WorldWideScience

Sample records for cleared science reviews

  1. MI Gap Clearing Kicker Magnet Design Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Chris; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The kicker system requirements were originally conceived for the NOvA project. NOvA is a neutrino experiment located in Minnesota. To achieve the desired neutrino flux several upgrades are required to the accelerator complex. The Recycler will be used as a proton pre-injector for the Main Injector (MI). As the Recycler is the same size as the MI, it is possible to do a single turn fill ({approx}11 {micro}sec), minimizing the proton injection time in the MI cycle and maximizing the protons on target. The Recycler can then be filled with beam while the MI is ramping to extract beam to the target. To do this requires two new transfer lines. The existing Recycler injection line was designed for 10{pi} pbar beams, not the 20{pi} proton beams we anticipate from the Booster. The existing Recycler extraction line allows for proton injection through the MI, while we want direct injection from the Booster. These two lines will be decommissioned. The new injection line from the MI8 line into the Recycler will start at 848 and end with injection kickers at RR104. The new extraction line in the RR30 straight section will start with a new extraction kicker at RR232 and end with new MI injection kickers at MI308. Finally, to reduce beam loss activation in the enclosure, a new gap clearing kicker will be used to extract uncaptured beam created during the slip stack injection process down the existing dump line. It was suggested that the MI could benefit from this type of system immediately. This led to the early installation of the gap clearing system in the MI, followed by moving the system to Recycler during NOvA. The specifications also changed during this process. Initially the rise and fall time requirements were 38 ns and the field stability was {+-}1%. The 38 ns is based on having a gap of 2 RF buckets between injections. (There are 84 RF buckets that can be filled from the Booster for each injection, but 82 would be filled with beam. MI and Recycler contain 588 RF buckets

  2. Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Urethra: Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the urethra (CCAU is extremely rare and a number of clinicians may be unfamiliar with its diagnosis and biological behaviour. Aims. To review the literature on CCAU. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results/Literature Review. (i CCAU occurs in adults and in women in the great majority of cases. (ii It has a particular association with urethral diverticulum, which has been present in 56% of the patients; is indistinguishable from clear cell adenocarcinoma of the female genital tract but is not associated with endometriosis; and probably does not arise by malignant transformation of nephrogenic adenoma. (iii It is usually, readily distinguished from nephrogenic adenoma because of greater cytological a-typicality and mitotic activity and does not stain for prostate-specific antigen or prostatic acid phosphatase. (iv It has been treated by anterior exenteration in women and cystoprostatectomy in men and at times by radiotherapy; chemotherapy has rarely been given. (v CCAU is aggressive with low 5-year survival rates. (vi There is no consensus opinion of treatment options that would improve the prognosis. Conclusions. Few cases of CCAU have been reported. Urologists, gynaecologists, pathologists, and oncologists should report cases of CCAU they encounter and enter them into a multicentric trial to determine the best treatment options that would improve the prognosis.

  3. Science & technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document is the August, 1995 issue of the Science and Technology review, a Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory publication. It contains two major articles, one on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - as applied to materials engineering studies, and one on risk assessment, in this case looking primarily at a health care problem. Separate articles will be indexed from this journal to the energy database.

  4. Annual review of computer science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, J.F. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Grosz, B.J. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Lampson, B.W. (Digital Equipment Corp. (US)); Nilsson, N.J. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA))

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the annual review of computer science. Topics covered include: Database security, parallel algorithmic techniques for combinatorial computation, algebraic complexity theory, computer applications in manufacturing, and computational geometry.

  5. Science& Technology Review October 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-10-01

    The October 2003 issue of Science & Technology Review consists of the following articles: (1) Award-Winning Technologies from Collaborative Efforts--Commentary by Hal Graboske; (2) BASIS Counters Airborne Bioterrorism--The Biological Aerosol Sentry and Information System is the first integrated biodefense system; (3) In the Chips for the Coming Decade--A new system is the first full-field lithography tool for use at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths; (4) Smoothing the Way to Print the Next Generation of Computer Chips--With ion-beam thin-film planarization, the reticles and projection optics made for extreme ultraviolet lithography are nearly defect-free; (5) Eyes Can See Clearly Now--The MEMS-based adaptive optics phoropter improves the process of measuring and correcting eyesight aberrations; (6) This Switch Takes the Heat--A thermally compensated Q-switch reduces the light leakage on high-average-power lasers; (7) Laser Process Forms Thick, Curved Metal Parts--A new process shapes parts to exact specifications, improving their resistance to fatigue and corrosion cracking; and (8) Characterizing Tiny Objects without Damaging Them--Livermore researchers are developing nondestructive techniques to probe the Lilliputian world of mesoscale objects.

  6. Science & Technology Review March 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E

    2005-01-25

    This issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) Enhanced National Security through International Research Collaborations--Commentary by Stephen G. Cochran; (2) Building Networks of Trust through Collaborative Science--Livermore scientists are leading collaborative science and technology projects with colleagues from Central and South Asia and the Middle East; (3) Tracing the Steps in Nuclear Material Trafficking--The Laboratory.s nuclear science expertise is helping to thwart the illicit trafficking of nuclear material; (4) Looking at Earth in Action--Geophysicists at Livermore are using laboratory experiments to examine such issues as how best to store nuclear wastes and how to mitigate the effects of greenhouse gases; and (5) Gamma-Ray Bursts Shower the Universe with Metals--Computer models indicate that gamma-ray bursts from dying stars may be important sources of elements such as iron, zinc, titanium, and copper.

  7. Optimal policies for Production-Clearing Systems under Continuous-Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germs, R.; Foreest, van Nicky D.; Kilic, Onur A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a production-clearing system with compound Poisson demand under continuous review. The production facility produces one type of item without stopping and at a constant rate, and stores the product into a buffer to meet future demand. To prevent high inventory levels, a cle

  8. Science & Technology Review June 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-04-30

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on ensuring our nation's security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  9. Science & Technology Review June 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  10. Science& Technology Review November 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-11-01

    This issue of Science & Technology Review covers the following topics: (1) We Will Always Need Basic Science--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) When Semiconductors Go Nano--experiments and computer simulations reveal some surprising behavior of semiconductors at the nanoscale; (3) Retinal Prosthesis Provides Hope for Restoring Sight--A microelectrode array is being developed for a retinal prosthesis; (4) Maglev on the Development Track for Urban Transportation--Inductrack, a Livermore concept to levitate train cars using permanent magnets, will be demonstrated on a 120-meter-long test track; and (5) Power Plant on a Chip Moves Closer to Reality--Laboratory-designed fuel processor gives power boost to dime-size fuel cell.

  11. Science & Technology Review October 2007

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    Chinn, D J

    2007-08-21

    Livermore researchers won five R&D 100 awards in R&D Magazine's annual competition for the top 100 industrial innovations worldwide. This issue of Science & Technology Review highlights the award-winning technologies: noninvasive pneumothorax detector, microelectromechanical system-based adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, large-area imager, hyper library of linear solvers, and continuous-phase-plate optics system manufactured using magnetorheological finishing. Since 1978, Laboratory researchers have received 118 R&D 100 awards. The R&D 100 logo (on the cover and p 1) is reprinted courtesy of R&D Magazine.

  12. Primary clear cell ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: A case report and clinicopathologic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashpal Modi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a very rare, interesting case of a carcinoma of the pancreas with predominantly abundant clear cell morphology. According to the WHO classification, primary clear cell carcinoma of the pancreas is classified as a rare "miscellaneous" carcinoma. The tumor was observed in the distal body and tail of the pancreas of a 74-year-old woman. The histopathology of tumor cells showed well-defined cell membranes, clear cytoplasm, and prominent cell boundaries. Immunohistochemical (IHC staining showed positive reactions to antibodies against vimentin, cytokeratin 7 (CK-7, mucicarmine (MUC-1, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS, periodic acid-Schiff with diastase (PASD, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, and Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9. On the other hand, IHC staining was negative for alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, cytokeratin 20 (CK-20, HMB45, chromogranin, and synaptophysin. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with a primary solid-type pancreatic clear cell carcinoma with hepatic metastasis. Herein, we report this rare case and include a review of the current literature of this tumor.

  13. A review on fuzzy multi-criteria decision making land clearing for oil palm plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdani Hamdani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Our review paper research categorize the methods in the method of Fuzzy Multi-Criteria Decision Making (FMCDM to find the method is widely used in the case of land clearing for plantation. Model FMCDM is used to assess the parameter in multi-criteria-based decision making. The dominant percentage of the result was obtained using Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP method. While the application of other methods for the same problem are Fuzzy Ordered Weighted Averaging (FOWA, Fuzzy Elimination Et Choix Traduisant la Realite or Elimination and Choice Translating Reality (FELECTRE, Fuzzy Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (FTOPSIS, Fuzzy, Artificial Neural Networks (FANNs has less. Some the research result also implemented hybrid in FMCDM Method to give some weight in the assessment of decision making. There was also a paper which integrates FMCDM to the GIS method on the land clearing. Therefore, it is concluded that the issue on the land clearing can be done through collaboration of several models of FMCDM, so that it can be developed by involving the decision model using multi-stakeholder model

  14. Science & Technology Review November 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K

    2002-09-25

    This months issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) High-Tech Help for Fighting Wildfires--Commentary by Leland W. Younker; (2) This Model Can Take the Heat--A physics-based simulation program to combat wildfires combines the capabilities and resources of Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos national laboratories. (3) The Best and the Brightest Come to Livermore--The Lawrence Fellowship Program attracts the most sought-after postdoctoral researchers to the Laboratory. (4) A view to Kill--Livermore sensors are aimed at the ''kill'' vehicle when it intercepts an incoming ballistic missile. (5) 50th Anniversary Highlight--Biological Research Evolves at Livermore--Livermore's biological research program keeps pace with emerging national issues, from studying the effects of ionizing radiation to detecting agents of biological warfare.

  15. CMB anisotropy science: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Challinor, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides us with our most direct observational window to the early universe. Observations of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB have played a critical role in defining the now-standard cosmological model. In this contribution we review some of the basics of CMB science, highlighting the role of observations made with ground-based and balloon-borne Antarctic telescopes. Most of the ingredients of the standard cosmological model are poorly understood in terms of fundamental physics. We discuss how current and future CMB observations can address some of these issues, focusing on two directly relevant for Antarctic programmes: searching for gravitational waves from inflation via B-mode polarization, and mapping dark matter through CMB lensing.

  16. Science& Technology Review May 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-05-01

    This May 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''Another Weapon in the Battle against Proliferation''; (2) ''Chemical Weapons Can't Evade This Lab'', Livermore's Forensic Science Center is certified to analyze samples collected during inspections conducted to monitor the Chemical Weapons Convention. (3) ''Bird's-Eye View Clarifies Research on the Ground'' Geobotanical remote sensing has applications in homeland security and energy resource development and provides new insights into complex ecologic systems. (4) ''Age Does Make a Difference'' Age-dating techniques and ultrasensitive technologies provide a comprehensive map of California's groundwater and indicate where it is most vulnerable to contaminants. (5) ''Reducing Aerodynamic Drag'' Simulations and experiments reveal ways to make heavy trucks more aerodynamic and fuel efficient.

  17. Science& Technology Review October 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K S

    2002-10-01

    The October 2002 issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) Applied Science Is a Hallmark of This Laboratory--Commentary by Hal Graboske. (2) Sending Up Signals for Genetic Variation--In situ rolling circle amplification promises to advance the detection and treatment of cancer and other diseases. (3) SiMM Is Anything But Simple--Modules of silicon microchannels and microlenses result in the smallest, most powerful, and least expensive laser diode pumps ever. (4) World's Most Powerful Solid-State Laser--A new design allows tremendous scaling up of solid-state laser power. (5) Stepping Up to Extreme Lithography--The next generation of computer chips can now be produced on a commercial scale. (6) Relief for Acute and Chronic Pain--New technology turns an ancient pain management method into a modern medical tool. (7)50th Anniversary Highlight--14 Energy and Environment: Understanding Our World--The Laboratory's energy and environmental research is an important adjunct to its core national security mission.

  18. The Clear Sky Experience: NASA Jumpstarts an Elementary Science Teaching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, P. N.; Faszewski, E. E.

    2006-03-01

    Wheelock College has moved forward with a new program to produce scientifically skilled and knowledgeable pre-service elementary teachers. A science design team consisting of science and education faculty has planned and begun implementation of the program working through NASA's NOVA Program.

  19. A clear cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with hepatoid differentiation: case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Wei; Mu, Dianbin; Shi, Xuetao; Zhao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old male was referred to our department for a gallbladder mass. He denied any history of alcohol consumption or cholecystitis and smoking. Hepatitis B surface antigen test and antihepatitis C antibody test were found to be negative. Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and carcinoembryonic antigen were elevated (CA19-9 was 59.92 U/mL and carcinoembryonic antigen was 12.64 ng/mL), whereas alpha-fetoprotein was below the normal limit (2.46 ng/mL). Computed tomography scan revealed a solid mass with measurements of 4.6×5.6×7.1 cm, which nearly filled the whole gallbladder space. Radical cholecystectomy, including segments IV B and V of the liver and lymphadenectomy, was performed. The neoplasm in gallbladder was completely resected, and the patient obtained a negative margin. Histological and immunohistochemical profile suggested a clear cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with hepatoid differentiation. After reviewing the literature, we reported that this case is the first identified case of cell adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with extensive hepatoid differentiation. However, clinical features of clear cell adenocarcinoma with hepatoid differentiation remain unclear due to the extremely rare incidence. There was no indication of adjuvant chemotherapy and no literature has been reported on the application of chemotherapy. This case showed a promising clinical outcome after curative resection, which indicated that surgical treatment could be potentially considered for suitable patients.

  20. Seafloor Observatory Science: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Beranzoli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The ocean exerts a pervasive influence on Earth’s environment. It is therefore important that we learn how this system operates (NRC, 1998b; 1999. For example, the ocean is an important regulator of climate change (e.g., IPCC, 1995. Understanding the link between natural and anthropogenic climate change and ocean circulation is essential for predicting the magnitude and impact of future changes in Earth’s climate. Understanding the ocean, and the complex physical, biological, chemical, and geological systems operating within it, should be an important goal for the opening decades of the 21st century. Another fundamental reason for increasing our understanding of ocean systems is that the global economy is highly dependent on the ocean (e.g., for tourism, fisheries, hydrocarbons, and mineral resources (Summerhayes, 1996. The establishment of a global network of seafloor observatories will help to provide the means to accomplish this goal. These observatories will have power and communication capabilities and will provide support for spatially distributed sensing systems and mobile platforms. Sensors and instruments will potentially collect data from above the air-sea interface to below the seafloor. Seafloor observatories will also be a powerful complement to satellite measurement systems by providing the ability to collect vertically distributed measurements within the water column for use with the spatial measurements acquired by satellites while also providing the capability to calibrate remotely sensed satellite measurements (NRC, 2000. Ocean observatory science has already had major successes. For example the TAO array has enabled the detection, understanding and prediction of El Niño events (e.g., Fujimoto et al., 2003. This paper is a world-wide review of the new emerging “Seafloor Observatory Science”, and describes both the scientific motivations for seafloor observatories and the technical solutions applied to their architecture. A

  1. Science& Technology Review September 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-09-01

    This September 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''The National Ignition Facility Is Born''; (2) ''The National Ignition Facility Comes to Life'' Over the last 15 years, thousands of Livermore engineers, scientists, and technicians as well as hundreds of industrial partners have worked to bring the National Ignition Facility into being. (3) ''Tracking the Activity of Bacteria Underground'' Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, researchers at Livermore are gaining knowledge on how bacteria work underground to break down compounds of environmental concern. (4) ''When Every Second Counts--Pathogen Identification in Less Than a Minute'' Livermore has developed a system that can quickly identify airborne pathogens such as anthrax. (5) ''Portable Radiation Detector Provides Laboratory-Scale Precision in the Field'' A team of Livermore physicists and engineers has developed a handheld, mechanically cooled germanium detector designed to identify radioisotopes.

  2. A Review of Forensic Science Management Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, M M; McAndrew, W P; Porter, M; Davies, B

    2015-01-01

    The science in forensic science has received increased scrutiny in recent years, but interest in how forensic science is managed is a relatively new line of research. This paper summarizes the literature in forensic science management generally from 2009 to 2013, with some recent additions, to provide an overview of the growth of topics, results, and improvements in the management of forensic services in the public and private sectors. This review covers only the last three years or so and a version of this paper was originally produced for the 2013 Interpol Forensic Science Managers Symposium and is available at interpol.int.

  3. Book review of "Encyclopedia of soil science"

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book review describes "Encyclopedia of soil science" edited by Chesworth et al. (2008), an update of the 1979 version of "The encyclopedia of soil science" edited by Fairbridge and Finkl. It is compared with Hillel et al. (2004) second edition of "Encyclopedia of soils in the environment" and w...

  4. Sscience & technology review; Science Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. This review for the month of July 1996 discusses: Frontiers of research in advanced computations, The multibeam Fabry-Perot velocimeter: Efficient measurement of high velocities, High-tech tools for the American textile industry, and Rock mechanics: can the Tuff take the stress.

  5. MADE CLEAR: Riding the waves of new science standards and environmental literacy requirements to enhance climate change education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, D. F.; Griswold, M.; Targett, N. M.; Stylinski, C.; Merrill, J. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The ongoing development of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) provides an unprecedented opportunity to engage K-12 educators in climate change education. In particular, scientists and educators can collaborate on NGSS performance expectations, materials and interpretation for instruction and assessment. This could include working together to incorporate real world science and engineering practices, such as data analysis, model development and interpretation, arguments from evidence and critical evaluation of solutions. NGSS learning progressions allow the ramping up of science relevant to climate change starting from a broad foundation in elementary school to a focus on the interdisciplinary concepts in high school. The Maryland-Delaware Climate Change Education, Assessment and Research (MADE CLEAR) partnership is fostering such an integrated approach through collaborations among environmental scientists, learning scientists, K-12 educators, and informal educators in our states. First, we are engaging and assisting the state departments of education in Maryland and Delaware to inform the development and implementation of climate change science in curricula not only for inclusion in the NGSS, but also new environmental literacy requirements. Second, we are convening informal and formal educators to refine approaches and address gaps in teaching about climate change science, with a particular focus on regional consequences. Lastly, K-12 and informal educators are provided access to experts in the fields of climate science, adaptation, and energy production and conservation. This will be achieved through professional development and creation of regionally focused resources in an iterative approach, assessed and guided by learning scientists. When fully implemented, we believe that our frameworks, curricula, processes and lessons learned can serve as models for other states in developing strategies for implementing science standards that also improve literacy in

  6. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of a female urethra: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Trabelsi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the urethra is an extremely rare tumour. Its histogenetic derivation remains controversial. Case report : We report a new case of clear cell adenocarcinoma of the proximal urethra in a 56-year-old woman who presented with grossly hematuria. Urethral cystoscopy revealed a tumour protruding from the posterior urethral wall at the bladder neck. Treatment consisted of urethrocystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection. Histologically, the neoplasm consisted of clear cell adenocarcinoma of the urethra. Conclusion : It appears that female urethral adenocarcinoma has more than one tissue of origin.

  7. Case of clear cell ependymoma of medulla oblongata: clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study with literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatya, Vishwa Jeet; Takeshima, Yukio; Kaneko, Mayumi; Nakano, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru; Nakazato, Yoichi; Inai, Kouki

    2003-05-01

    Clear cell ependymoma has been included in the WHO classification of the central nervous system in 1993, after the first report by Kawano et al. Since then, only a few cases have been reported. Most clear cell ependymoma cases reported in the literature so far were located in the supra-tentorial compartment and/or cerebellum, and one case was in the cervical spinal cord. We report a case of clear cell ependymoma whose histological features were sufficient for the diagnosis and was unusually located in the fourth ventricle originating from the medulla oblongata. The tumor showed uniform tumor cells with perinuclear halo, nuclei being centrally located. Most of the tumor cells were arranged as perivascular pseudorosettes, and no ependymal canals or rosettes were evident. Mitotic figures were not frequent. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were strongly reactive for glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin, and weak and dot-like positive for epithelial membrane antigen. Clear cell change of the tumor cells appeared to be fixation artifact because this feature was not evident in the frozen section. PMID:12713564

  8. Science of floorball: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tervo T

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Taru Tervo,1 Anna Nordström2 1Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Floorball Research and Development Center, Umeå School of Sport Sciences, 2Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Umeå School of Sport Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Background: The purpose of this study was to comprehensively review the scientific research on floorball at the competitive and recreational levels according to field of study. Methods: Full articles containing original data on floorball that had been published in English in peer-reviewed journals were considered for inclusion. Results: Of 75 articles screened, 19 were included in this systematic review. One article each was identified in the fields of sports management and sports psychology, and the remaining 17 articles were in the field of sports medicine. Injury epidemiology in floorball players was the most thoroughly examined topic of research. To date, no research has been performed on the incidence of floorball-related injury, or any aspect of the sport, in children and adolescents. Conclusion: Collaborative research among sports science disciplines is needed to identify strategies to reduce the incidence of injury and enhance the performance of licensed floorball players. Despite the increasing popularity of floorball in recent years, surprisingly little research has examined this sport. Keywords: floorball, unihockey, review

  9. Science & Technology Review June 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blobaum, K J

    2010-04-28

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Leader in High-Pressure Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Diamonds Put the Pressure on Materials--New experimental capabilities are helping Livermore scientists better understand how extreme pressure affects a material's structure; (3) Exploring the Unusual Behavior of Granular Materials--Livermore scientists are developing new techniques for predicting the response of granular materials under pressure; (4) A 1-Ton Device in a Briefcase--A new briefcase-sized tool for nuclear magnetic resonance is designed for onsite analysis of suspected chemical weapons; and (5) Targets Designed for Ignition--A series of experiments at the National Ignition Facility is helping scientists finalize the ignition target design.

  10. Science & Technology Review November 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H

    2006-09-29

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) Expanded Supercomputing Maximizes Scientific Discovery--Commentary by Dona Crawford; (2) Thunder's Power Delivers Breakthrough Science--Livermore's Thunder supercomputer allows researchers to model systems at scales never before possible. (3) Extracting Key Content from Images--A new system called the Image Content Engine is helping analysts find significant but hard-to-recognize details in overhead images. (4) Got Oxygen?--Oxygen, especially oxygen metabolism, was key to evolution, and a Livermore project helps find out why. (5) A Shocking New Form of Laserlike Light--According to research at Livermore, smashing a crystal with a shock wave can result in coherent light.

  11. Science & Technology Review September 2002

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    Budil, K

    2002-09-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Livermore--Poised for the Future, Commentary by Michael R. Anastasio; (2) A Hitchhiker's Guide to Early Earth--Experiments examine the possibility that the building blocks of life arrived on Earth as hitchhikers on comets; (3) A New World of Maps--More than pretty pictures, maps prepared with the tools of geographic information sciences allow researchers to find new relationships among spatial information; (4) Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells Stack Up to Efficient, Clean Power--The goal of Livermore's research in solid-oxide fuel cells is electric power generated cleanly and efficiently at an affordable cost; and (5) Empowering Light, Historic Accomplishments in Laser Research--During the past 40 plus years, the laser program at Livermore has played a seminal role in taking high-energy lasers from concept to reality.

  12. Science & Technology Review June 2009

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    Bearinger, J P

    2009-06-05

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Safer and Even More Effective TATB - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Dissolving Molecules to Improve Their Performance - Computer scientists and chemists have teamed to develop a green method for recycling a valuable high explosive that is no longer manufactured; (3) Exceptional People Producing Great Science - Postdoctoral researchers lend their expertise to projects that support the Laboratory's missions; (4) Revealing the Identities and Functions of Microbes - A new imaging technique illuminates bacterial metabolic pathways and complex relationships; and (5) A Laser Look inside Planets - Laser-driven ramp compression may one day reveal the interior structure of Earth-like planets in other solar systems.

  13. Science & Technology Review March 2009

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    Bearinger, J P

    2009-01-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Seismic Science and Nonproliferation--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Sleuthing Seismic Signals--Supercomputer simulations improve the accuracy of models used to distinguish nuclear explosions from earthquakes and pinpoint their location; (3) Wind and the Grid--The Laboratory lends technical expertise to government and industry to more effectively integrate wind energy into the nation's electrical infrastructure; (4) Searching for Tiny Signals from Dark Matter--Powerful amplifiers may for the first time allow researchers to detect axions, hypothesized particles that may constitute 'dark matter', and (5) A Better Method for Self-Decontamination--A prototype decontamination system could one day allow military personnel and civilians to better treat themselves for exposure to toxic chemicals.

  14. Science & Technology Review September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-07-24

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Remembering the Laboratory's First Director - Commentary by Harold Brown; (2) Herbert F. York (1921-2009): A Life of Firsts, an Ambassador for Peace - The Laboratory's first director, who died on May 19, 2009, used his expertise in science and technology to advance arms control and prevent nuclear war; (3) Searching for Life in Extreme Environments - DNA will help researchers discover new marine species and prepare to search for life on other planets; (4) Energy Goes with the Flow - Lawrence Livermore is one of the few organizations that distills the big picture about energy resources and use into a concise diagram; and (5) The Radiant Side of Sound - An experimental method that converts sound waves into light may lead to new technologies for scientific and industrial applications.

  15. Science & Technology Review May 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide III, M B

    2006-04-03

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Science and Technology Help the Nation Counter Terrorism--Commentary by Raymond J. Juzaitis; (2) Imagers Provide Eyes to See Gamma Rays--Gamma-ray imagers provide increased radiation detection capabilities and enhance the nation's arsenal for homeland security; (3) Protecting the Nation's Livestock--Foot-and-mouth disease could devastate America's livestock; a new assay provides a rapid means to detect it; (4) Measures for Measures--Laboratory physicists combine emissivity and reflectivity to achieve highly accurate temperature measurements of metal foils; and (5) Looping through the Lamb Shift--Livermore scientists measured a small perturbation in the spectra of highly ionized uranium--the first measurement of the two-loop Lamb shift in a bound state.

  16. Science & Technology Review April 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2007-02-27

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Shaking the Foundations of Solar-System Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention--The first samples retrieved from a comet are a treasure trove of surprises to Laboratory researchers; (3) Fire in the Hole--Underground coal gasification may help to meet future energy supply challenges with a production process from the past; (4) Big Physics in Small Spaces--A newly developed computer model successfully simulates particle-laden fluids flowing through complex microfluidic systems; (5) A New Block on the Periodic Table--Livermore and Russian scientists add a new block to the periodic table with the creation of element 118; and (6) A Search for Patterns and Connections--Throughout his career, Edward Teller searched for mathematical solutions to explain the physical world.

  17. Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Colon: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Daniel Barrera-Maldonado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the colon has been described scarcely in the literature. It affects elderly men more commonly than women and usually appears in the left side of the colon. A Hispanic 41-year-old female came to the emergency room with abdominal pain, vomiting, and distension. Physical exam revealed generalized tenderness without peritoneal signs. Laboratory data was unremarkable. A CT scan showed an apple-core lesion in the distal colon. A flexible sigmoidoscopy revealed an obstructive mass that made further evaluation impossible. Exploratory surgery revealed a hard mass obstructing the descending colon, which was resected. Histopathology analysis with immunohistochemistry staining was positive for cytokeratin 20, cytokeratin 10, CDX2, and villin, while it was negative for cytokeratin 7, RCC, vimentin, and CD31. These results confirmed the clear cell variant of the adenocarcinoma. Clear cell adenocarcinomas usually arise from the kidneys and Müllerian organs. Immunohistochemistry is crucial for establishing the origin of these neoplastic cells. A cytokeratin 20+/7− with positive CDX2 is highly specific and sensitive for intestinal neoplastic origin. The main treatment has been surgery alone with moderately good results. More research and information about this malignancy is needed, especially in regard to prognosis and in order to provide the best treatment option.

  18. Science & Technology Review October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide III, M B

    2005-08-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Important Missions, Great Science, and Innovative Technology--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) NanoFoil{reg_sign} Solders with Less Heat--Soldering and brazing to join an array of materials are now Soldering and brazing to join an array of materials are now possible without furnaces, torches, or lead; (3) Detecting Radiation on the Move--An award-winning technology can detect even small amounts An award-winning technology can detect even small amounts of radioactive material in transit; (4) Identifying Airborne Pathogens in Time to Respond--A mass spectrometer identifies airborne spores in less than A mass spectrometer identifies airborne spores in less than a minute with no false positives; (5) Picture Perfect with VisIt--The Livermore-developed software tool VisIt helps scientists The Livermore-developed software tool VisIt helps scientists visualize and analyze large data sets; (6) Revealing the Mysteries of Water--Scientists are using Livermore's Thunder supercomputer and new algorithms to understand the phases of water; and (7) Lightweight Target Generates Bright, Energetic X Rays--Livermore scientists are producing aerogel targets for use in inertial Livermore scientists are producing aerogel targets for use in inertial confinement fusion experiments and radiation-effects testing.

  19. Science & Technology Review March 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2007-02-05

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Partnering to Enhance Americans Health--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) Advancing the Frontiers in Cancer Research--Researchers at the University of California Davis Cancer Center and Lawrence Livermore are teaming up to fight cancer; (3) On the Leading Edge of Atmospheric Predictions--Continual research and development at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center help mitigate the consequences of toxic airborne hazards; (4) Climate and Agriculture: Change Begets Change--A Livermore researcher is using computer models to explore how a warmer climate may affect crop yields in California; (5) New Routes to High Temperatures and Pressures--With functionally graded density impactors composed of thin metal and polyethylene films, researchers can explore new areas of experimental physics; and (6) From Sound Waves to Stars: Teller's Contributions to Shock Physics--Edward Teller's interest in shock physics led to significant developments in both basic and applied science.

  20. Skull Base Clear Cell Carcinoma, Metastasis of Renal Primary Tumor: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilson Sepúlveda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on a patient who presented with cranial nerve VI bilateral paresis, absence of pharyngeal reflex, dysarthria, right tongue deviation, and right facial paralysis. Imaging studies showed an expansive process in the cranial base with clivus and petrous apex osteolysis. A biopsy confirmed the presence of clear cell adenocarcinoma and suspicion of renal tumor metastases. Abdominal imaging studies revealed a mass in the right kidney. Consequently, radiotherapy was performed, and the patient was enrolled in a palliative care and pain control program.

  1. Lymph node location of a clear cell hidradenoma: report of a patient and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingaud, Claire; Costes, Valérie; Frouin, Eric; Delfour, Christophe; Cribier, Bernard; Guillot, Bernard; Szablewski, Vanessa

    2016-08-01

    Cutaneous clear cell hidradenoma is an uncommon benign adnexal tumor which is not supposed to metastasize, contrary to its rare malignant counterpart, hidradenocarcinoma. We report the case of a 49-year-old man, who had had a stable inguinal lymph node enlargement for 6 years. An excision was performed and revealed an intra-nodal tumor, made of large clear cells with abundant cytoplasm and round nuclei without atypia or mitosis. The immunohistochemical staining showed diffuse positivity for keratin AE1/AE3, keratin 5/6 and p63, and focal staining with keratin 7, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and carcinous epithelial antigen (CEA), which underlined some ductular structures. Tumor cells were negative for renal markers PAX8 and CD10. Ki67 stained less than 1% of tumor cells. A translocation involving MAML2 gene was evidenced by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. No primary cutaneous tumor was found after extensive examination. Altogether, these results are in favor of an isolated nodal hidradenoma, for which we discuss two hypothesis: a primary nodal lesion, or a 'benign metastasis' of a cutaneous tumor. Cases of morphologically benign hidradenoma with lymph node involvement are exceptional. Our case, similar to every other reported case, was associated with an excellent prognosis, supporting the idea that these patients should not be overtreated. PMID:27080562

  2. Science & Technology Review July/August 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-07-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for the months of July and August 2016, there are two features: one on Science and Technology in Support of Nuclear Nonproliferation, and another on Seeking Out Hidden Radioactive Materials. Then there are highlights are three research projects--on optics, plasma science, and the nature of neutrinos--along with a news section and patents and awards.

  3. Nuclear computational science a century in review

    CERN Document Server

    Azmy, Yousry

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear engineering has undergone extensive progress over the years. In the past century, colossal developments have been made and with specific reference to the mathematical theory and computational science underlying this discipline, advances in areas such as high-order discretization methods, Krylov Methods and Iteration Acceleration have steadily grown. Nuclear Computational Science: A Century in Review addresses these topics and many more; topics which hold special ties to the first half of the century, and topics focused around the unique combination of nuclear engineering, computational

  4. Science and Technology Review, December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D.

    1998-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on assuring our nationÕs security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the LaboratoryÕs scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publicationÕs goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  5. Science & Technology Review October/November 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  6. Science and Technology Review, November 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D.

    1998-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on assuring our nationÕs security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the LaboratoryÕs scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publicationÕs goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  7. Science & Technology Review January/February 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  8. Science & Technology Review July/August 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-07-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for the months of July and August 2016, there are two features: one on Science and Technology in Support of Nuclear Nonproliferation, and another on Seeking Out Hidden Radioactive Materials. Then there are highlights are three research projects, along with a news section and patents and awards.

  9. Nanoparticles applied to plant science: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Sandra Cristina Capaldi; Silva, Alisson Luiz Diniz; Galazzi, Rodrigo Moretto; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2015-01-01

    The present review addresses certain important aspects regarding nanoparticles and the environment, with an emphasis on plant science. The production and characterization of nanoparticles is the focus of this review, providing an idea of the range and the consolidation of these aspects in the literature, with modifications on the routes of synthesis and the application of the analytical techniques for characterization of the nanoparticles (NPs). Additionally, aspects related to the interaction between the NPs and plants, their toxicities, and the phytoremediation process, among others, are also discussed. Future trends are also presented, supplying evidence for certain possibilities regarding new research involving nanoparticles and plants.

  10. Review: Applications of chromatography in forensic sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj S. Charde

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the use of different Chromatography techniques in the forensic science, Chromatographic technique is very sensitive and selective. Different types of chromatography techniques used were Liquid chromatography -mass spectrometry, Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, Thin layer chromatography, HPTLC in investigating criminal cases of which chemical warfare’s, terrorist attacks, smugglers, drug abuse, alcoholics. This techniques are promising to detect even pictogram or very less, with selectivity and sensitivity.

  11. Network science: a review focused on tourism

    CERN Document Server

    Baggio, R; Cooper, C

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the methods of the science of networks with an application to the field of tourism studies. The basic definitions and computational techniques are described and a case study (Elba, Italy) used to illustrate the effect of network typology on information diffusion. A static structural characterization of the network formed by destination stakeholders is derived from stakeholder interviews and website link analysis. This is followed by a dynamic analysis of the information diffusion process within the destination demonstrating that stakeholder cohesion and adaptive capacity have a positive effect on information diffusion. The outcomes and the implications of this analysis for improving destination management are discussed.

  12. Filling in the gaps: Illuminating (a) Clearing mechanisms in transitional protoplanetary disks, and (b) Quantitative illiteracy among undergraduate science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follette, Katherine Brutlag

    What processes are responsible for the dispersal of protoplanetary disks? In this dissertation, beginning with a brief Introduction to planet detection, disk dispersal and high-contrast imaging in Chapter 1, I will describe how ground-based adaptive optics (AO) imaging can help to inform these processes. Chapter 2 presents Polarized Differential Imaging (PDI) of the transitional disk SR21 at H-band taken as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS). These observations were the first to show that transition disk cavities can appear markedly different at different wavelengths. The observation that the sub-mm cavity is absent in NIR scattered light is consistent with grain filtration at a planet-induced gap edge. Chapter 3 presents SEEDS data of the transition disk Oph IRS 48. This highly asymmetrical disk is also most consistent with a planet-induced clearing mechanism. In particular, the images reveal both the disk cavity and a spiral arm/divot that had not been imaged previously. This study demonstrates the power of multiwavelength PDI imaging to verify disk structure and to probe azimuthal variation in grain properties. Chapter 4 presents Magellan visible light adaptive optics imaging of the silhouette disk Orion 218-354. In addition to its technical merits, these observations reveal the surprising fact that this very young disk is optically thin at H-alpha. The simplest explanation for this observation is that significant grain growth has occurred in this disk, which may be responsible for the pre-transitional nature of its SED. Chapter 5 presents brief descriptions of several other works-in-progress that build on my previous work. These include the MagAO Giant Accreting Protoplanet Survey (GAPlanetS), which will probe the inner regions of transition disks at unprecedented resolution in search of young planets in the process of formation. Chapters 6-8 represent my educational research in quantitative literacy, beginning with an

  13. Internet-Based Science Learning: A Review of Journal Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Wu, Ying-Tien; Tsai, Meng-Jung; Liu, Tzu-Chien; Hwang, Fu-Kwun; Lai, Chih-Hung; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Wu, Huang-Ching; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2011-01-01

    Internet-based science learning has been advocated by many science educators for more than a decade. This review examines relevant research on this topic. Sixty-five papers are included in the review. The review consists of the following two major categories: (1) the role of demographics and learners' characteristics in Internet-based science…

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Science Fair Projects: Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Helen

    2000-11-01

    I have often thought that the notion of a Science Fair is intrinsically a good one but have never set one up. With this book such an undertaking is possible, with 47 projects from which you can choose. Each project has a clearly stated purpose with an overview that contains the physics you need to get started. A hypothesis, or sometimes two, and a procedure detailing what the student should do follow this. The materials to be used are those you should be able to find at home, and safety guidelines as well as places the student needs adult help are clearly marked. Every project asks the student to write down the results of their experiment and decide whether or not their hypothesis was correct. There are also suggestions for taking each project further. Some of these projects are standard experiments that you may already do with students in class, for example, making plasticine boats, string telephones and levers. Most are interesting twists on standard experiments such as using a wedge as a simple machine, home-made spinning toys and the experiments with light bulbs. The latter are the only real cause for concern if students were to do these things at home as adult supervision would be essential. This is obviously an American book, though. Teachers in British classrooms would need to work out how to deal with the references to temperature in Fahrenheit and mass in ounces. Length is usually given in centimetres as well as inches. Translations of soda bottles and bobby pins would also be needed. This book is designed to be full of ideas and to give structure to projects students can do at home, not to provide ideas that you can transport into the classroom. It does this very well and I would recommend it to anyone thinking of starting up a Science Fair. Alternatively, this is an excellent resource for more interesting homework assignments that would put more responsibility on the student and give them something fun to do.

  15. Reviews of accelerator science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2008-01-01

    Particle accelerators are a major invention of the 20th century. In the last eight decades, they have evolved enormously and have fundamentally changed the way we live, think and work. Accelerators are the most powerful microscopes for viewing the tiniest inner structure of cells, genes, molecules, atoms and their constituents such as protons, neutrons, electrons, neutrinos and quarks. This opens up a whole new world for materials science, chemistry and molecular biology.Accelerators with megawatt beam power may ultimately solve a critical problem faced by our society, namely, the treatment of nuclear waste and the supply of an alternative type of energy. There are also tens of thousands of small accelerators all over the world. They are used every day for medical imaging, cancer therapy, radioisotope production, high-density chip-making, mass spectrometry, cargo x-ray/gamma-ray imaging, detection of explosives and illicit drugs, and weapons. This volume provides a comprehensive review of this driving and fas...

  16. Review of compartmental analysis in ecosystem science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    The compartment model has a large number of applications in ecosystem science. An attempt is made to outline the problem areas and objectives for which this type of model has particular advantages. The areas identified are an adequate model of tracer movement through an undisturbed but non-equilibrium ecosystem; an adequate model of the movement of material in greater than tracer quantity through an ecosystem near steady state; a minimal model based on limited data; a tool for extrapolating past trends; a framework for the summarization of large data sets; and a theoretical tool for exploring and comparing limited aspects of ecosystem dynamics. The review is set in an historical perspective which helps explain why these models were adopted in ecology. References are also provided to literature which documents available mathematical techniques in an ecological context.

  17. Science and Technology Review September 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This September 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''The National Ignition Facility Is Born''; (2) ''The National Ignition Facility Comes to Life'' Over the last 15 years, thousands of Livermore engineers, scientists, and technicians as well as hundreds of industrial partners have worked to bring the National Ignition Facility into being. (3) ''Tracking the Activity of Bacteria Underground'' Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, researchers at Livermore are gaining knowledge on how bacteria work underground to break down compounds of environmental concern. (4) ''When Every Second Counts--Pathogen Identification in Less Than a Minute'' Livermore has developed a system that can quickly identify airborne pathogens such as anthrax. (5) ''Portable Radiation Detector Provides Laboratory-Scale Precision in the Field'' A team of Livermore physicists and engineers has developed a handheld, mechanically cooled germanium detector designed to identify radioisotopes

  18. Science and Technology Review June 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K.

    2002-06-01

    This Science and Technology Review has the following stories: (1) Fighting Bioterrorism, Fighting Cancer; (2) A Two-Pronged Attack on Bioterrorism--synthetic two-legged molecules will be excellent detectors of biowarfare agents and cancer cells; (3) Adaptive Optics Sharpen the View from Earth--astronomers are obtaining images with unprecedented resolution, thanks to telescopes equipped with adaptive optics developed at Livermore; (4) Experiments Re-create X Rays from Comets--Experiments using the Laboratory's electron beam ion trap and an x-ray spectrometer designed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are shedding light on how comets emit x rays as they pass the Sun; (5) Chemistry--50 Years of exploring the Material World--from isotopic analysis to atomic-level simulations of material behavior, Livermore's chemists and materials scientists apply their expertise to fulfill the Laboratory's mission.

  19. SNOW CLEARING

    CERN Multimedia

    Groupe de Transport/Transport Group

    1999-01-01

    In order to facilitate snow-clearing operations, which commence at 4.30 every morning, drivers of CERN vehicles are kindly requested to group their cars together in the car parks. This will greatly help us in our work. Thank you for your co-operation.Transport Group / ST-HMTel. 72202

  20. Clear as Crystal: The Story of the Braggs--How X-Ray Crystallography Has Contributed to Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Robert; Patterson, John

    2014-01-01

    Here is a brief history of the work of two of Australia's most famous scientists, Sir William Bragg and his son Sir Lawrence Bragg. Jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in 1915 for their groundbreaking research into the use of X-rays to study the chemical structure and function of molecules, they have contributed to our heritage and to science at…

  1. Review of Psychotherapy as a human science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Reviews the book, Psychotherapy as a human science by Daniel Burston and Roger Frie (see record 2006-12980-000). In this book, the authors show how philosophical assumptions pervade therapeutic praxis. "In our view, philosophy is inherent to the very practice of psychotherapy" (p. 2). There is a "common ground that unites the therapists of today with the philosophers of the past" (p. 17). Their effort succeeds brilliantly in reconnecting psychology and philosophy and, by that homecoming, to ground psychotherapy (including contemporary psychoanalysis) as a "human science." The book begins by sketching ideas about truth we inherit from the Greeks, then shows how Descartes and Pascal helped launch the Enlightenment with their thinking about truth and the limits of reason. Kant, Hegel, and Marx broaden the scope to include reason, the unconscious, and the course of history. Kierkegaard and Nietzsche interject angst and authenticity. Dilthey proposes a human science neither scientistic nor irrational. Husserl launches phenomenology as the proper study of experience; Scheler, Jaspers and Heidegger react in their particular ways. Freud and Jung come to loggerheads over the unconscious. Buber, Binswanger, and Boss further develop existential-phenomenological perspectives in terms of human interrelatedness. Confrontation with the other and the limits of reciprocity engage Sartre, Lacan, and Laing. Psychoanalysis grows intersubjectively through the work of Sullivan, Fromm, Merleau-Ponty, Benjamin, and Stolorow. Postmodernism's excess, Frie and Burston conclude, requires acknowledgment of an authentic self answerable for choices in life: '...[W]e are both determined by, and exercise our agency in determining, the communicative contexts in which we exist" (p. 262). Psychotherapy from this existential-phenomenological perspective becomes "a rigorous exploration of our ways of making meaning--both consciously and unconsciously" (p. 263). The book ends, then, with an affirmation

  2. Review of Psychotherapy as a human science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Reviews the book, Psychotherapy as a human science by Daniel Burston and Roger Frie (see record 2006-12980-000). In this book, the authors show how philosophical assumptions pervade therapeutic praxis. "In our view, philosophy is inherent to the very practice of psychotherapy" (p. 2). There is a "common ground that unites the therapists of today with the philosophers of the past" (p. 17). Their effort succeeds brilliantly in reconnecting psychology and philosophy and, by that homecoming, to ground psychotherapy (including contemporary psychoanalysis) as a "human science." The book begins by sketching ideas about truth we inherit from the Greeks, then shows how Descartes and Pascal helped launch the Enlightenment with their thinking about truth and the limits of reason. Kant, Hegel, and Marx broaden the scope to include reason, the unconscious, and the course of history. Kierkegaard and Nietzsche interject angst and authenticity. Dilthey proposes a human science neither scientistic nor irrational. Husserl launches phenomenology as the proper study of experience; Scheler, Jaspers and Heidegger react in their particular ways. Freud and Jung come to loggerheads over the unconscious. Buber, Binswanger, and Boss further develop existential-phenomenological perspectives in terms of human interrelatedness. Confrontation with the other and the limits of reciprocity engage Sartre, Lacan, and Laing. Psychoanalysis grows intersubjectively through the work of Sullivan, Fromm, Merleau-Ponty, Benjamin, and Stolorow. Postmodernism's excess, Frie and Burston conclude, requires acknowledgment of an authentic self answerable for choices in life: '...[W]e are both determined by, and exercise our agency in determining, the communicative contexts in which we exist" (p. 262). Psychotherapy from this existential-phenomenological perspective becomes "a rigorous exploration of our ways of making meaning--both consciously and unconsciously" (p. 263). The book ends, then, with an affirmation

  3. Peer Review and the Relevance of Science

    OpenAIRE

    Alister Scott

    2006-01-01

    Recent science-policy debates have emphasised a growing role for science in helping to address some of society's most pressing challenges such as global environmental change, caring for the needs of ageing populations, and competitiveness in a global age. Other 'relevance' pressures include drives for public accountability, pressure for the 'democratisation' of science and demands from industry for usable knowledge. Underlying the question of the social relevance of science is the matter of d...

