enrichment degree decreases. The results of the research have an important guiding significance for coal and gas simultaneous extraction.

  12. Multi scale study of the plasticity at low temperature in {alpha}-iron: application for the cleavage; Etude multiechelle de la plasticite du fer-{alpha} a basse temperature application au clivage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaussidon, J

    2007-10-15

    An accident inside a nuclear power plant may lead to the cleavage of the nuclear vessel made of bainitic steel. In order to understand the origin of this fracture, we studied BCC-iron plasticity at low temperature using numerical simulations at different scales. Molecular Dynamics simulations show the high dependency of screw dislocation motion with temperature and stress. Results from these simulations were added to experiment data to develop a new Dislocation Dynamics code dedicated to BCC iron at low temperature. The code was used to model plasticity into a ferritic lath for various temperatures. This work confirms that cleavage is favoured by low temperatures. (author)

  13. Oxidative stress, caspase-3 activation and cleavage of ROCK-1 play an essential role in MeHg-induced cell death in primary astroglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; López-Granero, Caridad; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, João B T; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2018-02-08

    Methylmercury is a toxic environmental contaminant that elicits significant toxicity in humans. The central nervous system is the primary target of toxicity, and is particularly vulnerable during development. Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK-1) is a major downstream effector of the small GTPase RhoA and a direct substrate of caspase-3. The activation of ROCK-1 is necessary for membrane blebbing during apoptosis. In this work, we examined whether MeHg could affect the RhoA/ROCK-1 signaling pathway in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes. Exposure of cells with 10 μM MeHg decreased cellular viability after 24 h of incubation. This reduction in viability was preceded by a significant increase in intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels, as well as a reduced NAD + /NADH ratio. MeHg also induced an increase in mitochondrial-dependent caspase-9 and caspase-3, while the levels of RhoA protein expression were reduced or unchanged. We further found that MeHg induced ROCK-1 cleavage/activation and promoted LIMK1 and MYPT1 phosphorylation, both of which are the best characterized ROCK-1 downstream targets. Inhibiting ROCK-1 and caspases activation attenuated the MeHg-induced cell death. Collectively, these findings are the first to show that astrocytes exposed to MeHg showed increased cleavage/activation of ROCK-1, which was independent of the small GTPase RhoA. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Wide range stress intensity factor expressions for ASTM E 399 standard fracture toughness specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srawley, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    For each of the two types of specimens, bend and compact, described previously for plane strain fracture toughness of materials, E 399, a polynominal expression is given for calculation of the stress intensity factor, K, from the applied force, P, and the specimen dimensions. It is explicitly stated, however, that these expressions should not be used outside the range of relative crack length, a/W, from 0.45 to 0.55. While this range is sufficient for the purpose of E 399, the same specimen types are often used for other purposes over a much wider range of a/W; for example, in the study of fatigue crack growth. Expressions are presented which are at least as accurate as those in E 399-74, and which cover much wider ranges of a/W: for the three-point bend specimen from 0 to 1; and for the compact specimen from 0.2 to 1. The range has to be restricted for the compact specimen because of the proximity of the loading pin holes to the crackline, which causes the stress intensity factor to be sensitive to small variations in dimensions when a/W is small. This is a penalty inherently associated with the compactness of the specimen.

  15. Incidence and risk factors for medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fracture in high school runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Shigenori; Muneta, Takeshi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2013-03-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) and tibial stress fracture (SF) are common lower leg disorders in runners. A prospective study was done to identify the incidence of MTSS and SF in high school runners and to determine risk factors. A total of 230 runners participating in high school running teams were evaluated. All runners aged 15 years as first grade of high school were involved in the study. They were followed up for 3 years. The measured items included height, weight, body mass index (BMI), range of hip and ankle motion, straight leg raising (SLR), intercondylar and intermalleolar interval, Q-angle, navicular drop test, hip abductor strength and physical conditioning. Each runner was followed for 3 years to report occurrence of MTSS and SF. A total number of 102 MTSS (0.29 athlete exposures) and 21 SF (0.06 athlete exposures) were identified. In females, BMI significantly increased the risk of MTSS after adjustment for the other variables in this study (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95 % confidence interval, 0.31-0.86). Increased internal rotation of the hip significantly increased the risk of MTSS (adjusted odds ratio, 0.91; 95 % confidence interval, 0.85-0.99). In males, limited SLR also significantly increased the risk of SF with adjustment for the other variables in this study (adjusted odds ratio, 1.38; 95 % confidence interval, 1.04-1.83). A significant relationship was found between BMI, internal hip rotation angle and MTSS in females, and between limited SLR and SF in males. Prospective cohort study, Level II.

  16. ACR Appropriateness Criteria®Stress (Fatigue/Insufficiency) Fracture, Including Sacrum, Excluding Other Vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencardino, Jenny T; Stone, Taylor J; Roberts, Catherine C; Appel, Marc; Baccei, Steven J; Cassidy, R Carter; Chang, Eric Y; Fox, Michael G; Greenspan, Bennett S; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Hochman, Mary G; Jacobson, Jon A; Mintz, Douglas N; Mlady, Gary W; Newman, Joel S; Rosenberg, Zehava S; Shah, Nehal A; Small, Kirstin M; Weissman, Barbara N

    2017-05-01

    Stress fractures, including both fatigue and insufficiency types, are frequently encountered in clinical practice as a source of pain in both athletes and patients with predisposing conditions. Radiography is the imaging modality of choice for baseline diagnosis. MRI has greatly improved our ability to diagnose radiographically occult stress fractures. Tc-99m bone scan and CT may also be useful as diagnostic tools. Although fatigue and insufficiency fractures can be self-limited and go onto healing even without diagnosis, there is usually value in initiating prompt therapeutic measures as incomplete stress fractures have the potential of progressing to completion and requiring more invasive treatment or delay in return to activity. This is particularly important in the setting of stress fractures of the femoral neck. Accuracy in the identification of these injuries is also relevant because the differential diagnosis includes entities that would otherwise be treated significantly different (ie, osteoid osteoma, osteomyelitis, and metastasis). The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrated In Situ Stress Estimation by Hydraulic Fracturing, Borehole Observations and Numerical Analysis at the EXP-1 Borehole in Pohang, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanna; Xie, Linmao; Min, Ki-Bok; Bae, Seongho; Stephansson, Ove

    2017-12-01

    It is desirable to combine the stress measurement data produced by different methods to obtain a more reliable estimation of in situ stress. We present a regional case study of integrated in situ stress estimation by hydraulic fracturing, observations of borehole breakouts and drilling-induced fractures, and numerical modeling of a 1 km-deep borehole (EXP-1) in Pohang, South Korea. Prior to measuring the stress, World Stress Map (WSM) and modern field data in the Korean Peninsula are used to construct a best estimate stress model in this area. Then, new stress data from hydraulic fracturing and borehole observations is added to determine magnitude and orientation of horizontal stresses. Minimum horizontal principal stress is estimated from the shut-in pressure of the hydraulic fracturing measurement at a depth of about 700 m. The horizontal stress ratios ( S Hmax/ S hmin) derived from hydraulic fracturing, borehole breakout, and drilling-induced fractures are 1.4, 1.2, and 1.1-1.4, respectively, and the average orientations of the maximum horizontal stresses derived by field methods are N138°E, N122°E, and N136°E, respectively. The results of hydraulic fracturing and borehole observations are integrated with a result of numerical modeling to produce a final rock stress model. The results of the integration give in situ stress ratios of 1.3/1.0/0.8 ( S Hmax/ S V/ S hmin) with an average azimuth of S Hmax in the orientation range of N130°E-N136°E. It is found that the orientation of S Hmax is deviated by more than 40° clockwise compared to directions reported for the WSM in southeastern Korean peninsula.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; Nafi Toksoz

    2006-03-16

    Using a 3-D finite difference method with a rotated-staggered-grid (RSG) scheme we generated synthetic seismograms for a reservoir model consisting of three horizontal layers with the middle layer containing parallel, equally spaced fractures. By separating and analyzing the backscattered signals in the FK domain, we can obtain an estimate of the fracture spacing. The fracture spacing is estimated by taking one-half of the reciprocal of the dominant wavenumber of the backscattered energy in data acquired normal to the fractures. FK analysis for fracture spacing estimation was successfully applied to these model results, with particular focus on PS converted waves. The method was then tested on data from the Emilio Field. The estimated fracture spacing from the dominant wavenumber values in time windows at and below the reservoir level is 25-40m. A second approach for fracture spacing estimation is based on the observation that interference of forward and backscattered energy from fractures introduces notches in the frequency spectra of the scattered wavefield for data acquired normal to the fracture strike. The frequency of these notches is related to the spacing of the fractures. This Spectral Notch Method was also applied to the Emilio data, with the resulting range of fracture spacing estimates being 25-50m throughout the field. The dominant spacing fracture spacing estimate is about 30-40 m, which is very similar to the estimates obtained from the FK method.

  19. Stress inversion using borehole images and geometry evolution of the fractures in the Rittershoffen EGS project (Alsace, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzola, Jérôme; Valley, Benoît; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Genter, Albert; Hehn, Régis

    2017-04-01

    In the Upper Rhine Graben, several deep geothermal projects based on the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) exploit local geothermal reservoirs. The principle underlying this technology consists of increasing the hydraulic performances of the reservoir by stimulating natural fractures using different methods, in order to extract hot water with commercially flow rates. In this domain, the knowledge of the in-situ stress state is of central importance to predict the response of the rock mass to stimulations. Here we characterized the stress tensor from Ultrasonic Borehole Imager (UBI) in the open hole section of the EGS doublet located in Rittershoffen, France (in the Upper Rhine Graben). Interestingly extensive logging programs were leaded at different key moments of the development of the injection well using hydraulic, thermal and chemical stimulation (Baujard et al., 2017)1. The time lapse UBI dataset consists of images of the injection well before, shortly and lastly after the stimulation. The geometry of the induced fractures in compression (breakouts) picked on the UBI images are used to determine the orientation of the in-situ stress tensor. The magnitude of the principal stresses is deduced from the drilling data. The magnitude of the maximum horizontal principal stress is evaluated using an inversion method with three failure criteria (Mohr-Coulomb, Mogi-Coulomb and modified Hoek-Brown criterion) and under the assumption of a vertical or a deviated well. Moreover, the characteristic of the dataset enables the analysis of the evolution of the borehole fracturing, as the deepening or widening of the induced fractures. The correlation of the UBI image allows firstly to determine the tool trajectory and to adapt the post and pre-stimulation images. It secondly leads to the estimation of a complete displacement field which characterizes the deformation induced by the stimulations. Even if the variable image quality deeply conditions the comparison, the considered

  20. Rib stress fractures among rowers: definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors and effectiveness of injury prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Lisa K; Hume, Patria A; Nolte, Volker

    2011-11-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) can have serious effects on rowing training and performance and accordingly represent an important topic for sports medicine practitioners. Therefore, the aim of this review is to outline the definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors, injury management and injury prevention strategies for RSF in rowers. To this end, nine relevant books, 140 journal articles, the proceedings of five conferences and two unpublished presentations were reviewed after searches of electronic databases using the keywords 'rowing', 'rib', 'stress fracture', 'injury', 'mechanics' and 'kinetics'. The review showed that RSF is an incomplete fracture occurring from an imbalance between the rate of bone resorption and the rate of bone formation. RSF occurs in 8.1-16.4% of elite rowers, 2% of university rowers and 1% of junior elite rowers. Approximately 86% of rowing RSF cases with known locations occur in ribs four to eight, mostly along the anterolateral/lateral rib cage. Elite rowers are more likely to experience RSF than nonelite rowers. Injury occurrence is equal among sweep rowers and scullers, but the regional location of the injury differs. The mechanism of injury is multifactorial with numerous intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors contributing. Posterior-directed resultant forces arising from the forward directed force vector through the arms to the oar handle in combination with the force vector induced by the scapula retractors during mid-drive, or repetitive stress from the external obliques and rectus abdominis in the 'finish' position, may be responsible for RSF. Joint hypomobility, vertebral malalignment or low bone mineral density may be associated with RSF. Case studies have shown increased risk associated with amenorrhoea, low bone density or poor technique, in combination with increases in training volume. Training volume alone may have less effect on injury than other factors. Large differences in seat and handle

  1. Energy Release Rate in hydraulic fracture: can we neglect an impact of the hydraulically induced shear stress?

    CERN Document Server

    Wrobel, Michal; Piccolroaz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A novel hydraulic fracture (HF) formulation is introduced which accounts for the hydraulically induced shear stress at the crack faces. It utilizes a general form of the elasticity operator alongside a revised fracture propagation condition based on the critical value of the energy release rate. It is shown that the revised formulation describes the underlying physics of HF in a more accurate way and is in agreement with the asymptotic behaviour of the linear elastic fracture mechanics. A number of numerical simulations by means of the universal HF algorithm previously developed in Wrobel & Mishuris (2015) are performed in order to: i) compare the modified HF formulation with its classic counterpart and ii) investigate the peculiarities of the former. Computational advantages of the revised HF model are demonstrated. Asymptotic estimations of the main solution elements are provided for the cases of small and large toughness. The modified formulation opens new ways to analyse the physical phenomenon of HF ...

