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Sample records for clear-pem detector modules

  1. Performance and quality control of Clear-PEM detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Pedro; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Miguel; Moura, Rui; Ortigao, Catarina; Rodrigues, Pedro; Da Silva, Jose C.; Trindade, Andreia; Varela, Joao

    2007-01-01

    Clear-PEM is a dedicated PET scanner for breast and axilla cancer diagnosis, under development within the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, aiming at the detection of tumors down to 2 mm in diameter. The camera consists of two planar detector heads with active dimensions 16.0x14.5 cm 2 . Each head has 96 Clear-PEM detector modules consisting of 32 LYSO:Ce pixels with dimensions 2x2x20 mm 3 packed in a 4x8 BaSO 4 reflector matrix compressed between two Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays in a double-readout configuration for Depth-of-Interaction (DoI) determination. The modules are individually measured and characterized before being grouped into Supermodules (comprised of 24 modules). Measured properties include photo-peak position, relative gain dispersion, energy resolution, cross-talk and DoI resolution. Optical inspection of matrices was also performed with the aid of a microscope, to search for pixel misalignments and matrix defects. Modules' performance was thoroughly evaluated with a 511 keV collimated beam to exactly determine DoI resolution. In addition, a fast quality control (QC) procedure using flood irradiations from a 137 Cs source was applied systematically. The overall performance of the 24 detector modules complies with the design goals of the Clear-PEM detector, showing energy resolution around 15%, DoI resolution of about 2 mm and gain dispersion among pixels of 15%

  2. Long-term stability of the Clear-PEM detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Pedro; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Miguel; Luyten, Joan; Moura, Rui; Ortigao, Catarina; Rodrigues, Pedro; Silva, Jose C. da; Trindade, Andreia; Varela, Joao

    2007-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the imaging system Clear-PEM for positron emission mammography, under development within the framework of the crystal clear collaboration at CERN, is presented in terms of its long-term stability. The detector modules and experimental setup are described. Time evolution results of signal yield, energy resolution, depth-of-interaction and inter-channel crosstalk for a reference detector module are reported

  3. Characterization and quality control of avalanche photodiode arrays for the Clear-PEM detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Conceicao; Amaral, Pedro; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Miguel; Luyten, Joan; Moura, Rui; Ortigao, Catarina; Rato, Pedro; Varela, Joao

    2007-01-01

    Clear-PEM is a Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) prototype being developed in the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN. This device is a dedicated PET camera for mammography, based on LYSO:Ce scintillator crystals, Avalanche PhotoDiodes (APD) and a fast, low-noise electronics readout system, designed to examine both the breast and the axillary lymph node areas, and aiming at the detection of tumors down to 2 mm in diameter. The prototype has two planar detector heads, each composed of 96 detector modules. The Clear-PEM detector module is composed of a matrix of 32 identical 2x2x20 mm 3 LYSO:Ce crystals read at both ends by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays (4x8) for Depth-of-Interaction (DoI) capability. The APD arrays were characterized by the measurement of gain and dark current as a function of bias voltage, under controlled temperature conditions. Two independent setups were used. The full set of 398 APD arrays followed a well-defined quality control (QC) protocol, aiming at the rejection of arrays not complying within defined specifications. From a total of 398 arrays, only 2 (0.5%) were rejected, reassuring the trust in these detectors for prototype assembly and future developments

  4. Reconstruction of Clear-PEM data with STIR

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, M V; Rodrigues, P; Trindade, A; Oliveira, N; Correia, M; Cordeiro, H; Ferreira, N C; Varela, J; Almeida, P

    2006-01-01

    The Clear-PEM scanner is a device based on planar detectors that is currently under development within the Crystal Clear Collaboration, at CERN. The basis for 3D image reconstruction in Clear-PEM is the software for tomographic image reconstruction (STIR). STIR is an open source object-oriented library that efficiently deals with the 3D positron emission tomography data sets. This library was originally designed for the traditional cylindrical scanners. In order to make its use compatible with planar scanner data, new functionalities were introduced into the library's framework. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations of the Clear-PEM scanner acquisitions were used as input for image reconstruction with the 3D OSEM algorithm available in STIR. The results presented indicate that dual plate PEM data can be accurately reconstructed using the enhanced STIR framework.

  5. Clear-PEM: A PET imaging system dedicated to breast cancer diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Albuquerque, E; Almeida, F G; Almeida, P; Amaral, P; Auffray, Etiennette; Bento, P; Bruyndonckx, P; Bugalho, R; Carriço, B; Cordeiro, H; Ferreira, M; Ferreira, N C; Gonçalves, F; Lecoq, Paul; Leong, C; Lopes, F; Lousã, P; Luyten, J; Martins, M V; Matela, N; Rato-Mendes, P; Moura, R; Nobre, J; Oliveira, N; Ortigão, C; Peralta, L; Rego, J; Ribeiro, R; Rodrigues, P; Santos, A I; Silva, J C; Silva, M M; Tavernier, Stefaan; Teixeira, I C; Texeira, J P; Trindade, A; Trummer, Julia; Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The Clear-PEM scanner for positron emission mammography under development is described. The detector is based on pixelized LYSO crystals optically coupled to avalanche photodiodes and readout by a fast low-noise electronic system. A dedicated digital trigger (TGR) and data acquisition (DAQ) system is used for on-line selection of coincidence events with high efficiency, large bandwidth and small dead-time. A specialized gantry allows to perform exams of the breast and of the axilla. In this paper we present results of the measurement of detector modules that integrate the system under construction as well as the imaging performance estimated from Monte Carlo simulated data.

  6. Experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM scanner spectrometric performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugalho, R; Carrico, B; Ferreira, C S; Frade, M; Ferreira, M; Moura, R; Ortigao, C; Pinheiro, J F; Rodrigues, P; Rolo, I; Silva, J C; Trindade, A; Varela, J [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas (LIP), Av. Elias Garcia 14-1, 1000-149 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: frade@lip.pt

    2009-10-15

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution and high-specificity scanner for breast cancer imaging, a Positron Emission Mammography tomograph has been developed and installed at the Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto hospital. The Clear-PEM scanner is mainly composed by two planar detector heads attached to a robotic arm, trigger/data acquisition electronics system and computing servers. The detector heads hold crystal matrices built from 2 x 2 x 20 mm{sup 3} LYSO:Ce crystals readout by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays. The APDs are optically coupled to both ends of the 6144 crystals in order to extract the DOI information for each detected event. Each one of 12288 APD's pixels is read and controlled by Application Specific Integrated Circuits water-cooled by an external cooling unit. The Clear-PEM frontend boards innovative design results in a unprecedented integration of the crystal matrices, APDs and ASICs, making Clear-PEM the PET scanner with the highest number of APD pixels ever integrated so far. In this paper, the scanner's main technical characteristics, calibration strategies and the first spectrometric performance evaluation in a clinical environment are presented. The first commissioning results show 99.7% active channels, which, after calibration, have inter-pixel and absolute gain distributions with dispersions of, respectively, 12.2% and 15.3%, demonstrating that despite the large number of channels, the system is uniform. The mean energy resolution at 511 keV is of 15.9%, with a 8.8% dispersion, and the mean C{sub DOI}{sup -1} is 5.9%/mm, with a 7.8% dispersion. The coincidence time resolution, at 511 keV, for a energy window between 400 and 600 keV, is 5.2 ns FWHM.

  7. Development of ClearPEM-Sonic, a multimodal mammography system for PET and Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucciati, G.; Auffray, E.; Bugalho, R.; Cao, L.; Di Vara, N.; Farina, F.; Felix, N.; Frisch, B.; Ghezzi, A.; Juhan, V.; Jun, D.; Lasaygues, P.; Lecoq, P.; Mensah, S.; Mundler, O.; Neves, J.; Paganoni, M.; Peter, J.; Pizzichemi, M.; Siles, P.; Silva, J. C.; Silva, R.; Tavernier, S.; Tessonnier, L.; Varela, J.

    2014-03-01

    ClearPEM-Sonic is an innovative imaging device specifically developed for breast cancer. The possibility to work in PEM-Ultrasound multimodality allows to obtain metabolic and morphological information increasing the specificity of the exam. The ClearPEM detector is developed to maximize the sensitivity and the spatial resolution as compared to Whole-Body PET scanners. It is coupled with a 3D ultrasound system, the SuperSonic Imagine Aixplorer that improves the specificity of the exam by providing a tissue elasticity map. This work describes the ClearPEM-Sonic project focusing on the technological developments it has required, the technical merits (and limits) and the first multimodal images acquired on a dedicated phantom. It finally presents selected clinical case studies that confirm the value of PEM information.

  8. Development of ClearPEM-Sonic, a multimodal mammography system for PET and Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucciati, G; Vara, N Di; Ghezzi, A; Paganoni, M; Pizzichemi, M; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Lecoq, P; Bugalho, R; Neves, J; Cao, L; Peter, J; Farina, F; Felix, N; Juhan, V; Mundler, O; Siles, P; Jun, D; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S

    2014-01-01

    ClearPEM-Sonic is an innovative imaging device specifically developed for breast cancer. The possibility to work in PEM-Ultrasound multimodality allows to obtain metabolic and morphological information increasing the specificity of the exam. The ClearPEM detector is developed to maximize the sensitivity and the spatial resolution as compared to Whole-Body PET scanners. It is coupled with a 3D ultrasound system, the SuperSonic Imagine Aixplorer that improves the specificity of the exam by providing a tissue elasticity map. This work describes the ClearPEM-Sonic project focusing on the technological developments it has required, the technical merits (and limits) and the first multimodal images acquired on a dedicated phantom. It finally presents selected clinical case studies that confirm the value of PEM information

  9. ClearPEM: prototype PET device dedicated to breast imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Joao Varela

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials have begun in Portugal on a new breast imaging system (ClearPEM) using positron emission tomography (PET). The system, developed by a Portuguese consortium in collaboration with CERN and laboratories participating in the Crystal Clear collaboration, will detect even the smallest tumours and thus help avoid unnecessary biopsies.

  10. Clear-PEM, a dedicated PET camera for mammography

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary results suggest that Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) can offer a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Metabolic images from PEM contain unique information not available from conventional morphologic imaging techniques and aid in expeditiously establishing the diagnosis of cancer. A dedicated machine seems to offer better perspectives in terms of position resolution and sensitivity. This paper describes the concept of Clear-PEM, the system presently developed by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN for an evaluation of this approach. This device is based on new crystals introduced by the Crystal Clear as well as on modern data acquisition techniques developed for the large experiments in high energy physics experiments.

  11. Clear-PEM: A dedicated PET camera for improved breast cancer detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, M. C.; Almeida, P.; Balau, F.; Ferreira, N. C.; Fetal, S.; Fraga, F.; Martins, M.; Matela, N.; Moura, R.; Ortigao, C.; Peralta, L.; Rato, P.; Ribeiro, R.; Rodrigues, P.; Santos, A. I.; Trindade, A.; Varela, J.

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) can offer a non-invasive method for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Metabolic images from PEM using 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose, contain unique information not available from conventional morphologic imaging techniques like X-ray radiography. In this work, the concept of Clear-PEM, the system presently developed in the frame of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, is described. Clear-PEM will be a dedicated scanner, offering better perspectives in terms of position resolution and detection sensitivity. (authors)

  12. Simulation results of a veto counter for the ClearPEM

    CERN Document Server

    Trummer, J; Lecoq, P

    2009-01-01

    The Crystal Clear Collaboration (CCC) has built a prototype of a novel positron emission tomograph dedicated to functional breast imaging, the ClearPEM. The ClearPEM uses the common radio pharmaceutical FDG for imaging cancer. As FDG is a rather non-specific radio tracer, it accumulates not only in cancer cells but in all cells with a high energy consumption, such as the heart and liver. This fact poses a problem especially in breast imaging, where the vicinity of the heart and other organs to the breast leads to a high background noise level in the scanner. In this work, a veto counter to reduce the background is described. Different configurations and their effectiveness were studied using the GATE simulation package.

  13. Solid state detector module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    A solid state detector in which each scintillator is optimally configured and coupled with its associated sensing diode in a way which exploits light piping effects to enhance efficiency, and at the same time provide a detector which is modular in nature. To achieve light piping, the scintillator crystal is oriented such that its sides conform with the crystal cleavage plane, and the sides are highly polished. An array of tungsten collimator plates define the individual channels. Multi-channel scintillator/diode modules are mounted behind and in registry with the plurality of collimator plates. A plurality of scintillators are bonded together after coating the surfaces thereof to minimize optical crosstalk. After lapping the face of the scintillator module, it is then bonded to a diode module with individual scintillators in registration with individual diodes. The module is then positioned in the detector array with collimator plates at the junctions between the scintillators

  14. Detector module for gas monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to radioactive source detector module for use in a gas monitor. It is adapted to contain the source and other detector components to allow sealed coupling of those components with other portions of the gas monitor. It is particularly concerned with the use of radioactive materials used as electron sources in gas monitors. The module is used to detect changes in electron flow caused by partial absorption of the electron capture gas flowing between two electrodes. The assembly includes a gas flow source, a gas receiver and an electronic assembly for receiving a signal from the detector. The radioactive source and electrodes are housed so that they are connected to the gas flow source so as to prevent accidental or undesired disconnection. It is designed so that the detector module may be removed or replaced into the gas monitor assemblies by untrained personnel so as to prevent exposure to the radioactive material. Full details are given. (U.K.)

  15. The CRESST-III detector module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuestrich, Marc [Max-Planck-Institut f. Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) (Germany); Collaboration: CRESST-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The direct dark matter experiment CRESST uses scintillating calorimeters to detected WIMP induced nuclear scattering in CaWO{sub 4} single crystals. Equipped with transition edge sensors (TESs), these detectors can achieve detection thresholds well below 1 keV. The last physics run of CRESST-II proved the high potential of the experiment especially for small WIMP masses and triggered the development of a new detector module using much smaller CaWO{sub 4} main absorbers. The upcoming CRESST-III run will mainly be equipped with these newly developed modules, which combine a fully scintillating detector housing with an improved detection threshold (<100 keV). While many features of the new module were adapted from previous module designs in an improved way, also new features are implemented like instrumented sticks (iSticks) holding the crystals and optimized TES structures for phonon and light detectors. First tests above ground validated the improved performance of these detector modules and promise to explore new regions in the WIMP parameter space in the next CRESST-III run.

  16. Experimental characterization of the 192 channel Clear-PEM frontend ASIC coupled to a multi-pixel APD readout of LYSO:Ce crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Edgar; Bexiga, Vasco; Bugalho, Ricardo; Carrico, Bruno; Ferreira, Claudia S.; Ferreira, Miguel; Godinho, Joaquim; Goncalves, Fernando; Leong, Carlos; Lousa, Pedro; Machado, Pedro; Moura, Rui; Neves, Pedro; Ortigao, Catarina; Piedade, Fernando; Pinheiro, Joao F.; Rego, Joel; Rivetti, Angelo; Rodrigues, Pedro; Silva, Jose C.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution scanner for breast cancer imaging, a very compact and dense frontend electronics system has been developed for readout of multi-pixel S8550 Hamamatsu APDs. The frontend electronics are instrumented with a mixed-signal Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), which incorporates 192 low-noise charge pre-amplifiers, shapers, analog memory cells and digital control blocks. Pulses are continuously stored in memory cells at clock frequency. Channels above a common threshold voltage are readout for digitization by off-chip free-sampling ADCs. The ASIC has a size of 7.3x9.8mm 2 and was implemented in a AMS 0.35μm CMOS technology. In this paper the experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM frontend ASIC, reading out multi-pixel APDs coupled to LYSO:Ce crystal matrices, is presented. The chips were mounted on a custom test board connected to six APD arrays and to the data acquisition system. Six 32-pixel LYSO:Ce crystal matrices coupled on both sides to APD arrays were readout by two test boards. All 384 channels were operational. The chip power consumption is 660 mW (3.4 mW per channel). A very stable behavior of the chip was observed, with an estimated ENC of 1200-1300e - at APD gain 100. The inter-channel noise dispersion and mean baseline variation is less than 8% and 0.5%, respectively. The spread in the gain between different channels is found to be 1.5%. Energy resolution of 16.5% at 511 keV and 12.8% at 662 keV has been measured. Timing measurements between the two APDs that readout the same crystal is extracted and compared with detailed Monte Carlo simulations. At 511 keV the measured single photon time RMS resolution is 1.30 ns, in very good agreement with the expected value of 1.34 ns.

  17. The ALPHA detector : Module Production and Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Butler, E; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Friesen, T; Gutierrez, A; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Jonsell, S; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Pusa, P; Sampson, J; Seddon, D; Seif el Nasr, S; So, C; Thornhill, J; Wells, D; Jorgensen, L V

    2012-01-01

    ALPHA is one of the experiments situated at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD). A Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is placed to surround the ALPHA atom trap. The main purpose of the SVD is to detect and locate antiproton annihilation events by means of the emitted charged pions. The SVD system is presented with special focus given to the design, fabrication and performance of the modules.

  18. Array Detector Modules for Spent Fuel Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2018-05-07

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) proposes to evaluate the arrays of position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid (VFG) detectors for passive gamma-ray emission tomography (ET) to verify the spent fuel in storage casks before storing them in geo-repositories. Our primary objective is to conduct a preliminary analysis of the arrays capabilities and to perform field measurements to validate the effectiveness of the proposed array modules. The outcome of this proposal will consist of baseline designs for the future ET system which can ultimately be used together with neutrons detectors. This will demonstrate the usage of this technology in spent fuel storage casks.

  19. Thermal Module Tests with Irradiated 070 Detectors.

    CERN Document Server

    HOWCROFT, C L F

    1998-01-01

    Four n-in-n detectors were irradiated at KEK to a fluence of 3*1014 protons cm-2. These were used to construct a thermal barrel module to 070 drawings with an A3-90 baseboard at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Thermal testes were conducted on the module, examining the runaway point and the temperatures across the silicon. The results obtained were used to calculate the runaway point under ATLAS conditions. It was concluded that this module meets the specifications in the Technical Design Report, of 160 mW mm-2@ 0°C for runaway and less than 5°C across the silicon. The module was also compared to a Finite Element Analysis, and showed a good agreement.

  20. Cryogenic Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Perea-Solano, B

    2004-01-01

    CERN is presently constructing the LHC, which will produce collisions of 7 TeV protons in 4 interaction points at a design luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The radiation dose resulting from the operation at high luminosity will cause a serious deterioration of the silicon tracker performance. The state-of-art silicon microstrip detectors can tolerate a fluence of about 3 1014 cm-2 of hadrons or charged leptons. This is insufficient, however, for long-term operation in the central parts of the LHC trackers, in particular after the possible luminosity upgrade of the LHC. By operating the detectors at cryogenic temperatures the radiation hardness can be improved by a factor 10. This work proposes a cryogenic microstrip detector module concept which has the features required for the microstrip trackers of the upgraded LHC experiments at CERN. The module can hold an edgeless sensor, being a good candidate for improved luminosity and total cross-section measurements in the ATLAS, CMS and TOTEM experiments. The design o...

  1. Construction and Tests of Modules for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068490

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system and will contribute significantly to the ATLAS track and vertex reconstruction. The detector consists of identical sensor-chip-hybrid modules, arranged in three barrels in the centre and three disks on either side for the forward region. The position of the pixel detector near the interaction point requires excellent radiation hardness, mechanical and thermal robustness, good long-term stability, all combined with a low material budget. The pre-production phase of such pixel modules has nearly finished, yielding fully functional modules. Results are presented of tests with these modules.

  2. Detector Modules for the CMS Pixel Phase 1 Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, De Hua; Berger, Pirmin; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Starodumov, Andrey; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Pixel phase 1 upgrade detector consists of 1184 modules with new design. An important part of the production is the module qualification and calibration, ensuring their proper functionality within the detector. This paper summarizes the qualification and calibration results of modules used in the innermost two detector layers with focus on methods using module-internal calibration signals. Extended characterizations on pixel level such as electronic noise and bump bond connectivity, optimization of operational parameters, sensor quality and thermal stress resistance were performed using a customized setup with controlled environment. It could be shown that the selected modules have on average $0.55 \\mathrm{ {}^{0\\!}\\!/\\!_{00} }\\, \\pm \\, 0.01 \\mathrm{ {}^{0\\!}\\!/\\!_{00} }\\,$ defective pixels and that all performance parameters stay within their specifications.

  3. Evaluation of Irradiated Barrel Detector Modules for the Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sibille, Jennifer Ann

    2013-01-01

    Prototype detector modules comprising sensors and the new readout chips were assembled and irradiated with protons at the CERN PS, and readout chips without sensors have been irradiated with protons at the Karls...

  4. MCC: the Module Controller Chip for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beccherle, R.; Darbo, G.; Gagliardi, G.; Gemme, C.; Morettini, P.; Musico, P.; Osculati, B.; Oppizzi, P.; Pratolongo, F.; Ruscino, E.; Schiavi, C.; Vernocchi, F.; Blanquart, L.; Einsweiler, K.; Meddeler, G.; Richardson, J.; Comes, G.; Fischer, P.; Calvet, D.; Boyd, R.; Sicho, P.

    2002-01-01

    In this article we describe the architecture of the Module Controller Chip for the ATLAS Pixel Detector. The project started in 1997 with the definition of the system specifications. A first fully-working rad-soft prototype was designed in 1998, while a radiation hard version was submitted in 2000. The 1998 version was used to build pixel detector modules. Results from those modules and from the simulated performance in ATLAS are reported. In the article we also describe the hardware/software tools developed to test the MCC performance at the LHC event rate

  5. Beam tests of ATLAS SCT silicon strip detector modules

    CERN Document Server

    Campabadal, F; Key, M; Lozano, M; Martínez, C; Pellegrini, G; Rafí, J M; Ullán, M; Johansen, L; Pommeresche, B; Stugu, B; Ciocio, A; Fadeev, V; Gilchriese, M G D; Haber, C; Siegrist, J; Spieler, H; Vu, C; Bell, P J; Charlton, D G; Dowell, John D; Gallop, B J; Homer, R J; Jovanovic, P; Mahout, G; McMahon, T J; Wilson, J A; Barr, A J; Carter, J R; Fromant, B P; Goodrick, M J; Hill, J C; Lester, C G; Palmer, M J; Parker, M A; Robinson, D; Sabetfakhri, A; Shaw, R J; Anghinolfi, F; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Chouridou, S; Fortin, R; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwé, M; Ferrari, P; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; MacPherson, A; Niinikoski, T O; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Rudge, A; Ruggiero, G; Wallny, R; Weilhammer, P; Bialas, W; Dabrowski, W; Grybos, P; Koperny, S; Blocki, J; Brückman, P; Gadomski, S; Godlewski, J; Górnicki, E; Malecki, P; Moszczynski, A; Stanecka, E; Stodulski, M; Szczygiel, R; Turala, M; Wolter, M; Ahmad, A; Benes, J; Carpentieri, C; Feld, L; Ketterer, C; Ludwig, J; Meinhardt, J; Runge, K; Mikulec, B; Mangin-Brinet, M; D'Onofrio, M; Donega, M; Moêd, S; Sfyrla, A; Ferrère, D; Clark, A G; Perrin, E; Weber, M; Bates, R L; Cheplakov, A P; Saxon, D H; O'Shea, V; Smith, K M; Iwata, Y; Ohsugi, T; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Terada, S; Ujiie, N; Ikegami, Y; Unno, Y; Takashima, R; Brodbeck, T; Chilingarov, A G; Hughes, G; Ratoff, P; Sloan, T; Allport, P P; Casse, G L; Greenall, A; Jackson, J N; Jones, T J; King, B T; Maxfield, S J; Smith, N A; Sutcliffe, P; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Beck, G A; Carter, A A; Lloyd, S L; Martin, A J; Morris, J; Morin, J; Nagai, K; Pritchard, T W; Anderson, B E; Butterworth, J M; Fraser, T J; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; Postranecky, M; Warren, M R M; Cindro, V; Kramberger, G; Mandic, I; Mikuz, M; Duerdoth, I P; Freestone, J; Foster, J M; Ibbotson, M; Loebinger, F K; Pater, J; Snow, S W; Thompson, R J; Atkinson, T M; Bright, G; Kazi, S; Lindsay, S; Moorhead, G F; Taylor, G N; Bachindgagyan, G; Baranova, N; Karmanov, D; Merkine, M; Andricek, L; Bethke, Siegfried; Kudlaty, J; Lutz, Gerhard; Moser, H G; Nisius, R; Richter, R; Schieck, J; Cornelissen, T; Gorfine, G W; Hartjes, F G; Hessey, N P; de Jong, P; Muijs, A J M; Peeters, S J M; Tomeda, Y; Tanaka, R; Nakano, I; Dorholt, O; Danielsen, K M; Huse, T; Sandaker, H; Stapnes, S; Bargassa, Pedrame; Reichold, A; Huffman, T; Nickerson, R B; Weidberg, A; Doucas, G; Hawes, B; Lau, W; Howell, D; Kundu, N; Wastie, R; Böhm, J; Mikestikova, M; Stastny, J; Broklová, Z; Broz, J; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Kubík, P; Reznicek, P; Vorobel, V; Wilhelm, I; Chren, D; Horazdovsky, T; Linhart, V; Pospísil, S; Sinor, M; Solar, M; Sopko, B; Stekl, I; Ardashev, E N; Golovnya, S N; Gorokhov, S A; Kholodenko, A G; Rudenko, R E; Ryadovikov, V N; Vorobev, A P; Adkin, P J; Apsimon, R J; Batchelor, L E; Bizzell, J P; Booker, P; Davis, V R; Easton, J M; Fowler, C; Gibson, M D; Haywood, S J; MacWaters, C; Matheson, J P; Matson, R M; McMahon, S J; Morris, F S; Morrissey, M; Murray, W J; Phillips, P W; Tyndel, M; Villani, E G; Dorfan, D E; Grillo, A A; Rosenbaum, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Spencer, E; Wilder, M; Booth, P; Buttar, C M; Dawson, I; Dervan, P; Grigson, C; Harper, R; Moraes, A; Peak, L S; Varvell, K E; Chu Ming Lee; Hou Li Shing; Lee Shih Chang; Teng Ping Kun; Wan Chang Chun; Hara, K; Kato, Y; Kuwano, T; Minagawa, M; Sengoku, H; Bingefors, N; Brenner, R; Ekelöf, T J C; Eklund, L; Bernabeu, J; Civera, J V; Costa, M J; Fuster, J; García, C; García, J E; González-Sevilla, S; Lacasta, C; Llosa, G; Martí i García, S; Modesto, P; Sánchez, J; Sospedra, L; Vos, M; Fasching, D; González, S; Jared, R C; Charles, E

    2005-01-01

    The design and technology of the silicon strip detector modules for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment have been finalised in the last several years. Integral to this process has been the measurement and verification of the tracking performance of the different module types in test beams at the CERN SPS and the KEK PS. Tests have been performed to explore the module performance under various operating conditions including detector bias voltage, magnetic field, incidence angle, and state of irradiation up to 3 multiplied by 1014 protons per square centimetre. A particular emphasis has been the understanding of the operational consequences of the binary readout scheme.

  6. Long sandwich modules for photon veto detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yershov, N.; Khabibullin, M.; Kudenko, Yu.; Littenberg, L.; Mayatski, V.; Mineev, O.

    2005-01-01

    Long lead-scintillator sandwich modules developed for the BNL experiment KOPIO are described. The individual 4 m long module consists of 15 layers of 7 mm thick extruded scintillator and 15 layers of 1 mm lead absorber. Readout is implemented via WLS fibers glued into grooves in a scintillator with 7 mm spacing and viewed from both ends by the phototubes. Time resolution of 300 ps for cosmic MIPs was obtained. Light output stability monitored for 2 years shows no degradation beyond the measurement errors. A 4 m long C-bent sandwich module was also manufactured and tested

  7. A detector for high frequency modulation in auroral particle fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiger, R. J.; Oehme, D.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Murphree, J.; Anderson, H. R.; Anderson, R.

    1974-01-01

    A high time resolution electron detector has been developed for use in sounding rocket studies of the aurora. The detector is used to look for particle bunching in the range 50 kHz-10 MHz. The design uses an electron multiplier and an onboard frequency spectrum analyzer. By using the onboard analyzer, the data can be transmitted back to ground on a single 93-kHz voltage-controlled oscillator. The detector covers the 50 kHz-10 MHz range six times per second and detects modulation on the order of a new percent of the total electron flux. Spectra are presented for a flight over an auroral arc.

  8. Validation of the excore detector module of PANBOX 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Du Ill; Kang, Jung Kil; Hwang, Sun Tack [Korea Nuclear Fuel Company, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeong Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Finnemann, H; Boer, R [Siemens/KWU N, Erlangen (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    In the PANBOX 2 system an excore detector module simulating the excore signal responses during a short term transient is implemented in order to simulate the reaction of the flux detector and control system upon rapid power changes as it occurs e. g., in rod drop events. This module has been verified in the past by comparison calculations with the PANBOX 1 system. This report describes additional PANBOX 2 validation calculations which have been compared with experimental data measured at german plant KKG, cycle 1, for a rod drop event. In general, the PANBOX 2 results are in very good agreement with the KKG experiments. Therefore it is concluded that the excore detector model of PANBOX 2 is successfully validated. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  9. Validation of the excore detector module of PANBOX 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Du Ill; Kang, Jung Kil; Hwang, Sun Tack [Korea Nuclear Fuel Company, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeong Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Finnemann, H; Boer, R. [Siemens/KWU N, Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In the PANBOX 2 system an excore detector module simulating the excore signal responses during a short term transient is implemented in order to simulate the reaction of the flux detector and control system upon rapid power changes as it occurs e. g., in rod drop events. This module has been verified in the past by comparison calculations with the PANBOX 1 system. This report describes additional PANBOX 2 validation calculations which have been compared with experimental data measured at german plant KKG, cycle 1, for a rod drop event. In general, the PANBOX 2 results are in very good agreement with the KKG experiments. Therefore it is concluded that the excore detector model of PANBOX 2 is successfully validated. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  10. Detectors and focal plane modules for weather satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E.; Masterjohn, S.; Ely, P.; Khalap, V.; Babu, S.; Smith, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    Weather satellite instruments require detectors with a variety of wavelengths ranging from the visible to VLWIR. One of the remote sensing applications is the geostationary GOES-ABI imager covering wavelengths from the 450 to 490 nm band through the 13.0 to 13.6 μm band. There are a total of 16 spectral bands covered. The Cross-track infrared Sounder (CrIS) is a Polar Orbiting interferometric sensor that measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution, using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The pressure, temperature and moisture sounding data are used in weather prediction models that track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. The CrIS instrument contains SWIR (λc ~ 5 μm at 98K), MWIR (λc ~ 9 μm at 98K) and LWIRs (λc ~ 15.5 μm at 81K) bands in three Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs). GOES-ABI contains three focal plane modules (FPMs), (i) a visible-near infrared module consisting of three visible and three near infrared channels, (ii) a MWIR module comprised of five channels from 3.9 μm to 8.6 μm and (iii) a 9.6 μm to 13.3 μm, five-channel LWIR module. The VNIR FPM operates at 205 K, and the MWIR and LWIR FPMs operate at 60 K. Each spectral channel has a redundant array built into a single detector chip. Switching is thus permitted from the primary selected array in each channel to the redundant array, given any degradation in performance of the primary array during the course of the mission. Silicon p-i-n detectors are used for the 0.47 μm to 0.86 μm channels. The thirteen channels above 1 μm are fabricated in various compositions of Hg1-xCdxTe, and in this particular case using two different detector architectures. The 1.38 μm to 9.61 μm channels are all fabricated in Hg1-xCdxTe grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) using the HDVIP detector architecture. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown Hg1-xCdxTe material are used for the LWIR 10.35 μm to 13.3 μm channels fabricated in Double

  11. Pitch adaptors of the ATLAS-SCT Endcap detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullan, M; Lozano, M; Campabadal, F; Fleta, C; Pellegrini, G; Garcia, C; Gonzalez, F

    2007-01-01

    Interconnection between detectors and electronics in modern High Energy Physics has become an issue of difficult solution due to the need to integrate both parts in the same module and the need for a low mass, simple connection. The Endcap section of the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at CERN has adopted the solution of using interface devices called pitch adaptors or fan-ins that, mounted on the modules, and using automatic wire bonding, connect the detector's multiple channels to the front-end electronics, adapting their different designs (pad pitch, dimensions, position). This paper describes the characteristics of these devices, the qualification tests that they have been submitted to, and the final results of their fabrication including quality assurance procedures

  12. Beam test of CSES silicon strip detector module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da-Li; Lu, Hong; Wang, Huan-Yu; Li, Xin-Qiao; Xu, Yan-Bing; An, Zheng-Hua; Yu, Xiao-xia; Wang, Hui; Shi, Feng; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Xiao-Yun

    2017-05-01

    The silicon-strip tracker of the China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite (CSES) consists of two double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) which provide incident particle tracking information. A low-noise analog ASIC VA140 was used in this study for DSSD signal readout. A beam test on the DSSD module was performed at the Beijing Test Beam Facility of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) using a 400-800 MeV/c proton beam. The pedestal analysis results, RMSE noise, gain correction, and intensity distribution of incident particles of the DSSD module are presented. Supported by the XXX Civil Space Programme

  13. Pixel detector modules using MCM-D technology

    CERN Document Server

    Grah, C

    2001-01-01

    For the upcoming ATLAS-experiment at CERN it is planned to build a large area pixel detector, providing more than 100*10/sup 6/ sensor cells. For the innermost layer, the B-physics layer, it is planned to use MCM-D technology to perform the signal interconnections and power distribution on the modules. Focus of this paper is to give an introduction to this technology and present measurements on single chip MCM-D assemblies and a full scale MCM-D module prototype. (10 refs).

  14. Studies on MCM-D pixel-detector-modules

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, T; Gerlach, P; Grah, C; Mättig, P; Rohe, T

    2003-01-01

    In the context of the development of the ATLAS-pixel-detector, a technology for building up the high density interconnects has been studied, the MCM-D (multichip module deposited) technology. Results of building up first assemblies have been reported. MCM-D technology allows to build up assemblies with uniformly segmented sensors. Especially the use of 'equal-sized(-bricked)' sensor geometry has been studied.

  15. Characterization of highly multiplexed monolithic PET / gamma camera detector modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, L. A.; Pedemonte, S.; DeWitt, D.; MacDonald, L.; Hunter, W. C. J.; Van Leemput, K.; Miyaoka, R.

    2018-04-01

    PET detectors use signal multiplexing to reduce the total number of electronics channels needed to cover a given area. Using measured thin-beam calibration data, we tested a principal component based multiplexing scheme for scintillation detectors. The highly-multiplexed detector signal is no longer amenable to standard calibration methodologies. In this study we report results of a prototype multiplexing circuit, and present a new method for calibrating the detector module with multiplexed data. A 50 × 50 × 10 mm3 LYSO scintillation crystal was affixed to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with 8 × 8 position-outputs and one channel that is the sum of the other 64. The 65-channel signal was multiplexed in a resistive circuit, with 65:5 or 65:7 multiplexing. A 0.9 mm beam of 511 keV photons was scanned across the face of the crystal in a 1.52 mm grid pattern in order to characterize the detector response. New methods are developed to reject scattered events and perform depth-estimation to characterize the detector response of the calibration data. Photon interaction position estimation of the testing data was performed using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood estimator and the resolution and scatter-rejection capabilities of the detector were analyzed. We found that using a 7-channel multiplexing scheme (65:7 compression ratio) with 1.67 mm depth bins had the best performance with a beam-contour of 1.2 mm FWHM (from the 0.9 mm beam) near the center of the crystal and 1.9 mm FWHM near the edge of the crystal. The positioned events followed the expected Beer–Lambert depth distribution. The proposed calibration and positioning method exhibited a scattered photon rejection rate that was a 55% improvement over the summed signal energy-windowing method.

  16. Qualification of barrel pixel detector modules for the Phase 1 Upgrade of the CMS vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kudella, Simon

    2016-01-01

    To withstand the higher particle rates of LHC Runs 2 and 3, with expected luminosities of up to $2\\times 10^{34}\\,\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$, the current CMS pixel detector at the LHC will be replaced as part of the CMS Phase I Upgrade during the extended winter shutdown in 2016/17. The new pixel detector features a new geometry with one additional detector layer in the barrel region~(BPIX) and one pair of additional disks in the forward region~(FPIX), new digital readout chips as well as a new CO$_{2}$-based cooling system for both the barrel and forward region. The BPIX detector module production is summarized, with special focus on the different stages of quality assurance. The quality tests as well as the calibrations which all produced modules undergo in a temperature and humidity controlled environment are described. Exemplarily, the KIT/Aachen production line and its subprocesses are presented together with its quality and yields.

  17. Prototype Strip Barrel Modules for the ATLAS ITk Strip Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sawyer, Craig; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The module design for the Phase II Upgrade of the new ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) detector at the LHC employs integrated low mass assembly using single-sided flexible circuits with readout ASICs and a powering circuit incorporating control and monitoring of HV, LV and temperature on the module. Both readout and powering circuits are glued directly onto the silicon sensor surface resulting in a fully integrated, extremely low radiation length module which simultaneously reduces the material requirements of the local support structure by allowing a reduced width stave structure to be employed. Such a module concept has now been fully demonstrated using so-called ABC130 and HCC130 ASICs fabricated in 130nm CMOS technology to readout ATLAS12 n+-in-p silicon strip sensors. Low voltage powering for these demonstrator modules has been realised by utilising a DCDC powerboard based around the CERN FEAST ASIC. This powerboard incorporates an HV multiplexing switch based on a Panasonic GaN transistor. Control and monitori...

  18. The front-end (Level-0) electronics interface module for the LHCb RICH detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bibby, J.H. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Brisbane, S. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Gibson, V. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Harnew, N. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Jones, M. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Libby, J. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: j.libby1@physics.ox.ac.uk; Powell, A. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Newby, C. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Rotolo, N. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Smale, N. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Somerville, L.; Sullivan, P.; Topp-Jorgensen, S. [Sub-department of Particle Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Wotton, S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Wyllie, K. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2007-03-11

    The front-end (Level-0) electronics interface module for the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors is described. This module integrates the novel hybrid photon detectors (HPDs), which instrument the RICH detectors, to the LHCb trigger, data acquisition (DAQ) and control systems. The system operates at 40 MHz with a first-level trigger rate of 1 MHz. The module design is presented and results are given for both laboratory and beam tests.

  19. The front-end (Level-0) electronics interface module for the LHCb RICH detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, M.; Bibby, J.H.; Brisbane, S.; Gibson, V.; Harnew, N.; Jones, M.; Libby, J.; Powell, A.; Newby, C.; Rotolo, N.; Smale, N.; Somerville, L.; Sullivan, P.; Topp-Jorgensen, S.; Wotton, S.; Wyllie, K.

    2007-01-01

    The front-end (Level-0) electronics interface module for the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors is described. This module integrates the novel hybrid photon detectors (HPDs), which instrument the RICH detectors, to the LHCb trigger, data acquisition (DAQ) and control systems. The system operates at 40 MHz with a first-level trigger rate of 1 MHz. The module design is presented and results are given for both laboratory and beam tests

  20. Comparing interaction rate detectors for weakly interacting massive particles with annual modulation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copi, Craig J.; Krauss, Lawrence M.

    2003-01-01

    We compare the sensitivity of WIMP detection via direct separation of possible signal versus background to WIMP detection via detection of an annual modulation, in which signal and background cannot be separated on an event-by-event basis. In order to determine how the constraints from the two different types of experiments might be combined an adequate incorporation of uncertainties due to galactic halo models must be made. This issue is particularly timely in light of recent direct detection limits from Edelweiss and CDMS, which we now demonstrate cannot be made consistent with the most recent claimed DAMA annual modulation observation by including halo uncertainties for spin independent interactions. On the other hand, we demonstrate that a combination of these two techniques, in the event of any positive direct detection signal, could ultimately allow significant constraints on anisotropic halo models even without directional sensitivity in these detectors

  1. A Prototype Large Area Detector Module for Muon Scattering Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, C.A.; Boakes, J.; Burns, J.; Snow, S.; Stapleton, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Quillin, S. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Abstract-Shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) are of concern as some fissile isotopes have low gamma and neutron emission rates. These materials are also easily shielded to the point where their passive emissions are comparable to background. Consequently, shielded SNM is very challenging for passive radiation detection portals which scan cargo containers. One potential solution for this is to utilise the natural cosmic ray muon background and examine how these muons scatter from materials inside the container volume, terms; the muon scattering tomography (MST) technique measures the three-dimensional localised scattering at all points within a cargo container, providing a degree of material discrimination. There is the additional benefit that the MST signal increases with the presence of more high density shielding materials, in contrast to passive radiation detection. Simulations and calculations suggest that the effectiveness of the technique is sensitive to the tracking accuracy amongst other parameters, motivating the need to develop practical detector systems that are capable of tracking cosmic ray muons. To this end, we have constructed and tested a 2 m by 2 m demonstration module based on gaseous drift chambers and triggered by a large area scintillator-based detector, which is readout by wavelength shifting fibres. We discuss its design, construction, characterisation and operational challenges. (authors)

  2. Characterization and selection of CZT detector modules for HEX experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadawale, S.V.; Purohit, S.; Shanmugam, M.; Acharya, Y.B.; Goswami, J.N.; Sudhakar, M.; Sreekumar, P.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of characterization of a large sample of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector modules planned to be used for the HEX (High Energy X-ray spectrometer) experiment onboard India's first mission to the Moon, Chandrayaan-1. We procured forty modules from Orbotech Medical Solutions Ltd. and carried out a detailed characterization of each module at various temperatures and selected final nine detector modules for the flight model of HEX. Here we present the results of the characterization of all modules and the selection procedure for the HEX flight detector modules. These modules show 5-6% energy resolution (at 122 keV, for best 90% of pixels) at room temperature which is improved to ∼4% when these modules are cooled to sub-0 deg. C temperature. The gain and energy resolution were stable during the long duration tests.

  3. Design and test of a prototype silicon detector module for ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker endcaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.G.; Donega, M.; D'Onofrio, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) will be a central part of the tracking system of the ATLAS experiment. The SCT consists of four concentric barrels of silicon detectors as well as two silicon endcap detectors formed by nine disks each. The layout of the forward silicon detector module presented in this paper is based on the approved layout of the silicon detectors of the SCT, their geometry and arrangement in disks, but uses otherwise components identical to the barrel modules of the SCT. The module layout is optimized for excellent thermal management and electrical performance, while keeping the assembly simple and adequate for a large scale module production. This paper summarizes the design and layout of the module and present results of a limited prototype production, which has been extensively tested in the laboratory and testbeam. The module design was not finally adopted for series production because a dedicated forward hybrid layout was pursued

  4. Long-drift calorimeter modules for the Soudan 2 nucleon decay detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoftiezer, J.

    1985-01-01

    The first full size 5-ton detector modules for the Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment have been assembled and operated. Modules consist of a hexagonal array of drift tubes and corrugated steel, instrumented to read out three-dimensional track positions and pulse height. These will be assembled to form an isotropic, continuously sensitive, self-triggering detector. Details of the design, construction, operation and performance of the modules are discussed. 7 refs., 10 figs

  5. Performance And Radiation Hardness Of The Atlas/sct Detector Module

    CERN Document Server

    Eklund, L

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a general purpose experiment being constructed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at FERN, Geneva. ATLAS is designed to exploit the full physics potential of LHC, in particular to study topics concerning the Higgs mechanism, Super-symmetry and CP violation. The cross sections for the processes under study are extremely small, requiring very high luminosity colliding beams. The Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) is an essential part of the Inner Detector tracking system of ATLAS. The active elements of the SCT is 4088 detector modules, tiled on four barrel cylinders and eighteen endcap disks. As a consequence of the high luminosity, the detector modules will operate in a harsh radiation environment. This thesis describes work concerning radiation hardness, beam test performance and methods for production testing of detector modules. The radiation hardness studies have been focused on the electrical performance of the front-end ASIC and the detector module. The results have identified features ...

  6. Proposed method of assembly for the BCD silicon strip vertex detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenmeyer, C.

    1989-01-01

    The BCD Silicon strip Vertex Detector is constructed of 10 identical central region modules and 18 similar forward region modules. This memo describes a method of assembling these modules from individual silicon wafers. Each wafer is fitted with associated front end electronics and cables and has been tested to insure that only good wafers reach the final assembly stage. 5 figs

  7. Electrical production testing of the D0 Silicon microstrip tracker detector modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D0, SMT Production Testing Group; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    The D0 Silicon Microstrip Tracker (SMT) is the innermost system of the D0 detector in Run 2. It consists of 912 detector units, corresponding to 5 different types of assemblies, which add up to a system with 792,576 readout channels. The task entrusted to the Production Testing group was to thoroughly debug, test and grade each detector module before its installation in the tracker. This note describes the production testing sequence and the procedures by which the detector modules were electrically tested and characterized at the various stages of their assembly.

  8. The FCMM, a Fastbus Control and Memory Module for readout of the DELPHI SAT track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikne, J.C.; Skaali, B.

    1990-02-01

    The Small Angle Tagger (SAT) in the DELPHI experiment at CERN concists of detector units placed close to the beam on both sides of the interaction point. The track detector part of the SAT is built of Si-strip detectors where position can be measured to an accurancy of 1 mm in the radial direction. A specially developed Fastbus module for reading and front end buffering of the data from the track detector is decribed in the report. The description is intended as a complete technical manual for the module. 13 refs.; 27 figs

  9. Charge distribution and response time for a modulation-doped extrinsic infrared detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadek, Victor

    1987-01-01

    The electric charge distribution and response time of a modulation-doped extrinsic infrared detector are determined. First, it is demonstrated theoretically that the photoconductive layer is effectively depleted of ionized majority-impurity charges so that scattering is small and mobility is high for photogenerated carriers. Then, using parameters appropriate to an actual detector, the predicted response time is 10 to the -8th to about 10 to the -9th s, which is much faster than comparable conventional detectors. Thus, the modulation-doped detector design would be valuable for heterodyne applications.

  10. Production and Quality Assurance of Detector Modules for the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Volyanskyy, D; Agari, M; Bauer, C; Blouw, J; Hofmann, W; Löchner, S; Maciuc, F; Schmelling, M; Smale, N; Schwingenheuer, B; Voss, H; Borysova, M; Ohrimenko, O; Pugatch, V; Yakovenko, V; Bay, A; Bettler, M O; Fauland, P; Frei, R; Nicolas, L; Knecht, M; Perrin, A; Schneider, O; Tran, M T; Van Hunen, J; Vervink, K; Adeva, B; Esperante-Pereira, D; Gallas, A; Fungueirino-Pazos, J L; Lois, C; Pazos-Alvarez, A; Pérez-Trigo, E; Pló-Casasus, M; Vázquez, P; Bernhard, R P; Bernet, R; Gassner, J; Köstner, S; Lehner, F; Needham, M; Sakhelashvili, T; Steiner, S; Straumann, U; Van Tilburg, J; Vollhardt, A; Wenger, A

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb experiment, which is currently under construction at the Large Hadron Collider~(CERN, Geneva), is designed to study $CP$ violation and find rare decays in the $B$ meson system. To achieve the physics goals the LHCb detector must have excellent tracking performance. An important element of the LHCb tracking system is the Silicon Tracker, which covers a sensitive surface of about 12~m$^2$ with silicon microstrip detectors and includes about 272k readout channels. It uses up to 132~cm long detector modules with readout strips of up to 38~cm in length and up to 57~cm long Kapton interconnects in between sensors and readout hybrids. The production of detector modules has been completed recently and the detector is currently under installation. A rigorous quality assurance programme has been performed to ensure that the detector modules meet the mechanical and electrical requirements and study their various characteristics. In this paper, the detector design, the module production steps, and the module qua...