  4. The Multiple Faces of Peer Review in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2002-04-01

    I use autobiographical narratives to describe and analyse my involvement in peer review activities in science education and to illustrate their historical, social and cultural constitution. I explore ways in which peer review and science education have interrelated in 30-plus years in which I have been a science educator. I employ cultural sociology and activity theory to identify patterns of coherence and coexisting contradictions that create tensions able to catalyse improvements in science education. I argue that early career science educators need a gradual induction into peer review activities, preferably increasing their effectiveness by coparticipating with more experienced colleagues. Also, I critically examine my roles as a peer reviewer, within various contexts that include being an editor of journals and a book series, an examiner of dissertations and an advisor of graduate students, and as a reviewer of applications for tenure and promotion. In so doing I probe power relationships between the reviewer and the reviewed and explore the possibility that peer review is hegemonic. Finally, I present strategies for science educators to reach a collective understanding of how to enact peer review equitably.

  5. EMERGING SCIENCE: EPA'S ORD SUPPORTS REGIONAL HAZE PROGRAM; POSTERS FROM BOSC REVIEW AND SCIENCE FORUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of presentations from EPA's Board of Science Councilors review in April 2005 and the Science Forum in May 2005 are being made available to the Regional Planning Organization conference on June 9-10, 2005. Attendees will be able to review the materials during the confere...

  6. Science and Technology Review May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D

    1999-05-01

    The following two abstracts are for the 2 feature stories in this issue of ''Science and Technology Review''. (1) ''Leveraging Science and Technology in the National Interest''--A sampling of current projects at Lawrence Livermore demonstrates the many ways in which the Laboratory's science and technology support Department of Defense missions. These projects range from engineering and fabricating munitions and explosives to developing the advanced computer codes that optimize warhead design or assess their hazards. The Penetration Augmented Munition is a portable, multistage weapon that not only provides offensive capability for diminishing adversaries' mobility and capability but also gives US soldiers an additional margin of security in a hostile encounter. Livermore's fiber-composite sabot makes weapons more lethal and is particularly effective in tank warfare. The GLO (global local optimizer) code optimizes the design of shaped-charge warheads, while the CHEETAH thermochemical code improves explosives formulation. CALE, a multiuse mechanical code, is used to help the Air Force assess missile launch site safety and in particular to predict hazards from propellant that falls to the ground when rockets misfire. ALE3D, now being upgraded, will increase the capability of codes to assess safety hazards. (2) ''Extracting Valuable Information from Acoustic Waves''--Lawrence Livermore researchers are developing advanced techniques for interpreting acoustic signals, focusing on complex algorithms that at times mimic the reasoning processes of the human brain. Three current acoustic signal-processing projects, involving heart valve classification, oil exploration, and large-structure analysis, demonstrate the wide range of acoustic signal usefulness. To determine whether an artificial heart valve is intact or needs replacing, a suite of Livermore algorithms sift through heart and body sounds to

  7. Science and Technology Review, June 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following two abstracts are for the 2 feature stories in this issue of ''Science and Technology Review''. (1) ''Forewarnings of Coming Hazards''--The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore is an emergency response organization chartered to aid Department of Energy and Department of Defense sites when radioactive or toxic material is released into the atmosphere. Developed from studies beginning in the 1960s, it became a funded operational program in the late 1970s. Using an emergency response modeling system now in its third generation, ARAC scientists predict how atmospheric releases that could affect public health and safety will disperse. The ARAC system has evolved through experience gained during regular training exercises and in over 160 alerts and emergency responses to date. The work of ARAC scientists described in the article demonstrates the different modeling challenges they encounter in preparing for and responding to a variety of atmospheric emergencies. (2) ''Unraveling the Mystery of Detonation''--Laboratory experts in the detonation of high explosives are putting the computational power of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) to the test. Their research centers on insensitive explosives, whose behavior during detonation is slower and more complex than that of sensitive explosives. The article features three research projects, which are exploring detonation from different angles: the initiation phase, the molecules produced during detonation, and further development of CHEETAH, a thermochemical detonation code. All research teams are using ASCI supercomputers, which have increased their ability to simulate the detonation process by a factor of 100,000

  8. Clear Cell Atypical Fibroxanthoma: Clinicopathological Study of 6 Cases and Review of the Literature With Special Emphasis on the Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardío, Juan C; Pinedo, Fernando; Aramburu, José Antonio; Martínez-González, Miguel Á; Arias, Dolores; Khedaoui, Radia; Suárez-Massa, Dolores; Santonja, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX) is an uncommon dermal-based neoplasm arising on the sun-damaged skin of elderly people. Clear cell AFX is a rare variant with only 12 cases reported until the present date, all of them as case reports, except for 1 small series of 3 cases. The authors report 6 new cases and review the literature with special emphasis on the differential diagnosis. The clear cell variant represents 5% of AFX from their files. Histopathologically, it consists of sheets of epithelioid, pleomorphic cells, intermixed with a varying number of giant multinucleated and spindle cells, the latter arranged in a fascicular pattern. All cell types predominantly exhibit a clear, microvacuolated cytoplasm with well-demarcated cell borders. The clinical and immunohistochemical features of this variant are similar to those of the classic type. Clear cell AFX must be differentiated from other cutaneous clear cell neoplasms, some of them with an aggressive clinical behavior, including clear cell melanoma, primary cutaneous and metastatic clear cell carcinomas, clear cell sarcoma, pleomorphic liposarcoma, tumor of perivascular epithelioid cells, and distinctive dermal clear cell mesenchymal neoplasm. The clinical presentation and immunohistochemical profile play a key role in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26848640

  9. Thank you to 2015 reviewers of Radio Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Phil; Salous, Sana

    2016-04-01

    On behalf of Radio Science, AGU, and the scientific community, the editors and associate editors would like to thank everybody who reviewed manuscripts for Radio Science in 2015. Peer review is widely accepted as an indispensable part of science. The hours spent reading and commenting on manuscripts not only improve the manuscripts themselves, but also ensure the scientific rigor of future research in our field. These contributions are vital. Many of those listed below went further and reviewed three or more manuscripts for our journal, and they are indicated in italics. Overall, reviewers contributed 591 individual reviews of 282 manuscripts. Thank you once again to all our reviewers for contributing your valuable time to this essential task. We look forward to a 2016 of exciting advances in our field and communicating those advances to our community and to the broader public.

  10. Clear-cell variant urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Tezval

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell variants of transitional cell carcinomas (TCC of the bladder are extremely rare tumors. Only 6 cases have been reported until now. We report of a 67 year old man who presented with fast growing tumor disease. While initial diagnosis showed localized bladder tumor, final histopathology revealed pT4, G3, L1 urothelial carcinoma with clear cell differentiation. No more than 14 weeks after initial diagnosis the patient died from multi-organ failure after unsuccessful salvage laparotomy which showed massive tumor burden within the pelvis and peritoneal carcinosis. This case demonstrated an extremely fast tumor growth. Therefore, patients with clear cell urothelial carcinoma should be treated vigorously and without time delay. We present a case of clear cell variant of TCC which exhibited an extremely aggressive behavior. To our knowledge this is the fifth report of this rare disease.

  11. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE) (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE DISCUSSION DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment...

  12. IRIS Toxicological Review for Acrylamide (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review for Acrylamide, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development Process<...

  13. Fire science at LLNL: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, H.K. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    This fire sciences report from LLNL includes topics on: fire spread in trailer complexes, properties of welding blankets, validation of sprinkler systems, fire and smoke detectors, fire modeling, and other fire engineering and safety issues. (JEF)

  14. Regime for Bowel Preparation in Patients Scheduled to Colonoscopy: Low-Residue Diet or Clear Liquid Diet? Evidence From Systematic Review With Power Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-Min; Tian, Xu; Ma, Li; Yi, Li-Juan; Shuai, Ting; Zeng, Zi; Zeng, Xian-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Clear liquid diet (CLD) is used to perform bowel preparation before colonoscopy traditionally, but several clinical studies indicated that low-residue diet (LRD) generates equal effects to CLD and a conclusive conclusion has not yet been yielded. The systematic review was performed to address this conflict and facilitate informed decision-making eventually. To capture randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LRD with CLD in terms of bowel preparation, a search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Science Direct, recent conference abstracts, Google Scholar, and Clinicaltrials.gov through May 2015. We performed all meta-analyses based on fixed- or random-effects model, which is generated from clinical characteristics and methodology. Moreover, the G*Power software was adopted to achieve statistical power for each outcome. In total, we captured 109 potential citations at initial search stage and 2 topic-related articles were included through other sources. After critical appraisal, 7 RCTs were eligible for our inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses generated similar effects in bowel preparation quality, efficacy of colon cleansing, and compliance with recommended dietary regime when LRD versus CLD regime, but patients who were prescribed to receive LRD have slightly better tolerance (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11) and tended to repeat the same preparation regime in future (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.09-1.26) relative to patients in CLD. Importantly, both regimes resulted in similar adverse events (AEs). With the best available evidence, LRD could be recommended to be as standard regime for bowel preparation prior to colonoscopy. PMID:26735547

  15. 75 FR 82489 - Process for Submissions for Review of Security-Based Swaps for Mandatory Clearing and Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... a CCP for securities transactions is a clearing agency as defined in the Exchange Act and is... methods: Electronic Comments Use the Commission's Internet comment form( http://www.sec.gov/rules/proposed...-based swaps, for the purpose of including transactions and entities that have been structured to...

  16. A Methodological Review of Computer Science Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Justus; Julnes, George; Sutinen, Erkki; Lehman, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Methodological reviews have been used successfully to identify research trends and improve research practice in a variety of academic fields. Although there have been three methodological reviews of the emerging field of computer science education research, they lacked reliability or generalizability. Therefore, because of the capacity for a…

  17. Science and Technology Review December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Pruneda, J.H.

    2000-12-01

    This issue contains the following articles: (1) ''Computational Know-How Advances Materials Science''. (2) ''Following Materials over Time and Space'' Large-scale simulations, performed over an enormous range of length and time scales, enable researchers to advance their understanding of material behavior. (3) ''The Art of Systems Science'' Systems scientists practice the multidisciplinary art of gathering information and constructing the systems models needed for informed decision making. (4) ''A Solution for Carbon Dioxide Overload''. (5) ''Preparing for Strong Earthquakes''.

  18. Peer review, program officers and science funding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Roebber

    Full Text Available Increased competition for research funding has led to growth in proposal submissions and lower funding-success rates. An agent-based model of the funding cycle, accounting for variations in program officer and reviewer behaviors, for a range of funding rates, is used to assess the efficiency of different proposal-submission strategies. Program officers who use more reviewers and require consensus can improve the chances of scientists submitting fewer proposals. Selfish or negligent reviewers reduce the effectiveness of submitting more proposals, but have less influence as available funding declines. Policies designed to decrease proposal submissions reduce reviewer workload, but can lower the quality of funded proposals. When available funding falls below 10-15% in this model, the most effective strategy for scientists to maintain funding is to submit many proposals.

  19. Science & Technology Review March/April 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2008-01-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Science and Security in Sharp Focus--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Extending the Search for Extrasolar Planets--The Gemini Planet Imager will delve deep into the universe to identify planets that cannot be detected with current instrumentation; (3) Standardizing the Art of Electron-Beam Welding--The Laboratory's EBeam Profiler makes electron-beam welds consistent and improves quality control; (4) Molecular Building Blocks Made of Diamonds--Livermore physicists are exploring the electrical properties of diamondoids, tiny molecules of diamond; and (5) Animation Brings Science to Life--Animation helps scientists and engineers effectively communicate their ideas and research in a visually compelling way.

  20. Science and technology review, October 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, R.

    1997-10-01

    This month`s issue contains articles entitled Livermore Science and Technology Garner Seven 1997 R&D 100 Awards; New Interferometer Measures to Atomic Dimensions; Compact More Powerful Chips from Virtually Defect-free Thin Film Systems, A New Precision Cutting Tool; The Femtosecond Laser; MELD: A CAD Tool for Photonoics Systems, The Tiltmeter: Tilting at Great Depths to Find Oil; Smaller Insulators Handle Higher Voltage; and Compact Storage Management Software: The Next Generation.

  1. Science & Technology Review January/February 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2006-12-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Another Step for High-Energy-Density Science and Teller's Legacy--Commentary by George H. Miller. (2) Titan Leads the Way in Laser-Matter Science--Livermore's Titan laser combines long- and short-pulse lasers to explore high-energy-density science. (3) Identifying the Source of Stolen Nuclear Materials--Nuclear forensic scientists are using advanced techniques to discover the exact nature of interdicted radiological and nuclear materials, their age and origin, and where legitimate control was lost. (4) Tiny Tubes Make the Flow Go--Membranes made up of billions of tiny carbon tubes 50,000 times slimmer than a human hair allow liquids and gases to flow through at astonishingly fast speeds. (5) Acidic Microbe Community Fosters the Unique--In an abandoned mine, where the pH can be even lower than zero, communities of acidophilic microbes produce hundreds of unusual proteins.

  2. Science and Technology Review September 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D

    1999-09-01

    This review consists of the following titles; The Laboratory in the News; Life Performance of Complex Systems; A Better Picture of Aging Materials; Researchers Determine Chernobyl Liquidators' Exposure; and Target Chamber's Dedication Marks a Giant Milestone.

  3. Research Methods for Comprehensive Science Literature Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barry N.

    2009-01-01

    Finding some information on most topics is easy. There are abundant sources of information readily available. However, completing a comprehensive literature review on a particular topic is often difficult, laborious, and time intensive; the project requires organization, persistence, and an understanding of the scholarly communication and…

  4. Science and technology review: June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S. [eds.

    1996-06-01

    The first feature article is a survey of four research projects showing how theory and modeling efforts by scientist in the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate at LLNL are advancing the understanding of the property of materials with consideration of underlying structures. The second feature article discusses Livermore and DOE`s Oakland Operations Office teaming up to decontaminate, decommission, and close out--on time and under budget--the Ann Arbor Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility in Michigan. Two research highlights on Mammoth Mountain CO{sub 2} mystery and osteoporosis are also included.

  5. Science and Technology Review March 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pruneda, J H

    2000-03-01

    The contents of this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory newsletter include the following: (1) The Laboratory in the News; (2) Commentary by George Miller--Reaping Unexpected Benefits from the Petawatt Laser Breakthrough; (3) The Amazing Power of the Petawatt--For three years, the Petawatt laser was the most powerful laser in the world, pushing electrons toward the speed of light and accomplishing some remarkable science in the process; (4) Building a Virtual Time Machine--A powerful new computer code simulates geologic changes eons into the future at Yucca Mountain, a potential underground nuclear waste repository; (5) Research Highlight: Dead Sea Explosions Trigger International Cooperation; and (6) Patents and Awards; (7) Abstracts.

  6. Science & Technology Review July/August 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2008-05-27

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) Science Translated for the Greater Good--Commentary by Steven D. Liedle; (2) The New Face of Industrial Partnerships--An entrepreneurial spirit is blossoming at Lawrence Livermore; (3) Monitoring a Nuclear Weapon from the Inside--Livermore researchers are developing tiny sensors to warn of detrimental chemical and physical changes inside nuclear warheads; (4) Simulating the Biomolecular Structure of Nanometer-Size Particles--Grand Challenge simulations reveal the size and structure of nanolipoprotein particles used to study membrane proteins; and (5) Antineutrino Detectors Improve Reactor Safeguards--Antineutrino detectors track the consumption and production of fissile materials inside nuclear reactors.

  7. Science and technology review: June 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first feature article is a survey of four research projects showing how theory and modeling efforts by scientist in the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate at LLNL are advancing the understanding of the property of materials with consideration of underlying structures. The second feature article discusses Livermore and DOE's Oakland Operations Office teaming up to decontaminate, decommission, and close out--on time and under budget--the Ann Arbor Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility in Michigan. Two research highlights on Mammoth Mountain CO2 mystery and osteoporosis are also included

  8. Exploring Peer Review in the Computer Science Classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Scott

    2009-01-01

    In computer science, students could benefit from more opportunities to learn important, high-level concepts and to improve their learning skills. Peer review is one method to encourage this by providing students with the opportunity to evaluate other people's work and to receive feedback on their own projects. This allows for rich learning experience but it is not immediately obvious how to create a programming project review that will improve the students' conceptual understanding, require higher level thinking, and be engaging. The current literature does not typically address differences between review implementations or provide reasons for design decisions. This work explored how two different types of reviews affected the students' learning of concepts, high-level thinking, and engagement. There were indications that the type of review affected how well students addressed the concept they were reviewing and the comments' length. This shows that the review's type may affect student engagement and conceptu...

  9. Science and Technology Review, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-08-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. Topics discussed in this August 1996 issue are: Keeping the nuclear stockpile safe, secure, and reliable; Molten salt takes the bang out of high explosives; Security clearances meet the electronic age; and Exploring oil fields with crosshole electromagnetic induction.

  10. Science and Technology Review October 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eimerl, D.

    1999-09-01

    The following titles are in the review: The Laboratory in the News; Commentary about the year's R and D 100 Honors; The Optical Modulator and Switch: Light on the Move; From Dinosaur Bones to Software, Gamma Rays Protect Property; High-Power Green Lasers Open up Precision Machining; Breakthrough Design for Accelerators; New Deposition System for the Microchip Revolution; and PEREGRINE{trademark} Takes Aim at Cancer Tumors.

  11. Science and Technology Review September 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, A.A.

    2001-09-01

    This issue contains the following articles: (1) ''Technology Transfer Takes a Team''. (2) ''Zeroing In on Genes'' With Gene Recovery Microdissection, sequencing an entire genome to find its genes will no longer be necessary. (3) ''Big Glass for a Big Laser'' Together, Livermore and two leading laser glass producers have developed a revolutionary new method for making big pieces of high-quality laser glass. (4) ''Lasershot Makes Its Mark'' The Lasershot Marking System creates permanent, high-resolution identification marks on safety-critical metal parts, without weakening the part. (5) ''Tracking the Global Spread of Advanced Technology'' The Center for Global Security Research takes on the challenge of analyzing and raising awareness of the potential national security threats posed by advances in science and technology.

  12. Science and Technology Review April 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2004-02-24

    This months issue has the following articles: (1)''Computing Science: One Arrow in the Quiver for Homeland Security''--Commentary by Wayne Shotts; (2) ''On the Front Lines of Biodefense''--The Laboratory's pathogen bioinformatics group is developing ways to rapidly identify microbes that could pose a threat to the nation's citizens, livestock, and crops. (3) ''Defending against Corrosion''--Livermore researchers are designing a rugged system to prevent nuclear wastes from seeping into the environment at the proposed underground repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. (4) ''Engine Shows Diesel Efficiency without the Emissions''--Computer models are helping Laboratory engineers better understand the homogeneous compression charge ignition engine, a fuel-efficient engine with reduced emissions.

  13. A review of writing to learn in science: Implications for practice and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Léonard P.

    The published literature on writing to learn in science was reviewed in order to develop a conceptual framework for readers of this special issue and an agenda for future research. Professional journals, books, ERIC documents, and doctoral dissertations were consulted in this review process. Research on writing to learn has been hindered because studies have not always been well designed or clearly reported, and few have been conducted in authentic classroom environments. Furthermore, the links between writing to learn and conceptual change, and writing to learn and critical thinking have not received sufficient attention. Carefully designed studies, both qualitative and quantitative, are still required to provide data from a variety of perspectives. Because the reported studies at the college level outnumber those at other levels, research is still required to generalize the findings across a variety of science classrooms and to elucidate principles for guiding effective teacher use of writing-to-learn strategies.

  14. Exploring Peer Review in the Computer Science Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Scott; Perez-Quinones, Manuel A.

    2009-01-01

    In computer science, students could benefit from more opportunities to learn important, high-level concepts and to improve their learning skills. Peer review is one method to encourage this by providing students with the opportunity to evaluate other people's work and to receive feedback on their own projects. This allows for rich learning experience but it is not immediately obvious how to create a programming project review that will improve the students' conceptual understanding, require h...

  15. Science and Technology Review, September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Upadhye, R.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The feature articles are `Taking Lasers beyond the National Ignition Facility` and `Jumpin` Jupiter! Metallic Hydrogen`. The first article describes the ultimate goal of laser fusion as the production of electricity by inertial confinement fusion. Advances in diode-laser technology promise to take another step closer to that goal. The latter article discusses a Laboratory team`s efforts to provide evidence for the metallization of hydrogen based on the team`s expertise in shock compression. A commentary on `The Next Frontiers of Advanced Lasers Research is provided, and a research highlight is given on `Modeling Human Joints and Prosthetic Implants.

  16. Peer review versus editorial review and their role in innovative science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Georg; Adlassnig, Wolfram; Risch, Jesaka Ahau; Anderlini, Serena; Arguriou, Petros; Armendariz, Aaron Zolen; Bains, William; Baker, Clark; Barnes, Martin; Barnett, Jonathan; Baumgartner, Michael; Baumgartner, Thomas; Bendall, Charles A; Bender, Yvonne S; Bichler, Max; Biermann, Teresa; Bini, Ronaldo; Blanco, Eduardo; Bleau, John; Brink, Anthony; Brown, Darin; Burghuber, Christopher; Calne, Roy; Carter, Brian; Castaño, Cesar; Celec, Peter; Celis, Maria Eugenia; Clarke, Nicky; Cockrell, David; Collins, David; Coogan, Brian; Craig, Jennifer; Crilly, Cal; Crowe, David; Csoka, Antonei B; Darwich, Chaza; Del Kebos, Topiciprin; Derinaldi, Michele; Dlamini, Bongani; Drewa, Tomasz; Dwyer, Michael; Eder, Fabienne; de Palma, Raúl Ehrichs; Esmay, Dean; Rött, Catherine Evans; Exley, Christopher; Falkov, Robin; Farber, Celia Ingrid; Fearn, William; Felsmann, Sophie; Flensmark, Jarl; Fletcher, Andrew K; Foster, Michaela; Fountoulakis, Kostas N; Fouratt, Jim; Blanca, Jesus Garcia; Sotelo, Manuel Garrido; Gittler, Florian; Gittler, Georg; Gomez, Juan; Gomez, Juan F; Polar, Maria Grazia Gonzales; Gonzalez, Jossina; Gösselsberger, Christoph; Habermacher, Lynn; Hajek, Michael; Hakala, Faith; Haliburton, Mary-Sue; Hankins, John Robert; Hart, Jason; Hasslberger, Sepp; Hennessey, Donalyn; Herrmann, Andrea; Hersee, Mike; Howard, Connie; Humphries, Suzanne; Isharc, Laeeth; Ivanovski, Petar; Jenuth, Stephen; Jerndal, Jens; Johnson, Christine; Keleta, Yonas; Kenny, Anna; Kidd, Billie; Kohle, Fritz; Kolahi, Jafar; Koller-Peroutka, Marianne; Kostova, Lyubov; Kumar, Arunachalam; Kurosawa, Alejandro; Lance, Tony; Lechermann, Michael; Lendl, Bernhard; Leuchters, Michael; Lewis, Evan; Lieb, Edward; Lloyd, Gloria; Losek, Angelika; Lu, Yao; Maestracci, Saadia; Mangan, Dennis; Mares, Alberto W; Barnett, Juan Mazar; McClain, Valerie; McNair, John Sydney; Michael, Terry; Miller, Lloyd; Monzani, Partizia; Moran, Belen; Morris, Mike; Mößmer, Georg; Mountain, Johny; Phuthe, Onnie Mary Moyo; Muñoz, Marcos; Nakken, Sheri; Wambui, Anne Nduta; Neunteufl, Bettina; Nikolić, Dimitrije; Oberoi, Devesh V; Obmode, Gregory; Ogar, Laura; Ohara, Jo; Rybine, Naion Olej; Owen, Bryan; Owen, Kim Wilson; Parikh, Rakesh; Pearce, Nicholas J G; Pemmer, Bernhard; Piper, Chris; Prince, Ian; Reid, Terence; Rindermann, Heiner; Risch, Stefan; Robbins, Josh; Roberts, Seth; Romero, Ajeandro; Rothe, Michael Thaddäus; Ruiz, Sergio; Sacher, Juliane; Sackl, Wolfgang; Salletmaier, Markus; Sanand, Jairaj; Sauerzopf, Clemens; Schwarzgruber, Thomas; Scott, David; Seegers, Laura; Seppi, David; Shields, Kyle; Siller-Matula, Jolanta; Singh, Beldeu; Sithole, Sibusio; Six, Florian; Skoyles, John R; Slofstra, Jildou; Sole, Daphne Anne; Sommer, Werner F; Sonko, Mels; Starr-Casanova, Chrislie J; Steakley, Marjorie Elizabeth; Steinhauser, Wolfgang; Steinhoff, Konstantin; Sterba, Johannes H; Steppan, Martin; Stindl, Reinhard; Stokely, Joe; Stokely, Karri; St-Pierre, Gilles; Stratford, James; Streli, Christina; Stryg, Carl; Sullivan, Mike; Summhammer, Johann; Tadesse, Amhayes; Tavares, David; Thompson, Laura; Tomlinson, Alison; Tozer, Jack; Trevisanato, Siro I; Trimmel, Michaela; Turner, Nicole; Vahur, Paul; van der Byl, Jennie; van der Maas, Tine; Varela, Leo; Vega, Carlos A; Vermaak, Shiloh; Villasenor, Alex; Vogel, Matt; von Wintzigerode, Georg; Wagner, Christoph; Weinberger, Manuel; Weinberger, Peter; Wilson, Nick; Wolfe, Jennifer Finocchio; Woodley, Michael A; Young, Ian; Zuraw, Glenn; Zwiren, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    Peer review is a widely accepted instrument for raising the quality of science. Peer review limits the enormous unstructured influx of information and the sheer amount of dubious data, which in its absence would plunge science into chaos. In particular, peer review offers the benefit of eliminating papers that suffer from poor craftsmanship or methodological shortcomings, especially in the experimental sciences. However, we believe that peer review is not always appropriate for the evaluation of controversial hypothetical science. We argue that the process of peer review can be prone to bias towards ideas that affirm the prior convictions of reviewers and against innovation and radical new ideas. Innovative hypotheses are thus highly vulnerable to being "filtered out" or made to accord with conventional wisdom by the peer review process. Consequently, having introduced peer review, the Elsevier journal Medical Hypotheses may be unable to continue its tradition as a radical journal allowing discussion of improbable or unconventional ideas. Hence we conclude by asking the publisher to consider re-introducing the system of editorial review to Medical Hypotheses. PMID:23054375

  17. Discussing legal scholarship from political science perspectives : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, P.; Giessen, L.

    2014-01-01

    Scholarship in international law aims at addressing global forest governance comprehensively. This article reviews the recent contribution Global Forest Governance — Legal Concepts and Policy Trends by Rowena Maguire and puts it into the perspective of recent political and policy science research on

  18. A Review of Microbiology: An Evolving Science, Second Edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara May

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Microbiology: An Evolving Science, 2nd ed.; Joan L Slonczweski and John W. Foster; (2011. W.W. Norton & Company, New York NY. 1096 pages. ISBN: 978-0-393-93447-2. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  19. The Use of Mobile Learning in Science: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Helen; Burke, Diane; Gregory, Kristen H.; Gräbe, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile learning in education is growing at an exponential rate. To best understand how mobile learning is being used, it is crucial to gain a collective understanding of the research that has taken place. This systematic review reveals the trends in mobile learning in science with a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of studies from…

  20. Forensic science in the context of Islamic law: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahtani, Theeb; Aljerian, Khaldoon; Golding, Bartholomew; Alqahtani, Sakher

    2015-08-01

    Even though it is still in its nascent phase, forensic science has already encountered strong resistance in Saudi Arabia due to its incompatibility with their present legal system. What follow is a review on the status of forensic medicine and its future in terms of acceptance and use in legal action.

  1. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  2. Calibrated peer review assignments for the earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, J.A., II; Wang, V.Z.; Cervato, C.; Ridky, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Calibrated Peer Review ??? (CPR), a web-based instructional tool developed as part of the National Science Foundation reform initiatives in undergraduate science education, allows instructors to incorporate multiple writing assignments in large courses without overwhelming the instructor. This study reports successful implementation of CPR in a large, introductory geology course and student learning of geoscience content. For each CPR assignment in this study, students studied web-based and paper resources, wrote an essay, and reviewed seven essays (three from the instructor, three from peers, and their own) on the topic. Although many students expressed negative attitudes and concerns, particularly about the peer review process of this innovative instructional approach, they also recognized the learning potential of completing CPR assignments. Comparing instruction on earthquakes and plate boundaries using a CPR assignment vs. an instructional video lecture and homework essay with extensive instructor feedback, students mastered more content via CPR instruction.

  3. 75 FR 16491 - Science and Technology Directorate; Submission for Review; Information Collection Request for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SECURITY Science and Technology Directorate; Submission for Review; Information Collection Request for the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate First Responders Community of Practice AGENCY: Science and Technology Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 30-day Notice and request for comment....

  4. Review of physical sciences research, 1979 - 1990 (Gas Research Institute)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    To meet the expectations and needs of the gas industry and its customers, basic research management techniques were developed that are appropriate for GRI's unique mission oriented research program. These techniques differ from those used in private industry and government. These techniques are described focussing on how GRI selects appropriate research topics, builds consensus for the Physical Sciences research program, and maintains an emphasis on providing useful results. Each of GRI's 37 active research topics are reviewed, describing their goals, results, and future plans. The reviews are presented in three groups: Physics, Chemistry, and Combustion, and each group begins with a summary of recent important results. Useful results of Physical Sciences Research are described throughout, but a comprehensive record of results is not presented.

  5. Carbon nanotubes applications in separation science: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Herrera, Antonio V.; Gonzalez-Curbelo, Miguel Angel [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avenida Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Hernandez-Borges, Javier, E-mail: jhborges@ull.es [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avenida Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Rodriguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avenida Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CNTs in Separation Science in the period 2009-2011 is reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNTs as stationary phases in LC, CE and GC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNTs as pseudostationary phases in EKC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNTs as sorbents in SPE and SPME. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other uses of CNTs in separation science, as LDI substrates or in membranes. - Abstract: Due to the intensive and multidisciplinary research carried out during the last two decades on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the scientific community understands nowadays much better the chemistry, structure and properties of these interesting materials. In fact, they have found their particular place in a wide number of application fields (nanotechnology, electronics, optics, medicine, etc.) among which Analytical Chemistry is becoming more and more important. The aim of this review is to provide an updated report of the most recent manuscripts (years 2009-2011) regarding the use of CNTs in Separation Science. In particular, the use of CNTs as solid-phase extraction and microextraction sorbents, as part of membranes as well as their use in chromatography and electrophoresis will be discussed and commented. Besides, although not as fully related to Separation Science as the previous techniques, the use of CNTs as laser desorption/ionization substrates has also been considered because of its importance in the field.

  6. The Use of Mobile Learning in Science: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Helen; Burke, Diane; Gregory, Kristen H.; Gräbe, Catharina

    2016-04-01

    The use of mobile learning in education is growing at an exponential rate. To best understand how mobile learning is being used, it is crucial to gain a collective understanding of the research that has taken place. This systematic review reveals the trends in mobile learning in science with a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of studies from the year 2000 onward. Major findings include that most of the studies focused on designing systems for mobile learning, followed by a combination of evaluating the effects of mobile learning and investigating the affective domain during mobile learning. The majority of the studies were conducted in the area of life sciences in informal, elementary (5-11 years) settings. Mobile devices were used in this strand of science easily within informal environments with real-world connections. A variety of research methods were employed, providing a rich research perspective. As the use of mobile learning continues to grow, further research regarding the use of mobile technologies in all areas and levels of science learning will help science educators to expand their ability to embrace these technologies.

  7. Does science speak clearly and fairly in trade and food safety disputes? The search for an optimal response of WTO adjudication to problematic international standard-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kuei-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Most international health-related standards are voluntary per se. However, the incorporation of international standard-making into WTO agreements like the SPS Agreement has drastically changed the status and effectiveness of the standards. WTO members are urged to follow international standards, even when not required to comply fully with them. Indeed, such standards have attained great influence in the trade system. Yet evidence shows that the credibility of the allegedly scientific approach of these international standard-setting institutions, especially the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex) governing food safety standards, has been eroded and diluted by industrial and political influences. Its decision-making is no longer based on consensus, but voting. The adoption of new safety limits for the veterinary drug ractopamine in 2012, by a very close vote, is simply another instance of the problematic operations of the Codex. These dynamics have led skeptics to question the legitimacy of the standard setting body and to propose solutions to rectify the situation. Prior WTO rulings have yet to pay attention to the defect in the decision-making processes of the Codex. Nevertheless, the recent Appellate Body decision on Hormones II is indicative of a deferential approach to national measures that are distinct from Codex formulas. The ruling also rejects the reliance on those experts who authored the Codex standards to assess new measures of the European Community. This approach provides an opportunity to contemplate what the proper relationship between the WTO and Codex ought to be. Through a critical review of WTO rulings and academic proposals, this article aims to analyze how the WTO ought to define such interactions and respond to the politicized standard-making process in an optimal manner. This article argues that building a more systematic approach and normative basis for WTO judicial review of standard-setting decisions and the selection of technical

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Key Science Physics: New Edition and Key Science Physics for International Schools: Extension File

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybank, Maureen

    1999-09-01

    When handling , I recalled how one set of sixth-form students that I taught affectionately referred to Jim Breithaupt's large format book Understanding Physics for Advanced Level as `Big Jim'. This package, for GCSE students and teachers, is its younger brother. Key Science Physics was reviewed in this journal over four years ago. Now it is in a new edition with an expanded ring file of teacher resources (a Teacher's Guide and Extension File). It has been expanded for a wider range of students to meet the requirements of all GCSE syllabuses with additional topics for IGCSE and IB. The international bit seems to be among materials in the file of resources and does not appear in the title of the students' textbook. This is not one of those purchases that will only get occasional use and be left in a department library but it is one that contains sufficient excellent material to become central to any GCSE Physics course. For the students there is a single-volume 396-page textbook in full colour (not a heavyweight book). Marginal comments point out places where an Activity or Assignment from the Extension File fits in. All the materials in the teacher's Extension File are cross referenced to the numbering of this textbook, i.e. its Themes, Topics, Checkpoints, Tests etc, not to page numbers. The margin is used in other attractive ways to highlight a summary, propose a first thought or provide a topic summary. The text is fruitful mix of pure physics, applications and personalities. To support the students' practical work the Extension File contains photocopiable sheets. For the activities and assignments a few contain a harder version to give access to the higher levels of attainment. Four alternatives to practical questions are given; there are also exam questions and multiple choice questions for each topic. These all have helpful mark schemes on the teacher's answers pages. What else do you get? A Glossary collection of sheets to photocopy with space to enter a

  9. SSNTD applications in science and technology - A brief review

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, H A

    1999-01-01

    The technique of Solid State Nuclear Track Detection (SSNTD) has matured since long as a viable method of charged particle detection. The usage of this method has been successfully extended to neutron detection and gamma dose measurements as well. The etch-track mechanism has been further exploited to generate a major application area of nuclear track filters. In spite of the remarkable diversity of SSNTD applications that have emerged over the years in different fields, its potential is by no means saturated. In this article, a brief review of SSNTD applications is presented with reference to contemporary interests in science and technology. For convenience, the coverage of topics is organized under broad categories of Nuclear Physics, Materials Research, Geology, Environmental Science and allied technologies. While identifying high interest areas, those with limited but innovative applications are also mentioned. In some cases, the important results are quoted for the purpose of illustrating the strength of...

  10. Science and Technology Review April/May 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, R J

    2011-03-03

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the focus is on science and technology research to ensure the nation's security. That expertise is also applied to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight time a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for April/May 2011, the features are 'Dealing with the Nonlinear Battlefield' and 'From Video to Knowledge.' Research highlights are 'Kinetic Models Predict Biofuel Efficiency,' Going Deep with MEGa-Rays' and 'Energy on Demand.'

  11. 78 FR 15745 - Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following Site Visit. Name: Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences, 10748. Date and...

  12. Wildlife forensic science: A review of genetic geographic origin assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Rob; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-09-01

    Wildlife forensic science has become a key means of enforcing legislation surrounding the illegal trade in protected and endangered species. A relatively new dimension to this area of forensic science is to determine the geographic origin of a seized sample. This review focuses on DNA testing, which relies on assignment of an unknown sample to its genetic population of origin. Key examples of this are the trade in timber, fish and ivory and these are used only to illustrate the large number of species for which this type of testing is potentially available. The role of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers is discussed, alongside a comparison of neutral markers with those exhibiting signatures of selection, which potentially offer much higher levels of assignment power to address specific questions. A review of assignment tests is presented along with detailed methods for evaluating error rates and considerations for marker selection. The availability and quality of reference data are of paramount importance to support assignment applications and ensure reliability of any conclusions drawn. The genetic methods discussed have been developed initially as investigative tools but comment is made regarding their use in courts. The potential to compliment DNA markers with elemental assays for greater assignment power is considered and finally recommendations are made for the future of this type of testing.

  13. Book Review: Digital Crime and Forensic Science in Cyberspace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary C. Kessler

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Kanellis, P., Kiountouzis, E., Kolokotronis, N., & Martakos, D. (2006. Digital Crime and Forensic Science in Cyberspace. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing, 357 pages, ISBN: 1-59140-873-3 (paper, US$79.95.Reviewed by Gary C. KesslerThis book, according to the preface, "is intended for those who are interested in a critical overview of what forensic science is, care about privacy issues, and wish to know what constitutes evidence for computer crime." It goes on to say that the specific audiences for which it was written are students in academia and professionals in the industry.If used carefully, this book does a good job at providing a snapshot of some of the current issues in digital forensics, although perhaps best aimed at information security professionals. It is a collection of 15 chapters written by authors from Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, South Africa, the U.K., and the U.S. The international flavor of the writing is also welcome in the field.(see PDF for full review

  14. 77 FR 24227 - Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... State University by the Division Social and Economic Sciences ( 10748). Dates & Times: May 2, 2012; 7 p...; Science, Technology and Society Program; Division of Social and Economic Sciences, Room 990,...

  15. On the evolving open peer review culture for chemical information science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, W Patrick; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Compared to the traditional anonymous peer review process, open post-publication peer review provides additional opportunities -and challenges- for reviewers to judge scientific studies. In this editorial, we comment on the open peer review culture and provide some guidance for reviewers of manuscripts submitted to the Chemical Information Science channel of F1000Research.

  16. On the evolving open peer review culture for chemical information science

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, W. Patrick; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Compared to the traditional anonymous peer review process, open post-publication peer review provides additional opportunities -and challenges- for reviewers to judge scientific studies. In this editorial, we comment on the open peer review culture and provide some guidance for reviewers of manuscripts submitted to the Chemical Information Science channel of F1000Research.

  17. Science and the major racket sports: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Adrian

    2003-09-01

    The major racket sports include badminton, squash, table tennis and tennis. The growth of sports science and the commercialization of racket sports in recent years have focused attention on improved performance and this has led to a more detailed study and understanding of all aspects of racket sports. The aim here, therefore, is to review recent developments of the application of science to racket sports. The scientific disciplines of sports physiology and nutrition, notational analysis, sports biomechanics, sports medicine, sports engineering, sports psychology and motor skills are briefly considered in turn. It is evident from these reviews that a great deal of scientific endeavour has been applied to racket sports, but this is variable across both the racket sports and the scientific disciplines. A scientific approach has helped to: implement training programmes to improve players' fitness; guide players in nutritional and psychological preparation for play; inform players of the strategy and tactics used by themselves and their opponents; provide insight into the technical performance of skills; understand the effect of equipment on play; and accelerate the recovery from racket-arm injuries. Racket sports have also posed a unique challenge to scientists and have provided vehicles for developing scientific methodology. Racket sports provide a good model for investigating the interplay between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and the effect of nutrition, heat and fatigue on performance. They have driven the development of mathematical solutions for multi-segment interactions within the racket arm during the performance of shots, which have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms of both performance and injury. They have provided a unique challenge to sports engineers in relation to equipment performance and interaction with the player. Racket sports have encouraged developments in notational analysis both in terms of analytical procedures and the

  18. Science and Technology Review July/August 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K.

    2002-07-01

    This Science and Technology Review has the following stories: (1) Integration is Key to Understanding Climate Change; (2) The Outlook is for Warming, with Measurable Local Effects--Livermore climate models are zeroing in on the effects of human activities on global climate, representing them in simulations with the finest resolution ever; (2) How Metals Fail--experiments are guiding the development of codes that predict how metals react to high explosives; (4) Converting Data to Decisions--a new statistical method executed on supercomputers is bridging the gap between complex data and usable information; (5) Knowing the Enemy, Anticipating the Threat--The Laboratory's charter to counter the nuclear threat has evolved over the years and now includes intelligence analysis and technology to understand and counter biological and chemical threats.

  19. Writing clear animal activity proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinson, David M

    2011-06-01

    Although IACUC-related topics are frequently discussed in the literature, there is little published information about how to write animal activity proposals. In this article, the author discusses key considerations in the writing and review of animal activity proposals. The author then describes a framework for developing and writing clear animal activity proposals that highlight animal welfare concerns. Though these recommendations are aimed at individuals writing and reviewing research proposals, the framework can be modified for other types of animal activity proposals.

  20. Clear cell eccrine carcinoma with comedonecrosis in neck region: a  rare case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka H Hande

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alka H Hande, Archana M Sonone, Minal S ChaudharyDepartment of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Sawangi (Meghe, Wardha, IndiaAbstract: Adnexal carcinomas of the skin are rare; they derive from structures such as sweat glands, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles. Adnexal tumors represent 1%–2% of skin cancers. Carcinomas of the eccrine sweat gland represent a rare group of tumors with potential for local destruction and metastasis. Clear cell changes are a prominent feature in a wide variety of squamous and adnexal carcinomas. Pure clear cell carcinomas of the skin are exceptionally rare. Eccrine clear cell carcinoma is most commonly seen in the scalp region. We represent a rare case report of clear cell eccrine carcinoma with comedonecrosis in the neck region which is an unusual location for this type of tumor.Keywords: adnexal carcinomas, carcinomas of the eccrine sweat gland, clear cell eccrine carcinoma with comedonecrosis

  1. 77 FR 24228 - Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... University of California--Santa Barbara by the Division of Social and Economic Sciences (10748). Dates.... Frederick Kronz, Program Director; Science, Technology, and Society Program; Division of Social and...

  2. Review of the National Defense Intelligence College's Master's Degree in Science and Technology Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National Research Council (NRC) was asked by the National Defense Intelligence College (NDIC) to convene a committee to review the curriculum and syllabi for their proposed master of science degree in science and technology intelligence. The NRC was asked to review the material provided by the NDIC and offer advice and recommendations…

  3. The communication of forensic science in the criminal justice system: A review of theory and proposed directions for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Loene M

    2015-03-01

    Clear communication about forensic science is essential to the effectiveness and perceived trustworthiness of the criminal justice system. Communication can be seen as a meaning-making process that involves different components such as the sender of a message, the message itself, the channel in which a message is sent, and the receiver of the message. Research conducted to date on the communication between forensic scientists and non-scientists in the criminal justice system has focused on different components of the communication process as objects of study. The purpose of this paper is to bring together communication theory and past research on the communication of forensic science to contribute to a deeper understanding of it, and to provide a coherent view of it overall. The paper first outlines the broader context of communication theory and science communication as a backdrop to forensic science communication. Then it presents a conceptual framework as a way to organise past research and, using the framework, reviews recent examples of empirical research and commentary on the communication of forensic science. Finally the paper identifies aspects of the communication of forensic science that may be addressed by future research to enhance the effectiveness of communication between scientists and non-scientists in this multidisciplinary arena.

  4. Clearing, transparency, and collateral

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Carli; Francesca Carapella; Gaetano Antinolfi

    2014-01-01

    In an environment of Over-The-Counter trading with adverse selection we study traders' incentives to screen their counterparties under different clearing arrangements. When the clearing arrangement is also a choice, traders decide which types of transactions to clear under each arrangement, with signicant consequences for transparency and collateral requirements. The key trade-off is between insurance and the value of information: on one hand risk averse traders want to smooth consumption and...

  5. UK review of radio science, 1984-1986. Ionosphere and magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper contains the United Kingdom (U.K.) review of Radio Science, 1984-1986, covering ionospheric and magnetospheric science. This is the current UK contribution towards an international review published by the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). The UK review is divided into topics prescribed by URSI and covers work that is actually published within the period October 1983 - Sept. 1986, also as prescribed by URSI. The topics discussed in the review include: incoherent and coherent scatter, probing the magnetosphere, plasma instabilities, ionospheric modification, composition, ionization and chemistry and ionospheric dynamics. (U.K.)

  6. A review of research on formal reasoning and science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    A central purpose of education is to improve students' reasoning abilities. The present review examines research in developmental psychology and science education that has attempted to assess the validity of Piaget's theory of formal thought and its relation to educational practice. Should a central objective of schools be to help students become formal thinkers? To answer this question research has focused on the following subordinate questions: (1) What role does biological maturation play in the development of formal reasoning? (2) Are Piaget's formal tasks reliable and valid? (3) Does formal reasoning constitute a unified and general mode of intellectual functioning? (4) How does the presence or absence of formal reasoning affect school achievement? (5) Can formal reasoning be taught? (6) What is the structural or functional nature of advanced reasoning? The general conclusion drawn is that although Piaget's work and that which has sprung from it leaves a number of unresolved theoretical and methodological problems, it provides an important background from which to make substantial progress toward a most significant educational objective.All our dignity lies in thought. By thought we must elevate ourselves, not by space and time which we can not fill. Let us endeavor then to think well; therein lies the principle of morality. Blaise Pascal 1623-1662.

  7. The 26th AFOSR chemical and atmospheric sciences program review FY81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, W. G.; Myers, L. E.; Stallings, S. A.

    1982-03-01

    A review is presented of research efforts sponsored by the Directorate of Chemical and Atmospheric Sciences which have completed their period of support. Illustrated accounts resulting from the basic research programs in the Atmospheric and Chemical Sciences are highlighted. The Atmospheric Sciences is concerned with meteorology and upper atmospheric structure and dynamics. The meteorology focuses on mesoscale meteorology, cloud physics, and atmospheric dynamics. The Chemical Sciences deal with Chemical Techniques, Chemical Structures, Surface Chemistry, Chemical Dynamics, and Synthesis and properties of Materials.