  2. [Stress fracture of the scapular spine associated with rotator cuff dysfunction: Report of 3 cases and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Coiradas, J; Lópiz, Y; Marco, F

    2014-01-01

    Scapular spine stress fractures have been scarcely reported in the literature. Their pathomechanics, clinical course and treatment are not well established. We review 3 cases in 2 patients that were associated with cuff dysfunction. On follow-up, none of these fractures progressed to healing. Two of them needed osteosynthesis and bone grafting, and the third one became a painless non-union. The authors propose the combination of 3 factors as a reason for this lesion: a functionally impaired cuff, a greater activation of the muscles with origin and insertion in the spine-acromion and a fragile bone. As we believe that these fractures are unstable, and non-union would be expected, their surgical management is recommended. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2004-07-19

    Expanded details and additional results are presented on two methods for estimating fracture orientation and density in subsurface reservoirs from scattered seismic wavefield signals. In the first, fracture density is estimated from the wavenumber spectra of the integrated amplitudes of the scattered waves as a function of offset in pre-stack data. Spectral peaks correctly identified the 50m, 35m, and 25m fracture spacings from numerical model data using a 40Hz source wavelet. The second method, referred to as the Transfer Function-Scattering Index Method, is based upon observations from 3D finite difference modeling that regularly spaced, discrete vertical fractures impart a ringing coda-type signature to any seismic energy that is transmitted through or reflected off of them. This coda energy is greatest when the acquisition direction is parallel to the fractures, the seismic wavelengths are tuned to the fracture spacing, and when the fractures have low stiffness. The method uses surface seismic reflection traces to derive a transfer function, which quantifies the change in an apparent source wavelet propagating through a fractured interval. The transfer function for an interval with low scattering will be more spike-like and temporally compact. The transfer function for an interval with high scattering will ring and be less temporally compact. A Scattering Index is developed based on a time lag weighting of the transfer function. When a 3D survey is acquired with a full range of azimuths, the Scattering Index allows the identification of subsurface areas with high fracturing and the orientation (or strike) of those fractures. The method was calibrated with model data and then applied to field data from a fractured reservoir giving results that agree with known field measurements. As an aid to understanding the scattered wavefield seen in finite difference models, a series of simple point scatterers was used to create synthetic seismic shot records collected over

  4. Overall evaluation of the effect of residual stress induced by shot peening in the improvement of fatigue fracture resistance for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renzhi; Ru, Jilai

    2015-03-01

    Before 1980s, the circular suspension spring in automobile subjected to torsion fatigue load, under the cyclic normal tensile stresses, the majority of fatigue fracture occurred was in normal tensile fracture mode(NTFM) and the fracture surface was under 45° diagonal. Because there exists the interaction between the residual stresses induced by shot peening and the applied cyclic normal tensile stresses in NTFM, which represents as "stress strengthening mechanism", shot peening technology could be used for improving the fatigue fracture resistance(FFR) of springs. However, since 1990s up to date, in addition to regular NTFM, the fatigue fractures occurred of peened springs from time to time are in longitudinal shear fracture mode(LSFM) or transverse shear fracture mode(TSFM) with the increase of applied cyclic shear stresses, which leads to a remarkable decrease of FFR. However, LSFM/TSFM can be avoided effectively by means of shot peening treatment again on the peened springs. The phenomena have been rarely happened before. At present there are few literatures concerning this problem. Based upon the results of force analysis of a spring, there is no interaction between the residual stresses by shot peening and the applied cyclic shear stresses in shear fracture. This means that the effect of "stress strengthening mechanism" for improving the FFR of LSFM/TSFM is disappeared basically. During shot peening, however, both of residual stress and cyclic plastic deformed microstructure are induced synchronously like "twins" in the surface layer of a spring. It has been found for the first time by means of force analysis and experimental results that the modified microstructure in the "twins" as a "structure strengthening mechanism" can improve the FFR of LSFM/TSFM. At the same time, it is also shown that the optimum technology of shot peening strengthening must have both "stress strengthening mechanism" and "structure strengthening mechanism" simultaneously so that the

  5. Iliotibial band release as an adjunct to the surgical management of patellar stress fracture in the athlete: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeley Anthony

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stress fracture of the patella is rare. In this report, a case of patellar stress fracture occurring in an amateur athlete is presented, and an operative adjunct to the surgical management of this condition is proposed. A review of the English literature identified 21 previous cases of stress fracture of the patella, the majority in young athletes. None of these reports discussed treatment addressing the pathological process contributing to patellar stress fracture. The subject of this case report is a young male netballer who presented with a transverse stress fracture in the inferior third of his patella, on a background of patellofemoral overload. The patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of his patella, combined with release of the iliotibial band. He returned to training after 6 weeks. The previous literature suggests that operative fixation is indicated for the treatment of displaced patellar stress fractures. Iliotibial band release, as a surgical adjunct to this treatment, may address the pathology of these fractures, and facilitate a return to sport at the highest level.

  6. Direct microscopic observation of striations in a fractured section of a sirolimus-eluting stent (Cypher Bx Velocity®) indicates induction of stent fracture by continuous shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akira; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Kashiwagi, Yusuke; Mutoh, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman with severe congestive heart failure was treated by implantation with a sirolimus-eluting stent (SES; Cypher Bx Velocity(®)) in the left main coronary artery (LMCA) using the staged T-stent, kissing balloon, and hugging balloon techniques. Follow-up coronary multislice computed tomography after 10 months revealed that SES was completely fractured in 2 directions; the fractured stent appeared in the shape of the letter "L" and had migrated into the aorta. An SES fragment was surgically removed and subsequent electron microscopy revealed striations (striped patterns in fractured sections) on the fracture plane, indicating continuous shear stress after SES implantation in the LMCA. This case provides direct evidence of continuous shear stress on the SES and indicates the necessity of improving the structure of the stent such that it can withstand shear stress.

  7. Effect of far-field stresses and residual stresses incorporation in predicting fracture toughness of carbon nanotube reinforced yttria stabilized zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Neelima; Nisar, Ambreen; Mohapatra, Pratyasha; Rawat, Siddharth; Ariharan, S.; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-10-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a potential thermal insulating ceramic for high temperature applications (>1000 °C). YSZ reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was processed via spark plasma sintering to produce dense, crack-free homogeneous sample and avoid any degradation of MWNTs when sintered using conventional routes. Despite porosity, the addition of MWNT has a profound effect in improving the damage tolerance of YSZ by allowing the retention of tetragonal phase. However, at some instances, the crack lengths in the MWNT reinforced YSZ matrices have been found to be longer than the standalone counterparts. Therefore, it becomes inappropriate to apply Anstis equation to calculate fracture toughness values. In this regard, a combined analytical cum numerical method is used to estimate the theoretical fracture toughness and quantitatively analyze the mechanics of matrix cracking in the reinforced composite matrices incorporating the effects of various factors (such as far-field stresses, volume fraction of MWNTs, change in the modulus and Poisson's ratio values along with the increase in porosity, and bridging and phase transformation mechanism) affecting the fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites. The results suggest that the incorporation of far-field stresses cannot be ignored in estimating the theoretical fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, E C; Robertson, A F; Malara, F A; O'Shea, T; Roebert, J K; Schneider, M E; Rotstein, A H

    2016-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, E.C.; Robertson, A.F.; Malara, F.A.; O' Shea, T.; Roebert, J.K.; Rotstein, A.H. [Victoria House Medical Imaging, Prahran, Victoria (Australia); Schneider, M.E. [Monash University, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  10. Characterization of In-Situ Stress and Permeability in Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2006-06-30

    Fracture orientation and spacing are important parameters in reservoir development. This project resulted in the development and testing of a new method for estimating fracture orientation and two new methods for estimating fracture spacing from seismic data. The methods developed were successfully applied to field data from fractured carbonate reservoirs. Specific results include: the development a new method for estimating fracture orientation from scattered energy in seismic data; the development of two new methods for estimating fracture spacing from scattered energy in seismic data; the successful testing of these methods on numerical model data and field data from two fractured carbonate reservoirs; and the validation of fracture orientation results with borehole data from the two fields. Researchers developed a new method for determining the reflection and scattering characteristics of seismic energy from subsurface fractured formations. The method is based upon observations made from 3D finite difference modeling of the reflected and scattered seismic energy over discrete systems of vertical fractures. Regularly spaced, discrete vertical fractures impart a ringing coda type signature to seismic energy that is transmitted through or reflected off of them. This signature varies in amplitude and coherence as a function of several parameters including: (1) the difference in angle between the orientation of the fractures and the acquisition direction, (2) the fracture spacing, (3) the wavelength of the illuminating seismic energy, and (4) the compliance, or stiffness, of the fractures. This coda energy is the most coherent when the acquisition direction is parallel to the strike of the fractures. It has the largest amplitude when the seismic wavelengths are tuned to the fracture spacing, and when the fractures have low stiffness. The method uses surface seismic reflection traces to derive a transfer function that quantifies the change in the apparent source

  11. Stress fractures of the ankle malleoli diagnosed by ultrasound: a report of 6 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Stefano [CIM SA, Cabinet Imagerie Medicale, Geneve (Switzerland); Luong, Dien Hung [CIM SA, Cabinet Imagerie Medicale, Geneve (Switzerland); University of Montreal, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Montreal (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    To present the ultrasound appearance of stress fractures (SF) of the ankle malleoli. We present a retrospective review of 6 patients (4 women and 2 men, with an age range of 24-52 years, mean age of 39 years) in which ultrasound diagnosed, together with the clinical findings, an SF of the ankle malleoli. For all of these patients ultrasound was the first imaging technique applied because of a clinical suspicion of soft tissue injuries following excessive exertion. Patients were subsequently examined using standard radiographs and/or MRI. At ultrasound patients showed thickening of the periosteum in all patients, calcified bone callus was evident in 3 out of 6 patients. Cortical irregularities and subcutaneous oedema were found in all but one patient. Colour Doppler showed local hypervascular changes in all patients. Local compression with the transducers during real-time scanning increased pain in all cases. Ultrasound, together with the clinical findings, can diagnose an SF of the ankle malleoli. We suggest that sonologists should include malleolar SF in their differential diagnosis, particularly in the case of perimalleolar pain from over-solicitation. They must also include, as part of every ultrasound examination of the ankle, the evaluation of both malleoli and should be aware of the ultrasound appearance of malleolar SF. If the diagnosis remains uncertain, an MRI should be prescribed. (orig.)

  12. Addition of perfluorocarbons to alginate hydrogels significantly impacts molecular transport and fracture stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joseph C; Stoppel, Whitney L; Roberts, Susan C; Bhatia, Surita R

    2013-02-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are used in biomaterial formulations to increase oxygen (O(2) ) tension and create a homogeneous O(2) environment in three-dimensional tissue constructs. It is unclear how PFCs affect mechanical and transport properties of the scaffold, which are critical for robustness, intracellular signaling, protein transport, and overall device efficacy. In this study, we investigate composite alginate hydrogels containing a perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) emulsion stabilized with Pluronic(®) F68 (F68). We demonstrate that PFC addition significantly affects biomaterial properties and performance. Solution and hydrogel mechanical properties and transport of representative hydrophilic (riboflavin), hydrophobic (methyl and ethyl paraben), and protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) solutes were compared in alginate/F68 composite hydrogels with or without PFOB. Our results indicate that mechanical properties of the alginate/F68/PFOB hydrogels are not significantly affected under small strains, but a significant decrease fracture stress is observed. The effective diffusivity D(eff) of hydrophobic small molecules decreases with PFOB emulsion addition, yet the D(eff) of hydrophilic small molecules remained unaffected. For BSA, the D(eff) increased and the loading capacity decreased with PFOB emulsion addition. Thus, a trade-off between the desired increased O(2) supply provided by PFCs and the mechanical weakening and change in transport of cellular signals must be carefully considered in the design of biomaterials containing PFCs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Transdermal drug delivery: feasibility for treatment of superficial bone stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh-Habashi, Ali; Yang, Yang; Tang, Kathy; Lőbenberg, Raimar; Doschak, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers the promise of effective drug therapy at selective sites of pathology whilst reducing systemic exposure to the pharmaceutical agents in off-target organs and tissues. However, that strategy is often limited to cells comprising superficial tissues of the body (rarely to deeper bony structures) and mostly indicated with small hydrophobic pharmacological agents, such as steroid hormones and anti-inflammatory gels to skin, muscle, and joints. Nonetheless, advances in transdermal liposomal formulation have rendered the ability to readily incorporate pharmacologically active hydrophilic drug molecules and small peptide biologics into transdermal dosage forms to impart the effective delivery of those bioactive agents across the skin barrier to underlying superficial tissue structures including bone, often enhanced by some form of electrical, chemical, and mechanical facilitation. In the following review, we evaluate transdermal drug delivery systems, with a particular focus on delivering therapeutic agents to treat superficial bone pain, notably stress fractures. We further introduce and discuss several small peptide hormones active in bone (such as calcitonins and parathyroid hormone) that have shown potential for transdermal delivery, often under the added augmentation of transdermal drug delivery systems that employ lipo/hydrophilicity, electric charge, and/or microprojection facilitation across the skin barrier.

  14. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee associated with ipsilateral tibial plateau stress fracture: report of two patients and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokoloff, R.M.; Farooki, S.; Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Two cases are presented of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK) associated with stress fractures of the tibial plateau. This association lends further credence to the postulate that SONK has a traumatic etiology. (orig.)

  15. Transverse stress fracture of the distal diaphysis of the third metacarpus in six Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, P H L

    2009-07-01

    Fractures involving the fetlock region are encountered commonly in Thoroughbred racehorses. Condylar fractures of the distal metacarpus/metatarsus and mid-sagittal fractures of the proximal phalanx account for the majority of fetlock injuries during both racing and training and clinical features, management and outcome of these injuries have been well described. Transverse fractures of the distal diaphysis of the third metacarpus, however, are seldom observed and have received little attention in the literature. This paper describes clinical and radiological findings associated with 6 cases encountered in first opinion racehorse practice over a 3 year period. Transverse third metacarpal fractures vary in presentation but typically have clinical signs referable to the fetlock region and may, on occasion, be life-threatening. They are therefore an important differential diagnosis when a fracture involving the fetlock is suspected.

  16. Reference point indentation is not indicative of whole mouse bone measures of stress intensity fracture toughness

    OpenAIRE

    Carriero, Alessandra; Bruse, Jan L.; Oldknow, Karla J.; Millán, José Luis; Farquharson, Colin; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Bone fragility is a concern for aged and diseased bone. Measuring bone toughness and understanding fracture properties of the bone are critical for predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease and for preclinical testing of therapies. A reference point indentation technique (BioDent) has recently been developed to determine bone's resistance to fracture in a minimally invasive way by measuring the indentation distance increase (IDI) between the first and last indentations over cyc...

  17. Stress and Fracture Analyses Under Elastic-plastic and Creep Conditions: Some Basic Developments and Computational Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, K. W.; Stonesifer, R. B.; Atluri, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    A new hybrid-stress finite element algorith, suitable for analyses of large quasi-static deformations of inelastic solids, is presented. Principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress-rate and spin. A such, a consistent reformulation of the constitutive equation is necessary, and is discussed. The finite element equations give rise to an initial value problem. Time integration has been accomplished by Euler and Runge-Kutta schemes and the superior accuracy of the higher order schemes is noted. In the course of integration of stress in time, it has been demonstrated that classical schemes such as Euler's and Runge-Kutta may lead to strong frame-dependence. As a remedy, modified integration schemes are proposed and the potential of the new schemes for suppressing frame dependence of numerically integrated stress is demonstrated. The topic of the development of valid creep fracture criteria is also addressed.

  18. Literature survey: Relations between stress change, deformation and transmissivity for fractures and deformation zones based on in situ investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, Aasa (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    This literature survey is focused upon relations between stress change, deformation and transmissivity for fractures and deformation zones and aims at compiling and commenting on relevant information and references with focus on data from in situ investigations. Main issues to investigate are: - Impact of normal stress change and deformation on transmissivity, for fractures and deformation zones. - Impact of shear stress and displacement on transmissivity, for fractures and deformation zones for different normal load conditions. Considering the line of research within the area, the following steps in the development can be identified. During the 1970's and 1980's, the fundamentals of rock joint deformation were investigated and identification and description of mechanisms were made in the laboratory. In the 1990's, coupling of stress-flow properties of rock joints were made using hydraulic testing to identify and describe the mechanisms in the field. Both individual fractures and deformation zones were of interest. In situ investigations have also been the topic of interest the last ten years. Further identification and description of mechanisms in the field have been made including investigation and description of system of fractures, different types of fractures (interlocked/mated or mismatched/unmated) and how this is coupled to the hydromechanical behavior. In this report, data from in situ investigations are compiled and the parameters considered to be important to link fracture deformation and transmissivity are normal stiffness, k{sub n} and hydraulic aperture, b{sub h}. All data except for those from one site originate from investigations performed in granitic rock. Normal stiffness, k{sub n}, and hydraulic aperture, b{sub h}, are correlated, even though data are scattered. In general, the largest variation is seen for small hydraulic apertures and high normal stiffness. The increasing number of contact points (areas) and fracture filling are

  19. Experimental-numerical evaluation of a new butterfly specimen for fracture characterisation of AHSS in a wide range of stress states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshekhodov, I.; Jiang, S.; Vucetic, M.; Bouguecha, A.; Berhens, B.-A.