  11. Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, John K.; Rice, Blake B.; McNeil, Walter J.; Solomon, Clell J.; Patterson, Eric L.; Bellinger, Steven L.

    2010-12-21

    Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

  12. Performance of SEM scintillation detector evaluated by modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the SEM detector is evaluated by the modulation transfer function (MTF) which expresses the detector's influence on the SEM image contrast. This is a novel approach, since the MTF was used previously to describe only the area imaging detectors, or whole imaging systems. The measurement technique and calculation of the MTF for the SEM detector are presented. In addition, the measurement and calculation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of the spatial frequency for the SEM detector are described. In this technique, the time modulated e-beam is used in order to create well-defined input signal for the detector. The MTF and DQE measurements are demonstrated on the Everhart-Thornley scintillation detector. This detector was alternated using the YAG:Ce, YAP:Ce, and CRY18 single-crystal scintillators. The presented MTF and DQE characteristics show good imaging properties of the detectors with the YAP:Ce or CRY18 scintillator, especially for a specific type of the e-beam scan. The results demonstrate the great benefit of the description of SEM detectors using the MTF and DQE. In addition, point-by-point and continual-sweep e-beam scans in SEM were discussed and their influence on the image quality was revealed using the MTF. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Quality tests for SM1 MicroMegas detector module

    CERN Document Server

    Del Gaudio, M

    2016-01-01

    The Phase-I ATLAS upgrade (2018) aims to improve the detector performance at high luminosity (2 × 10$^{34}$ cm$^{−2}s$^{−1}$). In particular, the upgrade of the muon spectrometer focuses on the Small Wheels (SW) in the end-cap region, which cover 1.3 < |η| < 2.7. The SW will be replaced by the New Small Wheels (NSW), which is a set of precision tracking and trigger detectors able to work at high rates with excellent real-time spatial and time resolution. Each NSW will be constituted by multiplet of planar gaseous detectors, with trapezoidal shape: smallstrip Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) and Micro-MEsh Gaseous Structure (MM). This paper describes some of the quality controls that the MM detectors must comply: planarity, thickness and gas tightness.

  14. A MCM-D-type module for the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Becks, K H; Ehrmann, O; Gerlach, P; Gregor, I M; Pieters, P; Topper, M; Truzzi, C; Wolf, J

    1999-01-01

    For the ATLAS experiment at the planned Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN hybrid pixel detectors are being built as innermost layers of the inner tracking detector system. Modules are the basic building blocks of the ATLAS pixel $9 detector. A module consists of a sensor tile with an active area of 16.4 mm*60.4 mm, 16 read out IC's, each serving 24*160 pixel unit cells, a module controller chip, an optical transceiver and the local signal interconnection and $9 power distribution busses. The dies are attached by flip-chip assembly to the sensor diodes and the local busses. In the following a module based on MCM-D technology will be discussed and prototype results will be presented.

  15. The fastbus trigger modules for the SAT detector in the DELPHI experiment at LEP, CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvsvaag, S.J.

    1992-09-01

    This thesis describes the functionality and performance of the fastbus trigger modules for the Small Angle Tagger (SAT) detector in the DELPHI experiment at the LEP machine at CERN. The main purpose of the modules is to provide a Bhabha trigger for the SAT calorimeter used for luminosity measurements. The author has bee responsible for the design, production, testing and installation of the trigger modules. All the test programs necessary to confirm that the modules function according to the specifications are included in this work. Is does not, however, aim to make detailed technical descriptions of the modules. 44 refs., 39 figs., 18 tabs

  16. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2015-01-01

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. We present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. While the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200–600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials.

  17. Depth of interaction decoding of a continuous crystal detector module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, T; Lewellen, T K; Miyaoka, R S

    2007-01-01

    We present a clustering method to extract the depth of interaction (DOI) information from an 8 mm thick crystal version of our continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) small animal PET detector. This clustering method, based on the maximum-likelihood (ML) method, can effectively build look-up tables (LUT) for different DOI regions. Combined with our statistics-based positioning (SBP) method, which uses a LUT searching algorithm based on the ML method and two-dimensional mean-variance LUTs of light responses from each photomultiplier channel with respect to different gamma ray interaction positions, the position of interaction and DOI can be estimated simultaneously. Data simulated using DETECT2000 were used to help validate our approach. An experiment using our cMiCE detector was designed to evaluate the performance. Two and four DOI region clustering were applied to the simulated data. Two DOI regions were used for the experimental data. The misclassification rate for simulated data is about 3.5% for two DOI regions and 10.2% for four DOI regions. For the experimental data, the rate is estimated to be ∼25%. By using multi-DOI LUTs, we also observed improvement of the detector spatial resolution, especially for the corner region of the crystal. These results show that our ML clustering method is a consistent and reliable way to characterize DOI in a continuous crystal detector without requiring any modifications to the crystal or detector front end electronics. The ability to characterize the depth-dependent light response function from measured data is a major step forward in developing practical detectors with DOI positioning capability

  18. Spherical Detector Device Mathematical Modelling with Taking into Account Detector Module Symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyj, V.G.; Fedorchenko, D.V.; Prokopets, S.I.; Prokopets, I.M.; Kazhmuradov, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical Model for spherical detector device accounting to symmetry properties is considered. Exact algorithm for simulation of measurement procedure with multiple radiation sources is developed. Modelling results are shown to have perfect agreement with calibration measurements

  19. Study of multi-channel readout ASIC and its discrete module for particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ke; Fan Lei; Zhang Shengjun; Li Xian

    2013-01-01

    Recently, kinds of particle detectors have used Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) in their electronics readout systems, it is the key part for the whole system. This project designed a multi-channel readout ASIC for general detectors. The chip has Preamplifier, Shaper and Peak Detector embedded for easy readout. For each channel, signal which is preprocessed by a low-noise preamplifier is sent to the shaper to form a quasi-Gaussian pulse and keep its peak for readout. This chip and modules of individual Preamplifier, Shaper and Peak Detector have been manufactured and tested. The discrete modules work well, and the 6-channel chip NPRE 6 is ready for test in some particle detection system. (authors)

  20. FMFinder: A Functional Module Detector for PPI Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Modi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics is an integrated area of data mining, statistics and computational biology. Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI network is the most important biological process in living beings. In this network a protein module interacts with another module and so on, forming a large network of proteins. The same set of proteins which takes part in the organic courses of biological actions is detected through the Function Module Detection method. Clustering process when applied in PPI networks is made of proteins which are part of a larger communication network. As a result of this, we can define the limits for module detection as well as clarify the construction of a PPI network. For understating the bio-mechanism of various living beings, a detailed study of FMFinder detection by clustering process is called for.

  1. Initial Measurements on Pixel Detector Modules for the ATLAS Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Gallrapp, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Delicate conditions in terms of peak and integrated luminosity in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will raise the ATLAS Pixel Detector to its performance limits. Silicon planar, silicon 3D and diamond pixel sensors are three possible sensor technologies which could be implemented in the upcoming Pixel Detector upgrades of the ATLAS experiment. Measurements of the IV-behavior and measurements with radioactive Americium-241 and Strontium-90 are used to characterize the sensor properties and to understand the interaction between the ATLAS FE-I4 front-end chip and the sensor. Comparisons of results from before and after irradiation for silicon planar and 3D pixel sensors, which give a first impression on the charge collection properties of the different sensor technologies, are presented.

  2. Initial Measurements On Pixel Detector Modules For The ATLAS Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Gallrapp, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated conditions in terms of peak and integrated luminosity in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will raise the ATLAS Pixel detector to its performance limits. Silicon planar, silicon 3D and diamond pixel sensors are three possible sensor technologies which could be implemented in the upcoming pixel detector upgrades of the ATLAS experiment. Measurements of the IV-behavior and measurements with radioactive Americium-241 and Strontium-90 are used to characterize the sensor properties and to understand the interaction between the ATLAS FE-I4 front-end chip and the sensor. Comparisons of results from before and after irradiation, which give a first impression on the charge collection properties of the different sensor technologies are presented.

  3. Druid, displaying root module used for linear collider detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, M

    2012-01-01

    Based on the ROOT TEve/TGeo classes and the standard linear collider data structure, a dedicated linear collider event display has been developed. It supports the latest detector models for both International Linear Collider and Compact Linear Collider as well as the CALICE test beam prototypes. It can be used to visualise event information at the generation, simulation and reconstruction levels. Many options are provided in an intuitive interface. It has been heavily employed in a variety of analyses.

  4. A facility for long term evaluation and quality assurance of LHCb Vertex Detector modules

    CERN Document Server

    Marinho, F; Dimattia, R; Doherty, F; Dumps, R; Gersabeck, M; Melone, J; Parkes, C; Saavedra, A; Tobin, M

    2007-01-01

    This note describes the facility developed for long term evaluation and quality assurance of the LHCb Vertex Detector modules, known as the 'Glasgow Burn-in System'. This facility was developed to ensure that the modules conform to stringent quality levels. The system was able to uncover any weaknesses that could be introduced during the manufacturing and assembly of the components or during the transport of the modules to CERN. The system consisted of: a high resolution microscope for visual inspections; and a burn-in system to operate cooled modules in vacuum. The main components of the burn-in system were a vacuum system, a cooling system and a DAQ system.

  5. Characterization of highly multiplexed monolithic PET / gamma camera detector modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, L. A.; Pedemonte, Stefano; Dewitt, Sharon

    2018-01-01

    tube with 8 × 8 position-outputs and one channel that is the sum of the other 64. The 65-channel signal was multiplexed in a resistive circuit, with 65:5 or 65:7 multiplexing. A 0.9 mm beam of 511 keV photons was scanned across the face of the crystal in a 1.52 mm grid pattern in order to characterize...... and scatter-rejection capabilities of the detector were analyzed. We found that using a 7-channel multiplexing scheme (65:7 compression ratio) with 1.67 mm depth bins had the best performance with a beam-contour of 1.2 mm FWHM (from the 0.9 mm beam) near the center of the crystal and 1.9 mm FWHM near the edge...... the detector response. New methods are developed to reject scattered events and perform depthestimation to characterize the detector response of the calibration data. Photon interaction position estimation of the testing data was performed using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood estimator and the resolution...

  6. Optical readout in a multi-module system test for the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flick, Tobias; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Gerlach, Peter; Kersten, Susanne; Maettig, Peter; Nderitu Kirichu, Simon; Reeves, Kendall; Richter, Jennifer; Schultes, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The innermost part of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, CERN, will be a pixel detector, which is presently under construction. The command messages and the readout data of the detector are transmitted over an optical data path. The readout chain consists of many components which are produced at several locations around the world, and must work together in the pixel detector. To verify that these parts are working together as expected a system test has been built up. It consists of detector modules, optoboards, optical fibres, Back of Crate cards, Readout Drivers, and control computers. In this paper, the system test setup and the operation of the readout chain are described. Also, some results of tests using the final pixel detector readout chain are given

  7. Radiation resistance of γ-detector modules at the labelling station of labelled neutrino complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pishchal'nikov, Yu.M.

    1986-01-01

    The data on efficiency and transparency decrease of various types of lightpipe-spectrum (LSS) and scintillation plates on the basis of PMMA and polystyrene under the dose irradiation ranging from 10 4 to 3x10 6 rad have been obtained. Sample irradiation was carried out in a wide muon beam and with the intensive radioactie source 60 Co. The deterioration in the γ-detector (TNF) energy resolution due to the radiation damage of scintillators and (LSS) is discussed. Radiation damage of the lead glass detectors (the GAMS detector) and ''sandwich'' type modules have been compared

  8. Development of the MCM-D technique for pixel detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grah, C.

    2005-03-01

    This thesis treats a copper--polymer based thin film technology, the MCM-D technique and its application when building hybrid pixel detector modules. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC will be equipped with a pixel detector system. The basic mechanical units of the pixel detector are multi chip modules. The main components of these modules are: 16 electronic chips, a controller chip and a large sensor tile, featuring more than 46000 sensor cells. MCM-D is a superior technique to build the necessary signal bus system and the power distribution system directly on the active sensor tile. In collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration, IZM, the thin film process is reviewed and enhanced. The multi layer system was designed and optimized for the interconnection system as well as for the 46000 pixel contacts. Laboratory measurements on prototypes prove that complex routing schemes for geometrically optimized single chips are suitable and have negligible influence on the front--end chips performance. A full scale MCM-D module has been built and it is shown that the technology is suitable to build pixel detector modules. Further tests include the investigation of the impact of hadronic irradiation on the thin film layers. Single chip assemblies have been operated in a test beam environment and the feasibility of the optimization of the sensors could be shown. A review on the potential as well as the perspective for the MCM-D technique in future experiments is given

  9. A sub-millimeter resolution PET detector module using a multi-pixel photon counter array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Yong; Wu Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Siegel, Stefan B

    2010-01-01

    A PET block detector module using an array of sub-millimeter lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount, semiconductor photosensors has been developed. The detector consists of a LSO array, a custom acrylic light guide, a 3 x 3 multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) array (S10362-11-050P, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) and a readout board with a charge division resistor network. The LSO array consists of 100 crystals, each measuring 0.8 x 0.8 x 3 mm 3 and arranged in 0.86 mm pitches. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to aid the design and fabrication of a custom light guide to control distribution of scintillation light over the surface of the MPPC array. The output signals of the nine MPPC are multiplexed by a charge division resistor network to generate four position-encoded analog outputs. Flood image, energy resolution and timing resolution measurements were performed using standard NIM electronics. The linearity of the detector response was investigated using gamma-ray sources of different energies. The 10 x 10 array of 0.8 mm LSO crystals was clearly resolved in the flood image. The average energy resolution and standard deviation were 20.0% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and ±5.0%, respectively, at 511 keV. The timing resolution of a single MPPC coupled to a LSO crystal was found to be 857 ps FWHM, and the value for the central region of detector module was 1182 ps FWHM when ±10% energy window was applied. The nonlinear response of a single MPPC when used to read out a single LSO was observed among the corner crystals of the proposed detector module. However, the central region of the detector module exhibits significantly less nonlinearity (6.5% for 511 keV). These results demonstrate that (1) a charge-sharing resistor network can effectively multiplex MPPC signals and reduce the number of output signals without significantly degrading the performance of a PET detector and (2) a custom light guide to permit light sharing

  10. Using Ionizing Radiation Detectors. Module 11. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on using ionizing radiation detectors. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming and telling the function…

  11. Module Production and Qualification for the Phase I Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086689

    2015-01-01

    After consolidation of the LHC in 2013/14 its centre-of-mass energy will increase to 13TeV and the luminosity will reach $2 \\cdot 10^{34}\\, \\textnormal{cm}^{-2} \\textnormal{s}^{-1}$, which is twice the design luminosity. The latter will result in more simultaneous particle collisions, which would significantly increase the dead time of the current readout chip of the CMS pixel detector. Therefore the entire CMS pixel detector is replaced in 2016/17 and a new digital readout with larger buffers will be used to handle increasing pixel hit rates. An additional fourth barrel-layer provides more space points to improve track reconstruction. Half of the required modules for layer four is being produced at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). This poster deals with the smallest discrete subunit of the pixel detector, the module and its assembly process. Moreover first production experience will be shown.

  12. Development of prototype luminosity detector modules for future experiments on linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081248; Idzik, Marek

    The main objective of this dissertation is to develop and validate the prototype module of the LumiCal luminosity detector. The dissertation presents the works executed from the first detector concept, through all subsequent R&D stages, ending with the test beam results obtained using the complete detector module. Firstly, the linear electron positron colliders and planned experiments are introduced, together with their role in our understanding of the basis of matter and sensing for the New Physics. The signal extraction from radiation sensors and further signal processing techniques are discussed in chapter 2. Besides the commonly accepted techniques of amplitude and time measurements, a novel readout implementation, utilizing digital signal processing and deconvolution principle, is proposed, and its properties are analyzed in details. The architecture, design, and measurements of the LumiCal readout chain components are presented in chapter 3. A dedicated test setups prepared for their parameterizatio...

  13. Development of a compact 25-channel preamplifier module for Si-pad detectors of the BARC-CPDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkar, A.; John, Bency; Vind, R.P.; Kinage, L.; Jangale, R.V.; Biswas, D.C.; Nayak, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    The BARC Charged Particle Detector Array modules use indigenously developed Si pad detectors as their first element. Total number of charge sensitive pre-amplifiers required for the Si-pad detectors is 250. One of the main ideas here is a layout of five pre-amplifiers connected with one Si-pad detector (called a bank of preamplifiers). In the present work, a 25-channel pre-amplifier module that can cater to 5 independent Si-pad detectors, or a five-bank module, has been developed. This module uses pre-amp hybrid chips A1422H from CAEN S.p.A. and is housed in a double width NIM standard box. The module has been tested for performance using proton and ''7Li beams from FOTIA facility, Trombay

  14. Simulation of thermal properties of the silicon detector modules in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Duerdoth, I P; Yuldashev, B S

    2002-01-01

    The temperature distribution and power flow from cell on the Silicon Module of the Forward Semiconductor Tracker in the ATLAS experiment have been simulated for irradiated detector. Power generated by conduction was compared for the modules with one and two cooling points. To obtain an optimal cooling temperature, the temperature of the hottest cell was plotted against power on the silicon module. The analysis of the approximation function and values for the critical power for each cooling temperature are presented. The optimal value of the cooling temperature occurred to be 260 K. (author)

  15. LHCb: Detector Module Design, Construction and Performance for the LHCb SciFi Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Ekelhof, R

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker for the LHCb Upgrade (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15) is based on 2.5 m long multi-layered ribbons from 10,000 km of scintillating fibre over 12 planes covering 350 m2. The planes are separated into modular detectors, each with cooled silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays for photo-readout. In this talk, we will present the construction and performance of this novel detector, including the intricacies of scintillating fibre ribbon production, constructing precision detector planes with a rigid and light module design, and the integration of the readout components for this detector. The complexities and issues regarding this active part of the SciFi Tracker will be emphasised along with the current solutions and measured performances.

  16. Development of high-resolution detector module with depth of interaction identification for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niknejad, Tahereh; Pizzichemi, Marco; Stringhini, Gianluca; Auffray, Etiennette; Bugalho, Ricardo; Da Silva, Jose Carlos; Di Francesco, Agostino; Ferramacho, Luis; Lecoq, Paul; Leong, Carlos; Paganoni, Marco; Rolo, Manuel; Silva, Rui; Silveira, Miguel; Tavernier, Stefaan; Varela, Joao; Zorraquino, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a Time-of-flight high resolution and commercially viable detector module for the application in small PET scanners. A new approach to depth of interaction (DOI) encoding with low complexity for a pixelated crystal array using a single side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and photodetectors was investigated. In this method the DOI information is estimated using the light sharing technique. The detector module is a 1.53×1.53×15 mm"3 matrix of 8×8 LYSO scintillator with lateral surfaces optically depolished separated by reflective foils. The crystal array is optically coupled to 4×4 silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) array and readout by a high performance front-end ASIC with TDC capability (50 ps time binning). The results show an excellent crystal identification for all the scintillators in the matrix, a timing resolution of 530 ps, an average DOI resolution of 5.17 mm FWHM and an average energy resolution of 18.29% FWHM. - Highlights: • A new method for DOI encoding for PET detectors based on light sharing is proposed. • A prototype module with LYSO scintillator matrix coupled to SiPMs array is produced. • The module has one side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and SiPMs. • A compact TOF front-end ASIC is used. • Excellent performances are shown by the prototype module.

  17. Development of high-resolution detector module with depth of interaction identification for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknejad, Tahereh, E-mail: tniknejad@lip.pt [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); Pizzichemi, Marco [University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Stringhini, Gianluca [University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Auffray, Etiennette [CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Bugalho, Ricardo; Da Silva, Jose Carlos; Di Francesco, Agostino [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); Ferramacho, Luis [PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal); Lecoq, Paul [CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Leong, Carlos [PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal); Paganoni, Marco [University of Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Rolo, Manuel [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); INFN, Turin (Italy); Silva, Rui [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); Silveira, Miguel [PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal); Tavernier, Stefaan [PETsys Electronics, Oeiras (Portugal); Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium); Varela, Joao [Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Zorraquino, Carlos [Biomedical Image Technologies Lab, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain); CIBER-BBN, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-11

    We have developed a Time-of-flight high resolution and commercially viable detector module for the application in small PET scanners. A new approach to depth of interaction (DOI) encoding with low complexity for a pixelated crystal array using a single side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and photodetectors was investigated. In this method the DOI information is estimated using the light sharing technique. The detector module is a 1.53×1.53×15 mm{sup 3} matrix of 8×8 LYSO scintillator with lateral surfaces optically depolished separated by reflective foils. The crystal array is optically coupled to 4×4 silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) array and readout by a high performance front-end ASIC with TDC capability (50 ps time binning). The results show an excellent crystal identification for all the scintillators in the matrix, a timing resolution of 530 ps, an average DOI resolution of 5.17 mm FWHM and an average energy resolution of 18.29% FWHM. - Highlights: • A new method for DOI encoding for PET detectors based on light sharing is proposed. • A prototype module with LYSO scintillator matrix coupled to SiPMs array is produced. • The module has one side readout and 4-to-1 coupling between scintillators and SiPMs. • A compact TOF front-end ASIC is used. • Excellent performances are shown by the prototype module.

  18. First large DEPFET pixel modules for the Belle II Pixel Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Felix; Avella, Paola; Kiesling, Christian; Koffmane, Christian; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Valentan, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Andricek, Ladislav; Richter, Rainer [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    DEPFET pixel detectors offer excellent signal to noise ratio, resolution and low power consumption with a low material budget. They will be used at Belle II and are a candidate for an ILC vertex detector. The pixels are integrated in a monolithic piece of silicon which also acts as PCB providing the signal and control routings for the ASICs on top. The first prototype DEPFET sensor modules for Belle II have been produced. The modules have 192000 pixels and are equipped with SMD components and three different kinds of ASICs to control and readout the pixels. The entire readout chain has to be studied; the metal layer interconnectivity and routings need to be verified. The modules are fully characterized, and the operation voltages and control sequences of the ASICs are investigated. An overview of the DEPFET concept and first characterization results is presented.

  19. Performance of the modules for layer 1 of the CMS phase 1 pixel detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Berger, Pirmin; Starodumov, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider will increase to up to 2x10$^{34}$\\;cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ by 2023. In order to cope with such luminosities, the pixel detector of the CMS experiment has been replaced in January 2017. The upgraded detector features four sensitive layers in the barrel part. A designated readout chip (PROC600V2) is used for layer 1, which is closest to the interaction point and therefore has to handle larger particle fluxes. An irradiation campaign has been performed with PROC600V2 to verify its radiation tolerance up to the maximum expected dose for 2017 of 0.2\\;MGy. Modules for layer 1 have been built with PROC600V2 for the detector production. The quality of every inserted module was assessed in a number of tests, some of which were performed using X-radiation. The characteristics of the modules used in the detector as well as the main failure modes will be presented.

  20. New design of a quasi-monolithic detector module with DOI capability for small animal pet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Lee, Seung-Jae; Baek, Cheol-Ha; Choi, Yong

    2008-01-01

    We report a new design of a detector module with depth of interaction (DOI) based on a quasi-monolithic LSO crystal, a multi-channel sensor, and maximum-likelihood position-estimation (MLPE) algorithm. Light transport and detection were modeled in a quasi-monolithic crystal using DETECT2000 code, with lookup tables (LUTs) built by simulation. Events were well separated by applying the MLPE method within 2.0 mm spatial resolution in both trans-axial and DOI directions. These results demonstrate that the proposed detector provides dependable positioning capability for small animal positron emission tomography (PET)

  1. Development of high data readout rate pixel module and detector hybridization at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Sergio

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the baseline design and a variation of the pixel module to handle the data rate required for the BTeV experiment at Fermilab. The present prototype has shown good electrical performance characteristics. Indium bump bonding is proven to be capable of successful fabrication at 50 micron pitch on real detectors. For solder bumps at 50 micron pitch, much better results have been obtained with the fluxless PADS processed detectors. The results are adequate for our needs and our tests have validated it as a viable technology

  2. Assembly procedure of the module (half-stave) of the ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Caselle, M; Antinori, F; Burns, M; Campbell, M; Chochula, P; Dinapoli, R; Elia, D; Formenti, F; Fini, R A; Ghidini, B; Kluge, A; Lenti, V; Manzari, V; Meddi, F; Morel, M; Navach, F; Nilsson, P; Pepato, Adriano; Riedler, P; Santoro, R; Stefanini, G; Viesti, G; Wyllie, K

    2004-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). The detector includes 1200 readout ASICs, each containing 8192 pixel cells, bump-bonded to Si sensor elements. The thickness of the readout chip and the sensor element is 150mum and 200mum, respectively. Low-mass solutions are implemented for the bus and the mechanical support. In this contribution, we describe the basic module (half-stave) of the two SPD layers and we give an overview of its assembly procedure.

  3. The Belle II DEPFET pixel vertex detector. Development of a full-scale module prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarenko, Mikhail

    2013-11-01

    The Belle II experiment, which will start after 2015 at the SuperKEKB accelerator in Japan, will focus on the precision measurement of the CP-violation mechanism and on the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. A new detection system with an excellent spatial resolution and capable of coping with considerably increased background is required. To address this challenge, a pixel detector based on DEPFET technology has been proposed. A new all silicon integrated circuit, called Data Handling Processor (DHP), is implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology. It is designed to steer the detector and preprocess the generated data. The scope of this thesis covers DHP tests and optimization as well the development of its test environment, which is the first Full-Scale Module Prototype of the DEPFET Pixel Vertex detector.

  4. ENC Measurement for ASIC Preamp Board as a Detector Module for PET System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nagara

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We developed a gamma ray detector with an LuAG:Pr scintillator and an avalanche photodiode as a detector for a positron emission tomography (PET system. Studies have been performed on the influences of gamma irradiation on application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC preamp boards used as a detector module. As a device used in nuclear environments for substantial durations, the ASIC has to have a lifetime long enough to ensure that there will be a negligible failure rate during this period. These front-end systems must meet the requirements for standard positron emission tomography (PET systems. Therefore, an equivalent noise charge (ENC experiment is needed to measure the front-end system's characteristics. This study showed that minimum ENC conditions can be achieved if a shorter shaping time could be applied.

  5. A silicon strip module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade in the super LHC collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S., E-mail: Sergio.Gonzalez.Sevilla@cern.ch [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Barbier, G. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Anghinolfi, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cadoux, F.; Clark, A. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Dabrowski, W.; Dwuznik, M. [AGH University of Sceince and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Ferrere, D. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Garcia, C. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); Ikegami, Y. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hara, K. [University of Tsukuba, School of Pure and Applied Sciences, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Jakobs, K. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Kaplon, J. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Koriki, T. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Lacasta, C. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); La Marra, D. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Marti i Garcia, S. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); Parzefall, U. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pohl, M. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Terada, S. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-04-21

    The ATLAS detector is a general purpose experiment designed to fully exploit the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a nominal luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. It is expected that after several years of successful data-taking, the LHC physics program will be extended by increasing the peak luminosity by one order of magnitude. For ATLAS, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of the Inner Detector (ID), since the current tracker will not provide the required performance due to cumulated radiation damage and a dramatic increase in the detector occupancy. In this paper, a proposal of a double-sided silicon micro-strip module for the short-strip region of the future ATLAS ID is presented. The expected thermal performance based upon detailed FEA simulations is discussed. First electrical results from a prototype version of the next generation readout front-end chips are also shown.

  6. Front-end module readout and control electronics for the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, M.N.; Allen, M.D.; Boissevain, J.

    1997-11-01

    Front-end module (FEM) readout and control are implemented as modular, high-density, reprogrammable functions in the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector. FEM control is performed by the heap manager, an FPGA-based circuit in the FEM unit. Each FEM has 256 channels of front-end electronics, readout, and control, all located on an MCM. Data readout, formatting, and control are performed by the heap manager along with 4 interface units that reside outside the MVD detector cylinder. This paper discusses the application of a generic heap manager and the addition of 4 interface module types to meet the specific control and data readout needs of the MVD. Unit functioning, interfaces, timing, data format, and communication rates will be discussed in detail. In addition, subsystem issues regarding mode control, serial architecture and functions, error handling, and FPGA implementation and programming will be presented

  7. Quality Assurance and Performance Tests of Silicon Detector Modules for the CMS/Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Dragicevic, Marko

    2005-01-01

    After providing a short overview of the LHC accelerator, the CMS experiment and it’s various detector systems, we will have an in-depth look on silicon semiconductor particle detectors. Various important aspects like theoretical principles, radiation damage and actual design considerations are discussed and the quality assurance scheme for the sensor and module production is introduced. A strong emphasis is made on the ARC module teststand which was set up and operated be the author. Another important aspect in establishing a good quality assurance scheme is flexibility and keeping an eye on the unexpected. At one such occasion, the author had to gather custom made test equipment, to investigate certain effects in silicon sensors manufactured by ST Microelectronics. Conclusions from these measurement could only be drawn very cautiously, as the manufacturing process and many of its subtle changes, remained a well kept secret of the company. Nevertheless, the investigations proofed to be useful and ST Microel...

  8. A 240-channel thick film multi-chip module for readout of silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, D.; Bellwied, R.; Beuttenmueller, R.; Caines, H.; Chen, W.; DiMassimo, D.; Dyke, H.; Elliott, D.; Grau, M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Humanic, T.; Jensen, P.; Kleinfelder, S.A.; Kotov, I.; Kraner, H.W.; Kuczewski, P.; Leonhardt, B.; Li, Z.; Liaw, C.J.; LoCurto, G.; Middelkamp, P.; Minor, R.; Mazeh, N.; Nehmeh, S.; O'Conner, P.; Ott, G.; Pandey, S.U.; Pruneau, C.; Pinelli, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Rykov, V.; Schambach, J.; Sedlmeir, J.; Sheen, J.; Soja, B.; Stephani, D.; Sugarbaker, E.; Takahashi, J.; Wilson, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a thick film multi-chip module for readout of silicon drift (or low capacitance ∼200 fF) detectors. Main elements of the module include a custom 16-channel NPN-BJT preamplifier-shaper (PASA) and a custom 16-channel CMOS Switched Capacitor Array (SCA). The primary design criteria of the module were the minimizations of the power (12 mW/channel), noise (ENC=490 e - rms), size (20.5 mmx63 mm), and radiation length (1.4%). We will discuss various aspects of the PASA design, with emphasis on the preamplifier feedback network. The SCA is a modification of an integrated circuit that has been previously described [1]; its design features specific to its application in the SVT (Silicon Vertex Tracker in the STAR experiment at RHIC) will be discussed. The 240-channel multi-chip module is a circuit with five metal layers fabricated in thick film technology on a beryllia substrate and contains 35 custom and commercial integrated circuits. It has been recently integrated with silicon drift detectors in both a prototype system assembly for the SVT and a silicon drift array for the E896 experiment at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. We will discuss features of the module's design and fabrication, report the test results, and emphasize its performance both on the bench and under experimental conditions

  9. Hadron and electron response of uranium/liquid argon calorimeter modules for the D0 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolins, M.; Astur, R.; Edmunds, D.; Linnemann, J.T.; Mooney, P.; Owen, D.P.; Pi, B.; Pope, B.G.; Weerts, H.; Ahn, S.C.; Demarteau, M.; Forden, G.E.; Good, M.L.; Grannis, P.D.; Guida, J.A.; Heuring, T.; Marx, M.; McCarthy, R.; Ng, K.K.; Paterno, M.; Schamberger, R.D.; Timko, M.; Aronson, S.H.; Featherly, J.; Gibbard, B.G.; Gordon, H.A.; Guida, J.M.; Guryn, W.; Kahn, S.; Protopopescu, S.; Yamin, P.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bross, A.D.; Christenson, J.H.; Cooper, W.E.; Fisk, H.E.; Haggerty, H.; Ito, A.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Jonckheere, A.M.; Merritt, K.W.; Raja, R.; Smith, R.P.; Treadwell, E.; Blazey, G.C.; Borders, J.; Draper, P.; Durston, S.; Ferbel, T.; Hirosky, R.; Kewley, D.; Libonate, S.; Lobkowicz, F.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, P.M.; Gerecht, J.; Kononenko, W.; Selove, W.; Wang, H.; Hadley, N.J.; Hagopian, S.; Linn, S.; Piekarz, H.; Wahl, H.D.; Yousseff, S.; Klopfenstein, C.; Madaras, R.J.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stevenson, M.L.; Wenzel, W.A.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Nemethy, P.; Nesic, D.; Sculli, J.; Martin, H.J.; Zieminski, A.; Roberts, K.; Wimpenny, S.J.; White, A.P.; Womersley, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    We present the results of tests on two types of uranium/liquid calorimeter modules, one electromagnetic and one hadronic, constructed for the DO detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. For electrons and hardons with energies between 10 and 150 GeV, we present measurements of energy resolution, linearity of response, electromagnetic to hadronic response ratio (e/π), and longitudinal hadronic shower development. We have also investigated the effects of adding small amounts of methane to the liquid argon. (orig.)

  10. Development of an MR-compatible DOI-PET detector module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Ministry of Education (Tsinghua University), Beijing (China); Wang, Shi; Xu, Tianpeng; Gao, Yunpeng; Liu, Yaqiang; Ma, Tianyu [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Ministry of Education (Tsinghua University), Beijing (China)

    2015-05-18

    Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) is a promising sensor for MR-compatible PET systems. In this paper, we developed a compact 2-layer DOI-PET detector. The top layer is a 15×15 LYSO array, and the crystal size is 2x2x7mm{sup 3}. The bottom layer is a 16×16 array with the same size crystals. There is half-crystal offset between two layers in both transverse directions. The detector is coupled to an 8×8 SiPM array (MicroFB-30035-SMT, Sensl). Sixty-four channels of SiPMs are read out by an ASIC chip with in-chip multiplexing resistor networks in the form of two position and one energy analog signals, and are then converted to wave-form digital signals with 80 MHz 12-bit ADC chips. The energy is calculated by averaging the 3 points around the peak of the pulse. Flood images with two 22Na point sources irradiated on the top and at the bottom of the detector module were acquired. The results show that the detector module achieves good crystal identification capability in both layers with an average energy resolution of 17.1% at 511 keV.

  11. Development of an MR-compatible DOI-PET detector module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Xu, Tianpeng; Gao, Yunpeng; Liu, Yaqiang; Ma, Tianyu

    2015-01-01

    Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) is a promising sensor for MR-compatible PET systems. In this paper, we developed a compact 2-layer DOI-PET detector. The top layer is a 15×15 LYSO array, and the crystal size is 2x2x7mm 3 . The bottom layer is a 16×16 array with the same size crystals. There is half-crystal offset between two layers in both transverse directions. The detector is coupled to an 8×8 SiPM array (MicroFB-30035-SMT, Sensl). Sixty-four channels of SiPMs are read out by an ASIC chip with in-chip multiplexing resistor networks in the form of two position and one energy analog signals, and are then converted to wave-form digital signals with 80 MHz 12-bit ADC chips. The energy is calculated by averaging the 3 points around the peak of the pulse. Flood images with two 22Na point sources irradiated on the top and at the bottom of the detector module were acquired. The results show that the detector module achieves good crystal identification capability in both layers with an average energy resolution of 17.1% at 511 keV.

  12. High bandwidth pixel detector modules for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backhaus, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of the nature of the recently discovered electro-weak symmetry breaking mechanism of the standard model of particle physics as well as the search for physics beyond the standard model with the LHC require to collect even more data. To achieve this goal, the luminosity of the LHC will be increased in two steps. The increased luminosity results in serious challenges for the inner tracking systems of the experiments at the LHC. The ATLAS pixel detector will also be upgraded in a two stage program. During the shutdown in 2013 and 2014 a fourth hybrid pixel detector layer, the socalled Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is inserted inside the existing pixel detector. This thesis focuses on the characterization, performance measurement, and production quality assurance of the central sensitive elements of the IBL, the modules. This includes a full characterization of the readout chip (FE-I4) and of the assembled modules. A completely new inner tracking system is mandatory in ATLAS after the second luminosity increase in the shutdown of 2022 and 2023. The final chapter of this thesis introduces a new module concept that uses an industrial high voltage CMOS technology as sensor layer, which is capacitively coupled to the FE-I4 readout chip.

  13. Development of the MCM-D technique for pixel detector modules

    CERN Document Server

    Grah, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This thesis treats a copper--polymer based thin film technology, the MCM-D technique and its application when building hybrid pixel detector modules. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC will be equipped with a pixel detector system. The basic mechanical units of the pixel detector are multi chip modules. The main components of these modules are: 16 electronic chips, a controller chip and a large sensor tile, featuring more than 46000 sensor cells. MCM-D is a superior technique to build the necessary signal bus system and the power distribution system directly on the active sensor tile. In collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration, IZM, the thin film process is reviewed and enhanced. The multi layer system was designed and optimized for the interconnection system as well as for the 46000 pixel contacts. Laboratory measurements on prototypes prove that complex routing schemes for geometrically optimized single chips are suitable and have negligible influence on the front--end ...

  14. Performance of CMS TOB Silicon Detector Modules on a Double Sided Prototype ROD

    CERN Document Server

    Valls, Juan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we summarize results of the performance of CMS TOB silicon detector modules mounted on the first assembled double-sided rod at CERN. Results are given in terms of noise, noise occupancies, signal to noise ratios and signal efficiencies. The noise figures from the rod optical setup are compared to the single module setup with electrical read out. Both test setups show a small or negligible common mode noise picked up by the modules. Similar noise results are obtained in both setups after full calibration gain values are applied. We measure total noise values of ~1600 electrons in peak mode and ~2600 electrons in deconvolution mode. Signal to noise ratios of the order of 15 (25) for deconvolution (peak) operation modes are found. The noise occupancies on the modules have important implications for the zero suppression algorithms which the CMS Tracker FEDs will use to reduce t he data volume flowing to the DAQ. The detector signal efficiencies and noise occupancies are also shown as a function of t...

  15. Opto-box: Optical modules and mini-crate for ATLAS pixel and IBL detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertsche David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The opto-box is a custom mini-crate for housing optical modules which process and transfer optoelectronic data. Many novel solutions were developed for the custom design and manufacturing. The system tightly integrates electrical, mechanical, and thermal functionality into a small package of size 35×10x8 cm3. Special attention was given to ensure proper shielding, grounding, cooling, high reliability, and environmental tolerance. The custom modules, which incorporate Application Specific Integrated Circuits, were developed through a cycle of rigorous testing and redesign. In total, fourteen opto-boxes have been installed and loaded with modules on the ATLAS detector. They are currently in operation as part of the LHC run 2 data read-out chain. This conference proceeding is in support of the poster presented at the International Conference on New Frontiers in Physics (ICNFP 2015 [1].

  16. First MCM-D modules for the b-physics layer of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Basken, O; Ehrmann, O; Gerlach, P; Grah, C; Gregor, I M; Linder, C; Meuser, S; Richardson, J; Topper, M; Wolf, J

    2000-01-01

    The innermost layer (b-physics layer) of the ATLAS Pixel Detector will consist of modules based on MCM-D technology. Such a module consists of a sensor tile with an active area of 16.4 mm*60.4 mm, 16 read out ICs, each serving 24* 160 pixel unit cells, a module controller chip (MCC), an optical transceiver and the local signal interconnection and power distribution busses. We show a prototype of such a module with additional test pads on both sides. The outer dimensions of the final module will be 21.4 mm*67.8 mm. The extremely high wiring density, which is necessary to interconnect the read-out chips, was achieved using a thin film copper/photo-BCB process on the pixel array. The bumping of the read out chips was done using electroplating PbSn. All dice are then attached by flip-chip assembly to the sensor diodes and the local busses. The focus of this paper is the description of the first results of such MCM-D-type modules. (11 refs).

  17. Ready to use detector modules for the NEAT spectrometer: Concept, design, first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, Ádám; Harmat, Péter; Russina, Margarita; Günther, Gerrit; Mezei, Ferenc

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents the detector system developed by Datalist Systems, Ltd. (previously ANTE Innovative Technologies) for the NEAT-II spectrometer at HZB. We present initial concept, design and implementation highlights as well as the first results of measurements such as position resolution. The initial concept called for modular architecture with 416 3He detector tubes organized into thirteen 32-tube modules that can be independently installed and removed to and from the detector vacuum chamber for ease of maintenance. The unalloyed aluminum mechanical support modules for four 8-tube units each also house the air-boxes that contain the front-end electronics (preamplifiers) that need to be on atmospheric pressure. The modules have been manufactured and partly assembled in Hungary and then fully assembled and installed on site by Datalist Systems crew. The signal processing and data acquisition solution is based on low time constant (˜60 ns) preamplifier electronics and sampling ADC's running at 50 MS/s (i.e. a sample every 20 ns) for all 832 data channels. The preamplifiers are proprietary, developed specifically for the NEAT spectrometer, while the ADC's and the FPGA's that further process the data are based on National Instruments products. The data acquisition system comprises 26 FPGA modules each serving 16 tubes (providing for up to 50 kHz count rate per individual tube) and it is organized into two PXI chassis and two data acquisition computers that perform post-processing, event classification and provide appropriate preview of the collected data. The data acquisition software based on Event Recording principles provides a single point of contact for the scientific software with an Event Record List with absolute timestamps of 100ns resolution, timing data of 100 ns resolution for the seven discs chopper system as well as classification data that can be used for flexible data filtering in off-line analysis of the gathered data. A unique 3-tier system of

  18. Testbeam studies of silicon microstrip sensor architectures modified to facilitate detector module mass production

    CERN Document Server

    Poley, Anne-luise; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    For the High Luminosity Upgrade of the LHC, the Inner Detector of the ATLAS detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracker, consisting of pixel and strip sensor detector modules. Silicon strip sensors are being developed to meet both the tracking requirements in a high particle density environment and constraints imposed by the construction process. Several thousand wire bonds per module, connecting sensor strips and readout channels, need to be produced with high reliability and speed, requiring wire bond pads of sufficient size on each sensor strip. These sensor bond pads change the local sensor architecture and the resulting electric field and thus alter the sensor performance. These sensor regions with bond pads, which account for up to 10 % of a silicon strip sensor, were studied using both an electron beam at DESY and a micro-focused X-ray beam at the Diamond Light Source. This contribution presents measurements of the effective strip width in sensor regions where the structure of standard parallel...

  19. Cosmic-muon characterization and annual modulation measurement with Double Chooz detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahão, T.; Anjos, J.C. dos [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22290-180 (Brazil); Almazan, H.; Buck, C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Appel, S. [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Baussan, E.; Brugière, T. [IPHC, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Bekman, I. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Bezerra, T.J.C. [SUBATECH, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, 44307 Nantes (France); Bezrukov, L. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Blucher, E. [The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Busenitz, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Cabrera, A. [AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Camilleri, L.; Carr, R. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cerrada, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, CIEMAT, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Chauveau, E. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Chimenti, P., E-mail: hgomez@apc.univ-paris7.fr [Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP, 09210-580 (Brazil); and others

    2017-02-01

    A study on cosmic muons has been performed for the two identical near and far neutrino detectors of the Double Chooz experiment, placed at ∼120 and ∼300 m.w.e. underground respectively, including the corresponding simulations using the MUSIC simulation package. This characterization has allowed us to measure the muon flux reaching both detectors to be (3.64 ± 0.04) × 10{sup −4} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} for the near detector and (7.00 ± 0.05) × 10{sup −5} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} for the far one. The seasonal modulation of the signal has also been studied observing a positive correlation with the atmospheric temperature, leading to an effective temperature coefficient of α {sub T} = 0.212 ± 0.024 and 0.355 ± 0.019 for the near and far detectors respectively. These measurements, in good agreement with expectations based on theoretical models, represent one of the first measurements of this coefficient in shallow depth installations.

  20. Cosmic-muon characterization and annual modulation measurement with Double Chooz detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, T.; Almazan, H.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Appel, S.; Baussan, E.; Bekman, I.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Bezrukov, L.; Blucher, E.; Brugière, T.; Buck, C.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chauveau, E.; Chimenti, P.; Corpace, O.; Crespo-Anadón, J. I.; Dawson, J. V.; Dhooghe, J.; Djurcic, Z.; Dracos, M.; Etenko, A.; Fallot, M.; Franco, D.; Franke, M.; Furuta, H.; Gil-Botella, I.; Giot, L.; Givaudan, A.; Gögger-Neff, M.; Gómez, H.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Goodman, M.; Hara, T.; Haser, J.; Hellwig, D.; Hourlier, A.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jochum, J.; Jollet, C.; Kale, K.; Kampmann, P.; Kaneda, M.; Kaplan, D. M.; Kawasaki, T.; Kemp, E.; de Kerret, H.; Kryn, D.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lane, C.; Laserre, T.; Lastoria, C.; Lhuillier, D.; Lima, H.; Lindner, M.; López-Castaño, J. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Maeda, J.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Matsubara, T.; Mention, G.; Meregaglia, A.; Miletic, T.; Minotti, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Navas-Nicolás, D.; Novella, P.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Onillon, A.; Oralbaev, A.; Palomares, C.; Pepe, I.; Pronost, G.; Reinhold, B.; Rybolt, B.; Sakamoto, Y.; Santorelli, R.; Schönert, S.; Schoppmann, S.; Sharankova, R.; Sibille, V.; Sinev, V.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Soiron, M.; Soldin, P.; Stahl, A.; Stancu, I.; Stokes, L. F. F.; Strait, M.; Suekane, F.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sun, Y.; Svoboda, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Veyssiere, C.; Vivier, M.; Wagner, S.; Wiebusch, C.; Wurm, M.; Yang, G.; Yermia, F.; Zimmer, V.

    2017-02-01

    A study on cosmic muons has been performed for the two identical near and far neutrino detectors of the Double Chooz experiment, placed at ~120 and ~300 m.w.e. underground respectively, including the corresponding simulations using the MUSIC simulation package. This characterization has allowed us to measure the muon flux reaching both detectors to be (3.64 ± 0.04) × 10-4 cm-2s-1 for the near detector and (7.00 ± 0.05) × 10-5 cm-2s-1 for the far one. The seasonal modulation of the signal has also been studied observing a positive correlation with the atmospheric temperature, leading to an effective temperature coefficient of αT = 0.212 ± 0.024 and 0.355 ± 0.019 for the near and far detectors respectively. These measurements, in good agreement with expectations based on theoretical models, represent one of the first measurements of this coefficient in shallow depth installations.

  1. Cosmic-muon characterization and annual modulation measurement with Double Chooz detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahão, T.; Anjos, J.C. dos; Almazan, H.; Buck, C.; Appel, S.; Baussan, E.; Brugière, T.; Bekman, I.; Bezerra, T.J.C.; Bezrukov, L.; Blucher, E.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chauveau, E.; Chimenti, P.