  8. Physical and Virtual Laboratories in Science and Engineering Education: review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Ton; Linn, Marcia C.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.

    2013-01-01

    The world needs young people who are skillful in and enthusiastic about science and who view science as their future career field. Ensuring that we will have such young people requires initiatives that engage students in interesting and motivating science experiences. Today, students can investigate

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 1, 2012, the draft Toxicological Review of Ammonia and the draft charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House ...

  10. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE CONSULTATION DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Septemeber 30, 2010, the draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenc...

  11. Critical review of the United Kingdom's "gold standard" survey of public attitudes to science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin K; Jensen, Eric A

    2016-02-01

    Since 2000, the UK government has funded surveys aimed at understanding the UK public's attitudes toward science, scientists, and science policy. Known as the Public Attitudes to Science series, these surveys and their predecessors have long been used in UK science communication policy, practice, and scholarship as a source of authoritative knowledge about science-related attitudes and behaviors. Given their importance and the significant public funding investment they represent, detailed academic scrutiny of the studies is needed. In this essay, we critically review the most recently published Public Attitudes to Science survey (2014), assessing the robustness of its methods and claims. The review casts doubt on the quality of key elements of the Public Attitudes to Science 2014 survey data and analysis while highlighting the importance of robust quantitative social research methodology. Our analysis comparing the main sample and booster sample for young people demonstrates that quota sampling cannot be assumed equivalent to probability-based sampling techniques. PMID:26783249

  12. Good science, deceptive science, and fraud, plus a brief discussion of peer review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2011-03-01

    What makes scientific publication different from other types of publication? Traditionally, it was that scientists published not only their conclusions, but also their data (which enabled others wanting to re-evaluate the data to do so). Publishing their data helped keep scientists honest. In the mid-20th century the policies of scientific journals changed, partly because very large data sets were being evaluated via computer. Many (but not all) scientific journals paid homage to scientific tradition by establishing archives for data serving as the basis for published scientific papers, while only a description of the study and the conclusions were published in the peer-reviewed scientific journals. This set the stage for scientific deception and scientific fraud, which became widespread in certain fields of study during the latter part of the 20th century. Indeed, some organizations were established that appeared to be legitimate scientific societies, but in fact existed for the purpose of promoting the incorrect evaluation of scientific data and publishing deceptive studies masquerading as sound scientific studies. The field of medicine has also become more science than art, with its current emphasis on ``evidence-based medicine.'' The different types of scientific deceit/fraud are identified, and a lifetime of experience with the correction of scientific error, plus encounters with scientific deception and scientific fraud, is summarized.

  13. Rewarding peer reviewers: maintaining the integrity of science communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Voronov, Alexander A; Kitas, George D

    2015-04-01

    This article overviews currently available options for rewarding peer reviewers. Rewards and incentives may help maintain the quality and integrity of scholarly publications. Publishers around the world implemented a variety of financial and nonfinancial mechanisms for incentivizing their best reviewers. None of these is proved effective on its own. A strategy of combined rewards and credits for the reviewers1 creative contributions seems a workable solution. Opening access to reviews and assigning publication credits to the best reviews is one of the latest achievements of digitization. Reviews, posted on academic networking platforms, such as Publons, add to the transparency of the whole system of peer review. Reviewer credits, properly counted and displayed on individual digital profiles, help distinguish the best contributors, invite them to review and offer responsible editorial posts. PMID:25829801

  14. Rewarding Peer Reviewers: Maintaining the Integrity of Science Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Gerasimov, Alexey N.; Voronov, Alexander A.; Kitas, George D.

    2015-01-01

    This article overviews currently available options for rewarding peer reviewers. Rewards and incentives may help maintain the quality and integrity of scholarly publications. Publishers around the world implemented a variety of financial and nonfinancial mechanisms for incentivizing their best reviewers. None of these is proved effective on its own. A strategy of combined rewards and credits for the reviewers1 creative contributions seems a workable solution. Opening access to reviews and ass...

  15. NOAA Science Advisory Board, Review of National Center for Environmental Prediction Ocean Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrafesa, L. J.; Blaskovich, D.; Blumberg, A.F.; A. J. Busalacchi; McClean, J.; Mooers, C.N.K.; Rogers, D.P.; Weisberg, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    In response to a request from the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service, an Ocean Model Review Panel (ORMP) was commissioned by the NOAA Science Advisory Board (SAB), to address the following two-part Charge:

  16. [Book review] The youngest science: notes of a medicine-watcher, by Lewis Thomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Review of: The youngest science: notes of a medicine-watcher. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Series. Lewis Thomas. Penguin Books, 1995. Pennsylvania State University. 270 pp. ISBN: 0140243275, 9780140243277.

  17. To what extent is clinical and laboratory information used to perform medication reviews in the nursing home setting? the CLEAR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mestres Gonzalvo C

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carlota Mestres Gonzalvo,1 Kim PGM Hurkens,2 Hugo AJM de Wit,3 Brigit PC van Oijen,1 Rob Janknegt,1 Jos MGA Schols,4 Wubbo J Mulder,5 Frans R Verhey,6 Bjorn Winkens,7 Paul-Hugo M van der Kuy1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Geriatric Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Toxicology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen, 4Department of Family Medicine and Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 6Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Alzheimer Centre Limburg/School for Mental Health and Neurosciences, 7Department of Methodology and Statistics, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate to what extent laboratory data, actual medication, medical history, and/or drug indication influence the quality of medication reviews for nursing home patients. Methods: Forty-six health care professionals from different fields were requested to perform medication reviews for three different cases. Per case, the amount of information provided varied in three subsequent stages: stage 1, medication list only; stage 2, adding laboratory data and reason for hospital admission; and stage 3, adding medical history/drug indication. Following a slightly modified Delphi method, a multidisciplinary team performed the medication review for each case and stage. The results of these medication reviews were used as reference reviews (gold standard. The remarks from the participants were scored, according to their potential clinical impact, from relevant to harmful on a scale of 3 to -1. A total score per case and stage was calculated and expressed as a percentage of the total score from the expert

  18. Optimizing biomedical science learning in a veterinary curriculum: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Amy L; Donnon, Tyrone

    2013-01-01

    As veterinary medical curricula evolve, the time dedicated to biomedical science teaching, as well as the role of biomedical science knowledge in veterinary education, has been scrutinized. Aside from being mandated by accrediting bodies, biomedical science knowledge plays an important role in developing clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic reasoning skills in the application of clinical skills, in supporting evidence-based veterinary practice and life-long learning, and in advancing biomedical knowledge and comparative medicine. With an increasing volume and fast pace of change in biomedical knowledge, as well as increased demands on curricular time, there has been pressure to make biomedical science education efficient and relevant for veterinary medicine. This has lead to a shift in biomedical education from fact-based, teacher-centered and discipline-based teaching to applicable, student-centered, integrated teaching. This movement is supported by adult learning theories and is thought to enhance students' transference of biomedical science into their clinical practice. The importance of biomedical science in veterinary education and the theories of biomedical science learning will be discussed in this article. In addition, we will explore current advances in biomedical teaching methodologies that are aimed to maximize knowledge retention and application for clinical veterinary training and practice.

  19. Clear cell chondrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R.; David, R.; Cierney, G. III

    1985-01-01

    The clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic features of three cases of clear cell chondrosarcoma are described. On radiographs, this rather benign-appearing tumor resembles a chondroblastoma when it occurs at the end of a long bone, and may occasionally show a calcified matrix. However, it has distinctive tumor cells with a centrally placed vesicular nucleus surrounded by clear cytoplasm. The lesion has a low-grade malignancy and is amenable to en bloc surgical resection, which results in a much better prognosis than that of conventional chondrosarcoma.

  20. Outcomes for implementation science: an enhanced systematic review of instruments using evidence-based rating criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Cara C.; Fischer, Sarah; Weiner, Bryan J.; Stanick, Cameo; Kim, Mimi; Martinez, Ruben G.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-quality measurement is critical to advancing knowledge in any field. New fields, such as implementation science, are often beset with measurement gaps and poor quality instruments, a weakness that can be more easily addressed in light of systematic review findings. Although several reviews of quantitative instruments used in implementation science have been published, no studies have focused on instruments that measure implementation outcomes. Proctor and colleagues establishe...

  1. Reviewing on the Development of Forestry Sciences and Technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This essay reviews and sums up about the major achievement of forestry sciences-and technology in the past 50 years in China, from 8 fields including hereditary breeding of forest, silviculture, forest ecology, forest management, forest protection, combating desertification, wood sciences and technology, and forestry chemistry and technology.

  2. Complementary Social Sciences Courses in the Alberta High School Curriculum: A Conceptual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszenski, Donna; Smits, Hans

    2008-01-01

    In keeping with Alberta Education's goals and responsibilities to develop and evaluate curriculum and to set standards and assess outcomes, the Ministry is reviewing the status and purpose of social sciences courses as part of the high school curriculum. The present social sciences curriculum was revised in 1985. As part of the social sciences…

  3. Game-Based Learning in Science Education: A Review of Relevant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Chaun; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review empirical research articles regarding game-based science learning (GBSL) published from 2000 to 2011. Thirty-one articles were identified through the Web of Science and SCOPUS databases. A qualitative content analysis technique was adopted to analyze the research purposes and designs, game design and…

  4. 77 FR 17463 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; National Assessment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011-13 System Clearance SUMMARY: The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is..., such as mathematics, reading, writing, science, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, and...

  5. 77 FR 58111 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; FAFSA Completion Project Evaluation SUMMARY: The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) at the U.S. Department of Education (ED) is conducting... project will provide 80 Local Educational Agencies or school districts with access to data on...

  6. 77 FR 36493 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; National Assessment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; National Assessment of Educational...) SUMMARY: The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is a federally authorized survey of..., science, U.S. history, civics, geography, economics, and the arts. DATES: Interested persons are...

  7. 75 FR 69078 - Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... AGENCY Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) AGENCY... a workshop to evaluate initial draft materials for the Pb Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) is... the scientific content of initial draft materials or sections for the draft ISA. Workshop...

  8. Peer review and refereeing in medicine and medical sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Ajao Oluwole

    1997-01-01

    Every academic scientist will come into contact with peer review process either as a reviewer of others work, or as an author whose work is being reviewed by others, or as an applicant for research grant. Historically, peer review process came at various times to various journals for a variety of reasons in haphazard manner. Many forms of criticisms have been made against the process of peer review, and some critics do not believe that the process prevents the publication of flawed articles a...

  9. BOOK REVIEW: The Expertise and Deployment of Science Teachers at Key Stage 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Ken

    2000-03-01

    - of particular interest to readers of this journal - how do physics teachers fit into all this? Donnelly and Jenkins sent out questionnaires to 500 secondary schools in England and Wales, most of them comprehensive schools, and about 50% replied. About a third of the science taught at Key Stage 4 is physics (of course), but only 17% of the teachers had physics degrees. At Key Stage 3 most physics (60%) is taught as part of a `cross-disciplinary' science course, but in the pre-GCSE years of Key Stage 4 most physics (56%) is taught as a specialism. At KS4 this is most commonly within a dual-award `coordinated science' GCSE, but it is interesting to find that so many schools, contrary to received opinion, try to keep the subjects clearly separate at this stage. In this brief review it is not possible to summarize the wealth of useful detail the booklet contains. Here are just a few highlights. For teacher training: nearly all initial teacher training in science assumes that their students will need to be flexible science teachers, covering the three main sciences. But most schools do their best to ensure that teachers teach within their specialisms; even at KS3 a third of physics teachers do so. It is suggested that then training should better match the needs of schools. Recruitment of physicists to teaching: over four-fifths of those teaching physics at KS4 do not have an academic (degree) qualification in physics. Although this does not mean that 80% of physics is taught by non-physicists, it does mean that IoP Education initiatives (and this journal, come to think of it) might do more to help these non-physicists who teach physics. Teachers' Views. A particularly interesting section of the booklet deals with what teachers think about the match between their training and their teaching loads. About a fifth were quite happy with how their backgrounds helped them teach - and another fifth were disappointed. The rest, presumably, soldiered on as usual. Some comments: An

  10. Peer review and refereeing in medicine and medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajao Oluwole

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Every academic scientist will come into contact with peer review process either as a reviewer of others work, or as an author whose work is being reviewed by others, or as an applicant for research grant. Historically, peer review process came at various times to various journals for a variety of reasons in haphazard manner. Many forms of criticisms have been made against the process of peer review, and some critics do not believe that the process prevents the publication of flawed articles and fraudulent research. Despite the criticisms, there are advantages of peer review. At present in medical journalism peer review process is an indispensable entity for assessing manuscripts intended for publication.

  11. Peer review and refereeing in medicine and medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajao, O G

    1997-09-01

    Every academic scientist will come into contact with peer review process either as a reviewer of others work, or as an author whose work is being reviewed by others, or as an applicant for research grant. Historically, peer review process came at various times to various journals for a variety of reasons in haphazard manner. Many forms of criticisms have been made against the process of peer review, and some critics do not believe that the process prevents the publication of flawed articles and fraudulent research. Despite the criticisms, there are advantages of peer review. At present in medical journalism peer review process is an indispensable entity for assessing manuscripts intended for publication. PMID:19864786

  12. Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alchorn, A L

    2003-04-04

    Thank you for your interest in the activities of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Computation Directorate. This collection of articles from the Laboratory's Science & Technology Review highlights the most significant computational projects, achievements, and contributions during 2002. In 2002, LLNL marked the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scientific advancement in support of our national security mission has always been the core of the Laboratory. So that researchers could better under and predict complex physical phenomena, the Laboratory has pushed the limits of the largest, fastest, most powerful computers in the world. In the late 1950's, Edward Teller--one of the LLNL founders--proposed that the Laboratory commission a Livermore Advanced Research Computer (LARC) built to Livermore's specifications. He tells the story of being in Washington, DC, when John Von Neumann asked to talk about the LARC. He thought Teller wanted too much memory in the machine. (The specifications called for 20-30,000 words.) Teller was too smart to argue with him. Later Teller invited Von Neumann to the Laboratory and showed him one of the design codes being prepared for the LARC. He asked Von Neumann for suggestions on fitting the code into 10,000 words of memory, and flattered him about ''Labbies'' not being smart enough to figure it out. Von Neumann dropped his objections, and the LARC arrived with 30,000 words of memory. Memory, and how close memory is to the processor, is still of interest to us today. Livermore's first supercomputer was the Remington-Rand Univac-1. It had 5600 vacuum tubes and was 2 meters wide by 4 meters long. This machine was commonly referred to as a 1 KFlop machine [E+3]. Skip ahead 50 years. The ASCI White machine at the Laboratory today, produced by IBM, is rated at a peak performance of 12.3 TFlops or E+13. We've improved computer processing power by 10 orders of magnitude in 50 years, and I do

  13. Clear cell carcinoma derived from an endometriosis focus in a scar after a caesarean section--a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrosz, Zuzanna; Paleń, Piotr; Stojko, Rafał; Właszczuk, Paweł; Niesłuchowska-Hoxha, Anna; Piechuta-Kośmider, Ilona

    2014-10-01

    Endometriosis is defined as the occurrence of endometrial glands and endometrial stromal cells outside their typical localization within the uterus. Malignant transformation of endometriosis foci in a scar after a caesarean section (cc) is very rare--until 2013 (in a span of 40 years), about 40 such cases have been described. In our article, we describe a case of a 42-year-old woman with a tumour localized in a scar after a caesarean section. The tumour was diagnosed as clear cell carcinoma derived from an endometriosis focus. The long time interval--17 years in average (from 3 to 39 years) between the surgery (cesarean section in most cases) and the tumor diagnosis is characteristic. In the case we describe, the patient was diagnosed 16 years after the endometriosis focus in the scar had arised. Even though endometriosis is a benign lesion, it has many features distinctive for invasive carcinoma; it may itself undergo a malignant transformation as well as increase the risk of endometrial carcinoma or clear cell ovarian carcinoma. Maybe in future, more exhaustive studies will allow establishing a therapeutic protocol in patients with extra-ovarian malignant transformation of endometriosis foci.

  14. Snow-clearing operations

    CERN Document Server

    EN Department

    2010-01-01

    To facilitate snow clearing operations, which commence at 4.30 in the morning, all drivers of CERN cars are kindly requested to park them together in groups. This will help us greatly assist us in our work. Thank-you for your help. Transport Group / EN-HE Tel. 72202

  15. Physically based mathematical models in soil science: History, current state, problems, and outlook (Analytical Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, E. V.

    2015-07-01

    The formation, development, and some problems of the current physically based models of water and solute transfer are considered in this review. These models appeared about a half century ago. They were based on the basic laws of soil physics and other branches of soil science (laws of balance, transfer, diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion, etc.) described by the corresponding equations and programs and supported by the experimental data in the form of physically based parameters. At present, one of the main problems in the development, adaptation, and application of these models is that the current and future mathematical models should rest upon the experimental support with a clear physical basis characterizing the nature of the phenomenon described. This experimental support enables creating research models, drawing conceptual conclusions, and, hence, understanding, analyzing, and managing soil processes. This is apparently possible only if the set of methods for the experimental support of models is substantiated, preferably in direct physical experiments and under field conditions close to the future model prognoses.

  16. Progress in Earthquake Science and Technology in China: Review and Prospects (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhangli

    2001-01-01

    In the article the author looks back the hard development course and great progress in earth quake science and technology in China during the last near a half of century and expounds the following 3 aspects: (1) The strong desire of the whole society to mitigate seismic disasters and reduce the effect of earthquakes on social-economic live is a great driving force to push forward the development of earthquake science and technology in China; (2) To better ensure people' s life and property, sustainable economic development, and social stability is an essential purpose to drive the development of earthquake science and technology in China; and (3) To insist on the dialectical connection of setup of technical system for seismic monitoring with the scientific research of earthquakes and to better handle the relation between crucial task, current scientif ic level, and the feasibility are the important principles to advance the earthquake science and technology in China. Some success and many setbacks in earthquake disaster mitigation consistently enrich our knowledge regarding the complexity of the conditions for earthquake occurrence and the process of earthquake preparation, promote the reconstruction and modernization of technical system for earthquake monitoring, and deepen the scientific research of earthquakes. During the last 5 years, the improvement and modernization of technical system for earthquake monitoring have clearly provided the technical support to study and practice of earthquake prediction and pre caution, give prominence to key problems and broaden the field of scientific research of earth quakes. These have enabled us to get some new recognition of the conditions for earthquake oc currence and process of earthquake preparation, characteristics of seismic disaster, and mecha nism for earthquake generation in China's continent. The progress we have made not only en courages us to enhance the effectiveness of earthquake disaster mitigation, but also

  17. Citizen Science and the Urban Ecology of Birds and Butterflies - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang Wei, James; Lee, Benjamin P Y-H; Bing Wen, Low

    2016-01-01

    Citizen science has gained widespread currency as a tool for ecological research over the past decade. However, in the discipline of urban ecology, the existing contributions and future potential of citizen science engagement, specifically in terms of knowledge gain, have not yet been comprehensively explored. Here, we present a systematic review of published work on the urban ecology of birds and butterflies in relation to their use of citizen science data between 2005 and 2014. We compared the number of studies that used citizen science data to the number of studies that could potentially have employed data derived from citizen science. The take-up rates of citizen science data were 21% and 26% for birds and butterflies respectively. Most studies that employed citizen science used volunteer-derived data as primary data, and adopted Collegial, Collaborative and Contributional engagement modes to the exclusion of Contractual and Co-created arrangements. There was no evidence that citizen science studies investigated a different organismal scale (community vs. species) compared to the urban ecology literature. For both taxa, citizen science contributions were lower than expected compared to their representation in the urban ecology literature for studies on species-environment relationships at landscape and micro-environment scales, as well as behavioural ecology in general. Other research topics that could benefit from further citizen science involvement include breeding studies and guild analyses for birds, and multi-taxa studies for butterflies. Promising models of citizen science engagement for urban ecology are highlighted in relation to their thematic foci and methodological detail, and a number of research questions that could be productively addressed using citizen science are identified. The dynamics of contemporary engagement between citizen science and urban ecology described by this review could inform the design and refinement of urban ecology

  18. Citizen Science and the Urban Ecology of Birds and Butterflies — A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang Wei, James; Lee, Benjamin P. Y-H.; Bing Wen, Low

    2016-01-01

    Citizen science has gained widespread currency as a tool for ecological research over the past decade. However, in the discipline of urban ecology, the existing contributions and future potential of citizen science engagement, specifically in terms of knowledge gain, have not yet been comprehensively explored. Here, we present a systematic review of published work on the urban ecology of birds and butterflies in relation to their use of citizen science data between 2005 and 2014. We compared the number of studies that used citizen science data to the number of studies that could potentially have employed data derived from citizen science. The take-up rates of citizen science data were 21% and 26% for birds and butterflies respectively. Most studies that employed citizen science used volunteer-derived data as primary data, and adopted Collegial, Collaborative and Contributional engagement modes to the exclusion of Contractual and Co-created arrangements. There was no evidence that citizen science studies investigated a different organismal scale (community vs. species) compared to the urban ecology literature. For both taxa, citizen science contributions were lower than expected compared to their representation in the urban ecology literature for studies on species-environment relationships at landscape and micro-environment scales, as well as behavioural ecology in general. Other research topics that could benefit from further citizen science involvement include breeding studies and guild analyses for birds, and multi-taxa studies for butterflies. Promising models of citizen science engagement for urban ecology are highlighted in relation to their thematic foci and methodological detail, and a number of research questions that could be productively addressed using citizen science are identified. The dynamics of contemporary engagement between citizen science and urban ecology described by this review could inform the design and refinement of urban ecology

  19. Citizen Science and the Urban Ecology of Birds and Butterflies - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang Wei, James; Lee, Benjamin P Y-H; Bing Wen, Low

    2016-01-01

    Citizen science has gained widespread currency as a tool for ecological research over the past decade. However, in the discipline of urban ecology, the existing contributions and future potential of citizen science engagement, specifically in terms of knowledge gain, have not yet been comprehensively explored. Here, we present a systematic review of published work on the urban ecology of birds and butterflies in relation to their use of citizen science data between 2005 and 2014. We compared the number of studies that used citizen science data to the number of studies that could potentially have employed data derived from citizen science. The take-up rates of citizen science data were 21% and 26% for birds and butterflies respectively. Most studies that employed citizen science used volunteer-derived data as primary data, and adopted Collegial, Collaborative and Contributional engagement modes to the exclusion of Contractual and Co-created arrangements. There was no evidence that citizen science studies investigated a different organismal scale (community vs. species) compared to the urban ecology literature. For both taxa, citizen science contributions were lower than expected compared to their representation in the urban ecology literature for studies on species-environment relationships at landscape and micro-environment scales, as well as behavioural ecology in general. Other research topics that could benefit from further citizen science involvement include breeding studies and guild analyses for birds, and multi-taxa studies for butterflies. Promising models of citizen science engagement for urban ecology are highlighted in relation to their thematic foci and methodological detail, and a number of research questions that could be productively addressed using citizen science are identified. The dynamics of contemporary engagement between citizen science and urban ecology described by this review could inform the design and refinement of urban ecology

  20. Crystal Clear Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jody H.; Lockhart, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Great science activities don't just happen; they are orchestrated by highly skilled teachers who are creative, caring, and innovative. Effective classroom teachers possess a deep understanding of the developmental characteristics of their students and are adept at translating this understanding into opportunities for individual students to…

  1. Popular Science Journalism: Facilitating Learning through Peer Review and Communication of Science News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuten, Holly; Temesvari, Lesly

    2013-01-01

    In a multisemester Popular Science Journalism course that met for 2 hours once a week at Clemson University, students produced science news articles for the university newspaper by using primary literature, the internet, and interviews with researchers. Short lectures were given on topic choice, story development, literature surveys, common…

  2. 76 FR 17649 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for Nominations; SAB Mercury Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... AGENCY Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for Nominations; SAB Mercury Review Panel AGENCY... Office provides notice that the SAB will form a panel to conduct an independent review of EPA's Mercury...), 5 U.S.C., App. 2. On February 28, 2011 (76 FR 10896-10897) the EPA SAB Staff Office published...

  3. 76 FR 10896 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for Nominations; CASAC Mercury Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... AGENCY Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Request for Nominations; CASAC Mercury Review Panel AGENCY... Committee (CASAC) panel to conduct an independent review of EPA's Mercury Technical Support Document. DATES... is developing a draft risk assessment for mercury, entitled Technical Support Document:...

  4. Interactive Learning through Web-Mediated Peer Review of Student Science Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Nancy M.

    2009-01-01

    Two studies analyzed impacts of writing and receiving web-mediated peer reviews on revision of research reports by undergraduate science students. After conducting toxicology experiments, 77 students posted draft reports and exchanged double-blind reviews. The first study randomly assigned students to four groups representing full, partial, or no…

  5. Productization and Commercialization of IT-Enabled Higher Education in Computer Science: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanpää, Irja; Isomäki, Hannakaisa

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews research literature on the production and commercialization of IT-enabled higher education in computer science. Systematic literature review (SLR) was carried out in order to find out to what extent this area has been studied, more specifically how much it has been studied and to what detail. The results of this paper make a…

  6. Science and technology review, July-August 1998 issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, J

    1998-07-01

    On the occasion of Edward Teller's 90th birthday, S&TR has the pleasure of honoring Lawrence Livermore's co-founder and most influential scientist. Teller is known for his inventive work in physics, his concepts leading to thermonuclear explosions, and his strong stands on such issues as science education, the nation's strategic defense, the needs for science in the future, and sharing scientific information. The articles in this issue also show him, as always, tirelessly moving forward with his new and changing interests.

  7. Qualitative Research in PBL in Health Sciences Education: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Bridges, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Context: Qualitative methodologies are relatively new in health sciences education research, especially in the area of problem-based learning (PBL). A key advantage of qualitative approaches is the ability to gain in-depth, textured insights into educational phenomena. Key methodological issues arise, however, in terms of the strategies of…

  8. Students’ acceptance of peer review in Computer Science course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Kubincová

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Peer review technique used in educational context could be beneficial for students from several points of view. Besides of developing students’ writing skills, critical thinking, practising articulation of own knowledge to the others and giving them feedback, it can encourage collaborative learning and boost the students’ interest in the course. In our web design course we successfully introduced peer review activities more than 2 years ago. In this paper we discuss the students’ acceptance of peer review applied on evaluation of other students’ projects.

  9. Clearing the Big Smog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Beijing is trying to clean up its sky with a new standard for vehicle emissions From March 1,Beijing has imple- mented a new stricter vehicle emission standard that could lead to cleaner air,but also force thousands of cars off the road. StandardⅣ,the latest in a series of measures aimed at clearing the per- sistent smog,will match the current standard of the European Union. All the new light petro vehicles that are on sale in the Beijing market shall

  10. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  11. The effects of using guided notes and review of science achievement for male and female students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, Diann Marie

    2000-11-01

    The National Science Foundation predicts a shortage of scientists and engineers within the next 15 years. Some agree that the participation of women in science will be required to help meet the future demand for scientists (Malcom, 1990). Consequently, conscientious teachers search for learning strategies that provide opportunities for young women to achieve success with others in their science classes. This research concerns a note taking and teaching strategy that involves seventh grade science students. The investigation measured student achievement under three prescribed conditions. The treatment conditions were reviewing, guided notes, and guided notes with reviewing. For this experiment, the Solomon four-group design was utilized. This 2 x 2 factorial design tested for treatment effect and pretest sensitivity. Data was collected on seventh grade boys (n = 119) and seventh grade girls (n = 139) in science. Comparisons were made between the boys and girls groups. The results showed that achievement improved significantly when reviewing car using guided notes independently. The results also shower that significant improvements in achievement were not observed when participants used guided notes and reviewing together. Analysis was completed to measure how well the participants performed according to gender. This research showed that both boys and girls significantly improved their achievement in science equally well for all treatment conditions. This research went a step further by factoring in cognitive ability test scores and comparing them to the treatment results. This provided the researcher with information on which treatment condition worked best for high or low achieving students.

  12. Science and Technology Review January/February 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) World's Most Intense X-Ray Laser Focuses on Livermore Science - Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Groundbreaking Science with the World's Brightest X Rays - Experiments with x rays of unparalleled brightness and extremely short duration aim to reveal new information about atoms and molecules in motion; (3) From Data to Discovery - Ongoing control system enhancements at the National Ignition Facility bolster the understanding of experimental data and keep the system performing at its peak; (4) The Sun in All Its Splendor - Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, Livermore-developed multilayer mirrors are enabling unprecedented full-disk, high-resolution images of the Sun; and (5) Drilling Deep into Plant Veins - A novel combination of imaging techniques is being used to understand the three-dimensional architecture of plant cell walls.

  13. Science and Technology Review January/February 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blobaum, K J

    2010-11-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) World's Most Intense X-Ray Laser Focuses on Livermore Science - Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Groundbreaking Science with the World's Brightest X Rays - Experiments with x rays of unparalleled brightness and extremely short duration aim to reveal new information about atoms and molecules in motion; (3) From Data to Discovery - Ongoing control system enhancements at the National Ignition Facility bolster the understanding of experimental data and keep the system performing at its peak; (4) The Sun in All Its Splendor - Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, Livermore-developed multilayer mirrors are enabling unprecedented full-disk, high-resolution images of the Sun; and (5) Drilling Deep into Plant Veins - A novel combination of imaging techniques is being used to understand the three-dimensional architecture of plant cell walls.

  14. Science and Technology Review January/February 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, R J

    2011-12-20

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Dawn of a New Era of Scientific Discovery - Commentary by Edward I. Moses; (2) At the Frontiers of Fundamental Science Research - Collaborators from national laboratories, universities, and international organizations are using the National Ignition Facility to probe key fundamental science questions; (3) Livermore Responds to Crisis in Post-Earthquake Japan - More than 70 Laboratory scientists provided round-the-clock expertise in radionuclide analysis and atmospheric dispersion modeling as part of the nation's support to Japan following the March 2011 earthquake and nuclear accident; (4) A Comprehensive Resource for Modeling, Simulation, and Experiments - A new Web-based resource called MIDAS is a central repository for material properties, experimental data, and computer models; and (5) Finding Data Needles in Gigabit Haystacks - Livermore computer scientists have developed a novel computer architecture based on 'persistent' memory to ease data-intensive computations.

  15. A Review of the Website TeamScience.net

    OpenAIRE

    Aronoff, David M.; Bartkowiak, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    As modern research methods have become more specialized and the true complexity of today’s most pressing health issues and diseases is revealed, collaborations among scientists trained in different fields have become essential for exploring and tackling these problems. This specialization of research methods has made interdependence, joint ownership, and collective responsibility between and among scientists near requirements. These features of team science may not suit everyone, but given th...

  16. The Miracle of Peer Review and Development in Science: An Agent-Based Model

    CERN Document Server

    Righi, Simone

    2016-01-01

    It is not easy to rationalize how peer review, as the current grassroots of science, can work based on voluntary contributions of reviewers. There is no rationale to write impartial and thorough evaluations. Consequently, there is no risk in submitting low-quality work by authors. As a result, scientists face a social dilemma: if everyone acts according to his or her own self-interest, low scientific quality is produced. Still, in practice, reviewers as well as authors invest high effort in reviews and submissions. We examine how the increased relevance of public good benefits (journal impact factor), the editorial policy of handling incoming reviews, and the acceptance decisions that take into account reputational information can help the evolution of high-quality contributions from authors. High effort from the side of reviewers is problematic even if authors cooperate: reviewers are still best off by producing low-quality reviews, which does not hinder scientific development, just adds random noise and unn...

  17. REALISM WITHOUT TRUTH: A REVIEW OF GIERE'S SCIENCE WITHOUT LAWS AND SCIENTIFIC PERSPECTIVISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Timothy D

    2009-01-01

    An increasingly popular view among philosophers of science is that of science as action—as the collective activity of scientists working in socially-coordinated communities. Scientists are seen not as dispassionate pursuers of Truth, but as active participants in a social enterprise, and science is viewed on a continuum with other human activities. When taken to an extreme, the science-as-social-process view can be taken to imply that science is no different from any other human activity, and therefore can make no privileged claims about its knowledge of the world. Such extreme views are normally contrasted with equally extreme views of classical science, as uncovering Universal Truth. In Science Without Laws and Scientific Perspectivism, Giere outlines an approach to understanding science that finds a middle ground between these extremes. He acknowledges that science occurs in a social and historical context, and that scientific models are constructions designed and created to serve human ends. At the same time, however, scientific models correspond to parts of the world in ways that can legitimately be termed objective. Giere's position, perspectival realism, shares important common ground with Skinner's writings on science, some of which are explored in this review. Perhaps most fundamentally, Giere shares with Skinner the view that science itself is amenable to scientific inquiry: scientific principles can and should be brought to bear on the process of science. The two approaches offer different but complementary perspectives on the nature of science, both of which are needed in a comprehensive understanding of science. PMID:19949495

  18. An Open Science Peer Review Oath [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4wf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Aleksic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the foundations of the scientific method is to be able to reproduce experiments and corroborate the results of research that has been done before. However, with the increasing complexities of new technologies and techniques, coupled with the specialisation of experiments, reproducing research findings has become a growing challenge. Clearly, scientific methods must be conveyed succinctly, and with clarity and rigour, in order for research to be reproducible. Here, we propose steps to help increase the transparency of the scientific method and the reproducibility of research results: specifically, we introduce a peer-review oath and accompanying manifesto. These have been designed to offer guidelines to enable reviewers (with the minimum friction or bias to follow and apply open science principles, and support the ideas of transparency, reproducibility and ultimately greater societal impact. Introducing the oath and manifesto at the stage of peer review will help to check that the research being published includes everything that other researchers would need to successfully repeat the work. Peer review is the lynchpin of the publishing system: encouraging the community to consciously (and conscientiously uphold these principles should help to improve published papers, increase confidence in the reproducibility of the work and, ultimately, provide strategic benefits to authors and their institutions.

  19. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    BOOK REVIEWS (353) Dr Dyer's Academy Further Advanced Physics Physics 11-14, with Biology 11-14 and Chemistry 11-14 Nelson Modular Science: Books 1 and 2 Key Science: Physics, 3rd Edition Nelson Science: Physics, 2nd Edition Physics for AQA: Separate Award, Coordinated Award Physical Processes: A Visual Approach WEB WATCH (359) Physics Favourites: John Miller's selection

  20. An observational study of bimatoprost 0.01% in patients on prior intraocular pressure-lowering therapy: the Canadian Lumigan® RC Early Analysis Review (CLEAR trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crichton AC

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Crichton,1 Donald R Nixon,2 Susan Simonyi,3 Meetu Bhogal,3 Christopher S Sigouin,4 Marino J Discepola,5 Cindy ML Hutnik,6 Darryl C Baptiste,3 David B Yan7 On behalf of the CLEAR Study Group 1Division of Ophthalmology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Private practice, Barrie, ON, Canada; 3Medical Affairs, Allergan Inc., Markham, ON, Canada; 4CLINWest Research, Burlington, ON, Canada; 5Department of Ophthalmology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 6Department of Ophthalmology and Pathology, Ivey Eye Institute, London, ON, Canada; 7Department of Ophthalmology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Purpose: To evaluate the ocular hyperemia and intraocular pressure (IOP-lowering efficacy of bimatoprost 0.01% in subjects with elevated IOP due to primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG or ocular hypertension (OHT in a real-world clinical setting. Subjects and methods: This open-label, 12-week, observational study was conducted at 67 centers in Canada. Subjects with elevated IOP due to POAG or OHT instilled bimatoprost 0.01% as monotherapy once daily. Ocular hyperemia was graded by the investigator at baseline, week 6, and week 12 using a standardized photographic 5-point grading scale. Change in IOP from baseline was also evaluated at these time points. This analysis includes the subgroup of 268 subjects who had been previously treated with latanoprost 0.005%, bimatoprost 0.03%, travoprost 0.004%, and travoprost 0.004% with SofZia™ or nonselective beta-adrenergic receptor blockers prior to the study. Results: After 12 weeks of treatment with 0.01% bimatoprost, ocular hyperemia was graded as none-to-mild hyperemia (grades 0, +0.5, or +1 for 94.1% of subjects and as moderate-to-severe hyperemia (grades +2 or +3 for 5.9%. No statistically significant shifts in ocular hyperemia ratings were observed at week 12 for any of the prior IOP-lowering therapies except bimatoprost 0.03%, in which 20.8% of subjects experienced an

  1. Vision science and schizophrenia research: toward a re-view of the disorder. Editors' introduction to special section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Steven M; Keane, Brian P

    2011-07-01

    This theme section on vision science and schizophrenia research demonstrates that our understanding of the disorder could be significantly accelerated by a greater adoption of the methods of vision science. In this introduction, we briefly describe what vision science is, how it has advanced our understanding of schizophrenia, and what challenges and opportunities lay ahead regarding schizophrenia research. We then summarize the articles that follow. These include reviews of abnormal form perception (perceptual organization and backward masking) and motion processing, and an article on reduced size contrast illusions experienced by hearing but not deaf persons with schizophrenia. These articles reveal that the methods of basic vision research can provide insights into a number of aspects of the disorder, including pathophysiology, development, cognition, social cognition, and phenomenology. Importantly, studies of visual processing in schizophrenia make it clear that there are impairments in the functioning of basic neural mechanisms (e.g., center-surround modulation, contextual modulation of feedforward processing, reentrant processing) that are found throughout the cortex and that are operative in multiple forms of cognitive dysfunction in the illness. Such evidence allows for an updated view of schizophrenia as a condition involving generalized failures in neural network formation and maintenance, as opposed to a primary failure in a higher level factor (e.g., cognitive control) that accounts for all other types of perceptual and cognitive dysfunction. Finally, studies of vision in schizophrenia can identify sensitive probes of neural functioning that can be used as biomarkers of treatment response. PMID:21700588

  2. Do Cochrane reviews provide a good model for social science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Merete; Kongsted, Hans Christian

    2012-01-01

    to conclude that the majority of reviews appears limited to considering randomised controlled trials only. Because recent studies have delineated conditions for observational studies in social research to produce valid evidence, we argue that an inclusive approach is essential for truly evidence-based policy...

  3. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry as a tool for source inference in forensic science: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Natacha; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Esseiva, Pierre; Doyle, Sean; Zollinger, Kurt; Delémont, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been used in numerous fields of forensic science in a source inference perspective. This review compiles the studies published on the application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to the traditional fields of forensic science so far. It completes the review of Benson et al. [1] and synthesises the extent of knowledge already gathered in the following fields: illicit drugs, flammable liquids, human provenancing, microtraces, explosives and other specific materials (packaging tapes, safety matches, plastics, etc.). For each field, a discussion assesses the state of science and highlights the relevance of the information in a forensic context. Through the different discussions which mark out the review, the potential and limitations of IRMS, as well as the needs and challenges of future studies are emphasized. The paper elicits the various dimensions of the source which can be obtained from the isotope information and demonstrates the transversal nature of IRMS as a tool for source inference.

  4. Alcohol and Violence in the Emergency Room: A Review and Perspectives from Psychological and Social Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Cheryl Cherpitel; Joel Swendsen; Lucie Pennel; Maurice Dematteis; Françoise Carpentier; Georges Brousse; Laurent Bègue; Oulmann Zerhouni

    2013-01-01

    Our objective is to present a focused review of the scientific literature on the effect of alcohol consumption on violence related-injuries assessed in the emergency room (ER) and to show how psychological and behavioral sciences could lead to a better understanding of the factors contributing to alcohol-related injuries in the ER. We retrieved published literature through a detailed search in Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE with Full Text PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Col...

  5. Systems Science and Childhood Obesity: A Systematic Review and New Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Asheley Cockrell Skinner; E. Michael Foster

    2013-01-01

    As a public health problem, childhood obesity operates at multiple levels, ranging from individual health behaviors to school and community characteristics to public policies. Examining obesity, particularly childhood obesity, from any single perspective is likely to fail, and systems science methods offer a possible solution. We systematically reviewed studies that examined the causes and/or consequences of obesity from a systems science perspective. The 21 included studies addressed four ge...

  6. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  7. Science and Technology Review, July-August 1998: Celebrating Edward Teller at 90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, J.

    1998-07-01

    On the occasion of Edward Teller's 90th birthday, Science and Technology Review (S&TR) has the pleasure of honoring Lawrence Livermore's co-founder and most influential scientist. Teller is known for his inventive work in physics, his concepts leading to thermonuclear explosions, and his strong stands on such issues as science education, the nation's strategic defense, the needs for science in the future, and sharing scientific information. The articles in this issue also show him, as always, tirelessly moving forward with his new and changing interests.

  8. Review of the Fusion Theory and Computing Program. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonsen, Thomas M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Berry, Lee A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Michael R. [Swarthmore College, PA (United States); Dahlburg, Jill P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Davidson, Ronald C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, Martin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hegna, Chris C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); McCurdy, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Newman, David E. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Pellegrini, Claudio [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Phillips, Cynthia K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Post, Douglass E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rosenbluth, Marshall N. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Sheffield, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Simonen, Thomas C. [Munising, MI (United States); Van Dam, James [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2001-08-01

    At the November 14-15, 2000, meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, a Panel was set up to address questions about the Theory and Computing program, posed in a charge from the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (see Appendix A). This area was of theory and computing/simulations had been considered in the FESAC Knoxville meeting of 1999 and in the deliberations of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) in 2000. A National Research Council committee provided a detailed review of the scientific quality of the fusion energy sciences program, including theory and computing, in 2000.

  9. All-solid-state lithium batteries with inorganic solid electrolytes: Review of fundamental science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiayin, Yao; Bingxin, Huang; Jingyun, Yin; Gang, Peng; Zhen, Huang; Chao, Gao; Deng, Liu; Xiaoxiong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The scientific basis of all-solid-state lithium batteries with inorganic solid electrolytes is reviewed briefly, touching upon solid electrolytes, electrode materials, electrolyte/electrode interface phenomena, fabrication, and evaluation. The challenges and prospects are outlined as well. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA050906), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51172250 and 51202265), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010201), and Zhejiang Province Key Science and Technology Innovation Team, China (Grant No. 2013PT16).

  10. Science and Technology Review July/August 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-06-29

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Game-Changing Science in the National Interest - Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) Preventing Close Encounters of the Orbiting Kind - The Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness is improving capabilities for monitoring and detecting threats to space operations; (3) A CAT Scanner for Nuclear Weapon Components - A new x-ray system images nuclear weapon components in three dimensions, promising unprecedented resolution and clarity; (4) Mass-Producing Positrons - Scientists reveal a new method for yielding a greater density of positrons at a much faster rate inside a laboratory setting; and (5) The Next Generation of Medical Diagnostic Devices - Portable medical diagnostic devices using ultrawideband technology help first responders evaluate injuries in emergency situations and could improve overall health care.

  11. Review on space weather in Latin America. 1. The beginning from space science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Dasso, Sergio; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. Americo

    2016-11-01

    The present work is the first of a three-part review on space weather in Latin America. It comprises the evolution of several Latin American institutions investing in space science since the 1960s, focusing on the solar-terrestrial interactions, which today is commonly called space weather. Despite recognizing advances in space research in all of Latin America, this review is restricted to the development observed in three countries in particular (Argentina, Brazil and Mexico), due to the fact that these countries have recently developed operational centers for monitoring space weather. The review starts with a brief summary of the first groups to start working with space science in Latin America. This first part of the review closes with the current status and the research interests of these groups, which are described in relation to the most significant works and challenges of the next decade in order to aid in the solving of space weather open issues.

  12. Unconceived alternatives and conservatism in science: the impact of professionalization, peer-review, and Big Science

    OpenAIRE

    Stanford, PK

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht Scientific realists have suggested that changes in our scientific communities over the course of their history have rendered those communities progressively less vulnerable to the problem of unconcieved alternatives over time. I argue in response not only that the most fundamental historical transformations of the scientific enterprise have generated steadily mounting obstacles to revolutionary, transformative, or unorthodox scientific theorizi...

  13. Surveys of current status in biomedical science grant review: funding organisations' and grant reviewers' perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroter, Sara; Groves, Trish; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (a) to describe the current status of grant review for biomedical projects and programmes from the perspectives of international funding organisations and grant reviewers, and (b) to explore funders' interest in developing uniform requirements for grant review...

  14. Fraud and misconduct in science: the stem cell seduction: Implications for the peer-review process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heyden, M A G; van de Ven, T; Opthof, T

    2009-01-01

    Scientific misconduct and fraud occur in science. The (anonymous) peer review process serves as goalkeeper of scientific quality rather than scientific integrity. In this brief paper we describe some limitations of the peer-review process. We describe the catastrophic facts of the 'Woo-Suk Hwang fraud case' and raise some ethical concerns about the issue. Finally, we pay attention to plagiarism, autoplagiarism and double publications. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:25-9.).

  15. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardoel, Agatha A [ORNL; Counce, Deborah M [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron

  16. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron pnictides and

  17. Open data used in water sciences - Review of access, licenses and understandability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenroth, Esa; Lagerbäck Adolphi, Emma; Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    . Understandability of the data sets: 13 major formats were found, but the major issues encountered were due to incomplete documentation or metadata and problems with decoding binary formats. Ideally, open data sets should be represented in well-known formats and they should be accompanied with sufficient documentation so the data set can be understood. The development efforts on Water ML and NETCDF and other standards could improve understandability of data sets over time but in this review, only a few data sets were provided in these formats. Instead, the majority of datasets were stored in various text-based or binary formats or even document-oriented formats such as PDF. Other disciplines such as meteorology have long-standing traditions of operational data exchange format whereas hydrology research is still quite fragmented and the data exchange is usually done on a case-by-case basis. With the increased sharing of open data there is a good chance the situation will improve for data sets used also in water sciences. License issue: Only 3% of the data is completely free to use, while 57% can be used for non-commercial purposes or research. A high number of datasets did not have a clear statement on terms of use and limitation for access. In most cases the provider could be contacted regarding licensing issues.