    2016-11-01

    Results of an experimental-numerical evaluation of a new butterfly specimen for fracture characterisation of AHHS sheets in a wide range of stress states are presented. The test on the new butterfly specimen is performed in a uniaxial tensile machine and provides sufficient data for calibration of common fracture models. In the first part, results of a numerical specimen evaluation are presented, which was performed with a material model of a dual-phase steel DP600 taken from literature with plastic flow and fracture descriptions. In the second part, results of an experimental-numerical specimen evaluation are shown, which was conducted on another dual-phase steel DP600, which was available with a description of plastic flow only and whose fracture behaviour was characterised in the frame of this work. The overall performance of the new butterfly specimen at different load cases with regard to characterisation of the fracture behaviour of AHSS was investigated. The dependency of the fracture strain on the stress triaxiality and Lode angle as well as space resolution is quantified. A parametrised CrachFEM ductile shear fracture model and modified Mohr-Coloumb ductile shear fracture model are presented as a result of this quantification. The test procedure and results analysis are believed to contribute to current discussions on requirements to AHSS fracture characterisation.

  20. An integrated workflow for stress and flow modelling using outcrop-derived discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Nick, Hamid; Bertotti, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    stresssensitive fracture permeability and matrix flow to determine the full permeability tensor. The applicability of this workflow is illustrated using an outcropping carbonate pavement in the Potiguar basin in Brazil, from which 1082 fractures are digitised. The permeability tensor for a range of matrix...

  1. Micro-scale fracture experiments on zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, H., E-mail: howard.chan@materials.ox.ac.uk; Roberts, S.G.; Gong, J.

    2016-07-15

    Fracture properties of micro-scale zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries were studied using microcantilever testing methods. FIB-machined microcantilevers were milled on cross-sectional surfaces of hydrided samples, with the most highly-stressed regions within the δ-hydride film, within the α-Zr or along the Zr-hydride interface. Cantilevers were notched using the FIB and then tested in bending using a nanoindenter. Load-displacement results show that three types of cantilevers have distinct deformation properties. Zr cantilevers deformed plastically. Hydride cantilevers fractured after a small amount of plastic flow; the fracture toughness of the δ-hydride was found to be 3.3 ± 0.4 MPam{sup 1/2} and SEM examination showed transgranular cleavage on the fracture surfaces. Cantilevers notched at the Zr-hydride interface developed interfacial voids during loading, at loads considerably lower than that which initiate brittle fracture of hydrides.

  2. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  3. Fractures, stress and fluid flow prior to stimulation of well 27-15, Desert Peak, Nevada, EGS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2009-01-01

    A suite of geophysical logs has been acquired for structural, fluid flow and stress analysis of well 27-15 in the Desert Peak Geothermal Field, Nevada, in preparation for stimulation and development of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Advanced Logic Technologies Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) and Schlumberger Formation MicroScanner (FMS) image logs reveal extensive drilling-induced tensile fractures, showing that the current minimum compressive horizontal stress, Shmin, in the vicinity of well 27-15 is oriented along an azimuth of 114±17°. This orientation is consistent with the dip direction of recently active normal faults mapped at the surface and with extensive sets of fractures and some formation boundaries seen in the BHTV and FMS logs. Temperature and spinner flowmeter surveys reveal several minor flowing fractures that are well oriented for normal slip, although over-all permeability in the well is quite low. These results indicate that well 27-15 is a viable candidate for EGS stimulation and complements research by other investigators including cuttings analysis, a reflection seismic survey, pressure transient and tracer testing, and micro-seismic monitoring.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2005-02-04

    Numerical modeling and field data tests are presented on the Transfer Function/Scattering Index Method for estimating fracture orientation and density in subsurface reservoirs from the ''coda'' or scattered energy in the seismic trace. Azimuthal stacks indicate that scattered energy is enhanced along the fracture strike direction. A transfer function method is used to more effectively indicate fracture orientation. The transfer function method, which involves a comparison of the seismic signature above and below a reservoir interval, effectively eliminates overburden effects and acquisition imprints in the analysis. The transfer function signature is simplified into a scattering index attribute value that gives fracture orientation and spatial variations of the fracture density within a field. The method is applied to two field data sets, a 3-D Ocean Bottom Cable (OBC) seismic data set from an offshore fractured carbonate reservoir in the Adriatic Sea and a 3-D seismic data set from an onshore fractured carbonate field in the Middle East. Scattering index values are computed in both fields at the reservoir level, and the results are compared to borehole breakout data and Formation MicroImager (FMI) logs in nearby wells. In both cases the scattering index results are in very good agreement with the well data. Field data tests and well validation will continue. In the area of technology transfer, we have made presentations of our results to industry groups at MIT technical review meetings, international technical conferences, industry workshops, and numerous exploration and production company visits.

  5. Water Stress from High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Potentially Threatens Aquatic Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Arkansas, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entrekin, Sally; Trainor, Anne; Saiers, James; Patterson, Lauren; Maloney, Kelly; Fargione, Joseph; Kiesecker, Joseph; Baruch-Mordo, Sharon; Konschnik, Katherine; Wiseman, Hannah; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Ryan, Joseph N

    2018-01-31

    Demand for high-volume, short duration water withdrawals could create water stress to aquatic organisms in Fayetteville Shale streams sourced for hydraulic fracturing fluids. We estimated potential water stress using permitted water withdrawal volumes and actual water withdrawals compared to monthly median, low, and high streamflows. Risk for biological stress was considered at 20% of long-term median and 10% of high- and low-flow thresholds. Future well build-out projections estimated potential for continued stress. Most water was permitted from small, free-flowing streams and "frack" ponds (dammed streams). Permitted 12-h pumping volumes exceeded median streamflow at 50% of withdrawal sites in June, when flows were low. Daily water usage, from operator disclosures, compared to median streamflow showed possible water stress in 7-51% of catchments from June-November, respectively. If 100% of produced water was recycled, per-well water use declined by 25%, reducing threshold exceedance by 10%. Future water stress was predicted to occur in fewer catchments important for drinking water and species of conservation concern due to the decline in new well installations and increased use of recycled water. Accessible and precise withdrawal and streamflow data are critical moving forward to assess and mitigate water stress in streams that experience high-volume withdrawals.

  6. Interleukin-6 as possible early marker of stress response after femoral fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesic, Goran; Jeremic, Jovana; Nikolic, Tamara; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Srejovic, Ivan; Vranic, Aleksandra; Bradic, Jovana; Ristic, Branko; Matic, Aleksandar; Prodanovic, Nikola; Jakovljevic, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    Bone fracture healing is a complex process which at best results in full recovery of function and structure of injured bone tissue, but all the mechanisms involved in this process, and their mutual interaction, are not fully understood. Despite advancement of surgical procedures, this type of fractures is still a major public health concern. In the last few decades, a lot of attention is focused on the oxygen-free radicals and inflammatory response markers as important factors of skeletal injury. Thus, the aim of the present study was to follow the changes in redox balance and inflammatory response in elderly patients with femoral fractures during the earliest stages of fracture healing, by measuring the values of the observed markers immediately after fracture, as well as the first, third, and seventh postoperative day. Present study was performed on a group of 65 elderly patients with femoral neck fractures, recruited from the Orthopedic Clinic, Clinical Centre Kragujevac in the period from February to May 2015. Redox status was measured spectrophotometrically and evaluated by measuring the levels of index of lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS), nitrite (NO 2 - ), superoxide anion radical (O 2 - ), and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) in plasma, while activities of corresponding antioxidative enzymes, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in erythrocytes. The cytokine concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were determined in plasma, using ELISA assays specific for human cytokines. Our study showed that redox status and TNF-α in elderly patients with femoral fractures did not show statistically significant changes during the early phase of fracture healing. On the other hand, IL-6 increased statistically in first day after intervention. This preliminary study has shown our observations, and we hope that these results may help in better understanding mechanisms which are included at

  7. Analysis of stress-strain, fracture and ductility behavior of aluminum matrix composites containing discontinuous silicon carbide reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical properties and stress-strain behavior for several types of commercially fabricated aluminum matrix composites, containing up to 40 vol % discontinuous SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement were evaluated. It was found that the elastic modulus of the composites was isotropic, to be independent of type of reinforcement, and to be controlled solely by the volume percentage of SiC reinforcement present. The yield/tensile strengths and ductility were controlled primarily by the matrix alloy and temper condition. Ductility decreased with increasing reinforcement content, however, the fracture strains observed were higher than those reported in the literature for this type of composite. This increase in fracture strain is attributed to cleaner matrix powder and increased mechanical working during fabrication. Conventional aluminum and titanium structural alloys were compared and have shown that the properties of these low cost, lightweight composites have good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  8. Cleavage of Bid by Executioner Caspases Mediates Feed Forward Amplification of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Permeabilization during Genotoxic Stress-induced Apoptosis in Jurkat Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Shary N.; Shawgo, Mary E.; Robertson, John D.

    2009-01-01

    The extent to which the BH3-only protein Bid is important for intrinsic (mitochondria-mediated) apoptotic cell death induced by genotoxic stress remains controversial. In the present study, we examine this issue using a panel of gene-manipulated Bax-deficient Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Cells stably depleted of Bid were far less sensitive than control-transfected cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis. In particular, drug-induced Bak activation, cytochrome c release, loss of m...

  9. Evaluation of crack-tip stress fields on microstructural-scale fracture in Al-Al2O3 interpenetrating network composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Moon; Mark Hoffman; Jurgen Rödel; Shigemi Tochino; Giuseppe Pezzotti

    2009-01-01

    The influence of local microstructure on the fracture process at the crack tip in a ceramic–metal composite was assessed by comparing the measured stress at a microstructural level and analogous finite element modelling (FEM). Fluorescence microprobe spectroscopy was used to investigate the influence of near-crack-tip stress fields on the resulting crack propagation at...

  10. Case of femoral diaphyseal stress fracture after long-term risedronate administration diagnosed by iliac bone biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai T

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Takashi Nagai, Keizo Sakamoto, Koji Ishikawa, Emi Saito, Takuma Kuroda, Katsunori Inagaki Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Showa University School of Medicine, Shinagwa-ku, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Bisphosphonate excessively inhibits bone resorption and results in pathological fracture of the femur or ilium. The subject of this study was administered risedronate for 7 years; we suspected an easy fracture of the femoral diaphysis. In this study, we report the results of this patient's bone biopsy and bone morphometric analysis. A 76-year-old female patient presented with right femoral pain. Bone mineral density of the anteroposterior surface of the 2nd to 4th lumbar vertebrae (L2-L4 was decreased and levels of bone turnover markers were high. Therefore, we initiated treatment with risedronate. As she continued the medication, urinary levels of cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase (bone-type isozyme were found to be within the normal ranges. After 7 years of administration, the patient experienced pain when she put weight on the right femur and right femoral pain while walking. Plain radiographic examination revealed polypoid stress fracture-like lesions on the right femoral diaphysis and on the slightly distal-lateral cortical bone. Similar lesions were observed on magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy. We suspected severely suppressed bone turnover. Bone biopsy was obtained after labeling with tetracycline, and bone morphometric analysis was performed. On microscopic examination, slight double tetracycline labeling was observed. The trabeculae were narrow, and the numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts were decreased. Further, rates of bone calcification and bone formation were slow. Hence, we diagnosed fracture as a result of low turnover osteopathy. Risedronate was withdrawn, and Vitamin D3 was administered to improve the bone turnover. At 6 months, abnormal signals on magnetic resonance

  11. Effect of stress-triaxiality on void growth in dynamic fracture of metals: a molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppala, E T; Belak, J; Rudd, R E

    2003-10-07

    The effect of stress-triaxiality on growth of a void in a three dimensional single-crystal face-centered-cubic (FCC) lattice has been studied. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using an embedded-atom (EAM) potential for copper have been performed at room temperature and using strain controlling with high strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7}/sec to 10{sup 10}/sec. Strain-rates of these magnitudes can be studied experimentally, e.g. using shock waves induced by laser ablation. Void growth has been simulated in three different conditions, namely uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial expansion. The response of the system in the three cases have been compared in terms of the void growth rate, the detailed void shape evolution, and the stress-strain behavior including the development of plastic strain. Also macroscopic observables as plastic work and porosity have been computed from the atomistic level. The stress thresholds for void growth are found to be comparable with spall strength values determined by dynamic fracture experiments. The conventional macroscopic assumption that the mean plastic strain results from the growth of the void is validated. The evolution of the system in the uniaxial case is found to exhibit four different regimes: elastic expansion; plastic yielding, when the mean stress is nearly constant, but the stress-triaxiality increases rapidly together with exponential growth of the void; saturation of the stress-triaxiality; and finally the failure.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2005-08-01

    During the past six months we have adapted our 3-D elastic, anisotropic finite difference code by implementing the rotated staggered grid (RSG) method to more accurately represent large contrasts of elastic moduli between the fractures and surrounding formation, and applying the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition to minimize boundary reflections. Two approaches for estimating fracture spacing from scattered seismic energy were developed. The first relates notches in the amplitude spectra of the scattered wavefield to the dominant fracture spacing that caused the scattering. The second uses conventional FK filtering to isolate the backscattered signals and then recovers an estimate of the fracture spacing from the dominant wavelength of those signals. Both methods were tested on synthetic data and then applied to the Emilio field data. The spectral notch method estimated the Emilio fracture spacing to be about 30 to 40 m, while the FK method found fracture spacing of about 48 to 53 m. We continue to work on two field data sets from fractured carbonate reservoirs provided by our industry sponsors--the offshore Emilio Field data (provided by ENIAGIP), and an onshore reservoir from the Middle East (provided by Shell). Calibration data in the form of well logs and previous fracture studies are available for both data sets. In previous reports we showed the spatial distribution fractures in the Emilio Field based on our calculated scattering index values. To improve these results we performed a map migration of all the scattering indices. The results of this migration process show a very strong correlation between the spatial distribution and orientation of our estimated fracture distribution and the fault system in the field. We observe that the scattering index clusters tend to congregate around the fault zones, particularly near multiple faults and at fault tips. We have also processed a swath of data from the second data set (the onshore

  13. Stress fracture of the second metatarsal and sprain of lisfranc joint in a pre-professional ballet dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, Peter; Rafferty, Jason; Evangelista, Peter; Van Valkenburg, Scott; DiGiovanni, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old pre-professional ballerina that demonstrates common features of two conditions affecting the midfoot that are often missed or subject to delay in diagnosis in such young athletes: 1. stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal, and 2. sprain of the Lisfranc joint complex. While these represent potentially career-altering injuries in the professional dancer, this case demonstrates that a high index of clinical suspicion, careful physical exam, appropriate radiographic assessment, and prompt treatment are essential to achieving the best possible outcome.