    2017-01-01

    A study on cosmic muons has been performed for the two identical near and far neutrino detectors of the Double Chooz experiment, placed at ∼120 and ∼300 m.w.e. underground respectively, including the corresponding simulations using the MUSIC simulation package. This characterization has allowed us to measure the muon flux reaching both detectors to be (3.64 ± 0.04) × 10 −4 cm −2 s −1 for the near detector and (7.00 ± 0.05) × 10 −5 cm −2 s −1 for the far one. The seasonal modulation of the signal has also been studied observing a positive correlation with the atmospheric temperature, leading to an effective temperature coefficient of α T = 0.212 ± 0.024 and 0.355 ± 0.019 for the near and far detectors respectively. These measurements, in good agreement with expectations based on theoretical models, represent one of the first measurements of this coefficient in shallow depth installations.

  2. Wire Bonding on 2S Modules of the Phase-2 CMS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2226525; Pooth, Oliver

    The LHC will be upgraded to the HL-LHC in the Long Shutdown 3 starting 2024. This upgrade will increase the collision rate and the overall number of colliding particles requiring high precision particle detectors which are able to cope with much higher radiation doses and numbers of particle interactions per bunch crossing. To fulfill these technical requirements the CMS detector will be upgraded in the so-called Phase-2 Upgrade. Among others the silicon tracking system will be completely replaced by a new system providing a higher acceptance, an improved granularity and the feature to include its tracking information into the level-1 trigger. The new outer-tracker will consist of so called 2S modules consisting of two strip sensors and PS modules with a macro-pixel sensor and a strip sensor. The electrical connection between the strip sensors and the front-end electronics is realized by thin aluminum wire bonds. In this thesis the process of wire bonding is introduced and its implementation in the 2S module ...

  3. Characterization of Ni/SnPb-TiW/Pt Flip Chip Interconnections in Silicon Pixel Detector Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Karadzhinova, Aneliya; Härkönen, Jaakko; Luukka, Panja-riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Tuominen, Eija; Haeggstrom, Edward; Kalliopuska, Juha; Vahanen, Sami; Kassamakov, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary high energy physics experiments, silicon detectors are essential for recording the trajectory of new particles generated by multiple simultaneous collisions. Modern particle tracking systems may feature 100 million channels, or pixels, which need to be individually connected to read-out chains. Silicon pixel detectors are typically connected to readout chips by flip-chip bonding using solder bumps. High-quality electro-mechanical flip-chip interconnects minimizes the number of dead read-out channels in the particle tracking system. Furthermore, the detector modules must endure handling during installation and withstand heat generation and cooling during operation. Silicon pixel detector modules were constructed by flip-chip bonding 16 readout chips to a single sensor. Eutectic SnPb solder bumps were deposited on the readout chips and the sensor chips were coated with TiW/Pt thin film UBM (under bump metallization). The modules were assembled at Advacam Ltd, Finland. We studied the uniformity o...

  4. Beam loss studies on silicon strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The large beam energy of the LHC demands for a save beam abort system. Nevertheless, failures cannot be excluded with last assurance and are predicted to occur once per year. As the CMS experiment is placed in the neighboured LHC octant, it is affected by such events. The effect of an unsynchronized beam abort on the silicon strip modules of the CMS tracking detector has been investigated in this thesis by performing one accelerator and two lab experiments. The dynamical behaviour of operational parameters of modules and components has been recorded during simulated beam loss events to be able to disentangle the reasons of possible damages. The first study with high intensive proton bunches at the CERN PS ensured the robustness of the module design against beam losses. A further lab experiment with pulsed IR LEDs clarified the physical and electrical processes during such events. The silicon strip sensors on a module are protected against beam losses by a part of the module design that originally has not been...

  5. Clock and trigger distribution for CBM-TOF quality evaluation of RPC super module detector assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Huang, X.; Cao, P.; Wang, J.; An, Q.

    2018-03-01

    RPC Super module (SM) detector assemblies are used for charged hadron identification in the Time-of-Flight (TOF) spectrometer at the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment. Each SM contains several multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) and provides up to 320 electronic channels in total for high-precision time measurements. Time resolution of the Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) is required to be better than 20 ps. During mass production, the quality of each SM needs to be evaluated. In order to meet the requirements, the system clock signal as well as the trigger signal should be distributed precisely and synchronously to all electronics modules within the evaluation readout system. In this paper, a hierarchical clock and trigger distribution method is proposed for the quality evaluation of CBM-TOF SM detectors. In a first stage, the master clock and trigger module (CTM) allocated in a 6U PXI chassis distributes the clock and trigger signals to the slave CTM in the same chassis. In a second stage, the slave CTM transmits the clock and trigger signals to the TDC readout module (TRM) through one optical link. In a third stage, the TRM distributes the clock and trigger signals synchronously to 10 individual TDC boards. Laboratory test results show that the clock jitter at the third stage is less than 4 ps (RMS) and the trigger transmission latency from the master CTM to the TDC is about 272 ns with 11 ps (RMS) jitter. The overall performance complies well with the required specifications.

  6. Effect of refraction index and light sharing on detector element identification for 2D detector modules in Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornai, M.P.; Hoffman, E.J.; Cherry, S.R.

    1994-01-01

    Relationships among indices of refraction (n) of scintillation detectors, light sharing among discrete detector elements and accuracy of detector element identification in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) 2-D detector arrays were examined with theory and experiment. Mismatches between the index of refraction of scintillators and the glass of photomultipliers (PMT) were seen to lead to nonlinear relationships between crystal position and ratio (positioning) signals derived from PMTs. Insight is provided into the empirically derived use of light sharing among elements of the crystals in PET 2-D array detectors to compensate for this nonlinear response. ((orig.))

  7. A room temperature LSO/PIN photodiode PET detector module that measures depth of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Melcher, C.L.; Manente, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    We present measurements of a 4 element PET detector module that uses a 2x2 array of 3 mm square PIN photodiodes to both measure the depth of interaction (DOI) and identify the crystal of interaction. Each photodiode is coupled to one end of a 3x3x25 mm LSO crystal, with the opposite ends of all 4 crystals attached to a single PMT that provides a timing signal and initial energy discrimination. Each LSO crystal is coated with a open-quotes lossyclose quotes reflector, so the ratio of light detected in the photodiode and PMT depends on the position of interaction in the crystal, and is used to determine this position on an event by event basis. This module is operated at +25 degrees C with a photodiode amplifier peaking time of 2 μs. When excited by a collimated beam of 511 keV photons at the photodiode end of the module (i.e. closest to the patient), the DOI resolution is 4 mm fwhm and the crystal of interaction is identified correctly 95% of the time. When excited at the opposite end of the module, the DOI resolution is 13 mm fwhm and the crystal of interaction is identified correctly 73% of the time. The channel to channel variations in performance are minimal

  8. A High Density Low Cost Digital Signal Processing Module for Large Scale Radiation Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Hui; Hennig, Wolfgang; Walby, Mark D.; Breus, Dimitry; Harris, Jackson T.; Grudberg, Peter M.; Warburton, William K.

    2013-06-01

    A 32-channel digital spectrometer PIXIE-32 is being developed for nuclear physics or other radiation detection applications requiring digital signal processing with large number of channels at relatively low cost. A single PIXIE-32 provides spectrometry and waveform acquisition for 32 input signals per module whereas multiple modules can be combined into larger systems. It is based on the PCI Express standard which allows data transfer rates to the host computer of up to 800 MB/s. Each of the 32 channels in a PIXIE-32 module accepts signals directly from a detector preamplifier or photomultiplier. Digitally controlled offsets can be individually adjusted for each channel. Signals are digitized in 12-bit, 50 MHz multi-channel ADCs. Triggering, pile-up inspection and filtering of the data stream are performed in real time, and pulse heights and other event data are calculated on an event-by event basis. The hardware architecture, internal and external triggering features, and the spectrometry and waveform acquisition capability of the PIXIE- 32 as well as its capability to distribute clock and triggers among multiple modules, are presented. (authors)

  9. A silicon strip module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade in the super LHC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Parzefall, U; Clark, A; Ikegami, Y; Hara, K; Garcia, C; Jakobs, K; Dwuznik, M; Terada, S; Barbier, G; Koriki, T; Lacasta, C; Unno, Y; Anghinolfi, F; Cadoux, F; Garcia, S M I; Ferrere, D; La Marra, D; Pohl, M; Dabrowski, W; Kaplon, J

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is a general purpose experiment designed to fully exploit the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a nominal luminosity of 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1). It is expected that after several years of successful data-taking, the LHC physics program will be extended by increasing the peak luminosity by one order of magnitude. For ATLAS, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of the Inner Detector (ID), since the current tracker will not provide the required performance due to cumulated radiation damage and a dramatic increase in the detector occupancy. In this paper, a proposal of a double-sided silicon micro-strip module for the short-strip region of the future ATLAS ID is presented. The expected thermal performance based upon detailed FEA simulations is discussed. First electrical results from a prototype version of the next generation readout front-end chips are also shown. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.H.; Jeon, H.B.; Park, H.; Uozumi, S.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A.K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P.K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.

    2016-01-01

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor “Origami” method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force. - Highlights: • Gluing and wire binding for Belle-II SVD are studied. • Gluing robot and Origami module are used. • QA are satisfied in terms of the achieved bonding throughput and the pull force. • Result will be applied for L6 ladder assembly.

  11. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, K.H.; Jeon, H.B. [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H., E-mail: sunshine@knu.ac.kr [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Uozumi, S. [RSRI, Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); and others

    2016-09-21

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor “Origami” method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force. - Highlights: • Gluing and wire binding for Belle-II SVD are studied. • Gluing robot and Origami module are used. • QA are satisfied in terms of the achieved bonding throughput and the pull force. • Result will be applied for L6 ladder assembly.

  12. Assembly and Electrical Tests of the First Full-size Forward Module for the ATLAS ITk Strip Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Argos, Carlos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will replace the existing Inner Detector by an all-silicon detector named the Inner Tracker (ITk) for the High Luminosity LHC upgrades. In the outer region of the Inner Tracker is the strip detector, which consists of a four layer barrel and six discs to each side of the barrel, with silicon-strip modules as basic units. Each module is composed of a sensor and one or more flex circuits that hold the read-out electronics. In the experiment, the modules are mounted on support structures with integrated power and cooling. The modules are designed with geometries that accommodate the central and forward regions, with rectangular sensors in the barrels and wedge shaped sensors in the end-caps. The strips lengths and pitch sizes vary according to the occupancy of the region. In this contribution, we present the construction and the results of the electrical tests of the first full-size module of the innermost forward region, named Ring 0 in the ATLAS ITk strip detector nomenclature. This module...

  13. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Poley, Luise; Bloch, Ingo; Edwards, Sam; Friedrich, Conrad; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Jones, Tim; Lacker, Heiko; Pyatt, Simon; Rehnisch, Laura; Sperlich, Dennis; Wilson, John

    2015-01-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy gl...

  14. Frequency-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Ranging Using Photon-Counting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Barber, Zeb W.; Dahl, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Optical ranging is a problem of estimating the round-trip flight time of a phase- or amplitude-modulated optical beam that reflects off of a target. Frequency- modulated, continuous-wave (FMCW) ranging systems obtain this estimate by performing an interferometric measurement between a local frequency- modulated laser beam and a delayed copy returning from the target. The range estimate is formed by mixing the target-return field with the local reference field on a beamsplitter and detecting the resultant beat modulation. In conventional FMCW ranging, the source modulation is linear in instantaneous frequency, the reference-arm field has many more photons than the target-return field, and the time-of-flight estimate is generated by balanced difference- detection of the beamsplitter output, followed by a frequency-domain peak search. This work focused on determining the maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation algorithm when continuous-time photoncounting detectors are used. It is founded on a rigorous statistical characterization of the (random) photoelectron emission times as a function of the incident optical field, including the deleterious effects caused by dark current and dead time. These statistics enable derivation of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRB) on the accuracy of FMCW ranging, and derivation of the ML estimator, whose performance approaches this bound at high photon flux. The estimation algorithm was developed, and its optimality properties were shown in simulation. Experimental data show that it performs better than the conventional estimation algorithms used. The demonstrated improvement is a factor of 1.414 over frequency-domainbased estimation. If the target interrogating photons and the local reference field photons are costed equally, the optimal allocation of photons between these two arms is to have them equally distributed. This is different than the state of the art, in which the local field is stronger than the target return. The optimal

  15. Assembly and Electrical Tests of the First Full-size Forward Module for the ATLAS ITk Strip Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Argos, Carlos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will replace the existing Inner Detector by an all-silicon detector named the Inner Tracker (ITk) for the High Luminosity LHC upgrades. In the outer region of the Inner Tracker is the strip detector, which consists of a four layer barrel and six discs to each side of the barrel, with silicon-strip modules as basic units. Each module is composed of a sensor and one or more flex circuits that hold the read-out electronics. In the experiment, the modules are mounted on support structures with integrated power and cooling. The modules are designed with geometries that accommodate the central and forward regions, with rectangular sensors in the barrels and wedge shaped sensors in the end-caps. The strips lengths and pitch sizes vary according to the occupancy of the region. In this contribution, we present the construction and results of the electrical tests of the first full-size module of the innermost forward region, named \\textit{Ring 0} in the ATLAS ITk strip detector nomenclature. This m...

  16. Development of a PET detector module incorporating a silicon photodiode array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, A.B.; Takacs, G.J.; Lerch, M.L.F.; Simmonds, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We are developing a new Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detection sub-module with depth of interaction capability. The new sub-module is simple and robust to minimise module assembly complications and is completely independent of photomultiplier tubes. The new sub-module has also been designed to maximise its flexibility for easy sub-module coupling so as to form a complete, customised, detection module to be used in PET scanners dedicated to human brain and breast, and small animal studies. Blue enhanced, silicon 8x8 detector arrays are used to read out the scintillation crystals, and form the basis of the new module. The new detectors were designed by the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) at the University of Wollongong in collaboration with the High Energy Physics Department, University of Melbourne and produced by SPO D etector , Ukraine. Complementing the work on the silicon photodetectors, we have also carried out simulations of the propagation of the scintillation light in the crystals, and the effect of crystal dimensions and surface treatment on the distribution of light detected by the photodiode array. The distribution of light over the photodiodes has then been used to test various algorithms for calculating the point of interaction of the gamma ray in the crystal. Simulations of the light propagation show that for a crystal of dimensions 25mm x 25mm x 3mm, it is possible to determine the point of interaction in 2 dimensions with an average accuracy of just over 0.5mm. The resulting photon distribution detected by the array. The surface treatment, while having a large effect on the light output, does not have a great effect on the accuracy. If these dimensions change to 25mm x 25mm x 6mm then the surface conditions have a greater effect on the accuracy. It is possible however, with careful surface treatment, to achieve an accuracy of around 0.6mm, only marginally worse than the case for the 3mm thick crystal. Gamma ray

  17. First results of the deployment of a SoLid detector module at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, N.

    The SoLid experiment aims to resolve the reactor neutrino anomaly by searching for electron-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillations. The search will be performed between 5.5 and 10 m from the highly enriched uranium core of the BR2 reactor at SCK-CEN. The experiment utilises a novel approach to anti-neutrino detection based on a highly segmented, composite scintillator detector design. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved using a combination of high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6 LiF:ZnS(Ag) and precise localisation of the inverse beta decay products. This compact detector system requires limited passive shielding as it relies on spacial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. The first full scale, 288 kg, detector module was deployed at the BR2 reactor in November 2014. A phased three tonne experimental deployment will begin in the second half of 2016, allowing a precise search for oscillations that will resolve the reactor anomaly using a three tonne detector running for three years. In this talk the novel detector design is explained and initial detector performance results from the module level deployment are presented along with an estimation of the physics reach of the next phase.

  18. Evaluation of detector array technology for the verification of advanced intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Mohammad

    Purpose: Quality assurance (QA) for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has evolved substantially. In recent years, various ionization chamber or diode detector arrays have become commercially available, allowing pre-treatment absolute dose verification with near real-time results. This has led to a wide uptake of this technology to replace point dose and film dosimetry and to facilitate QA streamlining. However, arrays are limited by their spatial resolution giving rise to concerns about their response to clinically relevant deviations. The common factor in all commercial array systems is the reliance on the gamma index (γ) method to provide the quantitative evaluation of the measured dose distribution against the Treatment Planning System (TPS) calculated dose distribution. The mathematical definition of the gamma index presents computational challenges that can cause a variation in the calculation in different systems. The purpose of this thesis was to evaluate the suitability of detector array systems, combined with their implementation of the gamma index, in the verification and dosimetry audit of advanced IMRT. Method: The response of various commercial detector array systems (Delta4®, ArcCHECK®, and the PTW 2D-Array seven29™ and OCTAVIUS II™ phantom combination, Gafchromic® EBT2 and composite EPID measurements) to simulated deliberate changes in clinical IMRT and VMAT plans was evaluated. The variability of the gamma index calculation in the different systems was also evaluated by comparing against a bespoke Matlab-based gamma index analysis software. A novel methodology for using a commercial detector array in a dosimetry audit of rotational radiotherapy was then developed. Comparison was made between measurements using the detector array and those performed using ionization chambers, alanine and radiochromic film. The methodology was developed as part of the development of a national audit of rotational radiotherapy. Ten cancer centres were

  19. Design and evaluation of a SiPM-based large-area detector module for positron emission imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Sánchez, H.; Murrieta-Rodríguez, T.; Calva-Coraza, E.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2018-03-01

    The design and evaluation of a large-area detector module for positron emission imaging applications, is presented. The module features a SensL ArrayC-60035-64P-PCB solid state detector (8×8 array of tileable silicon photomultipliers by SensL, 7.2 mm pitch) covering a total area of 57.4×57.4 mm2. The detector module was formed using a pixelated array of 40×40 lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillator crystal elements with 1.43 mm pitch. A 7 mm thick coupling light guide was used to allow light sharing between adjacent SiPM. A 16-channel symmetric charge division (SCD) readout board was designed to multiplex the number of signals from 64 to 16 (8 columns and 8 rows) and a center-of-gravity algorithm to identify the position. Data acquisition and digitization was accomplished using a custom-made system based on FPGAs boards. Crystal maps were obtained using 18F-positron sources and Voronoi diagrams were used to correct for geometric distortions and to generate a non-uniformity correction matrix. All measurements were taken at a controlled room temperature of 22oC. The crystal maps showed minor distortion, 90% of the 1600 total crystal elements could be identified, a mean peak-to-valley ratio of 4.3 was obtained and a 10.8% mean energy resolution for 511 keV annihilation photons was determined. The performance of the detector using our own readout board was compared to that using two different commercially readout boards using the same detector module arrangement. We show that these large-area SiPM arrays, combined with a 16-channel SCD readout board, can offer high spatial resolution, excellent energy resolution and detector uniformity and thus, can be used for positron emission imaging applications.

  20. Graphical user interface for a dual-module EMCCD x-ray detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Gupta, Sandesh K.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    A new Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed using Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) for a high-resolution, high-sensitivity Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII), which is a new x-ray detector for radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging, consisting of an array of Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) each having a variable on-chip electron-multiplication gain of up to 2000x to reduce the effect of readout noise. To enlarge the field-of-view (FOV), each EMCCD sensor is coupled to an x-ray phosphor through a fiberoptic taper. Two EMCCD camera modules are used in our prototype to form a computer-controlled array; however, larger arrays are under development. The new GUI provides patient registration, EMCCD module control, image acquisition, and patient image review. Images from the array are stitched into a 2kx1k pixel image that can be acquired and saved at a rate of 17 Hz (faster with pixel binning). When reviewing the patient's data, the operator can select images from the patient's directory tree listed by the GUI and cycle through the images using a slider bar. Commonly used camera parameters including exposure time, trigger mode, and individual EMCCD gain can be easily adjusted using the GUI. The GUI is designed to accommodate expansion of the EMCCD array to even larger FOVs with more modules. The high-resolution, high-sensitivity EMCCD modular-array SSXII imager with the new user-friendly GUI should enable angiographers and interventionalists to visualize smaller vessels and endovascular devices, helping them to make more accurate diagnoses and to perform more precise image-guided interventions.

  1. Graphical User Interface for a Dual-Module EMCCD X-ray Detector Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Gupta, Sandesh K; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-16

    A new Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed using Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) for a high-resolution, high-sensitivity Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII), which is a new x-ray detector for radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging, consisting of an array of Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) each having a variable on-chip electron-multiplication gain of up to 2000× to reduce the effect of readout noise. To enlarge the field-of-view (FOV), each EMCCD sensor is coupled to an x-ray phosphor through a fiberoptic taper. Two EMCCD camera modules are used in our prototype to form a computer-controlled array; however, larger arrays are under development. The new GUI provides patient registration, EMCCD module control, image acquisition, and patient image review. Images from the array are stitched into a 2k×1k pixel image that can be acquired and saved at a rate of 17 Hz (faster with pixel binning). When reviewing the patient's data, the operator can select images from the patient's directory tree listed by the GUI and cycle through the images using a slider bar. Commonly used camera parameters including exposure time, trigger mode, and individual EMCCD gain can be easily adjusted using the GUI. The GUI is designed to accommodate expansion of the EMCCD array to even larger FOVs with more modules. The high-resolution, high-sensitivity EMCCD modular-array SSXII imager with the new user-friendly GUI should enable angiographers and interventionalists to visualize smaller vessels and endovascular devices, helping them to make more accurate diagnoses and to perform more precise image-guided interventions.

  2. Development of a multi-channel front-end electronics module based on ASIC for silicon strip array detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xingwen; Yan Duo; Su Hong; Qian Yi; Kong Jie; Zhang Xueheng; Li Zhankui; Li Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The silicon strip array detector is one of external target facility subsystems in the Cooling Storage Ring on the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR). Using the ASICs, the front-end electronics module has been developed for the silicon strip array detectors and can implement measurement of energy of 96 channels. The performance of the front-end electronics module has been tested. The energy linearity of the front-end electronics module is better than 0.3% for the dynamic range of 0.1∼0.7 V. The energy resolution is better than 0.45%. The maximum channel crosstalk is better than 10%. The channel consistency is better than 1.3%. After continuously working for 24 h at room temperature, the maximum drift of the zero-peak is 1.48 mV. (authors)

  3. VXI based multibunch detector and QPSK modulator for the PEP-II/ALS/DAΦNE longitudinal feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.; Fox, J.; Teytelman, D.

    1997-04-01

    The PEP-II/ALS/DAΦNE feedback systems are complex systems implemented using analog, digital and microwave circuits. The VXI hardware implementation for the Front-end and Back-end analog processing modules is presented. The Front-end module produces a baseband beam phase signal from pickups using a microwave tone burst generator. The Back-end VXI module generates an AM/QPSK modulated signal from a baseband correction signal computed in a digital signal processor. These components are implemented in VXI packages that allow a wide spectrum of system functions including a 120 MHz bandwidth rms detector, reference phase servo, woofer link to the RF control system, standard VXI status/control, and user defined registers. The details of the design and implementation of the VXI modules including performance characteristics are presented

  4. Development of high sensitivity transimpedance amplifier module for self powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.K.; Tamboli, P.K.; Antony, J.; Balasubramanian, R.; Agilandaeswari, K.; Pramanik, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes design and development of a Transimpedance Amplifier for amplification of very low current from in core Self Powered Neutron Detectors (SPND). Measurement of neutron flux is very important for operation, control and protection of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). SPND is used to measure Reactor incore flux/power. Based on sensitivity of emitter material used in SPND, pitch length and neutron flux (power level); the current output from SPND varies from few pA to few μA. The described amplifier is suitable to use for this current range. The amplifier provides a very high gain using a resistive T network feedback topology. The amplifier is designed in two stages using ultra low bias current FET OPAMPs. Design of Transimpedance amplifier is carefully done to include ultra low input bias current, low offset voltage and noise. The amplifier has in built test facility for calibration and on line test facility for measurement of insulation resistance (IR). The amplifier module has on board isolated DC-DC converter circuit complying MIL/STD/461C/D which generate isolated +/-15V and +12V supply to provide parameter to parameter ground isolation and independence among each module/signal.The output from the amplifier is 0V to 6V for 0 to 150%FP. The design is simulated in computer and amplifier used at TAPS-3 was modified as per new design and has been tested at TAPS-3 site. The amplifier performed satisfactorily. The results showed that the IR measurement technique adopted in the design can tolerate lower IR of SPND in existing design. (author)

  5. Comparison of Semidefinite Relaxation Detectors for High-Order Modulation MIMO Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Y. Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO system is considered to be one of the key technologies of LTE since it achieves requirements of high throughput and spectral efficiency. The semidefinite relaxation (SDR detection for MIMO systems is an attractive alternative to the optimum maximum likelihood (ML decoding because it is very computationally efficient. We propose a new SDR detector for 256-QAM MIMO system and compare its performance with two other SDR detectors, namely, BC-SDR detector and VA-SDR detector. The tightness and complexity of these three SDR detectors are analyzed. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate that the proposed SDR can provide the best BLER performance among the three detectors, while the BC-SDR detector and the VA-SDR detector provide identical BLER performance. Moreover, the BC-SDR has the lowest computational complexity and the VA-SDR has the highest computational complexity, while the proposed SDR is in between.

  6. A LSO scintillator array for a PET detector module with depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, J.S.; Moses, W.W.; Andreaco, M.S.; Petterson, O.

    2000-01-01

    We present construction methods and performance results for a production scintillator array of 64 optically isolated, 3 mm x 3 mm x 30 mm sized LSO crystals. This scintillator array has been developed for a PET detector module consisting of the 8x8 LSO array coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PD). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse and initial energy discrimination, the PD identifies the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal, and the PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction (DOI). Unlike the previous LSO array prototypes, we now glue Lumirror reflector material directly onto 4 sides of each crystal to obtain an easily manufactured, mechanically rugged array with our desired depth dependence. With 511 keV excitation, we obtain a total energy signal of 3600 electrons, pulse-height resolution of 25% fwhm, and 6-15 mm fwhm DOI resolution

  7. Test beam demonstration of silicon microstrip modules with transverse momentum discrimination for the future CMS tracking detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Hoch, M.; Hrubec, J.; König, A.; Steininger, H.; Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Alderweireldt, S.; Beaumont, W.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Beghin, D.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Postiau, N.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Deroover, K.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; De Visscher, S.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Cabrera Jamoulle, J.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Michotte, D.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Szilasi, N.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Härkönen, J.; Lampén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Eerola, P.; Baulieu, G.; Boudoul, G.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Dupasquier, T.; Gallbit, G.; Lumb, N.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Viret, S.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bonnin, C.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E.; Chanon, N.; Charles, L.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-Ch.; Gross, L.; Hosselet, J.; Jansova, M.; Tromson, D.; Autermann, C.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Kiesel, K. M.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Pierschel, G.; Preuten, M.; Rauch, M.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Schwering, G.; Wlochal, M.; Zhukov, V.; Pistone, C.; Fluegge, G.; Kuensken, A.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Bertsche, D.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Hansen, K.; Haranko, M.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Keaveney, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kleinwort, C.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Maser, H.; Mittag, G.; Muhl, C.; Mussgiller, A.; Pitzl, D.; Reichelt, O.; Savitskyi, M.; Schuetze, P.; Walsh, R.; Zuber, A.; Biskop, H.; Buhmann, P.; Centis-Vignali, M.; Garutti, E.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Klanner, R.; Matysek, M.; Perieanu, A.; Scharf, Ch.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sonneveld, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Vormwald, B.; Wellhausen, J.; Abbas, M.; Amstutz, C.; Barvich, T.; Barth, Ch.; Boegelspacher, F.; De Boer, W.; Butz, E.; Casele, M.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Freund, B.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S.; Husemann, U.; Kornmeyer, A.; Kudella, S.; Muller, Th.; Printz, M.; Simonis, H. J.; Steck, P.; Weber, M.; Weiler, Th.; Anagnostou, G.; Asenov, P.; Assiouras, P.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Paspalaki, L.; Siklér, F.; Veszprémi, V.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Jain, G.; Ranjan, K.; Dutta, S.; Chowdhury, S. Roy; Bakhshiansohl, H.; Behnamian, H.; Khakzad, M.; Naseri, M.; Cariola, P.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; De Robertis, G.; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Loddo, F.; Sala, G.; Silvestris, L.; Maggi, G.; My, S.; Selvaggi, G.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M. A.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Brianzi, M.; Ciaranfi, R.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Latino, G.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Russo, L.; Scarlini, E.; Sguazzoni, G.; Strom, D.; Viliani, L.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Dall'Osso, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Tosi, M.; De Canio, F.; Gaioni, L.; Manghisoni, M.; Nodari, B.; Riceputi, E.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Comotti, D.; Ratti, L.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Cecchi, C.; Checcucci, B.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Gentsos, C.; Ionica, M.; Leonardi, R.; Manoni, E.; Mantovani, G.; Marconi, S.; Mariani, V.; Menichelli, M.; Modak, A.; Morozzi, A.; Moscatelli, F.; Passeri, D.; Placidi, P.; Postolache, V.; Rossi, A.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Storchi, L.; Spiga, D.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Arezzini, S.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Boccali, T.; Borrello, L.; Bosi, F.; Castaldi, R.; Ciampa, A.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Magazzu, G.; Martini, L.; Mazzoni, E.; Messineo, A.; Moggi, A.; Morsani, F.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Bellan, R.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Demaria, N.; Rivetti, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monteil, E.; Pacher, L.; Ravera, F.; Solano, A.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Jaramillo Echeverria, R.; Moya, D.; Gonzalez Sanchez, F. J.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Abbaneo, D.; Ahmed, I.; Albert, E.; Auzinger, G.; Berruti, G.; Bianchi, G.; Blanchot, G.; Bonnaud, J.; Caratelli, A.; Ceresa, D.; Christiansen, J.; Cichy, K.; Daguin, J.; D'Auria, A.; Detraz, S.; Deyrail, D.; Dondelewski, O.; Faccio, F.; Frank, N.; Gadek, T.; Gill, K.; Honma, A.; Hugo, G.; Jara Casas, L. M.; Kaplon, J.; Kornmayer, A.; Kottelat, L.; Kovacs, M.; Krammer, M.; Lenoir, P.; Mannelli, M.; Marchioro, A.; Marconi, S.; Mersi, S.; Martina, S.; Michelis, S.; Moll, M.; Onnela, A.; Orfanelli, S.; Pavis, S.; Peisert, A.; Pernot, J.-F.; Petagna, P.; Petrucciani, G.; Postema, H.; Rose, P.; Tropea, P.; Troska, J.; Tsirou, A.; Vasey, F.; Vichoudis, P.; Verlaat, B.; Zwalinski, L.; Bachmair, F.; Becker, R.; di Calafiori, D.; Casal, B.; Berger, P.; Djambazov, L.; Donega, M.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M.; Perozzi, L.; Roeser, U.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D.; Amsler, C.; Bösiger, K.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Maier, R.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Kaestli, H.-C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.; Chen, P.-H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Lu, R.-S.; Moya, M.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Jacob, J.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Cole, J.; Hoad, C.; Hobson, P.; Morton, A.; Reid, I. D.; Auzinger, G.; Bainbridge, R.; Dauncey, P.; Fulcher, J.; Hall, G.; James, T.; Magnan, A.-M.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Uchida, K.; Braga, D.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Jones, L.; Ilic, J.; Murray, P.; Prydderch, M.; Tomalin, I. R.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Narain, M.; Nelson, J.; Sagir, S.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Tersegno, D.; Watson-Daniels, J.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Flores, C.; Lander, R.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Squires, M.; Thomson, J.; Yohay, R.; Burt, K.; Ellison, J.; Hanson, G.; Olmedo, M.; Si, W.; Yates, B. R.; Gerosa, R.; Sharma, V.; Vartak, A.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Dutta, V.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Kyre, S.; Mullin, S.; Qu, H.; White, D.; Dominguez, A.; Bartek, R.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Apresyan, A.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chramowicz, J.; Christian, D.; Cooper, W. E.; Deptuch, G.; Derylo, G.; Gingu, C.; Grünendahl, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Hoff, J.; Howell, J.; Hrycyk, M.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Kahlid, F.; Lei, C. M.; Lipton, R.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Liu, T.; Los, S.; Matulik, M.; Merkel, P.; Nahn, S.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Schneider, B.; Sellberg, G.; Shenai, A.; Spiegel, L.; Tran, N.; Uplegger, L.; Voirin, E.; Berry, D. R.; Chen, X.; Ennesser, L.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Makauda, S.; Mills, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L. J.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C. S.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bubna, M.; Hinton, N.; Jones, M.; Miller, D. H.; Shi, X.; Tan, P.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Wilson, G.; Ivanov, A.; Mendis, R.; Mitchell, T.; Skhirtladze, N.; Taylor, R.; Anderson, I.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J.; Hahn, K.; Sevova, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Bartz, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Walker, M.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; McDermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Zientek, M.; Akgün, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Kilpatrick, M.; Nussbaum, T.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Covarelli, R.; Demina, R.; Hindrichs, O.; Petrillo, G.; Eusebi, R.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Delannoy, A. G.; D'Angelo, P.; Johns, W.

    2018-03-01

    A new CMS Tracker is under development for operation at the High Luminosity LHC from 2026 onwards. It includes an outer tracker based on dedicated modules that will reconstruct short track segments, called stubs, using spatially coincident clusters in two closely spaced silicon sensor layers. These modules allow the rejection of low transverse momentum track hits and reduce the data volume before transmission to the first level trigger. The inclusion of tracking information in the trigger decision is essential to limit the first level trigger accept rate. A customized front-end readout chip, the CMS Binary Chip (CBC), containing stub finding logic has been designed for this purpose. A prototype module, equipped with the CBC chip, has been constructed and operated for the first time in a 4 GeemVem/emc positron beam at DESY. The behaviour of the stub finding was studied for different angles of beam incidence on a module, which allows an estimate of the sensitivity to transverse momentum within the future CMS detector. A sharp transverse momentum threshold around 2 emVem/emc was demonstrated, which meets the requirement to reject a large fraction of low momentum tracks present in the LHC environment on-detector. This is the first realistic demonstration of a silicon tracking module that is able to select data, based on the particle's transverse momentum, for use in a first level trigger at the LHC . The results from this test are described here.

  8. The overvoltage protection module for the power supply system for the pixel detector at Belle II experiment at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, P.; Kisielewski, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the overvoltage protection modules (OVP) for the power supply (PS) system of the Belle II pixel detector (PXD) are described. The aim of the OVP is to protect the detector and associated electronics against overvoltage conditions. Most critical in the system are voltages supplying the front-end ASICs. The PXD detector consists of the DEPFET sensor modules with integrated chips like the Drain Current Digitizer, the Switcher and the Data Handling Processor. These chips, implemented in modern sub-micron technologies, are quite vulnerable to variations in the supply voltages. The PXD will be placed in the Belle II experiment as close as possible to the interaction point, where access during experiment is very limited or even impossible, thus the PS and OVP systems exploit the remote-sensing method. Overvoltage conditions are due to failures of the PS itself, wrong setting of the output voltages or transient voltages coming out of hard noisy environment of the experiment. The OVP modules are parts of the PS modules. For powering the PXD 40 PS modules are placed 15 m outside the Belle II spectrometer. Each one is equipped with the OVP board. All voltages (22) are grouped in 4 domains: Analog, Digital, Steering and Gate which have independent grounds. The OVP boards are designed from integrated circuits from Linear Technology. All configurations were simulated with the Spice program. The control electronics is designed in a Xilinx CPLD. Two types of integrated circuits were used. LT4356 surge stopper protects loads from high voltage transients. The output voltages are limited to a safe value and also protect loads against over current faults. For less critical voltages, the LTC2912 voltage monitors are used that detect under-voltage and overvoltage events. It has to be noted that the OVP system is working independently of any other protection of the PS system, which increases its overall reliability. (authors)

  9. The overvoltage protection module for the power supply system for the pixel detector at Belle II experiment at KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapusta, P.; Kisielewski, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul.Radzikowskiego 152, 31-875 Krakow, (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the overvoltage protection modules (OVP) for the power supply (PS) system of the Belle II pixel detector (PXD) are described. The aim of the OVP is to protect the detector and associated electronics against overvoltage conditions. Most critical in the system are voltages supplying the front-end ASICs. The PXD detector consists of the DEPFET sensor modules with integrated chips like the Drain Current Digitizer, the Switcher and the Data Handling Processor. These chips, implemented in modern sub-micron technologies, are quite vulnerable to variations in the supply voltages. The PXD will be placed in the Belle II experiment as close as possible to the interaction point, where access during experiment is very limited or even impossible, thus the PS and OVP systems exploit the remote-sensing method. Overvoltage conditions are due to failures of the PS itself, wrong setting of the output voltages or transient voltages coming out of hard noisy environment of the experiment. The OVP modules are parts of the PS modules. For powering the PXD 40 PS modules are placed 15 m outside the Belle II spectrometer. Each one is equipped with the OVP board. All voltages (22) are grouped in 4 domains: Analog, Digital, Steering and Gate which have independent grounds. The OVP boards are designed from integrated circuits from Linear Technology. All configurations were simulated with the Spice program. The control electronics is designed in a Xilinx CPLD. Two types of integrated circuits were used. LT4356 surge stopper protects loads from high voltage transients. The output voltages are limited to a safe value and also protect loads against over current faults. For less critical voltages, the LTC2912 voltage monitors are used that detect under-voltage and overvoltage events. It has to be noted that the OVP system is working independently of any other protection of the PS system, which increases its overall reliability. (authors)

  10. The quench detector on magnetic modulator for the UNK quench protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotin, I.M.; Enbaev, A.V.; Erokhin, A.N.; Gridasov, V.I.; Priyma, M.V.; Sychev, V.A.; Vasiliev, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    When designing and constructing superconducting high energy accelerators, the development of the Quench Detection System (QDS) for superconducting (SC) magnets becomes an important and critical problem. At present there is experience in developing such systems for the Tevatron (FNAL, USA) and HERA (Hamburg, Germany). The machines for more than 3 TeV-the UNK (Russia) and SSC (USA), which are presently under construction, have very large circumferences, 21 and 87 km, respectively. The QDS's, similar to those of the Tevatron, require a larger part of the active components of the electronic equipment be placed in the machine tunnel close to the magnets, and protected from irradiation or additional surface buildings will have to be constructed. In either case the cost of such a QDS increases. In addition the former ones reliability decreases and maintenance becomes more difficult. For such machines, a QDS in which the quench signal, in each superconducting magnet (SCM) or groups of SCM'S, is extracted with the help of a bridge circuit (BC) appears to be more suitable. The half coils of SCM's are connected as two arms of the bridge and the resistors placed in the vacuum vessels of the magnet cryostats are connected to the other two. The off-balance signal of each BC is enhanced with the help of magnetic amplifiers. This note describes the experimental prototype of a bridge-type Quench Detector (QD) based on a magnetic amplifier Magnetic Modulator (MM) type, allowing one not only to detect a quench in a SCM, but also making feasible a wider system capability, namely: to record the signals from all SC elements during a quench for further analysis of its causes; to check the presence of short circuits of the ring electromagnet bus relative to the cryostats and to localize their position

  11. The dependence of the modulation transfer function on the blocking layer thickness in amorphous selenium x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, David M.; Belev, Gueorgi; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Kasap, Safa O.; Mainprize, James G.; Rowlands, J. A.; Smith, Charles; Tuemer, Tuemay; Verpakhovski, Vladimir; Yin Shi; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    Blocking layers are used to reduce leakage current in amorphous selenium detectors. The effect of the thickness of the blocking layer on the presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) and on dark current was experimentally determined in prototype single-line CCD-based amorphous selenium (a-Se) x-ray detectors. The sampling pitch of the detectors evaluated was 25 μm and the blocking layer thicknesses varied from 1 to 51 μm. The blocking layers resided on the signal collection electrodes which, in this configuration, were used to collect electrons. The combined thickness of the blocking layer and a-Se bulk in each detector was ∼200 μm. As expected, the dark current increased monotonically as the thickness of the blocking layer was decreased. It was found that if the blocking layer thickness was small compared to the sampling pitch, it caused a negligible reduction in MTF. However, the MTF was observed to decrease dramatically at spatial frequencies near the Nyquist frequency as the blocking layer thickness approached or exceeded the electrode sampling pitch. This observed reduction in MTF is shown to be consistent with predictions of an electrostatic model wherein the image charge from the a-Se is trapped at a characteristic depth within the blocking layer, generally near the interface between the blocking layer and the a-Se bulk

  12. Scintillators module for the detection of X or gamma rays, realization process, and detector set up incorporating such modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colomb, Gilbert; Delattre, Dominique; Ricodeau, Jean; Roziere, Guy.

    1981-01-01

    The invention concerns a scintillator module (sodium iodide) for the detection of X and γ rays by light conversion into electrical signals. This conversion is made through optical elements associated to the scintillator and receiving the light generated by X and γ rays. This module is constituted of elementary scintillators separated by interstices, arranged on a transparent support exposed to incident radiations. These interstices constitute optical discontinuities at the surface between two elementary and successive scintillators. The interstices are blocked up by polymerisable and transparent resin to the light of the scintillator, and charged by magnesia powder reflecting this light [fr

  13. Design and construction of a small animal PET/CT scanner combining scintillation Phoswich modules and hybrid pixels detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, St.

    2010-07-01

    The pathway that has been followed by the imXgam team at CPPM was to combine on a single rotating device the detector modules of the small animal PET scanner ClearPET with a photon counting X-ray detector in order to perform simultaneous acquisition of images from the anatomy (X-ray CT) and from the metabolic function (PET) of the common field-of-view. A preliminary study of the hybrid imaging system ClearPET/XPAD3 carried out using Gate led us to form a new PET detection assembly based on 21 Phoswich modules, to fix the design of the PET/CT device, as well as to study and solve the difficulties arising from simultaneous hybrid imaging. Last but not least, the simulation tool also allowed us for thinking how well such a system could judiciously use the spatial and temporal correlations between anatomic and functional information. From an instrumentation point of view, we succeeded to set up the ClearPET/XPAD3 prototype. Once both imaging systems were operational individually, we demonstrated on one side that the ClearPET prototype was perfectly capable of performing correctly in simultaneous acquisition conditions, providing that the detector modules were appropriately shielded. On the other side, the new generation of the hybrid pixel camera using the XPAD3-S chip proved to be quite promising given the good quality of the first reconstructed images. Finally, the proof of concept of simultaneous PET/CT data acquisition was made using a sealed positron source and an X-ray tube. (author)

  14. The crystal zero degree detector at BESIII as a realistic high rate environment for evaluating PANDA data acquisition modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Marcel

    2015-03-01

    The BESIII experiment located in Beijing, China, is investigating physics in the energy region of the charm-quark via electron positron annihilation reactions. A small detector to be placed in the very forward/backward region around θ=0 at BESIII is foreseen to measure photons from the initial state. This is especially interesting, because it opens the door for various physics measurements over a wide range of energies, even below the experiment's designated energy threshold, which is fixed by the accelerator. This thesis is investigating the capabilities of a crystal zero degree detector (cZDD) consisting of PbWO 4 crystals placed in that region of BESIII. Detailed Geant4-based simulations have been performed, and the energy resolution of the detector has been determined to be σ/μ=0.06+0.025/√(E[GeV]). The determination of the center-of-mass energy √(s) isr after the emission of the photon is of great importance for the study of such events. Preliminary simulations estimated the resolution of the reconstructed √(s) isr using the cZDD information to be significantly better than 10 % for appropriate photon impacts on the detector. Such events can only be investigated, when data from the cZDD and other detectors of BESIII can be correlated. A fast and powerful Data Acquisition (DAQ) capable of performing event correlation in real time is needed. DAQ modules capable of performing real time event correlation are being developed for the PANDA experiment at the future FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Investigating these modules in a realistic high-rate environment such as provided at BESIII, offers a great opportunity to gain experience in real time event correlation before the start of PANDA. Developments for the cZDD's DAQ using prototype PANDA DAQ modules have been done and successfully tested in experiments with radioactive sources and a beamtest with 210 MeV electrons at the Mainz Microtron.

  15. D-Zero detector electronics Run IIb upgrade project: VME LVDS SERDES buff (VLSB) module specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapisarda, Stefano M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rubinov, Paul M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wilcer, Neal G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2011-03-09

    The D0 VME64 LVDS SERDES Buffer (D0 VLSB) is a VME64 [Ref. ] single wide 6U module used for testing the Analog Front-End boards system [Ref. ]. The module is a custom LVDS SERDES Buffer with 4 LVDS inputs channels and can be operated stand-alone with minimal additional hardware. The current testing needs require only a 4 channel D0 VLSB module but the design allows system expansion to multiple modules. A D0 VLSB module can receive/generate trigger signals over two Lemo© [Ref. ] connectors on the module front panel. A normal test system configuration consist of a VME 64 subrack were slot 1 is occupied by a VME subrack controller and the D0 VLSB cards will occupy one or more of the remaining slots.

  16. ATLAS ITk Short Strip Prototype Module with Integrated DCDC Powering and Control Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Tracker detector at the HL - LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Greenall, Ashley; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The prototype Barrel module design, for the Phase II upgrade of the of the new Inner Tracker (ITk) detector at the LHC, has adopted an integrated low mass assembly featuring single-sided flexible circuits, with readout ASICs, glued to the silicon strip sensor. Further integration has been achieved by the attachment of module DCDC powering, HV sensor biasing switch and autonomous monitoring and control to the sensor. This low mass, integrated module approach benefits further in a reduced width stave structure to which the modules are attached. The results of preliminary electrical tests of such an integrated module will be presented.

  17. Iodide- and bromide-specific electron-capture/photodetachment-modulated detector for the trace analysis of halocarbon mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mock, R.S.; Grimsrud, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    The use of photodetachment (PD) of electrons from negative ions in a pulsed electron capture detector (ECD) is described. By passing a chopped light beam through the ECD and amplification of the modulated component of the ECD signal, the photodetachment-modulated (PDM) pulsed ECD can be made to respond selectively and sensitively to iodine- containing hydrocarbons alone, or to iodine- and bromine-containing hydrocarbons in the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The detection limit of the iodide/bromide-specific mode of the PDM-ECD to CH 3 I is shown to be competitive with that of the normal mode of the pulsed ECD. This detection mode of the ECD is shown to be of great assistance in the gas chromatographic analysis of organobromides and organoiodides in complex mixtures which contain a large number of organochlorides

  18. Pyroelectric detectors with integrated operational amplifier for high modulation frequencies; Pyroelektrische Detektoren mit integriertem Operationsverstaerker fuer hohe Modulationsfrequenzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, N.; Saenze, H.; Heinze, M. [InfraTec GmbH Dresden (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    In order to use the advantages of the current mode operation a pyroelectric detector family with integrated transimpedance amplifier (TIA) was developed particularly for modulation frequencies up to the kHz range with a simplified external circuitry for new application fields, e.g. absorption spectroscopy using quantum-cascade-laser. The essential advantages of the TIA arise from the small electrical time constant {tau}{sub E} and the short-circuiting of the pyroelectric element. A flat amplitude response up to some kHz was aimed at for a sufficiently high response of 7500 V/W, appr., also at high modulation frequencies. This can be achieved through a electrical time constant of 1 ms or less and a wide bandwidth of the op amp. The article describes in detail how these demands were accomplished and which compromises had to be accepted. (orig.)