  18. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardoel, Agatha A [ORNL; Counce, Deborah M [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron

  19. Social Science Energy Review: a quarterly publication. Vol. 1, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, L C [ed.

    1978-01-01

    The Yale University Institution for Social and Policy Studies Mapping Project on Energy and the Social Sciences brings together an interdisciplinary group of Yale and visiting faculty, ISPS staff, and Yale graduate students meeting weekly to discuss topics in energy and the social sciences and to study and evaluate the importance for social policy of existing and potential social science energy research projects. The primary purposes of the project are: (1) to encourage timely social science investigations into important energy-related social issues, (2) to explore the present and potential roles for academic social science research in energy decision-making, and (3) to advise DOE and other government personnel in the planning of social science energy research. In addition to an overview of the Mapping Project, this report contains the following: (1) Social Science Research on ''The Energy Boomtown,'' by Leroy C. Gould--contains literature survey (66 references) and conveys Mapping Project's suggestions as to priorities on future social science research on ''energy boomtowns.'' (2) Men and Coal in Appalachia: a Survey of the Academic Literature, by Peter B. Allison (bibliography cites 7 journals, 3 government documents, and 70 books and articles). (3) Energy Research in Psychology, by John Sweeney (reprint of review of current status of energy research in psychology that appeared in December, 1977 issue of APA Monitor under the title, ''Boosting Energy Research'').

  20. Attitudes towards science: a review of the literature and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Jonathan; Simon, Shirley; Collins, Sue

    2003-09-01

    This article offers a review of the major literature about attitudes to science and its implications over the past 20 years. It argues that the continuing decline in numbers choosing to study science at the point of choice requires a research focus on students' attitudes to science if the nature of the problem is to be understood and remediated. Starting from a consideration of what is meant by attitudes to science, it considers the problems inherent to their measurement, what is known about students' attitudes towards science and the many factors of influence such as gender, teachers, curricula, cultural and other variables. The literature itself points to the crucial importance of gender and the quality of teaching. Given the importance of the latter we argue that there is a greater need for research to identify those aspects of science teaching that make school science engaging for pupils. In particular, a growing body of research on motivation offers important pointers to the kind of classroom environment and activities that might raise pupils' interest in studying school science and a focus for future research.

  1. Letting the daylight in: Reviewing the reviewers and other ways to maximize transparency in science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelte M Wicherts

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of online publishing, opportunities to maximize transparency of scientific research have grown considerably. However, these possibilities are still only marginally used. We argue for the implementation of (1 peer-reviewed peer review, (2 transparent editorial hierarchies, and (3 online data publication. First, peer-reviewed peer-review entails a community-wide review system in which reviews are published online and rated by peers. Reviewers with higher average ratings are weighted more heavily in publication decisions, thereby ensuring academic quality of reviews. Second, reviewers who write many highly regarded reviews may move to higher editorial positions. This leads to a transparent basis for editorial hierarchies and prevents politically inspired editorial appointments. Third, online publication of data ensures the possibility of independent verification of inferential claims in published papers. This counters statistical cherry-picking and data massaging to obtain favorable results. We illustrate the benefits of these strategies by discussing an example in which the classical publication system has gone awry, namely controversial IQ research. We argue that this case would have likely been avoided using more transparent publication practices. We argue that the proposed system leads to better reviews, meritocratic editorial hierarchies, and a higher degree of replicability of statistical analyses. Therefore it leads to a publication system that more fully benefits from the advantages and possibilities offered by online, open access publication.

  2. Optical metrology at the Optical Sciences Center: an historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creath, Katherine; Parks, Robert E.

    2014-10-01

    The Optical Sciences Center (OSC) begun as a graduate-level applied optics teaching institution to support the US space effort. The making of optics representative of those used in other space programs was deemed essential. This led to the need for optical metrology: at first Hartmann tests, but almost immediately to interferometric tests using the newly invented HeNe laser. Not only were new types of interferometers needed, but the whole infrastructure that went with testing, fringe location methods, aberration removal software and contour map generation to aid the opticians during polishing needed to be developed. Over the last half century more rapid and precise methods of interferogram data reduction, surface roughness measurement, and methods of instrument calibration to separate errors from those in the optic have been pioneered at OSC. Other areas of research included null lens design and the writing of lens design software that led into the design of computer generated holograms for asphere testing. More recently work has been done on the reduction of speckle noise in interferograms, methods to test large convex aspheres, and a return to slope measuring tests to increase the dynamic range of the types of aspheric surfaces amenable to optical testing including free-form surfaces. This paper documents the history of the development of optical testing projects at OSC and highlights the contributions some of the individuals associated with new methods of testing and the infrastructure needed to support the testing. We conclude with comments about the future trends optical metrology.

  3. Lake Mead--clear and vital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessells, Stephen M.; Rosen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    “Lake Mead – Clear and Vital” is a 13 minute documentary relating the crucial role of science in maintaining high water quality in Lake Mead. The program was produced coincident with release of the Lakes Mead and Mohave Circular a USGS publication covering past and on-going research in the lakes and tributaries of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

  4. HANDMADE PAPER: A REVIEW OF ITS HISTORY, CRAFT, AND SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Hubbe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available For over 2000 years the manual craft of papermaking has been practiced all over the world utilizing a variety of techniques. This review describes the evolution of hand papermaking and its cultural significance. Paper’s evolution has been shaped by the structure and chemical composition of the fibers. Almost every aspect of modern papermaking technology has been foreshadowed by traditional practices. Such practices were passed down for many generations within families of papermakers. The main sources of cellulosic fiber evolved as the ancient craft migrated from its birthplace in China to Korea and Japan, the Islamic world, and then to Europe and America. Though most paper made today comes from automated, continuous production systems, handmade paper has enjoyed a resurgence, both as a traditional craft and as an art-form. In addition, traditional papermaking methods can provide insights to help in modern applications involving cellulosic fibers.

  5. THE SPORTS SCIENCE OF CURLING: A PRACTICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Bradley

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Curling is a sport played on ice in which two teams each deliver 8 granite stones towards a target, or 'house'. It is the only sport in which the trajectory of the projectile can be influenced after it has been released by the athlete. This is achieved by sweeping the ice in front of the stone to change the stone-ice friction and thereby enable to stone to travel further, curl more or stay straight. Hard sweeping is physically demanding. Different techniques of sweeping can also have different effects on the stone. This paper will review the current research behind sweeping a curling stone, outline the physiological demands of sweeping, the associated performance effects and suggest potential strategies of sweeping that can be used by both coaches and curling teams

  6. A bibliographic review of medicine and science research in dancesport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Teri R; Wyon, Matthew; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Redding, Emma

    2013-06-01

    DanceSport is the competitive form of ballroom dancing, and even though it has more participants worldwide than ballet and modern dance, there is less peer-reviewed research. A review was conducted to identify all relevant literature to help researchers and clinicians gain an enhanced understanding of dancesport. Eight databases were searched, with 34 articles found in topics including participation motives, psychology, exercise physiology, fitness training, injuries and injury prevention, biomechanics, menstrual dysfunction, and substance use. Our results indicate that researchers have been inconsistently recording and reporting anthropometric and dancesport data; for example, 31 studies separated participants by gender, 21 included the competition classification of dancers, 19 reported which style of dancesport participants competed in, and 13 described the participants as a dance couple. Common injuries affected the neck, shoulder, spine, knee, lower leg, and foot. Dancesport is in the very heavy to extremely heavy category in energy expenditure (mean heart rate: male 175.2 ± 10.7, female 178.6 ± 8.6 bpm) and utilizes both aerobic and anaerobic energy systems. Alpha-beta and heart rate variability intervention techniques are reported to successfully enhance performance in dancers. Dancesport participants also appear less likely to smoke cigarettes, but have little knowledge about anti-doping rules. During events, professionals danced farther (30 m) and faster (0.3 m/sec) than junior dancers. Female competitors were more likely to be eumenorrheic. Dancesport is a physically and mentally demanding competitive sport, but there is a need to standardize measurements in future studies to allow comparison. PMID:23752280

  7. Book review: Neurofeminism: issues at the intersection of feminist theory and cognitive science

    OpenAIRE

    Muntanyola-Saura, Dafne

    2013-01-01

    Neurofeminism is the first interdisciplinary collection of essays to address how recent neuroscience affects traditional feminist issues. Philosophers, psychologists, sociomedical scientists, and feminist scholars explore questions of ‘feminine’ ethics, feminist neuroscience, and overcoming unhelpful pop science books. Reviewed by Dafne Muntanyola-Saura.

  8. Population physical activity behaviour change : A review for the European College of Sport Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biddle, S.J.H.; Brehm, W.; Verheijden, M.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2012-01-01

    The academic study of sport and exercise science has expanded greatly into the arena of public health over the past 20 years or more and Europe has played a significant role in this. It is opportune to review evidence concerning ways to change population levels of physical activity for health. This

  9. BOOK REVIEW OF "CHESAPEAKE BAY BLUES: SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND THE STRUGGLE TO SAVE THE BAY"

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a book review of "Chesapeake Bay Blues: Science, Politics, and the Struggle to Save the Bay". This book is very well written and provides an easily understandable description of the political challenges faced by those proposing new or more stringent environmental regulat...

  10. 77 FR 57079 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Teaching and Learning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013 Main Study SUMMARY: TALIS is an international survey of the teaching workforce, teaching as a profession, and the learning environments of schools. Data are collected...

  11. A Review of Research on Metacognition in Science Education: Current and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Anat; Barzilai, Sarit

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to map the current state of research in the field of metacognition in science education, to identify key trends, and to discern areas and questions for future research. We conducted a systematic analysis of 178 studies published in peer-reviewed journals in the years 2000-2012 and indexed in the ERIC database. The…

  12. 77 FR 51788 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Education Longitudinal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Education Longitudinal Study 2002... Study (ELS:2002 FAFS) SUMMARY: The Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) is a...

  13. Long-Term Retention of Basic Science Knowledge: A Review Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, Eugene J. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a review of long-term retention of basic science knowledge is presented. First, it is argued that retention of this knowledge has been a long-standing problem in medical education. Next, three types of studies are described that are employed in the literature to investigate long-term retention of knowledge in general. Subsequently,…

  14. Information Processing: A Review of Implications of Johnstone's Model for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair-Thompson, Helen; Overton, Tina; Botton, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The current review is concerned with an information processing model used in science education. The purpose is to summarise the current theoretical understanding, in published research, of a number of factors that are known to influence learning and achievement. These include field independence, working memory, long-term memory, and the use of…

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Tycho Brahe and Prague: Crossroads of European Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, C.; Christianson, J. R.; Hadravová, A.; Hadrava, P.; Solc, M.

    2003-01-01

    The 16th volume of the Acta Historica Astronomiae is the Proceedings of the International Symposium on the History of Science in the Rudolphine Period. The meeting was held in Prague from 22 to 25 October 2001, on the 400th anniversary of Tycho's sudden death, and was attended by approximately 65 scientists and historians. The volume contains 36 contributions dealing with the life and work of Tycho Brahe, the astronomy of the era, and many cultural aspects of Rudolphine Prague. One of the first papers is an eye-opener on the fact that Tycho Brahe was a cosmologically-driven observer. This is followed by a very illuminating paper on gender roles in science in the late 16th century, with emphasis on the role of Sophie Brahe, Tycho's youngest sister. Several subsequent papers reveal the existence of barely known links between Tycho and his contemporaneous colleagues. These extremely-well documented papers also deal with the broader philosophical investigation he was involved in, viz. meteorology, medicine, astrology, alchemy and even theology. Important names of Tycho's days are Petrus Severinus, Johannes Pratensis, Theophrastus Paracelsus, John Craig, Ursus (Nicolai Reymers Baer) etc. Very illuminating is the information on the relations between Tycho and the Jesuits in Prague, explaining the reason why this order was very supportive of the Tychonic cosmological model. The relationsship with Kepler, and also Kepler's observational activities (after Tycho's death) are highlighted as well as the hideous mode of communication between Galileo and Kepler. More than one paper deals with the accuracy and precision of Tycho's observations, and the causal impact of this accuracy on the scientific revolution. Another study discusses the study of Tycho's handwriting, this paper brings the aditional bonus of a list of accessible works which contain notes by him. One very interesting project was Brahe's proposal to the Republic of Venice to determine the exact latitudes of

  16. 76 FR 29746 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office Notification of a Public Meeting of the SAB Mercury Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... AGENCY Science Advisory Board Staff Office Notification of a Public Meeting of the SAB Mercury Review... SAB Mercury Review Panel. DATES: The meeting will be held on June 15, 2011 and June 16, 2011 from 9 a... Mercury Review Panel will hold a public meeting to review EPA's Technical Support Document:...

  17. Posttraumatic stress disorder: a state-of-the-science review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeroff, Charles B; Bremner, J Douglas; Foa, Edna B; Mayberg, Helen S; North, Carol S; Stein, Murray B

    2006-02-01

    This article reviews the state-of-the-art research in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from several perspectives: (1) Sex differences: PTSD is more frequent among women, who tend to have different types of precipitating traumas and higher rates of comorbid panic disorder and agoraphobia than do men. (2) Risk and resilience: The presence of Group C symptoms after exposure to a disaster or act of terrorism may predict the development of PTSD as well as comorbid diagnoses. (3) Impact of trauma in early life: Persistent increases in CRF concentration are associated with early life trauma and PTSD, and may be reversed with paroxetine treatment. (4) Imaging studies: Intriguing findings in treated and untreated depressed patients may serve as a paradigm of failed brain adaptation to chronic emotional stress and anxiety disorders. (5) Neural circuits and memory: Hippocampal volume appears to be selectively decreased and hippocampal function impaired among PTSD patients. (6) Cognitive behavioral approaches: Prolonged exposure therapy, a readily disseminated treatment modality, is effective in modifying the negative cognitions that are frequent among PTSD patients. In the future, it would be useful to assess the validity of the PTSD construct, elucidate genetic and experiential contributing factors (and their complex interrelationships), clarify the mechanisms of action for different treatments used in PTSD, discover ways to predict which treatments (or treatment combinations) will be successful for a given individual, develop an operational definition of remission in PTSD, and explore ways to disseminate effective evidence-based treatments for this condition. PMID:16242154

  18. 77 FR 15753 - Request for Nominations of Experts for a Science Advisory Board Panel To Review EPA's Web-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... AGENCY Request for Nominations of Experts for a Science Advisory Board Panel To Review EPA's Web-Based... Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board (EPA-SAB-EC-02-010), which is posted on the SAB Web site... Science Advisory Board (SAB) Staff Office requests public nominations of technical experts to form an...

  19. Statistical Techniques Utilized in Analyzing PISA and TIMSS Data in Science Education from 1996 to 2013: A Methodological Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Hung, Yi-Chen

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a methodological review of articles using the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) or Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) data published by the SSCI-indexed science education journals, such as the "International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education," the "International…

  20. REVIEW: Oxytocin: Crossing the bridge between basic science and pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viero, Cedric; Shibuya, Izumi; Kitamura, Naoki; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Katoh, Akiko; Ueta, Yoichi; Zingg, Hans H; Chvatal, Alexandr; Sykova, Eva; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2010-10-01

    Is oxytocin the hormone of happiness? Probably not. However, this small nine amino acid peptide is involved in a wide variety of physiological and pathological functions such as sexual activity, penile erection, ejaculation, pregnancy, uterus contraction, milk ejection, maternal behavior, osteoporosis, diabetes, cancer, social bonding, and stress, which makes oxytocin and its receptor potential candidates as targets for drug therapy. In this review, we address the issues of drug design and specificity and focus our discussion on recent findings on oxytocin and its heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptor OTR. In this regard, we will highlight the following topics: (i) the role of oxytocin in behavior and affectivity, (ii) the relationship between oxytocin and stress with emphasis on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, (iii) the involvement of oxytocin in pain regulation and nociception, (iv) the specific action mechanisms of oxytocin on intracellular Ca²(+) in the hypothalamo neurohypophysial system (HNS) cell bodies, (v) newly generated transgenic rats tagged by a visible fluorescent protein to study the physiology of vasopressin and oxytocin, and (vi) the action of the neurohypophysial hormone outside the central nervous system, including the myometrium, heart and peripheral nervous system. As a short nine amino acid peptide, closely related to its partner peptide vasopressin, oxytocin appears to be ideal for the design of agonists and antagonists of its receptor. In addition, not only the hormone itself and its binding to OTR, but also its synthesis, storage and release can be endogenously and exogenously regulated to counteract pathophysiological states. Understanding the fundamental physiopharmacology of the effects of oxytocin is an important and necessary approach for developing a potential pharmacotherapy. PMID:20626426

  1. Implementing Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) in a Large-lecture Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, A. S.; Bettis, E. A., III; Russell, J. E.; Van Horne, S.; Sipola, M.; Rocheford, M. K.; Colombo, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Assessing writing assignments and providing students the opportunity to meaningfully revise the assignments are challenging for instructors of large enrollment science classes. We included two individual writing assignments and peer assessments as part of course assessment for a large Introduction to Environmental Science course. In order to facilitate the assessment, Calibrated Peer Review (CPR), a web-based application developed by UCLA that enables frequent writing assignments in any discipline and with any class size, was adopted. The CPR assignment process involved four steps: submitting a writing assignment, calibrating each student's review skills, reviewing peers' writing, and assessing one's own writing assignment (self-assessment). A rubric was provided to guide students through each writing assignment and the same rubric was used in calibration, review, and self-assessment scoring. Once the instructors uploaded the writing prompts, rubrics, sample writings and answer keys into the CPR system, the CPR software fully directed all student activity (writing assignment submission, calibrations, reviews, and self-assessment). Students were able to view their results within the CPR program, including their self-calibration scores, reviewing scores, peers' ratings and feedback, total earned scores, and self-assessment scores. Surveys independently administered at the conclusion of the CPR assignments indicated that sixty to seventy-five percent of the students perceived that CPR was helpful in their learning, improved their writing and evaluation skills, and that the process of reviewing other students' essays and their own essays was more helpful than the comments received from peers. These survey results are in agreement with the well-established educational research literature that shows the benefits of peer review and peer assessment to student learning. Our experience with CPR in a large enrollment science course indicates that thoughtful planning of the

  2. Letting the daylight in : Reviewing the reviewers and other ways to maximize transparency in science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicherts, J.M.; Kievit, R.A.; Bakker, M.; Borsboom, D.

    2012-01-01

    With the emergence of online publishing, opportunities to maximize transparency of scientific research have grown considerably. However, these possibilities are still only marginally used. We argue for the implementation of (1) peer-reviewed peer review, (2) transparent editorial hierarchies, and (3

  3. Letting the daylight in: reviewing the reviewers and other ways to maximize transparency in science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Wicherts; R.A. Kievit; M. Bakker; D. Borsboom

    2012-01-01

    With the emergence of online publishing, opportunities to maximize transparency of scientific research have grown considerably. However, these possibilities are still only marginally used. We argue for the implementation of (1) peer-reviewed peer review, (2) transparent editorial hierarchies, and (3

  4. To Clear or Not To Clear - That Is the Question

    OpenAIRE

    Downing, Adam; Childs, Corey; Porr, C. A. Shea

    2009-01-01

    Many options exist if you do decide to clear land. Regardless of the option you choose, the primary goal should be the same: to minimize soil loss and movement during and immediately after the land clearing process.

  5. Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides reviews of four computer software packages designed for use in science education. Describes courseware dealing with a variety of tips for teaching physics concepts, chemical reactions in an aqueous solution, mitosis and meiosis, and photosynthesis. (TW)

  6. Context effects in forensic science: a review and application of the science of science to crime laboratory practice in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, M J; Risinger, D M; Rosenthal, R; Thompson, W C

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the phenomenon of "context effects" by reviewing the findings and practices of a range of scientific fields, including astronomy, physics, biology, medicine, and especially the relevant research and theory from psychology. Context information, such as expectations about what one is supposed to see or conclude, has been found to have a small but relentless impact on human perception, judgment, and decision-making. The article then considers the vulnerability of forensic science practice to context effects, and concludes by suggesting that forensic science adopt practices familiar in other fields of scientific work, in particular blind or double-blind testing and also the use of evidence line-ups. PMID:12879569

  7. Geoscience on television: a review of science communication literature in the context of geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, Rolf; Land-Zandstra, Anne M.; Smeets, Ionica; Stoof, Cathelijne R.

    2016-06-01

    Geoscience communication is becoming increasingly important as climate change increases the occurrence of natural hazards around the world. Few geoscientists are trained in effective science communication, and awareness of the formal science communication literature is also low. This can be challenging when interacting with journalists on a powerful medium like TV. To provide geoscience communicators with background knowledge on effective science communication on television, we reviewed relevant theory in the context of geosciences and discuss six major themes: scientist motivation, target audience, narratives and storytelling, jargon and information transfer, relationship between scientists and journalists, and stereotypes of scientists on TV. We illustrate each theme with a case study of geosciences on TV and discuss relevant science communication literature. We then highlight how this literature applies to the geosciences and identify knowledge gaps related to science communication in the geosciences. As TV offers a unique opportunity to reach many viewers, we hope this review can not only positively contribute to effective geoscience communication but also to the wider geoscience debate in society.

  8. Clear cell carcinoma of the female genital tract (not everything is as clear as it seems).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offman, Saul L; Longacre, Teri A

    2012-09-01

    Clear cell carcinoma has a storied history in the female genital tract. From the initial designation of ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma as "mesonephroma" to the linkage between vaginal clear cell carcinoma and diethylstilbestrol exposure in utero, gynecologic tract clear cell tumors have puzzled investigators, posed therapeutic dilemmas for oncologists, and otherwise presented major differential diagnostic challenges for pathologists. One of the most common errors in gynecologic pathology is misdiagnosis of clear cell carcinoma, on both frozen section and permanent section. Given the poor response to platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced-stage disease and increased risk of thromboembolism, accurate diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma is important in the female genital tract. This review (1) presents the clinical and pathologic features of female genital tract clear cell carcinomas; (2) highlights recent molecular developments; (3) identifies areas of potential diagnostic confusion; and (4) presents solutions for these diagnostic problems where they exist.

  9. Benchmarking participation of Canadian university health sciences librarians in systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Susan A; Boden, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    This study describes the current state of Canadian university health sciences librarians' knowledge about, training needs for, and barriers to participating in systematic reviews (SRs). A convenience sample of Canadian librarians was surveyed. Over half of the librarians who had participated in SRs acknowledged participating in a traditional librarian role (e.g., search strategy developer); less than half indicated participating in any one nontraditional librarian role (e.g., data extractor). Lack of time and insufficient training were the most frequently reported barriers to participating in SRs. The findings provide a benchmark for tracking changes in Canadian university health sciences librarians' participation in SRs. PMID:25918485

  10. Historical Research in the Atmospheric Sciences: The Value of Literature Reviews, Libraries, and Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David M.

    2004-07-01

    Based on a talk given at the sixth annual meeting of the Atmospheric Science Librarians International, this paper explores the author's experiences performing reviews of the scientific literature as a tool to advancing meteorology and studying the history of science. Three phases of performing literature searches with varying degrees of interaction with a research librarian are considered: do it yourself, librarian assisted, and librarian as collaborator. Examples are given for each phase: occluded fronts, conditional symmetric instability, and static instability terminology, respectively. Electronic availability of information is changing the relationship between scientists and librarians. Yet, despite these changes, books on library shelves and knowledgeable human librarians remain essential to the scientific enterprise.

  11. Expanding the Horizons of Educational Pair Programming: A Methodological Review of Pair Programming in Computer Science Education Research

    OpenAIRE

    Rimington, Keith B.

    2010-01-01

    Educators and researchers continue to explore the benefits, real or imagined, of implementing pair programming as part of the computer science pedagogy. Current reviews of computer science educational research practices do not focus on educational pair programming. This thesis presents a review of the research methods used in recent educational pair programming research. The primary purpose of this review is to inform the ongoing dialogue about and to provide evidence-based recommendations fo...

  12. The Open Science Peer Review Oath [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4ou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Aleksic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the foundations of the scientific method is to be able to reproduce experiments and corroborate the results of research that has been done before. However, with the increasing complexities of new technologies and techniques, coupled with the specialisation of experiments, reproducing research findings has become a growing challenge. Clearly, scientific methods must be conveyed succinctly, and with clarity and rigour, in order for research to be reproducible. Here, we propose steps to help increase the transparency of the scientific method and the reproducibility of research results: specifically, we introduce a peer-review oath and accompanying manifesto. These have been designed to offer guidelines to enable reviewers (with the minimum friction or bias to follow and apply open science principles, and support the ideas of transparency, reproducibility and ultimately greater societal impact. Introducing the oath and manifesto at the stage of peer review will help to check that the research being published includes everything that other researchers would need to successfully repeat the work. Peer review is the lynchpin of the publishing system: encouraging the community to consciously (and conscientiously uphold these principles should help to improve published papers, increase confidence in the reproducibility of the work and, ultimately, provide strategic benefits to authors and their institutions. Future incarnations of the various national Research Excellence Frameworks (REFs will evolve away from simple citations towards measurable societal value and impact. The proposed manifesto aspires to facilitate this goal by making transparency, reproducibility and citizen-scientist engagement (with the knowledge-creation and dissemination processes the default parameters for performing sound research.

  13. Systems Science and Childhood Obesity: A Systematic Review and New Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asheley Cockrell Skinner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a public health problem, childhood obesity operates at multiple levels, ranging from individual health behaviors to school and community characteristics to public policies. Examining obesity, particularly childhood obesity, from any single perspective is likely to fail, and systems science methods offer a possible solution. We systematically reviewed studies that examined the causes and/or consequences of obesity from a systems science perspective. The 21 included studies addressed four general areas of systems science in obesity: (1 translating interventions to a large scale, (2 the effect of obesity on other health or economic outcomes, (3 the effect of geography on obesity, and (4 the effect of social networks on obesity. In general, little research addresses obesity from a true, integrated systems science perspective, and the available research infrequently focuses on children. This shortcoming limits the ability of that research to inform public policy. However, we believe that the largely incremental approaches used in current systems science lay a foundation for future work and present a model demonstrating the system of childhood obesity. Systems science perspective and related methods are particularly promising in understanding the link between childhood obesity and adult outcomes. Systems models emphasize the evolution of agents and their interactions; such evolution is particularly salient in the context of a developing child.

  14. Argument-Driven Inquiry: Using the Laboratory to Improve Undergraduates' Science Writing Skills through Meaningful Science Writing, Peer-Review, and Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Joi Phelps; Sampson, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary evidence supporting the use of peer review in undergraduate science as a means to improve student writing and to alleviate barriers, such as lost class time, by incorporation of the peer-review process into the laboratory component of the course. The study was conducted in a single section of an undergraduate…

  15. Science and Technology review: The search for mutagens from cooked foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This past year and a half has been one of the most unsettled periods in the history of the Livermore Laboratory. Our laboratory, like all federal laboratories, has felt the winds of change from Washington. Various committees are questioning the way in which the federal government supports scientific research and the appropriateness of certain to programs. Science and Technology Review is one of the principal mechanisms by which we inform and educate a broad readership about our research programs and accomplishments. Much of the Laboratory`s research is at the cutting edge of science and technology, making it particularly challenging to describe state-of-the-art accomplishments and their significance in widely understood terms. Our goal is that the articles presented here represent the full range of projects at Livermore and convey the challenge and excitement of working at the frontiers of science and technology.

  16. Materials Science Experiments Under Microgravity - A Review of History, Facilities, and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Materials science experiments have been a key issue already since the early days of research under microgravity conditions. A microgravity environment facilitates processing of metallic and semiconductor melts without buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation. Hence, crystal growth of semiconductors, solidification of metallic alloys, and the measurement of thermo-physical parameters are the major applications in the field of materials science making use of these dedicated conditions in space. In the last three decades a large number of successful experiments have been performed, mainly in international collaborations. In parallel, the development of high-performance research facilities and the technological upgrade of diagnostic and stimuli elements have also contributed to providing optimum conditions to perform such experiments. A review of the history of materials science experiments in space focussing on the development of research facilities is given. Furthermore, current opportunities to perform such experiments onboard ISS are described and potential future options are outlined.

  17. On the ubiquitous presence of fractals and fractal concepts in pharmaceutical sciences: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippa, Natassa; Dokoumetzidis, Aristides; Demetzos, Costas; Macheras, Panos

    2013-11-18

    Fractals have been very successful in quantifying nature's geometrical complexity, and have captured the imagination of scientific community. The development of fractal dimension and its applications have produced significant results across a wide variety of biomedical applications. This review deals with the application of fractals in pharmaceutical sciences and attempts to account the most important developments in the fields of pharmaceutical technology, especially of advanced Drug Delivery nano Systems and of biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics. Additionally, fractal kinetics, which has been applied to enzyme kinetics, drug metabolism and absorption, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are presented. This review also considers the potential benefits of using fractal analysis along with considerations of nonlinearity, scaling, and chaos as calibration tools to obtain information and more realistic description on different parts of pharmaceutical sciences. As a conclusion, the purpose of the present work is to highlight the presence of fractal geometry in almost all fields of pharmaceutical research.

  18. Game-Based Learning in Science Education: A Review of Relevant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Chaun; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to review empirical research articles regarding game-based science learning (GBSL) published from 2000 to 2011. Thirty-one articles were identified through the Web of Science and SCOPUS databases. A qualitative content analysis technique was adopted to analyze the research purposes and designs, game design and implementation, theoretical backgrounds and learning foci of these reviewed studies. The theories and models employed by these studies were classified into four theoretical foundations including cognitivism, constructivism, the socio-cultural perspective, and enactivism. The results indicate that cognitivism and constructivism were the major theoretical foundations employed by the GBSL researchers and that the socio-cultural perspective and enactivism are two emerging theoretical paradigms that have started to draw attention from GBSL researchers in recent years. The analysis of the learning foci showed that most of the digital games were utilized to promote scientific knowledge/concept learning, while less than one-third were implemented to facilitate the students' problem-solving skills. Only a few studies explored the GBSL outcomes from the aspects of scientific processes, affect, engagement, and socio-contextual learning. Suggestions are made to extend the current GBSL research to address the affective and socio-contextual aspects of science learning. The roles of digital games as tutor, tool, and tutee for science education are discussed, while the potentials of digital games to bridge science learning between real and virtual worlds, to promote collaborative problem-solving, to provide affective learning environments, and to facilitate science learning for younger students are also addressed.

  19. Opening Scholarly Communication in Social Sciences: Supporting Open Peer Review with Fidus Writer

    OpenAIRE

    Mayr, Philipp; Momeni, Fakhri; Lange, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Scholarly communication in the social sciences is centered around publications, in which data also play a key role. The increasingly collaborative scientific process, from a project plan, to collecting data, to interpreting them in a paper and submitting it for peer review, to publishing an article, to, finally, its consumption by readers, is insufficiently supported by contemporary information systems. They support every individual step, but media discontinuities between steps cause ineff...

  20. Review on the science and technology of water desalination by capacitive deionization

    OpenAIRE

    Porada, S.; Zhao, R.; Wal, van der, A.C.; Presser, V.; Biesheuvel, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Porous carbon electrodes have significant potential for energy-efficient water desalination using a promising technology called Capacitive Deionization (CDI). In CDI, salt ions are removed from brackish water upon applying an electrical voltage difference between two porous electrodes, in which the ions will be temporarily immobilized. These electrodes are made of porous carbons optimized for salt storage capacity and ion and electron transport. We review the science and technology of CDI and...

  1. Social media and television: a bibliographic review based on the Web of Science

    OpenAIRE

    Segado, Francisco; Grandío, María del Mar; Fernández Gomez, Erika

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important trends in current television research has to do with the increasing impact of social media on viewing and consumption. This article reviews the literature on social media and television included in the Web of Science database from 2005 to 2013 in order to find the main research questions guiding academic research within media studies. The topics investigated included the theoretical approach and definition of social television, the central role of Twitter as...

  2. 2011 Year in review--Earth Resources Observation and Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca, (compiler)

    2012-01-01

    The USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center's 2011 Year in Review is an annual report recounting the broad scope of the Center's 2011 accomplishments. The report covers preparations for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) launch, the ever-increasing use of free Landsat data, monitoring the effects of natural hazards, and more to emphasize the importance of innovation in using satellite data to study change over time.

  3. Causes of academic failure of medical and medical sciences students in Iran: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Azari, Sheida; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Fata, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Academic failure of medical and medical sciences students is one of the major problems of higher education centers in many countries. This study aims to collect and compare relevant researches in this field in Iran. Methods: The appropriate keywords were searched in the national and international databases, and the findings were categorized into related and non-related articles accordingly. Results: Only 22 articles were included in this systematic review. In terms of content anal...

  4. Benchmarking participation of Canadian university health sciences librarians in systematic reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Susan A.; Boden, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the current state of Canadian university health sciences librarians' knowledge about, training needs for, and barriers to participating in systematic reviews (SRs). A convenience sample of Canadian librarians was surveyed. Over half of the librarians who had participated in SRs acknowledged participating in a traditional librarian role (e.g., search strategy developer); less than half indicated participating in any one nontraditional librarian role (e.g., data extractor)....

  5. A historical review on the roles of science and politics in addressing global environmental issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter USHER; Qian YE

    2009-01-01

    Based on a historical review of the so-called Ozone crisis in the late 1970s and global climate changes since the 1980s, this paper examines the role of sciences and policies in the international community in dealing with the global environmental issues. Lessons show that a multi-discipline, multi-organizational and multi-national UN agency which remains relevant, assisting rather than guiding the process of climate negotiations is important.

  6. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation strategy review recommendations. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1994 the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO)'s Board initiated a comprehensive five month review which purpose was to develop a mission for ANSTO and thus define its role both domestically and internationally. The review took into account the needs of ANSTO stakeholders, analysed ANSTO capabilities as well as available international opportunities. Outcomes of the review included an assessment of the priorities and needs of stakeholders, an understanding of how these needs can be meet, and the resulting resource implications. ANSTO's major mission objectives, as defined in the consultants's report should be: to support the Government's nuclear policies (this objective is paramount), support industrial competitiveness and innovation through technology transfer, as well as to maintain a high quality nuclear science base and to enable academic institutions and other science organizations to perform research by providing access to unique facilities and expertise. The consultants also made recommendations on appropriate management arrangements for ANSTO, an implementation plan, progress milestones and operational targets. Details of the relevance-excellence analysis, commercial customer analysis and justification for recommended activity action imperatives are presented in the appendices. 48 figs

  7. Report of the Review Committee on valuation of the research subjects in the fields of advanced science research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods, etc. the Ad Hoc Review Committee composed of eight experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the research theme completed in FY1998 and those planned for five years starting in FY2000 in the Advanced Science Research Center. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on September 17, 1999. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research results/plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Research Group Leaders. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on March 14, 2000. As a result, the Research Evaluation Committee acknowledged appropriateness of the review results. This report describes the review results. (author)

  8. Systems science and systems thinking for public health: a systematic review of the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Gemma; Malbon, Eleanor; Carey, Nicole; Joyce, Andrew; Crammond, Brad; Carey, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper reports on findings from a systematic review designed to investigate the state of systems science research in public health. The objectives were to: (1) explore how systems methodologies are being applied within public health and (2) identify fruitful areas of activity. Design A systematic review was conducted from existing literature that draws on or uses systems science (in its various forms) and relates to key public health areas of action and concern, including tobacco, alcohol, obesity and the social determinants of health. Data analysis 117 articles were included in the review. An inductive qualitative content analysis was used for data extraction. The following were systematically extracted from the articles: approach, methodology, transparency, strengths and weaknesses. These were then organised according to theme (ie, commonalities between studies within each category), in order to provide an overview of the state of the field as a whole. The assessment of data quality was intrinsic to the goals of the review itself, and therefore, was carried out as part of the analysis. Results 4 categories of research were identified from the review, ranging from editorial and commentary pieces to complex system dynamic modelling. Our analysis of each of these categories of research highlighted areas of potential for systems science to strengthen public health efforts, while also revealing a number of limitations in the dynamic systems modelling being carried out in public health. Conclusions There is a great deal of interest in how the application of systems concepts and approach might aid public health. Our analysis suggests that soft systems modelling techniques are likely to be the most useful addition to public health, and align well with current debate around knowledge transfer and policy. However, the full range of systems methodologies is yet to be engaged with by public health researchers. PMID:26719314

  9. Computer Simulations to Support Science Instruction and Learning: A critical review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Lara Kathleen; Bell, Randy L.

    2012-06-01

    Researchers have explored the effectiveness of computer simulations for supporting science teaching and learning during the past four decades. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive, critical review of the literature on the impact of computer simulations on science teaching and learning, with the goal of summarizing what is currently known and providing guidance for future research. We report on the outcomes of 61 empirical studies dealing with the efficacy of, and implications for, computer simulations in science instruction. The overall findings suggest that simulations can be as effective, and in many ways more effective, than traditional (i.e. lecture-based, textbook-based and/or physical hands-on) instructional practices in promoting science content knowledge, developing process skills, and facilitating conceptual change. As with any other educational tool, the effectiveness of computer simulations is dependent upon the ways in which they are used. Thus, we outline specific research-based guidelines for best practice. Computer simulations are most effective when they (a) are used as supplements; (b) incorporate high-quality support structures; (c) encourage student reflection; and (d) promote cognitive dissonance. Used appropriately, computer simulations involve students in inquiry-based, authentic science explorations. Additionally, as educational technologies continue to evolve, advantages such as flexibility, safety, and efficiency deserve attention.

  10. Proposal Auto-Categorizer and Manager for Time Allocation Review at Space Telescope Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Sophia; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Lagerstrom, Jill; Weissman, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Space Telescope Science Institute annually receives more than one thousand formal proposals for Hubble Space Telescope time, exceeding the available time with the observatory by a factor of over four. With JWST, the proposal pressure will only increase, straining our ability to provide rigorous peer review of each proposal's scientific merit. Significant hurdles in this process include the proper categorization of proposals, to ensure Time Allocation Committees (TACs) have the required and desired expertise to fairly and appropriately judge each proposal, and the selection of reviewers themselves, to establish diverse and well-qualified TACs. The Panel Auto-Categorizer and Manager (PACMan; a naive Bayesian classifier) was developed to automatically sort new proposals into their appropriate science categories and, similarly, to appoint panel reviewers with the best qualifications to serve on the corresponding TACs. We will provide an overview of PACMan and present the results of its testing on five previous cycles of proposals. PACMan will be implemented in upcoming cycles to support and eventually replace the process for constructing the time allocation reviews.

  11. Media Language, Clear or Obscure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bjarne le Fevre; Ejstrup, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract— Be clear, not obscure. One of the four maxims for optimal communication is that it is essential to develop proficiency in being concise and clear. The question is whether this is really a good idea in all contexts. There is some evidence to the contrary. Undoubtedly, we have many contex...

  12. Media Language, Clear or Obscure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejstrup, Michael; le Fevre Jakobsen, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Be clear, not obscure. One of the four maxims for optimal communication is that it is essential to develop proficiency in being concise and clear. The question is whether this is really a good idea in all contexts. There is some evidence to the contrary. Undoubtedly, we have many contexts where i...

  13. Vision Science and Schizophrenia Research: Toward a Re-view of the Disorder Editors’ Introduction to Special Section

    OpenAIRE

    Silverstein, Steven M.; Keane, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    This theme section on vision science and schizophrenia research demonstrates that our understanding of the disorder could be significantly accelerated by a greater adoption of the methods of vision science. In this introduction, we briefly describe what vision science is, how it has advanced our understanding of schizophrenia, and what challenges and opportunities lay ahead regarding schizophrenia research. We then summarize the articles that follow. These include reviews of abnormal form per...

  14. Less Than Proficient A Review of the Draft Science Framework for the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    The mission of this review is to appraise the new draft NAEP science framework and to determine whether it is up to snuff. This is an evaluation of the September 30, 2005, draft document, Science Framework for the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (Framework), developed for the National Assessment Governing Board. The criteria is…

  15. Peer Review-Based Scripted Collaboration to Support Domain-Specific and Domain-General Knowledge Acquisition in Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriadis, Stavros; Egerter, Tina; Hanisch, Frank; Fischer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of using peer review in the context of scripted collaboration to foster both domain-specific and domain-general knowledge acquisition in the computer science domain. Using a one-factor design with a script and a control condition, students worked in small groups on a series of computer science problems…

  16. A Thematic Review of Interactive Whiteboard Use in Science Education: Rationales, Purposes, Methods and General Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormanci, Ummuhan; Cepni, Salih; Deveci, Isa; Aydin, Ozhan

    2015-10-01

    In Turkey and many other countries, the importance of the interactive whiteboard (IWB) is increasing, and as a result, projects and studies are being conducted regarding the use of the IWB in classrooms. Accordingly, in these countries, many issues are being researched, such as the IWB's contribution to the education process, its use in classroom settings and problems that occur when using the IWB. In this context, the research and analysis of studies regarding the use of the IWB have important implications for educators, researchers and teachers. This study aims to review and analyze studies conducted regarding the use of the IWB in the field of science. Accordingly, as a thematic review of the research was deemed appropriate, extant articles available in the literature were analyzed using a matrix that consisted of general features (type of journal, year and demographic properties) and content features (rationales, aims, research methods, samples, data collections, results and suggestions). According to the findings, it was concluded that the studies regarding the use of IWBs were conducted due to deficiencies in the current literature. However, there are rare studies in which the reasons for the research were associated with the nature of science education. There were also studies that focused on the effects of the IWB on student academic success and learning outcomes. Within this context, it is evident that there is a need for further research concerning the use of IWBs in science education and for studies regarding the effect of IWBs on students' skills.

  17. The Huygens surface science package (SSP): Flight performance review and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, M. R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Hathi, B.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2012-09-01

    The Surface Science Package (SSP) was one of six instruments flown onboard the Huygens probe to Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, in the framework of the NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini-Huygens mission (Matson et al., 2002). The SSP operated throughout the probe's descent and after landing on Titan on 14th January 2005. This paper reviews scientific results from the Surface Science Package, and also reports previously unpublished flight data which illustrate the performance of the measurement systems in the Titan environment. This review provides some lessons learned that may be useful for further detailed analysis of the Huygens mission data, and for payloads for future missions to Titan, in which there has been recent interest (e.g., the Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) (Joint TSSM Science Definition Team, 2009), TANDEM (Coustenis et al., 2009) or the Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) Discovery-class proposal (Stofan et al., 2010)), as well as for planetary probe missions more generally.

  18. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    WE RECOMMEND Geyser Tube A simple plastic tube makes a great difference to an old trick Field Trip to the Moon This DVD postulates what the next Moon mission will be like Plutonium: A History of the World's Most Dangerous Element A fascinating account of the people and the science behind atomic bombs Solar Energy Modules A series of units ideal for use with 7-14-year-olds Photocopiable Practical Science New teaching resource is clear, straightforward and flexible Joseph Rotblat: Visionary for Peace Biography that is thorough, well-told and worth the telling WORTH A LOOK Applied Biophysics: A Molecular Approach for Physical Scientists This book explains why physics is essential to biology William's Words in Science Classroom dictionary of scientific terms can be hit and miss HANDLE WITH CARE Zero Time Space This story of quantum mechanics loses its thread in translation WEB WATCH A whizz around the pole-related science tools that are available

  19. e-Research in the Social Sciences: The Possibilities and the Reality (A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Russell Searight

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to examine the current status as well as benefits and barriers to online research in the social sciences. With the rapid development of internet technology in the past decade, there has been growing interest in the application of on-line technologies to social science research. While there are a number of on-line sites for survey completion and centralized data sets for studying psychological, health, political and sociological issues, collaborative on-line research communities have not developed at the same pace as these other innovations. The few exploratory studies of e-research collaboration conducted to date suggest that while there are potential benefits, there are a number of social, ethical and professional barriers to its development in the social sciences. A recent curricular innovation, in which undergraduate students from different institutions work collaboratively on an on-line research project, suggests that with specific training, a number of these obstacles can be overcome. However, at this point, there appears to be more potential for collaborative online research than is being realized. Issues such as trust, ownership, and quality assurance will need to be addressed before collaborative on-line research in social science becomes a common practice.

  20. Progress in Significant Soil Science Fields of China over the Last Three Decades: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qi-Guo; HE Ji-Zheng; YAN Xiao-Yuan; ZHANG Bin; ZHANG Gan-Lin; CAI Zu-Cong

    2011-01-01

    Due to continuous decreases in arable land area and continuous population increases, Chinese soil scientists face great challenges in meeting food demands, mitigating adverse environmental impacts, and sustaining or enhancing soil productivity under intensive agriculture.With the aim of promoting the application of soil science knowledge, this paper reviews the achievements of Chinese scientists in soil resource use and management, soil fertility, global change mitigation and soil biology over the last 30 years.During this period, soil resource science has provided essential support for the use and exploitation of Chinese soil resources, and has itself developed through introduction of new theories such as Soil Taxonomy and new technologies such us remote sensing.Soil fertility science has contributed to the alleviation and elimination of impeding physical and chemical factors that constrain availability of essential nutrients and water in soils, the understanding of nutrient cycling in agroecosystems, and the increase in nutrient use efficiency for sustainable crop production.Chinese soil scientists have contributed to the understanding of the cropland's role in global change, particularly to the understanding of methane and nitrous oxide emission from rice fields and the effect of elevated carbon dioxide and ozone on rice-wheat system.Soil biology research has progressed in biological N fixation, distribution of fauna in Chinese soils, and bioremediation of polluted soils.A new generation of soil scientists has arisen in the last three decades.The gaps between research and application in these soil science fields are also discussed.