  14. The effect of concentrated bone marrow aspirate in operative treatment of fifth metatarsal stress fractures; a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weel, Hanneke; Mallee, Wouter H; van Dijk, C Niek; Blankevoort, Leendert; Goedegebuure, Simon; Goslings, J Carel; Kennedy, John G; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2015-08-20

    Fifth metatarsal (MT-V) stress fractures often exhibit delayed union and are high-risk fractures for non-union. Surgical treatment, currently considered as the gold standard, does not give optimal results, with a mean time to fracture union of 12-18 weeks. In recent studies, the use of bone marrow cells has been introduced to accelerate healing of fractures with union problems. The aim of this randomized trial is to determine if operative treatment of MT-V stress fractures with use of concentrated blood and bone marrow aspirate (cB + cBMA) is more effective than surgery alone. We hypothesize that using cB + cBMA in the operative treatment of MT-V stress fractures will lead to an earlier fracture union. A prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted in an academic medical center in the Netherlands. Ethics approval is received. 50 patients will be randomized to either operative treatment with cB + cBMA, harvested from the iliac crest, or operative treatment without cB + cBMA but with a sham-treatment of the iliac crest. The fracture fixation is the same in both groups, as is the post-operative care.. Follow up will be one year. The primary outcome measure is time to union in weeks on X-ray. Secondary outcome measures are time to resumption of work and sports, functional outcomes (SF-36, FAOS, FAAM), complication rate, composition of osteoprogenitors in cB + cBMA and cost-effectiveness. Furthermore, a bone biopsy is taken from every stress fracture and analysed histologically to determine the stage of the stress fracture. The difference in primary endpoint between the two groups is analysed using student's t-test or equivalent. This trial will likely provide level-I evidence on the effectiveness of cB + cBMA in the operative treatment of MT-V stress fractures. Netherlands Trial Register (reg.nr NTR4377 ).

  15. Size effects and strain localization in atomic-scale cleavage modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, B. A. M.; Müller, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we study the adhesion and decohesion of Cu(1 0 0) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. An upper stress to surface decohesion is obtained via the universal binding energy relation (UBER), but the model is limited to rigid separation of bulk-terminated surfaces. When structural relaxations are included, an unphysical size effect arises if decohesion is considered to occur as soon as the strain energy equals the energy of the newly formed surfaces. We employ the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to show that this size effect is opposed by a size-dependency of the energy barriers involved in the transition. Further, we find that the transition occurs via a localization of bond strain in the vicinity of the cleavage plane, which resembles the strain localization at the tip of a sharp crack that is predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics.

  16. Evaluation Of Finite Element Mesh Arrangements And Stress Intensity Factor Calculation Methods For Opening Mode Fracture Of Cracked-Cemented Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R. Nikraz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture mechanics is a branch of mechanics, which deals with the cracked body. Every construction material that currently in use inevitably is not flawless. The pre-existing crack may grow to cause structure failure due to low stress, which acts to a structure. Stress intensity factor (K is a single parameter in fracture mechanics, which can be used to examine if a crack, would propagate in a cracked structure under particular loading condition. Finite element method is used to analyze the cracked body to provide the displacements data around the crack tip (at quarter point elements due to load prescribed, for stress intensity factor determination. Two methods of stress intensity factor calculation, Quarter Point Displacement Technique (QPDT and Displacement Correlation Technique (DCT, were evaluated. A series of standard fracture testing were undertaken to provide the fracture load data (Pf, which coupled with the stress intensity factor analytical formula to calculate fracture toughness. The results showed that under a particular mesh arrangement, the result of finite element analysis could deviate from the analytical formula calculation result. The QPDT method is suitable for compact tension specimen but DCT seemed to be not. For cracked beam analysis, the QPDT and DCT calculations were in good agreement with the analytical formula as long as coupled with the appropriate mesh arrangement around the crack tip.

  17. Effect of Stress-Induced Phase Transformation on the Fracture Toughness of Fe3Al Intermetallic Reinforced with Yttria-Partially Stabilized Zirconia Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri Talischi, Lima; Samadi, Ahad

    2017-10-01

    In this study, fracture toughness and microhardness of Fe3Al intermetallic reinforced with yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (Y-PSZ) particles were investigated. Fe3Al/Y-PSZ composites containing up to 20 wt pct of Y-PSZ were fabricated by hot pressing of powder mixtures. It is found that the microhardness and fracture toughness of Fe3Al intermetallic increase by adding Y-PSZ particles. The maximal levels of fracture toughness and microhardness correspond to Fe3Al-10 wt pct Y-PSZ composite with the fracture toughness of 23.1 MPa√m and the microhardness of 645 HV. The improvement in fracture toughness could be related to the stress-induced structural transformation of zirconia particles from tetragonal to monoclinic which causes crack deflection and prevents crack propagation.

  18. The effect of specimen and flaw dimensions on fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevalainen, M.J. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-06-01

    The effect of the specimen size and geometry on fracture toughness has been investigated both by experimental tests and computational analyses. The methods for constraint description, namely T-stress, Q-parameter and Small-Scale Yielding Correction (SSYC) have been compared and applied for various geometries. A statistical treatment for the specimen thickness effect on cleavage fracture toughness has been investigated. Elliptical surface cracks were compared with straight-thickness cracks and a method for crack shape correction was presented. Based on the results, the differences in apparent fracture toughness values obtained from various specimen configurations can be better understood and taken into account. 64 refs. The thesis includes also four previous publications by author.

  19. Participation in ball sports may represent a prehabilitation strategy to prevent future stress fractures and promote bone health in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam Sebastian; Sainani, Kristin Lynn; Carter Sayres, Lauren; Milgrom, Charles; Fredericson, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Sports participation has many benefits for the young athlete, including improved bone health. However, a subset of athletes may attain suboptimal bone health and be at increased risk for stress fractures. This risk is greater for female than for male athletes. In healthy children, high-impact physical activity has been shown to improve bone health during growth and development. We offer our perspective on the importance of promoting high-impact, multidirectional loading activities, including ball sports, as a method of enhancing bone quality and fracture prevention based on collective research. Ball sports have been associated with greater bone mineral density and enhanced bone geometric properties compared with participation in repetitive, low-impact sports such as distance running or nonimpact sports such as swimming. Runners and infantry who participated in ball sports during childhood were at decreased risk of future stress fractures. Gender-specific differences, including the coexistence of female athlete triad, may negate the benefits of previous ball sports on fracture prevention. Ball sports involve multidirectional loading with high ground reaction forces that may result in stiffer and more fracture-resistant bones. Encouraging young athletes to participate in ball sports may optimize bone health in the setting of adequate nutrition and in female athletes, eumenorrhea. Future research to determine timing, frequency, and type of loading activity could result in a primary prevention program for stress fracture injuries and improved life-long bone health. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical Simulation of 3D Hydraulic Fracturing Based on an Improved Flow-Stress-Damage Model and a Parallel FEM Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. C.; Tang, C. A.; Li, G.; Wang, S. Y.; Liang, Z. Z.; Zhang, Y. B.

    2012-09-01

    The failure mechanism of hydraulic fractures in heterogeneous geological materials is an important topic in mining and petroleum engineering. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model that considers the coupled effects of seepage, damage, and the stress field is introduced. This model is based on a previously developed two-dimensional (2D) version of the model (RFPA2D-Rock Failure Process Analysis). The RFPA3D-Parallel model is developed using a parallel finite element method with a message-passing interface library. The constitutive law of this model considers strength and stiffness degradation, stress-dependent permeability for the pre-peak stage, and deformation-dependent permeability for the post-peak stage. Using this model, 3D modelling of progressive failure and associated fluid flow in rock are conducted and used to investigate the hydro-mechanical response of rock samples at laboratory scale. The responses investigated are the axial stress-axial strain together with permeability evolution and fracture patterns at various stages of loading. Then, the hydraulic fracturing process inside a rock specimen is numerically simulated. Three coupled processes are considered: (1) mechanical deformation of the solid medium induced by the fluid pressure acting on the fracture surfaces and the rock skeleton, (2) fluid flow within the fracture, and (3) propagation of the fracture. The numerically simulated results show that the fractures from a vertical wellbore propagate in the maximum principal stress direction without branching, turning, and twisting in the case of a large difference in the magnitude of the far-field stresses. Otherwise, the fracture initiates in a non-preferred direction and plane then turns and twists during propagation to become aligned with the preferred direction and plane. This pattern of fracturing is common when the rock formation contains multiple layers with different material properties. In addition, local heterogeneity of the rock

  1. Numerical Simulation of Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement Fractures after Geomechanical Stress and Geochemical Reactions Using X-ray Computed Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Jung, Hun Bok; Kuprat, Andrew P; Beck, Anthon N; Varga, Tamas; Fernandez, Carlos A; Um, Wooyong

    2016-06-21

    X-ray microtomography (XMT) imaging combined with three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling technique was used to study the effect of geochemical and geomechanical processes on fracture permeability in composite Portland cement-basalt caprock core samples. The effect of fluid density and viscosity and two different pressure gradient conditions on fracture permeability was numerically studied by using fluids with varying density and viscosity and simulating two different pressure gradient conditions. After the application of geomechanical stress but before CO2-reaction, CFD revealed fluid flow increase, which resulted in increased fracture permeability. After CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed preferential precipitation of calcium carbonate within the fractures in the cement matrix and less precipitation in fractures located at the cement-basalt interface. CFD estimated changes in flow profile and differences in absolute values of flow velocity due to different pressure gradients. CFD was able to highlight the profound effect of fluid viscosity on velocity profile and fracture permeability. This study demonstrates the applicability of XMT imaging and CFD as powerful tools for characterizing the hydraulic properties of fractures in a number of applications like geologic carbon sequestration and storage, hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production, and enhanced geothermal systems.

  2. Method of Evaluating Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of Tempered Martensitic Steel Showing Intergranular Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yu; Takai, Kenichi

    2018-02-01

    A stress application method in delayed fracture susceptibility tests was investigated using 1450 MPa class tempered martensitic steel. Its fracture mode under hydrogen charging was mainly intergranular because of its relatively small Si content of 0.21 mass pct. The conditions for consistency in fracture strength between tensile tests and constant load tests (CLTs) were clarified: first, to conduct hydrogen precharging before stress application; and second, to choose a sufficiently low crosshead speed in tensile tests. When hydrogen precharging was not conducted before CLTs, the fracture strength was higher than the values in CLTs with hydrogen charging and in tensile tests. If the crosshead speed was too high, the fracture strength obtained was higher than the values in CLTs. The dependence of the fracture strength on crosshead speed was seen for both notched and smooth bar specimens. These results suggested that plastic deformation, i.e., dislocation motion, was related to intergranular fracture with a tear pattern as well as to quasi-cleavage fracture. In addition, cathodic electrolysis in an alkaline solution containing NaOH should be used as the hydrogen charging method to avoid the effects of corrosion.

  3. Method of Evaluating Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of Tempered Martensitic Steel Showing Intergranular Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yu; Takai, Kenichi

    2017-12-01

    A stress application method in delayed fracture susceptibility tests was investigated using 1450 MPa class tempered martensitic steel. Its fracture mode under hydrogen charging was mainly intergranular because of its relatively small Si content of 0.21 mass pct. The conditions for consistency in fracture strength between tensile tests and constant load tests (CLTs) were clarified: first, to conduct hydrogen precharging before stress application; and second, to choose a sufficiently low crosshead speed in tensile tests. When hydrogen precharging was not conducted before CLTs, the fracture strength was higher than the values in CLTs with hydrogen charging and in tensile tests. If the crosshead speed was too high, the fracture strength obtained was higher than the values in CLTs. The dependence of the fracture strength on crosshead speed was seen for both notched and smooth bar specimens. These results suggested that plastic deformation, i.e., dislocation motion, was related to intergranular fracture with a tear pattern as well as to quasi-cleavage fracture. In addition, cathodic electrolysis in an alkaline solution containing NaOH should be used as the hydrogen charging method to avoid the effects of corrosion.

  4. Failure analysis of ParaPost drills that fractured in service: a retrieval analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Fournelle, Raymond; Al Qhatani, Mirae; Zinelis, Spiros

    2016-10-01

    The aim was to determine the fracture mechanism of two clinically failed ParaPost drills. First, the fracture planes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The drill end of one of the fractured pieces of each drill was then embedded in resin and after being metallographically ground and polished, was chemically etched. The microstructure and elemental composition were then examined by SEM/EDS analysis while hardness was determined with a Vickers testing device. Fractographic analysis revealed that both drills failed in a brittle manner and showed a pattern characteristic of a quasi-cleavage fracture mode. SEM and EDS analysis revealed a random distribution of a second phase enriched in Mo, W, and V, probably appended to (Mo, W, V)×C carbides, while the alloy composition is similar to M3 tool steel, a high-speed molybdenum tool steel. The microhardness of a ParaPost Drill #1 was found to be HV 862±29 and that for a Drill #2 was 846±16, with no significant differences (p>0.05). In both cases, fracture originated from surface points acting as stress concentrators and facilitating brittle fracture in the quasi-cleavage mode indicating that failure rate might be further minimized by a better instrument design.

  5. Numerical fracture simulation using Hamiltonian Particle Method -Relationship of parallel faulting to stress filed and elastic parameters of rock mass-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Y.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.