  19. Search for an Annual Modulation in a p-Type Point Contact Germanium Dark Matter Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbeau, P.S. [University of Chicago; Collar, J.I. [University of Chicago; Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Hossbach, T.W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Aalseth, C.E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Fast, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Keillor, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kephart, J.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Miley, H.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Orrell, John L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Colaresi, James F. [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT; Yocum, K. Michael [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT; Leon, J. Diaz [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Knecht, A. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Marino, M. G. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Miller, M. L. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Radford, David C [ORNL; Wilkerson, John F [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen months of cumulative CoGeNT data are examined for indications of an annual modulation, a predicted signature of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) interactions. Presently available data support the presence of a modulated component of unknown origin, with parameters prima facie compatible with a galactic halo composed of light-mass WIMPs. Unoptimized estimators yield a statistical significance for a modulation of {approx}2.8{sigma}, limited by the short exposure.

  20. Investigation of innovative silicon detector assembling solutions for hadron calorimeter modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, G.; Ammannati, N.

    1995-01-01

    The application of large areas of silicon detector mosaics in calorimetry for high energy particles measurement in Physics has grown in the last few years and is still in progress. The high number of mosaic units in the calorimeter implies the following main requirements to be satisfied: a simple low cost for manufacturing and assembling, easy mountable/dismountable units, possibility to move or change silicon detectors easily, reliability of the electrical contacts between the aluminium layer on the silicon detector surface and the PCB breaker points.In order to satisfy the above requirements several assembling solutions have been investigated and tested recently, as fixed contact by using conducting epoxy-glues, mechanically dismountable contacts of gold-plated PCB copper to the silicon detectors, and others.The results of the tests show a general degradation of the original electrical characteristics of the contacts after of varying lengths operating times.This fact, due to corrosion phenomena assisted by chemical residuals in the contact interface, causes an irreversible damage of the detectors in the long term.In addition we found a room temperature interdiffusion of gold and copper.A promising solution to these problems can be achieved by careful removal of chemical, increase of golden layer of the PCB electrical copper contacts or aluminising them by pure aluminium vapour deposition in vacuum chamber.Thee estimated degradation time between the PCB copper and the aluminium film is very low in this case, and the risk of diffusion in the detector aluminium film surface is low along the whole operating life of the calorimeter. (orig.)

  1. A compact 7-cell Si-drift detector module for high-count rate X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K; Reckleben, C; Diehl, I; Klär, H

    2008-05-01

    A new Si-drift detector module for fast X-ray spectroscopy experiments was developed and realized. The Peltier-cooled module comprises a sensor with 7 × 7-mm 2 active area, an integrated circuit for amplification, shaping and detection, storage, and derandomized readout of signal pulses in parallel, and amplifiers for line driving. The compactness and hexagonal shape of the module with a wrench size of 16mm allow very short distances to the specimen and multi-module arrangements. The power dissipation is 186mW. At a shaper peaking time of 190 ns and an integration time of 450 ns an electronic rms noise of ~11 electrons was achieved. When operated at 7 °C, FWHM line widths around 260 and 460 eV (Cu-K α ) were obtained at low rates and at sum-count rates of 1.7 MHz, respectively. The peak shift is below 1% for a broad range of count rates. At 1.7-MHz sum-count rate the throughput loss amounts to 30%.

  2. Performance of a PET detector module utilizing an array of silicon photodiodes to identify the crystal of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Nutt, R.; Digby, W.M.; Williams, C.W.; Andreaco, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors initial performance results for a new multi-layer PET detector module consisting of an array of 3 mm square by 30 mm deep BGO crystals coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube and on the opposite end to an array of 3 mm square silicon photodiodes. The photomultiplier tube provides an accurate timing pulse and energy discrimination for all the crystals in the module, while the silicon photodiodes identify the crystal of interaction. When a single BGO crystal at +25 C is excited with 511 keV photons, the authors measure a photodiode signal centered at 700 electrons (e - ) with noise of 375 e - fwhm. When a four crystal/photodiode module is excited with a collimated line source of 511 keV photons, the crystal of interaction is correctly identified 82% of the time. The misidentification rate can be greatly reduced and an 8 x 8 crystal/photodiode module constructed by using thicker depletion layer photodiodes or cooling to 0 C

  3. Search for an Annual Modulation in a p-Type Point Contact Germanium Dark Matter Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Barbeau, Phil; Colaresi, J.; Collar, J. I.; Diaz Leon, J.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Knecht, A.; Marino, Michael G.; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Orrell, John L.; Radford, D. C.; Wilkerson, J.; Yocum, K. M.

    2011-09-01

    Fifteen months of cumulative CoGeNT data are examined for indications of an annual modulation, a predicted signature of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) interactions. Presently available data support the presence of a modulated component of unknown origin, with parameters prima facie compatible with a galactic halo composed of light-mass WIMPs.

  4. Variation of absorbed doses onboard of ISS Russian Service Module as measured with passive detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jadrníčková, Iva; Tateyama, R.; Yasuda, N.; Kawashima, H.; Kurano, M.; Uchihori, Y.; Kitamura, H.; Akatov, YU.; Shurshakov, V.; Kobayashi, I.; Ohguchi, H.; Koguchi, Y.; Spurný, František

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, 9-10 (2009), s. 901-904 ISSN 1350-4487. [International Conference on Nuclear Tracks in Solids /24./. Bologna, 01.09.2008-05.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100480901; GA ČR GA205/09/0171 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : space dosimetry * International Space Station * passive detector * track etch detector Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.973, year: 2009

  5. Performance of a high-resolution depth-encoding PET detector module using linearly-graded SiPM arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Junwei; Bai, Xiaowei; Gola, Alberto; Acerbi, Fabio; Ferri, Alessandro; Piemonte, Claudio; Yang, Yongfeng; Cherry, Simon R.

    2018-02-01

    The goal of this study was to exploit the excellent spatial resolution characteristics of a position-sensitive silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and develop a high-resolution depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding positron emission tomography (PET) detector module. The detector consists of a 30  ×  30 array of 0.445  ×  0.445  ×  20 mm3 polished LYSO crystals coupled to two 15.5  ×  15.5 mm2 linearly-graded SiPM (LG-SiPM) arrays at both ends. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the LYSO array can be resolved. The energy resolution, the coincidence timing resolution and the DOI resolution were 21.8  ±  5.8%, 1.23  ±  0.10 ns and 3.8  ±  1.2 mm, respectively, at a temperature of -10 °C and a bias voltage of 35.0 V. The performance did not degrade significantly for event rates of up to 130 000 counts s-1. This detector represents an attractive option for small-bore PET scanner designs that simultaneously emphasize high spatial resolution and high detection efficiency, important, for example, in preclinical imaging of the rodent brain with neuroreceptor ligands.

  6. MCC:the Module Controller Chip for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beccherle, R.; Darbo, G.; Gagliardi, G.; Šícho, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 492, 1-2 (2002), s. 117-133 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MPO RP-4210/69 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : ASIC * radiation hardness * silicon pixel detectors * ATLAS * LHC Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2002

  7. ATLAS Tracker Upgrade: Silicon Strip Detectors and Modules for the sLHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, Michel; Minano Moya, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    It is foreseen to increase the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN by a factor ten, with the upgraded machine dubbed Super-LHC or sLHC. The ATLAS experiment will require a new tracker for sLHC operation. In order to cope with the increase in pile-up backgrounds at the higher luminosity, an all silicon detector is being designed. The new strip detector will use significantly shorter strips than the current SCT in order to minimise the occupancy. As the increased luminosity will mean a corresponding increase in radiation dose, a new generation of extremely radiation hard silicon detectors is required. Extensive R programmes are underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation hardness. In parallel, new front-end electronics and readout systems are being designed to cope with the higher data rates. The challenges of powering and cooling a very large strip detector will be discussed. Ideas on possible schemes for the layout and support mechanics will be shown. (authors)

  8. A novel APD-based detector module for multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saoudi, A.; Lecomte, R.

    1999-01-01

    The lack of anatomical information in SPECT and PET images is one of the major factors limiting the ability to localize and accurately quantify radionuclide uptake in small regions of interest. This problem could be resolved by using multi-modality scanners having the capability to acquire anatomical and functional images simultaneously. The feasibility of a novel detector suitable for measuring high-energy annihilation radiation in PET, medium-energy γ-rays in SPECT and low-energy X-rays in transmission CT is demonstrated and its performance is evaluated for potential use in multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT imaging. The proposed detector consists of a thin CsI(Tl) scintillator sitting on top of a deep GSO/LSO pair read out by an avalanche photodiode. The GSO/LOS pair provides depth-of-interaction information for 511 keV detection in PET, while the thin CsI(Tl) that is essentially transparent to annihilation radiation is used for detecting lower energy X- and γ-rays. The detector performance is compared to that of an LSO/YSO phoswich. Although the implementation of the proposed GSO/LSO/CsI(Tl) detector raises special problems that increase complexity, it generally outperforms the LSO/YSO phoswich for simultaneous PET, SPECT and CT imaging

  9. ATLAS Tracker Upgrade: Silicon Strip Detectors and Modules for the SLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Minano, M

    2010-01-01

    It is foreseen to increase the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN by a factor ten, with the upgraded machine dubbed Super-LHC or sLHC. The ATLAS experiment will require a new tracker for sLHC operation. In order to cope with the increase in pile-up backgrounds at the higher luminosity, an all silicon detector is being designed. The new strip detector will use significantly shorter strips than the current SCT in order to minimise the occupancy. As the increased luminosity will mean a corresponding increase in radiation dose, a new generation of extremely radiation hard silicon detectors is required. Extensive R&D programmes are underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation hardness. In parallel, new front-end electronics and readout systems are being designed to cope with the higher data rates. The challenges of powering and cooling a very large strip detector will be discussed. Ideas on possible schemes for the layout and support mechanics will be shown.

  10. Atlas Tracker Upgrade: Silicon Strip Detectors and Modules for the SLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Minano, M

    2010-01-01

    It is foreseen to increase the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN by a significant factor, with the upgraded machine dubbed Super-LHC. The ATLAS experiment will require a new tracker for Super-LHC operation. In order to cope with the increase in pile-up backgrounds at the higher luminosity, an all silicon detector is being designed. The new strip detector will use significantly shorter strips than the current SCT in order to minimise the occupancy. As the increased luminosity will imply a corresponding increase in radiation dose, a new generation of extremely radiation hard silicon detectors is required. Extensive R&D programmes are underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation hardness. In parallel, new front-end electronics and readout systems are being designed to cope with the higher data rates. The challenges of powering and cooling a very large strip detector will be discussed. Ideas on possible schemes for the layout and support mechanics will be shown.

  11. Noise evaluation of silicon strip super-module with ABCN250 readout chips for the ATLAS detector upgrade at the High Luminosity LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todome, K., E-mail: todome@hep.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Jinnouchi, O. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Clark, A.; Barbier, G.; Cadoux, F.; Favre, Y.; Ferrere, D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Iacobucci, G.; La Marra, D.; Perrin, E.; Weber, M. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Ikegami, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Takubo, Y.; Unno, Y. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Takashima, R. [Department of Science Education, Kyoto University of Education, Kyoto 612-8522 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Tojo, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Kono, T. [Ochadai Academic Production, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1, Otsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Solid State Div., Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); and others

    2016-09-21

    Toward High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the whole ATLAS inner tracker will be replaced, including the semiconductor tracker (SCT) which is the silicon micro strip detector for tracking charged particles. In development of the SCT, integration of the detector is the important issue. One of the concepts of integration is the “super-module” in which individual modules are assembled to produce the SCT ladder. A super-module prototype has been developed to demonstrate its functionality. One of the concerns in integrating the super-modules is the electrical coupling between each module, because it may increase intrinsic noise of the system. To investigate the electrical performance of the prototype, the new Data Acquisition (DAQ) system has been developed by using SEABAS. The electric performance of the super-module prototype, especially the input noise and random noise hit rate, was investigated by using SEABAS system.

  12. A CAMAC timing module for the use with high energy resolution detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulian, N.; Plaga, R. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1992-06-15

    A CAMAC module which measures event times with a resolution of 10 ns continuously over a period of 32.6 days has been built. The event times are stored in a deep buffer memory in form of 48-bit data words. The pulse amplitude of each event can be measured concurrently in a high resolution ADC and stored in another FIFO buffer memory. These amplitudes are tagged with a flag to correlate time with amplitude value unambiguously. In spite of the high operating frequency of 100 MHz necessitating the use of ECL counters, the module is compact (single-width) thanks to the use of TTL registers for the intermediate storage of the 48-bit time-word. The setup and testing of the modules with a NaI-pair spectrometer used in the GALLEX dolar neutrino experiment is described. Other possible applications of the module in the field of non-accelerator particle physics are also mentioned. (orig.).

  13. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS inner detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poley, Luise; Bloch, Ingo; Edwards, Sam

    2016-04-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). This glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study concerning the use of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, the thermal conduction and shear strength, thermal cycling, radiation hardness, corrosion resistance and shear strength tests. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  14. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS inner detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poley, Luise [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany); Bloch, Ingo [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Edwards, Sam [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-04-15

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). This glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study concerning the use of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, the thermal conduction and shear strength, thermal cycling, radiation hardness, corrosion resistance and shear strength tests. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  15. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, L.; Bloch, I.; Edwards, S.; Friedrich, C.; Gregor, I.-M.; Jones, T.; Lacker, H.; Pyatt, S.; Rehnisch, L.; Sperlich, D.; Wilson, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive used initially between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). However, this glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for possible use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, thermal conduction and shear strength. Samples were thermally cycled, radiation hardness and corrosion resistance were also determined. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives than silver loaded glue. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  16. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poley, L.; Bloch, I.; Friedrich, C.; Gregor, I.-M.; Edwards, S.; Pyatt, S.; Wilson, J.; Jones, T.; Lacker, H.; Rehnisch, L.; Sperlich, D.

    2016-01-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive used initially between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). However, this glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for possible use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, thermal conduction and shear strength. Samples were thermally cycled, radiation hardness and corrosion resistance were also determined. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives than silver loaded glue. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  17. Implementation of Surface Detector Option in SCALE SAS4 Shielding Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.; Emmett, M.B.; Tang, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The Shielding Analysis Sequence No. 4 (SAS4) in the Standardized Cask Analysis and Licensing Evaluation System (SCALE) is designed to aid the novice user in the preparation of detailed three-dimensional models and radiation protection studies of transportation or storage packages containing spent fuel from a nuclear reactor facility. The underlying methodology in these analyses is the Monte Carlo particle-tracking approach as incorporated into the MORSE-SGC computer code. The use of these basic procedures is enhanced via the automatic generation of the biasing parameters in the SAS4 sequence, which dramatically increases the calculational efficiency of most standard shielding problems. Until recently the primary mechanism for dose estimates in SAS4 was the use of point detectors, which were effective for single-dose locations, but inefficient for quantification of dose-rate profiles. This paper describes the implementation of a new surface detector option for SAS4 with automatic discretization of the detector surface into multiple segments or subdetectors. Results from several sample problems are given and discussed

  18. Development and Evaluation of Test Stations for the Quality Assurance of the Silicon Micro-Strip Detector Modules for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pöttgens, Michael

    2007-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of four large-scale detectors which will be operated at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For the search for new physics the reconstruction of the collision products and their properties is essential. In the innermost part of the CMS detector the traces of ionizing particles are measured utilizing a silicon tracker. A large fraction of this detector is equipped with silicon micro-strip modules which provide a precise space resolution in 1-dimension. A module consists of a sensor for detection of particles, the corresponding read-out electronics (hybrid) and a mechanical support structure. Since the 15,148 modules, which will be installed in the silicon micro-strip detector, have a total sensitive surface area of about 198 m2, the inner tracker of CMS is the largest silicon tracking detector, which has ever been built. While the sensors and hybrids are produced in industry, the construction of the modules and the control o...

  19. Development and evaluation of test stations for the quality assurance of the silicon micro-strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poettgens, M.

    2007-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of four large-scale detectors which will be operated at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For the search for new physics the reconstruction of the collision products and their properties is essential. In the innermost part of the CMS detector the traces of ionizing particles are measured utilizing a silicon tracker. A large fraction of this detector is equipped with silicon micro-strip modules which provide a precise space resolution in 1-dimension. A module consists of a sensor for detection of particles, the corresponding read-out electronics (hybrid) and a mechanical support structure. Since the 15,148 modules, which will be installed in the silicon micro-strip detector, have a total sensitive surface area of about 198 m 2 , the inner tracker of CMS is the largest silicon tracking detector, which has ever been built. While the sensors and hybrids are produced in industry, the construction of the modules and the control of the quality is done by the members of the 21 participating institutes. Since the access to the silicon micro-strip tracker will be very limited after the installation in the CMS detector the installed modules must be of high quality. For this reason the modules are thoroughly tested and the test results are uploaded to a central database. By the development of a read-out system and the corresponding software the III. Physikalisches Institut made an important contribution for the electrical and functional quality control of hybrids and modules. The read-out system provides all features for the operation and test of hybrids and modules and stands out due to high reliability and simple handling. Because a very user-friedly and highly automated software it became the official test tool and was integrated in various test stands. The test stands, in which the read-out system is integrated in, are described and the tests which are implemented in the corresponding

  20. New Technique for Luminosity Measurement Using 3D Pixel Modules in the ATLAS IBL Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Peilian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Insertable b-Layer ( IBL ) is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system. It consists of planar pixel modules in the central region and 3D modules at two extremities. We use the cluster length distributions in 3D sensor modules of the IBL to determine the number of primary charged particles per event and suppress backgrounds. This Pixel Cluster Counting ( PCC ) algorithm provides a bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement. An accurate luminosity measurement is a key component for precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider and one of the largest uncertainties on the luminosity determination in ATLAS arises from the long-term stability of the measurement technique. The comparison of the PCC algorithm with other existing algorithms provides key insights in assessing and reducing such uncertainty.

  1. Vocational education training in environmental health sciences: using ionizing radiation detectors, module 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, F.C.

    1981-07-01

    In this instructional module, students learn to operate a geiger counter and read a pocket ion chamber dosimeter in demonstrating how radiation levels are affected by distance, shielding, and time. Training Prerequisites: Before beginning this module, students should be, or have been, enrolled in a course on radiation safety or its equivalent at the 2-year technical-school or college level. Upon completion of this module, students will be able to perform the following functions: (1) Name and tell the function of the major components of a geiger counter and check its operation using a sealed check source of low radioactivity. (2) Read a pocket ion chamber dosimeter and recharge the dosimeter using a dosimeter charger. (3) Demonstrate what effects distance, shielding, and time have on radiation levels

  2. Optical properties studies of glass samples for prototyping a TORCH detector module

    CERN Multimedia

    Castillo García, L

    2014-01-01

    TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) ) is a proposed particle identification system to achieve positive π/K/p separation at a ≥3σ level in the momentum range below 10 GeV/c. Cherenkov photons are generated from charged particle tracks crossing a 1cm-thick quartz plate. They propagate by total internal reflection to the edge and are focused onto an array of micro-channel plate photon detectors. Their position and arrival time are recorded. This allows the reconstruction of the photon trajectory and the particle crossing time. Results on optical tests are presented.

  3. High Precision Axial Coordinate Readout for an Axial 3-D PET Detector Module using a Wave Length Shifter Strip Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Joram, C; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, P; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Lustermann, W; Schinzel, D; Johnson, I; Renker, D; Albrecht, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel method to extract the axial coordinate from a matrix of long axially oriented crystals, which is based on wavelength shifting plastic strips. The method allows building compact 3-D axial gamma detector modules for PET scanners with excellent 3-dimensional spatial, timing and energy resolution while keeping the number of readout channels reasonably low. A voxel resolution of about 10 mm3 is expected. We assess the performance of the method in two independent ways, using classical PMTs and G-APDs to read out the LYSO (LSO) scintillation crystals and the wavelength shifting strips. We observe yields in excess of 35 photoelectrons from the strips for a 511 keV gamma and reconstruct the axial coordinate with a precision of about 2.5 mm (FWHM).

  4. Studies on Flat Sandwich-type Self-Powered Detectors for Flux Measurements in ITER Test Blanket Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Prasoon; Angelone, Maurizio; Döring, Toralf; Eberhardt, Klaus; Fischer, Ulrich; Klix, Axel; Schwengner, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    Neutron and gamma flux measurements in designated positions in the test blanket modules (TBM) of ITER will be important tasks during ITER's campaigns. As part of the ongoing task on development of nuclear instrumentation for application in European ITER TBMs, experimental investigations on self-powered detectors (SPD) are undertaken. This paper reports the findings of neutron and photon irradiation tests performed with a test SPD in flat sandwich-like geometry. Whereas both neutrons and gammas can be detected with appropriate optimization of geometries, materials and sizes of the components, the present sandwich-like design is more sensitive to gammas than 14 MeV neutrons. Range of SPD current signals achievable under TBM conditions are predicted based on the SPD sensitivities measured in this work.

  5. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00407830; Bloch, Ingo; Edwards, Sam; Friedrich, Conrad; Gregor, Ingrid M.; Jones, T; Lacker, Heiko; Pyatt, Simon; Rehnisch, Laura; Sperlich, Dennis; Wilson, John

    2016-05-24

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). This glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study concerning the use of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, the thermal conduction and shear strength, thermal cycling, radiation hardness, corrosion resistance and shear strength tests. These investigatio...

  6. CBM experiment. Characterization studies of the detector modules for silicon tracking syste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Panasenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The double-sided silicon microstrip detector prototypes with 50 μm pitch developed together with CiS, Germany, have been characterized in a 2.4 GeV/c proton beam at COSY, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany. Data analyses including reconstruction of 1-strip and 2-strip clusters have been performed. We have done the study of charge sharing in the interstrip gap. In particular it was found that there is a charge loss of less than 10 % in the interstrip gap. The calculated signal-to-noise ratio is around 19 for the p-side of the sensor and it is sufficient for hit reconstruction. Also the charge sharing function which allows more precise determination of the hit position in silicon sensor, have been reconstructed.

  7. Design of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Gas Distribution System for the Micromegas Detector Modules

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00084094; The ATLAS collaboration; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Maltezos, Stavros; Vlachos, Sotirios; Karentzos, Efstathios; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Moschovakos, Paris; Koutelieris, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present and describe the methodology, the particular calculations and simulations accordingly to achieve the appropriate gas flow rates ensuring a uniform gas distribution among the same type of NSW Micromegas modules. The majority of the components used are in large multiplicity so space saving criteria is taking into account and simplicity on the performance with respect to the total cost as well. An appropriate simulation program has been developed for studying the overall gas system determining the gauge pressure, flow rate in the crucial points and branches, respectively. Moreover, an overall prototype configuration, implemented at the NTUA laboratory and based on the Lock-in Amplifier technique to be used in conjunction with the gas leak test via the FRL method is presented. The obtained performances, by means of sensitivity and S/N ratio improvement, are also discussed.

  8. A terahertz EO detector with large dynamical range, high modulation depth and signal-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xinjian; Cai, Yi; Zeng, Xuanke; Zheng, Shuiqin; Li, Jingzhen; Xu, Shixiang

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents a novel design for terahertz (THz) free-space time domain electro-optic (EO) detection where the static birefringent phases of the two balanced arms are set close to zero but opposite to each other. Our theoretical and numerical analyses show this design has much stronger ability to cancel the optical background noise than both THz ellipsometer and traditional crossed polarizer geometry (CPG). Its optical modulation depth is about twice as high as that of traditional CPG, but about ten times as high as that of THz ellipsometer. As for the dynamical range, our improved design is comparable to the THz ellipsometer but obviously larger than the traditional CPG. Some experiments for comparing our improved CPG with traditional CPG agree well with the corresponding theoretical predictions. Our experiments also show that the splitting ratio of the used non-polarization beam splitter is critical for the performance of our design.

  9. Application of automatic tube current modulation with 64-detector CT in infant brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianming; Xu Wenbiao; Luo Yuanli; Liu Hongsheng; Zhou Ning

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of automatic tube modulation on imaging quality and lesion revealed in infant brain. Methods: The infant patients of 200 cases were divided into four groups according to the values of SD (2.5, 2.75, 3.0, 4.0), 50 cases in each group. They were performed with the automatic tube current modulation scanning in brain. The imaging quality and radiation dose were analyzed. Results: When the values of SD were 2.5, 2.75, 3.0 and 4.0, the high values of CTDI vol were 60.0, 49.8, 42.9 and 25.8 mGy, respectively. The effective doses were (3.27±1.01), (2.78±0.85), (2.40±0.74) and (1.49±0.45) mSv·mGy -1 ·cm -1 , respectively. There was significant difference among those groups (F=48.99, P<0.05). The excellent imaging qualities were 100%, 96%, 70% and 20%, 12 cases were neonate in SD 2.5 group. In SD 2.75 group, the imaging quality of neonate (2 cases) were all fine. In SD 3.0 group, the imaging quality was not ideal for the ages less than 1 year. In SD 4.0 group, when the infants aged over 2 years and 6 months, or with the larger head circumference, their imaging quality were all excellent. Conclusions: The individual application of ATCM could obtain the best balance among imaging quality, radiation dose and diagnostic quality. The SD 2.5, 2.75, 3.0 and 4.0 might be suitable to infants of newborn, 1 month to 1 year old, 1 to 3 years, the larger head circumference and part of the reviewed cases. (authors)

  10. Mechanical studies towards a silicon micro-strip super module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade at the high luminosity LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, G; Cadoux, F; Clark, A; Favre, Y; Ferrere, D; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Iacobucci, G; Marra, D La; Perrin, E; Seez, W; Endo, M; Hanagaki, K; Hara, K; Ikegami, Y; Nakamura, K; Takubo, Y; Terada, S; Jinnouchi, O; Nishimura, R; Takashima, R

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that after several years of data-taking, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics programme will be extended to the so-called High-Luminosity LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will be increased up to 5 × 10 34  cm −2  s −1 . For the general-purpose ATLAS experiment at the LHC, a complete replacement of its internal tracking detector will be necessary, as the existing detector will not provide the required performance due to the cumulated radiation damage and the increase in the detector occupancy. The baseline layout for the new ATLAS tracker is an all-silicon-based detector, with pixel sensors in the inner layers and silicon micro-strip detectors at intermediate and outer radii. The super-module (SM) is an integration concept proposed for the barrel strip region of the future ATLAS tracker, where double-sided stereo silicon micro-strip modules (DSM) are assembled into a low-mass local support (LS) structure. Mechanical aspects of the proposed LS structure are described

  11. In vivo measurements with MOSFET detectors in oropharynx and nasopharynx intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcie, Serge; Charpiot, Elisabeth; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Ciais, Gaston; Herault, Joel; Costa, Andre; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of in vivo measurements with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters for oropharynx and nasopharynx intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: During a 1-year period, in vivo measurements of the dose delivered to one or two points of the oral cavity by IMRT were obtained with MOSFET dosimeters. Measurements were obtained during each session of 48 treatment plans for 21 patients, all of whom were fitted with a custom-made mouth plate. Calculated and measured values were compared. Results: A total of 344 and 452 measurements were performed for the right and left sides, respectively, of the oral cavity. Seventy percent of the discrepancies between calculated and measured values were within ±5%. Uncertainties were due to interfraction patient positions, intrafraction patient movements, and interfraction MOSFET positions. Nevertheless, the discrepancies between the measured and calculated means were within ±5% for 92% and 95% of the right and left sides, respectively. Comparison of these discrepancies and the discrepancies between calculated values and measurements made on a phantom revealed that all differences were within ±5%. Conclusion: Our experience demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo measurements with MOSFET dosimeters for oropharynx and nasopharynx IMRT

  12. Design study of the precision optical calibration module for the PINGU detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veenkamp, Joost; Krings, Kai [TU Muenchen, Physik-Department, Excellence Cluster Universe, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU) will measure atmospheric neutrinos with a threshold of a few GeV. The primary goal for this extension is to determine the Neutrino mass hierarchy. A new level of precision is needed in order to reach this. The calibration of the DOM's is an important aspect in raising the precision to the needed level. A better calibration system will enable a better understanding of the ice and will therefore significantly reduce systematic effects. We present the Precision Optical Calibration Module (POCAM). By keeping the outer topology identical to that of the DOM, cost effective construction and deployment is ensured. The design of the POCAM is based on the principle of the integrating sphere. An appropriately placed LED in combination with a diffusive layer on the inside of the sphere results in an isotropic light emission from the apertures in the spherical housing. The output of the LED is controllable and known to high precision, it therefore ensures control over the output from the apertures. We report on the first investigations.

  13. Novel Trigger-Capable Modules for the Future CMS Tracking Detector and Inclusive Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Harb, Ali; Mussgiller, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This work covers two important aspects in the field of high-energy physics; detector development and physics data analysis. The first part of this thesis is devoted to the detector development activities for the Phase-II upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment’s outer tracking detector. To cope with the increased luminosity during the high-luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it is foreseen to replace the existing tracking system of CMS with an entirely new system. Owing to a novel module concept called the $p_T$–module, the upgraded tracking system will be able to provide first level trigger information by means of an on-board momentum discrimination logic. This will be achieved using a new readout chip, the so-called CMS Binary Chip (CBC). The very first test beam measurement using $p_T$ –module prototypes, equipped with the CBC chip is presented and discussed. The obtained results serve as a proof-of-concept for such modules and shows that the CBC performs as expected. In...

  14. Modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency of electron bombarded charge coupled device detector for low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    The use of a thinned back-side illuminated charge coupled device chip as two-dimensional sensor working in direct electron bombarded mode at optimum energy of the incident signal electrons is demonstrated and the measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are described. The MTF was measured for energy of electrons 4 keV using an edge projection method and a stripe projection method. The decrease of the MTF for a maximum spatial frequency of 20.8 cycles/mm, corresponding to the pixel size 24x24 μm, is 0.75≅-2.5 dB, and it is approximately the same for both horizontal and vertical directions. DQE was measured using an empty image and the mixing factor method. Empty images were acquired for energies of electrons from 2 to 5 keV and for various doses, ranging from nearly dark image to a nearly saturated one. DQE increases with increasing energy of bombarded electrons and reaches 0.92 for electron energy of 5 keV. For this energy the detector will be used for the angle- and energy-selective detection of signal electrons in the scanning low energy electron microscope

  15. Evaluation of modulators and electron-capture detectors for comprehensive two-dimensional GC of halogenated organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristenson, E.M.; Korytar, P.; Danielsson, C.; Kallio, M.; Brandt, M.; Makela, J.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Beens, J.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    2003-01-01

    Different cryogenic and a heated GC×GC modulator(s) were evaluated and compared for the analysis of high-boiling halogenated compounds. The cryogenic modulators investigated were: (i) the longitudinally modulated cryogenic system; (ii) the liquid-nitrogen-cooled jet modulator (KT2001); (iii) a

  16. Deriving the solar activity cycle modulation on cosmic ray intensity observed by Nagoya muon detector from October 1970 until December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendonça, Rafael R. S.; Braga, Carlos. R.; Echer, Ezequiel; Dal Lago, Alisson; Rockenbach, Marlos; Schuch, Nelson J.; Munakata, Kazuoki

    2017-10-01

    It is well known that the cosmic ray intensity observed at the Earth's surface presents an 11 and 22-yr variations associated with the solar activity cycle. However, the observation and analysis of this modulation through ground muon detectors datahave been difficult due to the temperature effect. Furthermore, instrumental changes or temporary problems may difficult the analysis of these variations. In this work, we analyze the cosmic ray intensity observed since October 1970 until December 2012 by the Nagoya muon detector. We show the results obtained after analyzing all discontinuities and gaps present in this data and removing changes not related to natural phenomena. We also show the results found using the mass weighted method for eliminate the influence of atmospheric temperature changes on muon intensity observed at ground. As a preliminary result of our analyses, we show the solar cycle modulation in the muon intensity observed for more than 40 years.

  17. Development and evaluation of test stations for the quality assurance of the silicon micro-strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poettgens, M.

    2007-11-22

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of four large-scale detectors which will be operated at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For the search for new physics the reconstruction of the collision products and their properties is essential. In the innermost part of the CMS detector the traces of ionizing particles are measured utilizing a silicon tracker. A large fraction of this detector is equipped with silicon micro-strip modules which provide a precise space resolution in 1-dimension. A module consists of a sensor for detection of particles, the corresponding read-out electronics (hybrid) and a mechanical support structure. Since the 15,148 modules, which will be installed in the silicon micro-strip detector, have a total sensitive surface area of about 198 m{sup 2}, the inner tracker of CMS is the largest silicon tracking detector, which has ever been built. While the sensors and hybrids are produced in industry, the construction of the modules and the control of the quality is done by the members of the 21 participating institutes. Since the access to the silicon micro-strip tracker will be very limited after the installation in the CMS detector the installed modules must be of high quality. For this reason the modules are thoroughly tested and the test results are uploaded to a central database. By the development of a read-out system and the corresponding software the III. Physikalisches Institut made an important contribution for the electrical and functional quality control of hybrids and modules. The read-out system provides all features for the operation and test of hybrids and modules and stands out due to high reliability and simple handling. Because a very user-friedly and highly automated software it became the official test tool and was integrated in various test stands. The test stands, in which the read-out system is integrated in, are described and the tests which are implemented in the

  18. Novel trigger-capable modules for the future CMS tracking detector and inclusive top quark pair production cross section at √(s)=13 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harb, Ali

    2017-07-01

    This work covers two important aspects in the field of high-energy physics; detector development and physics data analysis. The first part of this thesis is devoted to the detector development activities for the Phase-II upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's outer tracking detector. To cope with the increased luminosity during the high-luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it is foreseen to replace the existing tracking system of CMS with an entirely new system. Owing to a novel module concept called the p_T-module, the upgraded tracking system will be able to provide first level trigger information by means of an on-board momentum discrimination logic. This will be achieved using a new readout chip, the so-called CMS Binary Chip (CBC). The very first test beam measurement using p_T-module prototypes, equipped with the CBC chip is presented and discussed. The obtained results serve as a proof-of-concept for such modules and shows that the CBC performs as expected. In the second part of this thesis, the measurement of the top quark pair production cross section is addressed. The measurement is performed using 2.2 fb"-"1 of data collected by the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. Results are shown in the eμ di-lepton channel, and for the first time at such energy, in the ee and μμ channels. With an improved treatment of systematic uncertainties, the results in all three channels are found to be in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  19. Novel trigger-capable modules for the future CMS tracking detector and inclusive top quark pair production cross section at √(s)=13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harb, Ali

    2017-07-15

    This work covers two important aspects in the field of high-energy physics; detector development and physics data analysis. The first part of this thesis is devoted to the detector development activities for the Phase-II upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's outer tracking detector. To cope with the increased luminosity during the high-luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), it is foreseen to replace the existing tracking system of CMS with an entirely new system. Owing to a novel module concept called the p{sub T}-module, the upgraded tracking system will be able to provide first level trigger information by means of an on-board momentum discrimination logic. This will be achieved using a new readout chip, the so-called CMS Binary Chip (CBC). The very first test beam measurement using p{sub T}-module prototypes, equipped with the CBC chip is presented and discussed. The obtained results serve as a proof-of-concept for such modules and shows that the CBC performs as expected. In the second part of this thesis, the measurement of the top quark pair production cross section is addressed. The measurement is performed using 2.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. Results are shown in the eμ di-lepton channel, and for the first time at such energy, in the ee and μμ channels. With an improved treatment of systematic uncertainties, the results in all three channels are found to be in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  20. Simulation of Si P-i-N diodes for use in a positron emission tomography detector module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.J.; University of Wollongong, NSW; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Taylor, G.; Heiser, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Current Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems consist of scintillation crystals optically coupled to photomultiplier tubes with associated electronics used to detect photons generated within the scintillator. The cost of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) is considerable and is the major factor in the cost of PET systems. It has been suggested that Si P-i-N diodes can replace PMTs and provide Depth of Interaction (DOI) information for improved spatial resolution. Si P-i-N diodes of 25mm x 300μm and 3mm x 300μm cross sectional area were simulated using a 2D Monte Carlo program (PClD V5) from the UNSW photovoltics group. The diffusion lengths were varied from 0.5μm to 5μm and the charge collection characteristics of the diodes were observed. A 400nm monochromatic light source was used for the excitation as an approximation of the mean wavelength output from LSO crystal. The diodes were reverse biased with voltages 40V, 20V and 10V. The optimum diffusion length of up to 2μm and bias voltage of 40V were determined using the electric field, current density, carrier density and potential distribution results. These parameters will be used for the design of a device for optimal charge collection capabilities for the wavelengths encountered in PET applications. Further studies need to be conducted using spectra from LSO rather than a monochromatic source. The response of various Si P-i-N diodes to a monochromatic light source have been modeled in order to design a device for application in a PET detector module for DOI measurements. The charge collection within the first 2μm has been emphasized due to the strong absorption of photons from LSO near the surface.Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  1. Thermal Characterization and Optimization of the Pixel Module Support Structure for the Phase-1 Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2094386; Feld, Lutz Werner

    2015-01-01

    The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) pixel detector is used in CMS for the vertex reconstruction of events in high-energy proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It is planned for the future years that the LHC will deliver significantly higher instantaneous and integrated luminosities. Therefore, also the demands and requirements for the participating detectors rise. Thus the current CMS pixel detector will be replaced by the CMS Phase-1 Upgrade Pixel Detector in the extended year-end technical stop in winter 2016/2017. As a vertex detector, the pixel detector is the innermost detector component and it is located at a short distance to the proton-proton interaction point. Therefore it has to cope with high particle hit rates and high irradiation. The heat produced due to power consumption has to be removed while using a low-mass detector design. The low-mass design of the Phase-1 Upgrade Pixel Detector will be implemented by utilizing a new two-phase CO2 cooling concept and an ultra l...

  2. Comparison radiation dose of Z-axis automatic tube current modulation technique with fixed tube current multi-detector row CT scanning of lower extremity venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu; Kweon, Dae Cheol; Lee, Jong Seok; Jang, Keun Jo; Jeon, Sang Hwan; Kim, Yong Soo

    2007-01-01

    Z-axis automatic tube current modulation technique automatically adjusts tube current based on size of body region scanned. The purpose of the current study was to compare noise, and radiation dose of Multi-Detector row CT (MDCT) of lower extremity performed with Z-axis modulation technique of automatic tube current modulation with manual selection fixed tube current. Fifty consecutive underwent MDCT venography of lower extremity with use of a MDCT scanner fixed tube current and Z-axis automatic tube current modulation technique (10, 11 and 12 HU noise index, 70∼450 mA). Scanning parameters included 120 kVp, 0.5 second gantry rotation time, 1.35:1 beam pitch, and 1 mm reconstructed section thickness. For each subject, images obtained with Z-axis modulation were compared with previous images obtained with fixed tube current (200, 250, 300 mA) and with other parameters identical. Images were compared for noise at five levels: iliac, femoral, popliteal, tibial, and peroneal vein of lower extremity. Tube current and gantry rotation time used for acquisitions at these levels were recorded. All CT examinations of study and control groups were diagnostically acceptable, though objective noise was significantly more with Z-axis automatic tube current modulation. Compared with fixed tube current, Z-axis modulation resulted in reduction of CTDIvol (range, -6.5%∼-35.6%) and DLP (range,-0.2%∼-20.2%). Compared with manually selected fixed tube current, Z-axis automatic tube current modulation resulted in reduced radiation dose at MDCT of lower extremity venography

  3. Surface/Interface Carrier-Transport Modulation for Constructing Photon-Alternative Ultraviolet Detectors Based on Self-Bending-Assembled ZnO Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Zhou, Lianqun; Tang, Yuguo; Li, Lin; Zhang, Zhiqi; Yang, Hongbo; Ma, Hanbin; Nathan, Arokia; Zhao, Dongxu

    2017-09-13

    Surface/interface charge-carrier generation, diffusion, and recombination/transport modulation are especially important in the construction of photodetectors with high efficiency in the field of nanoscience. In the paper, a kind of ultraviolet (UV) detector is designed based on ZnO nanostructures considering photon-trapping, surface plasmonic resonance (SPR), piezophototronic effects, interface carrier-trapping/transport control, and collection. Through carefully optimized surface/interface carrier-transport modulation, a designed device with detectivity as high as 1.69 × 10 16 /1.71 × 10 16 cm·Hz 1/2 /W irradiating with 380 nm photons under ultralow bias of 0.2 V is realized by alternating nanoparticle/nanowire active layers, respectively, and the designed UV photodetectors show fast and slow recovery processes of 0.27 and 4.52 ms, respectively, which well-satisfy practical needs. Further, it is observed that UV photodetection could be performed within an alternative response by varying correlated key parameters, through efficient surface/interface carrier-transport modulation, spectrally resolved photoresponse of the detector revealing controlled detection in the UV region based on the ZnO nanomaterial, photodetection allowed or limited by varying the active layers, irradiation distance from one of the electrodes, standing states, or electric field. The detailed carrier generation, diffusion, and recombination/transport processes are well illustrated to explain charge-carrier dynamics contributing to the photoresponse behavior.

  4. The ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Huegging, Fabian

    2006-06-26

    The contruction of the ATLAS Pixel Detector which is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system is prgressing well. Because the pixel detector will contribute significantly to the ATLAS track and vertex reconstruction. The detector consists of identical sensor-chip-hybrid modules, arranged in three barrels in the centre and three disks on either side for the forward region. The position of the detector near the interaction point requires excellent radiation hardness, mechanical and thermal robustness, good long-term stability for all parts, combined with a low material budget. The final detector layout, new results from production modules and the status of assembly are presented.

  5. Development of radiation-hard n-in-p type silicon detectors and studies on modules with transverse momentum discrimination for the CMS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Printz, Martin; de Boer, Wim

    In der vorliegenden Dissertation werden sowohl die strahlenhärte von Silizium-Teilchendetektoren als auch die Triggerfunktionalität der zukünftigen Module für den CMS Detektor am CERN untersucht. Hierzu wurden Sensoren sowohl vor als auch nach Bestrahlung qualifiziert und mit T-CAD Simulationen verglichen. Darüberhinaus wurde ein Prototyp Triggermodul konstruiert und die Performance validiert.

  6. Fully integrated InGaAs/InP single-photon detector module with gigahertz sine wave gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Xiaolei; Ma Jian; Jin Ge; Chen Zengbing; Zhang Jun; Pan Jianwei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Liu Jianhong; Wang Quan; Du Debing [Anhui Quantum Communication Technology Co., Ltd., Hefei, Anhui 230088 (China)

    2012-08-15

    InGaAs/InP single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) working in the regime of GHz clock rates are crucial components for the high-speed quantum key distribution (QKD). We have developed for the first time a compact, stable, and user-friendly tabletop InGaAs/InP single-photon detector system operating at a 1.25 GHz gate rate that fully integrates functions for controlling and optimizing SPAD performance. We characterize the key parameters of the detector system and test the long-term stability of the system for continuous operation of 75 h. The detector system can substantially enhance QKD performance and our present work paves the way for practical high-speed QKD applications.

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Test System for the Quality Assurance during the Mass Production of Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Franke, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of four large-scale experiments that is going to be installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For CMS an inner tracking system entirely equipped with silicon microstrip detectors was chosen. With an active area of about 198 m2 it will be the largest tracking device of the world that was ever constructed using silicon sensors. The basic components in the construction of the tracking system are approximately 16,000 so-called modules, which are pre-assembled units consisting of the sensors, the readout electronics and a support structure. The module production is carried out by a cooperation of number of institutes and industrial companies. To ensure the operation of the modules within the harsh radiation environment extensive tests have to be performed on all components. An important contribution to the quality assurance of the modules is made by a test system of which all components were developed in Aachen. In ad...

  8. Evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Sciarrone, Danilo; Purcaro, Giorgia; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-10

    The present research is focused on the use and evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector, defined as barrier discharge ionization detector (BID), within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (FM GC×GC). The performance of the BID device was compared to that of a flame ionization detector (FID), under similar FM GC×GC conditions. Following development and optimization of the FM GC×GC method, the BID was subjected to fine tuning in relation to acquisition frequency and discharge flow. Moreover, the BID performance was measured and compared to that of the FID, in terms of extra-column band broadening, sensitivity and dynamic range. The comparative study was carried out by using standard compounds belonging to different chemical classes, along with a sample of diesel fuel. Advantages and disadvantages of the BID system, also within the context of FM GC×GC, are critically discussed. In general, the BID system was characterized by a more limited dynamic range and increased sensitivity, compared to the FID. Additionally, BID and FID contribution to band broadening was found to be similar under the operational conditions applied. Particular attention was devoted to the behaviour of the FM GC×GC-BID system toward saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, for a possible future use in the field of mineral-oil food contamination research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. SU-E-T-644: Evaluation of Angular Dependence Correction for 2D Array Detector Using for Quality Assurance of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karthikeyan, N; Ganesh, K M; Vikraman, S; Shariff, MH

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector in quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT). Methods: Total ten patients comprising of different sites were planned for VMAT and taken for the study. Each plan was exposed on Matrix Evolution 2D array detector with Omnipro IMRT software based on the following three different methods using 6MV photon beams from Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. First method, VMAT plan was delivered on Matrix Evolution detector as it gantry mounted with dedicated holder with build-up of 2.3cm. Second, the VMAT plan was delivered with the static gantry angle on to the table mounted setup. Third, the VMAT plan was delivered with actual gantry angle on Matrix Evolution detector fixed in Multicube phantom with gantry angle sensor and angular dependence correction were applied to quantify the plan quality. For all these methods, the corresponding QA plans were generated in TPS and the dose verification was done for both point and 2D fluence analysis with pass criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement. Results: The measured point dose variation for the first method was observed as 1.58±0.6% of mean and SD with TPS calculated. For second and third method, the mean and standard deviation(SD) was observed as 1.67±0.7% and 1.85±0.8% respectively. The 2D fluence analysis of measured and TPS calculated has the mean and SD of 97.9±1.1%, 97.88±1.2% and 97.55±1.3% for first, second and third methods respectively. The calculated two-tailed Pvalue for point dose and 2D fluence analysis shows the insignificance with values of 0.9316 and 0.9015 respectively, among the different methods of QA. Conclusion: The qualitative evaluation of angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector shows its competency in accuracy of quality assurance measurement of composite dose distribution of volumetric modulated arc therapy

  10. A detector module with highly efficient surface-alpha event rejection operated in CRESST-II Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Angloher, G.; Ferreiro, N.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Reindl, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bento, A. [Universidade de Coimbra, CIUC, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Gorla, P.; Schaeffner, K. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy); Erb, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperaturforschung, Garching (Germany); Feilitzsch, F. von; Guetlein, A.; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Muenster, A.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Schoenert, S.; Stanger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Scholl, S.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Kluck, H. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Wien (Austria); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Schieck, J. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Sivers, M. von [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    The cryogenic dark matter experiment CRESSTII aims at the direct detection of WIMPs via elastic scattering off nuclei in scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals. We present a new, highly improved, detector design installed in the current run of CRESST-II Phase 2 with an efficient active rejection of surface-alpha backgrounds. Using CaWO{sub 4} sticks instead of metal clamps to hold the target crystal, a detector housing with fully-scintillating inner surface could be realized. The presented detector (TUM40) provides an excellent threshold of ∝0.60 keV and a resolution of σ ∼ 0.090 keV (at 2.60 keV).With significantly reduced background levels, TUM40 sets stringent limits on the spin-independent WIMP nucleon scattering cross section and probes a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 3GeV/c{sup 2}. In this paper, we discuss the novel detector design and the surface-alpha event rejection in detail. (orig.)