  1. Learning in Earth and space science: a review of conceptual change instructional approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Reece; Tomas, Louisa; Lewthwaite, Brian

    2016-03-01

    In response to calls for research into effective instruction in the Earth and space sciences, and to identify directions for future research, this systematic review of the literature explores research into instructional approaches designed to facilitate conceptual change. In total, 52 studies were identified and analyzed. Analysis focused on the general characteristics of the research, the conceptual change instructional approaches that were used, and the methods employed to evaluate the effectiveness of these approaches. The findings of this review support four assertions about the existing research: (1) astronomical phenomena have received greater attention than geological phenomena; (2) most studies have viewed conceptual change from a cognitive perspective only; (3) data about conceptual change were generated pre- and post-intervention only; and (4) the interventions reviewed presented limited opportunities to involve students in the construction and manipulation of multiple representations of the phenomenon being investigated. Based upon these assertions, the authors recommend that new research in the Earth and space science disciplines challenges traditional notions of conceptual change by exploring the role of affective variables on learning, focuses on the learning of geological phenomena through the construction of multiple representations, and employs qualitative data collection throughout the implementation of an instructional approach.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Metallo-supramolecular modules as a paradigm for materials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk G Kurth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal ion coordination in discrete or extended metallo-supramolecular assemblies offers ample opportunity to fabricate and study devices and materials that are equally important for fundamental research and new technologies. Metal ions embedded in a specific ligand field offer diverse thermodynamic, kinetic, chemical, physical and structural properties that make these systems promising candidates for active components in functional materials. A key challenge is to improve and develop methodologies for placing these active modules in suitable device architectures, such as thin films or mesophases. This review highlights recent developments in extended, polymeric metallo-supramolecular systems and discrete polyoxometalates with an emphasis on materials science.

  3. Radiant research prospects? A review of nuclear waste issues in social science research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report has been put together on behalf of KASAM and constitutes a review of social science research and literature that been produced on the nuclear waste issue in Sweden, with focus on recent research. The aim with the investigation has been to map the scope of and the direction of the independent research about nuclear waste in Sweden, in relation to the research that has been initiated and financed by the stakeholders that are participating in the decision-making process in the nuclear waste issue. Another aim has been to point out areas that have not been taken into consideration

  4. Text mining for science and technology - a review part I - characterization/scientometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald N Kostoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the first part of a two-part review of the author′s work in developing text mining procedures. The focus of Part I is Scientometrics. Novel approaches that were used to text mine the field of nanoscience/nanotechnology and the science and technology portfolio of China are described. A unique approach to identify documents related to an application theme (e.g., military-related, intelligence-related, space-related rather than a discipline theme is also described in some detail.

  5. Isothermal Microcalorimetry: A Review of Applications in Soil and Environmental Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Xing-Min; HUANG Qiao-Yun; JIANG Dai-Hua; CAI Peng; LIANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    Isothermal microcMorimetry provides thermodynamic and kinetic information on various reactions and processes and is thereby a powerful tool to elucidate their mechanisms.Certain improvement in isothermal microcalorimetry with regard to the studies on soil and environmental sciences is briefly described.This review mainly focuses on the use of microcalorimetry in the determination of soil microbial activity,monitoring the toxicity and biodegradation of soil organic pollutants,the risk evaluation of metals and metalloids,the heat effect of ion exchange and adsorption in soil,and environmental researches.Promising prospects for the applications of the technique in the field are also discussed.

  6. Identifying Potential Types of Guidance for Supporting Student Inquiry When Using Virtual and Remote Labs in Science: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Manoli, Constantinos; Xenofontos, Nikoletta; de Jong, Ton; Pedaste, Margus; van Riesen, Siswa A.; Kamp, Ellen T.; Mäeots, Mario; Siiman, Leo; Tsourlidaki, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to identify specific types of guidance for supporting student use of online labs, that is, virtual and remote labs, in an inquiry context. To do so, we reviewed the literature on providing guidance within computer supported inquiry learning (CoSIL) environments in science education and classified all identified guidance…

  7. Identifying potential types of guidance for supporting student inquiry when using virtual and remote labs in science: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Manoli, Constantinos; Xenofontos, Nikoletta; Jong, de Ton; Pedaste, Margus; Riesen, van Siswa A.N.; Kamp, Ellen T.; Mäeots, Mario; Siiman, Leo; Tsourlidaki, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to identify specific types of guidance for supporting student use of online labs, that is, virtual and remote labs, in an inquiry context. To do so, we reviewed the literature on providing guidance within computer supported inquiry learning (CoSIL) environments in science e

  8. The Nexus of Reading, Writing and Researching in the Doctoral Undertaking of Humanities and Social Sciences: Implications for Literature Reviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Becky S.C.

    2008-01-01

    One indispensable task in the doctoral undertaking in the humanities and social sciences is that of reviewing the literature. To many graduate students, finding the "right" direction of reviewing is a particularly grueling experience, a practical concern seldom addressed in thesis manuals and studies of the doctoral thesis. This paper is an…

  9. Social science research on HIV in Vietnam: a critical review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Amy; Hirsch, Jennifer S; Giang, Le Minh; Parker, Richard G

    2013-01-01

    Social science research can enhance the response to Vietnam's growing HIV epidemic by capturing the country's rapidly changing social and political context. The present paper reviews the published, peer-reviewed and English-language social science literature on HIV in Vietnam in order to identify critical theoretical and substantive gaps, while laying the groundwork for future research. We found four broad foci for work on the social context of HIV and AIDS in Vietnam: the cultural meanings and social relationships that shape Vietnam's HIV epidemic; stigma and discrimination; social inequality and structural violence as contributors to HIV risk; and, finally, how broader global and social systems shape Vietnam's HIV epidemic. We signal the particular need for additional research on the effects of the media on attitudes towards HIV and AIDS, on social movements, and on health systems, as well as on a number of other key areas. Work along these lines, in addition to more effective communication of policy-relevant findings to those responsible for the development and implementation of policies and programmes, will strengthen Vietnam's response to HIV and AIDS. PMID:23906241

  10. The Life and Times of Aboutness: A Review of the Library and Information Science Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Rondeau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This paper explores the concept of “aboutness”, its related terms, and the process of aboutness determination as found in the Library and Information Science Literature. Methods – A review of the literature pertaining to aboutness determination and related terms specific to Library and Information Science was undertaken, borrowing extensively from the literature review of Daniel Joudrey’s (2005 dissertation, Building puzzles and growing pearls: A qualitative exploration of determining aboutness, as well as examining a small selection of research and articles not discussed by Joudrey. In addition, a concept map was developed to outline many of the concepts and theories found. Results – The LIS literature demonstrates conflicting positions surrounding the term aboutness and its correlates. Despite the lack of firm agreement on terminologies, the notion of subject is explored because it featured prominently in the literature. As well, intensional and extensional aboutness are explored in contrast to a more subjectivist perspective which asserts that a document's aboutness cannot be separated from its reader. Aboutness determination is also examined through the lens of theme and rheme, that is what is presupposed in a document versus what is new. Aboutness from the user perspective featured considerably in the literature, with many authors asserting both the importance and the challenge of mediating knowledge on behalf of the user. The stage of aboutness determination in the complete process of subject indexing is also presented here, and the findings demonstrate that the stages are anything but linear and sequential.

  11. Social science research on HIV in Vietnam: a critical review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Amy; Hirsch, Jennifer S; Giang, Le Minh; Parker, Richard G

    2013-01-01

    Social science research can enhance the response to Vietnam's growing HIV epidemic by capturing the country's rapidly changing social and political context. The present paper reviews the published, peer-reviewed and English-language social science literature on HIV in Vietnam in order to identify critical theoretical and substantive gaps, while laying the groundwork for future research. We found four broad foci for work on the social context of HIV and AIDS in Vietnam: the cultural meanings and social relationships that shape Vietnam's HIV epidemic; stigma and discrimination; social inequality and structural violence as contributors to HIV risk; and, finally, how broader global and social systems shape Vietnam's HIV epidemic. We signal the particular need for additional research on the effects of the media on attitudes towards HIV and AIDS, on social movements, and on health systems, as well as on a number of other key areas. Work along these lines, in addition to more effective communication of policy-relevant findings to those responsible for the development and implementation of policies and programmes, will strengthen Vietnam's response to HIV and AIDS.

  12. The AIRInforma experiment: peer-reviewed public dissemination of science in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forneris, Federico; Cassetta, Luca; Gravina, Teresita

    2015-04-01

    Public dissemination of science to the public is often negatively affected by biased, incorrect information distributed over the world wide web through social networks and weblogs. In Italy, the lack of correct scientific information has generated several important issues, raising concerns by the international scientific community in several occasions over the past five years. Our association AIRIcerca (International Association of Italian Researchers, http://www.airicerca.org) has recently started a novel scientific dissemination initiative to the general public in Italy. The project is based on 1) direct involvement of researchers (with accademic or industrial affiliation) in article preparation and publication and 2) introduction of a peer-reviewing system similar to that applied in conventional scientific publishing. Our initiative, named AIRInforma (http://informa.airicerca.org) has already published more than 10 original articles and 3 meeting reports, in Italian language, about various fields of scientific research, ranging from social sciences to evolutionary biology , mathematics and medicine . The editorial board is composed of approximately 20 Italian scientists working all over the world and voluntarily contributing to the AIRInforma initiative. Submitted manuscripts are initially evaluated by the editorial board and, if suitable, they are assigned to four non-anonymous reviewers selected by the editorial board for accurate evaluation. Two reviewers are selected based on their specific expertise on the topic presented in the manuscript (expert reviewers), and two are specifically selected as working on distant fields (naive reviewers). The purpose of naive reviewers is to provide feedback on the efficacy and clarity of the information for the general public. So far, AIRInforma has established a novel channel of scientific communication in Italy, receiving excellent feedback and reaching more than 8000 new unique visitors every month on our website and

  13. INSTITUTE OF SCIENTIFIC REVIEW TO A PLURALITY OF MODERN SCIENCE: NEED OR FICTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mukha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The current situation of plurality epistemological provokes distinct lack of clear criteria for scientific criticism humanities texts. This research raises the question of verification procedure for knowledge obtained humanities, its status and importance. Changes relate to the modern paradigm of scientific methodology in general, which involves switching from a focus on results orientation to the process of getting the truth (W.V.O. Quine, Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, Imre Lakatos, etc.. To determine the relationships with the text as a carrier of the alleged truth reception is off ered three formats of relations: Text – Author, Text – Reader and Text – Reviewer. The article stresses questions of general and specific objectives for the scientifi c peer review, as well as the problem of plagiarism and its ethical and legal consequences. It is proposed to consider plan algorithm scientific review of the 26 criteria for it, which will help to streamline Institute of scientific criticism. Recent cover content requirements (which include: the incorporation of a scientific context, the definition of methodological systems, structured research, avoiding plagiarism, there is a real «increase of knowledge» and applied significance, etc. and technical design, the variable respectively specifi c edition. Compliance with a number of requirements set out will help improve the effi ciency and profitability of the humanities.

  14. Plain Language Clear and Simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Literacy Secretariat, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Written for Canadian public servants and written with their help, this handbook presents principles and tips to make official writing clear, concise, and well organized. The handbook defines "plain language" writing as a technique of organizing information in ways that make sense to the reader--using familiar, straightforward words. The handbook…

  15. Open evaluation: a vision for entirely transparent post-publication peer review and rating for science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    The two major functions of a scientific publishing system are to provide access to and evaluation of scientific papers. While open access (OA) is becoming a reality, open evaluation (OE), the other side of the coin, has received less attention. Evaluation steers the attention of the scientific community and thus the very course of science. It also influences the use of scientific findings in public policy. The current system of scientific publishing provides only journal prestige as an indication of the quality of new papers and relies on a non-transparent and noisy pre-publication peer-review process, which delays publication by many months on average. Here I propose an OE system, in which papers are evaluated post-publication in an ongoing fashion by means of open peer review and rating. Through signed ratings and reviews, scientists steer the attention of their field and build their reputation. Reviewers are motivated to be objective, because low-quality or self-serving signed evaluations will negatively impact their reputation. A core feature of this proposal is a division of powers between the accumulation of evaluative evidence and the analysis of this evidence by paper evaluation functions (PEFs). PEFs can be freely defined by individuals or groups (e.g., scientific societies) and provide a plurality of perspectives on the scientific literature. Simple PEFs will use averages of ratings, weighting reviewers (e.g., by H-index), and rating scales (e.g., by relevance to a decision process) in different ways. Complex PEFs will use advanced statistical techniques to infer the quality of a paper. Papers with initially promising ratings will be more deeply evaluated. The continual refinement of PEFs in response to attempts by individuals to influence evaluations in their own favor will make the system ungameable. OA and OE together have the power to revolutionize scientific publishing and usher in a new culture of transparency, constructive criticism, and

  16. The formality of learning science in everyday life: A conceptual literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Bonderup Dohn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The terms non-formal and informal are attributed to learning in everyday life by many authors, often linked to their interests in particular learning practices. However, many authors use the terms without any clear definition, or employ conflicting definitions and boundaries. An analysis of relevant literature revealed two fundamentally different interpretations of informal learning. The one describes formality of education at the organizational level, while the second describes formality of learning at the psychological level. This article presents a conceptual reconciling of these two perspectives. Based on a literature review, the educational modes of education are defined as discrete entities (formal, non-formal, and informal education, whereas formality at the psychological level is defined in terms of attributes of formality and informality along a continuum (formal ↔ informal learning. Relations to other  well-established frameworks within the field of informal learning are discussed.

  17. Big Data and Clinicians: A Review on the State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqi

    2014-01-01

    Background In the past few decades, medically related data collection saw a huge increase, referred to as big data. These huge datasets bring challenges in storage, processing, and analysis. In clinical medicine, big data is expected to play an important role in identifying causality of patient symptoms, in predicting hazards of disease incidence or reoccurrence, and in improving primary-care quality. Objective The objective of this review was to provide an overview of the features of clinical big data, describe a few commonly employed computational algorithms, statistical methods, and software toolkits for data manipulation and analysis, and discuss the challenges and limitations in this realm. Methods We conducted a literature review to identify studies on big data in medicine, especially clinical medicine. We used different combinations of keywords to search PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar for literature of interest from the past 10 years. Results This paper reviewed studies that analyzed clinical big data and discussed issues related to storage and analysis of this type of data. Conclusions Big data is becoming a common feature of biological and clinical studies. Researchers who use clinical big data face multiple challenges, and the data itself has limitations. It is imperative that methodologies for data analysis keep pace with our ability to collect and store data. PMID:25600256

  18. Report from the Committee of Visitors on its Review of the Processes and Procedures used to Manage the Theory and Computations Program, Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Committee of Visitors (COV) was formed to review the procedures used by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences to manage its Theory and Computations program. The COV was pleased to conclude that the research portfolio supported by the OFES Theory and Computations Program was of very high quality. The Program supports research programs at universities, research industries, and national laboratories that are well regarded internationally and address questions of high relevance to the DOE. A major change in the management of the Theory and Computations program over the past few years has been the introduction of a system of comparative peer review to guide the OFES Theory Team in selecting proposals for funding. The COV was impressed with the success of OFES in its implementation of comparative peer review and with the quality of the reviewers chosen by the OFES Theory Team. The COV concluded that the competitive peer review process has improved steadily over the three years that it has been in effect and that it has improved both the fairness and accountability of the proposal review process. While the COV commends OFES in its implementation of comparative review, the COV offers the following recommendations in the hope that they will further improve the comparative peer review process: The OFES should improve the consistency of peer reviews. We recommend adoption of a results-oriented scoring system in their guidelines to referees (see Appendix II), a greater use of review panels, and a standard format for proposals; The OFES should further improve the procedures and documentation for proposal handling. We recommend that the folders documenting funding decisions contain all the input from all of the reviewers, that OFES document their rationale for funding decisions which are at variance with the recommendation of the peer reviewers, and that OFES provide a Summary Sheet within each folder; The OFES should better communicate the procedures used to determine funding

  19. Report from the Committee of Visitors on its Review of the Processes and Procedures used to Manage the Theory and Computations Program, Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-03-01

    A Committee of Visitors (COV) was formed to review the procedures used by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences to manage its Theory and Computations program. The COV was pleased to conclude that the research portfolio supported by the OFES Theory and Computations Program was of very high quality. The Program supports research programs at universities, research industries, and national laboratories that are well regarded internationally and address questions of high relevance to the DOE. A major change in the management of the Theory and Computations program over the past few years has been the introduction of a system of comparative peer review to guide the OFES Theory Team in selecting proposals for funding. The COV was impressed with the success of OFES in its implementation of comparative peer review and with the quality of the reviewers chosen by the OFES Theory Team. The COV concluded that the competitive peer review process has improved steadily over the three years that it has been in effect and that it has improved both the fairness and accountability of the proposal review process. While the COV commends OFES in its implementation of comparative review, the COV offers the following recommendations in the hope that they will further improve the comparative peer review process: The OFES should improve the consistency of peer reviews. We recommend adoption of a “results-oriented” scoring system in their guidelines to referees (see Appendix II), a greater use of review panels, and a standard format for proposals; The OFES should further improve the procedures and documentation for proposal handling. We recommend that the “folders” documenting funding decisions contain all the input from all of the reviewers, that OFES document their rationale for funding decisions which are at variance with the recommendation of the peer reviewers, and that OFES provide a Summary Sheet within each folder; The OFES should better communicate the procedures used to

  20. A student-run peer-reviewed journal: an educational tool for students in the health sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Winterbottom R; Patel P; Deonandan R

    2012-01-01

    Raywat Deonandan1, Premal Patel2, Robyn Winterbottom31Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, 3School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Students at the University of Ottawa, many of whom were targeting a career in medicine, were surveyed to determine their attitudes and expectations regarding a new student-run peer-reviewed journal for the health scienc...

  1. The art of thinking clearly

    CERN Document Server

    Dobelli, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The Art of Thinking Clearly by world-class thinker and entrepreneur Rolf Dobelli is an eye-opening look at human psychology and reasoning — essential reading for anyone who wants to avoid “cognitive errors” and make better choices in all aspects of their lives. Have you ever: Invested time in something that, with hindsight, just wasn’t worth it? Or continued doing something you knew was bad for you? These are examples of cognitive biases, simple errors we all make in our day-to-day thinking. But by knowing what they are and how to spot them, we can avoid them and make better decisions. Simple, clear, and always surprising, this indispensable book will change the way you think and transform your decision-making—work, at home, every day. It reveals, in 99 short chapters, the most common errors of judgment, and how to avoid them.

  2. Central Clearing of OTC Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cont, Rama; Kokholm, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We study the impact of central clearing of over-the-counter (OTC) transactions on counterparty exposures in a market with OTC transactions across several asset classes with heterogeneous characteristics. The impact of introducing a central counterparty (CCP) on expected interdealer exposure...... is determined by the tradeoff between multilateral netting across dealers on one hand and bilateral netting across asset classes on the other hand. We find this tradeoff to be sensitive to assumptions on heterogeneity of asset classes in terms of `riskyness' of the asset class as well as correlation...... of exposures across asset classes. In particular, while an analysis assuming independent, homogeneous exposures suggests that central clearing is efficient only if one has an unrealistically high number of participants, the opposite conclusion is reached if differences in riskyness and correlation across asset...

  3. Review. Teaching Legal and Administrative Science Nadia-Cerasela Anitei and Roxana Alina Petraru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina Mihaela POPA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The work Didactica predarii stiintelor juridice si administrative (Teaching Legal and Administrative Science authors Nadia- Cerasela Anitei and Roxana Alina Petraru is structured around the following 10 lessons: 1. General notions about teaching legal science, 2. Teaching legal science, 3. Learning with application in legal science, 4. Legal science teaching aims, 5. Education curriculum for teaching legal science, 6. Learning Methods 7. Educational assessment with applications for legal science, 8. Didactic principles in teaching legal science, 9. Educational activities organization in legal science, 10. Legal education in Romania.

  4. 77 FR 21277 - Customer Clearing Documentation, Timing of Acceptance for Clearing, and Clearing Member Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ...\\ Clearing Member Risk Management, 76 FR 45724 (Aug. 1, 2011). \\7\\ Adaption of Regulations to Incorporate... ``risk management.'' See, e.g., proposed Sec. 39.13 relating to risk management for DCOs, 76 FR at 3720... an important risk mitigant. This time lag potentially presents credit risk to the swap...

  5. The Life and Times of Aboutness: A Review of the Library and Information Science Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Rondeau

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This paper explores the concept of “aboutness”, its related terms, and the process of aboutness determination as found in the Library and Information Science Literature. Methods – A review of the literature pertaining to aboutness determination and related terms specific to Library and Information Science was undertaken, borrowing extensively from the literature review of Daniel Joudrey’s (2005 dissertation, Building puzzles and growing pearls: A qualitative exploration of determining aboutness, as well as examining a small selection of research and articles not discussed by Joudrey. In addition, a concept map was developed to outline many of the concepts and theories found. Results – The LIS literature demonstrates conflicting positions surrounding the term aboutness and its correlates. Despite the lack of firm agreement on terminologies, the notion of subject is explored because it featured prominently in the literature. As well, intensional and extensional aboutness are explored in contrast to a more subjectivist perspective which asserts that a document's aboutness cannot be separated from its reader. Aboutness determination is also examined through the lens of theme and rheme, that is what is presupposed in a document versus what is new. Aboutness from the user perspective featured considerably in the literature, with many authors asserting both the importance and the challenge of mediating knowledge on behalf of the user. The stage of aboutness determination in the complete process of subject indexing is also presented here, and the findings demonstrate that the stages are anything but linear and sequential. Conclusion – While the findings are more expositional than conclusive, they demonstrate the complexities and challenges surrounding the concept of “aboutness” and the process of its determination. The value of this review is in its ability to present the ways in which scholars and practitioners have

  6. Psychical research in the history and philosophy of science. An introduction and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    As a prelude to articles published in this special issue, I sketch changing historiographical conventions regarding the 'occult' in recent history of science and medicine scholarship. Next, a review of standard claims regarding psychical research and parapsychology in philosophical discussions of the demarcation problem reveals that these have tended to disregard basic primary sources and instead rely heavily on problematic popular accounts, simplistic notions of scientific practice, and outdated teleological historiographies of progress. I conclude by suggesting that rigorous and sensitively contextualized case studies of past elite heterodox scientists may be potentially useful to enrich historical and philosophical scholarship by highlighting epistemologies that have fallen through the crude meshes of triumphalist and postmodernist historiographical generalizations alike.

  7. Review and evaluation of the Office of Science and Technology`s Community Leaders Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, S.A.; Schweitzer, M.; Peelle, E.R.

    1997-08-01

    This report constitutes a review and evaluation of the Community Leaders Network (CLN), an informally structured national stakeholder group sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program`s Office of Science and Technology (OST) to obtain citizen input into the technology research and development programs of the OST. Since the CLN`s inception in 1993, its participants, currently numbering about 35 members mostly from jurisdictions hosting DOE waste management and environmental remediation sites, and its clients (i.e., OST) have invested substantial resources to develop the capability to enhance technology development and deployment activities through proactive stakeholder involvement. The specific objectives of the CLN are to: provide feedback and input to OST on technology development activities; provide information on OST ideas and approaches to key stakeholder groups, and provide input to OST on stakeholder concerns and involvement.

  8. Aging and degeneration of the intervertebral disc: review of basic science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josemberg da Silva Baptista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently there is a growing interest in the study of intervertebral discs due to loss of manpower brought to society by low back and neck pains. These papers seek to delineate the difference between normal aging and disc degeneration, trying to understand what factor would be determining for the second condition. Thus, the morphology field was expanded and knowledge on the structure of intervertebral discs currently uses the research field of cell and molecular biology, and genetics. The results indicate that regardless of age or condition, the intervertebral disc undergoes long and extensive remodeling of its constituents, which are influenced by several factors: environmental, soluble, cell growth and extracellular matrix. In this literature review we describe the biological characteristics of the cervical and lumbar intervertebral disc with a focus on basic science of aging and degeneration, selecting the latest findings and discussions of the area, which influence future research and clinical thoughts.

  9. Research collaboration and team science a state-of-the-art review and agenda

    CERN Document Server

    Bozeman, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Today in most scientific and technical fields more than 90% of research studies and publications are collaborative, often resulting in high-impact research and development of commercial applications, as reflected in patents. Nowadays in many areas of science, collaboration is not a preference but, literally, a work prerequisite. The purpose of this book is to review and critique the burgeoning scholarship on research collaboration. The authors seek to identify gaps in theory and research and identify the ways in which existing research can be used to improve public policy for collaboration and to improve project-level management of collaborations using Scientific and Technical Human Capital (STHC) theory as a framework. Broadly speaking, STHC is the sum of scientific and technical and social knowledge, skills and resources embodied in a particular individual. It is both human capital endowments, such as formal education and training and social relations and network ties that bind scientists and the users of ...

  10. Peer review role-playing as a method of teaching senior undergraduate science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie

    2008-11-01

    We present a case study of the use of role-playing as a method of enhancing course delivery in senior undergraduate science courses. Specifically we examine the use of simulating peer review of scientific proposals for time on major international telescopes in a third year astrophysics course at the University of Tasmania. We find that 90% of participating students found the experience to be both enjoyable and a good method for learning and that 100% of students felt that the exercise had aided their understanding of the course material. Furthermore 80% of students felt that the role-playing had enhanced their understanding of scientific decision making while 70% believed that they had learnt to apply principles from the course in new situations.

  11. FROM MARKET MAGIC TO CALYPSO SCIENCE POLICY A Review of Terence Kealey's The Economic Laws of Scientific Research

    OpenAIRE

    David, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    The current reconsideration of public research funding policies in the U.S., and U.K. and other industrialized economies makes it important that policy makers and the public understand the valid economic grounds for government support of science. This review article of a book that which argues for the ending of all government support of non-military R&D, provides an occasion to take stock of what is known about the subject. The review concludes that the extreme laissez-faire science policy ar...

  12. Threats to internal validity in exercise science: a review of overlooked confounding variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Israel; Pyne, David B; Martin, David T

    2015-10-01

    Internal validity refers to the degree of control exerted over potential confounding variables to reduce alternative explanations for the effects of various treatments. In exercise and sports-science research and routine testing, internal validity is commonly achieved by controlling variables such as exercise and warm-up protocols, prior training, nutritional intake before testing, ambient temperature, time of testing, hours of sleep, age, and gender. However, a number of other potential confounding variables often do not receive adequate attention in sports physiology and performance research. These confounding variables include instructions on how to perform the test, volume and frequency of verbal encouragement, knowledge of exercise endpoint, number and gender of observers in the room, influence of music played before and during testing, and the effects of mental fatigue on performance. In this review the authors discuss these variables in relation to common testing environments in exercise and sports science and present some recommendations with the goal of reducing possible threats to internal validity. PMID:25756869

  13. Alcohol and Violence in the Emergency Room: A Review and Perspectives from Psychological and Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Cherpitel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Our objective is to present a focused review of the scientific literature on the effect of alcohol consumption on violence related-injuries assessed in the emergency room (ER and to show how psychological and behavioral sciences could lead to a better understanding of the factors contributing to alcohol-related injuries in the ER. We retrieved published literature through a detailed search in Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE with Full Text PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, PsycINFO, PUBMed and SocINDEX with Full Text for articles related to emergency rooms, medical problems and sociocognitive models addressing alcohol intoxication articles. The first search was conducted in June 2011 and updated until August 2013. Literature shows that compared to uninjured patients; injured ones have a higher probability of: (i having an elevated blood-alcohol concentration upon arrival at the ER; (ii reporting having drunk alcohol during the six hours preceding the event; and (iii suffering from drinking-related consequences that adversely affect their social life. The main neurocognitive and sociocognitive models on alcohol and aggression are also discussed in order to understand the aetiology of violence-related injuries in emergency rooms. Suggestions are made for future research and prevention.

  14. Exploring Gusev Crater with Spirit: Review of science objectives and testable hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, N.A.; Grin, E.A.; Carr, M.H.; Sutter, B.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Farmer, J.D.; Greeley, R.; Kuzmin, R.O.; DesMarais, D.J.; Kramer, M.G.; Newsom, H.; Barber, C.; Thorsos, I.; Tanaka, K.L.; Barlow, N.G.; Fike, D.A.; Urquhart, M.L.; Grigsby, B.; Grant, F.D.; de Goursac, O.

    2003-01-01

    Gusev Crater was selected as the landing site for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit mission. Located at the outlet of Ma'adim Vallis and 250 km south of the volcano Apollinaris Patera, Gusev is an outstanding site to achieve the goals of the MER mission. The crater could have collected sediments from a variety of sources during its 3.9 Ga history, including fluvial, lacustrine, volcanic, glacial, impact, regional and local aeolian, and global air falls. It is a unique site to investigate the past history of water on Mars, climate and geological changes, and the potential habitability of the planet, which are central science objectives of the MER mission. Because of its complex history and potential diversity, Gusev will allow the testing of a large spectrum of hypotheses with the complete suite of MER instruments. Evidence consistent with long-lived lake episodes exist in the landing ellipse area. They might offer a unique opportunity to study, for the first time, Martian aqueous sediments and minerals formed in situ in their geological context. We review the geological history and diversity of the landing site, the science hypotheses that can be tested during the MER mission, and the relevance of Gusev to the MER mission objectives and payload. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. 76 FR 62077 - Submission for OBM Review; Comment Request; New Proposed Collection, Environmental Science...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... Collection, Environmental Science Formative Research Methodology Studies for the National Children's Study... Collection: Title: Environmental Science Formative Research Methodology Studies for the National Children's... environmental science professional organizations and practitioners, and schools and child care...

  16. Review. Teaching Legal and Administrative Science Nadia-Cerasela Anitei and Roxana Alina Petraru

    OpenAIRE

    Doina Mihaela POPA

    2011-01-01

    The work Didactica predarii stiintelor juridice si administrative (Teaching Legal and Administrative Science) authors Nadia- Cerasela Anitei and Roxana Alina Petraru is structured around the following 10 lessons: 1. General notions about teaching legal science, 2. Teaching legal science, 3. Learning with application in legal science, 4. Legal science teaching aims, 5. Education curriculum for teaching legal science, 6. Learning Methods 7. Educational assessment with applications for legal sci...

  17. Determinants and finalities in the choice of journal reviewing procedures: the case of RDST, a french science education research journal

    OpenAIRE

    Morge, Ludovic

    2011-01-01

    International audience The merging of two French journals both publishing articles on research in science and technology education has made it necessary for them to compare the different reviewing procedures used by each. This comparison highlights two points: first, there are extrinsic and intrinsic determinants which affect the choice of reviewing modalities; and secondly, there are two finalities which could lead to the two journals converging, namely, the equity (fairness) or the equal...

  18. New research advancement in electrical engineering field of China-Reviews on special issue of Science in China Series E: Technological Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI ShengWei; MA Jin

    2009-01-01

    Based on,but not limited to the research results of electrical engineering published in the special issue of Science in China Series E,June 2008,this essay gives a brief review on a wide range of state-of-art advancement in electrical engineering field of China,which includes power system modeling,analysis and control,risk assessments in power system,etc.

  19. 1999 in review: An assessment of new research developments relevant to the science of climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-03-31

    A synthesis of about 350 key scientific papers and reports dealing with the subject of climate change which appeared in the international peer-reviewed literature in 1999 is provided. The literature synthesized here deals with changes in atmospheric composition, radiative forcing, climate modelling, climate trends, climate impacts and adaptations, and climate change policy initiatives, especially the policy-science debate and mitigative response. With respect to the former, there are a number of scientists who continue to argue that there are significant discrepancies between observed trends in climate and trends projected by climate models, and suggest that there is cause for scepticism about the risk of climate change. They also suggest that mitigative action could be delayed until better technologies are developed. Others claim that the countries that are most vulnerable lack the resources to deal with the impacts of climate change and that the number of environmental refugees will increase six-fold by 2050 (estimated at 25 million in 1998). The references are classified under the broad topics used in the synthesis part of the review, with further subdivisions as appropriate. 348 refs.

  20. 1999 in review: An assessment of new research developments relevant to the science of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A synthesis of about 350 key scientific papers and reports dealing with the subject of climate change which appeared in the international peer-reviewed literature in 1999 is provided. The literature synthesized here deals with changes in atmospheric composition, radiative forcing, climate modelling, climate trends, climate impacts and adaptations, and climate change policy initiatives, especially the policy-science debate and mitigative response. With respect to the former, there are a number of scientists who continue to argue that there are significant discrepancies between observed trends in climate and trends projected by climate models, and suggest that there is cause for scepticism about the risk of climate change. They also suggest that mitigative action could be delayed until better technologies are developed. Others claim that the countries that are most vulnerable lack the resources to deal with the impacts of climate change and that the number of environmental refugees will increase six-fold by 2050 (estimated at 25 million in 1998). The references are classified under the broad topics used in the synthesis part of the review, with further subdivisions as appropriate. 348 refs

  1. Assessing Competencies in a Master of Science in Clinical Research Program: The Comprehensive Competency Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F W B; Moore, Charity G; McTigue, Kathleen M; Rubio, Doris M; Kapoor, Wishwa N

    2015-12-01

    Competencies in Master of Science Clinical Research programs are becoming increasingly common. However, students and programs can only benefit fully from competency-based education if students' competence is formally assessed. Prior to a summative assessment, students must have at least one formative, formal assessment to be sure they are developing competence appropriate for their stage of training. This paper describes the comprehensive competency review (CCR), a milestone for MS students in Clinical Research at the University of Pittsburgh's Institute for Clinical Research Education. The CCR involves metacognitive reflection of the student's learning as a whole, written evidence of each competency, a narrative explaining the choice of evidence for demonstrating competencies, and a meeting in which two faculty members review the evidence and solicit further oral evidence of competence. CCRs allow for individualized feedback at the midpoint in degree programs, providing students with confidence that they will have the means and strategies to develop competence in all areas by the summative assessment of competence at their thesis defense. CCRs have also provided programmatic insight on the need for curricular revisions and additions. These benefits outweigh the time cost on the part of students and faculty in the CCR process. PMID:26332763

  2. Ion clearing in an ERL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffstaetter, Georg H.; Liepe, Matthias

    2006-02-01

    The rest-gas in the beam-pipe of a particle accelerator is readily ionized by effects like collisions, synchrotron radiation and field emission. Positive ions are attracted to electron beams and create a nonlinear potential in the vicinity of the beam which can lead to beam halo, particle loss, optical errors or transverse and longitudinal instabilities. In an energy recovery linac (ERL) where beam-loss has to be minimal, and where beam positions and emittances have to be very stable in time, these ion effects have to be avoided. Here we investigate three measures of avoiding ion accumulation: (a) A long gap between linac bunch trains that allows ions to drift out of the beam region, a measure regularly applied in linacs; (b) a short ion clearing gap in the beam that leads to a time varying beam potential and produces large excited oscillations of ions around the electron beam, a measure regularly applied in storage rings; (c) Clearing electrodes that create a sufficient voltage to draw ions out of the beam potential, a measure used for DC electron beams and for antiproton beams. For the parameters of the X-ray ERL planned at Cornell University we show that method (a) cannot be applied, method (b) is technically cumbersome, and (c) should be most easily applicable.

  3. Cean air and clear responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the text of the address given by Commissioner Kenneth C. rogers, USNRC, at the 23rd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. Mr. Rogers reviews the regulatory approach to the subject, discussing the requirements of 10CFR20 and ALARA principles. A discussion of the talk follows the text

  4. State-of-the-science review: Does manganese exposure during welding pose a neurological risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Annette B; Cushing, Colleen A; Antonini, James M; Finley, Brent L; Mowat, Fionna S

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies report that exposure to manganese (Mn), an essential component of welding electrodes and some steels, results in neurotoxicity and/or Parkinson's disease (PD) in welders. This "state-of-the-science" review presents a critical analysis of the published studies that were conducted on a variety of Mn-exposed occupational cohorts during the last 100 yr, as well as the regulatory history of Mn and welding fumes. Welders often perform a variety of different tasks with varying degrees of duration and ventilation, and hence, to accurately assess Mn exposures that occurred in occupational settings, some specific information on the historical work patterns of welders is desirable. This review includes a discussion of the types of exposures that occur during the welding process--for which limited information relating airborne Mn levels with specific welding activities exists--and the human health studies evaluating neurological effects in welders and other Mn-exposed cohorts, including miners, millers, and battery workers. Findings and implications of studies specifically conducted to evaluate neurobehavioral effects and the prevalence of PD in welders are also discussed. Existing exposure data indicate that, in general, Mn exposures in welders are less than those associated with the reports of clinical neurotoxicity (e.g., "manganism") in miners and smelter workers. It was also found that although manganism was observed in highly exposed workers, the scant exposure-response data available for welders do not support a conclusion that welding is associated with clinical neurotoxicity. The available data might support the development of reasonable "worst-case" exposure estimates for most welding activities, and suggest that exposure simulation studies would significantly refine such estimates. Our review ends with a discussion of the data gaps and areas for future research.

  5. 77 FR 40590 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Pell Grant Experiments Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Pell Grant Experiments Study SUMMARY: The Pell Grant Experiments evaluation is a two-part, five-year demonstration study sponsored by... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Pell Grant Experiments Study. OMB...

  6. Investigating the Quality of Project-Based Science and Technology Learning Environments in Elementary School: A Critical Review of Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, Miranda; Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim; Laevers, Ferre

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a systematic review of instruments that have the potential to measure the quality of project-based science and technology (S&T) learning environments in elementary school. To this end, a comprehensive literature search was undertaken for the large field of S&T learning environments. We conducted a horizontal bottom-up…

  7. A Review on Learning Styles and Critically Thinking Disposition of Pre-Service Science Teachers in Terms of Miscellaneous Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenice, Nilgun

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out in order to review learning styles and critical thinking disposition of pre-service science teachers in terms of sex, grade and age, and to address the relationship between their learning styles and critical thinking disposition. It used Kolb's Inventory of Learning Styles and California Scale of Critical Thinking…

  8. Application in pesticide analysis: Liquid chromatography - A review of the state of science for biomarker discovery and identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book Chapter 18, titled Application in pesticide analysis: Liquid chromatography - A review of the state of science for biomarker discovery and identification, will be published in the book titled High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Pesticide Residue Analysis (Part of the C...

  9. A Hybrid Evaluation System Framework (Shell & Web) with Standardized Access to Climate Model Data and Verification Tools for a Clear Climate Science Infrastructure on Big Data High Performance Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadow, Christopher; Illing, Sebastian; Kunst, Oliver; Ulbrich, Uwe; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    by other users-saving CPU time, I/O and disk space. This study presents the different techniques and advantages of such a hybrid evaluation system making use of a Big Data HPC in climate science. website: www-miklip.dkrz.de visitor-login: click on "Guest"

  10. Linking Science and Language Arts: A Review of the Literature Which Compares Integrated Versus Non-integrated Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Leslie U.

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the literature published during the last 20 years that investigates the impact of approaches that describe themselves as integrating science and language arts on student learning and/or attitude at the elementary level. The majority of papers report that integrated approaches led to greater student achievement in science and language arts across elementary grade levels. Additionally, integrated approaches facilitate improved attitudes toward both science and reading. The second section of the findings provides an overview of the types of pedagogical approaches used in the classrooms described in the studies. At all grade levels, teachers linked a variety of strategies including read-alouds, independent reading, at home reading, and writing in various genres that connected hands-on science activities to language arts skills.

  11. Animal board invited review: advances in proteomics for animal and food sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, A M; Bassols, A; Bendixen, E; Bhide, M; Ceciliani, F; Cristobal, S; Eckersall, P D; Hollung, K; Lisacek, F; Mazzucchelli, G; McLaughlin, M; Miller, I; Nally, J E; Plowman, J; Renaut, J; Rodrigues, P; Roncada, P; Staric, J; Turk, R

    2015-01-01

    Animal production and health (APH) is an important sector in the world economy, representing a large proportion of the budget of all member states in the European Union and in other continents. APH is a highly competitive sector with a strong emphasis on innovation and, albeit with country to country variations, on scientific research. Proteomics (the study of all proteins present in a given tissue or fluid - i.e. the proteome) has an enormous potential when applied to APH. Nevertheless, for a variety of reasons and in contrast to disciplines such as plant sciences or human biomedicine, such potential is only now being tapped. To counter such limited usage, 6 years ago we created a consortium dedicated to the applications of Proteomics to APH, specifically in the form of a Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action, termed FA1002--Proteomics in Farm Animals: www.cost-faproteomics.org. In 4 years, the consortium quickly enlarged to a total of 31 countries in Europe, as well as Israel, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand. This article has a triple purpose. First, we aim to provide clear examples on the applications and benefits of the use of proteomics in all aspects related to APH. Second, we provide insights and possibilities on the new trends and objectives for APH proteomics applications and technologies for the years to come. Finally, we provide an overview and balance of the major activities and accomplishments of the COST Action on Farm Animal Proteomics. These include activities such as the organization of seminars, workshops and major scientific conferences, organization of summer schools, financing Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) and the generation of scientific literature. Overall, the Action has attained all of the proposed objectives and has made considerable difference by putting proteomics on the global map for animal and veterinary researchers in general and by contributing significantly to reduce the East-West and North-South gaps

  12. Theories of behaviour and behaviour change across the social and behavioural sciences: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel; Campbell, Rona; Hildon, Zoe; Hobbs, Lorna; Michie, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Interventions to change health-related behaviours typically have modest effects and may be more effective if grounded in appropriate theory. Most theories applied to public health interventions tend to emphasise individual capabilities and motivation, with limited reference to context and social factors. Intervention effectiveness may be increased by drawing on a wider range of theories incorporating social, cultural and economic factors that influence behaviour. The primary aim of this paper is to identify theories of behaviour and behaviour change of potential relevance to public health interventions across four scientific disciplines: psychology, sociology, anthropology and economics. We report in detail the methodology of our scoping review used to identify these theories including which involved a systematic search of electronic databases, consultation with a multidisciplinary advisory group, web searching, searching of reference lists and hand searching of key behavioural science journals. Of secondary interest we developed a list of agreed criteria for judging the quality of the theories. We identified 82 theories and 9 criteria for assessing theory quality. The potential relevance of this wide-ranging number of theories to public health interventions and the ease and usefulness of evaluating the theories in terms of the quality criteria are however yet to be determined. PMID:25104107

  13. The science and practice of micronutrient supplementations in nutritional anemia: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Mike, Leigh Ann

    2014-08-01

    Nutritional anemia is the most common type of anemia, affecting millions of people in all age groups worldwide. While inadequate access to food and nutrients can lead to anemia, patients with certain health status or medical conditions are also at increased risk of developing nutritional anemia. Iron, cobalamin, and folate are the most recognized micronutrients that are vital for the generation of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency is associated with insufficient production of hemoglobin. Deficiency of cobalamin or folate leads to impaired synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid, proteins, and cell division. Recent research has demonstrated that the status of copper and zinc in the body can significantly affect iron absorption and utilization. With an increasing number of patients undergoing bariatric surgical procedures, more cases of anemia associated with copper and zinc deficiencies have also emerged. The intestinal absorption of these 5 critical micronutrients are highly regulated and mediated by specific apical transport mechanisms in the enterocytes. Health conditions that persistently alter the histology of the upper intestinal architecture, expression, or function of these substrate-specific transporters, or the normal digestion and flow of these key micronutrients, can lead to nutritional anemia. The focus of this article is to review the science of intestinal micronutrient absorption, discuss the clinical assessment of micronutrient deficiencies in relation to anemia, and suggest an effective treatment plan and monitoring strategies using an evidence-based approach.

  14. State of Science, “Intuition in Nursing Practice”: A Systematic Review Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Parkhide; Jalali, Rostam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There were many attempts for introducing “intuition” to nursing practice, But despite the efficacy, it has been ignored as a valid way of knowing. Therefore the current study was conducted for evaluating the state of sciences to intuition in nursing practice. Materials and Methods In a systematic review study, all researches, published from 1995 to 2014, were searched in the databases of “PubMed”, using “intuition” and “nursing” keywords. The abstract of articles were read in scrutiny, then the related researches selected, thereafter the full text of them was assessed carefully. Results From searching the databases, 144 articles with “intuition and nursing” were found, 53 as original research, and 15 with inclusion criteria were selected. Most of the studies had qualitative approaches design as phenomenology (N=4), content analyses (N=2) and grounded theory (N=1), six was done for developing the instrument, and two studies have been conducted as descriptive method. Conclusion The results revealed the researches about intuition in nursing mostly were conducted with qualitative and instrument developing methodology and there is a lack of quantitative and trial studies. PMID:27042483

  15. Teaching and learning based on peer review: a realistic approach in forensic sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and learning methods need a continuous upgrade in higher education. However it is also true that some of the modern methodologies do not reduce or prevent school failure. Perhaps the real limitation is the inability to identify the true reasons that may explain it or ignore/undervalue the problem. In our opinion, one of the current constraints of the teaching/learning process is the excess of and inadequate bibliography recommended by the teacher, which results in continuous student difficulties and waste of time in searching and selecting useful information. The need to change the paradigm of the teaching/learning process comes also from employers. They claim forensic experts armed with useful knowledge to face professional life. It is therefore mandatory to identify the new needs and opportunities regarding pedagogical methodologies. This article reflects on the recent importance of peer review in teaching/learning forensic sciences based on the last 10 years of pedagogical experience inseparably from the scientific activity.

  16. Teaching and learning based on peer review: a realistic approach in forensic sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and learning methods need a continuous upgrade in higher education. However it is also true that some of the modern methodologies do not reduce or prevent school failure. Perhaps the real limitation is the inability to identify the true reasons that may explain it or ignore/undervalue the problem. In our opinion, one of the current constraints of the teaching/learning process is the excess of and inadequate bibliography recommended by the teacher, which results in continuous student difficulties and waste of time in searching and selecting useful information. The need to change the paradigm of the teaching/learning process comes also from employers. They claim forensic experts armed with useful knowledge to face professional life. It is therefore mandatory to identify the new needs and opportunities regarding pedagogical methodologies. This article reflects on the recent importance of peer review in teaching/learning forensic sciences based on the last 10 years of pedagogical experience inseparably from the scientific activity. PMID:27547377

  17. Theories of behaviour and behaviour change across the social and behavioural sciences: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel; Campbell, Rona; Hildon, Zoe; Hobbs, Lorna; Michie, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Interventions to change health-related behaviours typically have modest effects and may be more effective if grounded in appropriate theory. Most theories applied to public health interventions tend to emphasise individual capabilities and motivation, with limited reference to context and social factors. Intervention effectiveness may be increased by drawing on a wider range of theories incorporating social, cultural and economic factors that influence behaviour. The primary aim of this paper is to identify theories of behaviour and behaviour change of potential relevance to public health interventions across four scientific disciplines: psychology, sociology, anthropology and economics. We report in detail the methodology of our scoping review used to identify these theories including which involved a systematic search of electronic databases, consultation with a multidisciplinary advisory group, web searching, searching of reference lists and hand searching of key behavioural science journals. Of secondary interest we developed a list of agreed criteria for judging the quality of the theories. We identified 82 theories and 9 criteria for assessing theory quality. The potential relevance of this wide-ranging number of theories to public health interventions and the ease and usefulness of evaluating the theories in terms of the quality criteria are however yet to be determined.