    2011-12-01

    Echelon faults are a group of parallel shear failures of rock that have a certain angle to stress axis. These parallel cracks can be observed as various sizes from plate-scale to laboratory-scale. In the area surrounding Japan, one of the typical example is found in the Izu Peninsula and the offshore area. In these areas, the conjugate parallel faults can be also observed. The mechanism and the formation of these parallel and conjugate faults are not well investigated, and there still remains an important geophysical subject. In the Izu Peninsula, the crust mainly suffers the compressional stress force by the subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate and strike slip forces of two large shear faults. In this study, we conduct numerical simulations of rock mass failure under various conditions to discuss the forming mechanism of these parallel and conjugate fractures. If we find the relationship between the formation of echelon faults and stress field applied to rock mass, we could infer stress field loaded to the crust from the pattern of faults. For numerical simulation, the Finite Difference Method (FDM) and the Finite Element Method (FEM) are widely used to solve solid deformation problems. In these methods, the failure at faults or cracks, however, would not be well simulated when the displacement becomes large or the grid-based structure is broken. On the other hand, particle methods are free from these difficulties. Therefore, we use the Hamiltonian Particle Method (HPM), i.e., one of the particle methods to simulate the formation of echelon faults to investigate the nucleation conditions. We assume a rectangular plate and change the type of forces acting on the plate for simplifying Izu area. The model represents a two-dimensional plane strain. In Izu area, the oceanic crust is composed mainly of basalt. Thus, we assume that the parameters of the rock mass are basaltic. The density and Young's modulus of the model are determined to match those of basalt. In

  6. Roughness effects on the critical fracture toughness of materials under uniaxial stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, George

    1998-01-01

    The Griffith criterion is applied for the calculation of the critical fracture toughness upon which the formation of a rough self-affine crack (which is characterized by the rms roughness amplitude σ, the correlation length ξ, and the roughness exponent H) commences. For large crack sizes R»ξ, the

  7. Fatigue-type stress fractures of the lower limb associated with fibrous cortical defects/non-ossifying fibromas in the skeletally immature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimal, A.; Davies, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham B31 2AP (United Kingdom); James, S.L.J., E-mail: steven.james@roh.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham B31 2AP (United Kingdom); Grimer, R.J. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham B31 2AP (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Aim: To investigate the association of a fatigue-type stress fracture and a fibrous cortical defect/non-ossifying fibroma (FCD/NOF) of the lower limb long bones in skeletally immature patients. Materials and methods: The patient database of a specialist orthopaedic oncology centre was searched to determine the number of skeletally immature patients (<=16 years of age) over an 18 year period with a lower limb long bone lesion ultimately shown to be a fatigue-type stress fracture. The diagnosis was established by a combination of typical imaging findings of a fatigue-type stress fracture, the absence of aggressive features suggestive of a sarcoma (e.g., interrupted periosteal reaction, cortical breach, and a soft-tissue mass) together with evidence of consolidation or healing on follow-up radiographs and resolution of symptoms over the subsequent weeks. The database was also used to determine the number of skeletally immature cases (<=16 years of age) referred in the same period in which the principal lesion was shown to be a fibrous cortical defect (FCD) or non-ossifying fibroma (NOF) of the lower limb long bones. The clinical and imaging features of those cases common to both groups (i.e., with both a fatigue-type stress fracture and a FCD or NOF) were reviewed. Results: Six percent of patients (five cases) referred to an orthopaedic oncology unit, who were subsequently shown to have a stress fracture of the lower limb long bones, were found to have a related FCD/NOF. All had been referred with a suggested diagnosis of a bone sarcoma and/or osteomyelitis. The possibility of a stress fracture had been raised in only one case. Four cases involved the proximal tibia and one the distal femur. Radiographs revealed that both lesions arose in the posteromedial cortex in all but one of the cases. The radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features were considered typical of the overlapping pathological features of the lesions. Conclusions: A sarcoma could be

  8. A displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with female athlete triad: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Shinichi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report presents a case of a displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with amenorrhea. Both reduction and internal fixation were performed early after the injury. At 24 months postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy showed no positive signs of femoral head necrosis and bone union was confirmed on plain X-ray. A medical examination for the presence of the signs of the female athlete triad by checking weight, calorie intake and menstrual cycles is most important to prevent such stress fractures. Athletes as well as their coaches or parents therefore need to understand female athlete triad.

  9. A cross-sectional study of the effects of load carriage on running characteristics and tibial mechanical stress: implications for stress-fracture injuries in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chun; Silder, Amy; Zhang, Ju; Reifman, Jaques; Unnikrishnan, Ginu

    2017-03-23

    Load carriage is associated with musculoskeletal injuries, such as stress fractures, during military basic combat training. By investigating the influence of load carriage during exercises on the kinematics and kinetics of the body and on the biomechanical responses of bones, such as the tibia, we can quantify the role of load carriage on bone health. We conducted a cross-sectional study using an integrated musculoskeletal-finite-element model to analyze how the amount of load carriage in women affected the kinematics and kinetics of the body, as well as the tibial mechanical stress during running. We also compared the biomechanics of walking (studied previously) and running under various load-carriage conditions. We observed substantial changes in both hip kinematics and kinetics during running when subjects carried a load. Relative to those observed during running without load, the joint reaction forces at the hip increased by an average of 49.1% body weight when subjects carried a load that was 30% of their body weight (ankle, 4.8%; knee, 20.6%). These results indicate that the hip extensor muscles in women are the main power generators when running with load carriage. When comparing running with walking, finite element analysis revealed that the peak tibial stress during running (tension, 90.6 MPa; compression, 136.2 MPa) was more than three times as great as that during walking (tension, 24.1 MPa; compression, 40.3 MPa), whereas the cumulative stress within one stride did not differ substantially between running (15.2 MPa · s) and walking (13.6 MPa · s). Our findings highlight the critical role of hip extensor muscles and their potential injury in women when running with load carriage. More importantly, our results underscore the need to incorporate the cumulative effect of mechanical stress when evaluating injury risk under various exercise conditions. The results from our study help to elucidate the mechanisms of stress fracture in women.

  10. Nose fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It most ... occurs with other fractures of the face. Nose injuries and neck ...

  11. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fractureresistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information inarchival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. Infact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralizedtissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled,there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. Thepresent study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel setof in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving adouble-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whetherthe critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locallystress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used tocharacterize the notion of "plasticity" in dentin and the interaction ofcracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed thatfracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that thepresence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this processof crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to becritical steps in the development ofa micromechanical model for thefracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence ofboth the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  12. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of tensile fracture specimens containing cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.; Kring, J.

    1973-01-01

    A seminumerical method is presented for three-dimensional elastic analysis of finite geometry solids with traction-free cracks. Stress and displacement distributions are calculated for two rectangular bars which are loaded by a uniform surface stress distribution. The first bar contains a through-thickness central crack while the second bar has double-edge cracks. Stress intensity factors K sub I for both configurations are presented.

  13. Fracture resistance and analysis of stress distribution of implant-supported single zirconium ceramic coping combination with abutments made of different materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firidinoğlu, Kadir; Toksavul, Suna; Toman, Muhittin; Sarikanat, Mehmet; Nergiz, Ibrahim

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture resistance and fracture mode of single implant-zirconium coping combinations using zirconium and titanium abutments and to analyze the stress distribution pattern using three-dimensional finite elements analysis. Twenty implants with titanium and zirconium abutments were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10) and into resin blocks. Zirconium copings were cemented onto the abutments. The specimens were loaded with 135° angles to the long axis and the load values at the moment of failure were recorded using a universal test machine. Stress levels were calculated according to the maximum Von Mises criteria. The fracture resistances for titanium and zirconium abutment groups were 525.65 N and 514.05 N, respectively. No significant differences were observed between two groups regarding the fracture resistance levels. The maximum Von Mises equivalent stress concentrated on zirconium copings in both of the groups. Implant-abutment-ZrO2 coping combination has the potential to withstand physiological occlusal forces in the anterior region. Three-dimensional finite elements analysis results of the implant-abutment-ZrO2 coping combination is compatible with the results of fracture resistance.

  14. Influence of operation factors on brittle fracture initiation and critical local normal stress in SE(B) type specimens of VVER reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Erak, A. D.; Kiselev, A. S.; Bubyakin, S. A.; Bandura, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    A complex of mechanical tests and fractographic studies of VVER-1000 RPV SE(B) type surveillance specimens was carried out: the brittle fracture origins were revealed (non-metallic inclusions and structural boundaries) and the correlation between fracture toughness parameters (CTOD) and fracture surface parameters (CID) was established. A computational and experimental method of the critical local normal stress determination for different origin types was developed. The values of the critical local normal stress for the structural boundary origin type both for base and weld metal after thermal exposure and neutron irradiation are lower than that for initial state due to the lower cohesive strength of grain boundaries as a result of phosphorus segregation.

  15. Analysis of stress-strain, fracture, and ductility behavior of aluminum maxtrix composites containing discontinuous silicon carbide reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical properties and stress-strain behavior were evaluated for several types of commercially fabricated aluminum matrix composites, containing up to 40 vol pct discontinuous SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement. The elastic modulus of the composites was found to be isotropic, to be independent of type of reinforcement, and to be controlled solely by the volume percentage of SiC reinforcement present. The yield/tensile strengths and ductility were controlled primarily by the matrix alloy and temper condition. Type and orientation of reinforcement had some effect on the strengths of composites, but only for those in which the whisker reinforcement was highly oriented. Ductility decreased with increasing reinforcement content; however, the fracture strains observed were higher than those reported in the literature for this type of composite. This increase in fracture strain was probably attributable to cleaner matrix powder, better mixing, and increased mechanical working during fabrication. Comparison of properties with conventional aluminum and titanium structural alloys showed that the properties of the low-cost, lightweight composites demonstrated very good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  16. Analysis of the competition between brittle and ductile fracture: application for the mechanical behaviour of C-Mn and theirs welds; Etude de la competition dechirure ductile/rupture fragile: application de la tenue mecanique des tubes en acier C-Mn et de leurs joints soudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Corre, V

    2006-09-15

    This study deals with the fracture behaviour of welded thin structures in the ductile to brittle transition range. It aims to propose a criterion to define the conditions for which the risk of fracture by cleavage does not exist on a cracked structure. The literature review shows that the difficulties of prediction of the fracture behaviour of a structure are related to the dependence of the fracture probability to the mechanical fields at the crack tip. The ductile to brittle transition range thus depends on the studied geometry of the structure. A threshold stress, below which cleavage cannot take place, is defined using fracture tests on notched specimens broken at very low temperature. The finite element numerical simulation of fracture tests onspecimens in the transition range shows a linear relationship between the fracture probability and the volume exceeding the threshold stress, thus showing the relevance of the proposed criterion. Moreover, several relations are established allowing to simplify the identification of the criterion parameters. The criterion is applied to a nuclear structural C-Mn steel, by focusing more particularly on the higher boundary of the transition range. A fracture test on a full-scale pipe is designed, developed, carried out and analysed using its numerical simulation. The results show firstly that, on the structure, the transition range is shifted in temperature, compared to laboratory specimens, due to the low plasticity constraint achieved in thin structures, and secondly that the threshold stress criterion allows to estimate simply this shift. (author)

  17. An analytical and experimental stress analysis of a practical mode II fracture-test specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, D. B.; Jones, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation method has been employed to determine the Mode II stress intensity factors for a pair of through-the-thickness edge cracks in a finite isotropic plate. An elastostatic analysis has been carried out in terms of the complete Williams stress function employing both even and odd components. The results of the numerical analysis were verified by a two-step procedure whereby the symmetric and antisymmetric portions of the solution were independently compared with existing solutions. The complete solution was verified by comparison with a photoelastic analysis. A compact shear specimen (CSS) of Hysol epoxy resin was loaded in a photoelastic experiment designed to study the isochromatic fringe patterns resulting from the Mode II crack tip stress distribution. The experiment verified that a pure Mode II stress distribution existed in the neighborhood of the crack tips and confirmed the accuracy of the boundary collocation solution for the Mode II stress intensity factors.

  18. Surgical versus conservative treatment for high-risk stress fractures of the lower leg (anterior tibial cortex, navicular and fifth metatarsal base): a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallee, W.H.; Weel, H.; van Dijk, C.N.; van Tulder, M.W.; Kerkhoffs, G.M.; Lin, C.W.C.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare surgical and conservative treatment for high-risk stress fractures of the anterior tibial cortex, navicular and proximal fifth metatarsal. Methods Systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and PEDro were performed to identify relevant prospective and

  19. Sternal stress fracture in a gymnast: A case report and literature review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    swelling excluded conditions like the Tietze's syndrome. Muscle weakness and ... the shoulders, stressing the sternum via the clavicles. We postulate that the ... recommended for alleviation of pain and inflammation in impingement injuries ...

  20. SIMULATION OF THE stress-strain state of excavation BOUNDARIES in fractured massifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizomov Dzhahongir Nizomovich

    2012-07-01

    Any limiting process, namely, if or and any results are in line with the isotropic medium. The proposed algorithm and calculation pattern may be used to research the concentrated stresses alongside the boundaries of hydrotechnical engineering facilities.

  1. Fracture assessment of HSST Plate 14 shallow-flaw cruciform bend specimens tested under biaxial loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1998-06-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow, surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a far-field, out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for an RPV material. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies, namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness; the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect. A three-parameter Weibull model based on the hydrostatic stress criterion is shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxial effect on cleavage fracture toughness by providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  2. Assessment of foam fracture in sandwich beams using thermoelastic stress analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dulieu-Barton, J.M.; Berggreen, Christian; Mettemberg, C.

    2009-01-01

    Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) has been well established for determining crack-tip parameters in metallic materials. This paper examines its ability to determine accurately the crack-tip parameters for PVC foam used in sandwich structures.......Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) has been well established for determining crack-tip parameters in metallic materials. This paper examines its ability to determine accurately the crack-tip parameters for PVC foam used in sandwich structures....

  3. Healing and Shear Stress Reduction on Single Fracture of Rock Salt and Limestone under Slide-Hold-Slide Direct Shear Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, K.; Yano, T.; Yasuhara, H.

    2012-12-01

    In order to clarify the influence of the holding state on the shear strength in the shear process of a single rock fracture, slide-hold-slide (SHS) direct shear-flow coupling tests were carried out on single rock fractures at several confining stresses and under saturated/unsaturated conditions (Kishida, et al., 2011). Consequently, the mortar specimen could be confirmed as the significant shear strength recovery on the SHS process. In this research, the SHS direct shear tests are carried out on the halite (rock salt) and the limestone. In the case of rock salt, a single tensile fracture is artificially created by cutting away. On the other hand, the limestone has a natural rock joint. The experiments are carried out under various normal confining stress conditions and are employed various holding period at the residual state. Figure 1 shows the shear stress - shear displacement of the SHS direct shear experiments on the rock salt. From all cases, the shear stress increases at the initial phase of the experiments, and then, the shear stress reaches at the peak shear strength. After that, the shear stress slightly decreases such as strain softening. Finally, the shear stress reaches to the residual stress state. In every SHS processes, the shear stress is reducing in various hold period. And then, the shear stress is increasing in the process of re-sliding. The shear stress in the process of re-sliding takes over the value at the start time of the holding process. The shear stress reaches at the peak, and then, it reaches the residual stress state. In all cases, as the holding period becomes longer, it is confirmed that the decrement of the shear stress in the holding process is increasing and the increment of the shear stress at the re-sliding process is increasing. Therefore, it is confirmed that the time dependence of shear strength recovery can be observed. In addition, Dieterich's A constant value for the regression lines (Dieterich, 1972, 1994) is plotted

  4. Finite element analysis of the equivalent stress distribution in Schanz screws during the use of a femoral fracture distractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giordano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To evaluate the mechanical stress and elastic deformation exercised in the thread/shaft transition of Schanz screws in assemblies with different screw anchorage distances in the entrance to the bone cortex, through the distribution and location of tension in the samples. An analysis of 3D finite elements was performed to evaluate the distribution of the equivalent stress (triple stress state in a Schanz screw fixed bicortically and orthogonally to a tubular bone, using two mounting patterns: (1 thread/shaft transition located 20 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in the entrance to the bone cortex and (2 thread/shaft transition located 3 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in entrance to the bone cortex. The simulations were performed maintaining the same direction of loading and the same distance from the force vector in relation to the center of the hypothetical bone. The load applied, its direction, and the distance to the center of the bone were constant during the simulations in order to maintain the moment of flexion equally constant. The present calculations demonstrated linear behavior during the experiment. It was found that the model with a distance of 20 mm between the Schanz screws anchorage in the entrance to the bone cortex and the thread/shaft transition reduces the risk of breakage or fatigue of the material during the application of constant static loads; in this model, the maximum forces observed were higher (350 MPa. The distance between the Schanz screws anchorage at the entrance to the bone cortex and the smooth thread/shaft transition of the screws used in a femoral distractor during acute distraction of a fracture must be farther from the entrance to the bone cortex, allowing greater degree of elastic deformation of the material, lower mechanical stress in the thread/shaft transition, and minimized breakage or fatigue. The suggested distance is 20 mm.