  11. Ultra-light and stable composite structure to support and cool the ATLAS pixel detector barrel electronics modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olcese, M.; Caso, C.; Castiglioni, G.; Cereseto, R.; Cuneo, S.; Dameri, M.; Gemme, C.; Glitza, K.-W.; Lenzen, G.; Mora, F.; Netchaeva, P.; Ockenfels, W.; Piano, E.; Pizzorno, C.; Puppo, R.; Rebora, A.; Rossi, L.; Thadome, J.; Vernocchi, F.; Vigeolas, E.; Vinci, A.

    2004-01-01

    The design of an ultra light structure, the so-called 'stave', to support and cool the sensitive elements of the Barrel Pixel detector, the innermost part of the ATLAS detector to be installed on the new Large Hadron Collider at CERN (Geneva), is presented. Very high-dimensional stability, minimization of the material and ability of operating 10 years in a high radiation environment are the key design requirements. The proposed solution consists of a combination of different carbon-based materials (impregnated carbon-carbon, ultra high modulus carbon fibre composites) coupled to a thin aluminum tube to form a very light support with an integrated cooling channel. Our design has proven to successfully fulfil the requirements. The extensive prototyping and testing program to fully qualify the design and release the production are discussed

  12. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution PET detector module using a digital silicon photomultiplier coupled LGSO array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, Hyun Tae [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi@sogang.ac.kr [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu Bom; Lee, Sangwon [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yeom, Jung-Yeol, E-mail: jungyeol@korea.ac.kr [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-21

    In positron emission tomography (PET) for breast, brain and small animal imaging, the spatial resolution of a PET detector is crucial to obtain high quality PET images. In this study, a PET detector for sub-millimeter spatial resolution imaging purpose was assembled using 4×4 pixels of a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM, DPC-3200-22-44, Philips) coupled with a 15×15 LGSO array with BaSO{sub 4} reflector, and a 1 mm thick acrylic light guide for light distribution between the dSiPM pixels. The active area of each dSiPM pixel was 3.2×3.9 mm{sup 2} and the size of each LGSO scintillator element was 0.7×0.7×6 mm{sup 3}. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated the performance of the PET detector by measuring the energy resolution, 2D flood map, peak to valley (P/V) ratio, and coincidence resolving time (CRT). All measurements were performed at a temperature of 10±1 ℃. The average energy resolution was 15.6% (without correcting for saturation effects) at 511 keV and the best CRT was 242±5 ps. The 2D flood map obtained with an energy window of 400–600 keV demonstrated clear identification of all pixels, and the average P/V ratio of the X- and Y-directions were 7.31 and 7.81, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PET detector could be suitable for application in high resolution PET while achieving good timing resolution.

  13. Study of a prototype module of a precision time-of-flight detector for particle identification at low momentum

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388630

    In this thesis, Time Of internally Reflected Cherenkov light detector (TORCH), proposed for the LHCb Upgrade to perform three-sigma separation between kaon and pion up to 10$\\ \\rm{GeV}/\\textit{c}$, was studied. TORCH is designed to add significant particle identification capability to the existing LHCb system based on two gas Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors. TORCH would be placed at $\\sim$ 10 m from the interaction point, where the flight time difference between a primary pion and kaon is 37.5 ps. TORCH will give a pion-kaon separation of three sigma at 10$\\ \\rm{GeV}/\\textit{c}$ from the flight time using the Cherenkov photons generated by the charged particle in a 1 cm-thick quartz plate. In order to calculate accurately the flight time in a busy LHCb environment, Cherenkov angle and photon detection time information, as well as the momentum information from the tracking detector are included in the analysis. For the required TORCH performance, the flight time difference must be measured with a resolution o...

  14. Modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency of electron bombarded charge coupled device detector for low energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 9 (2005), 093704:1-6 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/1575 Keywords : electron bombarded CCD * modulation transfer function * detective quantum efficiency Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.235, year: 2005

  15. A robust detector for rolling element bearing condition monitoring based on the modulation signal bispectrum and its performance evaluation against the Kurtogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiange; Xi Gu, James; Rehab, Ibrahim; Abdalla, Gaballa M.; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, A. D.

    2018-02-01

    Envelope analysis is a widely used method for rolling element bearing fault detection. To obtain high detection accuracy, it is critical to determine an optimal frequency narrowband for the envelope demodulation. However, many of the schemes which are used for the narrowband selection, such as the Kurtogram, can produce poor detection results because they are sensitive to random noise and aperiodic impulses which normally occur in practical applications. To achieve the purposes of denoising and frequency band optimisation, this paper proposes a novel modulation signal bispectrum (MSB) based robust detector for bearing fault detection. Because of its inherent noise suppression capability, the MSB allows effective suppression of both stationary random noise and discrete aperiodic noise. The high magnitude features that result from the use of the MSB also enhance the modulation effects of a bearing fault and can be used to provide optimal frequency bands for fault detection. The Kurtogram is generally accepted as a powerful means of selecting the most appropriate frequency band for envelope analysis, and as such it has been used as the benchmark comparator for performance evaluation in this paper. Both simulated and experimental data analysis results show that the proposed method produces more accurate and robust detection results than Kurtogram based approaches for common bearing faults under a range of representative scenarios.

  16. The atlas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrodo, P.

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS detector, one of the two multi-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, is currently being built in order to meet the first proton-proton collisions in time. A description of the detector components will be given, corresponding to the most up to date design and status of construction, completed with test beam results and performances of the first serial modules. (author)

  17. Cherenkov water detector NEVOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    A unique multipurpose Cherenkov water detector, the NEVOD facility, uses quasispherical measuring modules to explore all the basic components of cosmic rays on Earth's surface, including neutrinos. Currently, the experimental complex includes the Cherenkov water detector, a calibration telescope system, and a coordinate detector. This paper traces the basic development stages of NEVOD, examines research directions, presents the results obtained, including the search for the solution to the 'muon puzzle', and discusses possible future development prospects.

  18. Development of an optical three-dimensional laser tracker using dual modulated laser diodes and a signal detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hau-Wei; Chen, Chieh-Li; Liu, Chien-Hung

    2011-03-01

    Laser trackers are widely used in industry for tasks such as the assembly of airplanes and automobiles, contour measurement, and robot calibration. However, laser trackers are expensive, and the corresponding solution procedure is very complex. The influence of measurement uncertainties is also significant. This study proposes a three-dimensional space position measurement system which consists of two tracking modules, a zero tracking angle return subsystem, and a target quadrant photodiode (QPD). The target QPD is placed on the object being tracked. The origin locking method is used to keep the rays on the origin of the target QPD. The position of the target QPD is determined using triangulation since the two laser rays are projected onto one QPD. Modulation and demodulation are utilized to separate the coupled positional values. The experiment results show that measurement errors in the X, Y, and Z directions are less than ±0.05% when the measured object was moved by 300, 300, and 200 mm in the X, Y, and Z axes, respectively. The theoretical measurement error estimated from the measurement model is between ±0.02% and ±0.07% within the defined measurable range. The proposed system can be applied to the measurements of machine tools and robot arms.

  19. Development of an optical three-dimensional laser tracker using dual modulated laser diodes and a signal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hau-Wei; Chen, Chieh-Li; Liu, Chien-Hung

    2011-01-01

    Laser trackers are widely used in industry for tasks such as the assembly of airplanes and automobiles, contour measurement, and robot calibration. However, laser trackers are expensive, and the corresponding solution procedure is very complex. The influence of measurement uncertainties is also significant. This study proposes a three-dimensional space position measurement system which consists of two tracking modules, a zero tracking angle return subsystem, and a target quadrant photodiode (QPD). The target QPD is placed on the object being tracked. The origin locking method is used to keep the rays on the origin of the target QPD. The position of the target QPD is determined using triangulation since the two laser rays are projected onto one QPD. Modulation and demodulation are utilized to separate the coupled positional values. The experiment results show that measurement errors in the X, Y, and Z directions are less than ±0.05% when the measured object was moved by 300, 300, and 200 mm in the X, Y, and Z axes, respectively. The theoretical measurement error estimated from the measurement model is between ±0.02% and ±0.07% within the defined measurable range. The proposed system can be applied to the measurements of machine tools and robot arms.

  20. Electrical tests of silicon detector modules for the ATLAS experiment and a study of the discovery potential of the $t\\overline{t}H, H \\to W^{+}W^{-}$ process

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, Inga

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this thesis was a contribution to the construction of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracking detector (SCT). About 200 SCT endcap modules were assembled at the University of Freiburg. Before installation in the experiment, each module was subject to thorough testing in order to ensure their functionality within the ATLAS specifications. A large part of these tests concerned the electrical functionality of the readout electronics and the bias current behaviour of the sensors. The responsibility for the electrical characterization of the Freiburg modules was part of this thesis. To be suited for the analysis of physics processes, the signals measured in the detector need to be transferred into particle four-momenta, requiring the reconstruction and identification of different particle types. This thesis contributes to the physics object identification by a study of methods to separate isolated electrons from real electron background produced in the decays of heavy quarks. A standard set of four disc...

  1. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  2. Design and Characterization of a Gradient-Transparent RF Copper Shield for PET Detector Modules in Hybrid MR-PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneking, Arne; Trinchero, Riccardo; Ha, YongHyun; Finster, Felix; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Lerche, Christoph; Shah, Nadim Jon

    2017-05-01

    This paper focuses on the design and the characterization of a frequency-selective shield for positron emission tomography (PET) detector modules of hybrid magnetic resonance-PET scanners, where the shielding of the PET cassettes is located close to the observed object. The proposed shielding configuration is designed and optimized to guarantee a high shielding effectiveness (SE) of up to 60 dB for B1-fields at the Larmor frequency of 64 MHz, thus preventing interactions between the radio-frequency (RF) coil and PET electronics. On the other hand, the shield is transparent to the gradient fields with the consequence that eddy-current artifacts in the acquired EPI images are significantly reduced with respect to the standard solid-shield configuration. The frequency-selective behavior of the shield is characterized and validated via simulation studies with CST MICROWAVE STUDIO in the megahertz and kilohertz range. Bench measurements with an RF coil built in-house demonstrated the high SE at the Larmor frequency. Moreover, measurements on a 4-T human scanner confirmed the abolishment of eddy current artifact and also provided an understanding of where the eddy currents occur with respect to the sequence parameters. Simulations and measurements for the proposed shielding concept were compared with a solid copper shielding configuration.

  3. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System (SPD)

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, A; Antinori, Federico; Burns, M; Cali, I A; Campbell, M; Caselle, M; Ceresa, S; Dima, R; Elias, D; Fabris, D; Krivda, Marian; Librizzi, F; Manzari, Vito; Morel, M; Moretto, Sandra; Osmic, F; Pappalardo, G S; Pepato, Adriano; Pulvirenti, A; Riedler, P; Riggi, F; Santoro, R; Stefanini, G; Torcato De Matos, C; Turrisi, R; Tydesjo, H; Viesti, G; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE silicon pixel detector (SPD) comprises the two innermost layers of the ALICE inner tracker system. The SPD includes 120 detector modules (half-staves) each consisting of 10 ALICE pixel chips bump bonded to two silicon sensors and one multi-chip read-out module. Each pixel chip contains 8192 active cells, so that the total number of pixel cells in the SPD is ≈ 107. The on-detector read-out is based on a multi-chip-module containing 4 ASICs and an optical transceiver module. The constraints on material budget and detector module dimensions are very demanding.

  4. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ionization detector having an array of detectors has, for example, grounding pads positioned in the spaces between some detectors (data detectors) and other detectors (reference detectors). The grounding pads are kept at zero electric potential, i.e. grounded. The grounding serves to drain away electrons and thereby prevent an unwanted accumulation of charge in the spaces, and cause the electric field lines to be more perpendicular to the detectors in regions near the grounding pads. Alternatively, no empty space is provided there being additional, grounded, detectors provided between the data and reference detectors. (author)

  5. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  6. FERMI multi-chip module

    CERN Multimedia

    This FERMI multi-chip module contains five million transistors. 25 000 of these modules will handle the flood of information through parts of the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC. To select interesting events for recording, crucial decisions are taken before the data leaves the detector. FERMI modules are being developed at CERN in partnership with European industry.

  7. Modeling an array of encapsulated germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, R

    2012-01-01

    A probability model has been presented for understanding the operation of an array of encapsulated germanium detectors generally known as composite detector. The addback mode of operation of a composite detector has been described considering the absorption and scattering of γ-rays. Considering up to triple detector hit events, we have obtained expressions for peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios of the cluster detector, which consists of seven hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. Results have been obtained for the miniball detectors comprising of three and four seven hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. The formalism has been extended to the SPI spectrometer which is a telescope of the INTEGRAL satellite and consists of nineteen hexagonal closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors. This spectrometer comprises of twelve detector modules surrounding the cluster detector. For comparison, we have considered a spectrometer comprising of nine detector modules surrounding the three detector configuration of miniball detector. In the present formalism, the operation of these sophisticated detectors could be described in terms of six probability amplitudes only. Using experimental data on relative efficiency and fold distribution of cluster detector as input, the fold distribution and the peak-to-total, peak-to-background ratios have been calculated for the SPI spectrometer and other composite detectors at 1332 keV. Remarkable agreement between experimental data and results from the present formalism has been observed for the SPI spectrometer.

  8. Transmutation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.c [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Sus, F. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kus, P.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-11

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  9. Transmutation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Klupak, V.; Sus, F.; Kucera, J.; Kus, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  10. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  11. Detector trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes briefly the development of detectors for high energy physics experiments. Especially considered are semiconductor microstrip detectors, drift tubes, holographic bubble chambers, scintillating fiber optics, and calorimeters. (HSI).

  12. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  13. Lepton detector workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imlay, R.; Iwata, S.; Jacobs, S.

    1976-01-01

    A discussion is given of the initial detector design, focusing on the cost estimates and on the inner detector modules. With regard to inner modules, the rate problem was examined for the closest elements, and the question whether one should use argon or lead-liquid scintillator calorimeters was discussed. New designs which involved major modifications to the lepton detector are considered. The major motivations for alternative designs were twofold. One was that the original detector looked quite expensive, and a study of the tradeoff of money versus physics had not really been done yet. The second point was that, since the physics region to be explored was totally new ground, one would like to leave as many options open as possible and build a detector that was as flexible as possible. A scaled-down version of the original design, which was strongly favored by this study, appears to save an appreciable amount of money with a small decrease in the initial physics scope. The more modular designs seem quite attractive, but not enough time was spent to demonstrate feasibility

  14. The Detector Control System of the ATLAS experiment at CERN An application to the calibration of the modules of the Tile Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Varelá-Rodriguez, F

    2002-01-01

    The principle subject of this thesis work is the design and development of the Detector Control System (DCS) of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The DCS must ensure the coherent and safe operation of the detector and handle the communication with external systems, like the LHC accelerator and CERN services. A bidirectional data flow between the Data AcQuisition (DAQ) system and the DCS will enable coherent operation of the experiment. The LHC experiments represent new challenges for the design of the control system. The extremely high complexity of the project forces the design of different components of the detector and related systems to be performed well ahead to their use. The long lifetime of the LHC experiments imposes the use of evolving technologies and modular design. The overall dimensions of the detector and the high number of I/O channels call for a control system with processing power distributed all over the facilities of the experiment while keeping a low cost. The environmental conditions require...

  15. Characterization of 1.2×1.2 mm2 silicon photomultipliers with Ce:LYSO, Ce:GAGG, and Pr:LuAG scintillation crystals as detector modules for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, N.; Sharma, R.; Ganka, T. R.; Schneider, F. R.; Paul, S.; Ziegler, S. I.

    2017-04-01

    The design of a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is specially challenging since it should not compromise high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, high count-rate capability, and good energy and time resolution. The geometrical design of the system alongside the characteristics of the individual PET detector modules contributes to the overall performance of the scanner. The detector performance is mainly influenced by the characteristics of the photo-detector and the scintillation crystal. Although silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have already proven to be promising photo-detectors for PET, their performance is highly influenced by micro-cell structure and production technology. Therefore, five types of SiPMs produced by KETEK with an active area size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm2 were characterized in this study. The SiPMs differed in the production technology and had micro-cell sizes of 25, 50, 75, and 100 μm. Performance of the SiPMs was evaluated in terms of their breakdown voltage, temperature sensitivity, dark count rate, and correlated noise probability. Subsequently, energy resolution and coincidence time resolution (CTR) of the SiPMs were measured with five types of crystals, including two Ce:LYSO, two Ce:GAGG, and one Pr:LuAG. Two crystals with a geometry of 1.5 × 1.5 × 6 mm3 were available from each type. The best CTR achieved was ~ 240 ps, which was obtained with the Ce:LYSO crystals coupled to the 50 μm SiPM produced with the trench technology. The best energy resolution for the 511 keV photo-peak was ~ 11% and was obtained with the same SiPM coupled to the Ce:GAGG crystals.

  16. Characterization of 1.2×1.2 mm2 silicon photomultipliers with Ce:LYSO, Ce:GAGG, and Pr:LuAG scintillation crystals as detector modules for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omidvari, N.; Sharma, R.; Schneider, F.R.; Ziegler, S.I.; Ganka, T.R.; Paul, S.

    2017-01-01

    The design of a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is specially challenging since it should not compromise high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, high count-rate capability, and good energy and time resolution. The geometrical design of the system alongside the characteristics of the individual PET detector modules contributes to the overall performance of the scanner. The detector performance is mainly influenced by the characteristics of the photo-detector and the scintillation crystal. Although silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have already proven to be promising photo-detectors for PET, their performance is highly influenced by micro-cell structure and production technology. Therefore, five types of SiPMs produced by KETEK with an active area size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm 2 were characterized in this study. The SiPMs differed in the production technology and had micro-cell sizes of 25, 50, 75, and 100 μm. Performance of the SiPMs was evaluated in terms of their breakdown voltage, temperature sensitivity, dark count rate, and correlated noise probability. Subsequently, energy resolution and coincidence time resolution (CTR) of the SiPMs were measured with five types of crystals, including two Ce:LYSO, two Ce:GAGG, and one Pr:LuAG. Two crystals with a geometry of 1.5 × 1.5 × 6 mm 3 were available from each type. The best CTR achieved was ∼ 240 ps, which was obtained with the Ce:LYSO crystals coupled to the 50 μm SiPM produced with the trench technology. The best energy resolution for the 511 keV photo-peak was ∼ 11% and was obtained with the same SiPM coupled to the Ce:GAGG crystals.

  17. Laser tests of silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolezal, Zdenek; Escobar, Carlos; Gadomski, Szymon; Garcia, Carmen; Gonzalez, Sergio; Kodys, Peter; Kubik, Petr; Lacasta, Carlos; Marti, Salvador; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Moorhead, Gareth F.; Phillips, Peter W.; Reznicek, Pavel; Slavik, Radan

    2007-01-01

    This paper collects experiences from the development of a silicon sensor laser testing setup and from tests of silicon strip modules (ATLAS End-cap SCT), pixel modules (DEPFET) and large-area diodes using semiconductor lasers. Lasers of 1060 and 680 nm wavelengths were used. A sophisticated method of focusing the laser was developed. Timing and interstrip properties of modules were measured. Analysis of optical effects involved and detailed discussion about the usability of laser testing for particle detectors are presented

  18. Gas position sensitive x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.F.

    1994-12-01

    The construction of gas x-ray detectors used to count and localize x-ray photons in one and two dimensions is reported. The principles of operation of the detectors are described, as well as the electronic modules comprised in the data acquisition system. Results obtained with detectors built at CBPF are shown, illustrating the performance of the Linear Position Sensitive Detectors. (author). 6 refs, 14 figs

  19. Improved photon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zermeno, A.; Marsh, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus and methods used to obtain image information from modulation of a uniform flux. A multi-layered detector apparatus is disclosed which comprises a first conductive layer having two sides, a photoconductive layer thick enough to obtain a desired level of sensitivity and resolution of the detector apparatus when the detector apparatus is exposed to radiation of known energy, one side of the photoconductive layer being integrally affixed to and in electrical contact with one side of the first conductive layer, an insulating layer having two sides that is a phosphor that will emit light when irradiated by x-rays, one side of the insulating layer being affixed to the other side of the photoconductive layer and a transparent conductive layer having two sides, one side of the transparent conductive layer being affixed to the other side of the insulating layer. (author)

  20. Superlattice electroabsorption radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, B.J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper provides a preliminary investigation of a new class of superlattice electroabsorption radiation detectors that employ direct optical modulation for high-speed, two-dimensional (2-D), high-resolution imaging. Applications for the detector include nuclear radiation measurements, tactical guidance and detection (laser radar), inertial fusion plasma studies, and satellite-based sensors. Initial calculations discussed in this paper indicate that a 1.5-μm (GaAlAs) multi-quantum-well (MQW) Fabry-Perot detector can respond directly to radiation of energies 1 eV to 10 KeV, and indirectly (with scattering targets) up through gamma, with 2-D sample rates on the order of 20 ps

  1. A PET imaging system dedicated to mammography

    CERN Document Server

    Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The imaging system Clear-PEM for positron emission mammography, under development within the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, is presented. The detector is based on pixelized LYSO crystals optically coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APD) and readout by a fast low-noise electronic system. A dedicated digital trigger and data acquisition system is used for on-line selection of coincidence events with high efficiency, large bandwidth and negligible dead-time. The detector module performance was characterized in detail.

  2. Cherenkov Detector for Beam Quality Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078842

    2016-01-01

    A new detector to measure the machine induced background at larger radiihas been developed and installed in the CMS experiment at LHC. Itconsists of 40 modules, each comprising a quartz bar read out by aphotomultiplier. Since Cerenkov radiation is emitted in a forward conearound the charged particle trajectory, these detectors can distinguishthe directions of the machine induced background.The back-end consists of a microTCA readout with excellent time resolution.The performance of the detector modules measured in several test-beamcampaigns will be reported. The installation in CMS will be described, andfirst results about operating the detector during data taking will begiven.

  3. Subpixel mapping and test beam studies with a HV2FEI4v2 CMOS-Sensor-Hybrid Module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisanz, T.; Große-Knetter, J.; Quadt, A.; Rieger, J.; Weingarten, J.

    2017-08-01

    The upgrade to the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider will increase the instantaneous luminosity by more than a factor of 5, thus creating significant challenges to the tracking systems of all experiments. Recent advancement of active pixel detectors designed in CMOS processes provide attractive alternatives to the well-established hybrid design using passive sensors since they allow for smaller pixel sizes and cost effective production. This article presents studies of a high-voltage CMOS active pixel sensor designed for the ATLAS tracker upgrade. The sensor is glued to the read-out chip of the Insertable B-Layer, forming a capacitively coupled pixel detector. The pixel pitch of the device under test is 33× 125 μm2, while the pixels of the read-out chip have a pitch of 50× 250 μm2. Three pixels of the CMOS device are connected to one read-out pixel, the information of which of these subpixels is hit is encoded in the amplitude of the output signal (subpixel encoding). Test beam measurements are presented that demonstrate the usability of this subpixel encoding scheme.

  4. Defect detection module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernwein, R.; Westermann, G.

    1986-01-01

    The ''defect detector'' module is aimed at exceptional event or state recording. Foreseen for voltage presence monitoring on high supply voltage module of drift chambers, its characteristics can also show up the vanishing of supply voltage and take in account transitory fast signals [fr

  5. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  7. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  8. The ANTARES optical module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amram, P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F.E.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J.; Azoulay, R.; Bailey, D.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Bellotti, R.; Benhammou, Y.; Bernard, F.; Berthier, R.; Bertin, V.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; Bland, R.W.; Blondeau, F.; Botton, N. de; Boulesteix, J.; Brooks, C.B.; Brunner, J.; Cafagna, F.; Calzas, A.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carloganu, C.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Carton, P.-H.; Cartwright, S.L.; Cassol, F.; Cecchini, S.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; Compere, C.; Cooper, S.; Coyle, P.; Croquette, J.; Cuneo, S.; Danilov, M.; Dantzig, R. van; De Marzo, C.; DeVita, R.; Deck, P.; Destelle, J.-J.; Dispau, G.; Drougou, J.F.; Druillole, F.; Engelen, J.; Feinstein, F.; Festy, D.; Fopma, J.; Gallone, J.-M.; Giacomelli, G.; Goret, P.; Gosset, L.; Gournay, J.-F.; Heijboer, A.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Herrouin, G.; Hubbard, J.R.; Jaquet, M.; Jong, M. de; Karolak, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H. E-mail: lafoux@cea.fr; Lamare, P.; Languillat, J.-C.; Laubier, L.; Laugier, J.-P.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Le Van Suu, A.; Lemoine, L.; Lo Nigro, L.; Lo Presti, D.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Magnier, P.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Massol, A.; Masullo, R.; Mazeas, F.; Mazeau, B.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J.E.; Michel, J.L.; Migneco, E.; Millot, C.; Mols, P.; Montanet, F.; Montaruli, T.; Morel, J.P.; Moscoso, L.; Musumeci, M.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Nooren, G.J.; Oberski, J.; Olivetto, C.; Oppelt-Pohl, A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Papaleo, R.; Payre, P.; Perrin, P.; Petruccetti, M.; Petta, C.; Piattelli, P.; Poinsignon, J.; Potheau, R.; Queinec, Y.; Racca, C.; Raia, G.; Randazzo, N.; Rethore, F.; Riccobene, G.; Ricol, J.-S.; Ripani, M.; Roca-Blay, V.; Rolin, J.F.; Rostovstev, A.; Russo, G.V.; Sacquin, Y.; Salusti, E.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schuster, W.; Soirat, J.-P.; Souvorova, O.; Spooner, N.J.C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stubert, D.; Taiuti, M.; Tao, C.; Tayalati, Y.; Thompson, L.F.

    2002-05-21

    The ANTARES collaboration is building a deep sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. This detector will cover a sensitive area of typically 0.1 km{sup 2} and will be equipped with about 1000 optical modules. Each of these optical modules consists of a large area photomultiplier and its associated electronics housed in a pressure resistant glass sphere. The design of the ANTARES optical module, which is a key element of the detector, has been finalized following extensive R and D studies and is reviewed here in detail.

  9. The ANTARES optical module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amram, P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F.E.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J.; Azoulay, R.; Bailey, D.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Bellotti, R.; Benhammou, Y.; Bernard, F.; Berthier, R.; Bertin, V.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; Bland, R.W.; Blondeau, F.; Botton, N. de; Boulesteix, J.; Brooks, C.B.; Brunner, J.; Cafagna, F.; Calzas, A.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carloganu, C.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Carton, P.-H.; Cartwright, S.L.; Cassol, F.; Cecchini, S.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; Compere, C.; Cooper, S.; Coyle, P.; Croquette, J.; Cuneo, S.; Danilov, M.; Dantzig, R. van; De Marzo, C.; DeVita, R.; Deck, P.; Destelle, J.-J.; Dispau, G.; Drougou, J.F.; Druillole, F.; Engelen, J.; Feinstein, F.; Festy, D.; Fopma, J.; Gallone, J.-M.; Giacomelli, G.; Goret, P.; Gosset, L.; Gournay, J.-F.; Heijboer, A.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Herrouin, G.; Hubbard, J.R.; Jaquet, M.; Jong, M. de; Karolak, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H.; Lamare, P.; Languillat, J.-C.; Laubier, L.; Laugier, J.-P.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Le Van Suu, A.; Lemoine, L.; Lo Nigro, L.; Lo Presti, D.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Magnier, P.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Massol, A.; Masullo, R.; Mazeas, F.; Mazeau, B.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J.E.; Michel, J.L.; Migneco, E.; Millot, C.; Mols, P.; Montanet, F.; Montaruli, T.; Morel, J.P.; Moscoso, L.; Musumeci, M.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Nooren, G.J.; Oberski, J.; Olivetto, C.; Oppelt-Pohl, A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Papaleo, R.; Payre, P.; Perrin, P.; Petruccetti, M.; Petta, C.; Piattelli, P.; Poinsignon, J.; Potheau, R.; Queinec, Y.; Racca, C.; Raia, G.; Randazzo, N.; Rethore, F.; Riccobene, G.; Ricol, J.-S.; Ripani, M.; Roca-Blay, V.; Rolin, J.F.; Rostovstev, A.; Russo, G.V.; Sacquin, Y.; Salusti, E.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schuster, W.; Soirat, J.-P.; Souvorova, O.; Spooner, N.J.C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stubert, D.; Taiuti, M.; Tao, C.; Tayalati, Y.; Thompson, L.F.; Tilav, S.; Triay, R.; Valente, V.; Varlamov, I.; Vaudaine, G.; Vernin, P.; Witt Huberts, P. de; Wolf, E. de; Zakharov, V.; Zavatarelli, S.; D Zornoza, J. de; Zuniga, J.

    2002-01-01

    The ANTARES collaboration is building a deep sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. This detector will cover a sensitive area of typically 0.1 km 2 and will be equipped with about 1000 optical modules. Each of these optical modules consists of a large area photomultiplier and its associated electronics housed in a pressure resistant glass sphere. The design of the ANTARES optical module, which is a key element of the detector, has been finalized following extensive R and D studies and is reviewed here in detail

  10. The ANTARES Optical Module

    CERN Document Server

    Amram, P; Anvar, S; Ardellier-Desages, F E; Aslanides, Elie; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Azoulay, R; Bailey, D; Basa, S; Battaglieri, M; Bellotti, R; Benhammou, Ya; Bernard, F; Berthier, R; Bertin, V; Billault, M; Blaes, R; Bland, R W; Blondeau, F; De Botton, N R; Boulesteix, J; Brooks, B; Brunner, J; Cafagna, F; Calzas, A; Capone, A; Caponetto, L; Cârloganu, C; Carmona, E; Carr, J; Carton, P H; Cartwright, S L; Cassol, F; Cecchini, S; Ciacio, F; Circella, M; Compere, C; Cooper, S; Coyle, P; Croquette, J; Cuneo, S; Danilov, M; Van Dantzig, R; De Marzo, C; De Vita, R; Deck, P; Destelle, J J; Dispau, G; Drougou, J F; Druillole, F; Engelen, J; Feinstein, F; Festy, D; Fopma, J; Gallone, J M; Giacomelli, G; Goret, P; Gosset, L G; Gournay, J F; Heijboer, A; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herrouin, G; Hubbard, John R; Jacquet, M; De Jong, M; Karolak, M; Kooijman, P M; Kouchner, A; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lachartre, D; Lafoux, H; Lamare, P; Languillat, J C; Laubier, L; Laugier, J P; Le Guen, Y; Le Provost, H; Le Van-Suu, A; Lemoine, L; Lo Nigro, L; Lo Presti, D; Loucatos, Sotirios S; Louis, F; Lyashuk, V I; Magnier, P; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Massol, A; Masullo, R; Mazéas, F; Mazeau, B; Mazure, A; McMillan, J E; Michel, J L; Migneco, E; Millot, C; Mols, P; Montanet, François; Montaruli, T; Morel, J P; Moscoso, L; Navas, S; Nezri, E; Nooren, G J L; Oberski, J; Olivetto, C; Oppelt-pohl, A; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Payre, P; Perrin, P; Petruccetti, M; Petta, P; Piattelli, P; Poinsignon, J; Popa, V; Potheau, R; Queinec, Y; Racca, C; Raia, G; Randazzo, N; Rethore, F; Riccobene, G; Ricol, J S; Ripani, M; Roca-Blay, V; Rolin, J F; Rostovtsev, A A; Russo, G V; Sacquin, Yu; Salusti, E; Schuller, J P; Schuster, W; Soirat, J P; Suvorova, O; Spooner, N J C; Spurio, M; Stolarczyk, T; Stubert, D; Taiuti, M; Tao, Charling; Tayalati, Y; Thompson, L F; Tilav, S; Triay, R; Valente, V; Varlamov, I; Vaudaine, G; Vernin, P; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; De Wolf, E; Zakharov, V; Zavatarelli, S; De Dios-Zornoza-Gomez, Juan; Zúñiga, J

    2002-01-01

    The ANTARES collaboration is building a deep sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. This detector will cover a sensitive area of typically 0.1 km-squared and will be equipped with about 1000 optical modules. Each of these optical modules consists of a large area photomultiplier and its associated electronics housed in a pressure resistant glass sphere. The design of the ANTARES optical module, which is a key element of the detector, has been finalized following extensive R & D studies and is reviewed here in detail.

  11. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  12. Recent test results on the ATLAS SCT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernegger, H.

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) will be a central part of the tracking system of the ATLAS experiment. The SCT, which is currently under construction, will consist of four concentric barrels of silicon detectors as well as two silicon endcap detectors formed by nine disks each. After an overview of the SCT and the detector module layout, the paper will summarize recent test results obtained from silicon detector modules, which have been extensively tested before starting their large series production. The tests presented here cover electrical performance of individual modules, their performance after irradiation, as well as system tests in a multi-module setup

  13. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfyrla, Anna [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-03-10

    In the first part of this work, we present a search for WW and WZ production in charged lepton, neutrino plus jets final states produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, using 1.2 fb-1 of data accumulated with the CDF II detector. This channel is yet to be observed in hadron colliders due to the large singleWplus jets background. However, this decay mode has a much larger branching fraction than the cleaner fully leptonic mode making it more sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings that manifest themselves at higher transverse W momentum. Because the final state is topologically similar to associated production of a Higgs boson with a W, the techniques developed in this analysis are also applicable in that search. An Artificial Neural Network has been used for the event selection optimization. The theoretical prediction for the cross section is σWW/WZtheory x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 2.09 ± 0.14 pb. They measured NSignal = 410 ± 212(stat) ± 102(sys) signal events that correspond to a cross section σWW/WZ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 1.47 ± 0.77(stat) ± 0.38(sys) pb. The 95% CL upper limit to the cross section is estimated to be σ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) < 2.88 pb. The second part of the present work is technical and concerns the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) assembly phase. Although technical, the work in the SCT assembly phase is of prime importance for the good performance of the detector during data taking. The production at the University of Geneva of approximately one third of the silicon microstrip end-cap modules is presented. This collaborative effort of the university of Geneva group that lasted two years, resulted in 655 produced modules, 97% of which were good modules, constructed within the mechanical and electrical specifications and delivered in the SCT collaboration for assembly on the end-cap disks. The SCT end-caps and barrels

  14. Production and Quality Assurance of Modules and Study of optimized Pixel Sensor Designs for the Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Heindl, Stefan; Husemann, Ulrich

    In der vorliegenden Dissertation wird die Modulproduktion am Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik des KIT für das Phase-I-Upgrade des CMS-Pixeldetektors im Jahr 2017 vorgestellt. Dies umfasst die gesamte Produktionskette, an deren Ende die fertigen Module stehen. Ein besonderes Augenmerk wird dabei auf die Qualitätssicherung während der Produktion gelegt. Darüber hinaus werden die Ergebnisse von Teststrahluntersuchungen von optimierten Pixelsensoren für das geplante Phase-II-Upgrade des CMS-Pixeldetektors präsentiert.

  15. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  16. Detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.

    1977-10-01

    Semiconductor detectors are now applied to a very wide range of problems. The combination of relatively low cost, excellent energy resolution, and simultaneous broad energy-spectrum analysis is uniquely suited to many applications in both basic and applied physics. Alternative techniques, such as magnetic spectrometers for charged-particle spectroscopy, while offering better energy resolution, are bulky, expensive, and usually far more difficult to use. Furthermore, they do not directly provide the broad energy-spectrum measurements easily accomplished using semiconductor detectors. Scintillation detectors, which are approximately equivalent to semiconductor detectors in convenience and cost, exhibit 10 to 100 times worse energy resolution. However, their high efficiency and large potential size recommend their use in some measurements

  17. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.; Howes, J.H.; Smout, D.W.S.

    1979-01-01

    A smoke detector is described which provides a smoke sensing detector and an indicating device and in which a radioactive substance is used in conjunction with two ionisation chambers. The system includes an outer electrode, a collector electrode and an inner electrode which is made of or supports the radioactive substance which, in this case, is 241 Am. The invention takes advantage of the fact that smoke particles can be allowed to enter freely the inner ionisation chamber. (U.K.)

  18. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, W.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation detector for measuring e.g. a neutron flux consists of a central emitter, an insulating shell arranged around it, and a tube-shaped collector enclosing both. The emitter itself is composed of a great number of stranded, spiral wires of small diameter giving a defined flexibility to the detector. For emitter material Pt, Rh, V, Co, Ce, Os or Ta may be used. (DG) [de

  19. Split detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederstrand, C.N.; Chism, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which provides a dual channel capability for the simultaneous determination of the presence and concentration of two gases in a stream of sample gas and which has a single infrared source, a single sample cell, two infrared bandpass filters, and two infrared detectors. A separator between the filters and detectors prevents interchange of radiation between the filters. The separator is positioned by fitting it in a slot

  20. INDIA: Photon multiplicity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The team of Indian scientists from Calcutta's Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Bhubaneswar Institute of Physics, Panjab (Chandigarh), Rajasthan (Jaipur) and Jammu in collaboration with GSI Darmstadt have contributed a large and highly granular preshower photon multiplicity detector (PMD) for the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS proton synchrotron. This experiment studies high energy collisions of lead ions and will measure both charged particle and photon multiplicity in a large overlap region. The motivation for measuring photon multiplicity in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions stems from theoretical predictions of changes in the relative production of photons and charged particles in the phase transition of hadronic matter to quarkgluon plasma and its subsequent hadronization. The photon multiplicity detector consists of a matrix of scintillator pads placed in light-tight boxes and mounted behind the lead converter plates. The light from the scintillator pads is transported to the readout system using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibres. Developing on the team's earlier experience with a smaller version for the WA93 experiment (September 1991, page 16), several modifications were incorporated to improve light collection and transport. Use of improved WLS fibres, short WLS pieces to minimize self-absorption, and thermal splicing with long clear fibres were some of the important changes incorporated. Tests showed signficantly improved light collection. The scintillator pads were fabricated at all the five collaborating centres in India and the complicated assembly in the detector box modules carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. More than 400 lead converter plates were machined in Calcutta to rigorous tolerances of 0.2 mm. The assembled detector box modules and lead plates were shipped to CERN in spring 1994 for tests and installation. The WA98 PMD consists of over 50,000 scintillator pads of sizes varying from 15 to

  1. INDIA: Photon multiplicity detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-01-15

    Full text: The team of Indian scientists from Calcutta's Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Bhubaneswar Institute of Physics, Panjab (Chandigarh), Rajasthan (Jaipur) and Jammu in collaboration with GSI Darmstadt have contributed a large and highly granular preshower photon multiplicity detector (PMD) for the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS proton synchrotron. This experiment studies high energy collisions of lead ions and will measure both charged particle and photon multiplicity in a large overlap region. The motivation for measuring photon multiplicity in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions stems from theoretical predictions of changes in the relative production of photons and charged particles in the phase transition of hadronic matter to quarkgluon plasma and its subsequent hadronization. The photon multiplicity detector consists of a matrix of scintillator pads placed in light-tight boxes and mounted behind the lead converter plates. The light from the scintillator pads is transported to the readout system using wavelength shifting (WLS) fibres. Developing on the team's earlier experience with a smaller version for the WA93 experiment (September 1991, page 16), several modifications were incorporated to improve light collection and transport. Use of improved WLS fibres, short WLS pieces to minimize self-absorption, and thermal splicing with long clear fibres were some of the important changes incorporated. Tests showed signficantly improved light collection. The scintillator pads were fabricated at all the five collaborating centres in India and the complicated assembly in the detector box modules carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. More than 400 lead converter plates were machined in Calcutta to rigorous tolerances of 0.2 mm. The assembled detector box modules and lead plates were shipped to CERN in spring 1994 for tests and installation. The WA98 PMD consists of over 50,000 scintillator pads of sizes varying from 15 to 25 mm

  2. Design of a lepton detector for ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnstein, R.; Carithers, W.C.; Duong-van, M.

    1975-01-01

    The theoretical background is given for a proposed experiment to detect W mesons using their leptonic decay mode. A lepton detector was designed for use at the planned ISABELLE proton--proton colliding beam storage rings. The general configuration of the detector is shown, and an electron identification module, an electron-hadron calorimeter, methods of muon identification, and an optional central detector (magnetic solenoid spectrometer) are discussed

  3. Shaped detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detector or detector array which has a non-constant spatial response, is disclosed individually and in combination with a tomographic scanner. The detector has a first dimension which is oriented parallel to the plane of the scan circle in the scanner. Along the first dimension, the detector is most responsive to radiation received along a centered segment of the dimension and less responsive to radiation received along edge segments. This non-constant spatial response can be achieved in a detector comprised of a scintillation crystal and a photoelectric transducer. The scintillation crystal in one embodiment is composed of three crystals arranged in layers, with the center crystal having the greatest light conversion efficiency. In another embodiment, the crystal is covered with a reflective substance around the center segment and a less reflective substance around the remainder. In another embodiment, an optical coupling which transmits light from adjacent the center segment with the greatest intensity couples the scintillation crystal and the photoelectric transducer. In yet another embodiment, the photoelectric transducer comprises three photodiodes, one receiving light produced adjacent the central segment and the other two receiving light produced adjacent the edge segments. The outputs of the three photodiodes are combined with a differential amplifier

  4. Development of a Low-power, Low-cost, Front-end Electronics Module for Large-Scale Distributed Neutrino Detectors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltzberg, David

    2009-01-01

    Final technical report for Advanced detector research program award at UCLA. To date, only two objects have been observed using neutrino messengers. However, each observation illustrates the incisive power of neutrino observations for both astrophysics and for particle physics. The first source observed with neutrinos was the Sun by Ray Davis and collaborators using a chlorine nuclear target. Until then, only electromagnetic emissions produced near the surface of the Sun had been studied. With neutrinos, the hydrogen-burning core of the Sun is directly observed - we now know even with its predicted intensity. Because neutrinos are so deeply penetrating, they give a direct window on the most energetic processes in the universe, unobscured by photospheres, fireballs and materials opaque to light. The solar neutrino observations largest impact however was felt by particle physicists. This experiment and follow-up experiments with water, heavy water, and gallium all observed the well-known deficit of the predicted number of electron-type neutrinos. After several decades of research using both astrophysical and accelerator observations inspired by this result, the effect is now known to be due the transformation of electron-type neutrinos into one of the two other flavors of neutrinos. These observations were the first and strongest data that showed particle physicists that the mass (propagating) eigenstates and weak eigenstates of neutrinos and their weak eigenstates are not identical. In addition, this transformation was the first indication that neutrinos have a small, but non-zero mass. The second, and latest, discovery of a cosmic neutrinos source was the explosion of supernova SN1987a in the Large Magellanic Cloud. In a type IIa supernova, 99% of the energy is expected to be released in the form of neutrinos since no other energy could escape the dense environment. The observations of SN1987a confirmed the theoretical models of this type of stellar core collapse

  5. Silicon Drift Detectors - A Novel Technology for Vertex Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, D.

    1996-10-01

    Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) are novel position sensing silicon detectors which operate in a manner analogous to gas drift detectors. Single SDD's were shown in the CERN NA45 experiment to permit excellent spatial resolution (pseudo-rapidity. Over the last three years we undertook a concentrated R+D effort to optimize the performance of the detector by minimizing the inactive area, the operating voltage and the data volume. We will present test results from several wafer prototypes. The charge produced by the passage of ionizing particles through the bulk of the detectors is collected on segmented anodes, with a pitch of 250 μm, on the far edges of the detector. The anodes are wire-bonded to a thick film multi-chip module which contains preamplifier/shaper chips and CMOS based switched capacitor arrays used as an analog memory pipeline. The ADC is located off-detector. The complete readout chain from the wafer to the DAQ will be presented. Finally we will show physics performance simulations based on the resolution achieved by the SVT prototypes.

  6. BES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.Z.; Bian, Q.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, L.J.; Chen, S.N.; Chen, Y.Q.; Chen, Z.Q.; Chi, Y.K.; Cui, H.C.; Cui, X.Z.; Deng, S.S.; Deng, Y.W.; Ding, H.L.; Dong, B.Z.; Dong, X.S.; Du, X.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, C.; Feng, Z.; Fu, Z.S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gao, W.X.; Gao, Y.N.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Guan, Y.Z.; Guo, H.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Guo, Y.Y.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; Hao, W.; He, J.; He, K.R.; He, M.J.; Hou, X.J.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, J.S.; Hu, J.W.; Huang, D.Q.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jia, Q.P.; Jiang, C.H.; Ju, Q.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, D.S.; Li, F.; Li, H.; Li Jia; Li, J.T.; Li Jin; Li, L.L.; Li, P.Q.; Li, Q.M.; Li, R.B.; Li, S.Q.; Li, W.; Li, W.G.; Li, Z.X.; Liang, G.N.; Lin, F.C.; Lin, S.Z.; Lin, W.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, Z.Y.; Lu, C.G.; Lu, W.D.; Lu, Z.Y.; Lu, J.G.; Ma, D.H.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Ni, H.L.; Nie, J.; Nie, Z.D.; Niu, W.P.; Pan, L.J.; Qi, N.D.; Qian, J.J.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Ruan, T.Z.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, J.; Sheng, H.Y.; Sheng, J.P.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, F.K.; Tang, S.Q.; Tian, W.H.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.Y.; Wang, J.G.; Wang, J.Y.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, S.Q.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wang, Z.H.; Wang, Z.J.; Wei, C.L.; Wei, Z.Z.; Wu, J.W.; Wu, S.H.; Wu, S.Q.; Wu, W.M.; Wu, X.D.; Wu, Z.D.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xiao, J.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, X.X.; Xu, J.G.; Xu, R.S.; Xu, Z.Q.; Xuan, B.C.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, S.P.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.Z.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, X.F.; Yang, X.R.; Ye, M.H.; Yu, C.H.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.D.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, C.Y.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.M.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, P.D.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, M.; Zheng, W.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhong, G.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, J.; Zhou Li; Zhou Lin; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Y.S.; Zhou, Y.H.; Zhu, G.S.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, S.G.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e + e - annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  7. Vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10 -13 s, among them the τ lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation

  8. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, E.

    1976-01-01

    A smoke detector is described consisting of a ventilated ionisation chamber having a number of electrodes and containing a radioactive source in the form of a foil supported on the surface of the electrodes. This electrode consists of a plastic material treated with graphite to render it electrically conductive. (U.K.)

  9. Semiconductor Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  10. Capillary detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijn, J.; Winter, K.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Fabre, J.P.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Goldberg, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Bay, A.; Currat, C.; Koppenburg, P.; Frekers, D.; Wolff, T.; Buontempo, S.; Ereditato, A.; Frenkel, A.; Liberti, B.; Martellotti, G.; Penso, G.; Ekimov, A.; Golovkin, S.; Govorun, V.; Medvedkov, A.; Vasil'chenko, V.