  18. Scientometric analysis: A technical need for medical science researchers either as authors or as peer reviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2016-01-01

    The nature of performing a scientific research is a process that has several different components which consist of identifying the key research question(s), choices of scientific approach for the study and data collection, data analysis, and finally reporting on results. Generally, peer review is a series of procedures in the evaluation of a creative work or performance by other people, who work in the same or related field, with the aim of maintaining and improving the quality of work or performance in that field. The assessment of the achievement of every scientist, and thus indirectly determining his reputation in the scientific community of these publications, especially journals, is done through the so-called impact factor index. The impact factor predicts or estimates that how many annual citations article may receive after its publication. Evaluation of scientific productivity and assessment of the published articles of researchers and scientists can be made through the so-called H-index. The quality of published results of scientific work largely depends on knowledge sources that are used in the preparation, which means that it should be considered to serve the purpose and the very relevance of the information used. Scientometrics as a field of science covers all aforementioned issues, and scientometric analysis is obligatory for quality assessment of the scientific validity of published articles and other type of publications. PMID:26985429

  19. Teaching and learning based on peer review: a realistic approach in forensic sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and learning methods need a continuous upgrade in higher education. However it is also true that some of the modern methodologies do not reduce or prevent school failure. Perhaps the real limitation is the inability to identify the true reasons that may explain it or ignore/undervalue the problem. In our opinion, one of the current constraints of the teaching/learning process is the excess of and inadequate bibliography recommended by the teacher, which results in continuous student difficulties and waste of time in searching and selecting useful information. The need to change the paradigm of the teaching/learning process comes also from employers. They claim forensic experts armed with useful knowledge to face professional life. It is therefore mandatory to identify the new needs and opportunities regarding pedagogical methodologies. This article reflects on the recent importance of peer review in teaching/learning forensic sciences based on the last 10 years of pedagogical experience inseparably from the scientific activity.

  20. Scientometric analysis: A technical need for medical science researchers either as authors or as peer reviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2016-01-01

    The nature of performing a scientific research is a process that has several different components which consist of identifying the key research question(s), choices of scientific approach for the study and data collection, data analysis, and finally reporting on results. Generally, peer review is a series of procedures in the evaluation of a creative work or performance by other people, who work in the same or related field, with the aim of maintaining and improving the quality of work or performance in that field. The assessment of the achievement of every scientist, and thus indirectly determining his reputation in the scientific community of these publications, especially journals, is done through the so-called impact factor index. The impact factor predicts or estimates that how many annual citations article may receive after its publication. Evaluation of scientific productivity and assessment of the published articles of researchers and scientists can be made through the so-called H-index. The quality of published results of scientific work largely depends on knowledge sources that are used in the preparation, which means that it should be considered to serve the purpose and the very relevance of the information used. Scientometrics as a field of science covers all aforementioned issues, and scientometric analysis is obligatory for quality assessment of the scientific validity of published articles and other type of publications.

  1. A Review of the School Science Curricula in Eleven High Achieving Jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins, Martin; Reiss, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen unprecedented interest in science curricula, with many governments seeing improvements in the performance of their school students in science as key to future economic prosperity. We present the results of an analysis of the curriculum documents for primary and secondary science in Australia (New South Wales and…

  2. 78 FR 35984 - Proposal Review Panel for Ocean Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... the Coastal Margin Observatory and Prediction Science and Technology Center (CMOP). Agenda Tuesday... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... Committee Act Pub. L. 92- 463, as amended), the National Science Foundation announces the following...

  3. Science Teaching in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Reading the interesting article "Discerning selective traditions in science education" by Per Sund, which is published in this issue of "CSSE," allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must…

  4. The case for driver science in motorsport: a review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potkanowicz, Edward S; Mendel, Ronald W

    2013-07-01

    When discussing sports and the athletes who participate in them, it has long been recognized that fitness is a prerequisite for optimal performance. The goal of training to improve fitness levels in athletes is ultimately to minimize the stress that the body experiences during competition. When it comes to the topic of racecar drivers, however, drivers and their trainers have largely been left to their own devices to figure out the stressors and the areas of specific training focus. Unfortunately, racecar drivers have battled the stereotype that they are not athletes, and with little regard for them as athletes, drivers are seldom the focus of scientific research related to their performance. Like the cars they drive, driver-athletes are complex, but from a physiological perspective. However, unlike the cars they drive, driver-athletes have not been examined, evaluated, and tweaked to the same degree. The purpose of this review is two-fold: first, by examining the available literature, to make the case for new research into the driver's role in the driver-car system (i.e. driver science) and the stresses experienced; second, to make the case for more extensive use of microtechnology in the real-time monitoring of driver-athletes. With the miniaturization of sensors and the advent of portable data storage devices, the prospect of quantifying the stresses unique to the driver are no longer as daunting, and the relative impossibility and difficulties associated with measuring the driver-athlete in real-time no longer need to be as challenging. Using microtechnology in the assessment of the driver-athlete and with a more public discussion and dissemination of information on the topic of driver science, the scientific community has the opportunity to quantify that which has been largely assumed and speculated. The current article will offer the following recommendations: first, rather than examining a singular physiological stressor, to examine the interaction of

  5. Review of Cold war social science: Knowledge production, liberal democracy, and human nature, and Working knowledge: Making the human sciences from Parsons to Kuhn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Reviews the books, Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature by Mark Solovey and Hamilton Cravens (2012) and Working Knowledge: Making the Human Sciences From Parsons to Kuhn by Joel Isaac (see record 2012-13212-000). Taken together, these two important books make intriguing statements about the way to write the histories of fields like psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics in the Anglo American world during the 20th century. To date, histories of these fields have drawn on a number of fairly well-established punctuation marks to assist in periodization: the shift from interwar institutionalism in economics to postwar neoclassicism, with its physics-like emphasis on mathematical theory-building; the transition from the regnant prewar behaviorism through a postwar "cognitive revolution" in American psychology; and the move in fields like sociology and anthropology away from positivism and the pursuit of what has sometimes been called "grand theory" in the early postwar era toward a period defined by intellectual and political fragmentation, the reemergence of interpretive approaches and a reaction to the scientistic pretensions of the earlier period. These books, by contrast, provide perspectives orthogonal to such existing narrative frameworks by adopting cross-cutting lenses like the "Cold War" and the working practices of researchers in the social and behavioral sciences. As a result, they do much to indicate the value of casting a historiographical net beyond individual disciplines, or even beyond the "social sciences" or the "human sciences" sensu stricto, in the search for deeper patterns of historical development in these fields. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Review of Cold war social science: Knowledge production, liberal democracy, and human nature, and Working knowledge: Making the human sciences from Parsons to Kuhn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Reviews the books, Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature by Mark Solovey and Hamilton Cravens (2012) and Working Knowledge: Making the Human Sciences From Parsons to Kuhn by Joel Isaac (see record 2012-13212-000). Taken together, these two important books make intriguing statements about the way to write the histories of fields like psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics in the Anglo American world during the 20th century. To date, histories of these fields have drawn on a number of fairly well-established punctuation marks to assist in periodization: the shift from interwar institutionalism in economics to postwar neoclassicism, with its physics-like emphasis on mathematical theory-building; the transition from the regnant prewar behaviorism through a postwar "cognitive revolution" in American psychology; and the move in fields like sociology and anthropology away from positivism and the pursuit of what has sometimes been called "grand theory" in the early postwar era toward a period defined by intellectual and political fragmentation, the reemergence of interpretive approaches and a reaction to the scientistic pretensions of the earlier period. These books, by contrast, provide perspectives orthogonal to such existing narrative frameworks by adopting cross-cutting lenses like the "Cold War" and the working practices of researchers in the social and behavioral sciences. As a result, they do much to indicate the value of casting a historiographical net beyond individual disciplines, or even beyond the "social sciences" or the "human sciences" sensu stricto, in the search for deeper patterns of historical development in these fields. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24245858

  7. A Review of the Past Century in the Context of the Past Millennium:Science & Society in China and the West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Guangbi

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the significance and future of science, we must make clear the interaction between science and society. Although a consensus on this has reached among scholars and even the public, an explicit analytical framework for related studies on science and society is so far unavailable.In light of the outlook of cultural evolutionism, this article puts forward an analytic framework, on which an analysis on the Chinese science in the 20th century is made based on the discussion of science in China and the West. The principal conclusion obtained from the discussion is: Without a system of modern democracy, it is impossible to make science prosper and without a modern market system, technological progress is out of the question. Similarly, without contributions to the world's science and technology, the Chinese nation will not be able to get an equal foothold among the other nations in today's world.

  8. Designing Peer Review for Pedagogical Success: What Can We Learn from Professional Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Nancy M.

    2009-01-01

    This article compares peer review in professional versus education settings, summarizing key aspects of scientific peer review and reflecting on how these relate to the process as experienced by students. Consideration of professional peer review benefits educators in two ways. First, systems used for student peer review can employ some of the…

  9. [Industry of traditional Chinese patent medicine science and technology development and review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianwei; Wang, Fang; Yan, Dongmei; Luo, Yun; Yang, Ming

    2012-01-01

    "Fifteen" since, our country Chinese traditional medicine industry science and technology has made remarkable achievements. In this paper, the development of science and technology policy, Chinese medicine industry, platform construction and other aspects were analyzed, showing 10 years of Chinese traditional medicine industry development of science and technology innovation achievement and development, and on the current development of traditional Chinese medicine industry facing the main tasks and guarantee measures are analyzed. PMID:22741452

  10. Medical Hypotheses 2006 impact factor rises to 1.3--a vindication of the 'editorial review' system for revolutionary science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The Thomson Scientific Impact Factor (IF) for Medical Hypotheses has risen to 1.299 for 2006. This means that the IF has more than doubled since 2004, when it stood at 0.607. Using Elsevier's Scopus database; in 2004 there were 437 citations to Medical Hypotheses papers published in the previous two years--by 2006 this had trebled to 1216 citations. Monthly internet usage of Medical Hypotheses run at an average of about 26000 papers downloaded per month. An IF of 1.3 means that Medical Hypotheses has now entered the mainstream level of 'respectable' medical journals, in terms of its usage by other scientists. This is particularly pleasing given the aim of the journal is to publish radical and speculative ideas. A healthy IF is important to Medical Hypotheses because the journal deploys a system of editorial review, rather than peer review, for evaluation and selection of papers. Editorial review involves selection of a journal's content primarily by an editor who has broad experience and competence in the field, assisted by a relatively small editorial advisory board. The great advantage of editorial review is that it is able, by policy, to favour the publication of revolutionary science. But since editorial review relies on hard-to-quantify and non-transparent individual judgments, it is important for its outcomes to be open to objective evaluations. Scientometric measures of usage such as citations, impact factors and downloads constitute objective evidence concerning a journal's usefulness. Since Medical Hypotheses is performing adequately by such criteria, this provides a powerful answer to those who fetishize peer review and regard any other system of evaluation as suspect. Journal review procedures are merely a means to the end, and the end is a journal that serves a useful function in the dynamic process of science. Medical Hypotheses can now claim to perform such a role. PMID:17706892

  11. A review of Computer Science resources for learning and teaching with K-12 computing curricula: an Australian case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age children, with the intention to engage children and increase interest, rather than to formally teach concepts and skills. What is the educational quality of existing Computer Science resources and to what extent are they suitable for classroom learning and teaching? In this paper, an assessment framework is presented to evaluate the quality of online Computer Science resources. Further, a semi-systematic review of available online Computer Science resources was conducted to evaluate resources available for classroom learning and teaching and to identify gaps in resource availability, using the Australian curriculum as a case study analysis. The findings reveal a predominance of quality resources, however, a number of critical gaps were identified. This paper provides recommendations and guidance for the development of new and supplementary resources and future research.

  12. Clearing and Labeling Techniques for Large-Scale Biological Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jinyoung; Choe, Minjin; Kim, Sung-Yon

    2016-06-30

    Clearing and labeling techniques for large-scale biological tissues enable simultaneous extraction of molecular and structural information with minimal disassembly of the sample, facilitating the integration of molecular, cellular and systems biology across different scales. Recent years have witnessed an explosive increase in the number of such methods and their applications, reflecting heightened interest in organ-wide clearing and labeling across many fields of biology and medicine. In this review, we provide an overview and comparison of existing clearing and labeling techniques and discuss challenges and opportunities in the investigations of large-scale biological systems. PMID:27239813

  13. Sense about Science--"Making Sense of Radiation" and Understanding Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Leonor

    2011-01-01

    Sense About Science is a UK-based charitable trust that equips people to make sense of science and of evidence on issues that matter to society. It was set up in 2003 in response to newspaper front pages being full of headlines about mobile phones "frying your brain", genetically modified "Frankenstein foods", the MMR vaccine, "cocktails of toxic…

  14. Argument to Foster Scientific Literacy: A Review of Argument Interventions in K-12 Science Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnetto, Andy R.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of scientific literacy has led to a steady increase in argument-based interventions in science education contexts. It has been suggested that student participation in argument develops communication skills, metacognitive awareness, critical thinking, an understanding of the culture and practice of science, and scientific literacy.…

  15. Science communication in Brazil: A historical review and considerations about the current situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarani, Luisa; Moreira, Ildeu DE Castro

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a historical overview of the science communication activities in Brazil since the nineteenth century and we analyze the current situation and its main concerns. The principal scopes and tools for science communication discussed here are the following: science centers and museums, mass media and large public events for communicating science and technology (S&T). In recent years, such activities have had a significant breakthrough in Brazil. Yet, there is still a long way to go in order to deliver a quality and extensive science and technology communication to the Brazilians as well as to achieve a suitable level of social appropriation of knowledge on S&T by the Brazilian society. Some of the main challenges that we are facing are discussed herein. PMID:27556221

  16. Science communication in Brazil: A historical review and considerations about the current situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarani, Luisa; Moreira, Ildeu DE Castro

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a historical overview of the science communication activities in Brazil since the nineteenth century and we analyze the current situation and its main concerns. The principal scopes and tools for science communication discussed here are the following: science centers and museums, mass media and large public events for communicating science and technology (S&T). In recent years, such activities have had a significant breakthrough in Brazil. Yet, there is still a long way to go in order to deliver a quality and extensive science and technology communication to the Brazilians as well as to achieve a suitable level of social appropriation of knowledge on S&T by the Brazilian society. Some of the main challenges that we are facing are discussed herein.

  17. Phenylketonuria Scientific Review Conference: state of the science and future research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Kathryn M; Parisi, Melissa A; Acosta, Phyllis B; Berry, Gerard T; Bilder, Deborah A; Blau, Nenad; Bodamer, Olaf A; Brosco, Jeffrey P; Brown, Christine S; Burlina, Alberto B; Burton, Barbara K; Chang, Christine S; Coates, Paul M; Cunningham, Amy C; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Ferguson, John H; Franklin, Thomas D; Frazier, Dianne M; Grange, Dorothy K; Greene, Carol L; Groft, Stephen C; Harding, Cary O; Howell, R Rodney; Huntington, Kathleen L; Hyatt-Knorr, Henrietta D; Jevaji, Indira P; Levy, Harvey L; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A; Matalon, Kimberlee; MacDonald, Anita; McPheeters, Melissa L; Mitchell, John J; Mofidi, Shideh; Moseley, Kathryn D; Mueller, Christine M; Mulberg, Andrew E; Nerurkar, Lata S; Ogata, Beth N; Pariser, Anne R; Prasad, Suyash; Pridjian, Gabriella; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Reddy, Uma M; Rohr, Frances J; Singh, Rani H; Sirrs, Sandra M; Stremer, Stephanie E; Tagle, Danilo A; Thompson, Susan M; Urv, Tiina K; Utz, Jeanine R; van Spronsen, Francjan; Vockley, Jerry; Waisbren, Susan E; Weglicki, Linda S; White, Desirée A; Whitley, Chester B; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Yannicelli, Steven; Young, Justin M

    2014-06-01

    New developments in the treatment and management of phenylketonuria (PKU) as well as advances in molecular testing have emerged since the National Institutes of Health 2000 PKU Consensus Statement was released. An NIH State-of-the-Science Conference was convened in 2012 to address new findings, particularly the use of the medication sapropterin to treat some individuals with PKU, and to develop a research agenda. Prior to the 2012 conference, five working groups of experts and public members met over a 1-year period. The working groups addressed the following: long-term outcomes and management across the lifespan; PKU and pregnancy; diet control and management; pharmacologic interventions; and molecular testing, new technologies, and epidemiologic considerations. In a parallel and independent activity, an Evidence-based Practice Center supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality conducted a systematic review of adjuvant treatments for PKU; its conclusions were presented at the conference. The conference included the findings of the working groups, panel discussions from industry and international perspectives, and presentations on topics such as emerging treatments for PKU, transitioning to adult care, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulatory perspective. Over 85 experts participated in the conference through information gathering and/or as presenters during the conference, and they reached several important conclusions. The most serious neurological impairments in PKU are preventable with current dietary treatment approaches. However, a variety of more subtle physical, cognitive, and behavioral consequences of even well-controlled PKU are now recognized. The best outcomes in maternal PKU occur when blood phenylalanine (Phe) concentrations are maintained between 120 and 360 μmol/L before and during pregnancy. The dietary management treatment goal for individuals with PKU is a blood Phe concentration between 120 and 360 μmol/L. The use

  18. IRIS Toxicological Review of Tert-Butyl Alcohol (Tert-Butanol) (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On April 29, 2016, the Toxicological Review of tert-Butyl Alcohol (tert-Butanol) (Public Comment Draft) was released for public comment. The draft Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and the Executive Office ...

  19. Between Knowledge and Grotesque: how Wojciech Sady Understands the History of Religion, Philosophy, and Science, review of: Wojciech Sady, Dzieje religii...

    OpenAIRE

    Spychała, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Between Knowledge and Grotesque: how Wojciech Sady Understands the History of Religion, Philosophy, and Science, review of: Wojciech Sady, Dzieje religii, fi lozofi i i nauki. Od Talesa z Miletu do Mahometa [ The History of Religion, Philosophy, and Science: ales of Miletus to Mohammed], Wydawnictwo ANTYK Marek Derewiecki, Kęty 2010, 672 p

  20. CO2 Efflux from Cleared Mangrove Peat

    OpenAIRE

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Roger W Ruess; Feller, Ilka C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CO(2) emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured CO(2) efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO(2) efflux. CO(2) efflux from soils de...

  1. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clear Lake. 9.99 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Clear Lake.” (b) Approved...

  2. 77 FR 66219 - Clearing Agency Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... to clear credit default swaps. See Exchange Act Release Nos. 60372 (July 23, 2009), 74 FR 37748 (July 29, 2009), 61973 (Apr. 23, 2010), 75 FR 22656 (Apr. 29, 2010) and 63389 (Nov. 29, 2010), 75 FR 75520 (Dec. 3, 2010) (CDS clearing by ICE Clear Europe Limited); 60373 (July 23, 2009), 74 FR 37740 (July...

  3. Teaching Evolution in New Zealand's Schools—Reviewing Changes in the New Zealand Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alison; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2011-05-01

    New Zealand has had a national school science curriculum for more than 80 years. In the past the evolution content of this document has varied, and has at times been strongly influenced by creationist lobby groups. The `new' science curriculum, to be fully implemented in 2010, places much greater emphasis than before on understanding evolution, and also on teaching the nature of science. Interplay between the two can potentially improve student understanding of the culture and processes of science in general and evolutionary theory in particular. While the explicit use of the word `evolution' highlights its significance, it is necessary to provide both resources and pedagogical guidelines to support teachers in dealing with this important topic.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences: Chaos, Fractals, Selforganization and Disorder: Concepts and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, S.

    2004-10-01

    Since the discovery of the renormalization group theory in statistical physics, the realm of applications of the concepts of scale invariance and criticality has pervaded several fields of natural and social sciences. This is the leitmotiv of Didier Sornette's book, who in Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences reviews three decades of developments and applications of the concepts of criticality, scale invariance and power law behaviour from statistical physics, to earthquake prediction, ruptures, plate tectonics, modelling biological and economic systems and so on. This strongly interdisciplinary book addresses students and researchers in disciplines where concepts of criticality and scale invariance are appropriate: mainly geology from which most of the examples are taken, but also engineering, biology, medicine, economics, etc. A good preparation in quantitative science is assumed but the presentation of statistical physics principles, tools and models is self-contained, so that little background in this field is needed. The book is written in a simple informal style encouraging intuitive comprehension rather than stressing formal derivations. Together with the discussion of the main conceptual results of the discipline, great effort is devoted to providing applied scientists with the tools of data analysis and modelling necessary to analyse, understand, make predictions and simulate systems undergoing complex collective behaviour. The book starts from a purely descriptive approach, explaining basic probabilistic and geometrical tools to characterize power law behaviour and scale invariant sets. Probability theory is introduced by a detailed discussion of interpretative issues warning the reader on the use and misuse of probabilistic concepts when the emphasis is on prediction of low probability rare---and often catastrophic---events. Then, concepts that have proved useful in risk evaluation, extreme value statistics, large limit theorems for sums of independent

  5. R. M. Harrison and S. J. De Mora: Introductory Chemistry for the Environmental Sciences [book review

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Michael R

    2000-01-01

    Harrison and De Mora have revised the first edition of their book, Introductory Chemistry for the Environmental Sciences, which has an intended reading audience of college or university undergraduates who are studying or majoring in the environmental sciences, environmental chemistry, or ecology. Their intent is to present the basic concepts of chemistry within the context of the thermodynamic universe known at ‘the environment'.

  6. A scoping review of time-use research in occupational therapy and occupational science

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, EA; Hunt, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Time use is a defining interest within occupational therapy and occupational science. This is evident through the range of contributions to the disciplinary knowledge base. Indeed it has been suggested that time-use methods are amongst the most established research techniques used to explore aspects of human occupation. However, the extent and nature of such activity in occupational therapy and occupational science has not been examined to date. Aim: This study sought to map the e...

  7. Systematic reviews on reports of hip fractures in Web of Science:a bibliometric analysis of publication activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao Zhi; Wang Guoqi; Mei Xifan; Chen Shuo; Liu Xiaoxie; Zeng Xiantao; Long Anhua

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to analyze the trend in the publication of systematic reviews on hip fractures through a bibliometric approach.Methods Literature including systematic reviews or meta-analyses on hip fractures was searched from the ISI Web of Science citation database.The search results were analyzed in terms of geographical authorship and frequency of citation by country,institution,author,and periodical distribution.Results A total of 654 published systematic reviews from 1995 to 2013 in 48 countries or regions were retrieved.The United States (171) was the predominant country in terms of the number of total publications,followed by the United Kingdom (149),Canada (120),Australia (76),and China (54).The number of systematic reviews significantly increased during the last 6 years,especially in China.The production ranking changed in 2012,at which time the United States and China were the leaders in the yearly production of systematic reviews on hip fractures.The amount of literature (27 publications) from China contributed almost one-quarter of the total literature (109 publications) in 2012.However,the average number of citations of each article from China was still low (6.70),while the highest number of citations of each article was from Sweden (193.36).The references were published in 239 different journals,with 15 journals contributing to 41.3% of the systematic reviews on hip fractures.The two journals that contributed the most were Osteoporosis International (10.6%) and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (7.6%).The predominant institution in terms of the number of publications was McMaster University (36) in Canada.Conclusions The best evidence in the field of hip fractures has attracted increasing attention.Systematic reviews on hip fractures from China have been increasingly more frequent during the past 6 years,particularly in 2012.

  8. Nuclear threat. A clear and present danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was disappointed at the discussion in the review conference of the NPT held in 2005. The fact may be caused by the estrangement between the international urgent issues related to the non-proliferation and the effectiveness of archaic measures through the NPT. However, it should not be recognized that the international obligation and worth of NPT has been gone. The NPT referred the typical international situation under the cold war era. Although several permanent issues of the nuclear non-proliferation exist in current discussions, the activities relevant to the NPT may not be effect against newly unstable situations after the September 11th of 2001. Urgent challenges to be taken are that we must strictly analyze the interventions between 'the clear and present danger' of our world and the nuclear herms, and must take appropriate actions toward them without influences from previous international situations that might be subsisted in current international treaties and agreements. This paper identified the features of nuclear threats based on the four categories and examined the possibilities of nuclear terrorism from previous facts with the inductive inference. The results identified the possibility of nuclear facility attack and of radioactive materials theft by the Polico-Religious Groups and others are stood out. The authors would suggest the important of urgent recognition to establish the certain security system against nuclear terrorism. (author)

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Science and Eastern Orthodoxy. From the Greek Fathers to the Age of Globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, E.; Sterken, C.

    2014-01-01

    The long debate on the ambivalent relation between science and religion in Western civilization is well documented in the literature on the history and philosophy of science and religion, but few studies paid attention to that relation within Eastern civilization. Nicolaidis' book provides an overview of the relationship between science and Christian Orthodoxy, the official church of the Oriental Roman Empire. The study covers a time span from the fourth to the twentieth century. The author documents the vision that conflicts between science and the Greek Orthodox church were not science versus Christianity, but rather ecclesiastical debates that traversed the whole of society. This book provides a wealth of information concerning the attitude of the Orthodox (i.e., non-Slavic) Church to science today as well as in the past. But the book covers much more than science and religion: also political debates are documented, as well as the role played by Byzantine emperors in relation with science and Orthodoxy. The book presents a very useful time line of events and works covering circa AD 300-1980. There are short descriptions of the Ptolemaic cosmos, the spherical universe with its seven planets (i.e., excluding the Earth, but including Sun and Moon), the Hellenic Aristotelian world view, the duration of the world (eternal or created), the place of the Earth, the matter of creation, the nature of darkness and light, day and night, the Sun and stars, the laws of nature. The last two chapters about Greece, from the independence to the European Union (but also covering science and religion in the Greek State), are quite interesting. Particularly fascinating for astronomers is the fact that the very first establishment (in 1842) of the Greek nation-state that could be termed a research institute was the Observatory of Athens, made possible by a donation from a very wealthy diaspora Greek who resided in Vienna. This is a very useful book to serve as supportive document for

  10. A report of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee: 1992 review of the Basic Energy Sciences Program of the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general quality of BES research at each of the 4 laboratories is high. Diversity of management at the different laboratories is beneficial as long as the primary BES mission and goals are clearly identified and effectively pursued. External sources of personnel should be encouraged. DOE has been designing a new high flux research reactor, the Advanced Neutron Source, to replace DOE's two aging research reactors; BESAC conducted a panel evaluation of neutron sources for the future. The two new light sources, Advanced Light Source and Advanced Photon source will come on line well before all of their beamline instrumentation can be funded, developed, and installed. Appointment of a permanent director and deputy for OBES would enhance OBES effectiveness in budget planning and intra-DOE program coordination. Some DOE and DP laboratories have substantial infrastructure which match well industry development-applications needs; interlaboratory partnerships in this area are encouraged. Funding for basic science research programs should be maintained at FY1993 levels, adjusted for inflation; OBES plans should be updated and monitored to maintain the balance between basic research and facilities construction and operation. The recommendations are discussed in detail in this document

  11. Personalizing Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielowich, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Science teachers are aware of many social issues that intersect with science. These socio-scientific issues (SSIs) are "open-ended problems without clear-cut solutions [that] can be informed by scientific principles, theories, and data, but…cannot be fully determined by [them]" (Sadler 2011, p. 4). This article describes the SSI lessons…

  12. A review of the literature on the aging adult skull and face: implications for forensic science research and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, A Midori; Ricanek, Karl; Patterson, Eric

    2007-10-01

    This paper is a summary of findings of adult age-related craniofacial morphological changes. Our aims are two-fold: (1) through a review of the literature we address the factors influencing craniofacial aging, and (2) the general ways in which a head and face age in adulthood. We present findings on environmental and innate influences on face aging, facial soft tissue age changes, and bony changes in the craniofacial and dentoalveolar skeleton. We then briefly address the relevance of this information to forensic science research and applications, such as the development of computer facial age-progression and face recognition technologies, and contributions to forensic sketch artistry. PMID:17434276

  13. Contributions of Albert Einstein to Earth Sciences: A review in Commemoration of the World Year of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Frias, J; Rull, F; Hochberg, David; Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Rull, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The World Year of Physics (2005) is an international celebration to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of Einstein's "Annus Mirabilis". The United Nations has officially declared 2005 the International Year of Physics. However, the impact of Einstein's ideas was not restricted to physics. Among numerous other disciplines, Einstein also made significant and specific contributions to Earth Sciences. His geosciences-related letters, comments, and scientific articles, are dispersed, not easily accesible and are poorly known. The present review attempts to integrate them, as a tribute to Einstein in commemoration of this centenary. These contributions can be classified into three basic areas: geodynamics, geological (planetary) catastrophism and fluvial geomorphology.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Clear Cell Lesions of Head and Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anshi; Shetty, Devi Charan; Juneja, Saurabh; Narwal, Nidhi

    2016-05-01

    The salivary glands, oral mucosa and jaws constitute a group of lesions which are heterogeneous in nature and are odontogenic, salivary or metastatic in origin. This group of tumours is termed as Clear Cell Tumours. Fixation artifacts are one of the most important reasons for the cell to appear clear but clearing of cells may also result from cytoplasmic accumulation of water, presence of glycogen within the cell, intermediate filaments, immature zymogen granules, or a paucity of cellular organelles. Clear cell Odontogenic neoplasms predominantly include odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour. Clear cell tumours of salivary gland origin are almost invariably malignant in nature but they do include two benign lesions. Very frequently, surgical pathologist encounters clear cells in many malignant neoplasms, the nature and sources of which are undetermined on the basis of conventional histopathology. This review will selectively discuss the clinicopathological features of neoplasms which at times may pose a diagnostic challenge and dilemma due to clear cell changes. PMID:27437379

  15. 77 FR 47067 - Notification of Two Public Quality Review Teleconferences of the Chartered Science Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Ecological Risk Assessment in Environmental Decision- Making'' (EPA-SAB-08-002). Background information about... review report on EPA's accounting framework for biogenic carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources... report entitled ``SAB Review (7-26-12 Draft) of EPA's Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO 2...

  16. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia Noncancer Inhalation (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In September 2016, EPA finalized the IRIS assessment of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation). The Toxicological Review was reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices before public release in June 2016. Consistent with the May 2009 IRIS assessment d...

  17. 14th annual Results and Review Workshop on High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Nagel, Wolfgang E; Resch, Michael M; Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center, Stuttgart (HLRS) 2011; High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '11

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in simulation on supercomputers. Leading researchers present results achieved on systems of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) for the year 2011. The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering, ranging from CFD to computational physics and chemistry, to computer science, with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting results for both vector systems and microprocessor-based systems, the book allows readers to compare the performance levels and usability of various architectures. As HLRS

  18. Science for common entrance physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pickering, WR

    2015-01-01

    Cover everything required for the 13+ Common Entrance Physics exam with clearly presented content, lively illustrations and challenging end-of-chapter questions. This challenging and stimulating Science course has been reviewed by the ISEB subject editor and covers the content of both Levels 1 and 2 of the 13+ Physics exam. Designed for pupils in Years 7 and 8, it is an indispensable resource that lays the foundations for Common Entrance success. - Explores every Level 1 and 2 topic with clear explanations and examples - Includes topic-based exercises and extension questions - Builds on p

  19. Book Review: "The Honest Broker: Making Sense of Science in Policy and Politics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Honest Broker is a must-read for any scientist with even a modest interest in environmental policy or politics, and I recommend it especially to scientists unfamiliar with the continuing controversy over how scientists misuse science in environmental policy and politics. The ...

  20. Book Review: Khine Swe, M. (Ed., Critical Analysis of Science Textbooks: Evaluating instructional effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Slapničar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Science educators agree that textbooks play a crucial role in teaching and learning processes (Clement, 2008; Koppal & Caldwell, 2004; consequently, numerous research studies have been conducted in the analysis of science textbooks. In 1941, Graham noted that ‘The textbook is an old instrument in learning and teaching processes’ and traced the origin of the textbook back to the classical Greek era. With the invention of the printing press, textbooks became omnipresent in every school. Since textbooks are being used as a major source of information in teaching a particular subject, the quality and accuracy of the content is crucial for their educational effectiveness. Critical Analysis of Science Textbooks: Evaluating instructional effectiveness includes contributions by authors from various backgrounds, theorists and practitioners. In analysing science textbooks, researchers look into the balance between theoretical and practical knowledge, the portrayal of minorities, women and gender fairness, the treatment of socio-scientific and controversial issues, and the depiction of graphical information, vocabulary load, comprehensibility and readability at the intended level, the representation of indigenous knowledge, the role of textbook questions, and cultural and religious sensibility

  1. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: 'Advanced science research' (Pre-review report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for prior assessment of 'Advanced Science Research,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program and activities of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as 'ASRC') for the period of five years from April 2010. The Committee evaluated the management and the research program of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC and the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders. This report summarizes the result of the assessment by the Committee with the Committee report attached from page 7. (author)

  2. 75 FR 65528 - Membership of the National Science Board's Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... Director, Division of Human Resource Management and Chief Human Capital Officer, National Science..., Division of Human Resource Management and Chief Human Capital Officer. Plus two members to be selected from... Resource Management and Chief Human Capital Officer. BILLING CODE 7555-01-M...

  3. 77 FR 12331 - Membership of National Science Foundation's Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    .... 4314(c)(4). ADDRESSES: Comments should be addressed to Director, Division of Human Resource Management... F. Hubbard, Director, Office of Information and Resource Management and Chief Human Capital Officer... Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences. ] Judith S. Sunley, Director, Division of Human Resource Management...

  4. Phenylketonuria Scientific Review Conference : State of the science and future research needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, Kathryn M.; Parisi, Melissa A.; Acosta, Phyllis B.; Berry, Gerard. T.; Bilder, Deborah A.; Blau, Nenad; Bodamer, Olaf A.; Brosco, Jeffrey P.; Brown, Christine S.; Burlina, Alberto B.; Burton, Barbara K.; Chang, Christine S.; Coates, Paul M.; Cunningham, Amy C.; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Ferguson, John H.; Franklin, Thomas D.; Frazier, Dianne M.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Greene, Carol L.; Groft, Stephen C.; Harding, Cary O.; Howell, R. Rodney; Huntington, Kathleen L.; Hyatt-Knorr, Henrietta D.; Jevaji, Indira P.; Levy, Harvey L.; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A.; Matalon, Kimberlee; MacDonald, Anita; McPheeters, Melissa L.; Mitchell, John J.; Mofidi, Shideh; Moseley, Kathryn D.; Mueller, Christine M.; Mulberg, Andrew E.; Nerurkar, Lata S.; Ogata, Beth N.; Pariser, Anne R.; Prasad, Suyash; Pridjian, Gabriella; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Reddy, Uma M.; Rohr, Frances J.; Singh, Rani H.; Sirrs, Sandra M.; Stremer, Stephanie E.; Tagle, Danilo A.; Thompson, Susan M.; Urv, Tiina K.; Utz, Jeanine R.; van Spronsen, Francjan; Vockley, Jerry; Waisbren, Susan E.; Weglicki, Linda S.; White, Desiree A.; Whitley, Chester B.; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Yannicelli, Steven; Young, Justin M.

    2014-01-01

    New developments in the treatment and management of phenylketonuria (PKU) as well as advances in molecular testing have emerged since the National Institutes of Health 2000 PKU Consensus Statement was released. An NIH State-of-the-Science Conference was convened in 2012 to address new findings, part

  5. Methods Matter: Improving Causal Inference in Educational and Social Science Research: A Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Eric R.; Showalter, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Professors Richard J. Murnane and John B. Willett set out to capitalize on recent developments in education data and methodology by attempting to answer the following questions: How can new methods and data be applied most effectively in educational and social science research? What kinds of research designs are most appropriate? What kinds of…

  6. Organizational Teaching and Learning--A (Re)View from Educational Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahn, Leif Christian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the dominance of the participation metaphor for learning in the literature on learning organizations and to propose a working model of the teaching organization with conceptual input from educational science and the sociology of professions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines…

  7. Pierce Butler's "An Introduction to Library Science: A Tract for Our Times? A Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Blaise

    2004-01-01

    Considers the historic and contemporary import of Pierce Butler's "An Introduction to Library Science". Characterizes the content of each chapter and critically analyses the central theses. Relates Butler's positivistic premises, assumptions and conclusions to the congeries of competing epistemological and ideological standpoints that defines…

  8. Review of Developing Quantitative Literacy Skills in History and the Social Sciences: A Web-Based Common Core Approach by Kathleen W. Craver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor J. Ricchezza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen W. Craver. Developing Quantitative Literacy Skills in History and Social Sciences: A Web-Based Common Core Standards Approach (Lantham MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc., 2014. 191 pp. ISBN 978-1-4758-1050-9 (cloth; ISBN …-1051-6 (pbk; ISBN…-1052-3 (electronic. This book could be a breakthrough for teachers in the trenches who are interested in or need to know about quantitative literacy (QL. It is a resource providing 85 topical pieces, averaging 1.5 pages, in which a featured Web site is presented, described, and accompanied by 2-4 critical-thinking questions purposefully drawing on data from the Web site. The featured Web sites range from primary documents (e.g., All about California and the Inducements to Settle There, 1870 to modern databases (e.g., city-data.com. The 85 pieces are organized under three headings (Social Science Sites; U.S. History Sites; World History Sites following three chapters introducing QL, quantitative sources, and communicating with data. The QL skills in the questions are the usual suspects such as making comparisons, graph reading, table reading, and calculating and thinking about ratios. The author, the Head Librarian at the National Cathedral School (Washington DC, clearly aims the book at high school teachers who wish to comply with the Common Core Standards, which call for making communication with data a part of English Language Arts. The authors of this review believe the book will be of great value for college-level teachers too, whether they be interested in finding context (e.g., history and social science topics for their QL-math courses, or adding QL-type questions to their in-discipline courses. Moreover, we fervently wish that this book will inspire others to create and compile similar resources in such a way that, in the future, there will be a vast open-access library of such collections of QL questions coupled to data sources – with updated links – available on the

  9. Synopsis of the Review on Space Weather in Latin America: Space Science, Research Networks and Space Weather Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Dasso, Sergio; Gonzalez-Esparza, Americo

    2016-07-01

    The present work is a synopsis of a three-part review on space weather in Latin America. The first paper (part 1) comprises the evolution of several Latin American institutions investing in space science since the 1960's, focusing on the solar-terrestrial interactions, which today is commonly called space weather. Despite recognizing advances in space research in all of Latin America, this part 1 is restricted to the development observed in three countries in particular (Argentina, Brazil and Mexico), due to the fact that these countries have recently developed operational centers for monitoring space weather. The review starts with a brief summary of the first groups to start working with space science in Latin America. This first part of the review closes with the current status and the research interests of these groups, which are described in relation to the most significant works and challenges of the next decade in order to aid in the solving of space weather open issues. The second paper (part 2) comprises a summary of scientific challenges in space weather research that are considered to be open scientific questions and how they are being addressed in terms of instrumentation by the international community, including the Latin American groups. We also provide an inventory of the networks and collaborations being constructed in Latin America, including details on the data processing, capabilities and a basic description of the resulting variables. These instrumental networks currently used for space science research are gradually being incorporated into the space weather monitoring data pipelines as their data provides key variables for monitoring and forecasting space weather, which allow these centers to monitor space weather and issue warnings and alerts. The third paper (part 3) presents the decision process for the spinning off of space weather prediction centers from space science groups with our interpretation of the reason/opportunities that leads to

  10. Prospect Theory and Choice Behaviour Strategies: Review and Synthesis of Concepts from Social and Transport sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Kaa, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Utility Theory is commonly considered as the most useful descriptive theory of human choice behaviour. Alternative concepts are only incidentally considered. This paper reviews alternative assumptions and empirical findings about human choice behaviour. To facilitate comparison and synthesis the rev

  11. Science Review: Vasopressin and the cardiovascular system part 1 – receptor physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Cheryl L; Landry, Donald W.; Granton, John T.

    2003-01-01

    Vasopressin is emerging as a rational therapy for vasodilatory shock states. Unlike other vasoconstrictor agents, vasopressin also has vasodilatory properties. The goal of the present review is to explore the vascular actions of vasopressin. In part 1 of the review we discuss structure, signaling pathways, and tissue distributions of the classic vasopressin receptors, namely V1 vascular, V2 renal, V3 pituitary and oxytocin receptors, and the P2 class of purinoreceptors. Knowledge of the funct...

  12. "Earth System Science Data" (ESSD) — A Peer Reviewed Journal for Publication of Data

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffenberger, Hans; Carlson, David

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, ESSD was established to provide a venue for publishing highly important research data, with two main aims: To provide reward for data "authors" through fully qualified citation of research data, classically aligned with the certification of quality of a peer reviewed journal. A major step towards this goal was the definition and rationale of article structure and review criteria for articles about datasets.

  13. Astrophysics and Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Jeremy; Brinks, Elias; Khanna, Ramon

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysics and Space Science publishes original contributions and invited reviews covering the entire range of astronomy, astrophysics, astrophysical cosmology, planetary and space science, and the astrophysical aspects of astrobiology. This includes both observational and theoretical research, the techniques of astronomical instrumentation and data analysis, and astronomical space instrumentation. We particularly welcome papers in the general fields of high-energy astrophysics, astrophysical and astrochemical studies of the interstellar medium including star formation, planetary astrophysics, the formation and evolution of galaxies and the evolution of large scale structure in the Universe. Papers in mathematical physics or in general relativity which do not establish clear astrophysical applications will not longer be considered.The journal also publishes topical collections consisting of invited reviews and original research papers selected special issues in research fields of particular scientific interest. These consist of both invited reviews and original research papers.Conference proceedings will not be considered. All papers published in the journal are subject to thorough and strict peer-reviewing.Astrophysics and Space Science has an Impact Factor of 2.4 and features short editorial turnaround times as well as short publication times after acceptance, and colour printing free of charge. Published by Springer the journal has a very wide online dissemination and can be accessed by researchers at a very large number of institutes worldwide.

  14. Appreciation of Peer Reviewers for 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratoux, David; Hauck, Steven A., II; Stanley, Sabine; Wieczorek, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Scientific publishing relies heavily on the process of peer review to ensure that the most well-founded and clearly described science is communicated to our colleagues and beyond. Papers published in JGR Planets benefit from the time, effort, and talents of the reviewers who provide thoughtfully considered advice on each manuscript. This role is critical to the advancement of planetary science as these reviews lead to even clearer and higher-quality papers. In 2014, papers submitted to JGR Planets were the beneficiaries of more than 520 reviews provided by 340 members of the planetary science community. To everyone who volunteers their time and intellect to peer reviewing, thank you for helping us share the best science possible.

  15. Communicating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Nicholas

    2009-10-01

    Introduction: what this book is about and why you might want to read it; Prologue: three orphans share a common paternity: professional science communication, popular journalism, and literary fiction are not as separate as they seem; Part I. Professional Science Communication: 1. Spreading the word: the endless struggle to publish professional science; 2. Walk like an Egyptian: the alien feeling of professional science writing; 3. The future's bright? Professional science communication in the age of the internet; 4. Counting the horse's teeth: professional standards in science's barter economy; 5. Separating the wheat from the chaff: peer review on trial; Part II. Science for the Public: What Science Do People Need and How Might They Get It?: 6. The Public Understanding of Science (PUS) movement and its problems; 7. Public engagement with science and technology (PEST): fine principle, difficult practice; 8. Citizen scientists? Democratic input into science policy; 9. Teaching and learning science in schools: implications for popular science communication; Part III. Popular Science Communication: The Press and Broadcasting: 10. What every scientist should know about mass media; 11. What every scientist should know about journalists; 12. The influence of new media; 13. How the media represents science; 14. How should science journalists behave?; Part IV. The Origins of Science in Cultural Context: Five Historic Dramas: 15. A terrible storm in Wittenberg: natural knowledge through sorcery and evil; 16. A terrible storm in the Mediterranean: controlling nature with white magic and religion; 17. Thieving magpies: the subtle art of false projecting; 18. Foolish virtuosi: natural philosophy emerges as a distinct discipline but many cannot take it seriously; 19. Is scientific knowledge 'true' or should it just be 'truthfully' deployed?; Part V. Science in Literature: 20. Science and the Gothic: the three big nineteenth-century monster stories; 21. Science fiction: serious

  16. 76 FR 45724 - Clearing Member Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 1 and 23 RIN 3038-AD51 Clearing Member Risk Management AGENCY: Commodity Futures... extensive regulations addressing open access and risk management at the derivatives clearing organization (DCO) level.\\4\\ The Commission also has proposed regulations addressing risk management for...

  17. Internalization, Clearing and Settlement, and Liquidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degryse, H.A.; van Achter, M.; Wuyts, G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: We study the relation between liquidity in financial markets and post-trading fees (i.e. clearing and settlement fees). The clearing and settlement agent (CSD) faces different marginal costs for different types of transactions. Costs are lower for an internalized transaction, i.e. when buy

  18. 17 CFR 39.4 - Procedures for implementing derivatives clearing organization rules and clearing new products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... product until its registration as a derivatives clearing organization is reinstated under the procedures... clearing a new product that is not traded on a designated contract market or a registered derivatives... of the product that make it acceptable for clearing with a certification that the clearing of...

  19. SNOW CLEARING SERVICE WINTER 2001-2002

    CERN Multimedia

    ST-HM Group; Tel. 72202

    2001-01-01

    As usual at this time of the year, the snowing clearing service, which comes under the control of the Transport Group (ST-HM), is preparing for the start of snow-clearing operations (timetable, stand-by service, personnel responsible for driving vehicles and machines, preparation of useful and necessary equipment, work instructions, etc.) in collaboration with the Cleaning Service (ST-TFM) and the Fire Brigade (TIS-FB). The main difficulty for the snow-clearing service is the car parks, which cannot be properly cleared because of the presence of CERN and private vehicles parked there overnight in different parts of the parking areas. The ST-HM Transport Group would therefore like to invite you to park vehicles together in order to facilitate the access of the snow ploughs, thus allowing the car parks to be cleared more efficiently before the personnel arrives for work in the mornings.