  5. Brittle fracture of an Au/Ag alloy induced by a surface film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R. G.; Frost, A. J.; Shahrabi, T.; Newman, R. C.

    1991-02-01

    The film-induced cleavage model of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) has been tested using an Ag-20 at. pct Au alloy in 1 M HClO4 solution. Brittle cracks, both intergranular (IG) and transgranular (TG) in nature, were formed by high-speed loading of a thin foil covered with a dealloyed (nanoporous gold) layer. These cracks were found to propagate through the dealloyed layer and into the uncorroded bulk face-centered cubic (fcc) material for a distance of many microns. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) can be excluded on thermodynamic grounds; thus, only film-induced cleavage can explain the observed decoupling of stress and corrosion in the fracture process.

  6. Fracture Mechanisms For SiC Fibers And SiC/SiC Composites Under Stress-Rupture Conditions at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, Hee Mann; Hurst, Janet B.; Viterna, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The successful application of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites as high-temperature structural materials depends strongly on maximizing the fracture or rupture life of the load-bearing fiber and matrix constituents. Using high-temperature data measured under stress-rupture test conditions, this study examines in a mechanistic manner the effects of various intrinsic and extrinsic factors on the creep and fracture behavior of a variety of SiC fiber types. It is shown that although some fiber types fracture during a large primary creep stage, the fiber creep rate just prior to fracture plays a key role in determining fiber rupture time (Monkman-Grant theory). If it is assumed that SiC matrices rupture in a similar manner as fibers with the same microstructures, one can develop simple mechanistic models to analyze and optimize the stress-rupture behavior of SiC/SiC composites for applied stresses that are initially below matrix cracking.

  7. Stress orientation and fracturing during three-dimensional buckling: Numerical simulation and application to chocolate-tablet structures in folded turbidites, SW Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, J. E.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Burg, J.-P.

    2010-10-01

    Two orthogonal sets of veins, both orthogonal to bedding, form chocolate tablet structures on the limbs of folded quartzwackes of Carboniferous turbidites in SW Portugal. Structural observations suggest that (1) mode 1 fractures transverse to the fold axes formed while fold amplitudes were small and limbs were under layer-subparallel compression and (2) mode 1 fractures parallel to the fold axes formed while fold amplitudes were large and limbs were brought to be under layer-subparallel tension. We performed two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations investigating the evolution of stress orientations during viscous folding to test whether and how these two successive sets of fractures were related to folding. We employed ellipses and ellipsoids for the visualization and quantification of the local stress field. The numerical simulations show a change in the orientation of the local σ1 direction by almost 90° with respect to the bedding plane in the fold limbs. The coeval σ3 direction rotates from parallel to the fold axis at low fold amplitudes to orthogonal to the fold axis at high fold amplitudes. The stress orientation changes faster in multilayers than in single-layers. The numerical simulations are consistent with observation and provide a mechanical interpretation for the formation of the chocolate tablet structures through consecutive sets of fractures on rotating limbs of folded competent layers.

  8. Management and treatment of femoral neck stress fractures in recreational runners: a report of four cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biz, Carlo; Berizzi, Antonio; Crimì, Alberto; Marcato, Chiara; Trovarelli, Giulia; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2017-10-18

    Femoral neck stress fractures (FNSFs) in healthy young subjects are uncommon and most prevalent among long-distance runners and military recruits. Women seem to be at higher risk of developing stress fractures because of possible eating disorders followed by amenorrhea and osteoporosis. This case report describes four young and middle-aged, active female recreational runners who developed stress fractures of the femoral neck. In three of them, with a clinical history of persistent pain in the groin region, which worsened during training, early diagnosis by MRI was considered essential in detecting the fractures. The patients were clinically, metabolically and radiographically evaluated; they were then treated and followed-up at our institution. Only one case was treated conservatively, while the others underwent surgical internal fixation using a screw-plate (DHS®). All of them returned to sport physical activity after a recovery period. Regarding the challenging management of FNSFs, our report highlights the importance of groin pain, especially in athletic females, an early diagnosis by MRI, and a proper classification of these injuries for a correct choice of treatment in order to prevent further dislocation and avoid avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  9. Biomechanical analysis of a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy bone fracture plate shows less stress shielding compared to a standard clinical metal plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Zahra S; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Bougherara, Habiba; Aziz, Mina S R; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-09-01

    Femur fracture at the tip of a total hip replacement (THR), commonly known as Vancouver B1 fracture, is mainly treated using rigid metallic bone plates which may result in "stress shielding" leading to bone resorption and implant loosening. To minimize stress shielding, a new carbon fiber (CF)/Flax/Epoxy composite plate has been developed and biomechanically compared to a standard clinical metal plate. For fatigue tests, experiments were done using six artificial femurs cyclically loaded through the femoral head in axial compression for four stages: Stage 1 (intact), stage 2 (after THR insertion), stage 3 (after plate fixation of a simulated Vancouver B1 femoral midshaft fracture gap), and stage 4 (after fracture gap healing). For fracture fixation, one group was fitted with the new CF/Flax/Epoxy plate (n = 3), whereas another group was repaired with a standard clinical metal plate (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN) (n = 3). In addition to axial stiffness measurements, infrared thermography technique was used to capture the femur and plate surface stresses during the testing. Moreover, finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to evaluate the composite plate's axial stiffness and surface stress field. Experimental results showed that the CF/Flax/Epoxy plated femur had comparable axial stiffness (fractured = 645 ± 67 N/mm; healed = 1731 ± 109 N/mm) to the metal-plated femur (fractured = 658 ± 69 N/mm; healed = 1751 ± 39 N/mm) (p = 1.00). However, the bone beneath the CF/Flax/Epoxy plate was the only area that had a significantly higher average surface stress (fractured = 2.10 ± 0.66 MPa; healed = 1.89 ± 0.39 MPa) compared to bone beneath the metal plate (fractured = 1.18 ± 0.93 MPa; healed = 0.71 ± 0.24 MPa) (p Flax/Epoxy material could be a potential candidate for bone fracture plate applications as it can simultaneously provide similar mechanical stiffness and lower stress

  10. Skull fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture ... Skull fractures may occur with head injuries . The skull provides good protection for the brain. However, a severe impact ...

  11. Alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist treatment reduces neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and brain injury in mice with ischemic stroke and bone fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhenying; Li, Li; Wang, Liang; Degos, Vincent; Maze, Mervyn; Su, Hua

    2014-11-01

    Bone fracture at the acute stage of stroke exacerbates stroke injury by increasing neuroinflammation. We hypothesize that activation of α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α-7 nAchR) attenuates neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, and reduces brain injury in mice with bone fracture and stroke. Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) was performed in C57BL/6J mice followed by tibia fracture 1 day later. Mice were treated with 0.8 mg/kg PHA 568487 (PHA, α-7 nAchR-specific agonist), 6 mg/kg methyllycaconitine (α-7 nAchR antagonist), or saline 1 and 2 days after pMCAO. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Neuronal injury, CD68(+) , M1 (pro-inflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory) microglia/macrophages, phosphorylated p65 component of nuclear factor kappa b in microglia/macrophages, oxidative and anti-oxidant gene expression were quantified. Compared to saline-treated mice, PHA-treated mice performed better in behavioral tests, had fewer apoptotic neurons (NeuN(+) TUNEL(+) ), fewer CD68(+) and M1 macrophages, and more M2 macrophages. PHA increased anti-oxidant gene expression and decreased oxidative stress and phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa b p65. Methyllycaconitine had the opposite effects. Our data indicate that α-7 nAchR agonist treatment reduces neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, which are associated with reduced brain injury in mice with ischemic stroke plus tibia fracture. Bone fracture at the acute stage of stroke exacerbates neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and brain injury, and our study has shown that the α-7 nAchR agonist, PHA (PHA 568487), attenuates neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and brain injury in mice with stroke and bone fracture. Hence, PHA could provide an opportunity to develop a new strategy to reduce brain injury in patients suffering from stroke and bone fracture. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Residual Stress and Fracture of PECVD Thick Oxide Films for Power MEMS Structures and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    temperatures below what is required for recrystallization (Volkert 1993; Thum and Cook 2002, 2004; Chen et al 2003). For PECVD SiO,, films, both stress...physical vapor deposited (PVD) materials (such as AIOx), and low-k silsesquioxane-based materials ( Thum and Cook 2002). 6.2. Experimental Details

  13. Accurate Solutions of Stress Intensity Factors of Standard Fracture Test Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Saimoto, Akihide; Motomura, Fumitaka; Nisitani, Hironobu

    2010-01-01

    Practically exact solutions of stress intensity factor for several two-dimensional standard specimens were calculated and shown in numeric tables. The solutions were confirmed to converge until 6 significant figures through a systematical computation of discretization analysis. The convergence analyses were carried out by using a general purpose program based on a body force method.

  14. Bone Geometry as a Predictor of Tissue Fragility and Stress Fracture Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 01-10-2006 2. REPORT...Epidemiol Rev 24:228–247. 10. Giladi M, Milgrom C, Simkin A, Danon Y 1991 Stress frac- tures. Identifiable risk factors. Am J Sports Med 19:647–652. 11

  15. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of strength-mismatching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Approximate solutions to stress-fields are provided for a strength-mismatched interface crack in small-scale yielding (SSY) for non-hardening and low hardening materials. Variations of local deformation intensities, characterized by a J-type contour integral, are proposed. The softer material experiences a higher deformation intensity level, J{sub S}, while the harder material sees a much lower deformation intensity level, J{sub H}, compared to that obtained from the applied J near the respective homogeneous crack-tips. For a low hardening material, the stress fields are obtained by scaling from an elastic/perfectly-plastic problem, based on an effective mismatch, M{sub eff}, which is a function of mismatch, M, and the hardening exponent, n. Triaxial stress build-up is discussed quantitatively in terms of M. The influence of strength-mismatch on cleavage fracture is discussed using Weibull statistics.

  16. Thermal/moisture-related stresses and fracture behaviour in solid wood members during forced drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn

    because of internalconstraints that are strongly affected by the annual ring pattern, the moisture gradient over the cross section, differential shrinkage and the inhomogeneity of the material. The objective of the work reported here was to investigate the behaviour of softwood during drying...... with a drying history that was generated, to verify a model that was used to simulate disc samples of the same type. The stresses were analyzed so as to clarify whether and when critical stress stateswere encountered during the drying process. The reversibility of the mechano-sorptive strains, i.......e. the possibility of driving mechano-sorptive strains back to their original state, was studied then by use of the verified model. Kiln-drying experiments were carried out, ina specially designed climate chamber under well-defined climatic conditions, allowing the climatic variation limits for crack initiation...

  17. Fracture Profile and Crack Propagation of Ultra-High Strength Hot-Stamped Boron Steel During Mechanical Trimming Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xianhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Sisi; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical trimming process for ultra-high strength boron steel after hot stamping was carried out in this study. Shear and tensile tests were designed to analyze the influences of stress state on the fracture mode; trimmed fracture surface and profile were observed and compared to other commonly used steels such as DP980 and Q235 etc.; the crack propagation during trimming process was studied through step-by-step tests. The observation and analysis reveal that the fracture mode of hot-stamped boron steel is highly related to the stress state, it belongs to cleavage fracture on low stress triaxiality but dimple fracture on high stress triaxiality. Such phenomenon is reflected in the trimming process, during which the stress state changes from shear-dominated state to tensile-dominated state. In addition, the burnish zone of trimmed boron steel is much smaller than other high strength steels, and the profile of cutting surface shows an `S'-like shape which is destructive to the trimming tool. Moreover, during the trimming process, most martensite laths near the cutting edge are stretched and rotated markedly to the direction of the shear band, and the main crack expands along those grain boundaries, which may penetrate through a few martensite laths and form small crack branches.

  18. Tensile stress-dependent fracture behavior and its influences on photovoltaic characteristics in flexible PbS/CdS thin-film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Min; Yeon, Deuk Ho; Mohanty, Bhaskar Chandra; Cho, Yong Soo

    2015-03-04

    Tensile stress-dependent fracture behavior of flexible PbS/CdS heterojunction thin-film solar cells on indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates is investigated in terms of the variations of fracture parameters with applied strains and their influences on photovoltaic properties. The PbS absorber layer that exhibits only mechanical cracks within the applied strain range from ∼0.67 to 1.33% is prepared by chemical bath deposition at different temperatures of 50, 70, and 90 °C. The PbS thin films prepared at 50 °C demonstrate better mechanical resistance against the applied bending strain with the highest crack initiating bending strain of ∼1.14% and the lowest saturated crack density of 0.036 μm(-1). Photovoltaic properties of the cells depend on the deposition temperature and the level of applied tensile stress. The values of short-circuit current density and fill factor are dramatically reduced above a certain level of applied strain, while open-circuit voltage is nearly maintained. The dependency of photovoltaic properties on the progress of fractures is understood as related to the reduced fracture energy and toughness, which is limitedly controllable by microstructural features of the absorber layer.