    1998-01-01

    The option for a microvertex detector using glass capillary arrays filled with liquid scintillator is presented. The status of capillary layers development and possible read-out techniques for high rate environment are reported. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Modelling of performance of the ATLAS SCT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The ATLAS detector being built at LHC will use the SCT (semiconductor tracking) module for particle tracking in the inner core of the detector. An analytical/numerical model of the discriminator threshold dependence and the temperature dependence of the SCT module was derived. Measurements were conducted on the performance of the SCT module versus temperature and these results were compared with the predictions made by the model. The affect of radiation damage of the SCT detector was also investigated. The detector will operate for approximately 10 years so a study was carried out on the effects of the 10 years of radiation exposure to the SCT

  12. Muon detector for the COSINE-100 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihtiadi, H.; Adhikari, G.; Adhikari, P.; Barbosa de Souza, E.; Carlin, N.; Choi, S.; Choi, W. Q.; Djamal, M.; Ezeribe, A. C.; Ha, C.; Hahn, I. S.; Hubbard, A. J. F.; Jeon, E. J.; Jo, J. H.; Joo, H. W.; Kang, W.; Kang, W. G.; Kauer, M.; Kim, B. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Leonard, D. S.; Lim, K. E.; Lynch, W. A.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mouton, F.; Olsen, S. L.; Park, H. K.; Park, H. S.; Park, J. S.; Park, K. S.; Pettus, W.; Pierpoint, Z. P.; Ra, S.; Rogers, F. R.; Rott, C.; Scarff, A.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Thompson, W. G.; Yang, L.; Yong, S. H.

    2018-02-01

    The COSINE-100 dark matter search experiment has started taking physics data with the goal of performing an independent measurement of the annual modulation signal observed by DAMA/LIBRA. A muon detector was constructed by using plastic scintillator panels in the outermost layer of the shield surrounding the COSINE-100 detector. It detects cosmic ray muons in order to understand the impact of the muon annual modulation on dark matter analysis. Assembly and initial performance tests of each module have been performed at a ground laboratory. The installation of the detector in the Yangyang Underground Laboratory (Y2L) was completed in the summer of 2016. Using three months of data, the muon underground flux was measured to be 328 ± 1(stat.)± 10(syst.) muons/m2/day. In this report, the assembly of the muon detector and the results from the analysis are presented.

  13. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  14. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  15. Ionization detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, E E

    1976-02-27

    This invention concerns a fire detection system making use of a beta source. The ionisation detector includes a first and second chamber respectively comprising a first and second electrode, preferably a plate, with a common electrode separating the first and second chamber. Communication is provided between these chambers through a set of orifices and each chamber also has a set of orifices for communication with the ambient atmosphere. One or both chambers can comprise a particle source, preferably beta. The detector also has an adjustable electrode housed in one of the chambers to regulate the voltage between the fixed electrode of this chamber and the common electrode located between the chambers. The electrodes of the structure are connected to a detection circuit that spots a change in the ionisation current when a fire alarm condition arises. The detection circuit of a new type includes a relaxation oscillator with a programmable unijunction transistor and a light emitting diode.

  16. MUST detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Auger, F.; Sauvestre, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The IPN-Orsay, in collaboration with the SPhN-Saclay and the DPTA Bruyeres, has built an array of 8 telescopes based on Si-strip technology for the study of direct reactions induced by radioactive beams. The detectors are described, along with the compact high density VXI electronics and the stand-alone data acquisition system developed in the laboratory. One telescope was tested using an 40 Ar beam and the measured performances are discussed. (authors)

  17. Radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohata, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Yoji

    1968-10-30

    Herein disclosed is an ionization chamber the airtightness of which can be readily tested. The ionization chamber is characterized in that a small amount of helium gas is filled in the chamber in combination with other ionization gases such as argon gas, xenon gas and the like. Helium leakage from the chamber is measured by a known helium gas sensor in a vacuum vessel. Hence the long term drift of the radiation detector sensitivity may be determined.

  18. Neutron detector with monitoring elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, P.

    1976-01-01

    To check the reliable reading of a neutron detector the signal of which results from (n,e) processes and which is used for neutron flux supervision in the reactor core of pressurized-water reactors, a circuit is given which makes it possible to record the isolation resistivity of the cable connected to the input of the current amplifier and of the neutron detector, this resistivity determining, among others, the output signal. For supervision, the input offset voltage of the current amplifier is modulated by a low-frequency ac voltage and a filter is assigned to the output of an op amplifier, this filter feeding a limiting value recorder. (ORU) [de

  19. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    This describes a smoke detector comprising a self-luminous light source and a photosensitive device which is so arranged that the light source is changed by the presence of smoke in a detecting region. A gaseous tritium light source is used. This consists of a borosilicate glass bulb with an internal phosphor coating, filled with tritium gas. The tritium emits low energy beta particles which cause the phosphor to glow. This is a reliable light source which needs no external power source. The photosensitive device may be a phototransistor and may drive a warning device through a directly coupled transistor amplifier. (U.K.)

  20. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Fernandez Bedoya

    2012-01-01

      The major activity of the DT group during this Year-End Technical Stop has been the reworking of LV modules. It has been a large campaign, carefully planned, to try to solve, once and for all, the long-standing problem of Anderson Power connectors overheating. The solution involved removing the 140 CAEN modules from the detector (6.5 kg each), soldering of “pigtails” in a temporary workshop in USC, and thorough testing of all the modules in a local system installed in USC. The operation has been satisfactorily smooth, taking into account the magnitude of the intervention. The system is now back in good shape and ready for commissioning. In addition, HV boards have been cleaned up, HV USC racks have been equipped with water detection cables, and the gas and HV have been switched back on smoothly. Other significant activities have also taken place during this YETS, such as the installation of a new and faster board for the Minicrates secondary link and the migration to Scienti...

  1. Study of preamplifier, shaper and peak detector in readout ASIC for particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ke; Zhang Shengjun; Fan Lei; Li Xian

    2014-01-01

    Recently, kinds of particle detectors have used Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) in their electronics readout system and ASICs have been designed in China now. This project designed a multi-channel readout ASIC for general detector. The chip has Preamplifier, Shaper and Peak Detector embedded for easy readout. For each channel, signal which is preprocessed by a low-noise preamplifier is sent to the shaper to form a quasi-Gaussian pulse and keep its peak for readout. This chip and modules of individual Preamplifier, Shaper and Peak Detector have been manufactured, results will be reported in time. (authors)

  2. SPECT detector system design based on embedded system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weizheng; Zhao Shujun; Zhang Lei; Sun Yuanling

    2007-01-01

    A single-photon emission computed tomography detector system based on embedded Linux designed. This system is composed of detector module, data acquisition module, ARM MPU module, network interface communication module and human machine interface module. Its software uses multithreading technology based on embedded Linux. It can achieve high speed data acquisition, real-time data correction and network data communication. It can accelerate the data acquisition and decrease the dead time. The accuracy and the stability of the system can be improved. (authors)

  3. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector, therefore, in view of Run-2 of LHC, the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and an additional optical link per module was added to overcome in some layers the readout bandwidth limitation when LHC will exceed the nominal peak luminosity by almost a factor of 3. The key features and challenges met during the IBL project will be presented, as well as its operational experience and Pixel Detector performance in LHC.

  4. Waveform Sampler CAMAC Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, D.R.; Haller, G.M.; Kang, H.; Wang, J.

    1985-09-01

    A Waveform Sampler Module (WSM) for the measurement of signal shapes coming from the multi-hit drift chambers of the SLAC SLC detector is described. The module uses a high speed, high resolution analog storage device (AMU) developed in collaboration between SLAC and Stanford University. The AMU devices together with high speed TTL clocking circuitry are packaged in a hybrid which is also suitable for mounting on the detector. The module is in CAMAC format and provides eight signal channels, each recording signal amplitude versus time in 512 cells at a sampling rate of up to 360 MHz. Data are digitized by a 12-bit ADC with a 1 μs conversion time and stored in an on-board memory accessible through CAMAC

  5. The hardware of the ATLAS Pixel Detector Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henss, T; Andreani, A; Boek, J; Boyd, G; Citterio, M; Einsweiler, K; Kersten, S; Kind, P; Lantzsch, K; Latorre, S; Maettig, P; Meroni, C; Sabatini, F; Schultes, J

    2007-01-01

    The innermost part of the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) experiment, which is currently under construction at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider), will be a silicon pixel detector comprised of 1744 individual detector modules. To operate these modules, the readout electronics, and other detector components, a complex power supply and control system is necessary. The specific powering and control requirements, as well as the custom made components of our power supply and control systems, are described. These include remotely programmable regulator stations, the power supply system for the optical transceivers, several monitoring units, and the Interlock System. In total, this comprises the Pixel Detector Control System (DCS)

  6. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, B.; Finkenzeller, J.; Kiiehn, G.; Lichtenberg, W.

    1984-01-01

    In an exemplary embodiment, a flat radiation beam is detected having a common electrode disposed parallel to the beam plane at one side and a common support with a series of individual conductors providing electrodes opposite successive portions of the common electrode and lying in a plane also parallel to the beam plane. The beam may be fan-shaped and the individual electrodes may be aligned with respective ray paths separated by uniform angular increments in the beam plane. The individual conductors and the connection thereof to the exterior of the detector housing may be formed on an insulator which can be folded into a T-shape for leading the supply conductors for alternate individual conductors toward terminals at opposite sides of the chamber

  7. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Joram, Christian; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  8. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.

    1979-01-01

    An ionization smoke detector consisting of two electrodes defining an ionization chamber permitting entry of smoke, a radioactive source to ionize gas in the chamber and a potential difference applied across the first and second electrodes to cause an ion current to flow is described. The current is affected by entry of smoke. An auxiliary electrode is positioned in the ionization chamber between the first and second electrodes, and it is arranged to maintain or create a potential difference between the first electrode and the auxiliary electrode. The auxiliary electrode may be used for testing or for adjustment of sensitivity. A collector electrode divides the chamber into two regions with the auxiliary electrode in the outer sensing region. (U.K.)

  9. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A safe and reliable apparatus for detecting products of combustion and aerosols in the atmosphere was developed which uses a beta source. It is easy to adjust for optimum performance. The ionization detector comprises a double chamber; one of the chambers is the basic sensing chamber. The sensing chamber is ported to both the secondary chambers to account for slow ambient changes in the atmosphere outside of the chamber. The voltages from the ionization chamber are adjusted with electrodes in each chamber. The ionization chamber contains baffles to direct the air to be sensed as well as an electrostatic screen. A unique electronic circuit provides an inexpensive and reliable means for detecting the signal change which occurs in the ionization chamber. The decision level of the alarm circuit can be adjusted to allow for any desired sensitivity. (D.N.)

  10. Microstrip detector for the ALICE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a close up of one of the silicon microstrip detectors that will be installed on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. 1698 double-sided modules of these silicon microstrips will be installed in the two outermost layers of the ALICE inner tracking system. The microstrips have to be specially designed to withstand the high resolution levels at the heart of the detector.

  11. Simulation of cross-talk noise of high energy X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rifeng; Zhang Ping; Zhang Zehong

    2005-01-01

    The signal-noise ratio of detectors and the image quality will be affected by the detector cross-talk noise. The authors use EGSnrc to research the cross-talk noise in the CdWO 4 detector module, and analyze various factors which can bring about the cross-talk noise. The work will facilitate the selection of detector module and offer some parameters for the correction of cross-talk noise with software. (authors)

  12. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    2012-01-01

      Although the year 2012 is the third year without access to the chambers and the Front-End electronics, the fraction of good channels is still very high at 99.1% thanks also to the constant care provided by the on-site operation team. The downtime caused to CMS as a consequence of DT failures is to-date <2%. The intervention on the LV power supplies, which required a large number of CAEN modules (137 A3050, 13 A3100, and 3 MAO) to be removed from the detector, reworked and tested during this Year-End Technical Stop, can now, after a few months of stable operation of the LV, be declared to have solved once-and-for-all the persistent problem with the overheating LV Anderson connectors. Another piece of very good news is that measurements of the noise from single-hit rate outside the drift-time box as a function of the LHC luminosity show that the noise rate and distribution are consistent with expectations of the simulations in the Muon TDR, which have guided the detector design and constru...

  13. Silicon radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, G.

    1995-01-01

    An introduction to and an overview of function principles and properties of semiconductor radiation detectors is attempted. The paper is addressed to people interested in detector development but not already experts in the field of semiconductor detectors. (orig.)

  14. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lantzsch, Kerstin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with new service quarter panels to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run 1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning, operation and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector will be presented.

  15. Building CMS Pixel Barrel Detectur Modules

    CERN Document Server

    König, S; Horisberger, R.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.; Weber, R.; Kastli, H.Chr.; Erdmann, W.

    2007-01-01

    For the barrel part of the CMS pixel tracker about 800 silicon pixel detector modules are required. The modules are bump bonded, assembled and tested at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This article describes the experience acquired during the assembly of the first ~200 modules.

  16. Calibration of detector efficiency of neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hongsheng; He Xijun; Xu Rongkun; Peng Taiping

    2001-01-01

    BF 3 neutron detector has been set up. Detector efficiency is calibrated by associated particle technique. It is about 3.17 x 10 -4 (1 +- 18%). Neutron yield of neutron generator per pulse (10 7 /pulse) is measured by using the detector

  17. Position detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to detect the position of an moving object in a control rod position detector, stably in a digital manner at a high accuracy and free from the undesired effects of circumstantial conditions such as the reactor temperature. Constitution: Coils connected in parallel with each other are disposed along the passage of a moving object and variable resistors and relays are connected in series with each of the coils respectively. Light emitting diodes is connected in series with the contacts of the respective relays. The resistance value of the variable resistors are adjusted depending on the changes in the circumstantial conditions and temperature distribution upon carrying out the positional detection. When the object is inserted into a coils, the relevant relay is deenergized, by which the relay contacts are closed to light up the diode. In the same manner, as the object is successively inserted into the coils, the diodes are lighted-up successively thereby enabling highly accurate and stable positional detection in a digital manner, free from the undesired effects of the circumstantial conditions. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  19. A first principle approach for encapsulated type composite detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, R

    2012-01-01

    A first principle approach is presented for modeling a composite detector consisting of several high-purity germanium detector modules. Without making assumptions, if we consider the full energy peak counts from single and multiple detector module interactions, and the decomposition of background counts to counts corresponding to the escaping γ-rays and counts for γ-rays which could be recovered in addback mode, it is observed that the addback mode of a composite detector could be described in terms of four probability amplitudes only. Expressions for peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios are obtained. Considering details of the scattering and absorption processes in a composite detector, a formalism is introduced for understanding the probability amplitudes. Detailed investigation has been performed on the effect of shape and size of composite detectors on peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios. In accordance with isoperimetric inequality for hexagonal shapes, we have discussed about the optimal design of detector layout for extremely large values of detector modules. Using experimental data on relative single crystal efficiency, addback factor and peak-to-total ratio at 1332 keV for cluster detector, the peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios have been calculated for several composite detectors.

  20. Coincidence logic modules for criticality alarming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaief, C.C. III.

    1977-04-01

    A coincidence Logic Module and a companion contact closure Relay Module utilizing the NIM Standard have been developed for criticality alarming. The units provide an ALARM whenever two or more out of N detectors become activated. In addition, an ALERT is generated whenever one or more detectors is activated or when certain electronic component failures occur. The number of detector inputs (N) can be expanded in groups of six by adding modules. Serial and parallel redundancy were used to reduce the probability of system failure

  1. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2013-01-01

    During LS1, the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) collaboration is focusing its efforts on installation and commissioning of the fourth endcap station (RE4) and on the reparation and maintenance of the present system (1100 detectors). The 600 bakelite gaps, needed to build 200 double-gap RE4 chambers are being produced in Korea. Chamber construction and testing sites are located at CERN, in Ghent University, and at BARC (India). At present, 42 chambers have been assembled, 32 chambers have been successfully tested with cosmic rays runs and 7 Super Modules, made by two chambers, have been built at CERN by a Bulgarian/Georgian/Italian team and are now ready to be installed in the positive endcap. The 36 Super Modules needed to complete the positive endcap will be ready in September and installation is scheduled for October 2013. The Link-Board system for RE4 is under construction in Naples. Half of the system has been delivered at CERN in June. Six crates (Link-Board Boxes) and 75 boards, needed to instrument t...

  2. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers

  3. 3D silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzefall, Ulrich; Bates, Richard; Boscardin, Maurizio; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Eckert, Simon; Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste; Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne; Lozano, Manuel; Pahn, Gregor; Parkes, Chris; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pennicard, David; Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina; Szumlak, Tomasz; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10 15 N eq /cm 2 , which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10 15 N eq /cm 2 . The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5μm spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr 90 β-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the results obtained with 3D-STC-modules.

  4. 3D silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzefall, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Bates, Richard [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boscardin, Maurizio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Lozano, Manuel [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Pellegrini, Giulio [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Szumlak, Tomasz [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5{mu}m spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr{sup 90}{beta}-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of

  5. POSSuMUS: a position sensitive scintillating muon SiPM detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ruschke, Alexander

    The development of a modular designed large scale scintillation detector with a two-dimensional position sensitivity is presented in this thesis. This novel POsition Sensitive Scintillating MUon SiPM Detector is named POSSuMUS. The POSSuMUS detector is capable to determine the particle’s position in two space dimensions with a fast trigger capability. Each module is constructed from two trapezoidal shaped plastic scintillators to form one rectangular shaped detector module. Both trapezoids are optically insulated against each other. In both trapezoids the scintillation light is collected by plastic fibers and guided towards silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). SiPMs are light sensors which are capable to detect even smallest amounts of light. By combining several detector modules, position sensitive areas from 100 cm2 to few m2 are achievable with few readout channels. Therefore, POSSuMUS provides a cost effective detector concept. The position sensitivity along the trapezoidal geometry of one detector module ...

  6. Single photon light detector for deep ocean applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuno, S.; Babson, J.; Learned, J.G.; O'Connor, D.; Grieder, P.K.F.; Wilson, C.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a single photon sensitive light detector module which can be operated in the ocean to a depth of 5000 m. It was designed primarily to be used as a Cherenkov light detector in conjunction with the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detector) experiment. After calibration in the laboratory, seven detectors, assembled in a vertical string geometry, have been operated simultaneously in the deep ocean off the coast of the island of Hawaii. Cosmic ray muons have been recorded successfully at dephts ranging from 2000 to 4000 m. The results have demonstrated the capability of the detector; it fulfills the specifications required for the modules to be used in a deep ocean muon and neutrino detector. (orig.)

  7. Infrared LED Array For Silicon Strip Detector Qualification

    CERN Document Server

    Dirkes, Guido; Hartmann, Frank; Heier, Stefan; Schwerdtfeger, Wolfgang; Waldschmitt, M; Weiler, K W; Weseler, Siegfried

    2003-01-01

    The enormous amount of silicon strip detector modules for the CMS tracker requires a test-sytem to allow qualification of each individual detector module and its front-end electronics within minutes. The objective is to test the detector with a physical signal. Signals are generated in the detector by illumination with lightpulses emitted by a LED at 950~nm and with a rise time of 10~ns. In order to avoid a detector moving, an array of 64 LEDs is used, overlaping the complete detector width. The total length of an array is 15~cm. The spot size of an individual LED is controlled by apertures to illuminate about 25 strips. Furthermore it is possible to simulate the high leakage current of irradiated sensors by constant illumination of the sensor. This provides an effective mean to identfy pinholes on a sensor.

  8. The GRANDE detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, A.; Bond, R.; Coleman, L.; Rollefson, A.; Wold, D.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, H.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Price, L.R.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Wilson, C.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we present a detector facility which meets the requirements outlined above for a next-generation instrument. GRANDE (Gamma Ray and Neutrino DEtector) is an imaging, water Cerenkov detector, which combines in one facility an extensive air shower array and a high-energy neutrino detector. (orig.)

  9. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  10. The Mu3e Tile Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, Hans Patrick

    2015-05-06

    The Mu3e experiment is designed to search for the lepton flavour violating decay μ→e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -} with a sensitivity of one in 10{sup 16} decays. An observation of such a decay would be a clear sign of physics beyond the Standard Model. Achieving the targeted sensitivity requires a high precision detector with excellent momentum, vertex and time resolution. The Mu3e Tile Detector is a highly granular sub-detector system based on scintillator tiles with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) readout, and aims at measuring the timing of the muon decay products with a resolution of better than 100 ps. This thesis describes the development of the Tile Detector concept and demonstrates the feasibility of the elaborated design. In this context, a comprehensive simulation framework has been developed, in order to study and optimise the detector performance. The central component of this framework is a detailed simulation of the SiPM response. The simulation model has been validated in several measurements and shows good agreement with the data. Furthermore, a 16-channel prototype of a Tile Detector module has been constructed and operated in an electron beam. In the beam tests, a time resolution up to 56 ps has been achieved, which surpasses the design goal. The simulation and measurement results demonstrate the feasibility of the developed Tile Detector design and show that the required detector performance can be achieved.

  11. The Cosmic Ray Tracking (CRT) detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernloehr, K.; Gamp, S.; Hermann, G.; Hofmann, W.; Kihm, T.; Knoeppler, J.; Leffers, G.; Matheis, V.; Panter, M.; Trunk, U.; Ulrich, M.; Wolf, T.; Zink, R.; Heintze, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Tracking (CRT) project represents a study on the use of tracking detectors of the time projection chamber type to detect secondary cosmic ray particles in extensive air showers. In reconstructing the arrival direction of the primary cosmic ray particles, the CRT detectors take advantage of the angular correlation of secondary particles with the cosmic rays leading to these air showers. In this paper, the detector hardware including the custom-designed electronics system is described in detail. A CRT detector module provides an active area of 2.5 m 2 and allows to measure track directions with a precision of 0.4 circle . It consists of two circular drift chambers of 1.8 m diameter with six sense wires each, and a 10 cm thick iron plate between the two chambers. Each detector has a local electronics box with a readout, trigger, and monitoring system. The detectors can distinguish penetrating muons from other types of charged secondaries. A large detector array could be used to search for γ-ray point sources at energies above several TeV and for studies of the cosmic-ray composition. Ten detectors are in operation at the site of the HEGRA air shower array. (orig.)

  12. Dosimetry in radiotherapy with natural diamond detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, C.; Onori, S.; Pacilio, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Raffaele, L.; Bucciolini, M.; Mazzocchi, S.

    2002-01-01

    There is wide interest in the use of diamond detectors for dosimetry in radiotherapy mainly because of the small dimensions, radiation hardness, nearly tissue equivalence of sensitive material and capability to deliver the dosimetric response 'on line'. In order to assess the dosimetric properties of PTW Riga diamond detectors type 60003, experiments were performed in conventional (high energy photon and electron) therapy beams as well as in proton therapy beams. The main detector features investigated were reproducibility of response, dose-signal relationship, temperature dependence, dose-rate dependence, energy dependence and angular dependence. High energy photons (6-25 MV) and electrons (6-22 MeV), available at the Radiotherapy Department of the Florence University, were used for investigating the general properties. Two different PTW diamond detectors of the same type were used to evidence inter-sample differences. The beam quality dependence of the detector response is probably the most critical point and this statement is of particular relevance for proton dosimetry since the proton LET changes with depth in the medium. Mainly because of the little information available on detector sensitivity variations with beam energy, the use of diamonds for clinical proton dosimetry is not widespread. In two recent papers a sensitivity dependence on proton energy of a natural PTW diamond detector has been reported. Due to the necessity to characterise each diamond detector individually the PTW Riga natural diamond detector in operation at the LNS-INFN, Catania, Italy was tested with the local proton beam line. This experiment is of main concern because this proton beam, produced by a superconducting cyclotron and used for ocular melanoma treatment, is available only since 2001 (CATANA beam). The first patient has been treated in February 2002. Proton irradiations were performed with non modulated and modulated 62 MeV beams. Attention was focused on diamond sensitivity

  13. Silicon position sensitive detectors for the Helios (NA 34) experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, E Jr; Mani, S; Manns, T; Plants, D; Shepard, P F; Thompson, J A; Tosh, R; Chand, T; Shivpuri, R; Baker, W

    1987-01-15

    The design construction and testing of X-Y tracking modules for a silicon microstrip vertex detector for use in Fermilab experiment E706 is discussed. A successful adaptation of various technologies, essential for instrumenting this class of detectors at a university laboratory is described. Emphasis is placed on considerable cost reduction, design flexibiity and more rapid turnover with a view toward large detectors for the future.

  14. The data acquisition system for a SPECT with cylindrical detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yongjie; Liu Yinong; Li Yuanjing

    1995-01-01

    The data acquisition and position estimation system has been developed for a multi-crystal SPECT with modular cylindrical detector. The electronics screen photon energy determines the detector module stricken by incident photon. The relevant PMT outputs are digitized and passed onto a Pentium PC. Then PMT gain normalization, detector bar identification, energy correction, event coordinates calculation and linearity correction are real-time performed by the PC. The system has been employed in clinical brain imaging

  15. A large area transition radiation detector for the NOMAD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassompierre, G.; Bermond, M.; Berthet, M.; Bertozzi, T.; Détraz, C.; Dubois, J.-M.; Dumps, L.; Engster, C.; Fazio, T.; Gaillard, G.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gouanère, M.; Manola-Poggioli, E.; Mossuz, L.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Nédélec, P.; Palazzini, E.; Pessard, H.; Petit, P.; Petitpas, P.; Placci, A.; Sillou, D.; Sottile, R.; Valuev, V.; Verkindt, D.; Vey, H.; Wachnik, M.

    1998-02-01

    A transition radiation detector to identify electrons at 90% efficiency with a rejection factor against pions of 10 3 on an area of 2.85 × 2.85 m 2 has been constructed for the NOMAD experiment. Each of its 9 modules includes a 315 plastic foil radiator and a detector plane of 176 vertical straw tubes filled with a xenon-methane gas mixture. Details of the design, construction and operation of the detector are given.

  16. A large area transition radiation detector for the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, Gabriel; Berthet, M; Bertozzi, T; Détraz, C; Dubois, J M; Dumps, Ludwig; Engster, Claude; Fazio, T; Gaillard, G; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Gouanère, M; Manola-Poggioli, E; Mossuz, L; Mendiburu, J P; Nédélec, P; Palazzini, E; Pessard, H; Petit, P; Petitpas, P; Placci, Alfredo; Sillou, D; Sottile, R; Valuev, V Yu; Verkindt, D; Vey, H; Wachnik, M

    1997-01-01

    A transition radiation detector to identify electrons at 90% efficiency with a rejection factor against pions of 10 3 on an area of 2.85 × 2.85 m 2 has been constructed for the NOMAD experiment. Each of its 9 modules includes a 315 plastic foil radiator and a detector plane of 176 vertical straw tubes filled with a xenon-methane gas mixture. Details of the design, construction and operation of the detector are given.

  17. Integration and installation of the CMS pixel barrel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kastli, Hans-Christian

    2008-01-01

    A 66 million pixel detector has been installed in 2008 into the CMS experiment at CERN. The development and construction time took more than 10 years. In this paper the assembly of the barrel detector is described. A simple but effective method to accomplish a survey of the module positions during assembly is discussed. Furthermore the insertion and commissioning of the CMS pixel barrel detector which took place in July 2008 is illustrated.

  18. Solid state detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunarwan Prayitno; Ahmad Rifai

    2010-01-01

    Much has been charged particle detector radiation detector made by the industry, especially those engaged in the development of detection equipment and components. The development and further research will be made solid state detector with silicon material. To be able to detect charged particles (radiation), required the processing of silicon material into the detector material. The method used to make silicon detector material is a lithium evaporations. Having formed an intrinsic region contactor installation process, and with testing. (author)

  19. NaI Detector Network at Aragats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avakyan, Karen; Arakelyan, Karen; Chilingarian, Ashot; Daryan, Ara; Kozliner, Lev; Mailyan, Bagrat; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Pokhsraryan, David; Sargsyan, David

    2013-01-01

    The Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC) provides monitoring of different species of secondary cosmic rays and consists of two high altitude research stations on Mt. Aragats in Armenia. Along with solar modulation effects, ASEC detectors register several coherent enhancements associated with thunderstorm activity. The experimental techniques used allowed for the first time to simultaneously measure fluxes of the electrons, muons, gamma rays, and neutrons correlated with thunderstorm activity. Ground-based observations by a complex of surface particle detectors, measuring in systematically and repeatable fashion, gamma quanta, electrons, muons and neutrons from atmospheric sources are necessary for proving the theory of particle acceleration and multiplication during thunderstorms. Energy spectra and correlations between fluxes of different particles, measured on Earth's surface address the important issues of research of the solar modulation effects and the atmospheric high-energy phenomena. In May 26 2011, launched 5 NaI(Tl) (thallium-doped sodium iodide) scintillation detectors and 1 plastic one in the new ASEC laboratory on Aragats to detect low energy gamma rays from the thunderclouds and short particle bursts. Including NaI(Tl) detectors in ASEC detectors system is of great importance for investigation thunderstorm phenomena because NaI(Tl) detectors have high efficiency of gamma ray detecting in comparison with plastic ones.

  20. End-view of the DELPHI detector

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    End-view of the 10-m diameter DELPHI detector at CERN's LEP electron-positron collider from 1989 to 2000. Its concentric modules, including a pioneer large-scale application of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov technique to differentiate between all the various secondary particles, ensure high precision and 'granularity'.

  1. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Park, S. H.; Lee, W. G.; Ha, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    In 1945, Van Heerden measured α, β and γ radiations with the cooled AgCl crystal. It was the first radiation measurement using the compound semiconductor detector. Since then the compound semiconductor has been extensively studied as radiation detector. Generally the radiation detector can be divided into the gas detector, the scintillator and the semiconductor detector. The semiconductor detector has good points comparing to other radiation detectors. Since the density of the semiconductor detector is higher than that of the gas detector, the semiconductor detector can be made with the compact size to measure the high energy radiation. In the scintillator, the radiation is measured with the two-step process. That is, the radiation is converted into the photons, which are changed into electrons by a photo-detector, inside the scintillator. However in the semiconductor radiation detector, the radiation is measured only with the one-step process. The electron-hole pairs are generated from the radiation interaction inside the semiconductor detector, and these electrons and charged ions are directly collected to get the signal. The energy resolution of the semiconductor detector is generally better than that of the scintillator. At present, the commonly used semiconductors as the radiation detector are Si and Ge. However, these semiconductor detectors have weak points. That is, one needs thick material to measure the high energy radiation because of the relatively low atomic number of the composite material. In Ge case, the dark current of the detector is large at room temperature because of the small band-gap energy. Recently the compound semiconductor detectors have been extensively studied to overcome these problems. In this paper, we will briefly summarize the recent research topics about the compound semiconductor detector. We will introduce the research activities of our group, too

  2. Noise and detection in ''optical'' modulation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montelatici, V.

    1975-01-01

    The measuring techniques suitable for ''optical'' modulation spectroscopy are analyzed and source of noise identified. The choice of optical detector is for photoelectrical devices. It is shown that the shot noise of phototubes is the most important noise source

  3. Report on the SCT Forward Electrical Module Program

    CERN Document Server

    Benes, J; Feld, L; Hornung, M; Joos, D; Ketterer, C; Kodys, P; Kubik, P; Ludwig, J; Modesto, P; Rieth, G; Runge, K; Smith, T; Snow, S W; Taylor, G; Webel, M

    1999-01-01

    IN THE CONTEXT OF THE ATLAS SCT FORWARD HYBRID PROGRAM, THREEELECTRICAL DETECTOR MODULES HAVE BEEN BUILT. THIS NOTE DESCRIBES THEASSEMBLY AND SUMMARISES THE MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OFTHESE MODULES. SOME COMMENTS ON THE SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS OF THEPRODUCTION OF A REAL MODULE AS COMPARED TO DUMMY MODULES ARE GIVEN.A LIST OF OPEN QUESTIONS ARISING FROM THIS ASSEMBLY RUN IS APPENDED.

  4. Camera System MTF: combining optic with detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Torben B.; Granger, Zachary A.

    2017-08-01

    MTF is one of the most common metrics used to quantify the resolving power of an optical component. Extensive literature is dedicated to describing methods to calculate the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for stand-alone optical components such as a camera lens or telescope, and some literature addresses approaches to determine an MTF for combination of an optic with a detector. The formulations pertaining to a combined electro-optical system MTF are mostly based on theory, and assumptions that detector MTF is described only by the pixel pitch which does not account for wavelength dependencies. When working with real hardware, detectors are often characterized by testing MTF at discrete wavelengths. This paper presents a method to simplify the calculation of a polychromatic system MTF when it is permissible to consider the detector MTF to be independent of wavelength.

  5. Ultrafast photoconductor detector-laser-diode transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.L.; Davis, B.A.; Davies, T.J.; Nelson, M.A.; Thomas, M.C.; Zagarino, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report the results of an experiment in which we used an ultrafast, photoconductive, radiation detector to drive a fast laser-diode transmitter. When we irradiated the neutron-damaged Cr-doped GaAs detector with 17-MeV electron beams, the temporal response was measured to be less than 30 ps. The pulses from this detector modulated a fast GaAlAs laser diode to transmit the laser output through 30- and 1100-m optical fibers. Preliminary results indicate that 50- and 80-ps time resolutions, respectively, are obtainable with these fibers. We are now working to integrate the photoconductive detector and the laser diode transmitter into a single chip

  6. Ultrafast photoconductive detector-laser-diode transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.L.; Davies, T.J.; Nelson, M.A.; Thomas, M.C.; Zagarino, P.A.; Davis, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report the results of an experiment in which they used an ultrafast, photoconductive, radiation detector to drive a fast laser-diode transmitter. When they irradiated the neutron-damaged Cr-doped Ga/As detector with 17-MeV electron beams, the temporal response of was measured to be less than 30 ps. The pulses from this detector modulated a fast GaAlAs laser diode to transmit the laser output through 30- and 1100-m optical fibers. Preliminary results indicate that 50- and 80-ps time resolutions, respectively, are obtainable with these fibers. They are now working to integrate the photoconductive detector and the laser diode transmitter into a single chip

  7. Spatial Resolution of a Wedge Shaped MSGC Module

    CERN Document Server

    Bachmann, Sebastian

    1997-01-01

    A banana shaped closed design MSGC detector module was tested together with silicon detectors and other MSGCs in a 100 GeV muon beam. Despite of an undesirable geometry of the test setup, a spatial resolution below 40 micron m was reached. The efficiency of the module, defined by track reconstruction, shows to be 95,6 percent

  8. Scintillating fibre tracking neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Joakim.

    1995-04-01

    A detector for measurements of collimated fluxes of neutrons in the energy range 2-20 MeV is proposed. It utilizes (n.p) elastic scattering in scintillating optical fibres placed in successive orthogonal layers perpendicular to the neutron flux. A test module has been designed, constructed and tested with respect to separation of neutron and gamma events. The pulse height measurements show the feasibility to discriminate between neutron, gamma and background events. Application to measurements of fusion neutrons is considered. 18 refs, 22 figs, 4 tabs

  9. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I; Martinez laso, L

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  10. Performance of B-10 based detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, Mathieu; Anderson, Tom; Johnson, Nathan; Mckinny, Kevin; Mcpheeters, Matthew [GE Measurement and Control - Reuter-Stokes, Twinsburg, Ohio (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Helium-3 gas-filled detectors have been used in nuclear safeguards applications, in homeland security neutron detection modules and in research for over 30 years. With the current shortage of {sup 3}He gas, GE's Reuter-Stokes business developed a {sup 10}B lined proportional counter and a {sup 10}B hybrid detector, in which a small amount of {sup 3}He is added to a 10B detector to enhance the neutron sensitivity. In 2010, GE's Reuter-Stokes successfully developed a commercial alternative to 3He gas-filled detectors for homeland security neutron detection modules based on 10B lined proportional counters. We will present the concept behind the {sup 10}B neutron detection modules, as drop-in replacement to existing 3He neutron detection modules deployed, and the timeline and development needed to get a fully commercial application. To ensure the highest quality, each {sup 10}B neutron detection unit is put through a series of tests: temperature cycles from -40 deg. C to +55 deg. C, vibration testing at levels up to 2.5 g from 10 Hz to 50 Hz in every direction, neutron sensitivity reaching up to 4.5 cps/(ng {sup 252}CF at 2 m), and gamma insensitivity with field reaching 1 Sv/hr. In 2013, GE's Reuter-Stokes developed the B10Plus+{sup R} detector, in which a small amount of {sup 3}He is added to a {sup 10}B lined proportional counter. Depending on the amount of {sup 3}He added, the B10Plus+{sup R} can more than double the neutron sensitivity compared to a {sup 10}B lined proportional counter. {sup 10}B lined proportional counters and B10Plus+{sup R} have excellent gamma rejection and excellent performance even at very high neutron flux. The gamma rejection and high neutron flux performance of these detectors are comparable, if not better, than traditional {sup 3}He proportional counters. GE's Reuter-Stokes business modelled, designed, built and tested prototype coincidence counters using the {sup 10}B lined detectors and the {sup 10}B hybrid

  11. Mica fission detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.; Anderson, J.D.; Hansen, L.; Lehn, A.V.; Williamson, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The present development status of the mica fission detectors is summarized. It is concluded that the techniques have been refined and developed to a state such that the mica fission counters are a reliable and reproducible detector for fission events

  12. Barrier Infrared Detector (BIRD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in MWIR detector design, has resulted in a high operating temperature (HOT) barrier infrared detector (BIRD) that is capable of spectral...

  13. Simulating detectors dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustom, Ibrahim Farog Ibrahim

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear detectors are used in all aspects of nuclear measurements. All nuclear detectors are characterized by their dead time i.e. the time needed by a detector to recover from a previous incident. A detector dead time influences measurements taken by a detector and specially when measuring high decay rate (>) where is the detector dead time. Two models are usually used to correct for the dead time effect: the paralayzable and the non-paralayzable models. In the current work we use Monte Carlo simulation techniques to simulate radioactivity and the effect of dead time and the count rate of a detector with a dead time =5x10 - 5s assuming the non-paralayzable model. The simulation indicates that assuming a non -paralayzable model could be used to correct for decay rate measured by a detector. The reliability of the non-paralayzable model to correct the measured decay rate could be gauged using the Monte Carlo simulation. (Author)

  14. Forward tracking detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Forward tracking is an essential part of a detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The requirements for forward tracking are explained and the proposed solutions in the detector concepts are shown.

  15. The CMS detector magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Hervé, A

    2000-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is a general-purpose detector designed to run in mid-2005 at the highest luminosity at the LHC at CERN. Its distinctive features include a 6 m free bore diameter, 12.5 m long, 4 T superconducting solenoid enclosed inside a 10,000 tonne return yoke. The magnet will be assembled and tested on the surface by the end of 2003 before being transferred by heavy lifting means to a 90 m deep underground experimental area. The design and construction of the magnet is a `common project' of the CMS Collaboration. It is organized by a CERN based group with strong technical and contractual participation by CEA Saclay, ETH Zurich, Fermilab Batavia IL, INFN Geneva, ITEP Moscow, University of Wisconsin and CERN. The return yoke, 21 m long and 14 m in diameter, is equivalent to 1.5 m of saturated iron interleaved with four muon stations. The yoke and the vacuum tank are being manufactured. The indirectly-cooled, pure- aluminium-stabilized coil is made up from five modules internally wound with four ...

  16. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierluigi Paolucci

    2013-01-01

    In the second part of 2013 the two main activities of the RPC project are the reparation and maintenance of the present system and the construction and installation of the RE4 system. Since the opening of the barrel, repair activities on the gas, high-voltage and electronic systems are being done in parallel, in agreement with the CMS schedule. In YB0, the maintenance of the RPC detector was in the shadow of other interventions, nevertheless the scaffolding turned out to be a good solution for our gas leaks searches. Here we found eight leaking channels for about 100 l/h in total. 10 RPC/DT modules were partially extracted –– 90 cm –– in YB0, YB–1 and YB–2 to allow for the replacement of FE and LV distribution boards. Intervention was conducted on an additional two chambers on the positive endcap to solve LV and threshold control problems. Until now we were able to recover 0.67% of the total number of RPC electronic channels (1.5% of the channels...

  17. Peak reading detector circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtin, E.; Grund, K.; Traub, S.; Zeeb, H.

    1975-01-01

    The peak reading detector circuit serves for picking up the instants during which peaks of a given polarity occur in sequences of signals in which the extreme values, their time intervals, and the curve shape of the signals vary. The signal sequences appear in measuring the foetal heart beat frequence from amplitude-modulated ultrasonic, electrocardiagram, and blood pressure signals. In order to prevent undesired emission of output signals from, e. g., disturbing intermediate extreme values, the circuit consists of the series connections of a circuit to simulate an ideal diode, a strong unit, a discriminator for the direction of charging current, a time-delay circuit, and an electronic switch lying in the decharging circuit of the storage unit. The time-delay circuit thereby causes storing of a preliminary maximum value being used only after a certain time delay for the emission of the output signal. If a larger extreme value occurs during the delay time the preliminary maximum value is cleared and the delay time starts running anew. (DG/PB) [de

  18. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Pugliese

    2010-01-01

    In the second half of 2010 run, the overall behavior of the RPC system has been very satisfactory, both in terms of detector and trigger performance. This result was achieved through interventions by skilled personnel and fine-tuned analysis procedures. The hardware was quite stable: both gas and power systems did not present significant problems during the data-taking period, confirming the high reliability achieved. Only few interventions on some HV or LV channels were necessary during the periodical technical accesses. The overall result is given by the stable percentage of active channels at about 98.5%. The single exception was at beginning of the ion collisions, when it dipped to 97.4% because of the failure of one LV module, although this was recovered after a few days. The control and monitoring software is now more robust and efficient, providing prompt diagnostics on the status of the entire system. Significant efforts were made in collaboration with the CMS cooling team to secure proper working ...

  19. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    2010-01-01

    During the technical stop, the RPC team was part of the CMS task force team working on bushing replacements in the Endcap cooling system, also validating the repairs in terms of connectivity (HV, LV and signal cables), and gas leak, on RE chambers. In parallel, the RPC team profited from the opportunity to cure several known problems: six chambers with HV problems (1 off + 5 single gaps) were recovered on both gaps; four known HV problems were localized at chamber level; additional temperature sensors were installed on cooling pipes on negative REs; one broken LV module in RE-1 was replaced. During the last month, the RPC group has made big improvements in the operations tools. New trigger supervisor software has substantially reduced the configuration time. Monitoring is now more robust and more efficient in providing prompt diagnostics. The detector has been under central DCS control for two weeks. Improvements have been made to both functionality and documentation and no major problems were found. Beam s...

  20. HIBP primary beam detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A position measuring detector was fabricated for the Heavy Ion Beam Probe. The 11 cm by 50 cm detector was a combination of 15 detector wires in one direction and 63 copper bars - .635 cm by 10 cm to measure along an orthogonal axis by means of a current divider circuit. High transmission tungsten meshes provide entrance windows and suppress secondary electrons. The detector dimensions were chosen to resolve the beam position to within one beam diameter

  1. The OSMOND detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dalgliesh, R. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M., E-mail: dom.duxbury@stfc.ac.uk [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Helsby, W.I. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Holt, S.A.; Kinane, C.J. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marsh, A.S. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-11

    The development and testing of the Off Specular MicrOstrip Neutron Detector (OSMOND) is described. Based on a microstrip gas chamber the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate detector capable of replacing the existing rate limited scintillator detectors currently in use on the CRISP reflectometer for off specular reflectometry experiments. The detector system is described together with results of neutron beam tests carried out at the ISIS spallation neutron source.

  2. Monitoring radiation damage in the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schorlemmer, André Lukas; Quadt, Arnulf; Große-Knetter, Jörn; Rembser, Christoph; Di Girolamo, Beniamino

    2014-11-05

    Radiation hardness is one of the most important features of the ATLAS pixel detector in order to ensure a good performance and a long lifetime. Monitoring of radiation damage is crucial in order to assess and predict the expected performance of the detector. Key values for the assessment of radiation damage in silicon, such as the depletion voltage and depletion depth in the sensors, are measured on a regular basis during operations. This thesis summarises the monitoring program that is conducted in order to assess the impact of radiation damage and compares it to model predictions. In addition, the physics performance of the ATLAS detector highly depends on the amount of disabled modules in the ATLAS pixel detector. A worrying amount of module failures was observed during run I. Thus it was decided to recover repairable modules during the long shutdown (LS1) by extracting the pixel detector. The impact of the module repairs and module failures on the detector performance is analysed in this thesis.

  3. Prototype Performance of Novel Muon Telescope Detector at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, L.

    2008-01-01

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution

  4. Prototype performance of novel muon telescope detector at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, L.; Ames, V.

    2011-01-01

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution. (author)

  5. Antihydrogen annihilation reconstruction with the ALPHA silicon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D.R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Hayano, R S; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2012-01-01

    The ALPHA experiment has succeeded in trapping antihydrogen, a major milestone on the road to spectroscopic comparisons of antihydrogen with hydrogen. An annihilation vertex detector, which determines the time and position of antiproton annihilations, has been central to this achievement. This detector, an array of double-sided silicon microstrip detector modules arranged in three concentric cylindrical tiers, is sensitive to the passage of charged particles resulting from antiproton annihilation. This article describes the method used to reconstruct the annihilation location and to distinguish the annihilation signal from the cosmic ray background. Recent experimental results using this detector are outlined.

  6. Antihydrogen annihilation reconstruction with the ALPHA silicon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4 (Canada); Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hangst, J.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hardy, W.N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hayden, M.E. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Hayano, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Humphries, A.J. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-08-21

    The ALPHA experiment has succeeded in trapping antihydrogen, a major milestone on the road to spectroscopic comparisons of antihydrogen with hydrogen. An annihilation vertex detector, which determines the time and position of antiproton annihilations, has been central to this achievement. This detector, an array of double-sided silicon microstrip detector modules arranged in three concentric cylindrical tiers, is sensitive to the passage of charged particles resulting from antiproton annihilation. This article describes the method used to reconstruct the annihilation location and to distinguish the annihilation signal from the cosmic ray background. Recent experimental results using this detector are outlined.

  7. Geometry simulation and physics with the CMS forward pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parashar, N [Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, Indiana (United States)], E-mail: Neeti@fnal.gov

    2008-06-15

    The Forward Pixel Detector of CMS is an integral part of the Tracking system, which will play a key role in addressing the full physics potential of the collected data. It has a very complex geometry that encompasses multilayer structure of its detector modules. This presentation describes the development of geometry simulation for the Forward Pixel Detector. A new geometry package has been developed, which uses the detector description database (DDD) interface for the XML (eXtensive Markup Language) to GEANT simulation. This is necessary for digitization and GEANT4 reconstruction software for tracking. The expected physics performance is also discussed.

  8. Geometry simulation and physics with the CMS forward pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parashar, N

    2008-01-01

    The Forward Pixel Detector of CMS is an integral part of the Tracking system, which will play a key role in addressing the full physics potential of the collected data. It has a very complex geometry that encompasses multilayer structure of its detector modules. This presentation describes the development of geometry simulation for the Forward Pixel Detector. A new geometry package has been developed, which uses the detector description database (DDD) interface for the XML (eXtensive Markup Language) to GEANT simulation. This is necessary for digitization and GEANT4 reconstruction software for tracking. The expected physics performance is also discussed

  9. The solid state detector technology for picosecond laser ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    We developed an all solid state laser ranging detector technology, which makes the goal of millimeter accuracy achievable. Our design and construction philosophy is to combine the techniques of single photon ranging, ultrashort laser pulses, and fast fixed threshold discrimination while avoiding any analog signal processing within the laser ranging chain. The all solid state laser ranging detector package consists of the START detector and the STOP solid state photon counting module. Both the detectors are working in an optically triggered avalanche switching regime. The optical signal is triggering an avalanche current buildup which results in the generation of a uniform, fast risetime output pulse.