  20. Application of expert system in library and information science: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study seeks to provide an overview of the current state of development in the application of expert system in technology in the field of library and information science. The study starts briefly looking into the capabilities of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in general and then its relevance to LIS (Library Information System) work. A basic introduction to expert system technology and outgrowth of AI research is given. The major components of a generalized expert system are discussed in some detail, and the ways in which system development can be approached are looked at. The main area of expert system applications in library and information science are discussed, looking at cataloguing, classification, reference work and library management etc. (author)

  1. Observing, recording, and reviewing: Using mobile phones in support of science inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoo, Elaine; Williams, John; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin;

    2012-01-01

    Teaching science can be challenging, particularly if it involves the incorporation of inquiry approaches. Collaboration and co-construction of ideas and understandings requires changing teaching and learning practices to allow students to learn how to collaborate ‘inquiry style...... questions and investigations, and increased student ownership of their learning. Sharing the mobile phone recordings of their learning with their peers and community further enriched students’ developing science understandings beyond the classroom.......’. There is increasing evidence that the use of mobile learning devices can support inquiry learning by increasing the opportunities for student participation and collaboration in the learning process. This paper reports on the preliminary findings from a New Zealand Teaching and Learning Initiative funded project...

  2. The review of the modeling methods and numerical analysis software for nanotechnology in material science

    OpenAIRE

    SMIRNOV Vladimir Alexeevich; KOROLEV Evgenij Valerjevich; EVSTIGNEEV Alexandr Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high demand for building materials with universal set of roperties which extend their application area the research efforts are focusing on nanotechnology in material science. The rational combination of theoretical studies, mathematical modeling and simulation can favour reduced resource and time consumption when nanomodified materials are being developed. The development of composite material is based on the principles of system analysis which provides for the necessity of criter...

  3. Review of Science Translational Medicine - Cell-Based Therapeutics: The Next Pillar of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Forsythe, KH

    2013-01-01

    Science Translational Medicine - Scientists now have access to remarkable tools that allow rigorous translational investigations to be conducted. One of the challenges is the creation of a redefined discipline of translational medicine requiring the emergence of a new and vibrant community of dedicated scientists, who collaborate to fill knowledge gaps and dissolve or circumvent barriers to improve clinical medicine. The pharmaceutical industry is also being challenged with change. Two deca...

  4. Review of the Lujan neutron scattering center: basic energy sciences prereport February 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurd, Alan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rhyne, James J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lewis, Paul S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) at LANSCE is a designated National User Facility for neutron scattering and nuclear physics studies with pulsed beams of moderated neutrons (cold, thermal, and epithermal). As one of five experimental areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), the Lujan Center hosts engineers, scientists, and students from around the world. The Lujan Center consists of Experimental Room (ER) 1 (ERl) built by the Laboratory in 1977, ER2 built by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in 1989, and the Office Building (622) also built by BES in 1989, along with a chem-bio lab, a shop, and other out-buildings. According to a 1996 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Defense Programs (DP) Office of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) and the Office of Science (SC, then the Office of Energy Research), the Lujan Center flight paths were transferred from DP to SC, including those in ERI. That MOA was updated in 2001. Under the MOA, NNSA-DP delivers neutron beam to the windows of the target crypt, outside of which BES becomes the 'landlord.' The leveraging nature of the Lujan Center on the LANSCE accelerator is a substantial annual leverage to the $11 M BES operating fund worth approximately $56 M operating cost of the linear accelerator (LINAC)-in beam delivery.

  5. Open evaluation (OE: A vision for entirely transparent post-publication peer review and rating for science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus eKriegeskorte

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The two major functions of a scientific publishing system are to provide access to and evaluation of scientific papers. While open access (OA is becoming a reality, open evaluation (OE, the other side of coin, has received less attention. Evaluation steers the attention of the scientific community and thus the very course of science. It also influences the use of scientific findings in public policy. The current system of scientific publishing provides only journal prestige as an indication of the quality of new papers and relies on a non-transparent and noisy pre-publication peer review process, which delays publication by many months on average. Here I propose an OE system, in which papers are evaluated post-publication in an ongoing fashion by means of open peer review and rating. Through signed ratings and reviews, scientists steer the attention of their field and build their reputation. Reviewers are motivated to be objective, because low-quality or self-serving signed evaluations will negatively impact their reputation. A core feature of this proposal is a division of powers between the accumulation of evaluative evidence and the analysis of this evidence by paper evaluation functions (PEFs. PEFs can be freely defined by individuals or groups (e.g. scientific societies and provide a plurality of perspectives on the scientific literature. Simple PEFs will use averages of ratings, weighting reviewers (e.g. by H-factor and rating scales (e.g. by relevance to a decision process in different ways. Complex PEFs will use advanced statistical techniques to infer the quality of a paper. Papers with initially promising ratings will be more deeply evaluated. The continual refinement of PEFs in response to attempts by individuals to influence evaluations in their own favor will make the system ungameable. OA and OE together have the power to revolutionize scientific publishing and usher in a new culture of transparency, constructive criticism, and

  6. 77 FR 11558 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; STAR METRICS (Science and Technology for America's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... creation), on knowledge generation (such as citations, and patents) as well as on social and health... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; STAR...

  7. 77 FR 11135 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: STAR METRICS (Science and Technology for America's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... generation (such as citations, and patents) as well as on social and health outcomes. Frequency of Response... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: STAR...

  8. An Analysis of Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) in a Science Lecture Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvoord, Mark E.; Hoefnagels, Marielle H.; Gaffin, Douglas D.; Chumchal, Matthew M.; Long, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) is an online tool being used to integrate a writing component in classrooms. In an introductory zoology lecture class, the authors found that CPR-assigned scores were significantly higher than instructor-assigned scores on two of three essay assignments. They also found that neither students' technical-writing skills…

  9. Art of science? The challenges of publishing peer reviewed papers based on linked models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burrell, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The methodology used in a linked model system is generally too voluminous and of insufficient interest to form the basis of a peer-reviewed journal article. To be readily acceptable to an economics journal, the simulation results should provide economic insight and contribute to the economics litera

  10. Art or science? The challenges of publishing peer reviewed papers based on linked models

    OpenAIRE

    Burrell, Alison M.

    2008-01-01

    The methodology used in a linked model system is generally too voluminous and of insufficient interest to form the basis of a peer-reviewed journal article. To be readily acceptable to an economics journal, the simulation results should provide economic insight and contribute to the economics literature.

  11. The routinization of innovation research : A constructively critical review of the state-of-the-science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, N; De Dreu, CKW; Nijstad, BA

    2004-01-01

    In this review we argue that facilitators of innovation at the individual, group, and organizational levels have been reliably identified, and that validated process models of innovation have been developed. However, a content analysis of selected research published between 1997 and 2002 suggests a

  12. High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory conducted the High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project in the mid 1960s with the intention of better understanding air...

  13. Ion clearing the the XLS-ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozoki, E.S.; Halama, H.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of ion capture by the beam, their effects on the beam as well as ways to clear the ions are discussed. Special attention is given to these questions for the SXLS ring. 20 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Ion clearing the the XLS-ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of ion capture by the beam, their effects on the beam as well as ways to clear the ions are discussed. Special attention is given to these questions for the SXLS ring. 20 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Software Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science and Children, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are seven computer software packages for IBM and/or Apple Computers. Included are "Windows on Science: Volume 1--Physical Science"; "Science Probe--Physical Science"; "Wildlife Adventures--Grizzly Bears"; "Science Skills--Development Programs"; "The Clean Machine"; "Rock Doctor"; and "Geology Search." Cost, quality, hardware, and…

  16. komunikace značky Clean & Clear

    OpenAIRE

    Nováková, Kateřina

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to describe a communication campaign of Clean & Clear brand. A brand owned by Johnson & Johnson company specializing in cosmetics for teenage girls. Campaign is described into details, evaluated in terms of effectiveness of its communication tools by achieving marketing goals over a specified period of time. This thesis should confirm the suitability and effectivity of the communication mix applied for Clean & Clear brand in a specific enviroment of anti-acne c...

  17. Governance of securities clearing and settlement systems

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Russo; Terry L. Hart; Chryssa Papathanassiou

    2004-01-01

    In the context of securities clearing and settlement systems, the nature of governance arrangements acquires a dimension that goes beyond their traditional function in corporate law. They constitute a tool for regulators and central banks to achieve their respective policy goals relating to market operation, market integrity, and systemic stability. In the light of the analysis of this paper, and pending a further evolution in the regulation of securities clearing and settlement in the Commun...

  18. Final Technical Report: Science and technology reviews of FACE[Free Air Carbon Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, Boyd R.

    1998-03-23

    The purpose of this grant was to bring together the principals of all known facilities that had been developed, principals who had submitted proposals to develop FACE facilities, and principals who want to develop proposals for facilities. In addition, critical program personnel from potential funding agencies and a few high level science administrators were invited to observe the proceedings and to visit a working FACE facility. The objectives of this study are to conduct a three-day international meeting on scientific aspects of research with the new and developing free air carbon enrichment (FACE) technology. Immediately following the science meeting, conduct a two-day international meeting on experimental protocols to be applied in FACE research. To conduct a four day international meeting on the assessment of the responses of forest ecosystems to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. The three meetings supported by this grant were all highly successful meetings and resulted in the formation of an organized and identified working group with the acronym InterFACE (International Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment) working group.

  19. Skin optical clearing potential of disaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Shi, Rui; Ma, Ning; Tuchina, Daria K; Tuchin, Valery V; Zhu, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Skin optical clearing can significantly enhance the ability of biomedical optical imaging. Some alcohols and sugars have been selected to be optical clearing agents (OCAs). In this work, we paid attention to the optical clearing potential of disaccharides. Sucrose and maltose were chosen as typical disaccharides to compare with fructose, an excellent monosaccharide-OCA, by using molecular dynamics simulation and an ex vivo experiment. The experimental results indicated that the optical clearing efficacy of skin increases linearly with the concentration for each OCA. Both the theoretical predication and experimental results revealed that the two disaccharides exerted a better optical clearing potential than fructose at the same concentration, and sucrose is optimal. Since maltose has an extremely low saturation concentration, the other two OCAs with saturation concentrations were treated topically on rat skin in vivo, and optical coherence tomography imaging was applied to monitor the optical clearing process. The results demonstrated that sucrose could cause a more significant increase in imaging depth and signal intensity than fructose. PMID:27108771

  20. CO2 efflux from cleared mangrove peat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Lovelock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CO(2 emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured CO(2 efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO(2 efflux. CO(2 efflux from soils declines from time of clearing from ∼10,600 tonnes km(-2 year(-1 in the first year to 3000 tonnes km(2 year(-1 after 20 years since clearing. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO(2 efflux (27 umol m(-2 s(-1, but this had returned to baseline levels within 2 days. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Deforesting mangroves that grow on peat soils results in CO(2 emissions that are comparable to rates estimated for peat collapse in other tropical ecosystems. Preventing deforestation presents an opportunity for countries to benefit from carbon payments for preservation of threatened carbon stocks.

  1. Comparing Turkey and Iran in Political Science and Historical Sociology: A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    HAZIR, Agah

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews existing comparative literature on Iran and Turkey in terms of their approaches, themes and findings. It extracts and critically analyses two dominant trends in this literature; Comparative Analyses of Cultures and Comparative Analyses of Modernizations. This paper argues that, these two common lines of approaching have serious limitations since they carry the traces of orientalist and ethnocentric assumptions. New literature on this topic however, offers new avenues of r...

  2. Science Review: Vasopressin and the cardiovascular system part 2 – clinical physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Cheryl L; Landry, Donald W.; Granton, John T.

    2003-01-01

    Vasopressin is emerging as a rational therapy for vasodilatory shock states. In part 1 of the review we discussed the structure and function of the various vasopressin receptors. In part 2 we discuss vascular smooth muscle contraction pathways with an emphasis on the effects of vasopressin on ATP-sensitive K+ channels, nitric oxide pathways, and interaction with adrenergic agents. We explore the complex and contradictory studies of vasopressin on cardiac inotropy and coronary vascular tone. F...

  3. Book review: Large carnivore conservation: Integrating science and policy in the North American West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, A. J.; Cox, M. M.; Ernst, E. E.; Haley, H. J.; Klaver, Robert W.; Loney, D. A.; Mackert, M. M.; McCombs, A. L.; Piatscheck, F.; Pocius, V. M.; Stein, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Klaver reviewed Large Carnivore Conservation as part of a graduate seminar and seminar participants represented the full range of readers who might be interested in the book: natural resource managers, citizen advocates, researchers, and students. Although we encountered a variety of opinions based on our different backgrounds and orientations, we discovered a surprising amount of consensus both about what the book does well and where it falls short of our expectations.

  4. Medical marijuana: review of the science and implications for developmental-behavioral pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadland, Scott E; Knight, John R; Harris, Sion K

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana policy is rapidly evolving in the United States and elsewhere, with cannabis sales fully legalized and regulated in some jurisdictions and use of the drug for medicinal purposes permitted in many others. Amidst this political change, patients and families are increasingly asking whether cannabis and its derivatives may have therapeutic utility for a number of conditions, including developmental and behavioral disorders in children and adolescents. This review examines the epidemiology of cannabis use among children and adolescents, including those with developmental and behavioral diagnoses. It then outlines the increasingly well-recognized neurocognitive changes shown to occur in adolescents who use cannabis regularly, highlighting the unique susceptibility of the developing adolescent brain and describing the role of the endocannabinoid system in normal neurodevelopment. The review then discusses some of the proposed uses of cannabis in developmental and behavioral conditions, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder. Throughout, the review outlines gaps in current knowledge and highlights directions for future research, especially in light of a dearth of studies specifically examining neurocognitive and psychiatric outcomes among children and adolescents with developmental and behavioral concerns exposed to cannabis.

  5. Analytical methods for the determination of halogens in bioanalytical sciences: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Paola A; Barin, Juliano S; Duarte, Fabio A; Bizzi, Cezar A; Diehl, Liange O; Muller, Edson I; Flores, Erico M M

    2013-09-01

    Fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine have been studied in biological samples and other related matrices owing to the need to understand the biochemical effects in living organisms. In this review, the works published in last 20 years are covered, and the main topics related to sample preparation methods and analytical techniques commonly used for fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine determination in biological samples, food, drugs, and plants used as food or with medical applications are discussed. The commonest sample preparation methods, as extraction and decomposition using combustion and pyrohydrolysis, are reviewed, as well as spectrometric and electroanalytical techniques, spectrophotometry, total reflection X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation analysis, and separation systems using chromatography and electrophoresis. On this aspect, the main analytical challenges and drawbacks are highlighted. A discussion related to the availability of certified reference materials for evaluation of accuracy is also included, as well as a discussion of the official methods used as references for the determination of halogens in the samples covered in this review. PMID:23780223

  6. Analytical methods for the determination of halogens in bioanalytical sciences: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Paola A; Barin, Juliano S; Duarte, Fabio A; Bizzi, Cezar A; Diehl, Liange O; Muller, Edson I; Flores, Erico M M

    2013-09-01

    Fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine have been studied in biological samples and other related matrices owing to the need to understand the biochemical effects in living organisms. In this review, the works published in last 20 years are covered, and the main topics related to sample preparation methods and analytical techniques commonly used for fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine determination in biological samples, food, drugs, and plants used as food or with medical applications are discussed. The commonest sample preparation methods, as extraction and decomposition using combustion and pyrohydrolysis, are reviewed, as well as spectrometric and electroanalytical techniques, spectrophotometry, total reflection X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation analysis, and separation systems using chromatography and electrophoresis. On this aspect, the main analytical challenges and drawbacks are highlighted. A discussion related to the availability of certified reference materials for evaluation of accuracy is also included, as well as a discussion of the official methods used as references for the determination of halogens in the samples covered in this review.

  7. Instructional methods used by health sciences librarians to teach evidence-based practice (EBP): a systematic review*†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Stephanie M.; Dennison, Carolyn Ching; Farrell, Alison; Machel, Viola; Marton, Christine; O'Brien, Kelly K.; Pannabecker, Virginia; Thuna, Mindy; Holyoke, Assako Nitta

    2016-01-01

    Background Librarians often teach evidence-based practice (EBP) within health sciences curricula. It is not known what teaching methods are most effective. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted searching CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, LISTA, PubMed, Scopus, and others. Searches were completed through December 2014. No limits were applied. Hand searching of Medical Library Association annual meeting abstracts from 2009–2014 was also completed. Studies must be about EBP instruction by a librarian within undergraduate or graduate health sciences curricula and include skills assessment. Studies with no assessment, letters and comments, and veterinary education studies were excluded. Data extraction and critical appraisal were performed to determine the risk of bias of each study. Results Twenty-seven studies were included for analysis. Studies occurred in the United States (20), Canada (3), the United Kingdom (1), and Italy (1), with 22 in medicine and 5 in allied health. Teaching methods included lecture (20), small group or one-on-one instruction (16), computer lab practice (15), and online learning (6). Assessments were quizzes or tests, pretests and posttests, peer-review, search strategy evaluations, clinical scenario assignments, or a hybrid. Due to large variability across studies, meta-analysis was not conducted. Discussion Findings were weakly significant for positive change in search performance for most studies. Only one study compared teaching methods, and no one teaching method proved more effective. Future studies could conduct multisite interventions using randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trial study design and standardized assessment tools to measure outcomes. PMID:27366120

  8. A review of planetary and space science projects presented at iCubeSat, the Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael

    2015-04-01

    iCubeSat, the Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop, is an annual technical workshop for researchers working on an exciting new standardised platform and opportunity for planetary and space scientists. The first workshop was held in 2012 at MIT, 2013 at Cornell, 2014 at Caltech with the 2015 workshop scheduled to take place on the 26-27th May 2015 at Imperial College London. Mission concepts and flight projects presented since 2012 have included orbiters and landers targeting asteroids, the moon, Mars, Venus, Saturn and their satellites to perform science traditionally reserved for flagship missions at a fraction of their cost. Some of the first missions proposed are currently being readied for flight in Europe, taking advantage of multiple ride share launch opportunities and technology providers. A review of these and other interplanetary CubeSat projects will be presented, covering details of their science objectives, instrument capabilities, technology, team composition, budget, funding sources, and the other programattic elements required to implement this potentially revolutionary new class of mission.

  9. A Review of Filovirus Work and Facilities at The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Porton Down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Lever

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Porton Down houses two separate sites capable of conducting high containment research on ACDP (Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens Hazard Group 4 agents: the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl and the Health Protection Agency (HPA, and filovirus research has been performed at Porton Down since the first Marburg virus disease outbreak in 1967. All work is conducted within primary containment either within cabinet lines (for in vitro work or large rigid half-suit isolators (for in vivo work. There are extensive aerobiological facilities at high containment and the use of these facilities will be reported. Research at Dstl is primarily focused on assessing and quantifying the hazard, and testing the efficacy of medical countermeasures against filoviruses. Fundamental research directed to the study and understanding of the infectious and pathogenic nature of the filoviruses, particularly in aerosols, will be reported.

  10. A Collection of Articles Reprinted from Science & Technology Review on University Relations Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H; Rennie, G; Henke, A

    2006-08-23

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) The Power of Partnership--Livermore researchers forge strategic collaborations with colleagues from other University of California campuses to further science and better protect the nation; (2) Collaborative Research Prepares Our Next-Generation Scientists and Engineers--Commentary by Laura R. Gilliom; (3) Next-Generation Scientists and Engineers Tap Lab's Resources--University of California Ph.D. candidates work with Livermore scientists and engineers to conduct fundamental research as part of their theses; (4) The Best and the Brightest Come to Livermore--The Lawrence Fellowship Program attracts the most sought-after postdoctoral researchers to the Laboratory; and (5) Faculty on Sabbatical Find a Good Home at Livermore--Faculty members from around the world come to the Laboratory as sabbatical scholars.

  11. Review on the EFDA programme on tungsten materials technology and science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieth, M., E-mail: Michael.rieth@imf.fzk.de [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boutard, J.L. [EFDA-Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Dudarev, S.L. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Ahlgren, T. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Antusch, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baluc, N. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Barthe, M.-F. [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Universite d' Orleans, Polytech ou Faculte des Sciences, Avenue du Parc Floral, BP 6749, 45067 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Becquart, C.S. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Ciupinski, L. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Correia, J.B. [IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Domain, C. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Fikar, J. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Fortuna, E. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Fu, C.-C. [CEA, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Saclay (France); Gaganidze, E. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe (Germany); Galan, T.L. [Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Materials Science and Engineering, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Rosales, C. [CEIT, San Sebastian (Spain); Gludovatz, B. [OAW, Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Leoben (Austria); Greuner, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Heinola, K. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-10-01

    All the recent DEMO design studies for helium cooled divertors utilize tungsten materials and alloys, mainly due to their high temperature strength, good thermal conductivity, low erosion, and comparably low activation under neutron irradiation. The long-term objective of the EFDA fusion materials programme is to develop structural as well as armor materials in combination with the necessary production and fabrication technologies for future divertor concepts. The programmatic roadmap is structured into four engineering research lines which comprise fabrication process development, structural material development, armor material optimization, and irradiation performance testing, which are complemented by a fundamental research programme on 'Materials Science and Modeling'. This paper presents the current research status of the EFDA experimental and testing investigations, and gives a detailed overview of the latest results on fabrication, joining, high heat flux testing, plasticity, modeling, and validation experiments.

  12. Systematic Review: The Association and Impact of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Basic Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L.; Boyle, Simone N.; Kuykendal, Adam; Fisher, Matthew J.; Samaras, Athena T.; Barnato, Sara E.; Wagner, Robin L.; Goldstein, Carolyn E.; Tallman, Jacob; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Henke, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background No prior study has evaluated financial relationships of investigators with pharmaceutical manufacturers for basic science. An example of the importance and impact of such relationships is in the evaluation of erythropoietin receptors’(EpoRs) effects on cancer cell lines, since studies have reported increased mortality when cancer patients receive erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). Purpose To assess the disclosed association that exist between pharmaceutical industry support and EpoRs effects on solid cancer cell lines. Data Sources MEDLINE and EMBASE (1988- July 2008) and two EpoR conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Study Selection All publications investigating EpoRs that met inclusion criteria were identified and included. Data Extraction Data were extracted on detection of EpoRs, presence of erythropoietin-induced signaling events, presence of erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function, nature of qualitative conclusions, and sources of funding for all 74 studies. Data Synthesis In comparison to studies of academic investigators with no disclosed funding support from ESA manufacturers (n=64), the studies from academic investigators with funding support from ESA manufacturers (n= 7) and the laboratories directed by investigators employed by ESA manufacturers (n=3) were both less likely to identify: EpoR presence on solid tumor cells; erythropoietin-induced signaling events; erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function; and less likely to conclude that their research had identified potentially harmful effects of erythropoietin on cancer cells. Additionally, presentations from industry-based investigator teams at NIH conferences were less likely to report EpoRs on cancer cell lines, downstream effects of erythropoietin, and cell proliferation and migration effects following EpoR administration. Conclusion Financial conflicts of interest impact the outcomes and presentation of basic science research data as

  13. BOOK REVIEW: The Illustrated Wavelet Transform Handbook: Introductory Theory and Applications in Science, Engineering, Medicine and Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J.; Kingsbury, N. G.

    2004-02-01

    This book provides an overview of the theory and practice of continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. Divided into seven chapters, the first three chapters of the book are introductory, describing the various forms of the wavelet transform and their computation, while the remaining chapters are devoted to applications in fluids, engineering, medicine and miscellaneous areas. Each chapter is well introduced, with suitable examples to demonstrate key concepts. Illustrations are included where appropriate, thus adding a visual dimension to the text. A noteworthy feature is the inclusion, at the end of each chapter, of a list of further resources from the academic literature which the interested reader can consult. The first chapter is purely an introduction to the text. The treatment of wavelet transforms begins in the second chapter, with the definition of what a wavelet is. The chapter continues by defining the continuous wavelet transform and its inverse and a description of how it may be used to interrogate signals. The continuous wavelet transform is then compared to the short-time Fourier transform. Energy and power spectra with respect to scale are also discussed and linked to their frequency counterparts. Towards the end of the chapter, the two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform is introduced. Examples of how the continuous wavelet transform is computed using the Mexican hat and Morlet wavelets are provided throughout. The third chapter introduces the discrete wavelet transform, with its distinction from the discretized continuous wavelet transform having been made clear at the end of the second chapter. In the first half of the chapter, the logarithmic discretization of the wavelet function is described, leading to a discussion of dyadic grid scaling, frames, orthogonal and orthonormal bases, scaling functions and multiresolution representation. The fast wavelet transform is introduced and its computation is illustrated with an example using the Haar

  14. 76 FR 47529 - Customer Clearing Documentation and Timing of Acceptance for Clearing; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... Street, NW., Washington, DC 20581. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR Doc. 2011-19365 appearing on page... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 1, 23, and 39 RIN 3038-AD51 Customer Clearing Documentation and Timing of Acceptance... August 1, 2011, regarding Customer Clearing Documentation and Timing of Acceptance for Clearing....

  15. Shanghai Clearing House to Roll out Renminbi-denominated Copper Clearing Operations in Free Trade Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Clearing House Financial Markets Co.,Ltd.(Shanghai Clearing House)General Manager Xie Zhong told the media recently at the briefing of the international symposium of"Reform Deepening and Mechanism Innovation of the Post-crisis Kerb Market",Shanghai Clearing House will explore the feasibility of carrying out bond business in

  16. The development of assessment and remediation guidelines for contaminated soils, a review of the science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil contamination is no longer restricted to isolated incidents and locations; it is a general and contentious problem. However, the problem is complex, starting with the very definition of what level and type of contamination is unacceptable. A myriad of regulatory and de facto guidelines have emerged, and they are extremely fragmented, inconsistent and incomplete. This review attempts to summarize the historical development of assessment and remediation guidelines, to highlight the unique difficulties of the problem, and then to discuss the scientific information that exists and that is needed to improve guidelines. This is an unlimited scope for research on this subject. (author)

  17. Biomedical Biopolymers, their Origin and Evolution in Biomedical Sciences: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Preeti; Yadav, Harsh; Shah, Veena Gowri; Shah, Gaurav; Dhaka, Gaurav

    2015-09-01

    Biopolymers provide a plethora of applications in the pharmaceutical and medical applications. A material that can be used for biomedical applications like wound healing, drug delivery and tissue engineering should possess certain properties like biocompatibility, biodegradation to non-toxic products, low antigenicity, high bio-activity, processability to complicated shapes with appropriate porosity, ability to support cell growth and proliferation and appropriate mechanical properties, as well as maintaining mechanical strength. This paper reviews biodegradable biopolymers focusing on their potential in biomedical applications. Biopolymers most commonly used and most abundantly available have been described with focus on the properties relevant to biomedical importance.

  18. A review of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in food science and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaoyang; Wang, Yifen

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful nanoscale analysis technique used in food area. This versatile technique can be used to acquire high-resolution sample images and investigate local interactions in air or liquid surroundings. In this chapter, we explain the principles of AFM and review representative applications of AFM in gelatin, casein micelle, carrageenan, gellan gum, starch, and interface. We elucidate new knowledge revealed with AFM as well as ways to use AFM to obtain morphology and rheology information in different food fields.

  19. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Reports on Review of the Fusion Materials Research Program, Review of the Proposed Proof-of-Principle Programs, Review of the Possible Pathways for Pursuing Burning Plasma Physics, and Comments on the ER Facilities Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1998-07-01

    The Fusion Energy Science Advisory Committee was asked to conduct a review of Fusion Materials Research Program (the Structural Materials portion of the Fusion Program) by Dr. Martha Krebs, Director of Energy Research for the Department of Energy. This request was motivated by the fact that significant changes have been made in the overall direction of the Fusion Program from one primarily focused on the milestones necessary to the construction of successively larger machines to one where the necessary scientific basis for an attractive fusion energy system is. better understood. It was in this context that the review of current scientific excellence and recommendations for future goals and balance within the Program was requested.

  20. A review of the contributions of Albert Einstein to earth sciences--in commemoration of the World Year of Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Hochberg, David; Rull, Fernando

    2006-02-01

    The World Year of Physics (2005) is an international celebration to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Einstein's "Annus Mirabilis." The United Nations has officially declared 2005 as the International Year of Physics. However, the impact of Einstein's ideas was not restricted to physics. Among numerous other disciplines, Einstein also made significant and specific contributions to Earth Sciences. His geosciences-related letters, comments, and scientific articles are dispersed, not easily accessible, and are poorly known. The present review attempts to integrate them as a tribute to Einstein in commemoration of this centenary. These contributions can be classified into three basic areas: geodynamics, geological (planetary) catastrophism, and fluvial geomorphology. Regarding geodynamics, Einstein essentially supported Hapgood's very controversial theory called Earth Crust Displacement. With respect to geological (planetary) catastrophism, it is shown how the ideas of Einstein about Velikovsky's proposals evolved from 1946 to 1955. Finally, in relation to fluvial geodynamics, the review incorporates the elegant work in which Einstein explains the formation of meandering rivers. A general analysis of his contributions is also carried out from today's perspective. Given the interdisciplinarity and implications of Einstein's achievements to multiple fields of knowledge, we propose that the year 2005 serve, rather than to confine his universal figure within a specific scientific area, to broaden it for a better appreciation of this brilliant scientist in all of his dimensions.

  1. Clear plastic cups: a childhood choking hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R L; Goldstein, M N; Dharia, A; Zahtz, G; Abramson, A L; Patel, M

    1996-11-01

    The disposable plastic beverage cup is not usually regarded as hazardous to young children. Certain varieties of these products however, are manufactured from a brittle, clear plastic that easily cracks and fragments. While most conscientious parents keep their children safe from peanuts, balloons, and other known choking hazards, a child can surreptitiously bite a cup edge and aspirate the fragment. We report two cases of foreign body aspiration involving clear plastic cups that went undetected one of which remained 21 months following a negative rigid bronchoscopy. Diagnostic difficulties are related to the transparency and radiolucency of these objects. When suspicious of foreign body aspiration in children, otolaryngologists should inquire about the availability of clear plastic cups in the household and be mindful of the diagnostic pitfalls. Further investigations including CT scanning and repeat bronchoscopy may be helpful in cases of suspected missed foreign bodies. An educational campaign aimed at prevention and placement of product package warning labels should be established.

  2. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2003 at Department of Materials Science in Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from April 2002 to August 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 5th, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5th, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. (author)

  3. The debts' clearing problem: a new approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pătcaş, C

    2011-01-01

    The debts' clearing problem is about clearing all the debts in a group of $n$ entities (e.g. persons, companies) using a minimal number of money transaction operations. In our previous works we studied the problem, gave a dynamic programming solution solving it and proved that it is NP-hard. In this paper we adapt the problem to dynamic graphs and give a data structure to solve it. Based on this data structure we develop a new algorithm, that improves our previous one for the static version of the problem.

  4. Oral Cavity Clear Cell Odontogenic Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Villaflor, Victoria; Cipriani, Nicole A

    2016-06-01

    A case of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma of the oral cavity is described in this sine qua non radiology-pathology correlation article. CT demonstrated a solid and cystic mass arising from the mandible. Histology demonstrated variably-sized nests of clear to pale eosinophilic cells with occasional central necrosis embedded in a hyalinized to fibrocellular stroma. The specimen was also positive for the characteristic rearrangement of the EWSR1 (22q12) locus in 93.5 % of interphase cells. PMID:25994920

  5. Health science education: reviewing a framework for problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarlie, V Wallace; Orr, Daniel L

    2010-05-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) has become one pedagogical approach to gain currency in recent decades, its foundational underpinnings have remained obscure. This investigation seeks to elucidate the theoretical framework or assumptions upon which PBL operates. We have situated core PBL principles in the larger context of health science education, which underwent dramatic changes at the beginning of the twentieth century. The fundamental problem at that time in dental education was moving beyond a lecture-based and apprentice curriculum (students memorizing facts) to a critical thinking-based curriculum. We trace these developments and especially the principles that one thinker, who does not easily fit into any one school of thought, used to frame the problem. We found that the principles underlying the idea of PBL have existed for over a century in varying academic alleys outside of dentistry (including constructivist thought). Despite our technological advances, many of the core challenges of a century ago remain challenges today. Although PBL is certainly not the only way to provide dental students an opportunity to best develop critical thinking, it nevertheless provides an environment in which the learning process may be enhanced. PMID:20442425

  6. Health science education: reviewing a framework for problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarlie, V Wallace; Orr, Daniel L

    2010-05-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) has become one pedagogical approach to gain currency in recent decades, its foundational underpinnings have remained obscure. This investigation seeks to elucidate the theoretical framework or assumptions upon which PBL operates. We have situated core PBL principles in the larger context of health science education, which underwent dramatic changes at the beginning of the twentieth century. The fundamental problem at that time in dental education was moving beyond a lecture-based and apprentice curriculum (students memorizing facts) to a critical thinking-based curriculum. We trace these developments and especially the principles that one thinker, who does not easily fit into any one school of thought, used to frame the problem. We found that the principles underlying the idea of PBL have existed for over a century in varying academic alleys outside of dentistry (including constructivist thought). Despite our technological advances, many of the core challenges of a century ago remain challenges today. Although PBL is certainly not the only way to provide dental students an opportunity to best develop critical thinking, it nevertheless provides an environment in which the learning process may be enhanced.

  7. ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS OF GEOENGINEERING: A Review for Developing a Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Mace, Georgina; Jackson, Robert B.; Shepherd, John; Liss, Peter; Leinen, Margaret; Schimel, David; Vaughan, Naomi E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Boyd, Philip W.; Norby, Richard J.; Caldeira, Ken; Merikanto, Joonas; Artaxo, Paulo; Melillo, Jerry; Morgan, M. Granger

    2012-06-01

    Geoengineering methods are intended to reduce the magnitude of climate change. Climate change in some regions is already having demonstrable effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. Two different types of geoengineering activities have been proposed: carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which includes a range of engineered and biological processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, and solar radiation management (SRM, or sunlight reflection methods), whereby a small percentage of sunlight is reflected back into space to offset warming from greenhouse gases. In this review, we evaluate some of the possible impacts of CDR and SRM on the physical climate and their subsequent influence on ecosystems, including the risks and uncertainties associated with new kinds of purposeful perturbations to Earth. Specifically, we find evidence that, if implemented successfully, some CDR methods and continue use of some SRM methods) could alleviate some of the deleterious ecosystem impacts associated with climate changes that might occur in the foreseeable future.

  8. ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS OF GEOENGINEERING: A Review for Developing a Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Lynn M [University of California, San Diego; Jackson, Robert B [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Geoengineering methods are intended to reduce the magnitude of climate change, which is already having demonstrable effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. Two different types of activities have been proposed: solar radiation management (SRM), or sunlight reflection methods, which involves reflecting a small percentage of solar light back into space to offset the warming due to greenhouse gases, and carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which includes a range of engineered and biological processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. This report evaluates some of the possible impacts of CDR and SRM on the physical climate and their subsequent influence on ecosystems, which include the risks and uncertainties associated with new kinds of purposeful perturbations to the Earth. Therefore, the question considered in this review is whether CDR and SRM methods would exacerbate or alleviate the deleterious impacts on ecosystems associated with climate changes that might occur in the foreseeable future.Geoengineering methods are intended to reduce the magnitude of climate change, which is already having demonstrable effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. Two different types of activities have been proposed: solar radiation management (SRM), or sunlight reflection methods, which involves reflecting a small percentage of solar light back into space to offset the warming due to greenhouse gases, and carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which includes a range of engineered and biological processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. This report evaluates some of the possible impacts of CDR and SRM on the physical climate and their subsequent influence on ecosystems, which include the risks and uncertainties associated with new kinds of purposeful perturbations to the Earth. Therefore, the question considered in this review is whether CDR and SRM methods would exacerbate or alleviate the deleterious impacts on ecosystems associated with climate

  9. Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettell, T. A.; Saferstein, R.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review of articles appealing to forensic practitioners. Topics include: drugs and poisons, forensic biochemistry, and trace evidence. Lists noteworthy books published on forensic science topics since 1986. (MVL)

  10. Computer Science Teacher Professional Development in the United States: A Review of Studies Published between 2004 and 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menekse, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    While there has been a remarkable interest to make computer science a core K-12 academic subject in the United States, there is a shortage of K-12 computer science teachers to successfully implement computer sciences courses in schools. In order to enhance computer science teacher capacity, training programs have been offered through teacher…

  11. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    WEB WATCH (204) Try unearthing some interesting information about archaeology BOOK REVIEWS (206) Teaching and assessing practical skills Book Review: Learn to drive with Sir Isaac Newton DVD REVIEW (207) Bring some sunshine into the classroom EQUIPMENT REVIEWS (208) Robust air puck takes a kicking Flowlog offers sensing options plus multimode datalogging Mastering Chladni figures takes practice but it offers surprises

  12. The management of clear cell sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, DR; Hoekstra, HJ; Veth, RPH; Wobbes, T

    2003-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma is a rare soft tissue tumour, constituting approximately 1% of all soft tissue sarcomas. Prognosis is reported to be poor due to the great propensity to metastasise regionally and distantly. In this paper, we report the surgical experience of two university hospitals. Both disease

  13. AIDS and journalism. Trying to tell too clear a story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J

    1994-12-01

    Much in science is complex. Scientists, by definition, work within the realm of complex hypothesis, empirical evidence, and proof. Questions, answers, details, complexities; that is the domain of the scientist. Journalists, on the other hand, are paid to develop and present stories which are clearly read and interpreted by the general public. The mechanics and dynamics of HIV and AIDS are among the most complex scientific challenges in the history of humankind. Journalists calling upon scientists to obtain and report clear, concise, information about the agent and its resulting pandemic are therefore surely not always going to receive simple, readily reportable responses. HIV is a moving target upon which research continues. While there are some definitively affirmative and some definitively negative factors about HIV, the gray areas and speculation remain vast. The author gives a few examples of AIDS stories which the media mishandled because they were trying to tell too clear a story. He then discusses stories flawed because scientists managed to present clear information about which journalists were overly skeptical. In one case, the public was informed that AIDS vaccines were not working, with headlines which insinuated that the vaccines themselves were causing infections. None of the vaccines, however, contained infectious materials. As a result, people became overly fearful of participating in HIV vaccine trials. Coverage of the potential identification of HIV-3 was premature and only scared people, while Rolling Stone magazine's article hypothesizing the origin of HIV via trials of a contaminated polio vaccine in the Belgium Congo in the late 1950s should not have been published. Clear answers about HIV/AIDS are few and far between, but interesting and significant stories can still be found; they are just hard to tell. PMID:12319130

  14. Sleep-related attentional bias in insomnia: A state-of-the-science review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kamelia; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Espie, Colin A; MacMahon, Kenneth M A; Woods, Heather Cleland; Kyle, Simon D

    2015-12-01

    Prominent models of insomnia posit that sleep-related attentional bias plays an important role in the development and maintenance of insomnia. Here we conduct the first systematic review of the sleep-related attentional bias construct, indexed through reaction time-based experimental tasks. Literature search identified 13 studies that met pre-defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Included studies involved between-group comparisons (poor sleepers versus controls), as well as sleep manipulations and correlational investigations with healthy sleepers. For studies involving comparisons between poor sleepers and healthy controls, effect size estimates were computed for task-relevant dependent variables. Six of the nine studies comparing poor sleepers and controls revealed statistically significant group differences in support of a differential sleep-related attentional bias (medium-to-large effect sizes), with flicker, dot-probe and Posner tasks being most sensitive to group effects. Due to the paucity of studies and variability in design and measurement, no conclusions could be reached regarding manipulation or induction of attentional bias in good sleepers. Results from the relatively small number of studies support the presence of sleep-related attentional bias in insomnia; however, its role in the development and/or maintenance of insomnia remains to be elucidated. We set out a research agenda aimed at advancing the understanding of sleep-related attention bias.

  15. The science of spinal motion palpation: a review and update with implications for assessment and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Richard Edward; Russell Smith, A

    2013-08-01

    Spinal motion palpation (SMP) is a standard component of a manual therapy examination despite questionable reliability. The present research is inconclusive as to the relevance of the findings from SMP, with respect to the patient's pain complaints. Differences in the testing methods and interpretation of spinal mobility testing are problematic. If SMP is to be a meaningful component of a spinal examination, the methods for testing and interpretation must be carefully scrutinized. The intent of this narrative review is to facilitate a better understanding of how SMP should provide the examiner with relevant information for assessment and treatment of patients with spinal pain disorders. The concept of just noticeable difference is presented and applied to SMP as a suggestion for determining the neutral zone behavior of a spinal segment. In addition, the use of a lighter, or more passive receptive palpation technique, is considered as a means for increasing tactile discrimination of spinal movement behavior. Further understanding of the scientific basis of testing SMP may improve intra- and inter-examiner reliability. The significance of the findings from SMP should be considered in context of the patient's functional problem. Methodological changes may be indicated for the performance of SMP techniques, such as central posterior-anterior (PA) pressure and passive intervertebral motion tests, in order to improve reliability. Instructors of manual therapy involved in teaching SMP should be knowledgeable of the neurophysiological processes of touch sensation so as to best advise students in the application of the various testing techniques.

  16. The Search for Durable Exterior Clear Coatings for Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D. Evans

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of a durable exterior clear coating has eluded generations of coatings technologists, despite long-standing desire amongst the public for such a coating. The journey towards this goal initially focused on modifications to coating formulation, but took a completely different direction when it was found that a UV-transparent silicone clear coating on wood modified with chromic acid met consumer expectations of coating durability. This finding sparked world-wide interest in wood pre-treatments as a way of enhancing the durability of clear coatings. This interest initially focused on transition metal compounds, but has now shifted in the direction of organic and inorganic photostabilizers or even more drastic pre-treatments. Pre-treatments that dimensionally stabilize wood, protect it from microbial degradation and photostabilize lignin, when combined with flexible, photostable, coatings provide the next way-stop on the journey towards achieving the goal of durable exterior clear coatings for wood. This paper reviews this journey, drawing upon our research and that of other groups who have focused on this elusive goal.

  17. The review of the modeling methods and numerical analysis software for nanotechnology in material science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMIRNOV Vladimir Alexeevich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the high demand for building materials with universal set of roperties which extend their application area the research efforts are focusing on nanotechnology in material science. The rational combination of theoretical studies, mathematical modeling and simulation can favour reduced resource and time consumption when nanomodified materials are being developed. The development of composite material is based on the principles of system analysis which provides for the necessity of criteria determination and further classification of modeling methods. In this work the criteria of spatial scale, dominant type of interaction and heterogeneity are used for such classification. The presented classification became a framework for analysis of methods and software which can be applied to the development of building materials. For each of selected spatial levels - from atomistic one to macrostructural level of constructional coarsegrained composite – existing theories, modeling algorithms and tools have been considered. At the level of macrostructure which is formed under influence of gravity and exterior forces one can apply probabilistic and geometrical methods to study obtained structure. The existing models are suitable for packing density analysis and solution of percolation problems at the macroscopic level, but there are still no software tools which could be applied in nanotechnology to carry out systematic investigations. At the microstructure level it’s possible to use particle method along with probabilistic and statistical methods to explore structure formation but available software tools are partially suitable for numerical analysis of microstructure models. Therefore, modeling of the microstructure is rather complicated; the model has to include potential of pairwise interaction. After the model has been constructed and parameters of pairwise potential have been determined, many software packages for solution of ordinary

  18. Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Frits

    2002-01-01

    The application of modern techniques in histochemistry, electron microscopy, physiology, biochemistry, molecular biology, etc. in the last decades has changed embryology from a descriptive science to an experimental and applied science. The present book is a result of this development. A score of au

  19. Roadmap-Based Level Clearing of Buildings

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a roadmap-based approach for a multi-agent search strategy to clear a building or multi-story environment. This approach utilizes an encoding of the environment in the form of a graph (roadmap) that is used to encode feasible paths through the environment. The roadmap is partitioned into regions, e.g., one per level, and we design region-based search strategies to cover and clear the environment. We can provide certain guarantees within this roadmap-based framework on coverage and the number of agents needed. Our approach can handle complex and realistic environments where many approaches are restricted to simple 2D environments. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy of cleared mouse organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Sonia G.; Chia, Thomas H.; Zinter, Joseph P.; Levene, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Typical imaging depths with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are limited to less than 300 μm in many tissues due to light scattering. Optical clearing significantly reduces light scattering by replacing water in the organ tissue with a fluid having a similar index of refraction to that of proteins. We demonstrate MPM of intact, fixed, cleared mouse organs with penetration depths and fields of view in excess of 2 mm. MPM enables the creation of large 3-D data sets with flexibility in pixel format and ready access to intrinsic fluorescence and second-harmonic generation. We present high-resolution images and 3-D image stacks of the brain, small intestine, large intestine, kidney, lung, and testicle with image sizes as large as 4096×4096 pixels.

  1. Quantum Information Science: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwek, L. C.; Zen, Freddy P.

    2016-08-01

    It is now roughly thirty years since the incipient ideas on quantum information science was concretely formalized. Over the last three decades, there has been much development in this field, and at least one technology, namely devices for quantum cryptography, is now commercialized. Yet, the holy grail of a workable quantum computing machine still lies faraway at the horizon. In any case, it took nearly several centuries before the vacuum tubes were invented after the first mechanical calculating were constructed, and several decades later, for the transistor to bring the current computer technology to fruition. In this review, we provide a short survey of the current development and progress in quantum information science. It clearly does not do justice to the amount of work in the past thirty years. Nevertheless, despite the modest attempt, this review hopes to induce younger researchers into this exciting field.

  2. Internet compromise clears way for WSIS agreement

    CERN Multimedia

    Ermert, M

    2003-01-01

    A working group under the leadership of United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan himself will try to resolve the deep differences on the question of Internet governance, officials said here. The group, whose exact membership wasn't immediately clear, is to propose a solution to the controversial issue that has given negotiators at the World Summit of the Information Society (WSIS) a headache (1/2 page).