  19. Effect of hot extrusion, other constituents, and temperature on the strength and fracture of polycrystalline MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, R.W. (W.R. Grace and Co.-Conn, Columbia, MD (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Improved agreement was confirmed between the Petch intercept and single-crystal yield stresses at 22 C. Hot-extruded MgO crystal specimens stressed parallel with the resultant axial texture (1) gave the highest and least-scattered strength-grain size results at 22 C, (2) showed direct fractographic evidence of microplastic initiated fracture at 22 C and showed macroscopic yield at 1,315 and especially 1,540 C, and (3) fractured entirely via transgranular cleavage, except for intergranular failure initiation from one or a few grain boundary surfaces exposed on the subsequent fracture surface, mainly at 1,540 C. Hot-extruded, hot-pressed MgO billets gave comparable strength when fracture initiated transgranularly, but lower strength when fracture initiated from one or especially a few grain boundary surfaces exposed on the fracture. The extent and frequency of such boundary fracture increased with test temperature. While oxide additions of [<=] 5% or impurities in hot-pressed or hot-extruded MgO can make limited strength increases at larger grain sizes, those having limited solubility can limit strength at finer grain sizes, as can coarser surface finish. Overall, MgO strength is seen as a balance between flaw and microplastic controlled failure, with several parameters shifting the balance.

  20. Pace bowlers in cricket with history of lumbar stress fracture have increased risk of lower limb muscle strains, particularly calf strains

    OpenAIRE

    Orchard, John

    2010-01-01

    John Orchard1, Patrick Farhart2, Alex Kountouris3, Trefor James3, Marc Portus31School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia; 2Punjab Kings XI team, Indian Premier League, India; 3Cricket Australia, Melbourne, AustraliaObjective: To assess whether a history of lumbar stress fracture in pace bowlers in cricket is a risk factor for lower limb muscle strains.Methods: This was a prospective cohort risk factor study, conducted using injury data from contracted first class pace bowlers i...

  1. Fifth metatarsal stress fractures in elite basketball players: evaluation of forces acting on the fifth metatarsal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettler, Joseph H; Ruskan, Gregory J; Bytomski, Jeffrey R; Brown, Cristopher R; Richardson, Jan K; Moorman, Claude T

    2006-11-01

    Our hypothesis in this study was that significant forces act on the fifth metatarsal during certain maneuvers commonly performed while playing basketball and that medial arch support influences these forces. Eleven male collegiate basketball players participated in this study. Electronic pressure sensors capable of dynamic readings were inserted into the players' shoes, and surface electromyographic (EMG) electrodes were placed over the peroneus longus and brevis muscles. The players performed 3 common maneuvers postulated to place maximal stress on the fifth metatarsal. The maneuvers were performed in a standard basketball shoe, then in a shoe with an orthosis supporting the arch. During each of these maneuvers, EMG activity of the ankle everters was recorded, along with maximal force, total work, and time elapsed beneath the fifth metatarsal.

  2. Comparison of plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness, geometry, and architecture in male runners with and without a history of tibial stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamukoff, Derek N; Blackburn, J Troy

    2015-02-01

    Greater lower extremity joint stiffness may be related to the development of tibial stress fractures in runners. Musculotendinous stiffness is the largest contributor to joint stiffness, but it is unclear what factors contribute to musculotendinous stiffness. The purpose of this study was to compare plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness, architecture, geometry, and Achilles tendon stiffness between male runners with and without a history of tibial stress fracture. Nineteen healthy runners (age = 21 ± 2.7 years; mass = 68.2 ± 9.3 kg; height = 177.3 ± 6.0 cm) and 19 runners with a history of tibial stress fracture (age = 21 ± 2.9 years; mass = 65.3 ± 6.0 kg; height = 177.2 ± 5.2 cm) were recruited from community running groups and the university's varsity and club cross-country teams. Plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness was estimated from the damped frequency of oscillatory motion about the ankle follow perturbation. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure architecture and geometry of the medial gastrocnemius. Dependent variables were compared between groups via one-way ANOVAs. Previously injured runners had greater plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness (P healthy runners. No differences were found in muscle thickness, pennation angle, or fascicle length.

  3. Effect of α-lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor on bone metabolism, oxidative stress and nerve conduction function after femoral fracture surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Jun Cao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the effect of 毩 -lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor on bone metabolism, oxidative stress and nerve conduction function after femoral fracture surgery. Methods: A total of 110 patients with femoral fracture who received surgical treatment in the hospital between January 2015 and January 2017 were collected and divided into the control group (n=55 and study group (n=55 by random number table. Control group received postoperative nerve growth factor therapy, and study group received postoperative 毩 -lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor therapy. The differences in the contents of bone metabolism and oxidative stress indexes as well as the levels of nerve conduction function indexes were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, the differences in the contents of bone metabolism and oxidative stress indexes as well as the levels of nerve conduction function indexes were not statistically significant between the two groups. After treatment, serum bone metabolism indexes BGP and PⅠNP contents of study group were higher than those of control group while CTX-Ⅰ and TRAP contents were lower than those of control group; serum oxidative stress indexes TAC, CAT and SOD contents of study group were higher than those of control group while MDA content was lower than that of control group; limb nerve conduction velocity SCV and MCV levels of study group were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: 毩 -lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor therapy after femoral fracture surgery can effectively balance osteoblast/ osteoclast activity, reduce oxidative stress and improve limb nerve conduction velocity.

  4. Domainal cleavage as an Anisotropic Reaction-diffusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulchrone, Kieran; Meere, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Domainal cleavage comprises zones dominated by quartz and feldspar (QF-domains) and zones dominated by Mica (M-domains) which form at low metamorphic grades. The protolith is typically fairly homogeneous mudstone, siltstone, sandstone or limestone. Wet diffusion or pressure solution along grain boundaries is a key mechanism in the development of domanial cleavage. However, this does not explain why M-domains become sub-regularly spaced, visually evident in coarser-grained rocks, and take on an anastomising morphology. The ratio of M to QF-domains by volume can range from 1 to 0.1 and lower i.e. in extreme cases M-domains are intermittent but regularly spaced. It is suggested here that an anisotropic reaction-diffusion process model can explain these features. The imposed stress field instantaneously leads to anisotropy of diffusion by narrowing intergranular channels perpendicular to the principal stress. This leads to a preferred diffusion of chemicals parallel to the principal stress direction and lower diffusion rates in the normal direction. Combining this with the chemical reaction of pressure solution produces an anisotropic reaction-diffusion system. Both isotropic and anistropic reaction diffusion systems lead to pattern formation as discovered by Alan Turing on the 1950's as an explanation for patterns found in animal skins such as spots and stripes. Thus domanial cleavage is a striped pattern induced by diffusion anisotropy combined with a chemical reaction. Furthermore, rates of chemical reaction in intergranular fluids is likely to be many orders of magnitude greater that rates of deformation. Therefore we expect domanial cleavage to form relatively rapidly. As deformation progresses the M-domains behave less competently and may be the site of enhanced shearing. An example from Co. Cork, Ireland demonstrates shear folding in low-grade metasedimentary rocks with reverse shear along M-domains at a high angle to the maximum compressive stress.

  5. On the Mechanisms of Hydrogen Implantation Induced Silicon Surface Layer Cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbauer, Tobias [Univ. of Marburg (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    The “Ion-Cut”, a layer splitting process by hydrogen ion implantation and subsequent annealing is a versatile and efficient technique of transferring thin silicon surface layers from bulk substrates onto other substrates, thus enabling the production of silicon-oninsulator (SOI) materials. Cleavage is induced by the coalescence of the highly pressurized sub-surface H2-gas bubbles, which form upon thermal annealing. A fundamental understanding of the basic mechanisms on how the cutting process occurs is still unclear, inhibiting further optimization of the Ion-Cut process. This work elucidates the physical mechanisms behind the Ion-Cut process in hydrogen-implanted silicon. The investigation of the cleavage process reveals the cut to be largely controlled by the lattice damage, generated by the hydrogen ion irradiation process, and its effects on the local stress field and the fracture toughness within the implantation zone rather than by the depth of maximum H-concentration. Furthermore, this work elucidates the different kinetics in the H-complex formations in silicon crystals with different conductivity types, and examines the mechanically induced damage accumulation caused by the crack propagation through the silicon sample in the splitting step of the Ion-Cut process. Additionally, the influence of boron pre-implantation on the Ion-Cut in hydrogen implanted silicon is investigated. These studies reveal, that both, the atomic interaction between the boron implant and the hydrogen implant and the shift of the Fermi level due to the electrical activation of the implanted boron have a tremendous enhancing effect on the Ion-Cut process.

  6. On the Mechanisms of Hydrogen Implantation Induced Silicon Surface Layer Cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbauer, Tobias Franz [Univ. of Marburg (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    The “Ion-Cut”, a layer splitting process by hydrogen ion implantation and subsequent annealing is a versatile and efficient technique of transferring thin silicon surface layers from bulk substrates onto other substrates, thus enabling the production of silicon-oninsulator (SOI) materials. Cleavage is induced by the coalescence of the highly pressurized sub-surface H2-gas bubbles, which form upon thermal annealing. A fundamental understanding of the basic mechanisms on how the cutting process occurs is still unclear, inhibiting further optimization of the Ion-Cut process. This work elucidates the physical mechanisms behind the Ion-Cut process in hydrogen-implanted silicon. The investigation of the cleavage process reveals the cut to be largely controlled by the lattice damage, generated by the hydrogen ion irradiation process, and its effects on the local stress field and the fracture toughness within the implantation zone rather than by the depth of maximum H-concentration. Furthermore, this work elucidates the different kinetics in the H-complex formations in silicon crystals with different conductivity types, and examines the mechanically induced damage accumulation caused by the crack propagation through the silicon sample in the splitting step of the Ion-Cut process. Additionally, the influence of boron pre-implantation on the Ion-Cut in hydrogen implanted silicon is investigated. These studies reveal, that both, the atomic interaction between the boron implant and the hydrogen implant and the shift of the Fermi level due to the electrical activation of the implanted boron have a tremendous enhancing effect on the Ion-Cut process.

  7. Influence of stress concentrator shape and testing temperature on impact bending fracture of 17Mn1Si pipe steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, S. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Maruschak, P. O.; Moiseenko, D. D.; Berto, F.; Vinogradov, A.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the notch shape on the impact fracture of 17Mn1Si steel is investigated at different temperatures, with the focus placed on the low temperature behavior. An approach towards fracture characterization has been suggested based on the description of elastic-plastic deformation of impact loaded specimens on the stage of crack initiation and growth at ambient and lower temperatures. The analysis of the impact loading diagrams and fracture energy values for the 17Mn1Si pipe steel reveals the fracture mechanisms depending on the notch shape. It has been found that the testing temperature reduction plays a decisive role in plastic strain localization followed by dynamic fracture of the specimens with differently shaped notches.

  8. Imaging of insufficiency fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: christian.krestan@meduniwien.ac.at; Hojreh, Azadeh [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-09-15

    This review focuses on the occurrence, imaging and differential diagnosis of insufficiency fractures. Prevalence, the most common sites of insufficiency fractures and their clinical implications are discussed. Insufficiency fractures occur with normal stress exerted on weakened bone. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common cause of insufficiency fractures. Other conditions which affect bone turnover include osteomalacia, hyperparathyroidism, chronic renal failure and high-dose glucocorticoid therapy. It is a challenge for the radiologist to detect and diagnose insufficiency fractures, and to differentiate them from other bone lesions. Radiographs are still the most widely used imaging method for identification of insufficiency fractures, but sensitivity is limited, depending on the location of the fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very sensitive tool to visualize bone marrow abnormalities associated with insufficiency fractures. Thin section, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) depicts subtle fracture lines allowing direct visualization of cortical and trabecular bone. Bone scintigraphy still plays a role in detecting fractures, with good sensitivity but limited specificity. The most important differential diagnosis is underlying malignant disease leading to pathologic fractures. Bone densitometry and clinical history may also be helpful in confirming the diagnosis of insufficiency fractures.

  9. Recent progress to understand stress corrosion cracking in sodium borosilicate glasses: linking the chemical composition to structural, physical and fracture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Cindy L.

    2017-08-01

    This topical review is dedicated to understanding stress corrosion cracking in oxide glasses and specifically the SiO_2{\\text-B_2O_3{\\text-}Na_2O} (SBN) ternary glass systems. Many review papers already exist on the topic of stress corrosion cracking in complex oxide glasses or overly simplified glasses (pure silica). These papers look at how systematically controlling environmental factors (pH, temperature...) alter stress corrosion cracking, while maintaining the same type of glass sample. Many questions still exist, including: What sets the environmental limit? What sets the velocity versus stress intensity factor in the slow stress corrosion regime (Region I)? Can researchers optimize these two effects to enhance a glass’ resistance to failure? To help answer these questions, this review takes a different approach. It looks at how systemically controlling the glass’ chemical composition alters the structure and physical properties. These changes are then compared and contrasted to the fracture toughness and the stress corrosion cracking properties. By taking this holistic approach, researchers can begin to understand the controlling factors in stress corrosion cracking and how to optimize glasses via the initial chemical composition.

  10. Should 25-hydroxyvitamin D and bone density using DXA be tested in adolescents with lumbar stress fractures of the pars interarticularis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, John W; Vernon, Brian A; White, Michael A; Stamm, Sarah; Ryschon, Kay L

    2012-12-01

    Retrospective study. To determine if 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) level measurement and bone mineral density (BMD) using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are indicated in children with a history of stress fracture of the pars interarticularis. Healing rates of 4%-25% for bilateral and unilateral pars fractures, respectively, have previously been reported. Factors that may contribute to osteomalacia, rickets, and poor bone healing include low (25[OH]D) and low BMD. Patients were seen at the Nebraska Spine Center between 2008 and 2010. Selection criteria included a diagnosis of pars fracture with DXA Z-score values (lumbar and hip) and pretreatment serum (25[OH]D) level measurement. Twenty-four patients were included. Vitamin D was defined as sufficient when ≥ 32 ng/mL, insufficient when 20 to 50 ng/mL in 1 patient (4%). This correlated to 3 (13%) patients with deficient vitamin D (≤ 15 ng/mL), 12 (50%) patients with insufficient levels, and 9 (38%) with sufficient levels of vitamin D. The mean Z-scores were 0.43 ± 0.93 (lumbar, range, -1.3 to 2.8) and 1.0 ± 1.11 (hip, range, -0.5 to 3.0). All scores were consistent with normal bony mineralization for age. On the basis of these data, we recommend routine vitamin D testing and do not recommend routine DXA in adolescents with lumbar stress fractures of the pars interarticularis.