  10. Online Calibration and Performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately 80 million electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region, thus allowing measuring particle tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. The readout system of the Pixel Detector is based on a bi-directional optical data transmission system between the detector and the data acquisition system with an individual link for each of the 1744 modules. Signal conversion components are located on both ends, approximately 80 m apart. This paper describes the tuning and calibration of the optical links and the detector modules, including measurements of threshold, noise, charge measurement, timing performance and the sensor leakage current.

  11. WORKSHOP: Scintillating fibre detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Scintillating fibre detector development and technology for the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider, SSC, was the subject of a recent workshop at Fermilab, with participation from the high energy physics community and from industry. Sessions covered the current status of fibre technology and fibre detectors, new detector applications, fluorescent materials and scintillation compositions, radiation damage effects, amplification and imaging structures, and scintillation fibre fabrication techniques

  12. Shielded regenerative neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terhune, J.H.; Neissel, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion chamber type neutron detector is disclosed which has a greatly extended lifespan. The detector includes a fission chamber containing a mixture of active and breeding material and a neutron shielding material. The breeding and shielding materials are selected to have similar or substantially matching neutron capture cross-sections so that their individual effects on increased detector life are mutually enhanced

  13. The CAPRICE RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Codino, A.; Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata` Rome (Italy); Cafagna, F. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.; Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A compact RICH detector has been developed and used for particle identification in a balloon borne spectrometer to measure the flux of antimatter in the cosmic radiation. This is the first RICH detector ever used in space experiments that is capable of detecting unit charged particles, such as antiprotons. The RICH and all other detectors performed well during the 27 hours long flight.

  14. Self powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, C.S.; Ramachandra Rao, M.N.; Ingale, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    Two types of self powered neutron detectors used for in-core flux measurements are described. The characteristics of the various detectors, with emitters Rh, V, Co, Py are presented. Details about the fabrication of these detectors are given. (A.K.)

  15. The JADE muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-01-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.)

  16. Economical stabilized scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshakov, O.M.; Chudakov, V.A.; Gurinovich, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    An economical scintillation detector with the stabilization system of an integral type is described. Power consumed by the photomultiplier high-voltage power source is 40 mW, energy resolution is not worse than 9%. The given detector is used in a reference detector of a digital radioisotope densimeter for light media which is successfully operating for several years

  17. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, C.

    1993-01-01

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  18. HP Ge planar detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gornov, M.G.; Gurov, Yu.B.; Soldatov, A.M.; Osipenko, B.P.; Yurkowski, J.; Podkopaev, O.I.

    1989-01-01

    Parameters of planar detectors manufactured of HP Ge are presented. The possibilities to use multilayer spectrometers on the base of such semiconductor detectors for nuclear physics experiments are discussed. It is shown that the obtained detectors including high square ones have spectrometrical characteristics close to limiting possible values. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  19. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Document Server

    T. Camporesi

    P5 Commissioning activities The commissioning effort at the pit has made major progress since the last CMS week concerning the installation and operation of the off-detector electronics in USC. The progress has been much slower in the experi¬mental cavern due to the delay in the deployment of the infrastructure which should eventually allow safe powering-up of the front ends. Nevertheless, temporary power connections have allowed operation of slices of subdetectors at any given time. HF, HE, ECAL, DTs, RPCs and CSCs have carried out local commissioning tests with these temporary services. The status of hardware deployment in USC and on the towers/balconies is represented in the detailed table below.   Table 1: Status of installation of off-detector electronics. FEDs are detector dependent hardware modules which perform the first ‘colla¬tion’ of front-end data and send it to Central-data for event building. Tracker, ECAL, HCAL have their front end electronics mo...

  20. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  1. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  2. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  3. Radiation damage studies for the D0 silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, F.

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current D0 silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10 14 p/cm 2 at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalization techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling

  4. Radiation damage studies for the DOe silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, Frank

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current DOe silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10 14 p/cm 2 at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalisation techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling

  5. Allpix$^{2}$: A Modular Simulation Framework for Silicon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon; Hynds, Daniel; Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar; Benoit, Mathieu; Dannheim, Dominik; Gauvin, Neal; Nurnberg, Andreas Matthias; Schutze, Paul Jean; Vicente Barreto Pinto, Mateus

    2018-01-01

    Allpix$^{2}$ is a generic, open-source software framework for the simulation of silicon pixel detectors. Its goal is to ease the implementation of detailed simulations for both single detectors and more complex setups such as beam telescopes from incident radiation to the digitised detector response. Predefined detector types can be automatically constructed from simple model files describing the detector parameters. The simulation chain is arranged with the help of intuitive configuration files and an extensible system of modules, which implement separate simulation steps such as realistic charge carrier deposition with the Geant4 toolkit or propagation of charge carriers in silicon using a drift-diffusion model. Detailed electric field maps imported from TCAD simulations can be used to precisely model the drift behaviour of charge carriers within the silicon, bringing a new level of realism to Monte Carlo based simulations of particle detectors. This paper provides an overview of the framework and a select...

  6. Online calibrations and performance of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 1744 silicon sensors equipped with approximately 80 M electronic channels, providing typically three measurement points with high resolution for particles emerging from the beam-interaction region, thus allowing measuring particle tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. The readout system of the Pixel Detector is based on a bi-directional optical data transmission system between the detector and the data acquisition system with an individual link for each of the 1744 modules. Signal conversion components are located on both ends, approximately 80 m apart. The talk will give an overview of the calibration and performance of both the detector and its optical readout. The most basic parameter to be tuned and calibrated for the detector electronics is the readout threshold of the individual pixel channels. These need to be carefully tuned to optimise position resolution a...

  7. Modeling of clover detector in addback mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshetri, R.

    2012-07-01

    Based on absorption and scattering of gamma-rays, a formalism has been presented for modeling the clover germanium detector in addback mode and to predict its response for high energy γ-rays. In the present formalism, the operation of a bare clover detector could be described in terms of three quantities only. Considering an additional parameter, the formalism could be extended for suppressed clover. Using experimental data on relative single crystal efficiency and addback factor as input, the peak-to-total ratio has been calculated for three energies (Eγ = 3.401, 5.324 and 10.430 MeV) where direct measurement of peak-to-total ratio is impossible due to absence of a radioactive source having single monoenergetic gamma-ray of that energy. The experimental validation and consistency of the formalism have been shown considering data for TIGRESS clover detector. In a recent work (R. Kshetri, JINST 2012 7 P04008), we showed that for a given γ-ray energy, the formalism could be used to predict the peak-to-total ratio as a function of number of detector modules. In the present paper, we have shown that for a given composite detector (clover detector is considered here), the formalism could be used to predict the peak-to-total ratio as a function of γ-ray energy.

  8. Modeling of clover detector in addback mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, R

    2012-01-01

    Based on absorption and scattering of gamma-rays, a formalism has been presented for modeling the clover germanium detector in addback mode and to predict its response for high energy γ-rays. In the present formalism, the operation of a bare clover detector could be described in terms of three quantities only. Considering an additional parameter, the formalism could be extended for suppressed clover. Using experimental data on relative single crystal efficiency and addback factor as input, the peak-to-total ratio has been calculated for three energies (E γ = 3.401, 5.324 and 10.430 MeV) where direct measurement of peak-to-total ratio is impossible due to absence of a radioactive source having single monoenergetic gamma-ray of that energy. The experimental validation and consistency of the formalism have been shown considering data for TIGRESS clover detector. In a recent work (R. Kshetri, JINST 2012 7 P04008), we showed that for a given γ-ray energy, the formalism could be used to predict the peak-to-total ratio as a function of number of detector modules. In the present paper, we have shown that for a given composite detector (clover detector is considered here), the formalism could be used to predict the peak-to-total ratio as a function of γ-ray energy.

  9. 2D/3D-project, calibration of the UPTF tieplate flow module with 'advanced instrumentation' and investigation of the function from the CORE simulator feedback control system with break-thru-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, U.; Paul, J.; Schorsch, R.; Werner, K.D.; Liebert, J.; Emmerling, R.; Hertlein, R.

    1986-01-01

    Instruments of the Advanced Instrumentation for the use in UPTF-Mannheim were calibrated with single-phase and two-phase flow. An algorithm based on the physics was developed which identifies the flow regimes in UPTF and permits to calculate the local water- and steam mass flow rates through the tie plate with good accuracy. The feedback-control-system was examined with original components of UPTF. The control-system reacts to the break-through-detector-signal sufficiently fast and without oscillations. With 5 refs., 5 tabs., 91 figs [de

  10. Nuclear radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, S.S.; Ramamurthy, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present monograph is intended to treat the commonly used detectors in the field of nuclear physics covering important developments of the recent years. After a general introduction, a brief account of interaction of radiation with matter relevant to the processes in radiation detection is given in Chapter II. In addition to the ionization chamber, proportional counters and Geiger Mueller counters, several gas-filled detectors of advanced design such as those recently developed for heavy ion physics and other types of studies have been covered in Chapter III. Semiconductor detectors are dealt with in Chapter IV. The scintillation detectors which function by sensing the photons emitted by the luminescence process during the interaction of the impinging radiation with the scintillation detector medium are described in Chapter V. The topic of neutron detectors is covered in Chapter VI, as in this case the emphasis is more on the method of neutron detection rather than on detector type. Electronic instrumentation related to signal pulse processing dealt with in Chapter VII. The track etch detectors based on the visualization of the track of the impinging charge particle have also been briefly covered in the last chapter. The scope of this monograph is confined to detectors commonly used in low and medium energy nuclear physics research and applications of nuclear techniques. The monograph is intended for post-graduate students and those beginning to work with the radiation detectors. (author)

  11. Multi-Chip-Modul-Entwicklung fuer den ATLAS-Pixeldetektor

    CERN Document Server

    Stockmanns, Tobias

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: The innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system is a silicon pixel detector. The use of radiation tolerant components is mandatory due to the harsh radiation environment. The smallest independent component of the pixel detector is a hybride pixel module consisting of a large oxygen enriched silicon sensor and 16 specifically developed ASICs. To achieve the necessary radiation tolerance the ASICs are produced in a 0.25 µm technology in combination with special design techniques. The measurements of the readout electronics during all stages of production of a full module are presented and the performance of the modules is compared with the strict requirements of the ATLAS pixel detector. Furthermore a new powering scheme for pixel detectors is presented, aiming at reducing the total power consumption, the material for the electrical services and the amount of power cables. The advantages and disadvantages of this concept are discussed on the example of the ATLAS pixel detector with pixel modules mo...

  12. Production chain of CMS pixel modules

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The pictures show the production chain of pixel modules for the CMS detector. Fig.1: overview of the assembly procedure. Fig.2: bump bonding with ReadOut Chip (ROC) connected to the sensor. Fig.3: glueing a raw module onto the baseplate strips. Fig.4: glueing of the High Density Interconnect (HDI) onto a raw module. Fig.5: pull test after heat reflow. Fig.6: wafer sensor processing, Indium evaporation.

  13. Detectors for Particle Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinknecht, Konrad

    1999-01-01

    This textbook provides a clear, concise and comprehensive review of the physical principles behind the devices used to detect charged particles and gamma rays, and the construction and performance of these many different types of detectors. Detectors for high-energy particles and radiation are used in many areas of science, especially particle physics and nuclear physics experiments, nuclear medicine, cosmic ray measurements, space sciences and geological exploration. This second edition includes all the latest developments in detector technology, including several new chapters covering micro-strip gas chambers, silicion strip detectors and CCDs, scintillating fibers, shower detectors using noble liquid gases, and compensating calorimeters for hadronic showers. This well-illustrated textbook contains examples from the many areas in science in which these detectors are used. It provides both a coursebook for students in physics, and a useful introduction for researchers in other fields.

  14. Silicon Telescope Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurov, Yu B; Sandukovsky, V G; Yurkovski, J

    2005-01-01

    The results of research and development of special silicon detectors with a large active area ($> 8 cm^{2}$) for multilayer telescope spectrometers (fulfilled in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR) are reviewed. The detector parameters are listed. The production of totally depleted surface barrier detectors (identifiers) operating under bias voltage two to three times higher than depletion voltage is described. The possibility of fabrication of lithium drifted counters with a very thin entrance window on the diffusion side of the detector (about 10--20 $\\mu$m) is shown. The detector fabrication technique has allowed minimizing detector dead regions without degradation of their spectroscopic characteristics and reliability during long time operation in charge particle beams.

  15. Physics of scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, R.

    1991-01-01

    The general concept of a radiation detector is based on three fundamental principles: sensitivity of the device to the radiation of interest which requires a large cross-section in the detector material, detector response function to the physical properties of the radiation. As an example, a scintillation detector for charged particles should allow to identify the charge of the particle, its kinetic energy and the time of impact combined with optimum resolutions. Optimum conversion of the detector response (like luminescence of a scintillator) into electronical signals for further processing. The following article will concentrate on the various aspects of the first two listed principles as far as they appear to be relevant for photon and charged particle detection using organic and inorganic scintillation detectors. (orig.)

  16. ... ALICE forges ahead with further detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Following the installation of the HMPID, the project has progressed swiftly with further detectors being lowered into the ALICE cavern. The first supermodule of the ALICE transition radiation detector was successfully installed on 10 October. The TRD collaborators from Germany standing next to the supermodule mounted in a rotating frame (bottom left corner) in the ALICE cavern. In the final configuration, 18 supermodules that make up the transition radiation detector will cylindrically surround the large time projection chamber in the central barrel of the ALICE experiment. Each supermodule is about 7 metre long and consists of 30 drift chambers in six layers. The construction of the modules is a collaboration between five institutes in Germany (Universities of Frankfurt and Heidelberg and Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH in Darmstadt), Romania (NIPNE Bucharest) and Russia (JINR Dubna) with radiators (See 'Did you know?' section) produced at the University of Muenster, Germany. During the summer, ...

  17. History of infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  18. Noble Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Bolozdynya, Alexander I; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This book discusses the physical properties of noble fluids, operational principles of detectors based on these media, and the best technical solutions to the design of these detectors. Essential attention is given to detector technology: purification methods and monitoring of purity, information readout methods, electronics, detection of hard ultra-violet light emission, selection of materials, cryogenics etc.The book is mostly addressed to physicists and graduate students involved in the preparation of fundamental next generation experiments, nuclear engineers developing instrumentation

  19. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervino, G.; Boero, M.; Manfredotti, C.; Icardi, M.; Gabutti, A.; Bagnolatti, E.; Monticone, E.

    1990-01-01

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm 2 ), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  20. Detector and Front-end electronics for ALICE and STAR silicon strip layers

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, L; Coffin, J P; Guillaume, G; Higueret, S; Jundt, F; Kühn, C E; Lutz, Jean Robert; Suire, C; Tarchini, A; Berst, D; Blondé, J P; Clauss, G; Colledani, C; Deptuch, G; Dulinski, W; Hu, Y; Hébrard, L; Kucewicz, W; Boucham, A; Bouvier, S; Ravel, O; Retière, F

    1998-01-01

    Detector modules consisting of Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) and Front End Electronics (FEE) assembly have been designed in order to provide the two outer layers of the ALICE Inner Tracker System (ITS) [1] as well as the outer layer of the STAR Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) [2]. Several prototypes have beenproduced and tested in the SPS and PS beam at CERN to validate the final design. Double-sided, AC-coupled SSD detectors provided by two different manufacturers and also a pair of single-sided SSD have been asssociated to new low-power CMOS ALICE128C ASIC chips in a new detector module assembly. The same detectors have also been associated to current Viking electronics for reference purpose. These prototype detector modules are described and some first results are presented.

  1. ATLAS rewards two pixel detector suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, presented the ATLAS supplier award to Herbert Reichl, IZM director, and to Simonetta Di Gioia, from the SELEX company.Two of ATLAS’ suppliers were awarded prizes at a ceremony on Wednesday 13 June attended by representatives of the experiment’s management and of CERN. The prizes went to the Fraunhofer Institut für Zuverlässigkeit und Mikrointegration (IZM) in Berlin and the company SELEX Sistemi Integrati in Rome for the manufacture of modules for the ATLAS pixel detector. SELEX supplied 1500 of the modules for the tracker, while IZM produced a further 1300. The modules, each made up of 46080 channels, form the active part of the ATLAS pixel detector. IZM and SELEX received the awards for the excellent quality of their work: the average number of faulty channels per module was less than 2.10-3. They also stayed within budget and on schedule. The difficulty they faced was designing modules based on electronic components and sensor...

  2. The solenoidal detector collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems (STS) will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. The STS is physically a small part of the central tracking system and the calorimeter of the detector being proposed by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC). Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. The STS will consist of silicon microstrip detectors and possibly silicon pixel detectors. The other two components are an outer barrel tracker, which will consist of straw tubes or scintillating fibers; and an outer intermediate angle tracker, which will consist of gas microstrips. The components are designed to work as an integrated system. Each componenet has specific strengths, but is individually incapable of providing the overall performance required by the physics goals of the SSC. The large particle fluxes, the short times between beam crossing, the high channel count, and the required very high position measurement accuracy pose challenging problems that must be solved. Furthermore, to avoid degrading the measurements, the solutions must be achieved using only a minimal amount of material. An additional constraint is that only low-Z materials are allowed. If that were not difficlut enough, the solutions must also be affordable

  3. LHCb Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-03-05

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  4. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  5. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  6. The LHC detector challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Virdee, Tejinder S

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN, scheduled to come online in 2007, is a multi-TeV proton-proton collider with vast detectors. Two of the more significant detectors for LHC are ATLAS and CMS. Currently, both detectors are more than 65% complete in terms of financial commitment, and the experiments are being assembled at an increasing pace. ATLAS is being built directly in its underground cavern, whereas CMS is being assembled above ground. When completed, both detectors will aid researchers in determining what lies at the high-energy frontier, in particular the mechanism by which particles attain mass. (Edited abstract).

  7. Preparation of bubble damage detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Caiqing; Guo Shilun; Wang Yulan; Hao Xiuhong; Chen Changmao; Su Jingling

    1997-01-01

    Bubble damage detectors have been prepared by using polyacrylamide as detector solid and freon as detector liquid. Tests show that the prepared detectors are sensitive to fast neutrons and have proportionality between bubble number and neutron fluence within a certain range of neutron fluence. Therefore, it can be used as a fast neutron detector and a dosimeter

  8. Inner detector alignment and top-quark mass measurement with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moles-Valls, Regina

    This thesis is divided in two parts: one related with the alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector tracking system and other with the measurement of the top-quark mass. Both topics are connected by the Globalχ2 fitting method. In order to measure the properties of the particles with high accuracy, the ID detector is composed by devices with high intrinsic resolution. If by any chance the position of the modules in the detector is known with worse precision than their intrinsic resolution this may introduce a distortion in the reconstructed trajectory of the particles or at least degrade the tracking resolution. The alignment is the responsible of determining the location of each module with high precision and avoiding therefore any bias in the physics results. During the commissioning of the detector, different alignment exercises were performed for preparing the Globalχ2 algorithm (the CSC , the FDR, weak modes studies,…). At the same time, the ATLAS detector was collecting million of cosmic rays which were...

  9. Development of a Detector Control System for the ATLAS Pixel detector in the HL-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, N.; Kersten, S.; Zeitnitz, C.; Karagounis, M.

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC to the HL-LHC requires a new ITk detector. The innermost part of this new tracker is a pixel detector. The University of Wuppertal is developing a new DCS to monitor and control this new pixel detector. The current concept envisions three parallel paths of the DCS. The first path, called security path, is hardwired and provides an interlock system to guarantee the safety of the detector and human beings. The second path is a control path. This path is used to supervise the entire detector. The control path has its own communication lines independent from the regular data readout for reliable operation. The third path is for diagnostics and provides information on demand. It is merged with the regular data readout and provides the highest granularity and most detailed information. To reduce the material budget, a serial power scheme is the baseline for the pixel modules. A new ASIC used in the control path is in development at Wuppertal for this serial power chain. A prototype exists already and a proof of principle was demonstrated. Development and research is ongoing to guarantee the correct operation of the new ASIC in the harsh environment of the HL-LHC. The concept for the new DCS will be presented in this paper. A focus will be made on the development of the DCS chip, used for monitoring and control of pixel modules in a serial power chain.

  10. ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nayak, T

    2013-01-01

    Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) measures the multiplicity and spatial distribution of photons in the forward region of ALICE on a event-by-event basis. PMD is a pre-shower detector having fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 2.3 < η < 3.9.

  11. New detector concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemmer, J.; Lutz, G.

    1986-07-01

    On the basis of the semiconductor drift chamber many new detectors are proposed, which enable the determination of energy, energy loss, position and penetration depth of radiation. A novel integrated transistor-detector configuration allows non destructive repeated readout and amplification of the signal. The concept may be used for the construction of one or two-dimensional PIXEL arrays. (orig.)

  12. Stanford's big new detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    A detector constructed for the Standford Linear Collider is described. It consists of a central drift chamber in the field of a surrounding superconducting solenoid. Furthermore included are a Cherenkov ring imaging detector for particle identification and a liquid argon calorimeter. (HSI).

  13. CMS Detector Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CMS Detector posters (produced in 2000): CMS installation CMS collaboration From the Big Bang to Stars LHC Magnetic Field Magnet System Trackering System Tracker Electronics Calorimetry Eletromagnetic Calorimeter Hadronic Calorimeter Muon System Muon Detectors Trigger and data aquisition (DAQ) ECAL posters (produced in 2010, FR & EN): CMS ECAL CMS ECAL-Supermodule cooling and mechatronics CMS ECAL-Supermodule assembly

  14. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  15. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  16. Drift Chambers detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs

  17. Solid state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuther, H.

    1976-11-01

    This paper gives a survey of the present state of the development and the application of solid state track detectors. The fundamentals of the physical and chemical processes of the track formation and development are explained, the different detector materials and their registration characteristics are mentioned, the possibilities of the experimental practice and the most variable applications are discussed. (author)

  18. LHCb detector performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinol, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are

  19. The LDC detector concept

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In preparation of the experimental program at the international linear collider (ILC), the large detector concept (LDC) is being developed. The main points of the LDC are a large volume gaseous tracking system, combined with high precision vertex detector and an extremely granular calorimeter. The main design ...

  20. Detector Systems at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is designed to deliver e+e- collisions at a center of mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The detector systems at this collider have to provide highly efficient tracking and excellent jet energy resolution and hermeticity for multi-TeV final states with multiple jets and leptons. In addition, the detector systems have to be capable of distinguishing physics events from large beam-induced background at a crossing frequency of 2 GHz. Like for the detector concepts at the ILC, CLIC detectors are based on event reconstruction using particle flow algorithms. The two detector concepts for the ILC, ILD and SID, were adapted for CLIC using calorimeters with dense absorbers limiting leakage through increased compactness, as well as modified forward and vertex detector geometries and precise time stamping to cope with increased background levels. The overall detector concepts for CLIC are presented, with particular emphasis on the main detector and engineering challenges, such as: the ultra-thi...

  1. Future particle detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Allan G.

    2000-01-01

    Starting with a short summary of the major new experimental physics programs, we attempt to motivate the reasons why existing general-purpose detectors at Hadron Colliders are what they are, why they are being upgraded, and why new facilities are being constructed. The CDF and ATLAS detectors are used to illustrate these motivations. Selected physics results from the CDF experiment provide evidence for limitations on the detector performance, and new physics opportunities motivate both machine and detector upgrades. This is discussed with emphasis on the improved physics reach of the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron (√(s)=2 TeV). From 2005, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will become operational at a collision energy of √(s)=14 TeV, seven times larger than at the Tevatron Collider. To exploit the physics capability of the LHC, several large detectors are being constructed. The detectors are significantly more complex than those at the Tevatron Collider because of physics and operational constraints. The detector design and technology of the aspects of the large general-purpose detector ATLAS is described

  2. Developments on RICH detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, P.; Bourgeois, P.

    1996-01-01

    The RICH (ring imaging Cherenkov) detector which is dedicated to Cherenkov radiation detection is described. An improvement made by replacing photo sensible vapor with solid photocathode is studied. A RICH detector prototype with a CsI photocathode has been built in Saclay and used with Saturne. The first results are presented. (A.C.)

  3. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  4. Strip detectors read-out system user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, G.; Dulinski, W.; Lounis, A.

    1996-01-01

    The Strip Detector Read-out System consists of two VME modules: SDR-Flash and SDR-seq completed by a fast logic SDR-Trig stand alone card. The system is a self-consistent, cost effective and easy use solution for the read-out of analog multiplexed signals coming from some of the front-end electronics chips (Viking/VA chips family, Premus 128 etc...) currently used together with solid (silicon) or gas microstrip detectors. (author)

  5. Electronics for the Si detectors in APEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilt, P.R.; Betts, R.R.; Freer, M.

    1994-01-01

    APEX (ATLAS Positron EXperiment), a collaborative effort of ANL, FSU, MSU/NSCL, Princeton, Queen's, Rochester, Washington and Yale, is an experiment to study positron and electron production in very heavy ion collisions. The electrons and positrons are detected with two detector arrays, each consisting of 216 1 mm thick Si PIN diodes, and their energy and time-of-flight are measured. The number of detectors and limited space made it necessary to develop a system that could efficiently process and transfer signals from the detectors to the charge sensing ADC's and data readout electronics as well as monitor the condition of the detectors. The discussion will cover the electronics designed for the Si detectors, including the charge amplifier, ''Mother board'' for the charge amplifiers, 8 channel Shaper, 16 channel Constant Fraction Discriminator (CFD), 16 channel Peak-to-FERA (PTF) and the integration of the CFD and PTF with Charge sensing ADC's. Function and performance of the individual modules as well as the system as a whole will be discussed

  6. The GDH-Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Helbing, K; Fausten, M; Menze, D; Michel, T; Nagel, A; Ryckbosch, D; Speckner, T; Vyver, R V D; Zeitler, G

    2002-01-01

    For the GDH-Experiment at ELSA, the helicity dependent total photoabsorption cross-section is to be determined. These measurements will be performed with the newly developed GDH-Detector which is presented here. The concept of the GDH-Detector is to detect at least one reaction product from all possible hadronic processes with almost complete acceptance concerning solid angle and efficiency. This is realized by an arrangement of scintillators and lead. The overall acceptance for hadronic processes is better than 99%. The electromagnetic background is suppressed by about five orders of magnitude by means of a threshold Cherenkov detector. In dedicated tests, it has been demonstrated that all individual components of the GDH-Detector fulfill the design goals. Measurements of unpolarized total photoabsorption cross-sections were performed to ensure that the complete GDH-Detector is operational.

  7. Introduction to detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Walenta, Albert H

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for momentum measurements,particle identification and energy measurements (calorimeters) as well for imaging applications in medecine, biology and industry (non destructive testing) will be put into relation to the specific detection princip In particular the resolution for position, time, energy and intensity measurement and the efficiency will be discussed. Signal extraction,electronic signal processing and principles of information capture will close the logic circle to the input : the radiation properties.The lecture will provide some sources for data tables and small demonstration computer programs f The basic detector physics as interaction of radiation with matter, information transport via free charges,photons and phonons and the signal formation will be presented in some depth with emphasis on the influence on specific parameters for detector The lecture will cover the most popular detector principles, gas detectors (ion chambers,MPWC's and MSGC's), semiconductor detectors scintillators and ...

  8. ATLAS ITk Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenge to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with a whole silicon tracker which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation level are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the HL-LHC ATLA Pixel detector developments as well as the various layout options will be reviewed.

  9. Undepleted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancoita, P.G.; Seidman, A.

    1985-01-01

    Large-size silicon detectors employing relatively low resistivity material can be used in electromagnetic calorimetry. They can operate in strong magnetic fields, under geometric constraints and with microstrip detectors a high resolution can be achieved. Low noise large capacitance oriented electronics was developed to enable good signal-to-noise ratio for single relativistic particles traversing large area detectors. In undepleted silicon detectors, the charge migration from the field-free region has been investigated by comparing the expected peak position (from the depleted layer only) of the energy-loss of relativistic electrons with the measured one. Furthermore, the undepleted detectors have been employed in a prototype of Si/W electromagnetic colorimeter. The sensitive layer was found to be systematically larger than the depleted one

  10. Advanced far infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > λ > 50 μm are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide

  11. Charged corpuscular beam detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikawa, H; Nishikawa, Y

    1970-09-29

    The present invention relates to a charged particle beam detector which prevents transient phenomena disturbing the path and focusing of a charged particle beam travelling through a mounted axle. The present invention provides a charged particle beam detector capable of decreasing its reaction to the charge in energy of the charged particle beam even if the relative angle between the mounted axle and the scanner is unstable. The detector is characterized by mounting electrically conductive metal pieces of high melting point onto the face of a stepped, heat-resistant electric insulating material such that the pieces partially overlap each other and individually provide electric signals, whereby the detector is no longer affected by the beam. The thickness of the metal piece is selected so that an eddy current is not induced therein by an incident beam, thus the incident beam is not affected. The detector is capable of detecting a misaligned beam since the metal pieces partially overlap each other.

  12. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. This report discusses its design and operation

  13. CDF [Collider Detector at Fermilab] detector simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.

    1987-12-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) uses several different simulation programs, each tuned for specific applications. The programs rely heavily on the extensive test beam data that CDF has accumulated. Sophisticated shower parameterizations are used, yielding enormous gains in speed over full cascade programs. 3 refs., 5 figs

  14. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, F.; Austin, M. E.; Campbell, G.; Deterly, T.

    2012-01-01

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1–7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  15. Straw detector: 1 - Vacuum: 0

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The NA62 straw tracker is using pioneering CERN technology to measure charged particles from very rare kaon decays. For the first time, a large straw tracker with a 4.4 m2 coverage will be placed directly into an experiment’s vacuum tank, allowing physicists to measure the direction and momentum of charged particles with extreme precision. NA62 measurements using this technique will help physicists take a clear look at the kaon decay rate, which might be influenced by particles and processes that are not included in the Standard Model.   Straw ends are glued to an aluminium frame, a crucial step in the assembly of a module. The ends are then visually inspected before a leak test is performed.  “Although straw detectors have been around since the 1980s, what makes the NA62 straw trackers different is that they can work under vacuum,” explains Hans Danielsson from the PH-DT group leading the NA62 straw project. Straw detectors are basically small drift cha...

  16. Event timing in high purity germanium coaxial detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ibiary, M.Y.

    1979-08-01

    The timing of gamma ray radiation in systems using high purity coaxial germanium detectors is analyzed and compared to that of systems using Ge(Li) detectors. The analysis takes into account the effect of the residual impurities on the electric field distribution, and hence on the rate of rise of the electrical pulses delivered to the timing module. Conditions under which the electric field distribution could lead to an improvement in timing performance, are identified. The results of the analysis confirm the experimental results published elsewhere and when compared with those for Ge(Li) detectors, which usually operate under conditions of charge carrier velocity saturation, confirm that high purity germanium detectors need not have inferior timing characteristics. A chart is given to provide a quantitative basis on which the trade off between the radius of the detector and its time resolution may be made

  17. Vertex measurement at a hadron collider. The ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse-Knetter, J.

    2008-03-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system and will contribute significantly to the ATLAS track and vertex reconstruction. The detector consists of identical sensor-chip-hybrid modules, arranged in three barrels in the centre and three disks on either side for the forward region. The position of the Pixel Detector near the interaction point requires excellent radiation hardness, fast read-out, mechanical and thermal robustness, good long-term stability, all combined with a low material budget. The new design concepts used to meet the challenging requirements are discussed with their realisation in the Pixel Detector, followed by a description of a refined and extensive set of measurements to assess the detector performance during and after its construction. (orig.)

  18. The readout system of the new H1 silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, J.; Hansen, K.; Lange, W.; Prell, S.; Zimmermann, W.; Henschel, H.; Haynes, W.J.; Noyes, G.W.; Joensson, L.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Wagener, M.; Eichler, R.; Erdmann, W.; Niggli, H.; Pitzl, D.

    1995-03-01

    The H1 detector at HERA at DESY undergoes presently a major upgrade. In this context silicon strip detectors have been installed at beginning of 1995. The high bunch crossing frequency of HERA (10.4 MHz) demands a novel readout architecture which includes pipelining, signal processing and data reduction at a very early stage. The front end readout is hierarchically organized. The detector elements are read out by the APC chip which contains an analog pipeline and performs first background subtraction. Up to five readout chips are controlled by a Decoder Chip. The readout processor module (OnSiRoC) operates the detectors, controls the Decoder Chips and performs a first level data reduction. The paper describes the readout architecture of the H1 Silicon Detectors and performance data of the complete readout chain. (orig.)

  19. Test Results of the ALICE-HMPID Detector Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Volpe, G

    2008-01-01

    The ALICE High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) consists of seven identical proximity focusing RICH counters. It covers in total 11 m2, exploiting large area CsI photocathodes for Cherenkov light imaging. The detector is installed in the ALICE solenoid, ready for the data acquisition. By means of the Detector Control System, the Front-end (FEE) and the Readout (R/O) electronics, the MWPC high voltages, the cooling and the gas system have been tested. The HMPID module gas pressure, temperature, current and voltage trends have been monitored and archived in the ORACLE database. In this paper a comprehensive review on the test results is presented.

  20. Soudan 2 detector as a time-projection calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, W.W.M.; Alner, J.; Ambats, I.

    1986-01-01

    The Soudan 2 Nucleon Decay Detector uses Hytrel plastic tubes to cause ionization electrons to drift up to 50 cm prior to gas multiplication and collection. The drift tubes are embedded in a matrix of thin steel sheets. Readout is accomplished by flash digitizers in a system with distributed intelligence. This design is usable as a general-purpose calorimeter in which 3 spatial coordinates and pulse height are measured at all points where ionization occurs. Several 4.3 ton modules of this detector have now been studied in detail. We will present information about the detector performance and its dependence on manufacturing tolerances

  1. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  2. The HERMES recoil detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Belostotski, S.

    2013-02-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  3. Smile detectors correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Kivanc; Chang, Xin; Skarbek, Władysław

    2017-08-01

    The novel smile recognition algorithm is presented based on extraction of 68 facial salient points (fp68) using the ensemble of regression trees. The smile detector exploits the Support Vector Machine linear model. It is trained with few hundreds exemplar images by SVM algorithm working in 136 dimensional space. It is shown by the strict statistical data analysis that such geometric detector strongly depends on the geometry of mouth opening area, measured by triangulation of outer lip contour. To this goal two Bayesian detectors were developed and compared with SVM detector. The first uses the mouth area in 2D image, while the second refers to the mouth area in 3D animated face model. The 3D modeling is based on Candide-3 model and it is performed in real time along with three smile detectors and statistics estimators. The mouth area/Bayesian detectors exhibit high correlation with fp68/SVM detector in a range [0:8; 1:0], depending mainly on light conditions and individual features with advantage of 3D technique, especially in hard light conditions.

  4. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Belostotski, S. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Insitute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Recoil Detector Group

    2013-02-15

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  5. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  6. Commissioning of the recoil silicon detector for the HERMES experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickert, N.C.

    2008-02-01

    The reconstruction of the missing mass is limited by the position and momentum resolution of the HERMES spectrometer. In order to reach a higher accuracy in the measurements the backscattered nucleon must also be detected. A detector suited for this must give the possibility, to determine the momentum of the particles over a very large range: from minimally ionizing particles up to protons, which are stopped in the detector. The detector must also be able to discriminate hadrons and mesons as well as cover the complete spatial region around the target. In the winter 2005-2006 such a recoil detector was installed in the HERMES experiment. The detector sonsists of three partial detectors, a silicon counter within the scattering chamber, a sintillating-fiber detector and a photon detector. Before the installation of the detector the silicon modules were tested in a bench test and checked together with the other particle detectors in a test experiment. A large part of this dissertation is dedicated to the planning and performance of these tests as well to the evaluation of them. It could be show, that the modules worked accordly to their specifications, however because of unexpectedly high noise a signal correction became necessary. Different models for the correction were developed and tested in the framework of these thesis. In spite of the high noise cosmic muons could be detected and their energy deposition measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1. In the winter break 2005-2006 the recoil detector was installed into the HERMES experiment. First diagnosis and analysis software was developed. The silicon detector measured successfully energy depositions of minimally ionizing particles up to protons stopped in the sensor. Minimally ionizing particles could be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 5:1. By means of track information of the scintillating-fiber detector protons could be discriminated from pions and other mesons by the silicon detector. The HERMES

  7. Commissioning of the recoil silicon detector for the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickert, N C

    2008-02-15

    The reconstruction of the missing mass is limited by the position and momentum resolution of the HERMES spectrometer. In order to reach a higher accuracy in the measurements the backscattered nucleon must also be detected. A detector suited for this must give the possibility, to determine the momentum of the particles over a very large range: from minimally ionizing particles up to protons, which are stopped in the detector. The detector must also be able to discriminate hadrons and mesons as well as cover the complete spatial region around the target. In the winter 2005-2006 such a recoil detector was installed in the HERMES experiment. The detector sonsists of three partial detectors, a silicon counter within the scattering chamber, a sintillating-fiber detector and a photon detector. Before the installation of the detector the silicon modules were tested in a bench test and checked together with the other particle detectors in a test experiment. A large part of this dissertation is dedicated to the planning and performance of these tests as well to the evaluation of them. It could be show, that the modules worked accordly to their specifications, however because of unexpectedly high noise a signal correction became necessary. Different models for the correction were developed and tested in the framework of these thesis. In spite of the high noise cosmic muons could be detected and their energy deposition measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1. In the winter break 2005-2006 the recoil detector was installed into the HERMES experiment. First diagnosis and analysis software was developed. The silicon detector measured successfully energy depositions of minimally ionizing particles up to protons stopped in the sensor. Minimally ionizing particles could be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 5:1. By means of track information of the scintillating-fiber detector protons could be discriminated from pions and other mesons by the silicon detector. The HERMES

  8. A New Virtual Point Detector Concept for a HPGe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Jong In; Yun, Ju Yong

    2009-01-01

    For last several decades, the radiation measurement and radioactivity analysis techniques using gamma detectors have been well established. Especially , the study about the detection efficiency has been done as an important part of gamma spectrometry. The detection efficiency depends strongly on source-to-detector distance. The detection efficiency with source-to-detector distance can be expressed by a complex function of geometry and physical characteristics of gamma detectors. In order to simplify the relation, a virtual point detector concept was introduced by Notea. Recently, further studies concerning the virtual point detector have been performed. In previous other works the virtual point detector has been considered as a fictitious point existing behind the detector end cap. However the virtual point detector position for the front and side of voluminous detectors might be different due to different effective central axis of them. In order to more accurately define the relation, therefore, we should consider the virtual point detector for the front as well as side and off-center of the detector. The aim of this study is to accurately define the relation between the detection efficiency and source-to-detector distance with the virtual point detector. This paper demonstrates the method to situate the virtual point detectors for a HPGe detector. The new virtual point detector concept was introduced for three area of the detector and its characteristics also were demonstrated by using Monte Carlo Simulation method. We found that the detector has three virtual point detectors except for its rear area. This shows that we should consider the virtual point detectors for each area when applying the concept to radiation measurement. This concept can be applied to the accurate geometric simplification for the detector and radioactive sources.

  9. Detectors - Electronics; Detecteurs - Electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J. [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 (France)

    1998-04-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X {yields} e{sup -} converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the {sup 3}He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  10. Measurements of Charge Sharing Effects in Pixilated CZT/CdTe Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, charge sharing and charge loss effects in pixilated CZT/CdTe detectors are investigated by measurements. We measured charge sharing effects function of the inter-pixel gap (with same pixel pitch), the photon energy and the detector bias voltage for a large numbers of CZT and Cd......Te pixel detector samples. The results are used for the development of the large area X-ray and Gamma ray detector for the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) planned for the ISS ESA Columbus module. Charge sharing measurements on detector samples with identical size and pixel geometry...

  11. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  12. Lithium germanium detectors reactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolai, J.A.; Marti, G.V.; Riso, J.M.; Gimenez, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A convenient method to regenerate the characteristics of damaged Ge(li) detectors, that has been applied in the authors' laboratory, is described. The procedure consists in warming-up the crystal in its cryostat to temperatures between 10 deg C and 30 deg C above room temperature, in order to clean its surface. Subsequent cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperature, followed by one or more clean-up drifting processes, are applied to the crystals. This paper summarizes the results obtained with several detectors; this method was applied successfully to 15 detectors more. (author) [es

  13. The AGILE anticoincidence detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perotti, F.; Fiorini, M.; Incorvaia, S.; Mattaini, E.; Sant'Ambrogio, E.

    2006-01-01

    AGILE is a γ-ray astrophysics space mission which will operate, starting from 2006, in the 30 MeV-50 GeV energy range with imaging capability also in the 15-45 keV energy band. In order to achieve the required detection sensitivity, all AGILE detectors are surrounded by an anticoincidence detector aimed at charged particle background rejection with an inefficiency as low as 10 -4 . In this work, the design and the structure of this anticoincidence detector are presented, as well as its performances in terms of charged particles detection inefficiency as derived from extensive calibrations performed at CERN PS

  14. Liquid ionizing radiaion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deGaston, A.N.

    1979-01-01

    A normally nonconducting liquid such as liquid hydrocarbon is encased between a pair of electrodes in an enclosure so that when the liquid is subjected to ionizing radiation, the ion pairs so created measurably increase the conductivity of the fluid. The reduced impedance between the electrodes is detectable with a sensitive ohm-meter and indicates the amount of ionizing radiation. The enclosure, the electrodes and the fluid can be constructed of materials that make the response of the detector suitable for calibrating a large range of radiation energy levels. The detector is especially useful in medical applications where tissue equivalent X ray detectors are desired

  15. Ionization detectors, ch. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevcik, J.

    1976-01-01

    Most measuring devices used in gas chromatography consist of detectors that measure the ionization current. The process is based on the collision of a moving high-energy particle with a target particle that is ionised while an electron is freed. The discussion of the conditions of the collision reaction, the properties of the colliding particles, and the intensity of the applied field point to a unified classification of ionisation detectors. Radioactive sources suitable for use in these detectors are surveyed. The slow-down mechanism, recombination and background current effect are discussed

  16. The Clover detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, F A; Byrski, Th; Durien, D; Duchene, G; France, G de; Kharraja, B; Wei, L [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires; Butler, P; Jones, G; Jones, P [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Oliver Lodge Lab.; Hannachi, F [Daresbury Lab. (United Kingdom)

    1992-08-01

    The EUROGAM Phase I device is almost running for experiments and new technical developments are in progress for its second phase. For example, a composite Ge detector should enable: a very large photopeak efficiency with good energy and timing resolutions; and, the covering, with Ge, of a large portion of 4{pi}-Str. The Clover detector, proposed by the CRN, Strasbourg, is one of this new generation of Ge detectors. It is currently developed in France by the EUROGAM collaboration. The design, the technical characteristics of the counter and the first results of the prototype tests are discussed in this contribution. (author). 1 ref., 2 tabs., 2 refs.

  17. Fuel rod leak detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womack, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A typical embodiment of the invention detects leaking fuel rods by means of a radiation detector that measures the concentration of xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) within each individual rod. A collimated detector that provides signals related to the energy of incident radiation is aligned with one of the ends of a fuel rod. A statistically significant sample of the gamma radiation (γ-rays) that characterize 133 Xe is accumulated through the detector. The data so accumulated indicates the presence of a concentration of 133 Xe appropriate to a sound fuel rod, or a significantly different concentration that reflects a leaking fuel rod

  18. The HOTWAXS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E.; Derbyshire, G.E. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Diakun, G. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: d.m.duxbury@rl.ac.uk; Fairclough, J.P.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield, Brook Hill, Sheffield S3 7HF (United Kingdom); Harvey, I.; Helsby, W.I. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lipp, J.D.; Marsh, A.S.; Salisbury, J. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Sankar, G. [Royal Institution of GB, 21 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4BS (United Kingdom); Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Terrill, N.J. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-11

    The development and testing of the HOTWAXS position-sensitive X-ray detector for Synchrotron Radiation Sources is described. Funded from a facility development grant, the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate, parallax-free photon counting detector to be used in the combined studies of X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction (XAFS/XRD), and also in the technique of small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS). The detector system is described together with results of experiments carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source.

  19. The HOTWAXS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Derbyshire, G.E.; Diakun, G.; Duxbury, D.M.; Fairclough, J.P.A.; Harvey, I.; Helsby, W.I.; Lipp, J.D.; Marsh, A.S.; Salisbury, J.; Sankar, G.; Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R.; Terrill, N.J.

    2007-01-01

    The development and testing of the HOTWAXS position-sensitive X-ray detector for Synchrotron Radiation Sources is described. Funded from a facility development grant, the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate, parallax-free photon counting detector to be used in the combined studies of X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction (XAFS/XRD), and also in the technique of small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS). The detector system is described together with results of experiments carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source

  20. Semiconductor ionizino. radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Spectrometric semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation with the electron-hole junction, based on silicon and germanium are presented. The following parameters are given for the individual types of germanium detectors: energy range of detected radiation, energy resolution given as full width at half maximum (FWHM) and full width at one tenth of maximum (FWTM) for 57 Co and 60 Co, detection sensitivity, optimal voltage, and electric capacitance at optimal voltage. For silicon detectors the value of FWHM for 239 Pu is given, the sensitive area and the depth of the sensitive area. (E.S.)

  1. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  2. POSSuMUS. A position sensitive scintillating muon SiPM detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruschke, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The development of a modular designed large scale scintillation detector with a two-dimensional position sensitivity is presented in this thesis. This novel POsition Sensitive Scintillating MUon SiPM Detector is named POSSuMUS. The POSSuMUS detector is capable to determine the particle's position in two space dimensions with a fast trigger capability. Each module is constructed from two trapezoidal shaped plastic scintillators to form one rectangular shaped detector module. Both trapezoids are optically insulated against each other. In both trapezoids the scintillation light is collected by plastic fibers and guided towards silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). SiPMs are light sensors which are capable to detect even smallest amounts of light. By combining several detector modules, position sensitive areas from 100 cm 2 to few m 2 are achievable with few readout channels. Therefore, POSSuMUS provides a cost effective detector concept. The position sensitivity along the trapezoidal geometry of one detector module is achieved by the path length dependent amount of detected light for crossing particles. The ratio of the light yields in both trapezoids is calculated. This value corresponds to the position of the particle traversing the detector. A spatial resolution in the order of several mm is foreseen. The position sensitivity along the scintillator module is determined by the propagation time of light to the SiPMs located on opposite sides of the detector. A spatial resolution of few cm is expected for this direction. The POSSuMUS detector is applicable as large area trigger detector with a two dimensional position information of crossing particles. This is suitable in detector tests of large area precesion detectors or for measuring the small angle scattering of cosmic muons. At the beginning of this thesis, the determination of important SiPM characteristics like the breakdown voltage is presented. In the course of this work the detector principle is proven by

  3. DELPHI Barrel Muon Chamber Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The module was used as part of the muon identification system on the barrel of the DELPHI detector at LEP, and was in active use from 1989 to 2000. The module consists of 7 individual muons chambers arranged in 2 layers. Chambers in the upper layer are staggered by half a chamber width with respect to the lower layer. Each individual chamber is a drift chamber consisting of an anode wire, 47 microns in diameter, and a wrapped copper delay line. Each chamber provided 3 signal for each muon passing through the chamber, from which a 3D space-point could be reconstructed.