  3. Rapid radiative clearing of protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Haworth, Thomas J; Owen, James E

    2015-01-01

    The lack of observed transition discs with inner gas holes of radii greater than ~50AU implies that protoplanetary discs dispersed from the inside out must remove gas from the outer regions rapidly. We investigate the role of photoevaporation in the final clearing of gas from low mass discs with inner holes. In particular, we study the so-called "thermal sweeping" mechanism which results in rapid clearing of the disc. Thermal sweeping was originally thought to arise when the radial and vertical pressure scale lengths at the X-ray heated inner edge of the disc match. We demonstrate that this criterion is not fundamental. Rather, thermal sweeping occurs when the pressure maximum at the inner edge of the dust heated disc falls below the maximum possible pressure of X-ray heated gas (which depends on the local X-ray flux). We derive new critical peak volume and surface density estimates for rapid radiative clearing which, in general, result in rapid dispersal happening less readily than in previous estimates. Thi...

  4. New trends on mobile learning area: The review of published articles on mobile learning in science direct database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Soykan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Articles published in Science Direct between 2009 and 2014 (May were screened in this research. This is because of its respectable position in the field of technology and peer-reviewed secured structure of this database. From a total of 161 articles within the scope of the screening 156 articles were included in the study. Through this research, new trends in mobile learning activities in recent years will be determined and a new way will be shown for researchers . "Mobile learning" keywords used during researching process and all the articles with "mobile learning" keywords were included in this study. As a result of this research, it is determined that the most studies in the field of mobile learning were published in 2013 in Malaysia, UK and Taiwan. Particularly undergraduate students was selected as the sample group of the researches. It is emerged that, experimental research was used maximum as a research model. Quantitative data collection tools were used most as a means of data collection. It was emerged that foreign language education is the most widely used field in mobile learning. It is seen that smart phones as mobile learning devices and IOS operating system as an operating system were used in the most researches. Mobile-based method is seen to be used as the teaching method in the present study.

  5. A review of 40 years of hydrological science and practice in southern Africa using the Pitman rainfall-runoff model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D. A.

    2013-09-01

    The 40th anniversary of the initial development of the Pitman rainfall-runoff (developed in South Africa and widely applied throughout southern Africa) approximately coincides with the end of the IAHS PUB programme and the start of a new decade focussing on hydrological change (Panta Rhei) and society. The paper reviews the developments and applications of the Pitman model in the context of the appropriate outcomes of PUB and the proposed future directions of Panta Rhei. The focus of development of the Pitman model has been dominated by practical applications, while PUB was largely dominated by science issues. While some of the PUB principles have been applied with the Pitman model, there are others that are deemed inappropriate for practical modelling and others that would almost certainly benefit the Pitman model applications in the future. The paper includes discussions of the model structure, input data, parameters and output evaluations - all in the context of uncertainty. The capabilities of the model to address societal development impacts are also discussed and a brief example of an uncertainty approach to applying the model is provided. The conclusions are that some developments of the Pitman model anticipated more recent international developments, while others have not been ignored even if further efforts are required to effectively implement them. Perhaps the largest gap in applying uncertainty principles in practice is how to use them in water resources decision making.

  6. Writing in the natural sciences: Understanding the effects of different types of reviewers on the writing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patchan, M. M., ., &

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In undergraduate natural science courses, two types of evaluators are commonly used to assess student writing: graduate-student teaching assistants (TAs or peers. The current study examines how well these approaches to evaluation support student writing. These differences between the two possible evaluators are likely to affect multiple aspects of the writing process: first draft quality, amount and types of feedback provided, amount and types of revisions, and final draft quality. Therefore, we examined how these aspects of the writing process were affected when undergraduate students wrote papers to be evaluated by a group of peers versus their TA. Several interesting results were found. First, the quality of the students' first draft was greater when they were writing for their peers than when writing for their TA. In terms of feedback, students provided longer comments, and they also focused more on the prose than the TAs. Finally, more revisions were made if the students received feedback from their peers-especially prose revisions. Despite all of the benefits seen with peers as evaluators, there was only a moderate difference in final draft quality. This result indicates that while peer-review is helpful, there continues to be a need for research regarding how to enhance the benefits.

  7. Teaching and learning based on peer review: a realistic approach in forensic sciences [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching and learning methods need a continuous upgrade in higher education. However it is also true that some of the modern methodologies do not reduce or prevent school failure. Perhaps the real limitation is the inability to identify the true reasons that may explain it or ignore/undervalue the problem. In our opinion, one of the current constraints of the teaching/learning process is the excess of and inadequate bibliography recommended by the teacher, which results in continuous student difficulties and waste of time in searching and selecting useful information. The need to change the paradigm of the teaching/learning process comes also from employers. They claim forensic experts armed with useful knowledge to face professional life. It is therefore mandatory to identify the new needs and opportunities regarding pedagogical methodologies. This article reflects on the recent importance of peer review in teaching/learning forensic sciences based on the last 10 years of pedagogical experience inseparably from the scientific activity.

  8. Review of Research Progresses on the Science of Earthquake Underground Fluid in China During the Last 40 Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yaowei

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the development of scientific research and practice of earthquake underground fluid in China during the last 40 years,summaries early constructive research and primary achievements in this field.The science of earthquake underground fluid is closely correlated with earthquake monitoring and prediction,such as innovations in observation techniques and theoretical methods,and analysis of diversified parameters and research into predictive methods.The historical evolution of observation networks for underground fluid indicates that the demand for strong earthquake monitoring and prediction has become the driving force of the construction and development of the observation network.The development of observation techniques represents the trend based on multiform measurement,syntheses,and digitization.The study results of underground fluid theory and precursory mechanisms suggest that the precursory model,numerical simulation and in-door or field experimental research are the main technological approaches promoting innovation.Research results of earthquake forecast methods use physics based forecast techniques and the ideas of cornbination of usabifity and scientific advance.It has been proved by forecast practice that studying underground fluid is a very important subject in earthquake prediction on the Chinese mainland.Finally,the primary work and technical criterion on underground fluid are introduced,and some major scientific issues and development trends in different historical stages are summarized.

  9. Microplastics as vectors for bioaccumulation of hydrophobic organic chemicals in the marine environment: A state-of-the-science review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziccardi, Linda M; Edgington, Aaron; Hentz, Karyn; Kulacki, Konrad J; Kane Driscoll, Susan

    2016-07-01

    A state-of-the-science review was conducted to examine the potential for microplastics to sorb hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) from the marine environment, for aquatic organisms to take up these HOCs from the microplastics, and for this exposure to result in adverse effects to ecological and human health. Despite concentrations of HOCs associated with microplastics that can be orders of magnitude greater than surrounding seawater, the relative importance of microplastics as a route of exposure is difficult to quantify because aquatic organisms are typically exposed to HOCs from various compartments, including water, sediment, and food. Results of laboratory experiments and modeling studies indicate that HOCs can partition from microplastics to organisms or from organisms to microplastics, depending on experimental conditions. Very little information is available to evaluate ecological or human health effects from this exposure. Most of the available studies measured biomarkers that are more indicative of exposure than effects, and no studies showed effects to ecologically relevant endpoints. Therefore, evidence is weak to support the occurrence of ecologically significant adverse effects on aquatic life as a result of exposure to HOCs sorbed to microplastics or to wildlife populations and humans from secondary exposure via the food chain. More data are needed to fully understand the relative importance of exposure to HOCs from microplastics compared with other exposure pathways. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1667-1676. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:27093569

  10. STEM Professions: Opportunities and Challenges for Latinos in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. A Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taningco, Maria Teresa V.; Mathew, Ann Bessie; Pachon, Harry P.

    2008-01-01

    Although the United States has the best innovation ecosystem in the world, according to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), American students have weak math and science skills compared with those in the rest of the world. Even students at the top tier pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and…

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (Rdx) (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On March 10, 2016, the public comment draft Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine and the draft charge to external peer reviewers were released for public review and comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by othe...

  12. Nitrous oxide flux following tropical land clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luizao, Flavio; Luizao, Regina; Matson, Pamela; Livingston, Gerald; Vitousek, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The importance of seasonal cycles of N2O flux from tropical ecosystems and the possibility that tropical deforestation could contribute to the ongoing global increase in N2O concentrations were assessed by measuring N2O flux from forest, cleared land, and pasture over an annual cycle in the central Amazon. A pasture that had been converted from tropical forest had threefold greater annual N2O flux than a paired forest site; similar results were obtained in spot measurements in other pastures. If these results are general, such tropical pastures represent a globally significant source of increased N2O.

  13. CHINA'S WORST OIL LEAK CLEARED EXPENSIVELY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Eight days and nights of clean-up efforts after the worst oil leak ever in Chinese waters, the aftermath of a collision between two foreign ships happening at 9:35 pm on December 7 about 8 nautical miles away from the mouth of the Pearl River and near the Danjiang Island, have finally paid off. So far, hundreds of tons of waste oil and polluted water have been cleared up. A large area of oil spills has been cleaned thanks to the prompt and proper operation launched just two hours after the accident.

  14. Greenhouse problem in the Amazon jungle clearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the contribution of Amazon jungle clearing to the greenhouse problem and makes an assessment of long-run prospects. The introductory sections pose the problem from both international and Brazilian perspectives. The next section describes major features of the Amazonia ecosystems and presents methods and evidence on deforestation and on its impact on carbon dioxide emissions. Based upon cross-section information for a sample of municipalities in the Brazilian Amazon, the following section estimates elasticities of deforestation in relation to major economic factors- government policies included- and uses them to make projections for the future pace of deforestation. The last section discusses policy alternatives to slow down forest conversion

  15. PLANETARY CHAOTIC ZONE CLEARING: DESTINATIONS AND TIMESCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Sarah; Malhotra, Renu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We investigate the orbital evolution of particles in a planet's chaotic zone to determine their final destinations and their timescales of clearing. There are four possible final states of chaotic particles: collision with the planet, collision with the star, escape, or bounded but non-collision orbits. In our investigations, within the framework of the planar circular restricted three body problem for planet-star mass ratio μ in the range 10{sup –9} to 10{sup –1.5}, we find no particles hitting the star. The relative frequencies of escape and collision with the planet are not scale-free, as they depend upon the size of the planet. For planet radius R{sub p} ≥ 0.001 R{sub H} where R{sub H} is the planet's Hill radius, we find that most chaotic zone particles collide with the planet for μ ≲ 10{sup –5}; particle scattering to large distances is significant only for higher mass planets. For fixed ratio R{sub p} /R{sub H} , the particle clearing timescale, T {sub cl}, has a broken power-law dependence on μ. A shallower power law, T {sub cl} ∼ μ{sup –1/3}, prevails at small μ where particles are cleared primarily by collisions with the planet; a steeper power law, T {sub cl} ∼ μ{sup –3/2}, prevails at larger μ where scattering dominates the particle loss. In the limit of vanishing planet radius, we find T {sub cl} ≈ 0.024 μ{sup –3/2}. The interior and exterior boundaries of the annular zone in which chaotic particles are cleared are increasingly asymmetric about the planet's orbit for larger planet masses; the inner boundary coincides well with the classical first order resonance overlap zone, Δa {sub cl,} {sub int} ≅ 1.2 μ{sup 0.28} a{sub p} ; the outer boundary is better described by Δa {sub cl,} {sub ext} ≅ 1.7 μ{sup 0.31} a{sub p} , where a{sub p} is the planet-star separation.

  16. A gap clearing kicker for Main Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Kourbanis, I; Biggs, J; Brown, B; Capista, D; Jensen, C C; Krafczyk, G E; Morris, D K; Scott, D; Seiya, K; Ward, S R; Wu, G; Yang, M -J

    2012-01-01

    Fermilab Main Injector has been operating at high Beam Power levels since 2008 when multi-batch slip stacking became operational. In order to maintain and increase the beam power levels the localized beam loss due to beam left over in the injection kicker gap during slip stacking needs to be addressed. A set of gap clearing kickers that kick any beam left in the injection gap to the beam abort have been built. The kickers were installed in the summer of 2009 and became operational in November of 2010. The kicker performance and its effect on the beam losses will be described.

  17. Software Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Donna; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are seven software packages for Apple and IBM computers. Included are: "Toxicology"; "Science Corner: Space Probe"; "Alcohol and Pregnancy"; "Science Tool Kit Plus"; Computer Investigations: Plant Growth"; "Climatrolls"; and "Animal Watch: Whales." (CW)

  18. Science and Society Series off the Press

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ The CAS has published the 2002 Science & Society series. The series, which consists of reports on scientific development, high-tech development and sustainable development, aims to introduce the world's scientific and technological (S&T) progress and developmental trends in 2001, review the changes in the frontiers of science and technology, pinpoint the main problems in research and development (R&D), and recount S&T development in China. Through the series, it is hoped that China's decades-long efforts at capacity building of sustainability will be made clear to the world, including theoretical exploration, contents, identification,dynamic monitoring, parametric system and quantitative analysis.

  19. Clearing the Waters of the Fracking Debate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstoff, Alexi; Ellis, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the debate on “fracking” in the United States is fueled by poor communication among stakeholders. Information in the public sphere may be provided by biased sources, and complicated academic research is often misinterpreted by media sources. The goal of this review is to provide an open-access...

  20. ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program (PSAAP) II Review of the Carbon Capture Multidisciplinary Science Center (CCMSC) at the University of Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Still, C. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferencz, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hoekstra, R. J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hungerford, A. L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kuhl, A. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montoya, D. R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wagner, J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-08

    The review was conducted on March 31 – April 1, 2015 at the University of Utah. Overall the review team was impressed with the work presented and found that the CCMSC had met or exceeded all of their Year 1 milestones. Specific details, comments and recommendations are included in this document.

  1. Super Science Fair Sourcebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iritz, Maxine Haren

    This guide to science fair projects is designed for students and provides clear directions on how to complete a successful science project. Real projects are used as examples and information and advice is provided by teachers, judges, and participants and their families about the process. Topics covered in this book include choosing a science fair…

  2. WikiScience: Wikipedia for science and technology

    OpenAIRE

    Aibar Puentes, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Peer-reviewed Presentació de la conferència "WikiScience: Wikipedia for science and technology". Presentación de la conferencia "WikiScience: Wikipedia for science and technology". Presentation of the conference "Science Wiki: Wikipedia for science and technology".

  3. Examining the literacy component of science literacy: 25 years of language arts and science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yore, Larry D.; Bisanz, Gay L.; Hand, Brian M.

    2003-06-01

    This review, written to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the International Journal of Science Education, revealed a period of changes in the theoretical views of the language arts, the perceived roles of language in science education, and the research approaches used to investigate oral and written language in science, science teaching, and learning. The early years were dominated by behavioralist and logico-mathematical interpretations of human learning and by reductionist research approaches, while the later years reflected an applied cognitive science and constructivist interpretations of learning and a wider array of research approaches that recognizes the holistic nature of teaching and learning. The early years focus on coding oral language into categories reflecting source of speech, functional purpose, level of question and response, reading research focused on the readability of textbooks using formulae and the reader's decoding skills, and writing research was not well documented since the advocates for writing in service of learning were grass roots practitioners and many science teachers were using writing as an evaluation technique. The advent of applied cognitive science and the constructivist perspectives ushered in interactive-constructive models of discourse, reading and writing that more clearly revealed the role of language in science and in science teaching and learning. A review of recent research revealed that the quantity and quality of oral interactions were low and unfocused in science classrooms; reading has expanded to consider comprehension strategies, metacognition, sources other than textbooks, and the design of inquiry environments for classrooms; and writing-to-learn science has focused on sequential writing tasks requiring transformation of ideas to enhance science learning. Several promising trends and future research directions flow from the synthesis of this 25-year period of examining the literacy component of science literacy

  4. Reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Frits

    1995-01-01

    This is the seventh volume in the series of Proceedings of International Legume Conferences, published after the Third International Legume Conference held at Kew in 1992. Every paper in this volume has a phylogenetic basis using cladistic or molecular approaches, giving clear evidence that these ap

  5. Reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.; Steenis, van C.G.G.J.; Sleumer, H.

    1966-01-01

    This is a difficult book on account of the very wide range and complexity of its subject-matter, made more difficult by the fact that the author has not taken the trouble to arrange his writing so as to present a clear sequence of ideas; also he often uses needlessly complex sentences, some made mor

  6. An unusual case of clear cell meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deb Prabal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear-cell meningioma (CCM is an uncommon, aggressive variant of meningioma, usually affecting younger females and having predilection for infratentorial locations. We present a rare case of recurrent supratentorial CCM in a 58-year-old male. Ten years back, he had an intra-axial tumor in the left occipital lobe, which was managed by surgical excision and radiotherapy. Currently, the patient presented with sudden severe headache along with speech and vision disturbances. Neuroimaging revealed an extra-axial parietooccipital tumor, with intratumoural bleed. Histopathology of both tumors showed features of CCM, immunopositive for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA and vimentin. This case illustrates multiple unusual features of a rare variant of meningioma in the form of affection of an adult age group, supratentorial location, recurrence, and intratumoral bleed. It also highlights the importance of incorporating immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic workup, to exclude CCM mimics, each having distinctive biological behavior, and prognostic outcome, and warranting different therapeutic protocols.

  7. INCREASING ACHIEVEMENT AND HIGHER-EDUCATION REPRESENTATION OF UNDER-REPRESENTED GROUPS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS FIELDS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT K-12 INTERVENTION PROGRAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Valla, Jeffrey M.; Williams, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    The under-representation of women and ethnic minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and professions has resulted in a loss of human capital for the US scientific workforce and spurred the development of myriad STEM educational intervention programs. Increased allocation of resources to such programs begs for a critical, prescriptive, evidence-based review that will enable researchers to develop optimal interventions and administrators to maximize inve...

  8. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    WE RECOMMEND The Snowman's Coat and Other Science Questions A book of problem-solving for the very young An Inconvenient Truth Al Gore's climate change slide show, brought to DVD OCR Physics for GCSE A thorough but interesting high-level textbook 21st Century Science GCSE Resources A full range of resources to suit teacher and pupil WORTH A LOOK Thinking Without Objects - The Transformation of Mechanics in the Seventeenth Century This book covers a fruitful period in the history of science Paper Rollercoasters An intriguing teaching resource that uses paper and sticky tape HANDLE WITH CARE STEAM - Museum of the Great Western Railway The Swindon museum proves lacking in education resources WEB WATCH Games and simulations demonstrating moments and levers

  9. Connecting Research in Science Literacy and Classroom Practice: A Review of Science Teaching Journals in Australia, the UK and the United States, 1998-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brian; Yore, Larry D.; Jagger, Susan; Prain, Vaughan

    2010-01-01

    In the last 15 years (1994-2009), there has been considerable increased research interest in: (1) characterising the distinctive nature and constitutive elements of science literacy and (2) investigating classroom practices or necessary conditions that enable students to acquire this disciplinary capacity. This raises the question of the extent to…

  10. A Meta-Analytic Review of Graphic Organizers and Science Instruction for Adolescents with Learning Disabilities: Implications for the Intermediate and Secondary Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Douglas D.; Park, Youn J.; Hughes, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a meta-analysis of experimental and quasi-experimental studies in which intermediate and secondary students with learning disabilities were taught science content through the use of graphic organizers (GOs). Following an exhaustive search for studies meeting specified selection criteria, 23 standardized mean effect sizes were…

  11. Inquiry-Based Science Education Competencies of Primary School Teachers: A literature study and critical review of the American National Science Education Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alake - Tuenter, E.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Tobi, H.; Wals, A.E.J.; Oosterheert, I.; Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    Inquiry-based science education is an important innovation. Researchers and teachers consider it to be stimulating for pupils’ application of research skills, construction of meaning and acquiring scientific knowledge. However, there is ambiguity as to what competencies are required to teach inquiry

  12. Anatomy of Knowledge Bases used in Design Science Research - A Literature Review : 7. International Conference on Design Science Research in Information Systems and Technology (DESRIST 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gass, Oliver; Koppenhagen, Norbert; Biegel, Harald; Mädche, Alexander; Mueller, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Several papers have addressed the theory foundation of DSR. While researchers usually emphasize that the existence of such a knowledge base (KB) is essential for high quality design science research (DSR), opinions depart what kind of knowledge comprises such a knowledge base and which qualitative r

  13. Deconstructing normalisation: clearing the way for inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Culham, Andrew; Nind, Melanie

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers two major movements affecting the lives of people with an intellectual disability: normalisation and inclusion. The authors look back at the normalisation movement, reviewing its aims, processes and outcomes, and explore its relationship and compatibility with inclusion. In looking forward to the realisation of the inclusion agenda they ask whether normalisation is a suitable platform on which to build inclusion, or whether a process of deconstruction is needed. They disc...

  14. Clearing the Waters of the Fracking Debate

    OpenAIRE

    Ernstoff, Alexi; Ellis, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the debate on “fracking” in the United States is fueled by poor communication among stakeholders. Information in the public sphere may be provided by biased sources, and complicated academic research is often misinterpreted by media sources. The goal of this review is to provide an open-access source for a non-technical audience that facilitates a balanced discussion on the complex topics related to hydraulic fracturing and its impact on water resources. The limited information availa...

  15. GL Transparency: Through a Glass Clearly

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, Keith G (STFC); Asserson, Anne; GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2010-01-01

    GL (Grey literature, interpreted here as grey objects) is very heterogeneous in content, form and quality. Most GL objects evolve through a workflow. Some of these phases involve some form of evaluation or peer review, commonly internal within the management structure of an organisation and possibly involving external advice, including from "friendly peers" via an e-preprint mechanism. Unlike white literature the evaluation process commonly is unrecorded and undocumented. This leads to accusa...

  16. Science salaries reviewed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Salaries of experienced geoscientists have risen 215% since 1973, while the consumer price index rose 92.5%, according to a report by the Scientific Manpower Commission (SMC). ‘Salaries of Scientists, Engineers, and Technicians: A Summary of Salary Surveys, Tenth Edition,’ prepared by SMC Associate Director Eleanor L. Babco, is a compilation of salary information from numerous organizations, including federal agencies and departments, educational associations, magazine publishers, and other professional and trade groups. While there is little in the report that cannot be found elsewhere, SMC has collected the data in one place to provide a snapshot of scientists' salaries.Degreed geologists, geophysicists, production engineers, and ‘landmen,’ as a group, earn the highest salaries of almost any professional occupation in the United States, according to several salary studies by Vine Associates over the past 4 years.

  17. Is normal science good science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Kępińska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available “Normal science” is a concept introduced by Thomas Kuhn in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962. In Kuhn’s view, normal science means “puzzle solving”, solving problems within the paradigm—framework most successful in solving current major scientific problems—rather than producing major novelties. This paper examines Kuhnian and Popperian accounts of normal science and their criticisms to assess if normal science is good. The advantage of normal science according to Kuhn was “psychological”: subjective satisfaction from successful “puzzle solving”. Popper argues for an “intellectual” science, one that consistently refutes conjectures (hypotheses and offers new ideas rather than focus on personal advantages. His account is criticized as too impersonal and idealistic. Feyerabend’s perspective seems more balanced; he argues for a community that would introduce new ideas, defend old ones, and enable scientists to develop in line with their subjective preferences. The paper concludes that normal science has no one clear-cut set of criteria encompassing its meaning and enabling clear assessment.

  18. How Mimas cleared the Cassini Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyelles, Benoit; Baillie, Kevin; Lainey, Valery; Charnoz, Sebastien

    2016-10-01

    Recent measurements of the dissipation of Saturn (Lainey et al. 2016, Icarus, in press) combined with a theoretical study by Fuller et al. (2016, MNRAS) require to revisit the energy dissipation models in planetary systems and the way it affects their satellite system. In addition, the measurements of the large librations of Mimas (Tajeddine et al. 2014, Science) could point to a global ocean underneath the surface of the satellite. These results allowed us to refine the scenarios of the opening of the Cassini Division that we initially presented at the DPS 2012. Assuming a dissipation that is consistent with these latest results, we propose scenarios of combined evolutions of Mimas and the main rings of Saturn, that explain the current size and location of the Division, the excess of density in the outer B ring, a past episode of intense heating of Mimas required to create a global ocean, and its current eccentricity. For that, we show that a past resonance with Tethys increased the eccentricity of Mimas up to 0.2, possibly triggering the melting of Mimas and an episode of inward migration, which created the Cassini Division: the 2:1 resonance between Mimas and the rings pushed the ring material inner to accumulate in the B ring. Once its eccentricity is damped, Mimas resumes its outward migration, leading to a trapping into the current vertical resonance with Tethys. These results are supported by numerical simulations, in which Mimas is driven by the tides, and the rings are simulated with the 1-D hydrodynamical code Hydrorings (Charnoz et al., 2010, Nature). This study has been partially supported by the International Space Sciences Institute in Bern, Switzerland.

  19. The effect of homogeneous and heterogeneous review pairs on student achievement and attitude when utilizing computer-assisted instruction in middle-level Earth science classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Ellen Beth

    1998-09-01

    This research project investigated the influence of homogeneous (like-ability) review pairs coupled with heterogeneous (mixed-ability) cooperative learning groups using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on academic achievement and attitude toward science in eighth grade Earth science students. Subjects were placed into academic quartiles (Hi, Med-Hi, Med-Lo, and Lo) based on achievement. Cooperative learning groups of four (one student from each academic quartile) were formed in all classes, within which students completed CAI through a software package entitled Geoscience Education Through Interactive Technology, or GETITspTM. Each day, when computer activities were completed, students in the experimental classes were divided into homogeneous review pairs to review their work. The students in the control classes were divided into heterogeneous review pairs to review their work. The effects of the experimental treatment were measured by pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest measures, by pre- and post-student attitude scales, and by evaluation of amendments students made to their work during the time spent in review pairs. Results showed that student achievement was not significantly influenced by placement in homogeneous or heterogeneous review pairs, regardless of academic quartile assignment. Student attitude toward science as a school subject did not change significantly due to experimental treatment. Achievement retention of students in experimental and control groups within each quartile showed no significant difference. Notebook amendment patterns showed some significant differences in a few categories. For the Hi quartile, there were significant differences in numbers of deletion amendments and substitution amendments between the experimental and the control group. In both cases, subjects in the experimental group (homogeneous review pairs) made greater number of amendments then those in the control group (heterogeneous review pairs). For the Lo quartile

  20. A Review of Computer Science Resources for Learning and Teaching with K-12 Computing Curricula: An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Vivian, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To support teachers to implement Computer Science curricula into classrooms from the very first year of school, teachers, schools and organisations seek quality curriculum resources to support implementation and teacher professional development. Until now, many Computer Science resources and outreach initiatives have targeted K-12 school-age…

  1. 76 FR 59145 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NINR End-of-Life and Palliative Care Science Needs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ...-Life and Palliative Care Science Needs Assessment: Funding Source (Survey of Authors) Summary: Under... Request: NEW. Need and Use of Information Collection: The NINR End-of-Life Science Palliative Care (EOL PC... in the 30-day Federal Register Notice. Proposed Collection: Title: NINR End-of-Life and...

  2. Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, Floyd; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews eight textbooks, readers, and books. Topics include Latin America, colonial America, the Carolinians, women in French textbooks, the Vikings, the Soviet Union, nineteenth-century Black America, and Ernest Rutherford. (TRS)

  3. INCREASING ACHIEVEMENT AND HIGHER-EDUCATION REPRESENTATION OF UNDER-REPRESENTED GROUPS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS FIELDS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT K-12 INTERVENTION PROGRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Jeffrey M; Williams, Wendy M

    2012-01-01

    The under-representation of women and ethnic minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and professions has resulted in a loss of human capital for the US scientific workforce and spurred the development of myriad STEM educational intervention programs. Increased allocation of resources to such programs begs for a critical, prescriptive, evidence-based review that will enable researchers to develop optimal interventions and administrators to maximize investments. We begin by providing a theoretical backdrop for K-12 STEM programs by reviewing current data on under-representation and developmental research describing individual-level social factors undergirding these data. Next, we review prototypical designs of these programs, highlighting specific programs in the literature as examples of program structures and components currently in use. We then evaluate these interventions in terms of overall effectiveness, as a function of how well they address age-, ethnicity-, or gender-specific factors, suggesting improvements in program design based on these critiques. Finally, program evaluation methods are briefly reviewed and discussed in terms of how their empirical soundness can either enable or limit our ability to delineate effective program components. "Now more than ever, the nation's changing demographics demand that we include all of our citizens in science and engineering education and careers. For the U.S. to benefit from the diverse talents of all its citizens, we must grow the pipeline of qualified, underrepresented minority engineers and scientists to fill positions in industry and academia."-Irving P. McPhail.. PMID:22942637

  4. Perceptions of D.M.D. student readiness for basic science courses in the United States: can online review modules help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C J; Aiken, S A; Metz, M J

    2015-02-01

    There can be a disconnect between the level of content covered in undergraduate coursework and the expectations of professional-level faculty of their incoming students. Some basic science faculty members may assume that students have a good knowledge base in the material and neglect to appropriately review, whilst others may spend too much class time reviewing basic material. It was hypothesised that the replacement of introductory didactic physiology lectures with interactive online modules could improve student preparedness prior to lectures. These modules would also allow faculty members to analyse incoming student abilities and save valuable face-to-face class time for alternative teaching strategies. Results indicated that the performance levels of incoming U.S. students were poor (57% average on a pre-test), and students often under-predicted their abilities (by 13% on average). Faculty expectations varied greatly between the different content areas and did not appear to correlate with the actual student performance. Three review modules were created which produced a statistically significant increase in post-test scores (46% increase, P < 0.0001, n = 114-115). The positive results of this study suggest a need to incorporate online review units in the basic science dental school courses and revise introductory material tailored to students' strengths and needs. PMID:25756103

  5. The National Science Foundation's AST Portfolio Review of 2012 is Not Relevant to the Green Bank Telescope of 2017: A White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Lockman, Felix J; Frayer, David T; Mason, Brian D; Ransom, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) Astronomy Division's Portfolio Review of 2012 is no longer relevant to the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of 2017 for two principal reasons, one instrumental and the other astrophysical: 1) The GBT has begun significant operations in the 3mm band, giving it unrivaled capabilities for spectroscopy and continuum studies over 67-116 GHz. It is now an instrument that is unique worldwide and is a critical complement to ALMA for the U.S. scientific community. These capabilities had not been implemented at the time of the review. 2) The detection of gravitational radiation by LIGO in 2015 places the GBT's work on pulsar observations of nano-Hz gravitational radiation at the forefront of modern astrophysics. The Green Bank Telescope of 2017 is not the GBT that was reviewed by the Eisenstein-Miller committee in 2012, a review that was specific to the NSF Astronomy portfolio. The GBT serves a wide spectrum of science areas including physics, chemistry, and planetary studies as well as ...

  6. Science teaching in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    Reading the interesting article Discerning selective traditions in science education by Per Sund , which is published in this issue of CSSE, allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must constantly develop new methods to teach and differentiate between science education and teaching science in response to the changing needs of our students, and we must analyze what role teachers and teacher educators play in both. We must continually examine the methods and concepts involved in developing pedagogical content knowledge in science teachers. Otherwise, the possibility that these routines, based on subjective traditions, prevent emerging processes of educational innovation. Modern science is an enormous field of knowledge in its own right, which is made more expansive when examined within the context of its place in society. We propose the need to design educative interactions around situations that involve science and society. Science education must provide students with all four dimensions of the cognitive process: factual knowledge, conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and metacognitive knowledge. We can observe in classrooms at all levels of education that students understand the concepts better when they have the opportunity to apply the scientific knowledge in a personally relevant way. When students find value in practical exercises and they are provided opportunities to reinterpret their experiences, greater learning gains are achieved. In this sense, a key aspect of educational innovation is the change in teaching methodology. We need new tools to respond to new problems. A shift in teacher education is needed to realize the rewards of situating science questions in a societal context and opening classroom doors to active methodologies in science education to promote meaningful learning through meaningful teaching.

  7. Parameter estimation in food science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Kirk D; Mishra, Dharmendra K

    2013-01-01

    Modeling includes two distinct parts, the forward problem and the inverse problem. The forward problem-computing y(t) given known parameters-has received much attention, especially with the explosion of commercial simulation software. What is rarely made clear is that the forward results can be no better than the accuracy of the parameters. Therefore, the inverse problem-estimation of parameters given measured y(t)-is at least as important as the forward problem. However, in the food science literature there has been little attention paid to the accuracy of parameters. The purpose of this article is to summarize the state of the art of parameter estimation in food science, to review some of the common food science models used for parameter estimation (for microbial inactivation and growth, thermal properties, and kinetics), and to suggest a generic method to standardize parameter estimation, thereby making research results more useful. Scaled sensitivity coefficients are introduced and shown to be important in parameter identifiability. Sequential estimation and optimal experimental design are also reviewed as powerful parameter estimation methods that are beginning to be used in the food science literature.

  8. [Basic science and applied science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Tamayo, R

    2001-01-01

    A lecture was presented by the author at the Democratic Opinion Forum on Health Teaching and Research, organized by Mexico's National Health Institutes Coordinating Office, at National Cardiology Institute "Ignacio Chavez", where he presented a critical review of the conventional classification of basic and applied science, as well as his personal view on health science teaching and research. According to the author, "well-conducted science" is that "generating reality-checked knowledge" and "mis-conducted science" is that "unproductive or producing 'just lies' and 'non-fundable'. To support his views, the author reviews utilitarian and pejorative definitions of science, as well as those of committed and pure science, useful and useless science, and practical and esoterical science, as synonyms of applied and basic science. He also asserts that, in Mexico, "this classification has been used in the past to justify federal funding cutbacks to basic science, allegedly because it is not targeted at solving 'national problems' or because it was not relevant to priorities set in a given six-year political administration period". Regarding health education and research, the author asserts that the current academic programs are inefficient and ineffective; his proposal to tackle these problems is to carry out a solid scientific study, conducted by a multidisciplinary team of experts, "to design the scientific researcher curricula from recruitment of intelligent young people to retirement or death". Performance assessment of researchers would not be restricted to publication of papers, since "the quality of scientific work and contribution to the development of science is not reflected by the number of published papers". The English version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  9. Clear Channel Assessment in Integrated Medical Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Complementary WLAN and WPAN technologies as well as other wireless technologies will play a fundamental role in the medical environments to support ubiquitous healthcare delivery. This paper investigates clear channel assessment (CCA and its impact on the coexistence of WLAN (IEEE 802.11 high rate direct sequence spread spectrum (HR/DSSS PHY and WPAN (IEEE 802.15.4b in the 2.4 GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM band. We derived closed-form expressions of both energy-based CCA and feature-based CCA. We qualified unequal sensing abilities between them and termed this inequality asymmetric CCA, which is different from the traditional “hidden node” or “exposed node” issues in the homogeneous network. The energy-based CCA was considered in the considered integrated medical environment because the 2.4 GHz ISM band is too crowded to apply feature-based CCA. The WPAN is oversensitive to the 802.11 HR/DSSS signals and the WLAN is insensitive to the 802.15.4b signals. Choosing an optimal CCA threshold requires some prior knowledge of the underlying signals. In the integrated medical environment we considered here, energy-based CCA can effectively avoid possible packet collisions when they are close within the “heterogeneous exclusive CCA range” (HECR. However, when they are separated beyond the HECR, WPAN can still sense the 802.11 HR/DSSS signals, but WLAN loses its sense to the 802.15.4b signals. The asymmetric CCA leads to WPAN traffic in a position secondary to WLAN traffic.

  10. Clear Channel Assessment in Integrated Medical Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hara Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complementary WLAN and WPAN technologies as well as other wireless technologies will play a fundamental role in the medical environments to support ubiquitous healthcare delivery. This paper investigates clear channel assessment (CCA and its impact on the coexistence of WLAN (IEEE 802.11 high rate direct sequence spread spectrum (HR/DSSS PHY and WPAN (IEEE 802.15.4b in the 2.4 GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM band. We derived closed-form expressions of both energy-based CCA and feature-based CCA. We qualified unequal sensing abilities between them and termed this inequality asymmetric CCA, which is different from the traditional "hidden node" or "exposed node" issues in the homogeneous network. The energy-based CCA was considered in the considered integrated medical environment because the 2.4 GHz ISM band is too crowded to apply feature-based CCA. The WPAN is oversensitive to the 802.11 HR/DSSS signals and the WLAN is insensitive to the 802.15.4b signals. Choosing an optimal CCA threshold requires some prior knowledge of the underlying signals. In the integrated medical environment we considered here, energy-based CCA can effectively avoid possible packet collisions when they are close within the "heterogeneous exclusive CCA range" (HECR. However, when they are separated beyond the HECR, WPAN can still sense the 802.11 HR/DSSS signals, but WLAN loses its sense to the 802.15.4b signals. The asymmetric CCA leads to WPAN traffic in a position secondary to WLAN traffic.

  11. Revolutionary Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-01-01

    On rare occasions in the history of science, remarkable discoveries transform human society and forever alter mankind's view of the world. Examples of such discoveries include the heliocentric theory, Newtonian physics, the germ theory of disease, quantum theory, plate tectonics and the discovery that DNA carries genetic information. The science philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously described science as long periods of normality punctuated by times of crisis, when anomalous observations culminate in revolutionary changes that replace one paradigm with another. This essay examines several transformative discoveries in the light of Kuhn's formulation. We find that each scientific revolution is unique, with disparate origins that may include puzzle solving, serendipity, inspiration, or a convergence of disparate observations. The causes of revolutionary science are varied and lack an obvious common structure. Moreover, it can be difficult to draw a clear distinction between so-called normal and revolutionary science. Revolutionary discoveries often emerge from basic science and are critically dependent on nonrevolutionary research. Revolutionary discoveries may be conceptual or technological in nature, lead to the creation of new fields, and have a lasting impact on many fields in addition to the field from which they emerge. In contrast to political revolutions, scientific revolutions do not necessarily require the destruction of the previous order. For humanity to continue to benefit from revolutionary discoveries, a broad palette of scientific inquiry with a particular emphasis on basic science should be supported. PMID:26933052

  12. Revolutionary Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-01-01

    On rare occasions in the history of science, remarkable discoveries transform human society and forever alter mankind's view of the world. Examples of such discoveries include the heliocentric theory, Newtonian physics, the germ theory of disease, quantum theory, plate tectonics and the discovery that DNA carries genetic information. The science philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously described science as long periods of normality punctuated by times of crisis, when anomalous observations culminate in revolutionary changes that replace one paradigm with another. This essay examines several transformative discoveries in the light of Kuhn's formulation. We find that each scientific revolution is unique, with disparate origins that may include puzzle solving, serendipity, inspiration, or a convergence of disparate observations. The causes of revolutionary science are varied and lack an obvious common structure. Moreover, it can be difficult to draw a clear distinction between so-called normal and revolutionary science. Revolutionary discoveries often emerge from basic science and are critically dependent on nonrevolutionary research. Revolutionary discoveries may be conceptual or technological in nature, lead to the creation of new fields, and have a lasting impact on many fields in addition to the field from which they emerge. In contrast to political revolutions, scientific revolutions do not necessarily require the destruction of the previous order. For humanity to continue to benefit from revolutionary discoveries, a broad palette of scientific inquiry with a particular emphasis on basic science should be supported.

  13. Revolutionary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ferric C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT On rare occasions in the history of science, remarkable discoveries transform human society and forever alter mankind’s view of the world. Examples of such discoveries include the heliocentric theory, Newtonian physics, the germ theory of disease, quantum theory, plate tectonics and the discovery that DNA carries genetic information. The science philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously described science as long periods of normality punctuated by times of crisis, when anomalous observations culminate in revolutionary changes that replace one paradigm with another. This essay examines several transformative discoveries in the light of Kuhn’s formulation. We find that each scientific revolution is unique, with disparate origins that may include puzzle solving, serendipity, inspiration, or a convergence of disparate observations. The causes of revolutionary science are varied and lack an obvious common structure. Moreover, it can be difficult to draw a clear distinction between so-called normal and revolutionary science. Revolutionary discoveries often emerge from basic science and are critically dependent on nonrevolutionary research. Revolutionary discoveries may be conceptual or technological in nature, lead to the creation of new fields, and have a lasting impact on many fields in addition to the field from which they emerge. In contrast to political revolutions, scientific revolutions do not necessarily require the destruction of the previous order. For humanity to continue to benefit from revolutionary discoveries, a broad palette of scientific inquiry with a particular emphasis on basic science should be supported. PMID:26933052

  14. Revolutionary Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Casadevall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available On rare occasions in the history of science, remarkable discoveries transform human society and forever alter mankind’s view of the world. Examples of such discoveries include the heliocentric theory, Newtonian physics, the germ theory of disease, quantum theory, plate tectonics and the discovery that DNA carries genetic information. The science philosopher Thomas Kuhn famously described science as long periods of normality punctuated by times of crisis, when anomalous observations culminate in revolutionary changes that replace one paradigm with another. This essay examines several transformative discoveries in the light of Kuhn’s formulation. We find that each scientific revolution is unique, with disparate origins that may include puzzle solving, serendipity, inspiration, or a convergence of disparate observations. The causes of revolutionary science are varied and lack an obvious common structure. Moreover, it can be difficult to draw a clear distinction between so-called normal and revolutionary science. Revolutionary discoveries often emerge from basic science and are critically dependent on nonrevolutionary research. Revolutionary discoveries may be conceptual or technological in nature, lead to the creation of new fields, and have a lasting impact on many fields in addition to the field from which they emerge. In contrast to political revolutions, scientific revolutions do not necessarily require the destruction of the previous order. For humanity to continue to benefit from revolutionary discoveries, a broad palette of scientific inquiry with a particular emphasis on basic science should be supported.

  15. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    WE RECOMMEND Why the Sky is Blue This book gives an excellent answer to the age-old question Science Magic Book of experiments finds the fun in physics Function Generator Kit Build your own simple wave generator Dent pullers Instead of using them to pull out dents, get your pupils to pull them apart Rocket Tracker Launch and track rockets with this kit Stephen Hawking, A biograpy This book looks at both the science and the personal life of the famous physicist WORTH A LOOK The Universe and the Atom All-encompassing but uninspiring physics book Sizzling Magnets Another cheap toy proves its usefulness in the physics lab Efergy Energy-saving meter is easy to use but may not save you energy Experiments and Demonstrations in Physics This book is full of interesting experiments but skewed to a particular hardware system WEB WATCH Gary Williams recounts the valuable lessons he learned at the Software 4 Skint Schools workshop

  16. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND It’s About Time: Understanding Einstein’s Relativity An excellent novel explanation of special relativity. The Plane Factory A great way to make projects more quantitative. Spacesaver Microvoltmeter This meter is robust, portable and covers a good range of voltages. Cassell’s Laws of Nature This book covers everything that governs our physical universe. J D Bernal: The Sage of Science Awell researched biography that is hard to put down. AS-Level Physics: The Revision Guide A very good, reasonably priced revision guide. WORTH A LOOK Symmetry and the Beautiful Universe This book on modern physics is fairly readable but a bit haphazard. HANDLE WITH CARE Hover Football An inferior and cheaper version of the Kick Dis. art & science Art students will get more out of this than physics students. WEB WATCH Practicalphysics.org is an excellent site, packed with useful tips and instructions for practical physics experiments. Louisa Jones describes her favourite websites about waves

  17. Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Barker

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The user guide consists of a 28-page A5 format brochure. It gives an overview (4 pages of the contents of the CD-Rom and how it can assist in the writing process in three main sections: core skills, writing for science and writing for advocacy. Within each of these subsections more detail is provided, with the authors giving a short introductory aim for each task and the expected outcomes

  18. When a Cleared Rape Is Not Cleared: A Multilevel Study of Arrest and Exceptional Clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walfield, Scott M

    2016-05-01

    As rape remains one of the most underreported and least likely to be cleared of the violent crimes, it is of paramount importance to understand the factors associated with the likelihood of a case being cleared by law enforcement. This study uses data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) and the Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS), and a multilevel modeling approach to examine the relationship between victim, offender, incident, and police department characteristics contrasting the two types of clearance: arrest and exceptional clearance. The latter occurs due to reasons outside of law enforcement's control and despite being considered cleared, the offender is not arrested, charged, nor turned over for prosecution. Of the 16,231 cleared rapes in 238 departments, nearly half (47%) results in exceptional clearance when the victim refuses to cooperate or when prosecution is declined. Incident-level variables have a greater effect on the likelihood of exceptional clearance than victim and offender variables. The department explained a nontrivial amount of variation in the dependent variable, as 37% of the variance in type of clearance was between-department variation. Implications for future research on exceptional clearance and NIBRS are discussed. PMID:25646164

  19. Clear cell renal cell tumors: Not all that is "clear" is cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sean R; Cheng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Continued improvement of our understanding of the clinical, histologic, and genetic features of renal cell tumors has progressively evolved renal tumor classification, revealing an expanding array of distinct tumor types with different implications for prognosis, patient counseling, and treatment. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma is unequivocally the most common adult renal tumor, there is growing evidence that some "clear cell" renal neoplasms, such as exemplified by multilocular cystic clear cell renal neoplasm of low malignant potential (formerly multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma), do not have the same potential for insidious progression and metastasis, warranting reclassification as low malignant potential tumors or benign neoplasms. Still other novel tumor types such as clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma have been more recently recognized, which similarly have shown a conspicuous absence of aggressive behavior to date, suggesting that these too may be recategorized as noncancerous or may be premalignant neoplasms. This importance for prognosis is increasingly significant in the modern era, in which renal masses are increasingly found incidentally by imaging techniques at a small tumor size, raising consideration for less aggressive management options guided by renal mass biopsy diagnosis, including imaging surveillance, tumor ablation, or partial nephrectomy. PMID:26988177

  20. 76 FR 45730 - Customer Clearing Documentation and Timing of Acceptance for Clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... derivatives clearing organization (DCO) level.\\4\\ \\4\\ See, e.g., 76 FR 3698 (Jan. 20, 2011) (Risk Management.... 39.12(b)(2) to implement this provision.\\7\\ \\7\\ 76 FR 3698 (Jan. 20, 2011) (Risk Management... important risk mitigant. The Commission recently proposed Sec. 39.12(b)(7) regarding time frames...