  11. Prediction of non-brittle fracture in the welded joint of C-Mn steel in the brittle-ductile transition domain; Prediction de la non-rupture fragile dans un joint soude en acier C-Mn dans le domaine de la transition fragile/ductile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thai Ha

    2009-11-15

    This work concerns the nuclear safety, specifically the secondary circuit integrity of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The problem is that of the fracture of a thin tubular structure in ferritic steel with many welded joints. The ferritic steel and weld present a brittle/ductile tenacity transition. Moreover, the welds present geometry propitious to the appearance of fatigue cracks, due to vibrations and expansions. These cracks may cause the complete fracture of the structure. The objectives of this work are to establish a criterion of non-fracture by cleavage of thin welded structures in ferritic steel, applicable to actual structures. Therefore, the present study focuses on the fracture behaviour of welded thin structures in brittle/ductile transition. It aims at developing the threshold stress model initially proposed by Chapuliot, to predict the non-brittle-fracture of this welded structure. The model is identified for the welded joint in C-Mn steel for nuclear construction, specifically in the upper part of the transition. A threshold stress, below which the cleavage cannot take place, is identified using tensile tests at low temperature on axis-symmetrical notched specimens taken in welded joint. This threshold stress is used to define the threshold volume where the maximum principal stress exceeds the threshold stress during the test. The analysis by SEM of specimen fracture surfaces shows that the gross solidification molten zone in the weld is the most likely to cleave. The relation between the brittle fracture probability and the threshold volume in the gross solidification molten zone is established via a sensitivity function, using multi-materials simulations. The model thus identified is tested for the prediction of non-brittle-fracture of SENT specimens taken in the welded joint and tested in tension. The results obtained are encouraging with regards to the transferability of the model to the actual structure. (author)

  12. Fatigue stress fractures of the pubic ramus in the army: imaging features with radiographic, scintigraphic and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Chang Hyun [The Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Although fatigue fractures are not unusual in athletes and military personnel those of the pubic ramus are rare. We report three cases of fatigue fractures of the inferior pubic rami in two male recruits and one female military cadet. On the initial radiograph, most of the lesions were subtle and easy to overlook. However, bone scintigraphy provided more distinct images that allowed easy and early detection of lesion, and MR imaging presented more diagnostic information, which allowed a precise diagnosis.

  13. Fracture strength and principal stress fields during crush testing of the SiC layer in TRISO-coated fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Brian C., E-mail: brian.campbell.davis@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Ward, Logan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Fillery, Brent [Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow (Germany); Reimanis, Ivar [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Diametrical compression testing is an important technique to evaluate fracture properties of the SiC layer in TRISO-coated nuclear fuel particles. This study was conducted to expand the understanding and improve the methodology of the test. An analytic solution and multiple FEA models are used to determine the development of the principal stress fields in the SiC shell during a crush test. An ideal fracture condition where the diametrical compression test best mimics in-service internal pressurization conditions was discovered. For a small set of empirical data points, results from different analysis methodologies were input to an iterative Weibull equation set to determine characteristic strength (332.9 MPa) and Weibull modulus (3.80). These results correlate well with published research. It is shown that SiC shell asphericity is currently the limiting factor of greatest concern to obtaining repeatable results. Improvements to the FEA are the only apparent method for incorporating asphericity and improving accuracy. - Highlights: • A continuous stress vs. force function is defined by modifying the analytic solution. • FEA simulations with nonlinear geometry show improvements over analytic solutions. • During the test there are three different stress regimes defined by divot size. • SiC asphericity is a likely cause of numerical results deviating from empirical data. • Modeling true shell geometry is the factor of greatest concern in improving accuracy.

  14. Characterizing the influence of stress-induced microcracks on the laboratory strength and fracture development in brittle rocks using a finite-discrete element method-micro discrete fracture network FDEM-μDFN approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Hamdi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity is an inherent component of rock and may be present in different forms including mineral heterogeneity, geometrical heterogeneity, weak grain boundaries and micro-defects. Microcracks are usually observed in crystalline rocks in two forms: natural and stress-induced; the amount of stress-induced microcracking increases with depth and in-situ stress. Laboratory results indicate that the physical properties of rocks such as strength, deformability, P-wave velocity and permeability are influenced by increase in microcrack intensity. In this study, the finite-discrete element method (FDEM is used to model microcrack heterogeneity by introducing into a model sample sets of microcracks using the proposed micro discrete fracture network (μDFN approach. The characteristics of the microcracks required to create μDFN models are obtained through image analyses of thin sections of Lac du Bonnet granite adopted from published literature. A suite of two-dimensional laboratory tests including uniaxial, triaxial compression and Brazilian tests is simulated and the results are compared with laboratory data. The FDEM-μDFN models indicate that micro-heterogeneity has a profound influence on both the mechanical behavior and resultant fracture pattern. An increase in the microcrack intensity leads to a reduction in the strength of the sample and changes the character of the rock strength envelope. Spalling and axial splitting dominate the failure mode at low confinement while shear failure is the dominant failure mode at high confinement. Numerical results from simulated compression tests show that microcracking reduces the cohesive component of strength alone, and the frictional strength component remains unaffected. Results from simulated Brazilian tests show that the tensile strength is influenced by the presence of microcracks, with a reduction in tensile strength as microcrack intensity increases. The importance of microcrack heterogeneity in

  15. Effects of a high mean stress on the high cycle fatigue life of PWA 1480 and correlation of data by linear elastic fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, S.; Kwasny, R.

    1985-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue tests using 5-mm-diameter smooth specimens were performed on the single crystal alloy PWA 1480 (001 axis) at 70F (room temperature) in air and at 100F (538C) in vacuum (10 to the -6 power torr). Tests were conducted at zero mean stress as well as at high tensile mean stress. The results indicate that, although a tensile mean stress, in general, reduces life, the reduction in fatigue strength, for a given mean stress at a life of one million cycles, is much less than what is predicted by the usual linear Goodman plot. Further, the material appears to be significantly more resistant to mean stress effects at 1000F than at 70F. Metallographic examinations of failed specimens indicate that failures in all cases are initiated from micropores of sizes of the order of 30 to 40 microns. Since the macroscopic stress-strain response in all cases was observed to be linear elastic, linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analyses were carried out to determine the crack growth curves of the material assuming that crack initiation from a micropore (a sub o = 40 microns) occurs very early in life. The results indicate that the calculated crack growth rates at an R (defined as the ratio between minimum stress to maximum stress) value of zero are approximately the same at 70F as at 1000F. However, the calculated crack growth rates at other R ratios, both positive and negative, tend to be higher at 70F than at 1000F. Calculated threshold effects at large R values tend to be independent of temperature in the temperature regime studied. They are relatively constant with increasing R ratio up to a value of about 0.6, beyond which the calculated threshold stress intensity factor range decreases rapidly with increasing R ratios.

  16. Polymer liquids fracture like solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Hassager, Ole

    2017-01-01

    While fracture in brittle solids has been studied for centuries until today, there are few studies on fracture in polymer liquids. Recent developments in experimental techniques, especially the combination of controlled filament stretching rheometry and high speed imaging, have opened new windows...... into the detailed study of fracture processes for polymer liquids. High speed imaging shows that polymer liquids fracture like solids with initiation and propagation of an edge fracture. However, remarkable features such as highly reproducible critical stress, independent appearance of multiple fractures...

  17. Effects of Cysteamine on Sheep Embryo Cleavage Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Ö. ENGİNLER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress during in vitro culture leads to defects in development of gametes and embryos. Several antioxidants such as cysteamine, L-ascorbic acid, beta mercaptoethanol, cysteine, glutathione, proteins, vitamins have been used to supplement culture media to counter the oxidative stress. This study was conducted to detect the effect of adding cysteamine to the maturation medium to subsequent cleavage rates of sheep embryos. Totally 604 ovaries were obtained by ten replica and 2060 oocytes were collected. The cumulus oocyte complexes were recovered by the slicing method. A total of 1818 selected oocytes were divided into two groups and used for maturation (88.25%. The first group was created as supplemented with cysteamine (Group A and second group (Group B, control without cysteamine in TCM-199. The two groups were incubated for 24 h at 38.8 °C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2 in humidified air for in vitro maturation (IVM. After IVM, oocytes were fertilized with 50 x 107 / mL fresh ram semen in BSOF medium for 18 h. After fertilization, maturation groups were divided into two subgroups with different culture media: Group AI-SOF (Synthetic Oviduct Fluid medium, Group AII-CR1aa (Charles Rosencrans medium, Group BI-SOF and Group BII-CR1aa were achieved. Cleavage rates were evaluated at day 2. post insemination. The rates of cleavage were detected as 59.54% (184/309, 55.44% (173/312, 65.34% (215/329, 59.34% (200/337 respectively, with showing no statistically significant difference between the groups at the level of P>0.05. In conclusion, supplementing cysteamine to maturation media in TCM-199 did not affect the cleavage rates of sheep embryos in SOF and CR1aa culture media.

  18. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  19. Numerical Analysis on the Formation of Fracture Network during the Hydraulic Fracturing of Shale with Pre-Existing Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming He

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, configurations of pre-existing fractures in cubic rock blocks were investigated and reconstructed for the modeling of experimental hydraulic fracturing. The fluid-rock coupling process of hydraulic fracturing was simulated based on the displacement discontinuities method. The numerical model was validated against the related laboratory experiments. The stimulated fracture configurations under different conditions can be clearly shown using the validated numerical model. First, a dominated fracture along the maximum principle stress direction is always formed when the stress difference is large enough. Second, there are less reopened pre-existing fractures, more newly formed fractures and less shear fractures with the increase of the cohesion value of pre-existing fractures. Third, the length of the stimulated shear fracture decreases rapidly with the increase of the friction coefficient, while the length of the tensile fracture has no correlation to the fiction coefficient. Finally, the increase of the fluid injection rate is favorable to the formation of a fracture network. The unfavorable effects of the large stress difference and the large cohesion of pre-existing fractures can be partly suppressed by an increase of the injection rate in the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The results of this paper are useful for understanding fracture propagation behaviors during the hydraulic fracturing of shale reservoirs with pre-existing fractures.

  20. Cleavage development within a foreland fold and thrust belt, southern Pyrenees, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, James E.; Anastasio, David J.

    1995-03-01

    In the southern Pyrenees lithologically distinct cleavage fronts are each parallel to bedding and dip ˜20° towards the foreland. Pressure solution was the dominant mechanism of cleavage development. The mudstone cleavage front is coincident with the ˜195°C paleoisotherm and is associated with a pressure solution strain of ˜5%, a mechanical twin strain of ˜4%, and a deviatoric stress magnitude of ˜65 MPa. Illite crystallinity measurements define a geothermal gradient of 15°C km -1 and indicate that the paleoisotherms are bedding-parallel. Deviatoric stress magnitudes, from calcite twins, were regionally constant at ˜65 MPa and principal stress axes were perpendicular to cleavage. Temperature was the primary control on deformation micromechanisms and the position and orientation of the cleavage front within the foreland thrust wedge. Deformation below the cleavage front occurs predominantly by pressure solution, which in conjunction with mechanical twinning and microfracturing produces a quasi-plastic rheology. Stress magnitudes determined from mechanical twinning of carbonate grains and long-term (10 6-10 76 y) strain rates determined for regional folds and faults suggest an apparent macroscopic viscosity of 9.8 × 10 18 to 7.2 × 10 19 Pa s for the lower thrust wedge. Above the cleavage front temperature, pressure solution strain, total strain, and mesoscale deformation diminish. The region of the thrust wedge above the ˜100°C paleoisotherm is characterized by large brittle faults with cataclastic fault zones and negligible grain-scale deformation indicating an elastico-frictional rheology.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical signs in cases of isolated supination-external rotation-type lateral malleolar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortunen, S; Flinkkilä, T; Lantto, I; Kortekangas, T; Niinimäki, J; Ohtonen, P; Pakarinen, H

    2015-08-01

    We prospectively assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical findings to evaluate the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with supination-external rotation-type fractures of the lateral malleolus without widening of the medial clear space. The cohort included 79 patients with a mean age of 44 years (16 to 82). Two surgeons assessed medial tenderness, swelling and ecchymosis and performed the external rotation (ER) stress test (a reference standard). A diagnostic radiographer performed the gravity stress test. For the gravity stress test, the positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 5.80 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.75 to 12.27, and the negative LR was 0.15 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.35), suggesting a moderate change from the pre-test probability. Medial tenderness, both alone and in combination with swelling and/or ecchymosis, indicated a small change (positive LR, 2.74 to 3.25; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47), whereas swelling and ecchymosis indicated only minimal changes (positive LR, 1.41 to 1.65; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47). In conclusion, when gravity stress test results are in agreement with clinical findings, the result is likely to predict stability of the ankle mortise with an accuracy equivalent to ER stress test results. When clinical examination suggests a medial-side injury, however, the gravity stress test may give a false negative result. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  2. Odontoid Fracture: Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Peña

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An 84-year-old male presented with left-sided posterior head, neck, and back pain after a ground level fall. Exam was notable for left parietal scalp laceration and midline cervical spine tenderness with no obvious deformities. He was neurovascularly intact, and placed in an Aspen Collar with strict spine precautions. Significant findings: Computed Tomography (CT of the cervical spine showed a stable, acute, non-displaced fracture of the odontoid process extending into the body of C2, consistent with a Type III Odontoid Fracture. He was evaluated by orthopedic spine service who recommended conservative, non-operative management. Discussion: The cervical spine is composed of seven vertebrae, with C1 and C2 commonly referred to as the Atlas and Axis, respectively. Unique to C2 is a bony prominence, the Odontoid Process (Dens. Hyperextension or hyperflexion injuries can induce significant stress causing fractures. Odontoid fractures comprise approximately 10% of vertebral fractures, and there are three types with varying stability.1 Type 1 is the rarest and is a fracture involving the superior segment of the Dens. It is considered a stable fracture. Type 2 is the most common and is a fracture involving the base of the odontoid process, below the transverse component of the cruciform ligament. This fracture is unstable and requires operative stabilization. 2 Type 3 odontoid fractures are classified by a fracture of the Odontoid process, as well as the lateral masses of the C2. Determining the stability of a Type III Odontoid fracture requires radiographic evaluation. Strict cervical spine precautions must be adhered to until adequate imaging and surgical consultation is obtained. CT of the of cervical spine fractures poses several advantages to plain film radiography due to the ability to view the anatomy in three planes. 3 However, if there is concern for ligamentous injury, MRI is the preferred modality.3

  3. Brittle fracture in structural steels: perspectives at different size-scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, John

    2015-03-28

    This paper describes characteristics of transgranular cleavage fracture in structural steel, viewed at different size-scales. Initially, consideration is given to structures and the service duty to which they are exposed at the macroscale, highlighting failure by plastic collapse and failure by brittle fracture. This is followed by sections describing the use of fracture mechanics and materials testing in carrying-out assessments of structural integrity. Attention then focuses on the microscale, explaining how values of the local fracture stress in notched bars or of fracture toughness in pre-cracked test-pieces are related to features of the microstructure: carbide thicknesses in wrought material; the sizes of oxide/silicate inclusions in weld metals. Effects of a microstructure that is 'heterogeneous' at the mesoscale are treated briefly, with respect to the extraction of test-pieces from thick sections and to extrapolations of data to low failure probabilities. The values of local fracture stress may be used to infer a local 'work-of-fracture' that is found experimentally to be a few times greater than that of two free surfaces. Reasons for this are discussed in the conclusion section on nano-scale events. It is suggested that, ahead of a sharp crack, it is necessary to increase the compliance by a cooperative movement of atoms (involving extra work) to allow the crack-tip bond to displace sufficiently for the energy of attraction between the atoms to reduce to zero. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Stress history a