  4. Training detector as simulator of alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirosh, D.; Duvniz, E.; Assido, H.; Barak, D.; Paran, J.

    1997-01-01

    Alpha contamination is a common phenomena in radiation research laboratories and other sites. Training staff to properly detect and control alpha contamination, present special problems. In order to train health physics personnel, while using alpha sources, both the trainers and the trainees are inevitably exposed to alpha contamination. This fact of course, comes in conflict with safety principles. In order to overcome these difficulties, a training detector was developed, built and successfully tested. (authors)

  5. Multi electrode semiconductors detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Amendolia, S R; Bertolucci, Ennio; Bosisio, L; Bradaschia, C; Budinich, M; Fidecaro, F; Foà, L; Focardi, E; Giazotto, A; Giorgi, M A; Marrocchesi, P S; Menzione, A; Ristori, L; Rolandi, Luigi; Scribano, A; Stefanini, A; Vincelli, M L

    1981-01-01

    Detectors with very high space resolution have been built in this laboratory and tested at CERN in order to investigate their possible use in high energy physics experiments. These detectors consist of thin layers of silicon crystals acting as ionization chambers. Thin electrodes, structured in strips or in more fancy shapes are applied to their surfaces by metal coating. The space resolution which could be reached is of the order of a few microns. An interesting feature of these solid state detectors is that they can work under very high or low external pressure or at very low temperature. The use of these detectors would strongly reduce the dimensions and the cost of high energy experiments. (3 refs).

  6. Multi electrode semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Batignani, G.; Bertolucci, E.; Bosisio, L.; Budinich, M.; Bradaschia, C.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giazotto, A.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Rolandi, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Vincelli, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Detectors with very high space resolution have been built in the laboratory and tested at CERN in order to investigate their possible use in high energy physics experiments. These detectors consist of thin layers of silicon crystals acting as ionization chambers. Thin electrodes, structured in strips or in more fancy shapes are applied to their surfaces by metal coating. The space resolution which could be reached is of the order of a few microns. An interesting feature of these solid state detectors is that they can work under very high or low external pressure or at very low temperature. The use of these detectors would strongly reduce the dimensions and the cost of high energy experiments. (Auth.)

  7. Inverter ratio failure detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  8. Sensitive detectors in HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Detection of sample components in HPLC is difficult for many reasons; the key difficulty is the mobile phase which usually has properties similar to the solute. A variety of detectors have been developed for use in HPLC based on one of the above approaches; however, the search is still continuing for an ideal or universal detector. A universal detector should have the following characteristics: (1) responds to all solutes or has predictable specificity; (2) high detectability and the same predictable response; (3) fast response; (4) wide range of linearity; (5) unaffected by changes in temperature and mobile-phase flow; (6) responds independently of the mobile phase; (7) makes no contribution to extracolumn band broadening; (8) reliable and convenient to use; (9) nondestructive to the solute; (10) provides qualitative information on the detected peak. Unfortunately, no available HPLC detector possesses all these properties. 145 refs

  9. OPAL detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    Half of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the OPAL detector is seen in this photo. This calorimeter consists of 4720 blocks of lead glass. It was used to detect and measure the energy of photons, electrons and positrons by absorbing them.

  10. Construction of the ATLAS SCT Endcap modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) uses silicon strip detectors to measure trajectories of charged particles coming from 14 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The SCT provides at least four space points, in the radial range of 27-50 cm from the beam, for tracks within the angular acceptance vertical bar η vertical bar <2.5. The SCT is built up of 4088 modules, each consisting of two or four silicon detectors, a hybrid carrying several readout ASICS, and other components to support, cool and align the detectors. We report on construction of over 2000 end-cap modules of the SCT by a group of 14 institutes from seven countries. A key aspect of the project was to fully standardise the final module tests and to insist that test data from all institutes was stored in a single central database, while leaving institutes flexibility to vary their module assembly methods to suit local circumstances. First the module specifications and tests used for quality control are summarised, then we describe the main test results. Finally, we report our experience in terms of component quality, assembly and testing rates, yield of good modules and causes of lost modules. At the outset we assumed losses during assembly of 15% and procured components accordingly; in fact, losses were around 7%

  11. A prototype BPM electronics module for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, W.A.; Shea, T.J.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype components of the VXI-based Beam Position Monitor Electronics for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have been constructed and tested for accuracy, resolution and linearity. The detector, designed solely for single-bunch acquisition, consists of a homodyne detector followed by a sample and hold and Analog-to-Digital Converter. In the final modules, an on-board Digital Signal Processor will provide turn by turn data correction, continuously updated closed-orbit averaging, and circular buffer maintenance. A timing processor allows synchronization of modules to enable correlated data collection

  12. Changes to the forward SCT module design and their effect on thermal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, S.; Taylor, G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents detailed calculations of a module design of a module design with separate cooling to the hybrid and detector. In this paper, comparison of the baseline module with the separated-cooling module are presented to help identify critical elements of the baseline

  13. Detector Control System for the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    Czekierda, Sabina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) is a forward detector using a Roman Pot technique, recently installed in the LHC tunnel. It is aiming at registering protons that were diffractively or electromagnetically scattered in soft and hard processes. Infrastructure of the detector consists of hardware placed both in the tunnel and in the control room USA15 (about 330 meters from the Roman Pots). AFP detector, like the other detectors of the ATLAS experiment, uses the Detector Control System (DCS) to supervise the detector and to ensure its safe and coherent operation, since the incorrect detector performance may influence the physics results. The DCS continuously monitors the detector parameters, subset of which is stored in data bases. Crucial parameters are guarded by alarm system. A detector representation as a hierarchical tree-like structure of well-defined subsystems built with the use of the Finite State Machine (FSM) toolkit allows for overall detector operation and visualization. Every node in the hierarchy is...

  14. New detector techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Iarocci, Enzo

    1994-03-14

    The intense R&D effort being carried out in view of LHC has given rise in a relatively short time to a wide spectrum of new detector concepts and technologies. Subject of the lectures will be some of the most interesting new ideas and developments, in the field of noble liquid, crystal and scintillating fiber trackers. The emphasis will be on the basic aspects of detector operation.

  15. The Micro Wire Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeva, B.; Gomez, F.; Pazos, A.; Pfau, R.; Plo, M.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Vazquez, P.; Labbe, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    We present the performance of a new proportional gas detector. Its geometry consists of a cathode plane with 70x70 μm 2 apertures, crossed by 25 μm anode strips to which it is attached by 50 μm kapton spacers. In the region where the avalanche takes place, the anode strips are suspended in the gas mixture as in a standard wire chamber. This detector exhibits high rate capability and large gains, introducing very little material. (author)

  16. Calibration of germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurman, B.; Erlandsson, B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes problems concerning the calibration of germanium detectors for the measurement of gamma-radiation from environmental samples. It also contains a brief description of some ways of reducing the uncertainties concerning the activity determination. These uncertainties have many sources, such as counting statistics, full energy peak efficiency determination, density correction and radionuclide specific-coincidence effects, when environmental samples are investigated at close source-to-detector distances

  17. Lepton detector workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imlay, R.; Iwata, S.; Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    The study group met from June 7 to 11, 1976, with the dual purpose of reviewing an earlier Lepton Detector report in order to resolve some of the remaining design problems and of considering possible alternatives. Since the role of this group was primarily that of providing a critique of the earlier work, the reader is referred to that earlier paper for the general motivation and design of the detector. Problems studied at this session are described

  18. Liquid xenon detector engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, E.; Chen, M.; Gaudreau, M.P.J.; Montgomery, D.B.; Pelly, J.D.; Shotkin, S.; Sullivan, J.D.; Sumorok, K.; Yan, X.; Zhang, X.; Lebedenko, V.

    1991-01-01

    The design, engineering constraints and R and D status of a 15 m 3 precision liquid xenon, electromagnetic calorimeter for the Superconducting Super Collider are discussed in this paper. Several prototype liquid xenon detectors have been built, and preliminary results are described. The design of a conical 7 cell by 7 cell detector capable of measuring fully contained high energy electron showers is described in detail

  19. The LUCID-2 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sbarra, Carla; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    LUCID-2 (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) is the upgrade of the main detector dedicated to luminosity measurements in ATLAS. Most changes were motivated by the number of interactions per bunch-crossing and the 25 ns bunch-spacing expected in LHC RUN II (2015-2018). Both fast online information used by LHC for luminosity optimisation and levelling in ATLAS, and per-bunch data to be used offline, come from LUCID-2

  20. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  1. Microsonic detector (MSD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bober, J.T.; Haridas, P.; Oh, S.H.; Pless, I.A.; Stoughton, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    The microsonic detector (MSD) has good spatial resolution, moderate flux capacity, moderate event rate, and small volume. The MSD is a super clean bubble chamber driven at 10-50 KHz. It would be used in experiments as a vertex detector to detect short lived particles. Its characteristics--active volume, density, absorption length, radiation length, and spatial resolution--are given. The setup is schematicized, and a photograph of a 130 MeV/C photon bremsstrahlung beam is given

  2. Experience with parallel optical link for the CDF silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Dense Optical Interface Module (DOIM) is a byte-wide optical link developed for the Run II upgrade of the CDF silicon tracking system [1]. The module consists of a transmitter with a laser-diode array for conversion of digitized detector signals to light outputs, a 22 m optical fiber ribbon cable for light transmission, and a receiver converting the light pulses back to electrical signals. We report on the design feature, characteristics, and radiation tolerance

  3. A directional gamma-ray detector based on scintillator plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, D., E-mail: hanna@physics.mcgill.ca; Sagnières, L.; Boyle, P.J.; MacLeod, A.M.L.

    2015-10-11

    A simple device for determining the azimuthal location of a source of gamma radiation, using ideas from astrophysical gamma-ray burst detection, is described. A compact and robust detector built from eight identical modules, each comprising a plate of CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, can locate a point source of gamma rays with degree-scale precision by comparing the count rates in the different modules. Sensitivity to uniform environmental background is minimal.

  4. Protecting detectors in ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechman, M.; Augustinus, A.; Chochula, P.; Di Mauro, A.; Stig Jirden, L.; Rosinsky, P.; Schindler, H.; Cataldo, G. de; Pinazza, O.; Kurepin, A.; Moreno, A.

    2012-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the big LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments at CERN in Geneva. It is composed of many sophisticated and complex detectors mounted very compactly around the beam pipe. Each detector is a unique masterpiece of design, engineering and construction and any damage to it could stop the experiment for months or even for years. It is therefore essential that the detectors are protected from any danger and this is one very important role of the Detector Control System (DCS). One of the main dangers for the detectors is the particle beam itself. Since the detectors are designed to be extremely sensitive to particles they are also vulnerable to any excess of beam conditions provided by the LHC accelerator. The beam protection consists of a combination of hardware interlocks and control software and this paper will describe how this is implemented and handled in ALICE. Tools have also been developed to support operators and shift leaders in the decision making related to beam safety. The gained experiences and conclusions from the individual safety projects are also presented. (authors)

  5. Radiation detectors for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balagi, V.

    2005-01-01

    Detection and measurement of radiation plays a vital role in nuclear reactors from the point of view of control and safety, personnel protection and process control applications. Various types of radiation are measured over a wide range of intensity. Consequently a variety of detectors find use in nuclear reactors. Some of these devices have been developed in Electronics Division. They include gas-filled detectors such as 10 B-lined proportional counters and chambers, fission detectors and BF 3 counters are used for the measurement of neutron flux both for reactor control and safety, process control as well as health physics instrumentation. In-core neutron flux instrumentation employs the use detectors such as miniature fission detectors and self-powered detectors. In this development effort, several indigenous materials, technologies and innovations have been employed to suit the specific requirement of nuclear reactor applications. This has particular significance in view of the fact that several new types of reactors such as P-4, PWR and AHWR critical facilities, FBTR, PFBR as well as the refurbishment of old units like CIRUS are being developed. The development work has sought to overcome some difficulties associated with the non-availability of isotopically enriched neutron-sensing materials, achieving all-welded construction etc. The present paper describes some of these innovations and performance results. (author)

  6. Detectors for CBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggett, N.; Gordon, H.A.; Palmer, R.B.; Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1983-05-01

    We discuss some current approaches to a large solid angle detector. An alternative approach for utilizing the high rate of events at CBA is to design special purpose detectors for specific physics goals which can be pursued within a limited solid angle. In many cases this will be the only way to proceed, and then high luminosity has a different significance. The total rate in the restricted acceptance is less likely to be a problem, while the need for high luminosity to obtain sufficient data is obvious. Eight such experiments from studies carried out in the community are surveyed. Such experiments could be run on their own or in combination with others at the same intersection, or even with a large solid angle detector, if a window can be provided in the larger facility. The small solid angle detector would provide the trigger and special information, while the facility would provide back-up information on the rest of the event. We consider some possibilities of refurbishing existing detectors for use at CBA. This discussion is motivated by the fact that there is a growing number of powerful detectors at colliding beam machines around the world. Their builders have invested considerable amounts of time, money and ingenuity in them, and may wish to extend the useful lives of their creations, as new opportunities arise

  7. GANIL beam profile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribouillard, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the design phase of GANIL which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beamlines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The assembly of installed detectors (around 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beam extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beam, secondary ion beams from the production target of the LISE and SPEG spectrometers, different SPIRAL project lines. All of these detectors are based on standard characteristics: - standard flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; - identical analog electronics for all the detectors, with networking; - unique display system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (beam profile and ion packet lengths) make possible in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability. (author)

  8. Design of readout drivers for ATLAS pixel detectors using field programmable gate arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Sivasubramaniyan, Sriram

    Microstrip detectors are an integral patt of high energy physics research . Special protocols are used to transmit the data from these detectors . To readout the data from such detectors specialized instrumentation have to be designed . To achieve this task, creative and innovative high speed algorithms were designed simulated and implemented in Field Programmable gate arrays, using CAD/CAE tools. The simulation results indicated that these algorithms would be able to perform all the required tasks quickly and efficiently. This thesis describes the design of data acquisition system called the Readout Drivers (ROD) . It focuses on the ROD data path for ATLAS Pixel detectors. The data path will be an integrated part of Readout Drivers setup to decode the data from the silicon micro strip detectors and pixel detectors. This research also includes the design of Readout Driver controller. This Module is used to control the operation of the ROD. This module is responsible for the operation of the Pixel decoders bas...

  9. The Karlsruhe 4π barium fluoride detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisshak, K.; Guber, K.; Kaeppeler, F.; Krisch, J.; Mueller, H.; Rupp, G.; Voss, F.

    1989-12-01

    A new experimental approach has been implemented for accurate measurements of neutron capture cross sections in the energy range from 5 to 200 keV. The Karlsruhe 4π Barium Fluoride Detector consists of 42 crystals shaped as hexagonal and pentagonal truncated pyramids forming a spherical shell with 10 cm inner radius and 15 cm thickness. All crystals are supplied with reflector and photomultiplier, thus representing independent gamma-ray detectors. Each detector module covers the same solid angle with respect to a gamma-ray source located in the centre. The energy resolution of the 4π detector is 14% at 662 keV and 7% at 2.5 MeV gamma-ray energy, the overall time reslution is 500 ps and the peak efficiency 90% at 1 MeV. The detector allows to register capture cascades with 95% probability above a threshold energy of 2.5 MeV in the sum energy spectrum. Neutrons are produced via the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction using the pulsed proton beam of a Van de Graaff accelerator. The neutron spectrum can be taylored according to the experimental requirements in an energy range from 5 to 200 keV by choosing appropriate proton energies. A collimated neutron beam is passing through the detector and hits the sample in the centre. The energy of captured neutrons is determined via time of flight, the primary flight path being 77 cm. The combination of short primary flight path, a 10 cm inner radius of the spherical BaF 2 shell, and the low capture cross section of barium allows to discriminate background due to capture of sample scattered neutrons in the scintillator by time of flight, leaving part of the neutron energy range completely undisturbed. (orig./HSI) [de

  10. Survey of the ATLAS Pixel Detector Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreazza, A.; Kostyukhim, V.; Madaras, R.

    2008-01-01

    This document provides a description of the survey performed on different components of the ATLAS Pixel Detector at different stages of its assembly. During the production of the ATLAS pixel detector great care was put in the geometrical survey of the location of the sensitive area of modules. This had a double purpose: (1) to provide a check of the quality of the assembly procedure and assure tolerances in the geometrical assembly were met; and (2) to provide an initial point for the alignment (the so called 'as-built detector'), better than the ideal geometry. Since direct access to the sensitive area becomes more and more difficult with the progress of the assembly, the survey needed to be performed at different stages: after module loading on the local supports (sectors and staves) and after assembly of the local supports in disks or halfshells. Different techniques were used, including both optical 2D and 3D surveys and mechanical survey. This document summarizes the survey procedures, the analysis done on the collected data and how survey data are stored in case they will need to be accessed in the future

  11. Basic Radiation Detectors. Chapter 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eijk, C. W.E. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Radiation detectors are of paramount importance in nuclear medicine. The detectors provide a wide range of information including the radiation dose of a laboratory worker and the positron emission tomography (PET) image of a patient. Consequently, detectors with strongly differing specifications are used. In this chapter, general aspects of detectors are discussed.

  12. Frontier detectors for frontier physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervelli, F.; Scribano, A.

    1984-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named meeting. These concern developments of radiation detectors and counting techniques in high energy physics. Especially considered are tracking detectors, calorimeters, time projection chambers, detectors for rare events, solid state detectors, particle identification, and optical readout systems. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  13. The ALICE forward multiplicity detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm Christensen, Christian; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan; Sogaard, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4......The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4...

  14. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  15. Detectors on the drawing board

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Linear collider detector developers inside and outside CERN are tackling the next generation of detector technology. While their focus has centred on high-energy linear collider detectors, their innovative concepts and designs will be applicable to any future detector.   A simulated event display in one of the new generation detectors. “While the LHC experiments remain the pinnacle of detector technology, you may be surprised to realise that the design and expertise behind them is well over 10 years old,” says Lucie Linssen, CERN’s Linear Collider Detector (LCD) project manager whose group is pushing the envelope of detector design. “The next generation of detectors will have to surpass the achievements of the LHC experiments. It’s not an easy task but, by observing detectors currently in operation and exploiting a decade’s worth of technological advancements, we’ve made meaningful progress.” The LCD team is curr...

  16. Silicon position-sensitive detectors for the Helios (NA 34) experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, E Jr; Mani, S; Manns, T; Plants, D; Shepard, P F; Thompson, J A; Tosh, R; Chand, T; Shivpuri, R; Baker, W

    1987-01-15

    The design construction and testing of X-Y tracking modules for a silicon microstrip vertex detector for use in Fermilab experiment E706 is discussed. A successful adaptation of various technologies, essential for instrumenting this class of detectors at a university laboratory is described. Emphasis is placed on considerable cost reduction, design flexibiity and more rapid turnover with a view toward large detectors for the future.

  17. Development of a charged particle detector array in Pelletron-LINAC facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Bency; Inkar, A.L.; Saxena, A.; Vind, R.P.; Gupta, Y.K.; Biswas, D.C.; Nayak, B.K.; Thomas, R.G.; Danu, L.S.; Choudhury, R.K.; Kailas, S.; Topkar, A.; Venkatramanan, S.; Kumar, Manish; Sunilkumar, S.

    2010-01-01

    A charged particle detector array consisting of 50 Si-CsI detector telescopes for study of heavy-ion reactions is under construction in BARC-TIFR Pelletron-LINAC facility. Developmental work carried out for the detector modules, front-end and pulse shape discrimination electronics, scattering chamber and other mechanical parts are summarized. Some new ideas developed during the course of work are pointed out. (author)

  18. Measurement of Photomultipier Plateau Curves and Single MIP response in the AD detector at ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez Falero, Sebastian De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    The Alice Diffractive (AD) detector is a forward detector in the ALICE experiment at CERN. It is aimed to the triggering on diffractive events and extends the pseudorapidity coverage to about 4.9 < /n/ < 6.3. In this work, a PMT's efficiency plateau and single MIP response are measured using a replica of the detector's scintillator modules, electronic and data acquisition system and cosmic rays as particle source.

  19. BTDI detector technology for reconnaissance application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Stefan; Eckardt, Andreas; Krutz, David

    2017-11-01

    The Institute of Optical Sensor Systems (OS) at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 30 years of experience with high-resolution imaging technology. This paper shows the institute's scientific results of the leading-edge detector design in a BTDI (Bidirectional Time Delay and Integration) architecture. This project demonstrates an approved technological design for high or multi-spectral resolution spaceborne instruments. DLR OS and BAE Systems were driving the technology of new detectors and the FPA design for future projects, new manufacturing accuracy in order to keep pace with ambitious scientific and user requirements. Resulting from customer requirements and available technologies the current generation of space borne sensor systems is focusing on VIS/NIR high spectral resolution to meet the requirements on earth and planetary observation systems. The combination of large swath and high-spectral resolution with intelligent control applications and new focal plane concepts opens the door to new remote sensing and smart deep space instruments. The paper gives an overview of the detector development and verification program at DLR on detector module level and key parameters like SNR, linearity, spectral response, quantum efficiency, PRNU, DSNU and MTF.

  20. Double pass locking and spatial mode locking for gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cusack, B J; Slagmolen, B; Vine, G D; Gray, M B; McClelland, D E

    2002-01-01

    We present novel techniques for overcoming problems relating to the use of high-power lasers in mode cleaner cavities for second generation laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Rearranging the optical components into a double pass locking regime can help to protect locking detectors from damage. Modulator thermal lensing can be avoided by using a modulation-free technique such as tilt locking, or its recently developed cousin, flip locking.

  1. SLAC Scanner Processor applications in the data acquisition system for the upgraded Mark II detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklow, T.; Glanzman, T.; Lankford, A.J.; Riles, K.

    1985-09-01

    The SLAC Scanner Processor is a general purpose, programmable FASTBUS crate/cable master/slave module. This device plays a central role in the readout, buffering and pre-processing of data from the upgraded Mark II detector's new central drift chamber. In addition to data readout, the SSPs assist in a variety of other services, such as detector calibration, FASTBUS system management, FASTBUS system initialization and verification, and FASTBUS module testing. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  2. Control and data acquisition electronics for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, K.J.; Nelson, C.A.; Shaw, T.M.; Wesson, T.R.

    1991-11-01

    A control and data acquisition system has been designed for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) at Fermilab. The system controls the operation of the SVX Rev D integrated circuit (SVX IC) that is used to instrument a 46,000 microstrip silicon detector. The system consists of a Fastbus Sequencer, a Crate Controller and Digitizer modules. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Control and data acquisition electronics for the CDF silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    urner, K.J.; Nelson, C.A.; Shaw, T.M.; Wesson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a control and data acquisition system that has been designed for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) at Fermilab. The system controls the operation of the SVX Rev D integrated circuit (SVX IC) that is used to instrument a 46,000 microstrip silicon detector. The system consists of a Fastbus Sequencer, a Crate Controller and Digitizer modules

  4. Control and data acquisition electronics for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, K.J.; Nelson, C.A.; Shaw, T.M.; Wesson, T.R.

    1991-11-01

    A control and data acquisition system has been designed for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) at Fermilab. The system controls the operation of the SVX Rev D integrated circuit (SVX IC) that is used to instrument a 46,000 microstrip silicon detector. The system consists of a Fastbus Sequencer, a Crate Controller and Digitizer modules. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Assembly and validation of the SSD silicon microstrip detector of ALICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, A.P.; Kuijer, P.G.; Nooren, G.J.L.; Oskamp, C.J.; Sokolov, A.N.; van den Brink, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) forms the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of ALICE. The SSD detector consists of 1698 double-sided silicon microstrip modules. The electrical connection between silicon sensor and front-end electronics is made via TAB-bonded

  6. Receiver Gain Modulation Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hollis; Racette, Paul; Walker, David; Gu, Dazhen

    2011-01-01

    A receiver gain modulation circuit (RGMC) was developed that modulates the power gain of the output of a radiometer receiver with a test signal. As the radiometer receiver switches between calibration noise references, the test signal is mixed with the calibrated noise and thus produces an ensemble set of measurements from which ensemble statistical analysis can be used to extract statistical information about the test signal. The RGMC is an enabling technology of the ensemble detector. As a key component for achieving ensemble detection and analysis, the RGMC has broad aeronautical and space applications. The RGMC can be used to test and develop new calibration algorithms, for example, to detect gain anomalies, and/or correct for slow drifts that affect climate-quality measurements over an accelerated time scale. A generalized approach to analyzing radiometer system designs yields a mathematical treatment of noise reference measurements in calibration algorithms. By treating the measurements from the different noise references as ensemble samples of the receiver state, i.e. receiver gain, a quantitative description of the non-stationary properties of the underlying receiver fluctuations can be derived. Excellent agreement has been obtained between model calculations and radiometric measurements. The mathematical formulation is equivalent to modulating the gain of a stable receiver with an externally generated signal and is the basis for ensemble detection and analysis (EDA). The concept of generating ensemble data sets using an ensemble detector is similar to the ensemble data sets generated as part of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) with exception of a key distinguishing factor. EEMD adds noise to the signal under study whereas EDA mixes the signal with calibrated noise. It is mixing with calibrated noise that permits the measurement of temporal-functional variability of uncertainty in the underlying process. The RGMC permits the evaluation of EDA by

  7. Detectors for proton counting. Si-APD and scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Shunji

    2008-01-01

    Increased intensity of synchrotron radiation requests users to prepare photon pulse detectors having higher counting rates. As detectors for photon counting, silicon-avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) and scintillation detectors were chosen for the fifth series of detectors. Principle of photon detection by pulse and need of amplification function of the detector were described. Structure and working principle, high counting rate measurement system, bunch of electrons vs. counting rate, application example of NMR time spectroscopy measurement and comments for users were described for the Si-APD detector. Structure of scintillator and photomultiplier tube, characteristics of scintillator and performance of detector were shown for the NaI detector. Future development of photon pulse detectors was discussed. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Calibration and alignment of the CMS silicon tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoye, M.

    2007-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will dominate the high energy physics program in the coming decade. The discovery of the standard model Higgs boson and the discovery of super-symmetric particles are within the reach at the energy scale explored by the LHC. However, the high luminosity and the high energy of the colliding protons lead to challenging demands on the detectors. The hostile radiation environment requires irradiation hard detectors, where the innermost subdetectors, consisting of silicon modules, are most affected. This thesis is devoted to the calibration and alignment of the silicon tracking detector. Electron test beam data, taken at DESY, have been used to investigate the performance of detector modules which previously were irradiated with protons up to a dose expected after 10 years of operation. The irradiated sensors turned out to be still better than required. The performance of the inner tracking systems will be dominated by the degree to which the positions of the sensors can be determined. Only a track based alignment procedure can reach the required precision. Such an alignment procedure is a major challenge given that about 50000 geometry constants need to be measured. Making use of the novel χ 2 minimization program Millepede II an alignment strategy has been developed in which all detector components are aligned simultaneously, as many sources of information as possible are used, and all correlations between the position parameters of the detectors are taken into account. Utilizing simulated data, a proof of concept of the alignment strategy is shown. (orig.)

  9. Calibration and alignment of the CMS silicon tracking detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoye, M.

    2007-07-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will dominate the high energy physics program in the coming decade. The discovery of the standard model Higgs boson and the discovery of super-symmetric particles are within the reach at the energy scale explored by the LHC. However, the high luminosity and the high energy of the colliding protons lead to challenging demands on the detectors. The hostile radiation environment requires irradiation hard detectors, where the innermost subdetectors, consisting of silicon modules, are most affected. This thesis is devoted to the calibration and alignment of the silicon tracking detector. Electron test beam data, taken at DESY, have been used to investigate the performance of detector modules which previously were irradiated with protons up to a dose expected after 10 years of operation. The irradiated sensors turned out to be still better than required. The performance of the inner tracking systems will be dominated by the degree to which the positions of the sensors can be determined. Only a track based alignment procedure can reach the required precision. Such an alignment procedure is a major challenge given that about 50000 geometry constants need to be measured. Making use of the novel {chi}{sup 2} minimization program Millepede II an alignment strategy has been developed in which all detector components are aligned simultaneously, as many sources of information as possible are used, and all correlations between the position parameters of the detectors are taken into account. Utilizing simulated data, a proof of concept of the alignment strategy is shown. (orig.)

  10. The transition radiation detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Cyrano [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a fixed target heavy-ion experiment at the future FAIR accelerator facility. The CBM Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is one of the key detectors to provide electron identification above momenta of 1 GeV/c and charged particle tracking. Due its capability to identify charged particles via their specific energy loss, the TRD in addition will provide valuable information for the measurement of fragments. These requirements can be fulfilled with a XeCO{sub 2} based Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) detector in combination with an adequate radiator. The default MWPC is composed of a symmetric amplification area of 7 mm thickness, followed by a 5 mm drift region to enhance the TR-photon absorption probability in the active gas volume. This geometry provides also efficient and fast signal creation, as well as read-out, of the order of 200 μs per charged particle track. The performance of this detector is maximized by reducing the material budget between the radiator and gas volume to a minimum. The full detector at SIS100 will be composed of 200 modules in 2 sizes. To limit cost and production time the number of various module types is limited to 6 types and 4 types of Front End Board (FEB) flavors are required. An overview of the design and performance of the TRD detector is given.

  11. The VTRx+, an optical link module for data transmission at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Troska, Jan; Detraz, Stephane; Kraxner, Andrea; Olanterä, Lauri; Scarcella, Carmelo; Sigaud, Christophe; Soos, Csaba; Vasey, Francois

    2017-01-01

    Optical data transmission will remain a key enabling technology for the upgrading detectors at HL-LHC. In particular the inner tracking detectors will require low-mass, radiation tolerant optical transmit and receive modules for tight integration in the detector front-ends. We describe the development of such a module, giving details of the design, functional and environmental performance, as well as showing the feasibility of achieving small size, low-mass, and low-power operation.

  12. Diamond Pixel Detectors and 3D Diamond Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Results from detectors of poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposited (pCVD) diamond are presented. These include the first analysis of data of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). The DBM module consists of pCVD diamond sensors instrumented with pixellated FE-I4 front-end electronics. Six diamond telescopes, each with three modules, are placed symmetrically around the ATLAS interaction point. The DBM tracking capabilities allow it to discriminate between particles coming from the interaction point and background particles passing through the ATLAS detector. Also, analysis of test beam data of pCVD DBM modules are presented. A new low threshold tuning algorithm based on noise occupancy was developed which increases the DBM module signal to noise ratio significantly. Finally first results from prototypes of a novel detector using pCVD diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk, forming a 3D diamond device, are discussed. 3D devices based on pCVD diamond were successfully tested with test beams at CERN. The measured charge is compared to that of a strip detector mounted on the same pCVD diamond showing that the 3D device collects significantly more charge than the planar device.

  13. Experience with the silicon strip detector of ALICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooren, G.J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) forms the two outermost layers of the ALICE Inner Track- ing System (ITS), connecting the TPC with the inner layers of the ITS. The SSD consists of 1698 double-sided silicon microstrip modules, 95 μm pitch, distributed in two cylindrical bar- rels, whose radii are

  14. An Uncoventional Approach for a Straw Tube-Microstrip Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Basile, E.; Bellucci, F.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M. A.; Colonna, D.; Di Falco, F.; Fabbri, F. L.; Felli, F.; Giardoni, M.; La Monaca, A.; Mensitieri, G.; Ortenzi, B.; Pallotta, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on a novel concept of silicon microstrips and straw tubes detector, where integration is accomplished by a straw module with straws not subjected to mechanical tension in a Rohacell lattice and carbon fiber reinforced plastic shell. Results on mechanical and test beam performances are reported on as well.

  15. Electron crystallography with the EIGER detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Tinti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron crystallography is a discipline that currently attracts much attention as method for inorganic, organic and macromolecular structure solution. EIGER, a direct-detection hybrid pixel detector developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland, has been tested for electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. EIGER features a pixel pitch of 75 × 75 µm2, frame rates up to 23 kHz and a dead time between frames as low as 3 µs. Cluster size and modulation transfer functions of the detector at 100, 200 and 300 keV electron energies are reported and the data quality is demonstrated by structure determination of a SAPO-34 zeotype from electron diffraction data.

  16. Magnesium borate radiothermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskaya, V.A.; Kuzmin, V.V.; Minaeva, E.E.; Sokolov, A.D.

    1974-01-01

    In the report the technology of obtaining polycrystalline magnesium borate activated by dysprosium is described briefly and the method of preparing the tabletted detectors from it is presented. The dependence of the light sum of the samples on the proportion of the components and on the sintering regime has shown that the most sensitive material is obtained at the proportion of boric anhydride and magnesium oxide 2.2-2.4 and at the dysprosium concentration about 1 milligram-atom per gram molecule of the base. The glow curve of such a material has a simple form with one peak the maximum of which is located at 190-200 0 C. The measurement of the main dosimetric characteristics of the magnesium borate tabletted detectors and the comparison with similar parmaeters of the lithium fluoride tabletted detectors have shown that at practically identical effective number the former detectors have the following substantial advantages: the sensitivity is ten-twenty times as large, they are substantially more technological on synthesis of the radiothermoluminophor and during the production of the tabletted detectors, they have a simple glow curve, they do not require the utilization of the thermocycling during the use. (author)

  17. HPGe detector shielding adjustment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trnkova, L.; Rulik, P.

    2008-01-01

    Low-level background shielding of HPGe detectors is used mainly for environmental samples with very low content of radionuclides. National Radiation Protection Institute (SURO) in Prague is equipped with 14 HPGe detectors with relative efficiency up to 150%. The detectors are placed in a room built from materials with low content of natural radionuclides and equipped with a double isolation of the floor against radon. Detectors themselves are placed in lead or steel shielding. Steel shielding with one of these detectors with relative efficiency of 100% was chosen to be rebuilt to achieve lower minimum detectable activity (MDA). Additional lead and copper shielding was built up inside the original steel shielding to reduce the volume of the inner space and filled with nitrogen by means of evaporating liquid nitrogen. The additional lead and copper shielding, consequent reduction of the inner volume and supply of evaporated nitrogen, caused a decrease of the background count and accordingly MDA values as well. The effect of nitrogen evaporation on the net areas of peaks belonging to radon daughters is significant. The enhanced shielding adjustment has the biggest influence in low energy range, what can be seen in collected data. MDA values in energy range from 30 keV to 400 keV decreased to 0.65-0.85 of original value, in energy range from 400 keV to 2 MeV they fell to 0.70-0.97 of original value. (authors)

  18. ATLAS muon detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Muon detectors from the outer layer of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Over a million individual detectors combine to make up the outer layer of ATLAS. All of this is exclusively to track the muons, the only detectable particles to make it out so far from the collision point. How the muon’s path curves in the magnetic field depends on how fast it is travelling. A fast muon curves only a very little, a slower one curves a lot. Together with the calorimeters, the muon detectors play an essential role in deciding which collisions to store and which to ignore. Certain signals from muons are a sure sign of exciting discoveries. To make sure the data from these collisions is not lost, some of the muon detectors react very quickly and trigger the electronics to record. The other detectors take a little longer, but are much more precise. Their job is to measure exactly where the muons have passed, calculating the curvature of their tracks in the magnetic field to the nearest five hundredths of a ...

  19. Readout scheme for the Baby-MIND detector

    CERN Document Server

    Noah, Etam; Cadoux, F; Favre, Y; Martinez, B; Nicola, L; Parsa, S; Rayner, M; Antonova, M; Fedotov, S; Izmaylov, A; Kleymenova, A; Khabibullin, M; Khotyantsev, A; Kudenko, Y; Likhacheva, V; Mefodiev, A; Mineev, O; Ovsiannikova, T; Shaykhiev, A; Suvorov, S; Yershov, N; Tsenov, R

    2016-01-01

    A readout scheme has been designed for the plastic scintillator bars of the Baby-MIND detector modules. This spectrometer will measure momentum and identify the charge of 1 GeV/c muons with magnetized iron plates interleaved with detector modules. One challenge the detector aims to address is that of keeping high charge identification efficiencies for momenta below 1 GeV/c where multiple scattering in the iron plates degrades momentum resolution. A front-end board has been developed, with 3 CITIROC readout chips per board and up to 96 channels. Hamamatsu MPPCs type S12571-025C photosensors were chosen for readout of wavelength shifting fibers embedded in plastic scintillators. Procurement of the MPPCs has been carried out to instrument 3000 channels in total. Design choices and first results of this readout scheme are presented.

  20. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Zbijewski, W; Gang, G; Stayman, J W; Taguchi, K; Lundqvist, M; Fredenberg, E; Carrino, J A; Siewerdsen, J H

    2014-10-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1-7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f50 (spatial-frequency at which the MTF falls to a value of

  1. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f 50 (spatial-frequency at

  2. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E. [Philips Healthcare, Solna 171 41 (Sweden); Siewerdsen, J. H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f{sub 50} (spatial

  3. Study of run time errors of the ATLAS Pixel Detector in the 2012 data taking period

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00339072

    2013-05-16

    The high resolution silicon Pixel detector is critical in event vertex reconstruction and in particle track reconstruction in the ATLAS detector. During the pixel data taking operation, some modules (Silicon Pixel sensor +Front End Chip+ Module Control Chip (MCC)) go to an auto-disable state, where the Modules don’t send the data for storage. Modules become operational again after reconfiguration. The source of the problem is not fully understood. One possible source of the problem is traced to the occurrence of single event upset (SEU) in the MCC. Such a module goes to either a Timeout or Busy state. This report is the study of different types and rates of errors occurring in the Pixel data taking operation. Also, the study includes the error rate dependency on Pixel detector geometry.

  4. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  5. The H1 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzika, G.

    1992-11-01

    The H1 detector presently operating at the HERA e-p collider is described. A general overview of the detector is given with particular emphasis on the calorimeters, the main element of which is a liquid Argon calorimeter enclosed within a large radius solenoid. Calorimetry in the proton direction, close to the beam-pipe is provided by a copper-silicon pad hadronic calorimeter. In the electron direction a lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter closes the solid angle between the rear part of the liquid Argon calorimeter and the beam-pipe. An iron limited streamer tube tail catcher using the return yoke of the solenoid as absorber completes the calorimetry of the detector. The hardware triggers derived from the calorimeters are also described and some performance details of the calorimeters are given

  6. The ATLAS Inner Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, HM; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is equipped with a charged particle tracking system, the Inner Detector, built on three subdetectors, which provide high precision measurements made from a fine detector granularity. The Pixel and microstrip (SCT) subdetectors, which use the silicon technology, are complemented with the Transition Radiation Tracker. Since the LHC startup in 2009, the ATLAS inner tracker has played a central role in many ATLAS physics analyses. Rapid improvements in the calibration and alignment of the detector allowed it to reach nearly the nominal performance in the timespan of a few months. The tracking performance proved to be stable as the LHC luminosity increased by five orders of magnitude during the 2010 proton run, New developments in the offline reconstruction for the 2011 run will improve the tracking performance in high pile-up conditions as well as in highly boosted jets will be discussed.

  7. Silicon radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benc, I.; Kerhart, J.; Kopecky, J.; Krca, P.; Veverka, V.; Weidner, M.; Weinova, H.

    1992-01-01

    The silicon radiation detector, which is designed for the detection of electrons with energies above 500 eV and of radiation within the region of 200 to 1100 nm, comprises a PIN or PNN + type photodiode. The active acceptor photodiode is formed by a detector surface of shallow acceptor diffusion surrounded by a collector band of deep acceptor diffusion. The detector surface of shallow P-type diffusion with an acceptor concentration of 10 15 to 10 17 atoms/cm 3 reaches a depth of 40 to 100 nm. One sixth to one eighth of the collector band width is overlapped by the P + collector band at a width of 150 to 300 μm with an acceptor concentration of 10 20 to 10 21 atoms/cm 3 down a depth of 0.5 to 3 μm. This band is covered with a conductive layer, of NiCr for instance. (Z.S.)

  8. The AFP Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00514541; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is one of the forward detectors of the ATLAS experiment at CERN aiming at measuring momenta and angles of diffractively scattered protons. Silicon Tracking and Time-of-Flight detectors are located inside Roman Pot stations inserted into beam pipe aperture. The AFP detector is composed of two stations on each side of the ATLAS interaction point and is under commissioning. The detector is provided with high and low voltage distribution systems. Each station has vacuum and cooling systems, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. Monitoring of environmental parameters, like temperature and radiation, is also available. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of the detector hardware and ensures the safe and reliable operation of the detector, assuring good data quality. Comparing with DCS systems of other detectors, the AFP DCS main challenge is to cope with the large variety of AFP equipment. This paper describes t...

  9. The AFP detector control system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00514541; The ATLAS collaboration; Caforio, Davide; Czekierda, Sabina; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Olszowska, Jolanta; Sicho, Petr; Zabinski, Bartlomiej

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is one of the forward detectors of the ATLAS experiment at CERN aiming at measuring momenta and angles of diffractively scattered protons. Silicon Tracking and Time-of-Flight detectors are located inside Roman Pot stations inserted into beam pipe aperture. The AFP detector is composed of two stations on each side of the ATLAS interaction point and is under commissioning. The detector is provided with high and low voltage distribution systems. Each station has vacuum and cooling systems, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. Monitoring of environmental parameters, like temperature and radiation, is also available. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of the detector hardware and ensures the safe and reliable operation of the detector, assuring good data quality. Comparing with DCS systems of other detectors, the AFP DCS main challenge is to cope with the large variety of AFP equipment. This paper describes t...

  10. Semiconductor Thermal Neutron Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Aoki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The  CdTe  and  GaN  detector  with  a  Gd  converter  have  been developed  and  investigated  as  a  neutron  detector  for neutron  imaging.  The  fabricated  Gd/CdTe  detector  with  the  25  mm  thick  Gd  was  designed  on  the  basis  of  simulation results  of  thermal  neutron  detection  efficiency  and  spatial  resolution.  The  Gd/CdTe  detector  shows  the  detection  of neutron  capture  gamma  ray  emission  in  the  155Gd(n,  g156Gd,  157Gd(n,  g158Gd  and  113Cd(n,  g114Cd  reactions  and characteristic X-ray emissions due to conversion-electrons generated inside the Gd film. The observed efficient thermal neutron detection with the Gd/CdTe detector shows its promise in neutron radiography application. Moreover, a BGaN detector has also investigated to separate neutron signal from gamma-ray clearly. 

  11. Detectors for rare events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the possibility of combining the advantages of photographic data retrieval with the flexibility of operation of conventional gaseous or liquid detectors operated with electronic data retrieval. Possible applications of the proposed detectors to such problems as nucleon decay, neutrinoelectron interaction, and the search for magnetic monopoles are examined. Topics considered include the photography of ionization patterns, the photography of ionization tracks with the multistep avalanche chambers, and exploiting the stimulated scintillation light. Two processes which give rise to the emission of light when ionizing electrons interact in gases under the influence of an electric field are described

  12. The Micro Wire Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeva, B.; Gomez, F.; Pazos, A.; Pfau, R.; Plo, M. E-mail: maximo.plo@cern.ch; Rodriguez, J.M.; Vazquez, P.; Labbe, J.C

    1999-10-11

    We present the performance of a new proportional gas detector. Its geometry consists of a cathode plane with 70x70 {mu}m{sup 2} apertures, crossed by 25 {mu}m anode strips to which it is attached by 50 {mu}m kapton spacers. In the region where the avalanche takes place, the anode strips are suspended in the gas mixture as in a standard wire chamber. This detector exhibits high rate capability and large gains, introducing very little material. (author)

  13. A neutron activation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambardanishvili, T.S.; Kolomiitsev, M.A.; Zakharina, T.Y.; Dundua, V.J.; Chikhladze, N.V.

    1973-01-01

    The present invention concerns a neutron activation detector made from a moulded and hardened composition. According to the invention, that composition contains an activable substance constituted by at least two chemical elements and/or compounds of at least two chemical elements. Each of these chemical elements is capable of reacting with the neutrons forming radio-active isotopes with vatious levels of energy during desintegration. This neutron detector is mainly suitable for measuring integral thermal neutron and fast neutron fluxes during irradiation of the sample, and also for measuring the intensities of neutron fields [fr

  14. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, D.W.; Whittaker, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal

  15. Compton current detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Campos, J.S. de.

    1984-01-01

    The project and construction of a Compton current detector, with cylindrical geometry using teflon as dielectric material; for electromagnetic radiation in range energy between 10 KeV and 2 MeV are described. The measurements of Compton current in teflon were obtained using an electrometer. The Compton current was promoted by photon flux proceeding from X ray sources (MG 150 Muller device) and gamma rays of 60 Co. The theory elaborated to explain the experimental results is shown. The calibration curves for accumulated charge and current in detector in function of exposition rates were obtained. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. ATLAS Forward Proton Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grieco, Chiara; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector system is the measurement of protons scattered diffractively or electromagnetically at very small angles. The full two-arm setup was installed during the 2016/2017 EYETS. This allows measurements of processes with two forward protons: central diffraction, exclusive production, and two-photon processes. In 2017, AFP participated in the ATLAS high-luminosity data taking on the day-by-day basis. In addition, several special runs with reduced luminosity were taken. The poster will present the AFP detectors and the lessons learned from the last year operation and some performance from 2016 and 2017.

  17. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogure, Sumio; Seya, Toru; Watanabe, Masaaki.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To enhance the reliability of a failed fuel detector which detects radioactivity of nuclear fission products leaked out from fuel elements in cooling water. Constitution: Collected specimen is introduced into a separator and co-existing material considered to be an impediment is separated and removed by ion exchange resins, after which this specimen is introduced into a container housing therein a detector to systematically measure radioactivity. Thereby, it is possible to detect a signal lesser in variation in background, and inspection work also becomes simple. (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. Neutron detector assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Koi; Shirayama, Shinpei.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent gamma-ray from leaking externally passing through the inside of a neutron detector assembly. Constitution: In a neutron detector assembly having a protection pipe formed with an enlarged diameter portion which serves also as a spacer, partition plates with predetermined width are disposed at the upper and the lower portions in this expanded portion. A lot of metal particles are filled into spaces formed by the partition plates. In such a structure, the metal particles well-absorb the gamma-rays from above and convert them into heat to provide shielding for the gamma-rays. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. Multiple chamber ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    An ionization smoke detector employs a single radiation source in a construction comprising at least two chambers with a center or node electrode. The radioactive source is associated with this central electrode, and its positioning may be adjusted relative to the electrode to alter the proportion of the source that protrudes into each chamber. The source may also be mounted in the plane of the central electrode, and positioned relative to the center of the electrode. The central electrode or source may be made tiltable relative to the body of the detector

  20. High efficiency scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A scintillation counter consisting of a scintillation detector, usually a crystal scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube which converts photons to electrical pulses is described. The photomultiplier pulses are measured to provide information on impinging radiation. In inorganic crystal scintillation detectors to achieve maximum density, optical transparency and uniform activation, it has been necessary heretofore to prepare the scintillator as a single crystal. Crystal pieces fail to give a single composite response. Means are provided herein for obtaining such a response with crystal pieces, such means comprising the combination of crystal pieces and liquid or solid organic scintillator matrices having a cyclic molecular structure favorable to fluorescence. 8 claims, 6 drawing figures